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Sample records for native protein structure

  1. Amyloidogenic sequences in native protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Tzotzos, Susan; Doig, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    Numerous short peptides have been shown to form β-sheet amyloid aggregates in vitro. Proteins that contain such sequences are likely to be problematic for a cell, due to their potential to aggregate into toxic structures. We investigated the structures of 30 proteins containing 45 sequences known to form amyloid, to see how the proteins cope with the presence of these potentially toxic sequences, studying secondary structure, hydrogen-bonding, solvent accessible surface area and hydrophobicity. We identified two mechanisms by which proteins avoid aggregation: Firstly, amyloidogenic sequences are often found within helices, despite their inherent preference to form β structure. Helices may offer a selective advantage, since in order to form amyloid the sequence will presumably have to first unfold and then refold into a β structure. Secondly, amyloidogenic sequences that are found in β structure are usually buried within the protein. Surface exposed amyloidogenic sequences are not tolerated in strands, presumably because they lead to protein aggregation via assembly of the amyloidogenic regions. The use of α-helices, where amyloidogenic sequences are forced into helix, despite their intrinsic preference for β structure, is thus a widespread mechanism to avoid protein aggregation. PMID:20027621

  2. Relation between native ensembles and experimental structures of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Best, Robert B.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; DePristo, Mark A.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Different experimental structures of the same protein or of proteins with high sequence similarity contain many small variations. Here we construct ensembles of “high-sequence similarity Protein Data Bank” (HSP) structures and consider the extent to which such ensembles represent the structural heterogeneity of the native state in solution. We find that different NMR measurements probing structure and dynamics of given proteins in solution, including order parameters, scalar couplings, and residual dipolar couplings, are remarkably well reproduced by their respective high-sequence similarity Protein Data Bank ensembles; moreover, we show that the effects of uncertainties in structure determination are insufficient to explain the results. These results highlight the importance of accounting for native-state protein dynamics in making comparisons with ensemble-averaged experimental data and suggest that even a modest number of structures of a protein determined under different conditions, or with small variations in sequence, capture a representative subset of the true native-state ensemble. PMID:16829580

  3. Refinement and Selection of Near-native Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Zhang, Jingfen; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    In recent years in silico protein structure prediction reached a level where a variety of servers can generate large pools of near-native structures. However, the identification and further refinement of the best structures from the pool of decoys continue to be problematic. To address these issues, we have developed a selective refinement protocol (based on the Rosetta software package), and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based ranking method (MDR). The refinement of the selected structures is done by employing Rosetta's relax mode, subject to certain constraints. The selection of the final best models is done with MDR by testing their relative stability against gradual heating during all atom MD simulations. We have implemented the selective refinement protocol and the MDR method in our fully automated server Mufold-MD. Assessments of the performance of the Mufold-MD server in the CASP10 competition and other tests will be presented. This work was supported by grants from NIH. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  4. Electronic polarization is important in stabilizing the native structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chang G; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-12-10

    Quantum mechanical computations of proteins based on the molecular fragment approach have been carried out, and polarized protein-specific charges have been derived to provide accurate electrostatic interactions for a benchmark set of proteins. Our study shows that, under the polarized protein-specific force field, the native structure indeed corresponds to the lowest-energy conformation for these proteins. In contrast, when a standard mean-field force field such as AMBER is used, the energies of many decoy structures of proteins could be lower than those of the native structures. Furthermore, MD simulations were carried out and verified that the native structures of these proteins not only are statically more stable but are also dynamically more stable under the polarized protein-specific force field. The present results, together with several recent studies, provide strong evidence that protein polarization is critical to stabilizing the native structures of proteins.

  5. Structural Characterization of Native Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electron Ionization Dissociation-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Huilin; Sheng, Yuewei; McGee, William; Cammarata, Michael; Holden, Dustin; Loo, Joseph A

    2017-03-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has played an increasingly important role in the identification and structural and functional characterization of proteins. In particular, the use of tandem mass spectrometry has afforded one of the most versatile methods to acquire structural information for proteins and protein complexes. The unique nature of electron capture dissociation (ECD) for cleaving protein backbone bonds while preserving noncovalent interactions has made it especially suitable for the study of native protein structures. However, the intra- and intermolecular interactions stabilized by hydrogen bonds and salt bridges can hinder the separation of fragments even with preactivation, which has become particularly problematic for the study of large macromolecular proteins and protein complexes. Here, we describe the capabilities of another activation method, 30 eV electron ionization dissociation (EID), for the top-down MS characterization of native protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Rich structural information that cannot be delivered by ECD can be generated by EID. EID allowed for the comparison of the gas-phase and the solution-phase structural stability and unfolding process of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCA-I). In addition, the EID fragmentation patterns reflect the structural similarities and differences among apo-, Zn-, and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) dimers. In particular, the structural changes due to Cu-binding and a point mutation (G41D) were revealed by EID-MS. The performance of EID was also compared to that of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), which allowed us to explore their qualitative similarities and differences as potential valuable tools for the MS study of native proteins and protein complexes.

  6. A new scoring function for protein-protein docking that identifies native structures with unprecedented accuracy.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina S; Martins, João M; Coimbra, João T S; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2015-01-28

    Protein-protein (P-P) 3D structures are fundamental to structural biology and drug discovery. However, most of them have never been determined. Many docking algorithms were developed for that purpose, but they have a very limited accuracy in generating native-like structures and identifying the most correct one, in particular when a single answer is asked for. With such a low success rate it is difficult to point out one docked structure as being native-like. Here we present a new, high accuracy, scoring method to identify the 3D structure of P-P complexes among a set of trial poses. It incorporates alanine scanning mutagenesis experimental data that need to be obtained a priori. The scoring scheme works by matching the computational and the experimental alanine scanning mutagenesis results. The size of the trial P-P interface area is also taken into account. We show that the method ranks the trial structures and identifies the native-like structures with unprecedented accuracy (∼94%), providing the correct P-P 3D structures that biochemists and molecular biologists need to pursue their studies. With such a success rate, the bottleneck of protein-protein docking moves from the scoring to searching algorithms.

  7. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N.; Schug, Alexander

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  8. Structural Interface Parameters Are Discriminatory in Recognising Near-Native Poses of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sony; Sankar, Kannan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-01-01

    Interactions at the molecular level in the cellular environment play a very crucial role in maintaining the physiological functioning of the cell. These molecular interactions exist at varied levels viz. protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions or protein-small molecules interactions. Presently in the field, these interactions and their mechanisms mark intensively studied areas. Molecular interactions can also be studied computationally using the approach named as Molecular Docking. Molecular docking employs search algorithms to predict the possible conformations for interacting partners and then calculates interaction energies. However, docking proposes number of solutions as different docked poses and hence offers a serious challenge to identify the native (or near native) structures from the pool of these docked poses. Here, we propose a rigorous scoring scheme called DockScore which can be used to rank the docked poses and identify the best docked pose out of many as proposed by docking algorithm employed. The scoring identifies the optimal interactions between the two protein partners utilising various features of the putative interface like area, short contacts, conservation, spatial clustering and the presence of positively charged and hydrophobic residues. DockScore was first trained on a set of 30 protein-protein complexes to determine the weights for different parameters. Subsequently, we tested the scoring scheme on 30 different protein-protein complexes and native or near-native structure were assigned the top rank from a pool of docked poses in 26 of the tested cases. We tested the ability of DockScore to discriminate likely dimer interactions that differ substantially within a homologous family and also demonstrate that DOCKSCORE can distinguish correct pose for all 10 recent CAPRI targets. PMID:24498255

  9. Glycines: Role in α-Helical Membrane Protein Structures and a Potential Indicator for Native Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hao; Sharma, Mukesh; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Cross, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the growing number of membrane protein structures in the Protein Data Bank, there are many transmembrane domains that appear to be native-like; at the same time there are others that appear to have less than complete native-like character. Hence there is an increasing need for validation tools that distinguish native-like from nonnative-like structures. Membrane mimetics used in protein structural characterizations differ in numerous physicochemical properties from native membranes and provide many opportunities for introducing nonnative-like features into membrane protein structures. One possible approach for validating membrane protein structures is based on the use of glycine residues in transmembrane domains. Here, we have reviewed the membrane protein structure database and identified a set of benchmark proteins that appear to be native like. In these structures, conserved glycine residues rarely face the lipid interstices, and many of them participate in close helix-helix packing. Glycine-based validation allowed the identification of nonnative-like features in several membrane proteins and also shows the potential for verifying the native-like character for numerous other membrane protein structures. PMID:22650985

  10. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability.

    PubMed

    Gres, Anna T; Kirby, Karen A; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Tanner, John J; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2015-07-03

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Structural similarity between native proteins and chimera constructs obtained by inverting the amino Acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of the symmetry of protein three-dimensional structures can be extremely useful in order to understand and classify the protein structural universe. The structures of proteins with back-traced amino acid sequence were modeled and compared to the structures of their native counterparts. Only in a very limited set of cases, the two objects showed a significant level of similarity. These extremely symmetric examples can be of any structural class and of any dimension. The lack of biunique "N to C" and "C to N" symmetry at the structural level mirrors that at the sequence level and we propose to design as a dlof symmetry the cases in which a protein structure is similar to its back-traced variant.

  12. Can the fluorescence of green fluorescent protein chromophore be related directly to the nativity of protein structure?

    PubMed

    Melnik, B S; Povarnitsyna, T V; Melnik, T N

    2009-12-25

    In studies of green fluorescence protein (GFP) or other proteins with the use of GFP as a marker, the fluorescence of GFP is for the most part related directly to the nativity of its structure. Naturally, such a relation does exist since the chromophore of this protein is formed autocatalytically only just after GFP acquires its native structure. However, the fluorescence method may not yield reliable information on protein structure when studying renaturation and denaturation of this protein (with the formed chromophore). Using proteolysis, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism, we demonstrate herein that at major disturbances of the native structure of protein GFP-cycle3 the intensity of fluorescence of its chromophore can change insignificantly. In other words, the chromophore fluorescence does not reliably mirror alterations in protein structure. Since the main conclusions of this study are especially qualitative, it can be suggested that during renaturation/denaturation of wild-type GFP and its "multicolored" mutants their fluorescence is also not always associated with the changes in the structure of these proteins.

  13. Amyloidogenesis of Natively Unfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregation and subsequent development of protein deposition diseases originate from conformational changes in corresponding amyloidogenic proteins. The accumulated data support the model where protein fibrillogenesis proceeds via the formation of a relatively unfolded amyloidogenic conformation, which shares many structural properties with the pre-molten globule state, a partially folded intermediate first found during the equilibrium and kinetic (un)folding studies of several globular proteins and later described as one of the structural forms of natively unfolded proteins. The flexibility of this structural form is essential for the conformational rearrangements driving the formation of the core cross-beta structure of the amyloid fibril. Obviously, molecular mechanisms describing amyloidogenesis of ordered and natively unfolded proteins are different. For ordered protein to fibrillate, its unique and rigid structure has to be destabilized and partially unfolded. On the other hand, fibrillogenesis of a natively unfolded protein involves the formation of partially folded conformation; i.e., partial folding rather than unfolding. In this review recent findings are surveyed to illustrate some unique features of the natively unfolded proteins amyloidogenesis. PMID:18537543

  14. Selective Refinement and Molecular Dynamics Ranking Selection of Near-native Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Shang, Yi; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    In recent years in silico protein structure prediction reached a level where a variety of servers can generate large pools of near-native structures. However, the identification and further refinement of the best structures from the pool of decoys remain problematic. To address these issues, we have developed a selective refinement protocol (SRP), and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based ranking method (MDR). In SRP the refinement of structures is accomplished by using the relax mode of the Rosetta software package, subject to specific constraints determined by the type and complexity of the target. The final best models are selected with MDR by testing their relative stability against gradual heating during all atom MD simulations. We have implemented the selective refinement protocol and the MDR method in Mufold-MD, our fully automated protein structure prediction server. Mufold-MD was one of the top servers in the CASP10 competition.

  15. Selective refinement and selection of near-native models in protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiong; Barz, Bogdan; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years in silico protein structure prediction reached a level where fully automated servers can generate large pools of near-native structures. However, the identification and further refinement of the best structures from the pool of models remain problematic. To address these issues, we have developed (i) a target-specific selective refinement (SR) protocol; and (ii) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based ranking (SMDR) method. In SR the all-atom refinement of structures is accomplished via the Rosetta Relax protocol, subject to specific constraints determined by the size and complexity of the target. The best-refined models are selected with SMDR by testing their relative stability against gradual heating through all-atom MD simulations. Through extensive testing we have found that Mufold-MD, our fully automated protein structure prediction server updated with the SR and SMDR modules consistently outperformed its previous versions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Selective refinement and selection of near-native models in protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiong; Barz, Bagdan; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    In recent years in silico protein structure prediction reached a level where fully automated servers can generate large pools of near-native structures. However, the identification and further refinement of the best structures from the pool of models remain problematic. To address these issues, we have developed (i) a target-specific selective refinement (SR) protocol; and (ii) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based ranking (SMDR) method. In SR the all-atom refinement of structures is accomplished via the Rosetta Relax protocol, subject to specific constraints determined by the size and complexity of the target. The best-refined models are selected with SMDR by testing their relative stability against gradual heating through all-atom MD simulations. Through extensive testing we have found that Mufold-MD, our fully automated protein structure prediction server updated with the SR and SMDR modules consistently outperformed its previous versions. PMID:26214389

  17. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability

    DOE PAGES

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; ...

    2015-06-04

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. In this paper, we report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtlymore » altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Finally, inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle.« less

  18. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability

    SciTech Connect

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Tanner, John J.; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-06-04

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. In this paper, we report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Finally, inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle.

  19. A real valued Genetic Algorithm for generating native like structure of small globular protein.

    PubMed

    Madhusmita, S; Singh, Harjinder; Karlapalem, Kamalakar; Mitra, Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the 3D native conformation of a protein given the amino acid sequence is known as protein structure prediction (PSP) problem and is one of the greatest challenges of computational biology. The current work uses a real valued Genetic Algorithm (GA), a powerful variate of GA to simulate the PSP problem. This algorithm consists of basic evolutionary operators and a fitness vector. The fitness vector is designed by combining a set of knowledge based biophysical filters viz. persistence length, radius of gyration, packing fraction, hydrophobicity ratio and irregularity index of phi and psi. This vector converts all these biophysical measures into a real value by using specific weights or factors. The algorithm has been validated on six known globular proteins, with their length varying from 17-61 residues and total number of helices and strands in the range of 2-4. For all the test protein the algorithm converges rapidly and the converged structure shows a backbone RMSD (root mean square deviation) of 3-6A as compared to the native structure.

  20. Fast electron transfer through a single molecule natively structured redox protein.

    PubMed

    Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio; Chi, Qijin; Macdonald, J Emyr; Ulstrup, Jens; Jones, D Dafydd; Elliott, Martin

    2012-11-21

    The electron transfer properties of proteins are normally measured as molecularly averaged ensembles. Through these and related measurements, proteins are widely regarded as macroscopically insulating materials. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we present new measurements of the conductance through single-molecules of the electron transfer protein cytochrome b(562) in its native conformation, under pseudo-physiological conditions. This is achieved by thiol (SH) linker pairs at opposite ends of the molecule through protein engineering, resulting in defined covalent contact between a gold surface and a platinum-iridium STM tip. Two different orientations of the linkers were examined: a long-axis configuration (SH-LA) and a short-axis configuration (SH-SA). In each case, the molecular conductance could be 'gated' through electrochemical control of the heme redox state. Reproducible and remarkably high conductance was observed in this relatively complex electron transfer system, with single-molecule conductance values peaking around 18 nS and 12 nS for the SH-SA and SH-LA cytochrome b(562) molecules near zero electrochemical overpotential. This strongly points to the important role of the heme co-factor bound to the natively structured protein. We suggest that the two-step model of protein electron transfer in the STM geometry requires a multi-electron transfer to explain such a high conductance. The model also yields a low value for the reorganisation energy, implying that solvent reorganisation is largely absent.

  1. Contribution of cotranslational folding to the rate of formation of native protein structure.

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, A N; Baldwin, T O

    1995-01-01

    To compare the process of protein folding in the cell with refolding following denaturation in vitro, we have investigated and compared the kinetics of renaturation of a full-length protein upon dilution from concentrated urea with the rate of folding in the course of biosynthesis. Formation of enzymatically active bacterial luciferase, an alpha beta heterodimer, occurred 2 min after completion of beta-subunit synthesis in an Escherichia coli cell-free system. Renaturation of urea-denatured beta subunit, either in the presence of the cell-free protein synthesis system or in buffer solutions, proceeded more slowly. Cellular components present in the cell-free protein synthesis system slightly accelerated the rate of refolding of urea-unfolded beta subunit. The results indicate that the luciferase beta subunit begins the folding process cotranslationally and that cotranslational folding contributes to the rapid formation of the native structure in the cell. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7862665

  2. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopic characterization of the protein native structure.

    PubMed

    Feng, Manliang; Tachikawa, Hiroyasu

    2008-06-11

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra of biological species are often different from their resonance Raman (RR) spectra. A home-designed Raman flow system is used to determine the factors that contribute to the difference between the SERRS and RR of met-myoglobin (metMb). The results indicate that both the degree of protein-nanoparticles interaction and the laser irradiation contribute to the structural changes and are responsible for the observed differences between the SERRS and RR spectra of metMb. The prolonged adsorption of the protein molecules on the nanoparticle surface, which is the condition normally used for the conventional SERRS experiments, disturbs the heme pocket structure and facilitates the charge transfer process and the photoinduced transformation of proteins. The disruption of the heme pocket results in the loss of the distal water molecule, and the resulting SERRS spectrum of metMb shows a 5-coordinated high-spin heme. The flow system, when operated at a moderately high flow rate, can basically eliminate the factors that disturb the protein structure while maintaining a high enhancement factor. The SERRS spectrum obtained from a 1 x 10 (-7) M metMb solution using this flow system is basically identical to the RR spectrum of a 5 x 10 (-4) M metMb solution. Therefore, the Raman flow system reported here should be useful for characterizing the protein-nanoparticles interaction and the native structure of proteins using SERRS spectroscopy.

  3. Tuning the Continuum of Structural States in the Native Ensemble of a Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The mesoscale nature of proteins allows for an efficient coupling between environmental cues and conformational changes, enabling their function as molecular transducers. Delineating the precise structural origins of such a connection and the expected spectroscopic response has, however, been challenging. In this work, we perform a combination of urea–temperature double perturbation experiments and theoretical modeling to probe the conformational landscape of Cnu, a natural thermosensor protein. We observe unique ensemble signatures that point to a continuum of conformational substates in the native ensemble and that respond intricately to perturbations upon monitoring secondary and tertiary structures, distances between an intrinsic FRET pair, and hydrodynamic volumes. Binding assays further reveal a weakening of the Cnu functional complex with temperature, highlighting the molecular origins of signal transduction critical for pathogenic response in enterobacteriaceae. PMID:28345920

  4. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension D{c} approximately 1.9 , the fractal dimension D{f} approximately 2.5 , and the spectral dimension D{s} approximately 1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  5. Residue network in protein native structure belongs to the universality class of a three-dimensional critical percolation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2009-02-01

    Single protein molecules are regarded as contact networks of amino-acid residues. Relationships between the shortest path lengths and the numbers of residues within single molecules in the native structures are examined for various sized proteins. A universal scaling among proteins is obtained, which shows that the residue networks are fractal networks. This universal fractal network is characterized with three kinds of dimensions: the network topological dimension Dc≈1.9 , the fractal dimension Df≈2.5 , and the spectral dimension Ds≈1.3 . These values are in surprisingly good coincidence with those of the three-dimensional critical percolation cluster. Hence the residue contact networks in the protein native structures belong to the universality class of the three-dimensional percolation cluster. The criticality is relevant to the ambivalence in the protein native structures, the coexistence of stability and instability, both of which are necessary for protein functions.

  6. Identifying native-like protein structures using physics-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Dominy, Brian N; Brooks, Charles L

    2002-01-15

    As the field of structural genomics matures, new methods will be required that can accurately and rapidly distinguish reliable structure predictions from those that are more dubious. We present a method based on the CHARMM gas phase implicit hydrogen force field in conjunction with a generalized Born implicit solvation term that allows one to make such discrimination. We begin by analyzing pairs of threaded structures from the EMBL database, and find that it is possible to identify the misfolded structures with over 90% accuracy. Further, we find that misfolded states are generally favored by the solvation term due to the mispairing of favorable intramolecular ionic contacts. We also examine 29 sets of 29 misfolded globin sequences from Levitt's "Decoys 'R' Us" database generated using a sequence homology-based method. Again, we find that discrimination is possible with approximately 90% accuracy. Also, even in these less distorted structures, mispairing of ionic contacts results in a more favorable solvation energy for misfolded states. This is also found to be the case for collapsed, partially folded conformations of CspA and protein G taken from folding free energy calculations. We also find that the inclusion of the generalized Born solvation term, in postprocess energy evaluation, improves the correlation between structural similarity and energy in the globin database. This significantly improves the reliability of the hypothesis that more energetically favorable structures are also more similar to the native conformation. Additionally, we examine seven extensive collections of misfolded structures created by Park and Levitt using a four-state reduced model also contained in the "Decoys 'R' Us" database. Results from these large databases confirm those obtained in the EMBL and misfolded globin databases concerning predictive accuracy, the energetic advantage of misfolded proteins regarding the solvation component, and the improved correlation between energy

  7. X-Ray Structures of Native HIV-1 Capsid Protein Reveal Conformational Variability

    PubMed Central

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Tanner, John J.; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed molecular interactions between Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein (CA) hexamers have been elusive in the context of a native protein. We report crystal structures describing novel interactions between CA monomers related by 6-fold symmetry within a hexamer (intra-hexamer) and by 3-fold and 2-fold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (inter-hexamer). These structures help elucidate how CA builds a hexagonal lattice, the foundation of the mature capsid. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer that modulates interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer by crystal dehydration treatment alters inter-hexamer interfaces and condenses CA packing, highlighting an inherent structural variability. Capsid stability changes imparted by high concentrations of CA-targeting antiviral PF74 can be explained by variations at inter-hexamer interfaces remote to the ligand binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector molecule binding may perturb capsid uncoating or assembly and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. PMID:26044298

  8. Stepwise evolution of protein native structure with electrospray into the gas phase, 10(-12) to 10(2) s.

    PubMed

    Breuker, Kathrin; McLafferty, Fred W

    2008-11-25

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been revolutionized by electrospray ionization (ESI), which is sufficiently "gentle" to introduce nonvolatile biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids (RNA or DNA) into the gas phase without breaking covalent bonds. Although in some cases noncovalent bonding can be maintained sufficiently for ESI/MS characterization of the solution structure of large protein complexes and native enzyme/substrate binding, the new gaseous environment can ultimately cause dramatic structural alterations. The temporal (picoseconds to minutes) evolution of native protein structure during and after transfer into the gas phase, as proposed here based on a variety of studies, can involve side-chain collapse, unfolding, and refolding into new, non-native structures. Control of individual experimental factors allows optimization for specific research objectives.

  9. X-ray Structure of Native Scorpion Toxin BmBKTx1 by Racemic Protein Crystallography Using Direct Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Pentelute, Brad L.; Tereshko, Valentina; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2009-04-08

    Racemic protein crystallography, enabled by total chemical synthesis, has allowed us to determine the X-ray structure of native scorpion toxin BmBKTx1; direct methods were used for phase determination. This is the first example of a protein racemate that crystallized in space group I41/a.

  10. The Cold Denatured State of the C-terminal Domain of Protein L9 Is Compact and Contains Both Native and Non-native Structure

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Bing; McClendon, Sebastian; Rospigliosi, Carla; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    Cold denaturation is a general property of globular proteins, and the process provides insight into the origins of the cooperativity of protein folding and the nature of partially folded states. Unfortunately, studies of protein cold denaturation have been hindered by the fact that the cold denatured state is normally difficult to access experimentally. Special conditions such as addition of high concentrations of denaturant, encapsulation into reverse micelles, the formation of emulsified solutions, high pressure or extremes of pHs, have been applied, but these can perturb the unfolded state of proteins. The cold denatured state of the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 can be populated under native like conditions by taking advantage of a destabilizing point mutation which leads to cold denaturation at temperatures above zero °C. This state is in slow exchange with the native state on the NMR time scale. Virtually complete backbone 15N, 13C and 1H as well as side-chain 13Cβ and 1Hβ chemical shift assignments were obtained for the cold denatured state at pH 5.7, 12 °C. Chemical shift analysis, backbone N-H residual dipolar couplings, amide proton NOEs and R2 relaxation rates all indicate that the cold denatured state of CTL9 contains significant native like secondary structure, but also contains non-native structure. The regions corresponding to the two native α-helices show a strong tendency to populate helical Φ and Ψ angles. The segment which connects α-helix 2 and β-strand 2 (residues 107–124) in the native state exhibits a significant preference to form non-native helical structure in the cold denatured state. The structure observed in the cold denatured state of the I98A mutant is similar to that observed in the pH 3.8 unfolded state of wild type CTL9 at 25 °C, suggesting that it is a robust feature of the denatured state ensemble of this protein. The implications for protein folding and for studies of cold denatured states are

  11. Retention of Native Protein Structures in the Absence of Solvent: A Coupled Ion Mobility and Spectroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jongcheol; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Warnke, Stephan; Bowers, Michael T.; Pagel, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Can the structures of small to medium‐sized proteins be conserved after transfer from the solution phase to the gas phase? A large number of studies have been devoted to this topic, however the answer has not been unambiguously determined to date. A clarification of this problem is important since it would allow very sensitive native mass spectrometry techniques to be used to address problems relevant to structural biology. A combination of ion‐mobility mass spectrometry with infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins carefully transferred from solution to the gas phase. The two proteins investigated are myoglobin and β‐lactoglobulin, which are prototypical examples of helical and β‐sheet proteins, respectively. The results show that for low charge states under gentle conditions, aspects of the native secondary and tertiary structure can be conserved. PMID:27545682

  12. Can a physics-based, all-atom potential find a protein's native structure among misfolded structures? I. Large scale AMBER benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Liliana; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2007-09-01

    Recent work has shown that physics-based, all-atom energy functions (AMBER, CHARMM, OPLS-AA) and local minimization, when used in scoring, are able to discriminate among native and decoy structures. Yet, there have been only few instances reported of the successful use of physics based potentials in the actual refinement of protein models from a starting conformation to one that ends in structures, which are closer to the native state. An energy function that has a global minimum energy in the protein's native state and a good correlation between energy and native-likeness should be able to drive model structures closer to their native structure during a conformational search. Here, the possible reasons for the discrepancy between the scoring and refinement results for the case of AMBER potential are examined. When the conformational search via molecular dynamics is driven by the AMBER potential for a large set of 150 nonhomologous proteins and their associated decoys, often the native minimum does not appear to be the lowest free energy state. Ways of correcting the potential function in order to make it more suitable for protein model refinement are proposed. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Modulating Native-like Residual Structure in the Fully Denatured State of Photoactive Yellow Protein Affects Its Refolding*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung-Chul; Kumauchi, Masato; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2010-01-01

    Residual structure in the fully unfolded state is a key element for understanding protein folding. We show that the residual structure in fully denatured photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is affected by isomerization of its p-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore. The exposure of total surface area and hydrophobic surface area upon unfolding was quantified by denaturant m values and heat capacity changes (ΔCp), respectively. The exposure of the buried surface area upon the unfolding of the acid-denatured state of PYP containing trans-pCA is ∼20% smaller than that of the native state. In contrast, for the partially unfolded pB photocycle intermediate containing cis-pCA, unfolding-induced exposure of the surface area is not decreased. These results show that pCA photoisomerization reduces residual structure in the fully unfolded state. Thus, residual structure in the fully unfolded state of PYP is under direct experimental control by photoexcitation. The sensitivity of the unfolded state to pCA isomerization provides a novel criterion that residual structure in the unfolded state of PYP is native-like, involving native-like protein-chromophore interactions. A largely untested prediction is that native-like residual structure facilitates the conformational search during folding. In the case of PYP, refolding from the less disordered fully unfolded state containing trans-pCA indeed is substantially accelerated. The burial of hydrophobic surface area in the fully unfolded state suggests that a significant part of the hydrophobic collapse process already has occurred in the denatured state. PMID:20178976

  14. Designed protein G core variants fold to native-like structures: Sequence selection by ORBIT tolerates variation in backbone specification

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Scott A.; Sarisky, Catherine A.; Su, Alyce; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2001-01-01

    The solution structures of two computationally designed core variants of the β1 domain of streptococcal protein G (Gβ1) were solved by 1H NMR methods to assess the robustness of amino acid sequence selection by the ORBIT protein design package under changes in protein backbone specification. One variant has mutations at three of 10 core positions and corresponds to minimal perturbations of the native Gβ1 backbone. The other, with mutations at six of 10 positions, was calculated for a backbone in which the separation between Gβ1's α-helix and β-sheet was increased by 15% relative to native Gβ1. Exchange broadening of some resonances and the complete absence of others in spectra of the sixfold mutant bespeak conformational heterogeneity in this protein. The NMR data were sufficiently abundant, however, to generate structures of similar, moderately high quality for both variants. Both proteins adopt backbone structures similar to their target folds. Moreover, the sequence selection algorithm successfully predicted all core χ1 angles in both variants, five of six χ2 angles in the threefold mutant and four of seven χ2 angles in the sixfold mutant. We conclude that ORBIT calculates sequences that fold specifically to a geometry close to the template, even when the template is moderately perturbed relative to a naturally occurring structure. There are apparently limits to the size of acceptable perturbations: In this study, the larger perturbation led to undesired dynamic behavior. PMID:11266631

  15. Discriminating the native structure from decoys using scoring functions based on the residue packing in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2009-12-28

    Setting the rules for the identification of a stable conformation of a protein is of utmost importance for the efficient generation of structures in computer simulation. For structure prediction, a considerable number of possible models are generated from which the best model has to be selected. Two scoring functions, Rs and Rp, based on the consideration of packing of residues, which indicate if the conformation of an amino acid sequence is native-like, are presented. These are defined using the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and the partner number (PN) (other residues that are within 4.5 A) of a particular residue. The two functions evaluate the deviation from the average packing properties (ASA or PN) of all residues in a polypeptide chain corresponding to a model of its three-dimensional structure. While simple in concept and computationally less intensive, both the functions are at least as efficient as any other energy functions in discriminating the native structure from decoys in a large number of standard decoy sets, as well as on models submitted for the targets of CASP7. Rs appears to be slightly more effective than Rp, as determined by the number of times the native structure possesses the minimum value for the function and its separation from the average value for the decoys. Two parameters, Rs and Rp, are discussed that can very efficiently recognize the native fold for a sequence from an ensemble of decoy structures. Unlike many other algorithms that rely on the use of composite scoring function, these are based on a single parameter, viz., the accessible surface area (or the number of residues in contact), but still able to capture the essential attribute of the native fold.

  16. A Systematic Analysis of the Structures of Heterologously Expressed Proteins and Those from Their Native Hosts in the RCSB PDB Archive

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ren-Bin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Qin-Qin; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant expression of proteins has become an indispensable tool in modern day research. The large yields of recombinantly expressed proteins accelerate the structural and functional characterization of proteins. Nevertheless, there are literature reported that the recombinant proteins show some differences in structure and function as compared with the native ones. Now there have been more than 100,000 structures (from both recombinant and native sources) publicly available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive, which makes it possible to investigate if there exist any proteins in the RCSB PDB archive that have identical sequence but have some difference in structures. In this paper, we present the results of a systematic comparative study of the 3D structures of identical naturally purified versus recombinantly expressed proteins. The structural data and sequence information of the proteins were mined from the RCSB PDB archive. The combinatorial extension (CE), FATCAT-flexible and TM-Align methods were employed to align the protein structures. The root-mean-square distance (RMSD), TM-score, P-value, Z-score, secondary structural elements and hydrogen bonds were used to assess the structure similarity. A thorough analysis of the PDB archive generated five-hundred-seventeen pairs of native and recombinant proteins that have identical sequence. There were no pairs of proteins that had the same sequence and significantly different structural fold, which support the hypothesis that expression in a heterologous host usually could fold correctly into their native forms. PMID:27517583

  17. Multi-Body Coarse-Grained Potentials for Native Structure Recognition and Quality Assessment of Protein Models

    PubMed Central

    Gniewek, Pawel; Leelananda, Sumudu P.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Summary Multi-body potentials have been of much interest recently because they take into account three dimensional interactions related to residue packing and capture the cooperativity of these interactions in protein structures. Our goal was to combine long range multi-body potentials and short range potentials to improve recognition of native structure among misfolded decoys. We optimized the weights for four-body non-sequential, four-body sequential and short range potentials in order to obtain optimal model ranking results for threading and have compared these data against results obtained with other potentials. (Twenty six different coarse-grained potentials from the Potentials ‘R’Us web server have been used.) Our optimized multi-body potentials outperform all other contact potentials in the recognition of the native structure among decoys, both for models from homology template-based modeling and from template-free modeling in CASP8 decoy sets. We have compared the results obtained for this optimized coarse-grained potentials, where each residue is represented by a single point, with results obtained by using the DFIRE potential, which takes into account atomic level information of proteins. We found that for all proteins larger than 80 amino acids our optimized coarse-grained potentials yield results comparable to those obtained with the atomic DFIRE potential. PMID:21560165

  18. Effects of polarity on the structures and charge states of native-like proteins and protein complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Allen, Samuel J; Schwartz, Alicia M; Bush, Matthew F

    2013-12-17

    Native mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry were used to investigate the gas-phase structures of selected cations and anions of proteins and protein complexes with masses ranging from 6 to 468 kDa. Under the same solution conditions, the average charge states observed for all native-like anions were less than those for the corresponding cations. Using an rf-confining drift cell, similar collision cross sections were measured in positive and negative ion mode suggesting that anions and cations have very similar structures. This result suggests that for protein and protein complex ions within this mass range, there is no inherent benefit to selecting a specific polarity for capturing a more native-like structure. For peptides and low-mass proteins, polarity and charge-state dependent structural changes may be more significant. The charged-residue model is most often used to explain the ionization of large macromolecules based on the Rayleigh limit, which defines the upper limit of charge that a droplet can hold. Because ions of both polarities have similar structures and the Rayleigh limit does not depend on polarity, these results cannot be explained by the charged-residue model alone. Rather, the observed charge-state distributions are most consistent with charge-carrier emissions during the final stages of analyte desolvation, with lower charge-carrier emission energies for anions than the corresponding cations. These results suggest that the observed charge-state distributions in most native mass spectrometry experiments are determined by charge-carrier emission processes; although the Rayleigh limit may determine the gas-phase charge states of larger species, e.g., virus capsids.

  19. Identifying native-like protein structures with scoring functions based on all-atom ECEPP force fields, implicit solvent models and structure relaxation.

    PubMed

    Arnautova, Yelena A; Vorobjev, Yury N; Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-10-01

    Availability of energy functions which can discriminate native-like from non-native protein conformations is crucial for theoretical protein structure prediction and refinement of low-resolution protein models. This article reports the results of benchmark tests for scoring functions based on two all-atom ECEPP force fields, that is, ECEPP/3 and ECEPP05, and two implicit solvent models for a large set of protein decoys. The following three scoring functions are considered: (i) ECEPP05 plus a solvent-accessible surface area model with the parameters optimized with a set of protein decoys (ECEPP05/SA); (ii) ECEPP/3 plus the solvent-accessible surface area model of Ooi et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1987;84:3086-3090) (ECEPP3/OONS); and (iii) ECEPP05 plus an implicit solvent model based on a solution of the Poisson equation with an optimized Fast Adaptive Multigrid Boundary Element (FAMBEpH) method (ECEPP05/FAMBEpH). Short Monte Carlo-with-Minimization (MCM) simulations, following local energy minimization, are used as a scoring method with ECEPP05/SA and ECEPP3/OONS potentials, whereas energy calculation is used with ECEPP05/FAMBEpH. The performance of each scoring function is evaluated by examining its ability to distinguish between native-like and non-native protein structures. The results of the tests show that the new ECEPP05/SA scoring function represents a significant improvement over the earlier ECEPP3/OONS version of the force field. Thus, it is able to rank native-like structures with C(alpha) root-mean-square-deviations below 3.5 A as lowest-energy conformations for 76% and within the top 10 for 87% of the proteins tested, compared with 69 and 80%, respectively, for ECEPP3/OONS. The use of the FAMBEpH solvation model, which provides a more accurate description of the protein-solvent interactions, improves the discriminative ability of the scoring function to 89%. All failed tests in which the native-like structures cannot be discriminated as those with low

  20. Regulation of protein function by native metastability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheolju; Park, Soon-Ho; Lee, Min-Youn; Yu, Myeong-Hee

    2000-01-01

    In common globular proteins, the native form is in its most stable state. In contrast, each native form exists in a metastable state in inhibitory serpins (serine protease inhibitors) and some viral membrane fusion proteins. Metastability in these proteins is critical to their biological functions. Mutational analyses and structural examination have previously revealed unusual interactions, such as side-chain overpacking, buried polar groups, and cavities as the structural basis of the native metastability. However, the mechanism by which these structural defects regulate protein functions has not been elucidated. We report here characterization of cavity-filling mutations of α1-antitrypsin, a prototype serpin. Conformational stability of the molecule increased linearly with the van der Waals volume of the side chains. Increasing conformational stability is correlated with decreasing inhibitory activity. Moreover, the activity loss appears to correlate with the decrease in the rate of the conformational switch during complex formation with a target protease. These results strongly suggest that the native metastability of proteins is indeed a structural design that regulates protein functions. PMID:10884404

  1. Structure determination of membrane proteins in their native phospholipid bilayer environment by rotationally aligned solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Opella, Stanley J

    2013-09-17

    One of the most important topics in experimental structural biology is determining the structures of membrane proteins. These structures represent one-third of all of the information expressed from a genome, distinguished by their locations within the phospholipid bilayer of cells, organelles, or enveloped viruses. Their highly hydrophobic nature and insolubility in aqueous media means that they require an amphipathic environment. They have unique functions in transport, catalysis, channel formation, and signaling. Researchers are particularly interested in G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) because they modulate many biological processes, and about half of the approximately 800 of these proteins within the human genome are or can be turned into drug receptors that affect a wide range of diseases. Because of experimental difficulties, researchers have studied membrane proteins using a wide variety of artificial media that mimic membranes, such as mixed organic solvents or detergents. More sophisticated mimics include bilayer discs (bicelles) and the lipid cubic phase (LCP), but both of these contain a very large detergent component, which can disrupt the stability and function of membrane proteins. To have confidence in the resulting structures and their biological functions and to avoid disrupting these delicate proteins, the structures of membrane proteins should be determined in their native environment of liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This Account describes a recently developed general method for determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Because it relies on the natural, rapid rotational diffusion of these proteins about the bilayer normal, this method is referred to as rotationally aligned (RA) solid-state NMR. This technique elaborates on oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, its complementary predecessor. These methods exploit the power of

  2. Native-like in vivo folding of a circularly permuted jellyroll protein shown by crystal structure analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M; Piotukh, K; Borriss, R; Heinemann, U

    1994-01-01

    A jellyroll beta-sandwich protein, the Bacillus beta-glucanase H(A16-M), is used to probe the role of N-terminal peptide regions in protein folding in vivo. A gene encoding H(A16-M) is rearranged to place residues 1-58 of the protein behind a signal peptide and residues 59-214. The rearranged gene is expressed in Escherichia coli. The resultant circularly permuted protein, cpA16M-59, is secreted into the periplasm, correctly processed, and folded into a stable and active enzyme. Crystal structure analysis at 2.0-A resolution, R = 15.3%, shows cpA16M-59 to have a three-dimensional structure nearly identical with that of the parent beta-glucanase. An analogous experiment based on the wild-type Bacillus macerans beta-glucanase, giving rise to the circularly permuted variant cpMAC-57, yields the same results. Folding of these proteins, therefore, is not a vectorial process depending on the conformation adopted by their native N-terminal oligopeptides after ribosomal synthesis and translocation through the cytoplasmic membrane. Images PMID:7937966

  3. Native Mass Spectrometry of Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry, or as is sometimes called “native electrospray (ESI)” allows proteins in their native or near-native protein in solution to be introduced into gas phase and interrogated by MS. This approach is now a powerful tool to investigate protein complexes. This article reviews the background of native MS of protein complexes and describes its strengths, taking photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes as examples. Native MS can be utilized in combination with other MS-based approaches to obtain complementary information to that provided by tools such as X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy to understand the structure-function relationships of protein complexes. When additional information beyond that provided by native MS is required, other MS-based strategies can be successfully applied to augment the results of native MS. PMID:23337874

  4. Native structure of a retroviral envelope protein and its conformational change upon interaction with the target cell.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Christiane; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C Alistair; Whittle, Cathy; Lehmann, Maik J; Mothes, Walther; Grünewald, Kay

    2017-02-01

    Enveloped viruses enter their host cells by membrane fusion. The process of attachment and fusion in retroviruses is mediated by a single viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Conformational changes of Env in the course of fusion are a focus of intense studies. Here we provide further insight into the changes occurring in retroviral Env during its initial interaction with the cell, employing murine leukemia virus (MLV) as model system. We first determined the structure of both natively membrane anchored MLV Env and MLV Env tagged with YFP in the proline rich region (PRR) by electron cryo tomography (cET) and sub-volume averaging. At a resolution of ∼20Å, native MLV Env presents as a hollow trimer (height ∼85Å, diameter ∼120Å) composed of step-shaped protomers. The major difference to the YFP-tagged protein was in regions outside of the central trimer. Next, we focused on elucidating the changes in MLV Env upon interaction with a host cell. Virus interaction with the plasma membrane occurred over a large surface and Env clustering on the binding site was observed. Sub-volume averaging did yield a low-resolution structure of Env interacting with the cell, which had lost its threefold symmetry and was elongated by ∼35Å in comparison to the unbound protein. This indicates a major rearrangement of Env upon host cell binding. At the site of virus interaction, the otherwise clearly defined bilayer structure of the host cell plasma membrane was much less evident, indicative of integral membrane protein accumulation and/or a change in membrane lipid composition.

  5. How Closely Related Are Conformations of Protein Ions Sampled by IM-MS to Native Solution Structures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Russell, David H.

    2015-09-01

    Here, we critically evaluate the effects of changes in the ion internal energy (Eint) on ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS) of ions of two structurally diverse proteins, specifically the [M + 6H]6+ ion of ubiquitin (ubq6+), the [M + 5H]5+ ion of the intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) apo-metallothionein-2A (MT), and its partially- and fully-metalated isoform, the [CdiMT]5+ ion. The ion-neutral CCS for ions formed by "native-state" ESI show a strong dependence on Eint. Collisional activation is used to increase Eint prior to the ions entering and within the traveling wave (TW) ion mobility analyzer. Comparisons of experimental CCSs with those generated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for solution-phase ions and solvent-free ions as a function of temperature provide new insights about conformational preferences and retention of solution conformations. The Eint-dependent CCSs, which reveal increased conformational diversity of the ion population, are discussed in terms of folding/unfolding of solvent-free ions. For example, ubiquitin ions that have low internal energies retain native-like conformations, whereas ions that are heated by collisional activation possess higher internal energies and yield a broader range of CCS owing to increased conformational diversity due to losses of secondary and tertiary structures. In contrast, the CCS profile for the IDP apoMT is consistent with kinetic trapping of an ion population composed of a wide range of conformers, and as the Eint is increased, these structurally labile conformers unfold to an elongated conformation.

  6. How Closely Related Are Conformations of Protein Ions Sampled by IM-MS to Native Solution Structures?

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Russell, David H

    2015-09-01

    Here, we critically evaluate the effects of changes in the ion internal energy (E(int)) on ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS) of ions of two structurally diverse proteins, specifically the [M + 6H](6+) ion of ubiquitin (ubq(6+)), the [M + 5H](5+) ion of the intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) apo-metallothionein-2A (MT), and its partially- and fully-metalated isoform, the [CdiMT](5+) ion. The ion-neutral CCS for ions formed by "native-state" ESI show a strong dependence on E(int). Collisional activation is used to increase E(int) prior to the ions entering and within the traveling wave (TW) ion mobility analyzer. Comparisons of experimental CCSs with those generated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for solution-phase ions and solvent-free ions as a function of temperature provide new insights about conformational preferences and retention of solution conformations. The E(int)-dependent CCSs, which reveal increased conformational diversity of the ion population, are discussed in terms of folding/unfolding of solvent-free ions. For example, ubiquitin ions that have low internal energies retain native-like conformations, whereas ions that are heated by collisional activation possess higher internal energies and yield a broader range of CCS owing to increased conformational diversity due to losses of secondary and tertiary structures. In contrast, the CCS profile for the IDP apoMT is consistent with kinetic trapping of an ion population composed of a wide range of conformers, and as the E(int) is increased, these structurally labile conformers unfold to an elongated conformation.

  7. Charging of Proteins in Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Anna C.; Xia, Zijie; Tang, Henry Y. H.; Tainer, John A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2017-02-01

    Factors that influence the charging of protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and function were investigated. Protein ions ranging in molecular weight from 12.3 to 79.7 kDa and pI values from 5.4 to 9.6 were formed from different solutions and reacted with volatile bases of gas-phase basicities higher than that of ammonia in the cell of a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The charge-state distribution of cytochrome c ions formed from aqueous ammonium or potassium acetate is the same. Moreover, ions formed from these two solutions do not undergo proton transfer to 2-fluoropyridine, which is 8 kcal/mol more basic than ammonia. These results provide compelling evidence that proton transfer between ammonia and protein ions does not limit protein ion charge in native electrospray ionization. Both circular dichroism and ion mobility measurements indicate that there are differences in conformations of proteins in pure water and aqueous ammonium acetate, and these differences can account for the difference in the extent of charging and proton-transfer reactivities of protein ions formed from these solutions. The extent of proton transfer of the protein ions with higher gas-phase basicity bases trends with how closely the protein ions are charged to the value predicted by the Rayleigh limit for spherical water droplets approximately the same size as the proteins. These results indicate that droplet charge limits protein ion charge in native mass spectrometry and are consistent with these ions being formed by the charged residue mechanism.

  8. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  9. A comparative analysis of human plasma and serum proteins by combining native PAGE, whole-gel slicing and quantitative LC-MS/MS: Utilizing native MS-electropherograms in proteomic analysis for discovering structure and interaction-correlated differences.

    PubMed

    Wen, Meiling; Jin, Ya; Manabe, Takashi; Chen, Shumin; Tan, Wen

    2017-09-04

    MS identification has long been used for PAGE-separated protein bands, but global and systematic quantitation utilizing MS after PAGE has remained rare and not been reported for native PAGE. Here we reported on a new method combining native PAGE, whole-gel slicing and quantitative LC-MS/MS, aiming at comparative analysis on not only abundance, but also structures and interactions of proteins. A pair of human plasma and serum samples were used as test samples and separated on a native PAGE gel. Six lanes of each sample were cut, each lane was further sliced into thirty-five 1.1 mm × 1.1 mm squares and all the squares were subjected to standardized procedures of in-gel digestion and quantitative LC-MS/MS. The results comprised 958 data rows that each contained abundance values of a protein detected in one square in eleven gel lanes (one plasma lane excluded). The data were evaluated to have satisfactory reproducibility of assignment and quantitation. Totally 315 proteins were assigned, with each protein assigned in 1-28 squares. The abundance distributions in the plasma and serum gel lanes were reconstructed for each protein, named as "native MS-electropherograms". Comparison of the electropherograms revealed significant plasma-versus-serum differences on 33 proteins in 87 squares (fold difference > 2 or < 0.5, p < 0.05). Many of the differences matched with accumulated knowledge on protein interactions and proteolysis involved in blood coagulation, complement and wound healing processes. We expect this method would be useful to provide more comprehensive information in comparative proteomic analysis, on both quantities and structures/interactions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Protein-inhibitor flexible docking by a multicanonical sampling: native complex structure with the lowest free energy and a free-energy barrier distinguishing the native complex from the others.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2008-01-01

    Flexible docking between a protein (lysozyme) and an inhibitor (tri-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, tri-NAG) was carried out by an enhanced conformational sampling method, multicanonical molecular dynamics simulation. We used a flexible all-atom model to express lysozyme, tri-NAG, and water molecules surrounding the two bio-molecules. The advantages of this sampling method are as follows: the conformation of system is widely sampled without trapping at energy minima, a thermally equilibrated conformational ensemble at an arbitrary temperature can be reconstructed from the simulation trajectory, and the thermodynamic weight can be assigned to each sampled conformation. During the simulation, exchanges between the binding and free (i.e., unbinding) states of the protein and the inhibitor were repeatedly observed. The conformational ensemble reconstructed at 300 K involved various conformational clusters. The main outcome of the current study is that the most populated conformational cluster (i.e., the cluster of the lowest free energy) was assigned to the native complex structure (i.e., the X-ray complex structure). The simulation also produced non-native complex structures, where the protein and the inhibitor bound with different modes from that of the native complex structure, as well as the unbinding structures. A free-energy barrier (i.e., activation free energy) was clearly detected between the native complex structures and the other structures. The thermal fluctuations of tri-NAG in the lowest free-energy complex correlated well with the X-ray B-factors of tri-NAG in the X-ray complex structure. The existence of the free-energy barrier ensures that the lowest free-energy structure can be discriminated naturally from the other structures. In other words, the multicanonical molecular dynamics simulation can predict the native complex structure without any empirical objective function. The current study also manifested that the flexible all-atom model and the physico

  11. Exploration of the secondary structure specific differential solvation dynamics between the native and molten globule states of the protein HP-36.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy; Chakraborty, Sudip; Bagchi, Biman

    2006-10-19

    Recent experiments have shown that the time dependence of fluorescence Stokes shift of a chromophore is substantially different when the chromophore is located in a molten globule (MG) state and in the native state of the same protein. To understand the origin of this difference, particularly the role of water in the differential solvation of the protein in the native and the MG states, we have carried out fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water of a partially unfolded MG state of the protein HP-36 and compared the results with the solvation dynamics of the protein in the folded native state. It is observed that the polar solvation dynamics of the three helical segments of the protein is influenced in a nonuniform heterogeneous manner in the MG state. While the equilibrium solvation time correlation function for helix-3 has been found to relax faster in the MG state as compared to that in the native state, the decay of the corresponding function for the other two helices slows down in the MG state. A careful analysis shows that the origin of such heterogeneous relative solvation behavior lies in the differential location of the polar probe residues and their exposure to bulk solvent. We find a significant negative cross-correlation between the contribution (to the solvation energy of a tagged amino acid residue) of water and the other groups of the protein, indicating a competing role in solvation. The sensitivity of solvation dynamics to the secondary structure and the immediate environment can be used to discriminate the partially unfolded and folded states. These results therefore should be useful in explaining recent solvation dynamics experiments on native and MG states of proteins.

  12. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    PubMed Central

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues. PMID:27150430

  13. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues.

  14. Ultracompact states of native proteins.

    PubMed

    Grille Coronel, Leandro; Acierno, Juan P; Ermácora, Mario R

    2017-11-01

    A statistical analysis of circa 20,000 X-ray structures evidenced the effects of temperature of data collection on protein intramolecular distances and degree of compaction. Identical chains with data collected at cryogenic ultralow temperatures (≤160K) showed a radius of gyration (Rg) significantly smaller than at moderate temperatures (≥240K). Furthermore, the analysis revealed the existence of structures with a Rg significantly smaller than expected for cryogenic temperatures. In these ultracompact cases, the unusually small Rg could not be specifically attributed to any experimental parameter or crystal features. Ultracompaction involves most atoms and results in their displacement toward the center of the molecule. Ultracompact structures on average have significantly shorter van der Waals and hydrogen bonds than expected for ultralow temperature structures. In addition, the number of van der Waals contacts was larger in ultracompact than in ultralow temperature structures. The structure of these ultracompact states was analyzed in detail and the implication and possible causes of the phenomenon are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The individual structures of native celluloses

    Treesearch

    R. H. Atalla

    1999-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of native celluloses has been limited by the fact that studies of their structures have sought to establish ideal crystal lattice forms for the native state. Departures from ideal structures in the native state are viewed as defects in the ideal lattice. In most instances real celluloses have been regarded as departing from the ideal...

  16. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  17. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-04-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols.

  18. How special is the biochemical function of native proteins?

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Native proteins perform an amazing variety of biochemical functions, including enzymatic catalysis, and can engage in protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that are essential for life. A key question is how special are these functional properties of proteins. Are they extremely rare, or are they an intrinsic feature? Comparison to the properties of compact conformations of artificially generated compact protein structures selected for thermodynamic stability but not any type of function, the artificial (ART) protein library, demonstrates that a remarkable number of the properties of native-like proteins are recapitulated. These include the complete set of small molecule ligand-binding pockets and most protein-protein interfaces. ART structures are predicted to be capable of weakly binding metabolites and cover a significant fraction of metabolic pathways, with the most enriched pathways including ancient ones such as glycolysis. Native-like active sites are also found in ART proteins. A small fraction of ART proteins are predicted to have strong protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Overall, it appears that biochemical function is an intrinsic feature of proteins which nature has significantly optimized during evolution. These studies raise questions as to the relative roles of specificity and promiscuity in the biochemical function and control of cells that need investigation.

  19. In silico design of an immunogen against Acinetobacter baumannii based on a novel model for native structure of Outer membrane protein A.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Abolfazl; Rasooli, Iraj; Owlia, Parviz; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Salimian, Jafar

    2017-04-01

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is the most promising vaccine candidate against one of the most successful nosocomial pathogens, A. baumannii. Despite advantages of the antigen, its cytotoxicity could be considered as a challenge in clinical trials. In order to improve this effective immunogen, rational vaccine design strategies such as structure-based vaccinology should be assessed. However, native structure of OmpA remains controversial. The present study is conducted to address the native structure of OmpA; then, a novel immunogen with lower toxicity and higher antigenicity was designed based on structural vaccinology. Various bioinformatic and immunoinformatic tools were harnessed to perform analyses such as topology, secondary structure, and tertiary structure predictions as well as B-cell epitope predictions. A novel 12-stranded model is suggested for OmpA. K320 and K322 were substituted by Alanine, "NADEEFWN" sequence was replaced by "YKYDFDGVNRGTRGTSEEGTL", Position 1-24 at the N-terminus and the C-terminal sequence "VVQPGQEAAAPAAAQ" were removed. The designed construct has more epitope density and antigenic properties with higher immunogenicity while its cytotoxicity is decreased. Moreover, this single cross-protective antigen could trigger antibodies rendering protection against two important nosocomial pathogens i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and A. baumannii.

  20. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  1. Structures from Anomalous Diffraction of Native Biological Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Dahmane, Tassadite; Zhang, Zhen; Assur, Zahra; Brasch, Julia; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mancia, Filippo; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal structure analyses for biological macromolecules without known structural relatives entail solving the crystallographic phase problem. Typical de novo phase evaluations depend on incorporating heavier atoms than those found natively; most commonly, multi- or single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD or SAD) experiments exploit selenomethionyl proteins. Here we realize routine structure determination using intrinsic anomalous scattering from native macromolecules. We devised robust procedures for enhancing signal-to-noise in the slight anomalous scattering from generic native structures by combining data measured from multiple crystals at lower-than-usual x-ray energy. Using this multi-crystal SAD method (5–13 equivalent crystals), we determined structures at modest resolution (2.8Å-2.3Å) for native proteins varying in size (127–1148 unique residues) and number of sulfur sites (3–28). With no requirement for heavy-atom incorporation, such experiments provide an attractive alternative to selenomethionyl SAD experiments. PMID:22628655

  2. Native mass spectrometry: towards high-throughput structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kondrat, Frances D L; Struwe, Weston B; Benesch, Justin L P

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a sensitive method for structural proteomics, allowing practitioners to gain insight into protein self-assembly, including stoichiometry and three-dimensional architecture, as well as complementary thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. Although MS is typically performed in vacuum, a body of literature has described how native solution-state structure is largely retained on the timescale of the experiment. Native MS offers the benefit that it requires substantially smaller quantities of a sample than traditional structural techniques such as NMR and X-ray crystallography, and is therefore well suited to high-throughput studies. Here we first describe the native MS approach and outline the structural proteomic data that it can deliver. We then provide practical details of experiments to examine the structural and dynamic properties of protein assemblies, highlighting potential pitfalls as well as principles of best practice.

  3. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  4. Structural insights into the chaperone activity of the 40-kDa heat shock protein DnaJ: binding and remodeling of a native substrate.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Jorge; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Muga, Arturo; Valpuesta, José María; Moro, Fernando

    2013-05-24

    Hsp40 chaperones bind and transfer substrate proteins to Hsp70s and regulate their ATPase activity. The interaction of Hsp40s with native proteins modifies their structure and function. A good model for this function is DnaJ, the bacterial Hsp40 that interacts with RepE, the repressor/activator of plasmid F replication, and together with DnaK regulates its function. We characterize here the structure of the DnaJ-RepE complex by electron microscopy, the first described structure of a complex between an Hsp40 and a client protein. The comparison of the complexes of DnaJ with two RepE mutants reveals an intrinsic plasticity of the DnaJ dimer that allows the chaperone to adapt to different substrates. We also show that DnaJ induces conformational changes in dimeric RepE, which increase the intermonomeric distance and remodel both RepE domains enhancing its affinity for DNA.

  5. Critical Fluctuations in the Native State of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qian-Yuan; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Chialvo, Dante R.

    2017-02-01

    Based on protein structural ensembles determined by nuclear magnetic resonance, we study the position fluctuations of residues by calculating distance-dependent correlations and conducting finite-size scaling analysis. The fluctuations exhibit high susceptibility and long-range correlations up to the protein sizes. The scaling relations between the correlations or susceptibility and protein sizes resemble those in other physical and biological systems near their critical points. These results indicate that, at the native states, motions of each residue are felt by every other one in the protein. We also find that proteins with larger susceptibility are more frequently observed in nature. Overall, our results suggest that the protein's native state is critical.

  6. Assessment of semiempirical enthalpy of formation in solution as an effective energy function to discriminate native-like structures in protein decoy sets.

    PubMed

    Urquiza-Carvalho, Gabriel Aires; Fragoso, Wallace Duarte; Rocha, Gerd Bruno

    2016-08-05

    In this work, we tested the PM6, PM6-DH+, PM6-D3, and PM7 enthalpies of formation in aqueous solution as scoring functions across 33 decoy sets to discriminate native structures or good models in a decoy set. In each set these semiempirical quantum chemistry methods were compared according to enthalpic and geometric criteria. Enthalpically, we compared the methods according to how much lower was the enthalpy of each native, when compared with the mean enthalpy of its set. Geometrically, we compared the methods according to the fraction of native contacts (Q), which is a measure of geometric closeness between an arbitrary structure and the native. For each set and method, the Q of the best decoy was compared with the Q0 , which is the Q of the decoy closest to the native in the set. It was shown that the PM7 method is able to assign larger energy differences between the native structure and the decoys in a set, arguably because of a better description of dispersion interactions, however PM6-DH+ was slightly better than the rest at selecting geometrically good models in the absence of a native structure in the set. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  8. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  9. Fast native-SAD phasing for routine macromolecular structure determination.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Olieric, Vincent; Waltersperger, Sandro; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Chen, Lirong; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Dayong; Rose, John; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Schnapp, Gisela; Pautsch, Alexander; Bargsten, Katja; Prota, Andrea E; Surana, Parag; Kottur, Jithesh; Nair, Deepak T; Basilico, Federica; Cecatiello, Valentina; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Boland, Andreas; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Steinmetz, Michel O; Caffrey, Martin; Wang, Meitian

    2015-02-01

    We describe a data collection method that uses a single crystal to solve X-ray structures by native SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction). We solved the structures of 11 real-life examples, including a human membrane protein, a protein-DNA complex and a 266-kDa multiprotein-ligand complex, using this method. The data collection strategy is suitable for routine structure determination and can be implemented at most macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beamlines.

  10. Shortening a loop can increase protein native state entropy.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Yulian; Dagan, Shlomi; Levy, Yaakov

    2015-12-01

    Protein loops are essential structural elements that influence not only function but also protein stability and folding rates. It was recently reported that shortening a loop in the AcP protein may increase its native state conformational entropy. This effect on the entropy of the folded state can be much larger than the lower entropic penalty of ordering a shorter loop upon folding, and can therefore result in a more pronounced stabilization than predicted by polymer model for loop closure entropy. In this study, which aims at generalizing the effect of loop length shortening on native state dynamics, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study how gradual shortening a very long or solvent-exposed loop region in four different proteins can affect their stability. For two proteins, AcP and Ubc7, we show an increase in native state entropy in addition to the known effect of the loop length on the unfolded state entropy. However, for two permutants of SH3 domain, shortening a loop results only with the expected change in the entropy of the unfolded state, which nicely reproduces the observed experimental stabilization. Here, we show that an increase in the native state entropy following loop shortening is not unique to the AcP protein, yet nor is it a general rule that applies to all proteins following the truncation of any loop. This modification of the loop length on the folded state and on the unfolded state may result with a greater effect on protein stability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Analysis of Proteins, Protein Complexes, and Organellar Proteomes Using Sheathless Capillary Zone Electrophoresis - Native Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, Arseniy M; Viner, Rosa; Santos, Marcia R; Horn, David M; Bern, Marshall; Karger, Barry L; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2017-09-05

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a rapidly advancing field in the analysis of proteins, protein complexes, and macromolecular species of various types. The majority of native MS experiments reported to-date has been conducted using direct infusion of purified analytes into a mass spectrometer. In this study, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was coupled online to Orbitrap mass spectrometers using a commercial sheathless interface to enable high-performance separation, identification, and structural characterization of limited amounts of purified proteins and protein complexes, the latter with preserved non-covalent associations under native conditions. The performance of both bare-fused silica and polyacrylamide-coated capillaries was assessed using mixtures of protein standards known to form non-covalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes. High-efficiency separation of native complexes is demonstrated using both capillary types, while the polyacrylamide neutral-coated capillary showed better reproducibility and higher efficiency for more complex samples. The platform was then evaluated for the determination of monoclonal antibody aggregation and for analysis of proteomes of limited complexity using a ribosomal isolate from E. coli. Native CZE-MS, using accurate single stage and tandem-MS measurements, enabled identification of proteoforms and non-covalent complexes at femtomole levels. This study demonstrates that native CZE-MS can serve as an orthogonal and complementary technique to conventional native MS methodologies with the advantages of low sample consumption, minimal sample processing and losses, and high throughput and sensitivity. This study presents a novel platform for analysis of ribosomes and other macromolecular complexes and organelles, with the potential for discovery of novel structural features defining cellular phenotypes (e.g., specialized ribosomes). Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Analysis of Proteins, Protein Complexes, and Organellar Proteomes Using Sheathless Capillary Zone Electrophoresis - Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Arseniy M.; Viner, Rosa; Santos, Marcia R.; Horn, David M.; Bern, Marshall; Karger, Barry L.; Ivanov, Alexander R.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a rapidly advancing field in the analysis of proteins, protein complexes, and macromolecular species of various types. The majority of native MS experiments reported to-date has been conducted using direct infusion of purified analytes into a mass spectrometer. In this study, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was coupled online to Orbitrap mass spectrometers using a commercial sheathless interface to enable high-performance separation, identification, and structural characterization of limited amounts of purified proteins and protein complexes, the latter with preserved non-covalent associations under native conditions. The performance of both bare-fused silica and polyacrylamide-coated capillaries was assessed using mixtures of protein standards known to form non-covalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes. High-efficiency separation of native complexes is demonstrated using both capillary types, while the polyacrylamide neutral-coated capillary showed better reproducibility and higher efficiency for more complex samples. The platform was then evaluated for the determination of monoclonal antibody aggregation and for analysis of proteomes of limited complexity using a ribosomal isolate from E. coli. Native CZE-MS, using accurate single stage and tandem-MS measurements, enabled identification of proteoforms and non-covalent complexes at femtomole levels. This study demonstrates that native CZE-MS can serve as an orthogonal and complementary technique to conventional native MS methodologies with the advantages of low sample consumption, minimal sample processing and losses, and high throughput and sensitivity. This study presents a novel platform for analysis of ribosomes and other macromolecular complexes and organelles, with the potential for discovery of novel structural features defining cellular phenotypes (e.g., specialized ribosomes). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Protein roles in group I intron RNA folding: The tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase CYT-18 stabilizes the native state relative to a long-lived misfolded structure without compromising folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, Amanda B.; Bhaskaran, Hari; Russell, Rick

    2009-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa CYT-18 protein is a mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase that also promotes self-splicing of group I intron RNAs by stabilizing functional structure in the conserved core. CYT-18 binds the core along the same surface as a common peripheral element, P5abc, suggesting that CYT-18 can replace P5abc functionally. In addition to stabilizing structure generally, P5abc stabilizes the native conformation of the Tetrahymena group I intron relative to a globally-similar misfolded conformation, which has only local differences within the core and is populated significantly at equilibrium by a ribozyme variant lacking P5abc (EΔP5abc). Here we show that CYT-18 specifically promotes formation of the native group I intron core from this misfolded conformation. Catalytic activity assays demonstrate that CYT-18 shifts the equilibrium of EΔP5abc toward the native state by at least 35-fold, and binding assays suggest an even larger effect. Thus, like P5abc, CYT-18 preferentially recognizes the native core, despite the global similarity of the misfolded core and despite forming crudely similar complexes, as revealed by DMS footprinting. Interestingly, the effects of CYT-18 and P5abc on folding kinetics differ. Whereas P5abc inhibits refolding of the misfolded conformation by forming peripheral contacts that must break during refolding, CYT-18 does not display analogous inhibition, most likely because it relies to a greater extent on direct interactions with the core. Although CYT-18 does not encounter this RNA in vivo, our results suggest that it stabilizes its cognate group I introns relative to analogous misfolded intermediates. By specifically recognizing native structure, CYT-18 may also interact with earlier folding intermediates to avoid RNA misfolding or to trap native structure as it forms. More generally, our results highlight the ability of a protein cofactor to stabilize a functional RNA structure specifically without incurring associated costs in

  14. Native state interconversion of a metamorphic protein requires global unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Robert C.; Murray, Nathan J.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2011-01-01

    Lymphotactin (Ltn) is a unique chemokine that under physiological solution conditions displays large-scale structural heterogeneity, defining a new category of ‘metamorphic proteins’. Previous Ltn studies have indicated that each form is required for proper function, but the mechanism of interconversion remains unknown. Here we have investigated the temperature dependence of kinetic rates associated with interconversion and unfolding by stopped-flow fluorescence to determine transition-state free energies. Comparisons of derived thermodynamic parameters revealed striking similarities between interconversion and protein unfolding. We conclude that Ltn native state rearrangement proceeds by way of a large-scale unfolding process rather than a unique intermediate structure. PMID:21776971

  15. Knowledge of Native Protein-Protein Interfaces Is Sufficient To Construct Predictive Models for the Selection of Binding Candidates.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2015-10-26

    Selection of putative binding poses is a challenging part of virtual screening for protein-protein interactions. Predictive models to filter out binding candidates with the highest binding affinities comprise scoring functions that assign a score to each binding pose. Existing scoring functions are typically deduced by collecting statistical information about interfaces of native conformations of protein complexes along with interfaces of a large generated set of non-native conformations. However, the obtained scoring functions become biased toward the method used to generate the non-native conformations, i.e., they may not recognize near-native interfaces generated with a different method. The present study demonstrates that knowledge of only native protein-protein interfaces is sufficient to construct well-discriminative predictive models for the selection of binding candidates. Here we introduce a new scoring method that comprises a knowledge-based potential called KSENIA deduced from structural information about the native interfaces of 844 crystallographic protein-protein complexes. We derive KSENIA using convex optimization with a training set composed of native protein complexes and their near-native conformations obtained using deformations along the low-frequency normal modes. As a result, our knowledge-based potential has only marginal bias toward a method used to generate putative binding poses. Furthermore, KSENIA is smooth by construction, which allows it to be used along with rigid-body optimization to refine the binding poses. Using several test benchmarks, we demonstrate that our method discriminates well native and near-native conformations of protein complexes from non-native ones. Our methodology can be easily adapted to the recognition of other types of molecular interactions, such as protein-ligand, protein-RNA, etc. KSENIA will be made publicly available as a part of the SAMSON software platform at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software .

  16. Can natural proteins designed with 'inverted' peptide sequences adopt native-like protein folds?

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Settu; Guruprasad, Kunchur

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic computational analysis on a representative dataset of proteins of known three-dimensional structure, in order to evaluate whether it would possible to 'swap' certain short peptide sequences in naturally occurring proteins with their corresponding 'inverted' peptides and generate 'artificial' proteins that are predicted to retain native-like protein fold. The analysis of 3,967 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank revealed 102,677 unique identical inverted peptide sequence pairs that vary in sequence length between 5-12 and 18 amino acid residues. Our analysis illustrates with examples that such 'artificial' proteins may be generated by identifying peptides with 'similar structural environment' and by using comparative protein modeling and validation studies. Our analysis suggests that natural proteins may be tolerant to accommodating such peptides.

  17. The 3D structures of VDAC represent a native conformation

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Sebastian; Abramson, Jeff; Mannella, Carmen; Wagner, Gerhard; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-01-01

    The most abundant protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane is the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which facilitates the exchange of ions and molecules between mitochondria and cytosol and is regulated by interactions with other proteins and small molecules. VDAC has been extensively studied for more than three decades, and last year three independent investigations revealed a structure of VDAC-1 exhibiting 19 transmembrane β-strands, constituting a unique structural class of β-barrel membrane proteins. Here, we provide a historical perspective on VDAC research and give an overview of the experimental design used to obtain these structures. Furthermore, we validate the protein refolding approach and summarize biochemical and biophysical evidence that links the 19-stranded structure to the native form of VDAC. PMID:20708406

  18. The dynamic triple peak impact factor in traumatic brain injury influences native protein structures in gray and white matter as measured with computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Holst, Hans von; Li, Xiaogai

    2013-10-01

    calculated external kinetic energy was absorbed by the external parts of the head before the remaining energy of 5·19% reached the GM and WM. GM absorbed about twice as much of the energy compared to the WM. It is suggested that the dynamic triple peak impact factor may have a profound effect on native protein structures in the cerebral metabolism after a TBI.

  19. Separation of membrane protein complexes by native LDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Janine; Shapiguzov, Alexey; Fucile, Geoffrey; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis has become one of the most important methods for the analysis of proteins and protein complexes in a molecular weight range of 1-10(7) kDa. The separation of membrane protein complexes remained challenging to standardize until the demonstration of Blue Native PAGE in 1991 [1] and Clear Native PAGE in 1994 [2]. We present a robust protocol for high-resolution separation of photosynthetic complexes from Arabidopsis thaliana using lithium dodecyl sulfate as anion in a modified Blue Native PAGE (LDS-PAGE). Here, non-covalently bound chlorophyll is used as a sensitive probe to characterize the assembly/biogenesis of the pigment-protein complexes essential for photosynthesis. The high fluorescence yield recorded from chlorophyll-binding protein complexes can also be used to establish the separation of native protein complexes as an electrophoretic standard.

  20. Early Structural Evolution of Native Cytochrome c after Solvent Removal

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michal Z.; Elber, Ron; McLafferty, Fred W.; Gerber, R. Benny; Breuker, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    Electrospray ionization transfers thermally labile biomolecules, such as proteins, from solution into the gas phase, where they can be studied by mass spectrometry. Covalent bonds are generally preserved during and after the phase transition, but it is less clear to what extent noncovalent interactions are affected by the new gaseous environment. Here, we present atomic-level computational data on the structural rearrangement of native cytochrome c immediately after solvent removal. The first structural changes after desolvation occur surprisingly early, on a timescale of picoseconds. For the time segment of up to 4.2 ns investigated here, we observed no significant breaking of native noncovalent bonds; instead, we found formation of new noncovalent bonds. This generally involves charged residues on the protein surface, resulting in transiently stabilized intermediate structures with a global fold that is essentially the same as that in solution. Comparison with data from native electron capture dissociation experiments corroborates both its mechanistic postulations and our computational predictions, and suggests that global structural changes take place on a millisecond timescale not covered by our simulations. PMID:18785672

  1. Autofluorescence based visualization of proteins from unstained native-PAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunath, S.; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Proteins are the most diverse and functionally active biomolecules in the living system. In order to understand their diversity and dynamic functionality, visualization in native form without altering structural and functional properties during the separation from the complex mixtures is very much essential. In the present study, a sensitive methodology for optimal visualization of unstained or untagged proteins in native poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis (N-PAGE) has been developed where, concentration of the acrylamide and bis-acrylamide mixture, Percentage of the gel, fixing of the N-PAGE by methanol: acetic acid: water and washing of the gel in the mili-Q water has been optimized for highest sensitivity using laser induced autofluorescence. The outcome with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in PAGE was found to be highest at acrylamide and bis-acrylamide concentrations of 29.2 and 0.8 respectively in 12% N-PAGE. After the electrophoresis run, washing of the N-PAGE immediately with miliQ water for 12 times and eliminating the methanol: acetic acid: water, fixing of the N-PAGE yielded better sensitivity of visualization. Using the above methodology 25ng of BSA protein band in PAGE was clearly identified by the technique. The currently used staining techniques for the visualization of proteins are coomassie brilliant blue and silver staining, have the sensitivity of 100ng and 5ng respectively. The current methodology was found to be more sensitive as compared to coomassie staining and less sensitive compared to silver staining respectively. The added advantage of this methodology is the faster visualization of proteins without altering their structure and functional properties.

  2. Analysis of Native-Like Ions Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Samuel J; Eaton, Rachel M; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-09-20

    Ion mobility separation of native-like protein and protein complex ions expands the structural information available through native mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we implement Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) for the analysis of native-like ions. SLIM has been shown previously to operate with near lossless transmission of ions up to 3000 Da in mass. Here for the first time, SLIM was used to separate native-like protein and protein complex ions ranging in mass from 12 to 145 kDa. The resulting arrival-time distributions were monomodal and were used to determine collision cross section values that are within 3% of those determined from radio-frequency-confining drift cell measurements. These results are consistent with the retention of native-like ion structures throughout these experiments. The apparent resolving powers of native-like ions measured using SLIM are as high as 42, which is the highest value reported directly from experimental data for the native-like ion of a protein complex. Interestingly, the apparent resolving power depends strongly on the identity of the analyte, suggesting that the arrival-time distributions of these ions may have contributions from an ensemble of structures in the gas phase that is unique to each analyte. These results suggest that the broad range of emerging SLIM technologies may all be adaptable to the analysis of native-like ions, which will enable future applications in the areas of structural biology, biophysics, and biopharmaceutical characterization.

  3. Native state volume fluctuations in proteins as a mechanism for dynamic allostery

    DOE PAGES

    Law, Anthony B.; Sapienza, Paul J.; Zhang, Jun; ...

    2017-01-17

    Allostery enables tight regulation of protein function in the cellular environment. While existing models of allostery are firmly rooted in the current structure-function paradigm, the mechanistic basis for allostery in the absence of structural change remains unclear. In this study, we show that a typical globular protein is able to undergo significant changes in volume under native conditions while exhibiting no additional changes in protein structure. These native state volume fluctuations were found to correlate with changes in internal motions that were previously recognized as a source of allosteric entropy. This finding offers a novel mechanistic basis for allostery inmore » the absence of canonical structural change. As a result, the unexpected observation that function can be derived from expanded, low density protein states has broad implications for our understanding of allostery and suggests that the general concept of the native state be expanded to allow for more variable physical dimensions with looser packing.« less

  4. Reduced native state stability in crowded cellular environment due to protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cellular crowding environments on protein structure and stability is a key issue in molecular and cellular biology. The classical view of crowding emphasizes the volume exclusion effect that generally favors compact, native states. Here, results from molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments show that protein crowders may destabilize native states via protein-protein interactions. In the model system considered here, mixtures of villin head piece and protein G at high concentrations, villin structures become increasingly destabilized upon increasing crowder concentrations. The denatured states observed in the simulation involve partial unfolding as well as more subtle conformational shifts. The unfolded states remain overall compact and only partially overlap with unfolded ensembles at high temperature and in the presence of urea. NMR measurements on the same systems confirm structural changes upon crowding based on changes of chemical shifts relative to dilute conditions. An analysis of protein-protein interactions and energetic aspects suggests the importance of enthalpic and solvation contributions to the crowding free energies that challenge an entropic-centered view of crowding effects. PMID:23402619

  5. Self-assembly studies of native and recombinant fibrous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Donna Lucille

    The structure of silk proteins consists of alternating amorphous (glycine-rich) and ordered crystalline regions (poly(alanine) and poly(glycine-alanine) repeats), where the organized regions are typically beta-sheet assemblies. In collagen, the basic helical repeat (glycine-proline-hydroxyproline and variants on this repeat) drives hierarchical assembly. Three polypeptide chains form left-handed poly-proline II-like helices, these three chains then self-assemble to form a right-handed triple helix. The focus of this thesis is on these proteins and defined variations thereof to reveal features of fibrous protein self-assembly. The amino acid sequences of native silk and collagen and their respective assembly environments have been systematically manipulated. Spider silk protein, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline-silk, was genetically engineered to include methionines flanking the beta-sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively oxidized and reduced, altering the bulkiness and charge of a methionine-based sulfoxide group to control beta-sheet formation by steric hindrance. A second version of the sterical trigger included a recognition site for Protein Kinase A allowing for the selective phosphorylation of a serine. Patterning a monolayer of precursor "director" molecules on length scales ranging from nanometer- to micrometer-length scales simplifies the interpretation of supramolecular assembly. Utilizing the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based technique of dip-pen nanolithography, thiolated collagen and a collagen-like peptide were patterned at 30--50 nm line widths on evaporated gold surfaces. These are the largest molecules thus far positively printed on a surface at such small-length scales. The method preserved the triple helical structure and biological activity of collagen and even fostered the formation of characteristic higher-levels of structural organization. Nanopatterns were also achieved for

  6. Native proteins trap high-energy transit conformations.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Andrew E; Karplus, P Andrew

    2015-10-01

    During protein folding and as part of some conformational changes that regulate protein function, the polypeptide chain must traverse high-energy barriers that separate the commonly adopted low-energy conformations. How distortions in peptide geometry allow these barrier-crossing transitions is a fundamental open question. One such important transition involves the movement of a non-glycine residue between the left side of the Ramachandran plot (that is, ϕ < 0°) and the right side (that is, ϕ > 0°). We report that high-energy conformations with ϕ ~ 0°, normally expected to occur only as fleeting transition states, are stably trapped in certain highly resolved native protein structures and that an analysis of these residues provides a detailed, experimentally derived map of the bond angle distortions taking place along the transition path. This unanticipated information lays to rest any uncertainty about whether such transitions are possible and how they occur, and in doing so lays a firm foundation for theoretical studies to better understand the transitions between basins that have been little studied but are integrally involved in protein folding and function. Also, the context of one such residue shows that even a designed highly stable protein can harbor substantial unfavorable interactions.

  7. Maintenance of native-like protein dynamics may not be required for engineering functional proteins.

    PubMed

    Gobeil, Sophie M C; Clouthier, Christopher M; Park, Jaeok; Gagné, Donald; Berghuis, Albert M; Doucet, Nicolas; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2014-10-23

    Proteins are dynamic systems, and understanding dynamics is critical for fully understanding protein function. Therefore, the question of whether laboratory engineering has an impact on protein dynamics is of general interest. Here, we demonstrate that two homologous, naturally evolved enzymes with high degrees of structural and functional conservation also exhibit conserved dynamics. Their similar set of slow timescale dynamics is highly restricted, consistent with evolutionary conservation of a functionally important feature. However, we also show that dynamics of a laboratory-engineered chimeric enzyme obtained by recombination of the two homologs exhibits striking difference on the millisecond timescale, despite function and high-resolution crystal structure (1.05 Å) being conserved. The laboratory-engineered chimera is thus functionally tolerant to modified dynamics on the timescale of catalytic turnover. Tolerance to dynamic variation implies that maintenance of native-like protein dynamics may not be required when engineering functional proteins.

  8. Spatial Arrangement Overrules Environmental Factors to Structure Native and Non-Native Assemblages of Synanthropic Harvestmen

    PubMed Central

    Muster, Christoph; Meyer, Marc; Sattler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how space affects the occurrence of native and non-native species is essential for inferring processes that shape communities. However, studies considering spatial and environmental variables for the entire community – as well as for the native and non-native assemblages in a single study – are scarce for animals. Harvestmen communities in central Europe have undergone drastic turnovers during the past decades, with several newly immigrated species, and thus provide a unique system to study such questions. We studied the wall-dwelling harvestmen communities from 52 human settlements in Luxembourg and found the assemblages to be largely dominated by non-native species (64% of specimens). Community structure was analysed using Moran's eigenvector maps as spatial variables, and landcover variables at different radii (500 m, 1000 m, 2000 m) in combination with climatic parameters as environmental variables. A surprisingly high portion of pure spatial variation (15.7% of total variance) exceeded the environmental (10.6%) and shared (4%) components of variation, but we found only minor differences between native and non-native assemblages. This could result from the ecological flexibility of both, native and non-native harvestmen that are not restricted to urban habitats but also inhabit surrounding semi-natural landscapes. Nevertheless, urban landcover variables explained more variation in the non-native community, whereas coverage of semi-natural habitats (forests, rivers) at broader radii better explained the native assemblage. This indicates that some urban characteristics apparently facilitate the establishment of non-native species. We found no evidence for competitive replacement of native by invasive species, but a community with novel combination of native and non-native species. PMID:24595309

  9. Display of native proteins on Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jae-Gu; Choi, Soo-Keun; Jung, Heung-Chae; Kim, Eui-Joong

    2014-09-01

    In principle, protein display is enabled by fusing target proteins to naturally secreted, surface-anchored protein motifs. In this work, we developed a method of native protein display on the Bacillus spore surface that obviates the need to construct fusion proteins to display a motif. Spore coat proteins are expressed in the mother cell compartment and are subsequently assembled and deposited on the surface of spores. Therefore, target proteins overexpressed in the mother cell compartment during the late sporulation phase were expected to be targeted and displayed on the spore surface. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated the display of carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) in its native form on the spore surface. The target protein, CMCase, was expressed under the control of the cry1Aa promoter, which is controlled by σ(E) and σ(K) and is expressed in the mother cell compartment. The correct display was confirmed using enzyme activity assays, flow cytometry, and immunogold electron microscopy. In addition, we demonstrated the display of a β-galactosidase tetramer and confirmed its correct display using enzyme activity assays and protein characterization. This native protein display system, combined with the robust nature of Bacillus spores, will broaden the range of displayable target proteins. Consequently, the applications of display technology will be expanded, including high-throughput screening, vaccines, biosensors, biocatalysis, bioremediation, and other innovative bioprocesses.

  10. Implementation of Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques to Simultaneously Observe Native and Mutated Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Brennan; Ben, Kelty; Link, Justin

    A protein's natural, correctly folded structure can determine the protein's ability to carry out its function. If the unfolding process of proteins can be observed, then the relative stability can be better understood between native and mutated proteins. A global picture of the unfolding process may be completed through the studies of strategically mutated proteins using tryptophan as a probe. Horse heart cytochrome c, a thoroughly studied, model protein was used in our investigation to explore this idea. Various spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, and fluorescence were simultaneously applied while slowly unfolding our protein by increasing the concentration of a chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. This provided us information about the thermodynamic properties of the protein and several mutants which can then be interpreted to gain relative stability information among mutations. Efforts to utilize these techniques on native and mutated proteins in comparison to current scientific unfolding theories will be presented in this session.

  11. Dynamics of Vacuoles and H+-Pyrophosphatase Visualized by Monomeric Green Fluorescent Protein in Arabidopsis: Artifactual Bulbs and Native Intravacuolar Spherical Structures[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Segami, Shoji; Makino, Sachi; Miyake, Ai; Asaoka, Mariko; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    We prepared Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing a functional green fluorescent protein (GFP)-linked vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) under the control of its own promoter to investigate morphological dynamics of vacuoles and tissue-specific expression of H+-PPase. The lines obtained had spherical structures in vacuoles with strong fluorescence, which are referred to as bulbs. Quantitative analyses revealed that the occurrence of the bulbs correlated with the amount of GFP. Next, we prepared a construct of H+-PPase linked with a nondimerizing GFP (mGFP); we detected no bulbs. These results indicate that the membranes adhere face-to-face by antiparallel dimerization of GFP, resulting in the formation of bulbs. In plants expressing H+-PPase-mGFP, intravacuolar spherical structures with double membranes, which differed from bulbs in fluorescence intensity and intermembrane spacing, were still observed in peripheral endosperm, pistil epidermis and hypocotyls. Four-dimensional imaging revealed the dynamics of formation, transformation, and disappearance of intravacuolar spherical structures and transvacuolar strands in living cells. Visualization of H+-PPase-mGFP revealed intensive accumulation of the enzyme, not only in dividing and elongating cells but also in mesophyll, phloem, and nectary cells, which may have high sugar content. Dynamic morphological changes including transformation of vacuolar structures between transvacuolar strands, intravacuolar sheet-like structures, and intravacuolar spherical structures were also revealed. PMID:25118245

  12. Recent extensions to native chemical ligation for the chemical synthesis of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Malins, Lara R; Payne, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Native chemical ligation continues to play a pivotal role in the synthesis of increasingly complex peptide and protein targets twenty years after its initial report. This opinion article will highlight a number of recent, powerful extensions of the technology that have expanded the scope of the reaction, accelerated ligation rates, enabled chemoselective post-ligation modifications, and streamlined the ligation of multiple peptide fragments. These advances have facilitated the synthesis of a number of impressive protein targets to date and hold great promise for the continued application of native chemical ligation for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Probing Proteins and Differentiating Their Native and Denatured States with Aggregation-Induced Emission Fluorogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-06-01

    The tertiary 3D structures of proteins determine their unique functions. Perturbation of their native state including denaturation may cause loss of the protein functions. In this work, water-soluble tetraphenylethylene (TPE) fluorophore, sodium 1,2-bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)phenyl]-1,2-diphenylethene (BSPOTPE), with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics is utilized as a fluorescent probe for protein detection and for differentiating their folding modes. Owing to hydrophobic interaction between the proteins and BSPOTPE, it provides a fast and simple method to differentiate the native and denatured states of the proteins through monitoring fluorescence change in solution and PAGE gels. Six proteins are chosen as model proteins in the study. Among them, cytochrome c shows distinctive behavior to other proteins due to the presence of heme group. A comprehensive study of cytochrome c and human serum albumin is carried out in this work.

  14. X-ray crystal structures of manganese(II)-reconstituted and native toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase reveal rotamer shifts in conserved residues and an enhanced view of the protein interior.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael S; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Condon, Karen L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2006-11-29

    We report the X-ray crystal structures of native and manganese(II)-reconstituted toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase (ToMOH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 to 1.85 and 2.20 A resolution, respectively. The structures reveal that reduction of the dimetallic active site is accompanied by a carboxylate shift and alteration of the coordination environment for dioxygen binding and activation. A rotamer shift in a strategically placed asparagine 202 accompanies dimetallic center reduction and is proposed to influence protein component interactions. This rotamer shift is conserved between ToMOH and the corresponding residue in methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). Previously unidentified hydrophobic pockets similar to those present in MMOH are assigned.

  15. Phosphorylation of native porcine olfactory binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Nagnan-Le Meillour, Patricia; Le Danvic, Chrystelle; Brimau, Fanny; Chemineau, Philippe; Michalski, Jean-Claude

    2009-07-01

    The identification of various isoforms of olfactory binding proteins is of major importance to elucidate their involvement in detection of pheromones and other odors. Here, we report the characterization of the phosphorylation of OBP (odorant binding protein) and Von Ebner's gland protein (VEG) from the pig, Sus scrofa. After labeling with specific antibodies raised against the three types of phosphorylation (Ser, Thr, Tyr), the phosphate-modified residues were mapped by using the beta-elimination followed by Michael addition of dithiothreitol (BEMAD) method. Eleven phosphorylation sites were localized in the pOBP sequence and nine sites in the VEG sequence. OBPs are secreted by Bowman's gland cells in the extracellular mucus lining the nasal cavity. After tracking the secretion pathway in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of these cells, we hypothesize that these proteins may be phosphorylated by ectokinases that remain to be characterized. The existence of such a regulatory mechanism theoretically increases the number of OBP variants, and it suggests a more specific role for OBPs in odorant coding than the one of odorant solubilizer and transporter.

  16. Chemical cross-linking and native mass spectrometry: A fruitful combination for structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Sinz, Andrea; Arlt, Christian; Chorev, Dror; Sharon, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming increasingly popular in the field of structural biology for analyzing protein three-dimensional-structures and for mapping protein–protein interactions. In this review, the specific contributions of chemical crosslinking and native MS are outlined to reveal the structural features of proteins and protein assemblies. Both strategies are illustrated based on the examples of the tetrameric tumor suppressor protein p53 and multisubunit vinculin-Arp2/3 hybrid complexes. We describe the distinct advantages and limitations of each technique and highlight synergistic effects when both techniques are combined. Integrating both methods is especially useful for characterizing large protein assemblies and for capturing transient interactions. We also point out the future directions we foresee for a combination of in vivo crosslinking and native MS for structural investigation of intact protein assemblies. PMID:25970732

  17. Quantitative criteria for native energetic heterogeneity influences in the prediction of protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Samuel S.; Levy, Yaakov; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    Energy landscape theory requires that the protein-folding mechanism is generally globally directed or funneled toward the native state. The collective nature of transition state ensembles further suggests that sufficient averaging of the native interactions can occur so that the knowledge of the native topology may suffice for predicting the mechanism. Nevertheless, while simple homogeneously weighted native topology-based models predict the folding mechanisms for many proteins, for other proteins knowledge of the native topology, by itself, seems not to suffice in determining the folding mechanism. Simulations of proteins with differing topologies reveal that the failure of homogeneously weighted topology-based models can, however, be completely understood within the framework of a funneled energy landscape and can be quantified by comparing the fluctuation of entropy cost for forming contacts to the expected fluctuations in contact energy. To be precise, we find the transition state ensembles of proteins with all-α topologies, which are more uniform in the specific entropy cost of contact formation, have transition state ensembles that are more readily perturbed by differences in energetic weights than are the transition state ensembles of proteins with significant amounts of β-structure, where the specific entropy costs of contact formation are more widely distributed. This behavior is consistent with a random-field Ising model analogy that follows from the free energy functional approach to folding. PMID:19075236

  18. Analysis of Protein Interactions at Native Chloroplast Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Nabok, Alexei; Mustafa, Mohd K.; Al-Ammar, Rukaiah; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Smith, David P.; Abell, Ben M.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins. PMID:22479632

  19. Native protein nanolithography that can write, read and erase.

    PubMed

    Tinazli, Ali; Piehler, Jacob; Beuttler, Mirjam; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The development of systematic approaches to explore protein-protein interactions and dynamic protein networks is at the forefront of biological sciences. Nanopatterned protein arrays offer significant advantages for sensing applications, including short diffusion times, parallel detection of multiple targets and the requirement for only tiny amounts of sample. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques have successfully demonstrated patterning of molecules, including stable proteins, with submicrometre resolution. Here, we introduce native protein nanolithography for the nanostructured assembly of even fragile proteins or multiprotein complexes under native conditions. Immobilized proteins are detached by a novel vibrational AFM mode (contact oscillation mode) and replaced by other proteins, which are selectively self-assembled from the bulk. This nanolithography permits rapid writing, reading and erasing of protein arrays in a versatile manner. Functional protein complexes may be assembled with uniform orientation at dimensions down to 50 nm. Such fabrication of two-dimensionally arranged nano-objects with biological activity will prove powerful for proteome-wide interaction screens and single molecule/virus/cell analyses.

  20. Native protein nanolithography that can write, read and erase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinazli, Ali; Piehler, Jacob; Beuttler, Mirjam; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The development of systematic approaches to explore protein-protein interactions and dynamic protein networks is at the forefront of biological sciences. Nanopatterned protein arrays offer significant advantages for sensing applications, including short diffusion times, parallel detection of multiple targets and the requirement for only tiny amounts of sample. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques have successfully demonstrated patterning of molecules, including stable proteins, with submicrometre resolution. Here, we introduce native protein nanolithography for the nanostructured assembly of even fragile proteins or multiprotein complexes under native conditions. Immobilized proteins are detached by a novel vibrational AFM mode (contact oscillation mode) and replaced by other proteins, which are selectively self-assembled from the bulk. This nanolithography permits rapid writing, reading and erasing of protein arrays in a versatile manner. Functional protein complexes may be assembled with uniform orientation at dimensions down to 50 nm. Such fabrication of two-dimensionally arranged nano-objects with biological activity will prove powerful for proteome-wide interaction screens and single molecule/virus/cell analyses.

  1. The solution structure of a monomeric, reduced form of human copper,zinc superoxide dismutase bearing the same charge as the native protein.

    PubMed

    Banci, L; Bertini, I; Del Conte, R; Fadin, R; Mangani, S; Viezzoli, M S

    1999-12-01

    The solution structure of a mutated (Phe50Glu, Gly51Glu, Val148Lys, Ile151Lys), reduced, monomeric form of human copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD; 153 amino acids) has been determined through 2237 meaningful nuclear Overhauser enhancements, out of 2492, and 43 dihedral angle constraints. A characteristic of this mutant is that of having the same overall charge as the dimeric protein, but an activity of only 20% with respect to wild-type SOD. This protein, at variance with a previously characterized monomeric form (Phe50Glu, Gly51Glu, Glu133Gln), does not contain mutations in the active site. Therefore, its characterization allows us to understand the structural changes independently induced by the monomerization and by the active site mutation. The family of 36 conformers, which have a target function with respect to the experimental constraints lower than 1.5 A2, has RMSD values with respect to the average structure of 0.94 +/- 0.14 A2 and 1.50 +/- 0.14 A2 for the backbone and the heavy atoms, respectively. The overall folding, which includes the classical eight-stranded Greek-key beta-barrel and a short alpha-helix, is very close to that of the previously characterized monomeric mutant E133QM2SOD and to that of wild-type SOD. The region involved in the subunit-subunit interactions in the dimeric protein is confirmed to be disordered in the monomeric species. It is also observed that a sizable rearrangement of the charged groups of the electrostatic loop and of Arg143 takes place in the monomeric species. The width of the active site channel, both at its entrance and at the bottleneck of the active site, is discussed in the light of the influence on the enzymatic activity and the latter with respect to the overall charge. It is also confirmed that the NH proton of His63 shields the Cu(I) from the bulk solvent, thus supporting the suggestion that superoxide may interact with the reduced metal ion in an outer-sphere fashion.

  2. Rapid Design of Knowledge-Based Scoring Potentials for Enrichment of Near-Native Geometries in Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Alexander; de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Schindler, Christina E. M.; de Beauchêne, Isaure Chauvot

    2017-01-01

    Protein-protein docking protocols aim to predict the structures of protein-protein complexes based on the structure of individual partners. Docking protocols usually include several steps of sampling, clustering, refinement and re-scoring. The scoring step is one of the bottlenecks in the performance of many state-of-the-art protocols. The performance of scoring functions depends on the quality of the generated structures and its coupling to the sampling algorithm. A tool kit, GRADSCOPT (GRid Accelerated Directly SCoring OPTimizing), was designed to allow rapid development and optimization of different knowledge-based scoring potentials for specific objectives in protein-protein docking. Different atomistic and coarse-grained potentials can be created by a grid-accelerated directly scoring dependent Monte-Carlo annealing or by a linear regression optimization. We demonstrate that the scoring functions generated by our approach are similar to or even outperform state-of-the-art scoring functions for predicting near-native solutions. Of additional importance, we find that potentials specifically trained to identify the native bound complex perform rather poorly on identifying acceptable or medium quality (near-native) solutions. In contrast, atomistic long-range contact potentials can increase the average fraction of near-native poses by up to a factor 2.5 in the best scored 1% decoys (compared to existing scoring), emphasizing the need of specific docking potentials for different steps in the docking protocol. PMID:28118389

  3. The emerging role of native mass spectrometry in characterizing the structure and dynamics of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Petosa, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for determining the mass of biomolecules with high accuracy and sensitivity. MS performed under so-called “native conditions” (native MS) can be used to determine the mass of biomolecules that associate noncovalently. Here we review the application of native MS to the study of protein−ligand interactions and its emerging role in elucidating the structure of macromolecular assemblies, including soluble and membrane protein complexes. Moreover, we discuss strategies aimed at determining the stoichiometry and topology of subunits by inducing partial dissociation of the holo-complex. We also survey recent developments in "native top-down MS", an approach based on Fourier Transform MS, whereby covalent bonds are broken without disrupting non-covalent interactions. Given recent progress, native MS is anticipated to play an increasingly important role for researchers interested in the structure of macromolecular complexes. PMID:25676284

  4. Improved Peak Detection and Deconvolution of Native Electrospray Mass Spectra from Large Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jonathan; Trnka, Michael J.; Roh, Soung-Hun; Robinson, Philip J. J.; Shiau, Carrie; Fujimori, Danica Galonic; Chiu, Wah; Burlingame, Alma L.; Guan, Shenheng

    2015-12-01

    Native electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (native MS) measures biomolecules under conditions that preserve most aspects of protein tertiary and quaternary structure, enabling direct characterization of large intact protein assemblies. However, native spectra derived from these assemblies are often partially obscured by low signal-to-noise as well as broad peak shapes because of residual solvation and adduction after the electrospray process. The wide peak widths together with the fact that sequential charge state series from highly charged ions are closely spaced means that native spectra containing multiple species often suffer from high degrees of peak overlap or else contain highly interleaved charge envelopes. This situation presents a challenge for peak detection, correct charge state and charge envelope assignment, and ultimately extraction of the relevant underlying mass values of the noncovalent assemblages being investigated. In this report, we describe a comprehensive algorithm developed for addressing peak detection, peak overlap, and charge state assignment in native mass spectra, called PeakSeeker. Overlapped peaks are detected by examination of the second derivative of the raw mass spectrum. Charge state distributions of the molecular species are determined by fitting linear combinations of charge envelopes to the overall experimental mass spectrum. This software is capable of deconvoluting heterogeneous, complex, and noisy native mass spectra of large protein assemblies as demonstrated by analysis of (1) synthetic mononucleosomes containing severely overlapping peaks, (2) an RNA polymerase II/α-amanitin complex with many closely interleaved ion signals, and (3) human TriC complex containing high levels of background noise.

  5. Identification of cooperative folding units in a set of native proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A.; Smythers, G. W.; Covell, D. G.

    1997-01-01

    Cooperative unfolding penalties are calculated by statistically evaluating an ensemble of denatured states derived from native structures. The ensemble of denatured states is determined by dividing the native protein into short contiguous segments and defining all possible combinations of native, i.e., interacting, and non-native, i.e., non-interacting, segments. We use a novel knowledge-based scoring function, derived from a set of non-homologous proteins in the Protein Data Bank, to describe the interactions among residues. This procedure is used for the structural identification of cooperative folding cores for four globular proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, horse heart cytochrome c, French bean plastocyanin, and staphylococcal nuclease. The theoretical folding units are shown to correspond to regions that exhibit enhanced stability against denaturation as determined from experimental hydrogen exchange protection factors. Using a sequence similarity score for related sequences, we show that, in addition to residues necessary for enzymatic function, those amino acids comprising structurally important folding cores are also preferentially conserved during evolution. This implies that the identified folding cores may be part of an array of fundamental structural folding units. PMID:9260276

  6. Water in protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Papoian, Garegin A.; Ulander, Johan; Eastwood, Michael P.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    Proteins have evolved to use water to help guide folding. A physically motivated, nonpairwise-additive model of water-mediated interactions added to a protein structure prediction Hamiltonian yields marked improvement in the quality of structure prediction for larger proteins. Free energy profile analysis suggests that long-range water-mediated potentials guide folding and smooth the underlying folding funnel. Analyzing simulation trajectories gives direct evidence that water-mediated interactions facilitate native-like packing of supersecondary structural elements. Long-range pairing of hydrophilic groups is an integral part of protein architecture. Specific water-mediated interactions are a universal feature of biomolecular recognition landscapes in both folding and binding. PMID:14988499

  7. Native biomolecules in the gas phase? The case of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Frankevich, Vladimir; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Chingin, Konstantin; Nieckarz, Robert; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-04-02

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was ionized by native electrospray ionization and trapped for many seconds in high vacuum, allowing fluorescence emission to be measured as a probe of its biological function, to answer the question whether GFP exists in the native form in the gas phase or not. Although a narrow charge-state distribution, a collision cross-section very close to that expected for correctly folded GFP, and a large stability against dissociation all support a near-native gas-phase structure, no fluorescence emission was observed. The loss of the native form is attributed to the absence of residual water in the gas phase, which normally stabilizes the para-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolone chromophore of GFP.

  8. Native antigen fractionation protein microarrays for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Robert J; O'Rourke, Dennis J; Barder, Timothy J; Nelson, Bryce P; Liu, Brian C-S

    2011-01-01

    In this protocol, we used the T24 human bladder cancer cell line as a source of native antigens to construct fractionated lysate microarrays. Subsequently, these microarrays were used to compare the autoantibody responses of individuals with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) to those of normal female controls. To accomplish this, T24 cells were lysed under nondenaturing conditions to obtain native antigens. These native antigens were then fractionated in 2D using a PF-2D liquid chromatography; the first dimension separated the proteins by their isoelectric points, and the second separated them according to hydrophobicity. The resulting protein fractions were printed onto nitrocellulose-coated glass slides (PATH slides) to create a set of fractionated lysate microarrays. To compare the autoantibody responses of IC/PBS patients with normal controls, the fractionated lysate arrays were competitively hybridized with fluorescently labeled IgG samples purified from both IC/PBS and control sera. This protocol presents a detailed description of the creation and use of native antigen fractionated lysate microarrays for autoantibody profiling.

  9. Protein structure refinement by optimization.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Martin; Røgen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge-based protein potentials are simplified potentials designed to improve the quality of protein models, which is important as more accurate models are more useful for biological and pharmaceutical studies. Consequently, knowledge-based potentials often are designed to be efficient in ordering a given set of deformed structures denoted decoys according to how close they are to the relevant native protein structure. This, however, does not necessarily imply that energy minimization of this potential will bring the decoys closer to the native structure. In this study, we introduce an iterative strategy to improve the convergence of decoy structures. It works by adding energy optimized decoys to the pool of decoys used to construct the next and improved knowledge-based potential. We demonstrate that this strategy results in significantly improved decoy convergence on Titan high resolution decoys and refinement targets from Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction competitions. Our potential is formulated in Cartesian coordinates and has a fixed backbone potential to restricts motions to be close to those of a dihedral model, a fixed hydrogen-bonding potential and a variable coarse grained carbon alpha potential consisting of a pair potential and a novel solvent potential that are b-spline based as we use explicit gradient and Hessian for efficient energy optimization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. In vivo modification of native carrier protein domains.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Meier, Jordan L; Torpey, Justin W; Burkart, Michael D

    2009-04-17

    Carrier proteins are central to the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in all organisms. Here we describe metabolic labeling and manipulation of native acyl carrier proteins in both type I and II fatty acid synthases. By utilizing natural promiscuity in the CoA biosynthetic pathway in combination with synthetic pantetheine analogues, we demonstrate metabolic labeling of endogenous carrier proteins with reporter tags in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and in a human carcinoma cell line. The highly specific nature of the post-translational modification that was utilized for tagging allows for simple visualization of labeled carrier proteins, either by direct fluorescence imaging or after chemical conjugation to a fluorescent reporter. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of this approach for the isolation and enrichment of carrier proteins by affinity purification. Finally, we use these techniques to identify a carrier protein from an unsequenced organism, a finding that validates this proteomic approach to natural product biosynthetic enzyme discovery.

  11. Unique structural modulation of a non-native substrate by cochaperone DnaJ.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik; Mapa, Koyeli

    2013-02-12

    The role of bacterial DnaJ protein as a cochaperone of DnaK is strongly appreciated. Although DnaJ unaccompanied by DnaK can bind unfolded as well as native substrate proteins, its role as an individual chaperone remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DnaJ binds a model non-native substrate with a low nanomolar dissociation constant and, more importantly, modulates the structure of its non-native state. The structural modulation achieved by DnaJ is different compared to that achieved by the DnaK-DnaJ complex. The nature of structural modulation exerted by DnaJ is suggestive of a unique unfolding activity on the non-native substrate by the chaperone. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the zinc binding motif along with the C-terminal substrate binding domain of DnaJ is necessary and sufficient for binding and the subsequent binding-induced structural alterations of the non-native substrate. We hypothesize that this hitherto unknown structural alteration of non-native states by DnaJ might be important for its chaperoning activity by removing kinetic traps of the folding intermediates.

  12. Supercharging Protein Complexes from Aqueous Solution Disrupts their Native Conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Harry J.; Kintzer, Alexander F.; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Cassou, Catherine A.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-02-01

    The effects of aqueous solution supercharging on the solution- and gas-phase structures of two protein complexes were investigated using traveling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS). Low initial concentrations of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) in the electrospray ionization (ESI) solution can effectively increase the charge of concanavalin A dimers and tetramers, but at higher m-NBA concentrations, the increases in charge are accompanied by solution-phase dissociation of the dimers and up to a ~22% increase in the collision cross section (CCS) of the tetramers. With just 0.8% m-NBA added to the ESI solution of a ~630 kDa anthrax toxin octamer complex, the average charge is increased by only ~4% compared with the "native" complex, but it is sufficiently destabilized so that extensive gas-phase fragmentation occurs in the relatively high pressure regions of the TWIMS device. Anthrax toxin complexes exist in either a prechannel or a transmembrane channel state. With m-NBA, the prechannel state of the complex has the same CCS/charge ratio in the gas phase as the transmembrane channel state of the same complex formed without m-NBA, yet undergoes extensive dissociation, indicating that destabilization from supercharging occurs in the ESI droplet prior to ion formation and is not a result of Coulombic destabilization in the gas phase as a result of higher charging. These results demonstrate that the supercharging of large protein complexes is the result of conformational changes induced by the reagents in the ESI droplets, where enrichment of the supercharging reagent during droplet evaporation occurs.

  13. Comparative spectroscopic studies on drug binding characteristics and protein surface hydrophobicity of native and modified forms of bovine serum albumin: possible relevance to change in protein structure/function upon non-enzymatic glycation.

    PubMed

    Khodarahmi, Reza; Karimi, Seyyed Arash; Ashrafi Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Ghadami, Seyyed Abolghasem; Ghobadi, Sirous; Amani, Mojtaba

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between serum albumin (SA) and drugs has provided an interesting ground for understanding of drug effects, especially in drug distribution and drug-drug interaction on SA, in the case of multi-drug therapy. Determination of the impact of various factors on drug-protein interaction is especially important upon significant binding of drug to albumin. In the present study, the interaction of two drugs (furosemide and indomethacin) with native and modified albumins were investigated by using various spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data indicated that 1:1 binding of drugs to bovine serum albumin (BSA) is associated with quenching of albumin intrinsic fluorescence. The Job's plot also confirmed that drug binds to BSA via mentioned stoichiometry. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that intermolecular interactions between drug and albumin may change upon protein modification. The theoretical analyses also suggested some conformational changes of interacting side chains in subdomain IIA binding site (at the vicinity of W237), which were in good agreement with experimental data. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also observed upon both albumin modification and drug binding.

  14. Comparative spectroscopic studies on drug binding characteristics and protein surface hydrophobicity of native and modified forms of bovine serum albumin: Possible relevance to change in protein structure/function upon non-enzymatic glycation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodarahmi, Reza; Karimi, Seyyed Arash; Ashrafi Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Ghadami, Seyyed Abolghasem; Ghobadi, Sirous; Amani, Mojtaba

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between serum albumin (SA) and drugs has provided an interesting ground for understanding of drug effects, especially in drug distribution and drug-drug interaction on SA, in the case of multi-drug therapy. Determination of the impact of various factors on drug-protein interaction is especially important upon significant binding of drug to albumin. In the present study, the interaction of two drugs (furosemide and indomethacin) with native and modified albumins were investigated by using various spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data indicated that 1:1 binding of drugs to bovine serum albumin (BSA) is associated with quenching of albumin intrinsic fluorescence. The Job's plot also confirmed that drug binds to BSA via mentioned stoichiometry. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that intermolecular interactions between drug and albumin may change upon protein modification. The theoretical analyses also suggested some conformational changes of interacting side chains in subdomain IIA binding site (at the vicinity of W237), which were in good agreement with experimental data. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also observed upon both albumin modification and drug binding.

  15. Pure Protein Bilayers and Vesicles from Native Fungal Hydrophobins.

    PubMed

    Hähl, Hendrik; Vargas, Jose Nabor; Griffo, Alessandra; Laaksonen, Päivi; Szilvay, Géza; Lienemann, Michael; Jacobs, Karin; Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-01-01

    Pure protein bilayers and vesicles are formed using the native, fungal hydrophobin HFBI. Bilayers with hydrophobic (red) and hydrophilic (blue) core are produced and, depending on the type of core, vesicles in water, oily media, and even in air can be created using microfluidic jetting. Vesicles in water are even able to incorporate functional gramicidin A pores. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Secondary structure determines protein topology

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Patrick J.; Gong, Haipeng; Rose, George D.

    2006-01-01

    Using a test set of 13 small, compact proteins, we demonstrate that a remarkably simple protocol can capture native topology from secondary structure information alone, in the absence of long-range interactions. It has been a long-standing open question whether such information is sufficient to determine a protein's fold. Indeed, even the far simpler problem of reconstructing the three-dimensional structure of a protein from its exact backbone torsion angles has remained a difficult challenge owing to the small, but cumulative, deviations from ideality in backbone planarity, which, if ignored, cause large errors in structure. As a familiar example, a small change in an elbow angle causes a large displacement at the end of your arm; the longer the arm, the larger the displacement. Here, correct secondary structure assignments (α-helix, β-strand, β-turn, polyproline II, coil) were used to constrain polypeptide backbone chains devoid of side chains, and the most stable folded conformations were determined, using Monte Carlo simulation. Just three terms were used to assess stability: molecular compaction, steric exclusion, and hydrogen bonding. For nine of the 13 proteins, this protocol restricts the main chain to a surprisingly small number of energetically favorable topologies, with the native one prominent among them. PMID:16823044

  17. Tannin-assisted aggregation of natively unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, D.; Narayanan, T.; Hagenmuller, D.; Baron, A.; Guyot, S.; Cabane, B.; Bouhallab, S.

    2008-06-01

    Tannin-protein interactions are essentially physical: hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond-mediated. We explored the tannin-assisted protein aggregation on the case of β-casein, which is a natively unfolded protein known for its ability to form micellar aggregates. We used several tannins with specified length. Our SAXS results show that small tannins increase the number of proteins per micelle, but keeping their size constant. It leads to a tannin-assisted compactization of micelles. Larger tannins, with linear dimensions greater than the crown width of micelles, lead to the aggregation of micelles by a bridging effect. Experimental results can be understood within a model where tannins are treated as effective enhancers of hydrophobic attraction between specific sites in proteins.

  18. Influence of the native topology on the folding barrier for small proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Lidia; Rey, Antonio

    2007-11-01

    The possibility of downhill instead of two-state folding for proteins has been a very controversial topic which arose from recent experimental studies. From the theoretical side, this question has also been accomplished in different ways. Given the experimental observation that a relationship exists between the native structure topology of a protein and the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of its folding process, Gō-type potentials are an appropriate way to approach this problem. In this work, we employ an interaction potential from this family to get a better insight on the topological characteristics of the native state that may somehow determine the presence of a thermodynamic barrier in the folding pathway. The results presented here show that, indeed, the native topology of a small protein has a great influence on its folding behavior, mostly depending on the proportion of local and long range contacts the protein has in its native structure. Furthermore, when all the interactions present contribute in a balanced way, the transition results to be cooperative. Otherwise, the tendency to a downhill folding behavior increases.

  19. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  20. Detection and analysis of protein-protein interactions of organellar and prokaryotic proteomes by blue native and colorless native gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Krause, Frank; Seelert, Holger

    2008-11-01

    Native gels enable the analysis of protein complexes on a proteome-wide scale in a single experiment. The protocols described in this unit are based on separation of protein complexes by blue native polyacrylamide electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), the most versatile native gel system, and the closely related milder colorless native PAGE (CN-PAGE). Both BN-PAGE and CN-PAGE are described on analytical to preparative scales. In addition, methods for subsequent analysis of protein complexes are given, including electroelution from native gels as well as denaturing and native two-dimensional PAGE. Finally, the removal of Coomassie dye from electroeluted proteins is detailed along with a discussion of fundamental considerations for the solubilization of membrane protein complexes from various biological samples, which are exemplified for mitochondria, chloroplasts (thylakoids), and cyanobacteria.

  1. Native globular actin has a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure with elements of intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-02-01

    The native form of globular actin, G-actin, is formed in vivo as a result of complex post-translational folding processes that require ATP energy expenditure and are assisted by the 70 kDa heat shock protein, prefoldin and chaperonin containing TCP-1. G-actin is stabilized by the binding of one ATP molecule and one Ca(2+) ion (or Mg(2+) in vivo). Chemical denaturants, heating or Ca(2+) removal transform native actin (N) into 'inactivated actin' (I), a compact oligomer comprising 14-16 subunits. Viscogenic and crowding agents slow this process but do not stop it. The lack of calcium in the solution accelerates the spontaneous N → I transition. Thus, native G-actin has a kinetically stable (as a result of the high free energy barrier between the N and I states) but thermodynamically unstable structure, which, in the absence of Ca(2+) or other bivalent metal ions, spontaneously converts to the thermodynamically stable I state. It was noted that native actin has much in common with intrinsically disordered proteins: it has functionally important disordered regions; it is constantly in complex with one of its numerous partners; and it plays key roles in many cellular processes, in a manner similar to disordered hub proteins. By analyzing actin folding in vivo and unfolding in vitro, we advanced the hypothesis that proteins in a native state may have a thermodynamically unstable quasi-stationary structure. The kinetically stable native state of these proteins appears forcibly under the influence of intracellular folding machinery. The denaturation of such proteins is always irreversible because the inactivated state, for which the structure is determined by the amino acid sequence of a protein, comprises the thermodynamically stable state under physiological conditions.

  2. Native top-down mass spectrometry for the structural characterization of human hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiang; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Clubb, Robert T.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2015-06-09

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become an invaluable tool for the characterization of proteins and non-covalent protein complexes under near physiological solution conditions. Here we report the structural characterization of human hemoglobin (Hb), a 64 kDa oxygen-transporting protein complex, by high resolution native top-down mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization (ESI) and a 15-Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Native MS preserves the non-covalent interactions between the globin subunits, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) produces fragments directly from the intact Hb complex without dissociating the subunits. Using activated ion ECD, we observe the gradual unfolding process of the Hb complex in the gas phase. Without protein ion activation, the native Hb shows very limited ECD fragmentation from the N-termini, suggesting a tightly packed structure of the native complex and therefore low fragmentation efficiency. Precursor ion activation allows steady increase of N-terminal fragment ions, while the C-terminal fragments remain limited (38 c ions and 4 z ions on the α chain; 36 c ions and 2 z ions on the β chain). This ECD fragmentation pattern suggests that upon activation, the Hb complex starts to unfold from the N-termini of both subunits, whereas the C-terminal regions and therefore the potential regions involved in the subunit binding interactions remain intact. ECD-MS of the Hb dimer show similar fragmentation patterns as the Hb tetramer, providing further evidence for the hypothesized unfolding process of the Hb complex in the gas phase. Native top-down ECD-MS allows efficient probing of the Hb complex structure and the subunit binding interactions in the gas phase. Finally, it may provide a fast and effective means to probe the structure of novel protein complexes that are intractable to traditional structural characterization tools.

  3. Native top-down mass spectrometry for the structural characterization of human hemoglobin

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Jiang; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Clubb, Robert T.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become an invaluable tool for the characterization of proteins and non-covalent protein complexes under near physiological solution conditions. Here we report the structural characterization of human hemoglobin (Hb), a 64 kDa oxygen-transporting protein complex, by high resolution native top-down mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization (ESI) and a 15-Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Native MS preserves the non-covalent interactions between the globin subunits, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) produces fragments directly from the intact Hb complex without dissociating the subunits. Using activated ion ECD, we observe the gradual unfolding process of themore » Hb complex in the gas phase. Without protein ion activation, the native Hb shows very limited ECD fragmentation from the N-termini, suggesting a tightly packed structure of the native complex and therefore low fragmentation efficiency. Precursor ion activation allows steady increase of N-terminal fragment ions, while the C-terminal fragments remain limited (38 c ions and 4 z ions on the α chain; 36 c ions and 2 z ions on the β chain). This ECD fragmentation pattern suggests that upon activation, the Hb complex starts to unfold from the N-termini of both subunits, whereas the C-terminal regions and therefore the potential regions involved in the subunit binding interactions remain intact. ECD-MS of the Hb dimer show similar fragmentation patterns as the Hb tetramer, providing further evidence for the hypothesized unfolding process of the Hb complex in the gas phase. Native top-down ECD-MS allows efficient probing of the Hb complex structure and the subunit binding interactions in the gas phase. Finally, it may provide a fast and effective means to probe the structure of novel protein complexes that are intractable to traditional structural characterization tools.« less

  4. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a zinc diffusion facilitator protein in native nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Bersch, Beate; Dörr, Jonas M.; Hessel, Audrey; Killian, J. Antoinette; Schanda, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The structure, dynamics and function of membrane proteins are intimately linked to the properties of the membrane environment in which the proteins are embedded. For structural and biophysical characterization, membrane proteins generally need to be extracted from the membrane, and reconstituted in a suitable membrane-mimicking environment. Ensuring functional and structural integrity in these environments is often a major concern. The styrene/maleic acid co-polymer has recently been shown to be able to extract lipid/membrane protein patches directly from native membranes, forming nanosize discoidal proteolipid particles, also referred to as native nanodiscs. Here we show, for the first time, that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from an integral membrane protein in native nanodiscs, as exemplified with the 2 x 34 kDa-large bacterial cation diffusion facilitator CzcD from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. PMID:28128538

  5. Insights into the molecular mechanism of protein native-like aggregation upon glycation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luis M A; Gomes, Ricardo A; Yang, Dennis; Dennison, Sarah R; Família, Carlos; Lages, Ana; Coelho, Ana V; Murphy, Regina M; Phoenix, David A; Quintas, Alexandre

    2013-06-01

    Several human neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy, have long been associated with, structural and functional changes in disease related proteins leading to aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Such changes can be triggered by post-translational modifications. Methylglyoxal modifications have been shown to induce the formation of small and stable native-like aggregates in the case of the amyloidogenic proteins insulin and α-synuclein. However, the fundamental biophysical mechanism underlying such methylglyoxal-induced protein aggregation is not yet fully understood. In this work cytochrome c (Cyt c) was used as a model protein for the characterization of specific glycation targets and to study their impact on protein structure, stability, and ability to form native-like aggregates. Our results show that methylglyoxal covalently modifies Cyt c at a single residue and induces early conformational changes that lead to the formation of native-like aggregates. Furthermore, partially unfolded species are formed, but do not seem to be implicated in the aggregation process. This shows a clear difference from the amyloid fibril mechanisms which involve partially or totally unfolded intermediates. Equilibrium-unfolding experiments show that glycation strongly decreases Cyt c conformational stability, which is balanced with an increase of conformational stability upon aggregation. Data collected from analytical and spectroscopic techniques, along with kinetic analysis based on least-squares parameter fitting and statistical model discrimination are used to help to understand the driving force underlying glycation-induced native-like aggregation, and enable the proposal of a comprehensive thermodynamic and kinetic model for native-like aggregation of methylglyoxal glycated Cyt c. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein's native state stability in a chemically induced denaturation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Quiroz, L; Garcia-Colin, L S

    2007-05-21

    In this work, we present a generalization of Zwanzig's protein unfolding analysis [Zwanzig, R., 1997. Two-state models of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94, 148-150; Zwanzig, R., 1995. Simple model of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9801], in order to calculate the free energy change Delta(N)(D)F between the protein's native state N and its unfolded state D in a chemically induced denaturation. This Extended Zwanzig Model (EZM) is both based on an equilibrium statistical mechanics approach and the inclusion of experimental denaturation curves. It enables us to construct a suitable partition function Z and to derive an analytical formula for Delta(N)(D)F in terms of the number K of residues of the macromolecule, the average number nu of accessible states for each single amino acid and the concentration C(1/2) where the midpoint of the N<==>D transition occurs. The results of the EZM for proteins where chemical denaturation follows a sigmoidal-type profile, as it occurs for the case of the T70N human variant of lysozyme (PDB code: T70N) [Esposito, G., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 25910-25918], can be splitted into two lines. First, EZM shows that for sigmoidal denaturation profiles, the internal degrees of freedom of the chain play an outstanding role in the stability of the native state. On the other hand, that under certain conditions DeltaF can be written as a quadratic polynomial on concentration C(1/2), i.e., DeltaF approximately aC(1/2)(2)+bC(1/2)+c, where a,b,c are constant coefficients directly linked to protein's size K and the averaged number of non-native conformations nu. Such functional form for DeltaF has been widely known to fit experimental measures in chemically induced protein denaturation [Yagi, M., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 47009-47015; Asgeirsson, B., Guojonsdottir, K., 2006. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1764, 190-198; Sharma, S., et al., 2006. Protein Pept. Lett. 13(4), 323-329; Salem, M., et

  7. Structural entanglements in protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yani; Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-06-01

    We consider multi-chain protein native structures and propose a criterion that determines whether two chains in the system are entangled or not. The criterion is based on the behavior observed by pulling at both termini of each chain simultaneously in the two chains. We have identified about 900 entangled systems in the Protein Data Bank and provided a more detailed analysis for several of them. We argue that entanglement enhances the thermodynamic stability of the system but it may have other functions: burying the hydrophobic residues at the interface and increasing the DNA or RNA binding area. We also study the folding and stretching properties of the knotted dimeric proteins MJ0366, YibK, and bacteriophytochrome. These proteins have been studied theoretically in their monomeric versions so far. The dimers are seen to separate on stretching through the tensile mechanism and the characteristic unraveling force depends on the pulling direction.

  8. Slipknotting upon native-like loop formation in a trefoil knot protein.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jeffrey K; Sułkowska, Joanna I; Onuchic, José N

    2010-08-31

    Protein knots and slipknots, mostly regarded as intriguing oddities, are gradually being recognized as significant structural motifs. Recent experimental results show that knotting, starting from a fully extended polypeptide, has not yet been observed. Understanding the nucleation process of folding knots is thus a natural challenge for both experimental and theoretical investigation. In this study, we employ energy landscape theory and molecular dynamics to elucidate the entire folding mechanism. The full free energy landscape of a knotted protein is mapped using an all-atom structure-based protein model. Results show that, due to the topological constraint, the protein folds through a three-state mechanism that contains (i) a precise nucleation site that creates a correctly twisted native loop (first barrier) and (ii) a rate-limiting free energy barrier that is traversed by two parallel knot-forming routes. The main route corresponds to a slipknot conformation, a collapsed configuration where the C-terminal helix adopts a hairpin-like configuration while threading, and the minor route to an entropically limited plug motion, where the extended terminus is threaded as through a needle. Knot formation is a late transition state process and results show that random (nonspecific) knots are a very rare and unstable set of configurations both at and below folding temperature. Our study shows that a native-biased landscape is sufficient to fold complex topologies and presents a folding mechanism generalizable to all known knotted protein topologies: knotting via threading a native-like loop in a preordered intermediate.

  9. Non-native structure appears in microseconds during the folding of E. coli RNase H.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Laura E; Kathuria, Sagar V; Matthews, C Robert; Bilsel, Osman; Marqusee, Susan

    2015-01-30

    The folding pathway of Escherichia coli RNase H is one of the best experimentally characterized for any protein. In spite of this, spectroscopic studies have never captured the earliest events. Using continuous-flow microfluidic mixing, we have now observed the first several milliseconds of folding by monitoring the tryptophan fluorescence lifetime (60 μs dead time). Two folding intermediates are observed, the second of which is the previously characterized I(core) millisecond intermediate. The new earlier intermediate is likely on-pathway and appears to have long-range non-native structure, providing a rare example of such non-native structure formation in a folding pathway. The tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes also suggest a deviation from native packing in the second intermediate, I(core). Similar results from a fragment of RNase H demonstrate that only half of the protein is significantly involved in this early structure formation. These studies give us a view of the formation of tertiary structure on the folding pathway, which complements previous hydrogen-exchange studies that monitored only secondary structure and observed sequential native structure formation. Our results provide detailed folding information on both a timescale and a size-scale accessible to all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

  10. Structural and spectroscopic studies of the native hemocyanin from Maia squinado and its structural subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolashka-Angelova, Pavlina; Hristova, Rumijana; Schuetz, Juergen; Stoeva, Stanka; Schwarz, Heinz; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2000-09-01

    The dodecameric hemocyanin of the crab Maia squinado contains five major electrophoretically separable polypeptide chains (structural subunits) which have been purified by FPLC ion exchange chromatography. The various proteins have been characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with fluorescence quenching studies, using acrylamide, caesium chloride and potassium iodide as tryptophan quenchers. The results show that the tryptophyl side chains of dodecameric Hc are deeply buried in hydrophobic regions of the hemocyanin aggregates and the quenching efficiency values for the native Hc in comparison with those from the constituent subunits are two to four times less. The conformational stabilities of the native dodecameric aggregate and its isolated structural subunits towards various denaturants (pH, temperature, guanidinium hydrochloride) indicate that the quaternary structure is stabilized by hydrophilic and polar forces, whereby, both, the oxy- and apo-forms of the protein have been considered. The critical temperatures for the structural subunits, Tc, determined by fluorescence spectroscopy, are in the region of 50-60°C, coinciding with the melting temperatures, Tm, determined by CD spectroscopy. The free energy of stabilization in water, Δ GDH 2O , toward guanidinium hydrochloride is about two times higher for the dodecamer as compared to the isolated subunits. These studies reveal that oligomerization between functional subunits has a stabilizing effect on the whole molecule and differences in the primary structures result in different stabilities of the subunits.

  11. Proteins with Highly Similar Native Folds Can Show Vastly Dissimilar Folding Behavior When Desolvated**

    PubMed Central

    Schennach, Moritz; Breuker, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Proteins can be exposed to vastly different environments such as the cytosol or membranes, but the delicate balance between external factors and intrinsic determinants of protein structure, stability, and folding is only poorly understood. Here we used electron capture dissociation to study horse and tuna heart Cytochromes c in the complete absence of solvent. The significantly different stability of their highly similar native folds after transfer into the gas phase, and their strikingly different folding behavior in the gas phase, can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic interactions such as salt bridges. In the absence of hydrophobic bonding, protein folding is far slower and more complex than in solution. PMID:24259450

  12. Native-state interconversion of a metamorphic protein requires global unfolding.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Robert C; Murray, Nathan J; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F

    2011-08-23

    Lymphotactin (Ltn) is a unique chemokine that under physiological solution conditions displays large-scale structural heterogeneity, defining a new category of "metamorphic proteins". Previous Ltn studies have indicated that each form is required for proper function, but the mechanism of interconversion remains unknown. Here we have investigated the temperature dependence of kinetic rates associated with interconversion and unfolding by stopped-flow fluorescence to determine transition-state free energies. Comparisons of derived thermodynamic parameters revealed striking similarities between interconversion and protein unfolding. We conclude that Ltn native-state rearrangement proceeds by way of a large-scale unfolding process rather than a unique intermediate structure.

  13. Site-Selective Conjugation of Native Proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Trads, Julie B; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2017-06-20

    Conjugation of DNA to proteins is increasingly used in academia and industry to provide proteins with tags for identification or handles for hybridization to other DNA strands. Assay technologies such as immuno-PCR and proximity ligation and the imaging technology DNA-PAINT require DNA-protein conjugates. In DNA nanotechnology, the DNA handle is exploited to precisely position proteins by self-assembly. For these applications, site-selective conjugation is almost always desired because fully functional proteins are required to maintain the specificity of antibodies and the activity of enzymes. The introduction of a bioorthogonal handle at a specific position of a protein by recombinant techniques provides an excellent approach to site-specific conjugation, but for many laboratories and for applications where several proteins are to be labeled, the expression of recombinant proteins may be cumbersome. In recent years, a number of chemical methods that target conjugation to specific sites at native proteins have become available, and an overview of these methods is provided in this Account. Our laboratory has investigated DNA-templated protein conjugation (DTPC), which offers an alternative approach to site-selective conjugation of DNA to proteins. The method is inspired by the concept of DNA-templated synthesis where functional groups conjugated to DNA strands are preorganized by DNA hybridization to dramatically increase the reaction rate. In DPTC, we target metal binding sites in proteins to template selective covalent conjugation reactions. By chelation of a DNA-metal complex with a metal binding site of the protein, an electrophile on a second DNA strand is aligned for reaction with a lysine side chain on the protein in the proximity of the metal binding site. The method is quite general because approximately one-third of all wild-type proteins contain metal-binding sites, including many IgG antibodies, and it is also applicable to His-tagged proteins. This

  14. Desalting Protein Ions in Native Mass Spectrometry Using Supercharging Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Cassou, Catherine A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the supercharging reagents m-NBA and sulfolane on sodium ion adduction to protein ions formed using native mass spectrometry were investigated. There is extensive sodium adduction on protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions containing millimolar concentrations of NaCl, which can lower sensitivity by distributing the signal of a given charge state over multiple adducted ions and can reduce mass measuring accuracy for large proteins and non-covalent complexes for which individual adducts cannot be resolved. The average number of sodium ions adducted to the most abundant ion formed from ten small (8.6–29 kDa) proteins for which adducts can be resolved is reduced by 58% or 80% on average, respectively, when 1.5% m-NBA or 2.5% sulfolane are added to aqueous solutions containing sodium compared to without the supercharging reagent. Sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at reducing sodium ion adduction and at preserving non-covalent protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Desalting with 2.5% sulfolane enables detection of several glycosylated forms of 79.7 kDa holo-transferrin and NADH bound to the 146 kDa homotetramer LDH, which are otherwise unresolved due to peak broadening from extensive sodium adduction. Although sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at protein ion desalting, m-NBA reduces salt clusters at high m/z and can increase the signal-to-noise ratios of protein ions by reducing chemical noise. Desalting is likely a result of these supercharging reagents binding sodium ions in solution, thereby reducing the sodium available to adduct to protein ions. PMID:25133273

  15. Desalting protein ions in native mass spectrometry using supercharging reagents.

    PubMed

    Cassou, Catherine A; Williams, Evan R

    2014-10-07

    Effects of the supercharging reagents m-NBA and sulfolane on sodium ion adduction to protein ions formed using native mass spectrometry were investigated. There is extensive sodium adduction on protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions containing millimolar concentrations of NaCl, which can lower sensitivity by distributing the signal of a given charge state over multiple adducted ions and can reduce mass measuring accuracy for large proteins and non-covalent complexes for which individual adducts cannot be resolved. The average number of sodium ions adducted to the most abundant ion formed from ten small (8.6-29 kDa) proteins for which adducts can be resolved is reduced by 58% or 80% on average, respectively, when 1.5% m-NBA or 2.5% sulfolane are added to aqueous solutions containing sodium compared to without the supercharging reagent. Sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at reducing sodium ion adduction and at preserving non-covalent protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Desalting with 2.5% sulfolane enables detection of several glycosylated forms of 79.7 kDa holo-transferrin and NADH bound to the 146 kDa homotetramer LDH, which are otherwise unresolved due to peak broadening from extensive sodium adduction. Although sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at protein ion desalting, m-NBA reduces salt clusters at high m/z and can increase the signal-to-noise ratios of protein ions by reducing chemical noise. Desalting is likely a result of these supercharging reagents binding sodium ions in solution, thereby reducing the sodium available to adduct to protein ions.

  16. Tom40 protein import channel binds to non-native proteins and prevents their aggregation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Masatoshi; Kanamori, Takashi; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Shin, Injae; Schultz, Peter G; Endo, Toshiya

    2003-12-01

    Mitochondria contain the translocator of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) for protein entry into the organelle, and its subunit Tom40 forms a protein-conducting channel. Here we report the role of Tom40 in protein translocation across the membrane. The site-specific photocrosslinking experiment revealed that translocating unfolded or loosely folded precursor segments of up to 90 residues can be associated with Tom40. Purified Tom40 bound to non-native proteins and suppressed their aggregation when they are prone to aggregate. A denatured protein bound to the Tom40 channel blocked the protein import into mitochondria. These results indicate that, in contrast to the nonstick tunnel of the ribosome for polypeptide exit, the Tom40 channel offers an optimized environment to translocating non-native precursor proteins by preventing their aggregation.

  17. A genetic algorithm that seeks native states of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, S

    1995-01-01

    We describe a computer algorithm to predict native structures of proteins and peptides from their primary sequences, their known native radii of gyration, and their known disulfide bonding patterns, starting from random conformations. Proteins are represented as simplified real-space main chains with single-bead side chains. Nonlocal interactions are taken from structural database-derived statistical potentials, as in an earlier treatment. Local interactions are taken from simulations of (phi, psi) energy surfaces for each amino acid generated using the Biosym Discover program. Conformational searching is done by a genetic algorithm-based method. Reasonable structures are obtained for melittin (a 26-mer), avian pancreatic polypeptide inhibitor (a 36-mer), crambin (a 46-mer), apamin (an 18-mer), tachyplesin (a 17-mer), C-peptide of ribonuclease A (a 13-mer), and four different designed helical peptides. A hydrogen bond interaction was tested and found to be generally unnecessary for helical peptides, but it helps fold some sheet regions in these structures. For the few longer chains we tested, the method appears not to converge. In those cases, it appears to recover native-like secondary structures, but gets incorrect tertiary folds. PMID:8527647

  18. Protein complex analysis of native brain potassium channels by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Lesage, Florian

    2008-01-01

    TREK potassium channels belong to a family of channel subunits with two-pore domains (K(2P)). TREK1 knockout mice display impaired polyunsaturated fatty acid-mediated protection against brain ischemia, reduced sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, resistance to depression and altered perception of pain. Recently, we isolated native TREK1 channels from mouse brain and identified their specific components by mass spectrometry. Among the identified partners, the A-Kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP150 binds to a regulatory domain of TREK1 and acts as a molecular switch. It transforms low activity, outwardly rectifying TREK1 currents into robust leak conductances resistant to stimulation by arachidonic acid, membrane stretch and acidification. Inhibition of the TREK1/AKAP150 channel by Gs-coupled receptors is as extensive as for TREK1 alone (but faster) whereas inhibition of TREK1/AKAP150 by Gq-coupled receptors is reduced. Furthermore, the association of AKAP150 with TREK1 channels integrates them into postsynaptic scaffolds where G protein-coupled membrane receptors and channels dock simultaneously. This chapter describes the proteomic approach used to study the composition of native TREK1 channels and point out its advantages and limitations over more classical methods (two-hybrid screenings in the yeast and bacteria or GST-pull down).

  19. Differences in ecological structure, function, and native species abundance between native and invaded Hawaiian streams.

    PubMed

    Holitzki, Tara M; MacKenzie, Richard A; Wiegner, Tracy N; McDermid, Karla J

    2013-09-01

    Poeciliids, one of the most invasive species worldwide, are found on almost every continent and have been identified as an "invasive species of concern" in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Despite their global prevalence, few studies have quantified their impacts on tropical stream ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity. Utilizing Hawaiian streams as model ecosystems, we documented how ecological structure, function, and native species abundance differed between poeciliid-free and poeciliid-invaded tropical streams. Stream nutrient yields, benthic biofilm biomass, densities of macroinvertebrates and fish, and community structures of benthic algae, macroinvertebrates, and fish were compared between streams with and without established poeciliid populations on the island of Hawai'i, Hawaii, USA. Sum nitrate (sigmaNO3(-) = NO3(-) + NO2(-)), total nitrogen, and total organic carbon yields were eight times, six times, and five times higher, respectively, in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free streams. Benthic biofilm ash-free dry mass was 1.5x higher in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free streams. Percentage contributions of chironomids and hydroptilid caddisflies to macroinvertebrate densities were lower in poeciliid streams compared to poeciliid-free streams, while percentage contributions of Cheumatopsyche analis caddisflies, Dugesia sp. flatworms, and oligochaetes were higher. Additionally, mean densities of native gobies were two times lower in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free ones, with poeciliid densities being approximately eight times higher than native fish densities. Our results, coupled with the wide distribution of invasive poeciliids across Hawaii and elsewhere in the tropics, suggest that poeciliids may negatively impact the ecosystem structure, function, and native species abundance of tropical streams they invade. This underscores the need for increased public awareness to prevent future introductions and for

  20. Sucralose Destabilization of Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee; Shukla, Nimesh; Cho, Inha; Cohn, Erin; Taylor, Erika A; Othon, Christina M

    2015-04-16

    Sucralose is a commonly employed artificial sweetener that behaves very differently than its natural disaccharide counterpart, sucrose, in terms of its interaction with biomolecules. The presence of sucralose in solution is found to destabilize the native structure of two model protein systems: the globular protein bovine serum albumin and an enzyme staphylococcal nuclease. The melting temperature of these proteins decreases as a linear function of sucralose concentration. We correlate this destabilization to the increased polarity of the molecule. The strongly polar nature is manifested as a large dielectric friction exerted on the excited-state rotational diffusion of tryptophan using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. Tryptophan exhibits rotational diffusion proportional to the measured bulk viscosity for sucrose solutions over a wide range of concentrations, consistent with a Stokes-Einstein model. For sucralose solutions, however, the diffusion is dependent on the concentration, strongly diverging from the viscosity predictions, and results in heterogeneous rotational diffusion.

  1. Structural Alphabets for Protein Structure Classification: a Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quan; Pollastri, Gianluca; Koehl, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Finding structural similarities between proteins often helps revealing shared functionality which otherwise might not be detected by native sequence information alone. Such similarity is usually detected and quantified by protein structure alignment. Determining the optimal alignment between two protein structures remains however a hard problem. An alternative approach is to approximate each protein 3D structure using a sequence of motifs derived from a structural alphabet. Using this approach, structure comparison is performed by comparing the corresponding motif sequences, or structural sequences. In this paper, we measure the performance of such alphabets in the context of the protein structure classification problem. We consider both local and global structural sequences. Each letter of a local structural sequence corresponds to the best matching fragment to the corresponding local segment of the protein structure. The global structural sequence is designed to generate the best possible complete chain that matches the full protein structure. We use an alphabet of 20 letters, corresponding to a library of 20 motifs or protein fragments of size 4 residues. We show that the global structural sequences approximate well the native structures of proteins, with an average cRMS of 0.69 Å over 2225 test proteins. The approximation is best for all α-proteins, while relatively poorer for all β-proteins. We then test the performance of four different sequence representations of proteins (their native sequence, the sequence of their secondary structure elements, and the local and global structural sequences based on our fragment library) with different classifiers in their ability to classify proteins that belong to five distinct folds of CATH. Without surprise, the primary sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show that addition of either secondary structure information or local information from the structural sequence considerably improves the

  2. Specific non-local interactions are not necessary for recovering native protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Kasahara, Kota; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki; Kinjo, Akira R

    2014-01-01

    The elastic network model (ENM) is a widely used method to study native protein dynamics by normal mode analysis (NMA). In ENM we need information about all pairwise distances, and the distance between contacting atoms is restrained to the native value. Therefore ENM requires O(N2) information to realize its dynamics for a protein consisting of N amino acid residues. To see if (or to what extent) such a large amount of specific structural information is required to realize native protein dynamics, here we introduce a novel model based on only O(N) restraints. This model, named the 'contact number diffusion' model (CND), includes specific distance restraints for only local (along the amino acid sequence) atom pairs, and semi-specific non-local restraints imposed on each atom, rather than atom pairs. The semi-specific non-local restraints are defined in terms of the non-local contact numbers of atoms. The CND model exhibits the dynamic characteristics comparable to ENM and more correlated with the explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulation than ENM. Moreover, unrealistic surface fluctuations often observed in ENM were suppressed in CND. On the other hand, in some ligand-bound structures CND showed larger fluctuations of buried protein atoms interacting with the ligand compared to ENM. In addition, fluctuations from CND and ENM show comparable correlations with the experimental B-factor. Although there are some indications of the importance of some specific non-local interactions, the semi-specific non-local interactions are mostly sufficient for reproducing the native protein dynamics.

  3. New supercharging reagents produce highly charged protein ions in native mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Going, Catherine C; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R

    2015-11-07

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which these proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods.

  4. New Supercharging Reagents Produce Highly Charged Protein Ions in Native Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Going, Catherine C.; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods. PMID:26421324

  5. Variation in the Helical Structure of Native Collagen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-24

    domain’. Materials and Methods Fiber Diffraction and Coordinate Data X-ray fiber diffraction data from native, hydrated, rat tail tendon and lamprey ...including helical, structure) from rat tail tendon (collagen type I) and lamprey notochord (collagen type II) show several common features (Figure 5). Of

  6. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  7. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  8. Native Cellulose: Structure, Characterization and Thermal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, Matheus; Ornaghi Júnior, Heitor L.; Zattera, Ademir J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between cellulose crystallinity, the influence of extractive content on lignocellulosic fiber degradation, the correlation between chemical composition and the physical properties of ten types of natural fibers were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry techniques. The results showed that higher extractive contents associated with lower crystallinity and lower cellulose crystallite size can accelerate the degradation process and reduce the thermal stability of the lignocellulosic fibers studied. On the other hand, the thermal decomposition of natural fibers is shifted to higher temperatures with increasing the cellulose crystallinity and crystallite size. These results indicated that the cellulose crystallite size affects the thermal degradation temperature of natural fibers. This study showed that through the methods used, previous information about the structure and properties of lignocellulosic fibers can be obtained before use in composite formulations. PMID:28788179

  9. Protein promiscuity: drug resistance and native functions--HIV-1 case.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Tawfik, Dan S; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Sen, Taner; Jernigan, Bob

    2005-06-01

    The association of a drug with its target protein has the effect of blocking the protein activity and is termed a promiscuous function to distinguish from the protein's native function (Tawfik and associates, Nat. Genet. 37, 73-6, 2005). Obviously, a protein has not evolved naturally for drug association or drug resistance. Promiscuous protein functions exhibit unique traits of evolutionary adaptability, or evolvability, which is dependent on the induction of novel phenotypic traits by a small number of mutations. These mutations might have small effects on native functions, but large effects on promiscuous function; for example, an evolving protein could become increasingly drug resistant while maintaining its original function. Ariel Fernandez, in his opinion piece, notes that drug-binding "promiscuity" can hardly be dissociated from native functions; a dominant approach to drug discovery is the protein-native-substrate transition-state mimetic strategy. Thus, man-made ligands (e.g. drugs) have been successfully crafted to restrain enzymatic activity by focusing on the very same structural features that determine the native function. Using the successful inhibition of HIV-1 protease as an example, Fernandez illustrates how drug designers have employed naturally evolved features of the protein to suppress its activity. Based on these arguments, he dismisses the notion that drug binding is quintessentially promiscuous, even though in principle, proteins did not evolve to associate with man made ligands. In short, Fernandez argues that there may not be separate protein domains that one could term promiscuous domains. While acknowledging that drugs may bind promiscuously or in a native-like manner a la Fernandez, Tawfik maintains the role of evolutionary adaptation, even when a drug binds native-like. In the case of HIV-1 protease, drugs bind natively, and the initial onset of mutations results in drug resistance in addition to a dramatic decline in enzymatic

  10. A highly compliant protein native state with a spontaneous-like mechanical unfolding pathway.

    PubMed

    Heidarsson, Pétur O; Valpapuram, Immanuel; Camilloni, Carlo; Imparato, Alberto; Tiana, Guido; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kragelund, Birthe B; Cecconi, Ciro

    2012-10-17

    The mechanical properties of proteins and their force-induced structural changes play key roles in many biological processes. Previous studies have shown that natively folded proteins are brittle under tension, unfolding after small mechanical deformations, while partially folded intermediate states, such as molten globules, are compliant and can deform elastically a great amount before crossing the transition state barrier. Moreover, under tension proteins appear to unfold through a different sequence of events than during spontaneous unfolding. Here, we describe the response to force of the four-α-helix acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) in the low-force regime using optical tweezers and ratcheted molecular dynamics simulations. The results of our studies reveal an unprecedented mechanical behavior of a natively folded protein. ACBP displays an atypical compliance along two nearly orthogonal pulling axes, with transition states located almost halfway between the unfolded and folded states. Surprisingly, the deformability of ACBP is greater than that observed for the highly pliant molten globule intermediate states. Furthermore, when manipulated from the N- and C-termini, ACBP unfolds by populating a transition state that resembles that observed during chemical denaturation, both for structure and position along the reaction coordinate. Our data provide the first experimental evidence of a spontaneous-like mechanical unfolding pathway of a protein. The mechanical behavior of ACBP is discussed in terms of topology and helix propensity.

  11. Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the rapid discrimination between native-like and non-native states in freeze-dried protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Sigrid; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Roger, Jean-Michel; D'Hondt, Matthias; Hansen, Laurent; Palagos, Bernard; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates whether Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis (MVA) enables a rapid and direct differentiation between two classes of conformational states, i.e., native-like and non-native proteins, in freeze-dried formulations. A data set comprising of 99 spectra, both from native-like and various types of non-native freeze-dried protein formulations, was obtained by freeze-drying lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as model protein under various conditions. Changes in the secondary structure in the solid freeze-dried proteins were determined through visual interpretation of the blank corrected second derivative amide I band in the ATR-FTIR spectra (further called FTIR spectra) and served as an independent reference to assign class labels. Exploratory analysis and supervised classification, using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares - Linear Discriminant Analysis (PLS-LDA), respectively, revealed that Raman spectroscopy is with 95% accuracy able to correctly discriminate between native-like and non-native states in the tested freeze-dried LDH formulations. Backbone (i.e., amide III) and side chain sensitive spectral regions proved important for making the discrimination between both classes. As discrimination was not influenced by the spectral signals from the tested excipients, there was no need for blank corrections. The Raman model may allow direct and automated analysis of the investigated quality attribute, opening possibilities for a real time and in-line quality indication as a future step. However, the sensitivity of the method should be further investigated and where possible improved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetically Encoded Spin Labels for In Vitro and In-Cell EPR Studies of Native Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M J; Fedoseev, A; Summerer, D; Drescher, M

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful approach to study the structure, dynamics, and interactions of proteins. The genetic encoding of the noncanonical amino acid spin-labeled lysine 1 (SLK-1) eliminates the need for any chemical labeling steps in SDSL-EPR studies and enables the investigation of native, endogenous proteins with minimal structural perturbation, and without the need to create unique reactive sites for chemical labeling. We report detailed experimental procedures for the efficient synthesis of SLK-1, the expression and purification of SLK-1-containing proteins under conditions that ensure maximal integrity of the nitroxide radical moiety, and procedures for intramolecular EPR distance measurements in proteins by double electron-electron resonance.

  13. The preaggregated state of an amyloidogenic protein: Hydrostatic pressure converts native transthyretin into the amyloidogenic state

    PubMed Central

    Ferrão-Gonzales, Astria D.; Souto, Sandro O.; Silva, Jerson L.; Foguel, Débora

    2000-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation cause several diseases, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The formation of amyloid aggregates is the hallmark of most of these diseases. Here, the properties and formation of amyloidogenic intermediates of transthyretin (TTR) were investigated by the use of hydrostatic pressure and spectroscopic techniques. Native TTR tetramers (T4) were denatured by high pressure into a conformation that exposes tryptophan residues to the aqueous environment. This conformation was able to bind the hydrophobic probe bis-(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate), indicating persistence of elements of secondary and tertiary structure. Lowering the temperature facilitated the pressure-induced denaturation of TTR, which suggests an important role of entropy in stabilizing the native protein. Gel filtration chromatography showed that after a cycle of compression-decompression at 1°C, the main species present was a tetramer, with a small population of monomers. This tetramer, designated T4*, had a non-native conformation: it bound more bis-(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) than native T4, was less stable under pressure, and on decompression formed aggregates under mild acidic conditions (pH 5–5.6). Our data show that hydrostatic pressure converts native tetramers of TTR into an altered state that shares properties with a previously described amyloidogenic intermediate, and it may be an intermediate that lies on the aggregation pathway. This “preaggregated” state, which we call T4*, provides insight into the question of how a correctly folded protein may degenerate into the aggregation pathway in amyloidogenic diseases. PMID:10841549

  14. Design and structure of an equilibrium protein folding intermediate: a hint into dynamical regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ayuso-Tejedor, Sara; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Bueno, Marta; Campos, Luis A; Abián, Olga; Bernadó, Pau; Sancho, Javier; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2010-07-23

    Partly unfolded protein conformations close to the native state may play important roles in protein function and in protein misfolding. Structural analyses of such conformations which are essential for their fully physicochemical understanding are complicated by their characteristic low populations at equilibrium. We stabilize here with a single mutation the equilibrium intermediate of apoflavodoxin thermal unfolding and determine its solution structure by NMR. It consists of a large native region identical with that observed in the X-ray structure of the wild-type protein plus an unfolded region. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis indicates that the calculated ensemble of structures is consistent with the actual degree of expansion of the intermediate. The unfolded region encompasses discontinuous sequence segments that cluster in the 3D structure of the native protein forming the FMN cofactor binding loops and the binding site of a variety of partner proteins. Analysis of the apoflavodoxin inner interfaces reveals that those becoming destabilized in the intermediate are more polar than other inner interfaces of the protein. Natively folded proteins contain hydrophobic cores formed by the packing of hydrophobic surfaces, while natively unfolded proteins are rich in polar residues. The structure of the apoflavodoxin thermal intermediate suggests that the regions of natively folded proteins that are easily responsive to thermal activation may contain cores of intermediate hydrophobicity.

  15. Membrane proteins in their native habitat as seen by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play many critical roles in cells, mediating flow of material and information across cell membranes. They have evolved to perform these functions in the environment of a cell membrane, whose physicochemical properties are often different from those of common cell membrane mimetics used for structure determination. As a result, membrane proteins are difficult to study by traditional methods of structural biology, and they are significantly underrepresented in the protein structure databank. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSNMR) has long been considered as an attractive alternative because it allows for studies of membrane proteins in both native-like membranes composed of synthetic lipids and in cell membranes. Over the past decade, SSNMR has been rapidly developing into a major structural method, and a growing number of membrane protein structures obtained by this technique highlights its potential. Here we discuss membrane protein sample requirements, review recent progress in SSNMR methodologies, and describe recent advances in characterizing membrane proteins in the environment of a cellular membrane. PMID:25973959

  16. Native protein-initiated ATRP: a viable and potentially superior alternative to PEGylation for stabilizing biologics.

    PubMed

    Depp, Virginia; Alikhani, Azadeh; Grammer, Victoria; Lele, Bhalchandra S

    2009-02-01

    Comparison of in vitro serum stability and enzyme activity retention for PEGylated chymotrypsin and structurally different, biocompatible vinyl polymer grafts of chymotrypsin was performed. These polymer grafts were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiated by chymotrypsin covalently modified with 2-bromoisobutyric acid, the ATRP initiator. The maximum number of ATRP initiators attached to chymotrypsin was adjusted to be as close as possible to the maximum number of polyethylene glycol chains attached to chymotrypsin for better comparison and then polymerizations were conducted. In mouse serum, native and PEGylated chymotrypsin deactivated within 24h, whereas chymotrypsin-graft-poly(N-2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide) retained >50% of its catalytic activity even after 5 days of incubation. In human serum, PEGylated chymotrypsin deactivated within 4 days of incubation, whereas native chymotrypsin and chymotrypsin-graft-poly(N-2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide) and chymotrypsin-graft-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) retained >25% catalytic activity after 5 days of incubation. Biocompatible vinyl polymer grafts of chymotrypsin synthesized by protein-initiated ATRP had higher catalytic activity retention and molecular weights and lower polydispersity than PEGylated chymotrypsin. In summary, studying the effects of structures of conjugated polymers on the stability and activity retention of modified proteins can lead to identification of a polymer-protein conjugate having superior pharmacological properties than conventionally PEGylated protein. Also, since vinyl monomers that form biocompatible polymers are easily polymerizable by ATRP, protein-initiated ATRP can become a viable and potentially superior alternative to PEGylation for stabilizing biologics.

  17. Metastability of native proteins and the phenomenon of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Andrew J; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W; Devlin, Glyn L; Shammas, Sarah Lucy; Waudby, Christopher A; Mossuto, Maria F; Meehan, Sarah; Gras, Sally L; Christodoulou, John; Anthony-Cahill, Spencer J; Barker, Paul D; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2011-09-14

    An experimental determination of the thermodynamic stabilities of a series of amyloid fibrils reveals that this structural form is likely to be the most stable one that protein molecules can adopt even under physiological conditions. This result challenges the conventional assumption that functional forms of proteins correspond to the global minima in their free energy surfaces and suggests that living systems are conformationally as well as chemically metastable.

  18. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  19. Slipknotting upon native-like loop formation in a trefoil knot protein

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Jeffrey K.; Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Onuchic, José N.

    2010-01-01

    Protein knots and slipknots, mostly regarded as intriguing oddities, are gradually being recognized as significant structural motifs. Recent experimental results show that knotting, starting from a fully extended polypeptide, has not yet been observed. Understanding the nucleation process of folding knots is thus a natural challenge for both experimental and theoretical investigation. In this study, we employ energy landscape theory and molecular dynamics to elucidate the entire folding mechanism. The full free energy landscape of a knotted protein is mapped using an all-atom structure-based protein model. Results show that, due to the topological constraint, the protein folds through a three-state mechanism that contains (i) a precise nucleation site that creates a correctly twisted native loop (first barrier) and (ii) a rate-limiting free energy barrier that is traversed by two parallel knot-forming routes. The main route corresponds to a slipknot conformation, a collapsed configuration where the C-terminal helix adopts a hairpin-like configuration while threading, and the minor route to an entropically limited plug motion, where the extended terminus is threaded as through a needle. Knot formation is a late transition state process and results show that random (nonspecific) knots are a very rare and unstable set of configurations both at and below folding temperature. Our study shows that a native-biased landscape is sufficient to fold complex topologies and presents a folding mechanism generalizable to all known knotted protein topologies: knotting via threading a native-like loop in a preordered intermediate. PMID:20702769

  20. Detergent release prolongs the lifetime of native-like membrane protein conformations in the gas-phase.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Hewitt, Dominic J; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-04-24

    Recent studies have suggested that detergents can protect the structure of membrane proteins during their transition from solution to the gas-phase. Here we provide mechanistic insights into this process by interrogating the structures of membrane protein-detergent assemblies in the gas-phase using ion mobility mass spectrometry. We show a clear correlation between the population of native-like protein conformations and the degree of detergent attachment to the protein in the gas-phase. Interrogation of these protein-detergent assemblies, by tandem mass spectrometry, enables us to define the mechanism by which detergents preserve native-like protein conformations in a solvent free environment. We show that the release of detergent is more central to the survival of these conformations than the physical presence of detergent bound to the protein. We propose that detergent release competes with structural collapse for the internal energy of the ion and permits the observation of transient native-like membrane protein conformations that are otherwise lost to structural rearrangement in the gas-phase.

  1. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein-associated proteins using the method of digitized native protein mapping.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ya; Chen, Jin; Wang, Ahui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shumin; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The method of digitized native protein mapping, combining nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS (in data-independent acquisition mode, or MS(E) ), was improved by using a new MS/MS mode, ion mobility separation enhanced-MS(E) (HDMS(E) ), and applied to analyze the area of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). An 18 mm × 4.8 mm rectangular area which included LDL on a nondenaturing micro 2D gel of human plasma was grid-cut into 72 square gel pieces and subjected to quantitative LC-MS/MS. Compared with MS(E) , HDMS(E) showed significantly higher performance, by assigning 50% more proteins and detecting each protein in more squares. A total of 253 proteins were assigned with LC-HDMS(E) and the quantity distribution of each was reconstructed as a native protein map. The maps showed that Apo B-100 was the most abundant protein in the grid-cut area, concentrated at pI ca. 5.4-6.1 and apparent mass ca. 1000 kDa, which corresponded to four gel pieces, squares 39-42. An Excel macro was prepared to search protein maps which showed protein quantity peaks localized within this concentrated region of Apo B-100. Twenty-two proteins out of the 252 matched this criterion, in which 19 proteins have been reported to be associated with LDL. This method only requires several microliters of a plasma sample and the principle of the protein separation is totally different from the commonly used ultracentrifugation. The results obtained by this method would provide new insights on the structure and function of LDL.

  2. Native and denatured forms of proteins can be discriminated at edge plane carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ostatná, Veronika; Cernocká, Hana; Kurzątkowska, Katarzyna; Paleček, Emil

    2012-07-20

    In an attempt to develop a label-free electrochemical method for detection of changes in protein structures based on oxidizability of tyrosine and tryptophan residues we tested different types of carbon electrodes. We found that using edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode (EPGE) we can discriminate between native and denatured forms of human serum albumin (HSA) and of other proteins, such as bovine and chicken serum albumin, aldolase and concanavalin. Treatment of natively unfolded α-synuclein with 8 M urea resulted only in a small change in the tyrosine oxidation peak, in a good agreement with absence of highly ordered structure in this protein. Using square wave voltammetry with EPGE we were able to follow the course of HSA denaturation at different urea concentrations. The electrochemical denaturation curve agreed reasonably well with that based on intrinsic fluorescence of tyrosine and tryptophan. It can be expected that the electrochemical method will be applicable to a large number of proteins and may become useful in biomedicine and proteomics.

  3. Blind protein structure prediction using accelerated free-energy simulations

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Alberto; Morrone, Joseph A.; Brini, Emiliano; MacCallum, Justin L.; Dill, Ken A.

    2016-01-01

    We report a key proof of principle of a new acceleration method [Modeling Employing Limited Data (MELD)] for predicting protein structures by molecular dynamics simulation. It shows that such Boltzmann-satisfying techniques are now sufficiently fast and accurate to predict native protein structures in a limited test within the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) community-wide blind competition. PMID:27847872

  4. Transition from natively unfolded to folded state induced by desiccation in an anhydrobiotic nematode protein.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Kshamata; Tisi, Laurence; Basran, Amrik; Browne, John; Burnell, Ann; Zurdo, Jesus; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2003-04-11

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are associated with desiccation tolerance in resurrection plants and in plant seeds, and the recent discovery of a dehydration-induced Group 3 LEA-like gene in the nematode Aphelenchus avenae suggests a similar association in anhydrobiotic animals. Despite their importance, little is known about the structure of Group 3 LEA proteins, although computer modeling and secondary structure algorithms predict a largely alpha-helical monomer that forms coiled coil oligomers. We have therefore investigated the structure of the nematode protein, AavLEA1, in the first such analysis of a well characterized Group 3 LEA-like protein. Immunoblotting and subunit cross-linking experiments demonstrate limited oligomerization of AavLEA1, but analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration show that the vast majority of the protein is monomeric. Moreover, CD, fluorescence emission, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy indicate an unstructured conformation for the nematode protein. Therefore, in solution, no evidence was found to support structure predictions; instead, AavLEA1 seems to be natively unfolded with a high degree of hydration and low compactness. Such proteins can, however, be induced to fold into more rigid structures by partner molecules or by altered physiological conditions. Because AavLEA1 is associated with desiccation stress, its Fourier transform-infrared spectrum in the dehydrated state was examined. A dramatic but reversible increase in alpha-helix and, possibly, coiled coil formation was observed on drying, indicating that computer predictions of secondary structure may be correct for the solid state. This unusual finding offers the possibility that structural shifts in Group 3 LEA proteins occur on dehydration, perhaps consistent with their role in anhydrobiosis.

  5. Importance of native-state topology for determining the folding rate of two-state proteins.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between amino acid sequences and folding rate of proteins is a challenging task similar to protein folding problem. In this work, we have analyzed the relative importance of protein sequence and structure for predicting the protein folding rates in terms of amino acid properties and contact distances, respectively. We found that the parameters derived with protein sequence (physical-chemical, energetic, and conformational properties of amino acid residues) show very weak correlation (|r| < 0.39) with folding rates of 28 two-state proteins, indicating that the sequence information alone is not sufficient to understand the folding rates of two-state proteins. However, the maximum positive correlation obtained for the properties, number of medium-range contacts, and alpha-helical tendency reveals the importance of local interactions to initiate protein folding. On the other hand, a remarkable correlation (r varies from -0.74 to -0.88) has been obtained between structural parameters (contact order, long-range order, and total contact distance) and protein folding rates. Further, we found that the secondary structure content and solvent accessibility play a marginal role in determining the folding rates of two-state proteins. Multiple regression analysis carried out with the combination of three properties, beta-strand tendency, enthalpy change, and total contact distance improved the correlation to 0.92 with protein folding rates. The relative importance of existing methods along with multiple-regression model proposed in this work will be discussed. Our results demonstrate that the native-state topology is the major determinant for the folding rates of two-state proteins.

  6. Statistical analysis of native contact formation in the folding of designed model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiana, Guido; Broglia, Ricardo A.

    2001-02-01

    The time evolution of the formation probability of native bonds has been studied for designed sequences which fold fast into the native conformation. From this analysis a clear hierarchy of bonds emerge: (a) local, fast forming highly stable native bonds built by some of the most strongly interacting amino acids of the protein; (b) nonlocal bonds formed late in the folding process, in coincidence with the folding nucleus, and involving essentially the same strongly interacting amino acids already participating in the fast bonds; (c) the rest of the native bonds whose behavior is subordinated, to a large extent, to that of the strong local and nonlocal native contacts.

  7. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Diverse Effects on the Native β-Sheet of the Human Prion Protein due to Disease-Associated Mutations†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Kamp, Marc W. van der; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that involve the conversion of the normal cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) to a misfolded pathogenic form (PrPSc). There are many genetic mutations of PrP associated with human prion diseases. Three of these point mutations are located at the first strand of the native β-sheet in human PrP: G131V, S132I and A133V. To understand the underlying structural and dynamic effects of these disease-causing mutations on the human protein, we performed molecular dynamics of wild-type and mutated human PrP. The results indicate that the mutations induced different effects but they were all related to misfolding of the native β-sheet: G131V caused the elongation of the native β-sheet, A133V disrupted the native β-sheet, and S132I converted the native β-sheet to an α-sheet. The observed changes were due to the reorientation of side chain-side chain interactions upon introducing the mutations. In addition, all mutations impaired a structurally conserved water site at the native β-sheet. Our work suggests various misfolding pathways for human PrP in response to mutation. PMID:20949975

  9. Genetic Variation and Population Structure in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Ray, Nicolas; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rojas, Winston; Parra, Maria V; Molina, Julio A; Gallo, Carla; Mazzotti, Guido; Poletti, Giovanni; Hill, Kim; Hurtado, Ana M; Labuda, Damian; Klitz, William; Barrantes, Ramiro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Tsuneto, Luiza T; Llop, Elena; Rothhammer, Francisco; Excoffier, Laurent; Feldman, Marcus W; Rosenberg, Noah A; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    We examined genetic diversity and population structure in the American landmass using 678 autosomal microsatellite markers genotyped in 422 individuals representing 24 Native American populations sampled from North, Central, and South America. These data were analyzed jointly with similar data available in 54 other indigenous populations worldwide, including an additional five Native American groups. The Native American populations have lower genetic diversity and greater differentiation than populations from other continental regions. We observe gradients both of decreasing genetic diversity as a function of geographic distance from the Bering Strait and of decreasing genetic similarity to Siberians—signals of the southward dispersal of human populations from the northwestern tip of the Americas. We also observe evidence of: (1) a higher level of diversity and lower level of population structure in western South America compared to eastern South America, (2) a relative lack of differentiation between Mesoamerican and Andean populations, (3) a scenario in which coastal routes were easier for migrating peoples to traverse in comparison with inland routes, and (4) a partial agreement on a local scale between genetic similarity and the linguistic classification of populations. These findings offer new insights into the process of population dispersal and differentiation during the peopling of the Americas. PMID:18039031

  10. Structural conversion from non-native to native form of recombinant human epidermal growth factor by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, A; Ozawa, M; Mizukami, M; Yashiro, K; Ebisu, S; Tojo, T; Fujii, T; Takagi, H

    1999-11-01

    Brevibacillus choshinensis (Bacillus brevis) HPD31 is a very efficient producer of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF). The produced EGF is secreted into the medium with high efficiency. However part of the EGF that accumulates in the medium, exists as multimeric forms which are biologically inactive. We found the bacterium has the activity to structurally convert multimeric forms to the monomeric, native ones. Optimal temperature and pH for the conversion were 40 degrees C and pH 9, respectively. The reaction was promoted in the presence of reduced glutathione or cysteine. But the cells which had been sonicated or exposed to moderate heat treatment completely lost the activity. Thus, it was presumed that the activity might be due to the enzyme(s) that catalyze the protein disulfide exchanging reaction, and that they resides on the surface of viable cells.

  11. CoDNaS 2.0: a comprehensive database of protein conformational diversity in the native state

    PubMed Central

    Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Rohr, Cristian Oscar; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    CoDNaS (conformational diversity of the native state) is a protein conformational diversity database. Conformational diversity describes structural differences between conformers that define the native state of proteins. It is a key concept to understand protein function and biological processes related to protein functions. CoDNaS offers a well curated database that is experimentally driven, thoroughly linked, and annotated. CoDNaS facilitates the extraction of key information on small structural differences based on protein movements. CoDNaS enables users to easily relate the degree of conformational diversity with physical, chemical and biological properties derived from experiments on protein structure and biological characteristics. The new version of CoDNaS includes ∼70% of all available protein structures, and new tools have been added that run sequence searches, display structural flexibility profiles and allow users to browse the database for different structural classes. These tools facilitate the exploration of protein conformational diversity and its role in protein function. Database URL: http://ufq.unq.edu.ar/codnas PMID:27022160

  12. CoDNaS 2.0: a comprehensive database of protein conformational diversity in the native state.

    PubMed

    Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Rohr, Cristian Oscar; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    CoDNaS (conformational diversity of the native state) is a protein conformational diversity database. Conformational diversity describes structural differences between conformers that define the native state of proteins. It is a key concept to understand protein function and biological processes related to protein functions. CoDNaS offers a well curated database that is experimentally driven, thoroughly linked, and annotated. CoDNaS facilitates the extraction of key information on small structural differences based on protein movements. CoDNaS enables users to easily relate the degree of conformational diversity with physical, chemical and biological properties derived from experiments on protein structure and biological characteristics. The new version of CoDNaS includes ∼70% of all available protein structures, and new tools have been added that run sequence searches, display structural flexibility profiles and allow users to browse the database for different structural classes. These tools facilitate the exploration of protein conformational diversity and its role in protein function. Database URL:http://ufq.unq.edu.ar/codnas.

  13. Thermally responsive silicon nanowire arrays for native/denatured-protein separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Yanwei; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Lei; Yang, Weikang; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Dan; Chen, Hong

    2013-03-15

    We present our findings of the selective adsorption of native and denatured proteins onto thermally responsive, native-protein resistant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) decorated silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs). The PNIPAAm-SiNWAs surface, which shows very low levels of native-protein adsorption, favors the adsorption of denatured proteins. The amount of denatured-protein adsorption is higher at temperatures above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAAm. Temperature cycling surrounding the LCST, which ensures against thermal denaturation of native proteins, further increases the amount of denatured-protein adsorption. Moreover, the PNIPAAm-SiNWAs surface is able to selectively adsorb denatured protein even from mixtures of different protein species; meanwhile, the amount of native proteins in solution is kept nearly at its original level. It is believed that these results will not only enrich current understanding of protein interactions with PNIPAAm-modified SiNWAs surfaces, but may also stimulate applications of PNIPAAm-SiNWAs surfaces for native/denatured protein separation.

  14. Statistical potential for assessment and prediction of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min-yi; Sali, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    Protein structures in the Protein Data Bank provide a wealth of data about the interactions that determine the native states of proteins. Using the probability theory, we derive an atomic distance-dependent statistical potential from a sample of native structures that does not depend on any adjustable parameters (Discrete Optimized Protein Energy, or DOPE). DOPE is based on an improved reference state that corresponds to noninteracting atoms in a homogeneous sphere with the radius dependent on a sample native structure; it thus accounts for the finite and spherical shape of the native structures. The DOPE potential was extracted from a nonredundant set of 1472 crystallographic structures. We tested DOPE and five other scoring functions by the detection of the native state among six multiple target decoy sets, the correlation between the score and model error, and the identification of the most accurate non-native structure in the decoy set. For all decoy sets, DOPE is the best performing function in terms of all criteria, except for a tie in one criterion for one decoy set. To facilitate its use in various applications, such as model assessment, loop modeling, and fitting into cryo-electron microscopy mass density maps combined with comparative protein structure modeling, DOPE was incorporated into the modeling package MODELLER-8. PMID:17075131

  15. The Native Form and Maturation Process of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Wakita, Takaji; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Funahashi, Shin-Ichi; Ichikawa, Masumi; Kajita, Tadahiro; Moradpour, Darius; Wands, Jack R.; Kohara, Michinori

    1998-01-01

    The maturation and subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein were investigated with both a vaccinia virus expression system and CHO cell lines stably transformed with HCV cDNA. Two HCV core proteins, with molecular sizes of 21 kDa (p21) and 23 kDa (p23), were identified. The C-terminal end of p23 is amino acid 191 of the HCV polyprotein, and p21 is produced as a result of processing between amino acids 174 and 191. The subcellular localization of the HCV core protein was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although HCV core protein resided predominantly in the cytoplasm, it was also found in the nucleus and had the same molecular size as p21 in both locations, as determined by subcellular fractionation. The HCV core proteins had different immunoreactivities to a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Antibody 5E3 stained core protein in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, C7-50 stained core protein only in the cytoplasm, and 499S stained core protein only in the nucleus. These results clearly indicate that the p23 form of HCV core protein is processed to p21 in the cytoplasm and that the core protein in the nucleus has a higher-order structure different from that of p21 in the cytoplasm. HCV core protein in sera of patients with HCV infection was analyzed in order to determine the molecular size of genuinely processed HCV core protein. HCV core protein in sera was found to have exactly the same molecular weight as the p21 protein. These results suggest that p21 core protein is a component of native viral particles. PMID:9621068

  16. Characterization of Native Protein Complexes and Protein Isoform Variation Using Size-fractionation-based Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Larance, Mark; Lamond, Angus I.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins form a diverse array of complexes that mediate cellular function and regulation. A largely unexplored feature of such protein complexes is the selective participation of specific protein isoforms and/or post-translationally modified forms. In this study, we combined native size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with high-throughput proteomic analysis to characterize soluble protein complexes isolated from human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells. Using this approach, we have identified over 71,500 peptides and 1,600 phosphosites, corresponding to over 8,000 proteins, distributed across 40 SEC fractions. This represents >50% of the predicted U2OS cell proteome, identified with a mean peptide sequence coverage of 27% per protein. Three biological replicates were performed, allowing statistical evaluation of the data and demonstrating a high degree of reproducibility in the SEC fractionation procedure. Specific proteins were detected interacting with multiple independent complexes, as typified by the separation of distinct complexes for the MRFAP1-MORF4L1-MRGBP interaction network. The data also revealed protein isoforms and post-translational modifications that selectively associated with distinct subsets of protein complexes. Surprisingly, there was clear enrichment for specific Gene Ontology terms associated with differential size classes of protein complexes. This study demonstrates that combined SEC/MS analysis can be used for the system-wide annotation of protein complexes and to predict potential isoform-specific interactions. All of these SEC data on the native separation of protein complexes have been integrated within the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, an online, multidimensional data-sharing resource available to the community. PMID:24043423

  17. Characteristics of surface layer proteins from two new and native strains of Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Mobarak Qamsari, Elahe; Kasra Kermanshahi, Rouha; Erfan, Mohammad; Ghadam, Parinaz; Sardari, Soroush; Eslami, Neda

    2017-02-01

    In this work, some important characteristics of surface layer (S-layer) proteins extracted from two new and native Lactobacillus strains, L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7, were investigated. The presence of S-layer on the external surface of L.brevis KM3 was displayed by thin sectioning and negative staining. SDS-PAGE analysis were shown same dominant protein bands approximately around 48kDa for both S-layer proteins. Moreover, the S-layer reappeared when LiCl treated cells were allowed to grow again. Protein secondary structure and thermal behavior were evaluated by using circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. Both S-layer proteins had high content of β-sheet and low amount of α-helix. The thermograms of lyophilized S-layer proteins of L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7 showed one transition peak at 67.9°C and 59.14°C, respectively. To determine monodispersity of extracted S-layer proteins, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used. The results indicated that the main population of S-layer molecules in two tested lactobacillus strains were composed of monomer with an expected diameter close to 10nm. Furthermore, Zeta potential measurements were showed positive potential for both S-layer proteins, as expected. Our results could be used as the basis for biotechnological applications of these two new S-layer proteins.

  18. Protein structure determination from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-06-05

    NMR spectroscopy plays a major role in the determination of the structures and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Chemical shifts are the most readily and accurately measurable NMR parameters, and they reflect with great specificity the conformations of native and nonnative states of proteins. We show, using 11 examples of proteins representative of the major structural classes and containing up to 123 residues, that it is possible to use chemical shifts as structural restraints in combination with a conventional molecular mechanics force field to determine the conformations of proteins at a resolution of 2 angstroms or better. This strategy should be widely applicable and, subject to further development, will enable quantitative structural analysis to be carried out to address a range of complex biological problems not accessible to current structural techniques.

  19. Action of protein-glutaminase on alpha-lactalbumin in the native and molten globule states.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y S; Matsumura, Y; Yamaguchi, S; Mori, T

    2001-12-01

    The action of a novel protein-glutaminase from microorganisms on alpha-lactalbumin was investigated. When alpha-lactalbumin in the native state was incubated with protein-glutaminase, the deamidation proceeded gradually, i.e., the deamidation degree increased to 20% and 55% after 4 and 24 h, respectively. The transformation of alpha-lactalbumin from the native state to the molten globule state caused an increase in the rate of the enzyme-catalyzed deamidation, particularly in the early stage. The deamidation degree for the molten globule state reached 61% after 4 h, followed by a gradual increase to 66% after 24 h. CD spectral analyses of deamidated alpha-lactablumin revealed that the stability of the tertiary structure of alpha-lactablumin was closely related to the degree of deamidation, whereas the secondary structure was not affected by deamidation. Glutamine residues in alpha-lactalbumin to be modified by protein-glutaminase were identified as Gln[39], [43], [54], and [65]. Conformational characteristics of the amino acid sequence around these glutamine residues are discussed.

  20. Sucralose Destabilization of Protein Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inha; Chen, Lee; Shukla, Nimesh; Othon, Christina

    2015-03-01

    Sucralose is a commonly employed artificial sweetener. Sucralose behaves very differently than its natural disaccharide counterpart, sucrose, in terms of its interaction with biomolecules. The presence of sucralose in solution is found to destabilize the native structure of the globular protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The melting temperature decreases as a linear function of sucralose concentration. We correlate this destabilization with the increased polarity of the sucralose molecule as compared to sucrose. The strongly polar nature is observed as a large dielectric friction exerted on the excited state rotational diffusion of tryptophan using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. Tryptophan exhibits rotational diffusion proportional to the measured bulk viscosity for sucrose solutions over a wide range of concentrations, consistent with a Stokes-Einstein diffusional model. For sucralose solutions however, the diffusion is linearly dependent with the concentration, strongly diverging from the viscosity predictions. The polar nature of sucralose causes a dramatically different interaction with biomolecules than natural disaccharide molecules. Connecticut Space Grant Consortium.

  1. Scaffolded multiple cyclic peptide libraries for protein mimics by native chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    van de Langemheen, H; van Hoeke, M; Quarles van Ufford, H C; Kruijtzer, J A W; Liskamp, R M J

    2014-07-07

    The accessibility to collections, libraries and arrays of cyclic peptides is increasingly important since cyclic peptides may provide better mimics of the loop-like structures ubiquitously present in and - especially - on the surface of proteins. The next important step is the preparation of libraries of ensembles of scaffolded cyclic peptides, which upon screening may lead to promising protein mimics. Here we describe the synthesis of a tri-cysteine containing scaffold as well as the simultaneous native chemical ligation of three cyclic peptides thereby affording a clean library of multiple cyclic peptides on this scaffold, representing potential mimics of gp120. Members of this collection of protein mimics showed a decent inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction.

  2. Proteins with highly similar native folds can show vastly dissimilar folding behavior when desolvated.

    PubMed

    Schennach, Moritz; Breuker, Kathrin

    2014-01-03

    Proteins can be exposed to vastly different environments such as the cytosol or membranes, but the delicate balance between external factors and intrinsic determinants of protein structure, stability, and folding is only poorly understood. Here we used electron capture dissociation to study horse and tuna heart Cytochromes c in the complete absence of solvent. The significantly different stability of their highly similar native folds after transfer into the gas phase, and their strikingly different folding behavior in the gas phase, can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic interactions such as salt bridges. In the absence of hydrophobic bonding, protein folding is far slower and more complex than in solution. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  3. Population structure of Mazandaran native fowls using pedigree analysis.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Mohsen

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to use pedigree analysis to evaluate the population structure and genetic variability of the Mazandaran native fowls in Iran by quantifying the pedigree completeness index, effective population size, genetic diversity, inbreeding level, and individual increase in inbreeding. The pedigree completeness analysis showed 3.31 full, 10.19 maximum, and 6.30 equivalent generations. The effective number of founders (f e) was 131, representing 5% of the potential number of founders. The effective number of ancestors (f a) was 81, and the genetic contribution of the 37 most influent ancestors explained 50% of the genetic variability in the population. The ratio f e/f a (effective number of founders/effective number of ancestors), which expresses the effect of population bottlenecks, was 1.62. The inbreeding coefficient increased over generations and the average was 1.93%. The average relatedness coefficient between individuals of the population was estimated to be 2.59%. The effective population size, based on the number of full generations, was 56. Family size analysis showed that fewer males than females were used, resulting in the observed levels of inbreeding. Average inbreeding coefficient in the Mazandaran native fowls can be regarded to be below critical levels. However, considering the relationship coefficients of individuals is recommended to aid maintaining genetic diversity of Mazandaran native fowls.

  4. The supramolecular structure of the GPCR rhodopsin in solution and native disc membranes

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kitaru; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Summary Rhodopsin, the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, which is densely packed in the disc membranes of rod outer segments, was proposed to function as a monomer. However, a growing body of evidence indicates dimerization and oligomerization of numerous G-protein-coupled receptors, and atomic force microscopy images revealed rows of rhodopsin dimers in murine disc membranes. In this work we demonstrate by electron microscopy of negatively stained samples, blue native- and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, chemical crosslinking, and by proteolysis that native bovine rhodopsin exists mainly as dimers and higher oligomers. These results corroborate the recent findings from atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling on the supramolecular structure and packing arrangement of murine rhodopsin dimers. PMID:15764373

  5. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C. Robert; Lane, T. J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. Here, we report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. This prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. Using these results, we then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments as a means of model validation. This study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments. PMID:28272524

  6. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; Kathuria, Sagar V.; Bilsel, Osman; Matthews, C. Robert; Lane, T. J.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. Here, we report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. This prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. Using these results, we then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments as a means of model validation. This study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments.

  7. Ensemble-based evaluation for protein structure models.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-06-15

    Comparing protein tertiary structures is a fundamental procedure in structural biology and protein bioinformatics. Structure comparison is important particularly for evaluating computational protein structure models. Most of the model structure evaluation methods perform rigid body superimposition of a structure model to its crystal structure and measure the difference of the corresponding residue or atom positions between them. However, these methods neglect intrinsic flexibility of proteins by treating the native structure as a rigid molecule. Because different parts of proteins have different levels of flexibility, for example, exposed loop regions are usually more flexible than the core region of a protein structure, disagreement of a model to the native needs to be evaluated differently depending on the flexibility of residues in a protein. We propose a score named FlexScore for comparing protein structures that consider flexibility of each residue in the native state of proteins. Flexibility information may be extracted from experiments such as NMR or molecular dynamics simulation. FlexScore considers an ensemble of conformations of a protein described as a multivariate Gaussian distribution of atomic displacements and compares a query computational model with the ensemble. We compare FlexScore with other commonly used structure similarity scores over various examples. FlexScore agrees with experts' intuitive assessment of computational models and provides information of practical usefulness of models. https://bitbucket.org/mjamroz/flexscore dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. The origin of consistent protein structure refinement from structural averaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Hahnbeom; DiMaio, Frank; Baker, David

    2015-06-02

    Recent studies have shown that explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation followed by structural averaging can consistently improve protein structure models. We find that improvement upon averaging is not limited to explicit water MD simulation, as consistent improvements are also observed for more efficient implicit solvent MD or Monte Carlo minimization simulations. To determine the origin of these improvements, we examine the changes in model accuracy brought about by averaging at the individual residue level. We find that the improvement in model quality from averaging results from the superposition of two effects: a dampening of deviations from the correct structure in the least well modeled regions, and a reinforcement of consistent movements towards the correct structure in better modeled regions. These observations are consistent with an energy landscape model in which the magnitude of the energy gradient toward the native structure decreases with increasing distance from the native state.

  9. Structural Characterization of a Thrombin-Aptamer Complex by High Resolution Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has evolved as an invaluable tool for the characterization of intact native proteins and non-covalently bound protein complexes. Here we report the structural characterization by high resolution native top-down MS of human thrombin and its complex with the Bock thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), a 15-nucleotide DNA with high specificity and affinity for thrombin. Accurate mass measurements revealed that the predominant form of native human α-thrombin contains a glycosylation mass of 2205 Da, corresponding to a sialylated symmetric biantennary oligosaccharide structure without fucosylation. Native MS showed that thrombin and TBA predominantly form a 1:1 complex under near physiological conditions (pH 6.8, 200 mM NH4OAc), but the binding stoichiometry is influenced by the solution ionic strength. In 20 mM ammonium acetate solution, up to two TBAs were bound to thrombin, whereas increasing the solution ionic strength destabilized the thrombin-TBA complex and 1 M NH4OAc nearly completely dissociated the complex. This observation is consistent with the mediation of thrombin-aptamer binding through electrostatic interactions and it is further consistent with the human thrombin structure that contains two anion binding sites on the surface. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) top-down MS of the thrombin-TBA complex performed with a high resolution 15 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer showed the primary binding site to be at exosite I located near the N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain, consistent with crystallographic data. High resolution native top-down MS is complementary to traditional structural biology methods for structurally characterizing native proteins and protein-DNA complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Junin virus structural proteins.

    PubMed Central

    De Martínez Segovia, Z M; De Mitri, M I

    1977-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified Junin virus revealed six distinct structural polypeptides, two major and four minor ones. Four of these polypeptides appeared to be covalently linked with carbohydrate. The molecular weights of the six proteins, estimated by coelectrophoresis with marker proteins, ranged from 25,000 to 91,000. One of the two major components (number 3) was identified as a nucleoprotein and had a molecular weight of 64,000. It was the most prominent protein and was nonglycosylated. The other major protein (number 5), with a molecular weight of 38,000, was a glucoprotein and a component of the viral envelope. The location on the virion of three additional glycopeptides with molecular weights of 91,000, 72,000, and 52,000, together with a protein with a molecular weight of 25,000, was not well defined. PMID:189088

  11. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Native Peripherin-ROM1 Complex Isolated from Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kevany, Brian M.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Campuzano, Iain D. G.; Schnier, Paul D.; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Peripherin and its homologue ROM1 are retina-specific members of the tetraspanin family of integral membrane proteins required for morphogenesis and maintenance of photoreceptor outer segments, regions that collect light stimuli. Over 100 pathogenic mutations in peripherin cause inherited rod- and cone-related dystrophies in humans. Peripherin and ROM1 interact in vivo and are predicted to form a core heterotetrameric complex capable of creating higher order oligomers. However, structural analysis of tetraspanin proteins has been hampered by their resistance to crystallization. Here we present a simplified methodology for high yield purification of peripherin-ROM1 from bovine retinas that permitted its biochemical and biophysical characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography and blue native gel electrophoresis, we confirmed that the core native peripherin-ROM1 complex exists as a tetramer. Peripherin, but not ROM1, is glycosylated and we examined the glycosylation site and glycan composition of ROM1 by liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry was used to analyze the native complex in detergent micelles, demonstrating its tetrameric state. Our electron microscopy-generated structure solved to 18 Å displayed the tetramer as an elongated structure with an apparent 2-fold symmetry. Finally, we demonstrated that peripherin-ROM1 tetramers induce membrane curvature when reconstituted in lipid vesicles. These results provide critical insights into this key retinal component with a poorly defined function. PMID:24196967

  12. The inactivating factor of glutamine synthetase, IF7, is a "natively unfolded" protein

    PubMed Central

    Muro-Pastor, M. Isabel; Barrera, Francisco N.; Reyes, José C.; Florencio, Francisco J.; Neira, José L.

    2003-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme responsible for the primary assimilation of ammonium in all living organisms, and it catalyses the synthesis of glutamine from glutamic acid, ATP, and ammonium. One of the recently discovered mechanisms of GS regulation involves protein-protein interactions with a small 65-residue-long protein named IF7. Here, we study the structure and stability of IF7 and its binding properties to GS, by using several biophysical techniques (fluorescence, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and gel filtration chromatography) which provide complementary structural information. The findings show that IF7 has a small amount of residual secondary structure, but lacks a well defined tertiary structure, and is not compact. Thus, all of the studies indicate that IF7 is a "natively unfolded" protein. The binding of IF7 to GS, its natural binding partner, occurs with an apparent dissociation constant of KD = 0.3 ± 0.1 μM, as measured by fluorescence. We discuss the implications for the GS regulation mechanisms of IF7 being unfolded. PMID:12824490

  13. Interaction between dimer interface residues of native and mutated SOD1 protein: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Keerthana, S P; Kolandaivel, P

    2015-04-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is a highly conserved bimetallic protein enzyme, used for the scavenging the superoxide radicals (O2 (-)) produced due to aerobic metabolism in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Over 100 mutations have been identified and found to be in the homodimeric structure of SOD1. The enzyme has to be maintained in its dimeric state for the structural stability and enzymatic activity. From our investigation, we found that the mutations apart from the dimer interface residues are found to affect the dimer stability of protein and hence enhancing the aggregation and misfolding tendency of mutated protein. The homodimeric state of SOD1 is found to be held together by the non-covalent interactions. The molecular dynamics simulation has been used to study the hydrogen bond interactions between the dimer interface residues of the monomers in native and mutated forms of SOD1 in apo- and holo-states. The results obtained by this analysis reveal the fact that the loss of hydrogen bond interactions between the monomers of the dimer is responsible for the reduced stability of the apo- and holo-mutant forms of SOD1. The conformers with dimer interface residues in native and mutated protein obtained by the molecular dynamics simulation is subjected to quantum mechanical study using M052X/6-31G(d) level of theory. The charge transfer between N-H···O interactions in the dimer interface residues were studied. The weak interaction between the monomers of the dimer accounts for the reduced dimerization and enhanced deformation energy in the mutated SOD1 protein.

  14. Release of Native-like Gaseous Proteins from Electrospray Droplets via the Charged Residue Mechanism: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Robert G; Metwally, Haidy; Sun, Yu; Konermann, Lars

    2015-10-07

    The mechanism whereby gaseous protein ions are released from charged solvent droplets during electrospray ionization (ESI) remains a matter of debate. Also, it is unclear to what extent electrosprayed proteins retain their solution structure. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations offer insights into the temporal evolution of protein systems. Surprisingly, there have been no all-atom simulations of the protein ESI process to date. The current work closes this gap by investigating the behavior of protein-containing aqueous nanodroplets that carry excess positive charge. We focus on "native ESI", where proteins initially adopt their biologically active solution structures. ESI proceeds while the protein remains entrapped within the droplet. Protein release into the gas phase occurs upon solvent evaporation to dryness. Droplet shrinkage is accompanied by ejection of charge carriers (Na(+) for the conditions chosen here), keeping the droplet at ∼85% of the Rayleigh limit throughout its life cycle. Any remaining charge carriers bind to the protein as the final solvent molecules evaporate. The outcome of these events is largely independent of the initial protein charge and the mode of charge carrier binding. ESI charge states and collision cross sections of the MD structures agree with experimental data. Our results confirm the Rayleigh/charged residue model (CRM). Field emission of excess Na(+) plays an ancillary role by governing the net charge of the shrinking droplet. Models that envision protein ejection from the droplet are not supported. Most nascent CRM ions retain native-like conformations. For unfolded proteins ESI likely proceeds along routes that are different from the native state mechanism explored here.

  15. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Brian M G; van Ommeren, Sven P F I; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-06-04

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py-Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py-Im polyamides. The effect of Py-Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established.

  16. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Brian M. G.; van Ommeren, Sven P. F. I.; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py–Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py–Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py–Im polyamides. The effect of Py–Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established. PMID:26053396

  17. Predictors of natively unfolded proteins: unanimous consensus score to detect a twilight zone between order and disorder in generic datasets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Natively unfolded proteins lack a well defined three dimensional structure but have important biological functions, suggesting a re-assignment of the structure-function paradigm. To assess that a given protein is natively unfolded requires laborious experimental investigations, then reliable sequence-only methods for predicting whether a sequence corresponds to a folded or to an unfolded protein are of interest in fundamental and applicative studies. Many proteins have amino acidic compositions compatible both with the folded and unfolded status, and belong to a twilight zone between order and disorder. This makes difficult a dichotomic classification of protein sequences into folded and natively unfolded ones. In this work we propose an operational method to identify proteins belonging to the twilight zone by combining into a consensus score good performing single predictors of folding. Results In this methodological paper dichotomic folding indexes are considered: hydrophobicity-charge, mean packing, mean pairwise energy, Poodle-W and a new global index, that is called here gVSL2, based on the local disorder predictor VSL2. The performance of these indexes is evaluated on different datasets, in particular on a new dataset composed by 2369 folded and 81 natively unfolded proteins. Poodle-W, gVSL2 and mean pairwise energy have good performance and stability in all the datasets considered and are combined into a strictly unanimous combination score SSU, that leaves proteins unclassified when the consensus of all combined indexes is not reached. The unclassified proteins: i) belong to an overlap region in the vector space of amino acidic compositions occupied by both folded and unfolded proteins; ii) are composed by approximately the same number of order-promoting and disorder-promoting amino acids; iii) have a mean flexibility intermediate between that of folded and that of unfolded proteins. Conclusions Our results show that proteins unclassified by SSU

  18. Rapid evolution exposes the boundaries of domain structure and function in natively unfolded FG nucleoporins.

    PubMed

    Denning, Daniel P; Rexach, Michael F

    2007-02-01

    Nucleoporins with phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG Nups) function at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) to facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, each FG Nup contains a large natively unfolded domain that is punctuated by FG repeats. These FG repeats are surrounded by hydrophilic amino acids (AAs) common to disordered protein domains. Here we show that the FG domain of Nups from human, fly, worm, and other yeast species is also enriched in these disorder-associated AAs, indicating that structural disorder is a conserved feature of FG Nups and likely serves an important role in NPC function. Despite the conservation of AA composition, FG Nup sequences from different species show extensive divergence. A comparison of the AA substitution rates of proteins with syntenic orthologs in four Saccharomyces species revealed that FG Nups have evolved at twice the rate of average yeast proteins with most substitutions occurring in sequences between FG repeats. The rapid evolution of FG Nups is poorly explained by parameters known to influence AA substitution rate, such as protein expression level, interactivity, and essentiality; instead their rapid evolution may reflect an intrinsic permissiveness of natively unfolded structures to AA substitutions. The overall lack of AA sequence conservation in FG Nups is sharply contrasted by discrete stretches of conserved sequences. These conserved sequences highlight known karyopherin and nucleoporin binding sites as well as other uncharacterized sites that may have important structural and functional properties.

  19. The Native Structure and Composition of the Cruciferin Complex in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Nietzel, Thomas; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Haase, Christin; Denolf, Peter; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Braun, Hans-Peter; Sunderhaus, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Globulins are an important group of seed storage proteins in dicotyledonous plants. They are synthesized during seed development, assembled into very compact protein complexes, and finally stored in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs). Here, we report a proteomic investigation on the native composition and structure of cruciferin, the 12 S globulin of Brassica napus. PSVs were directly purified from mature seeds by differential centrifugations. Upon analyses by blue native (BN) PAGE, two major types of cruciferin complexes of ∼ 300–390 kDa and of ∼470 kDa are resolved. Analyses by two-dimensional BN/SDS-PAGE revealed that both types of complexes are composed of several copies of the cruciferin α and β polypeptide chains, which are present in various isoforms. Protein analyses by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF)/SDS-PAGE not only revealed different α and β isoforms but also several further versions of the two polypeptide chains that most likely differ with respect to posttranslational modifications. Overall, more than 30 distinct forms of cruciferin were identified by mass spectrometry. To obtain insights into the structure of the cruciferin holocomplex, a native PSV fraction was analyzed by single particle electron microscopy. More than 20,000 images were collected, classified, and used for the calculation of detailed projection maps of the complex. In contrast to previous reports on globulin structure in other plant species, the cruciferin complex of Brassica napus has an octameric barrel-like structure, which represents a very compact building block optimized for maximal storage of amino acids within minimal space. PMID:23192340

  20. The native structure and composition of the cruciferin complex in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Nietzel, Thomas; Dudkina, Natalya V; Haase, Christin; Denolf, Peter; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Boekema, Egbert J; Braun, Hans-Peter; Sunderhaus, Stephanie

    2013-01-25

    Globulins are an important group of seed storage proteins in dicotyledonous plants. They are synthesized during seed development, assembled into very compact protein complexes, and finally stored in protein storage vacuoles (PSVs). Here, we report a proteomic investigation on the native composition and structure of cruciferin, the 12 S globulin of Brassica napus. PSVs were directly purified from mature seeds by differential centrifugations. Upon analyses by blue native (BN) PAGE, two major types of cruciferin complexes of ∼ 300-390 kDa and of ∼470 kDa are resolved. Analyses by two-dimensional BN/SDS-PAGE revealed that both types of complexes are composed of several copies of the cruciferin α and β polypeptide chains, which are present in various isoforms. Protein analyses by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF)/SDS-PAGE not only revealed different α and β isoforms but also several further versions of the two polypeptide chains that most likely differ with respect to posttranslational modifications. Overall, more than 30 distinct forms of cruciferin were identified by mass spectrometry. To obtain insights into the structure of the cruciferin holocomplex, a native PSV fraction was analyzed by single particle electron microscopy. More than 20,000 images were collected, classified, and used for the calculation of detailed projection maps of the complex. In contrast to previous reports on globulin structure in other plant species, the cruciferin complex of Brassica napus has an octameric barrel-like structure, which represents a very compact building block optimized for maximal storage of amino acids within minimal space.

  1. Defining Gas-Phase Fragmentation Propensities of Intact Proteins During Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haverland, Nicole A; Skinner, Owen S; Fellers, Ryan T; Tariq, Areeba A; Early, Bryan P; LeDuc, Richard D; Fornelli, Luca; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-06-01

    Fragmentation of intact proteins in the gas phase is influenced by amino acid composition, the mass and charge of precursor ions, higher order structure, and the dissociation technique used. The likelihood of fragmentation occurring between a pair of residues is referred to as the fragmentation propensity and is calculated by dividing the total number of assigned fragmentation events by the total number of possible fragmentation events for each residue pair. Here, we describe general fragmentation propensities when performing top-down mass spectrometry (TDMS) using denaturing or native electrospray ionization. A total of 5311 matched fragmentation sites were collected for 131 proteoforms that were analyzed over 165 experiments using native top-down mass spectrometry (nTDMS). These data were used to determine the fragmentation propensities for 399 residue pairs. In comparison to denatured top-down mass spectrometry (dTDMS), the fragmentation pathways occurring either N-terminal to proline or C-terminal to aspartic acid were even more enhanced in nTDMS compared with other residues. More generally, 257/399 (64%) of the fragmentation propensities were significantly altered (P ≤ 0.05) when using nTDMS compared with dTDMS, and of these, 123 were altered by 2-fold or greater. The most notable enhancements of fragmentation propensities for TDMS in native versus denatured mode occurred (1) C-terminal to aspartic acid, (2) between phenylalanine and tryptophan (F|W), and (3) between tryptophan and alanine (W|A). The fragmentation propensities presented here will be of high value in the development of tailored scoring systems used in nTDMS of both intact proteins and protein complexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Sampling Realistic Protein Conformations Using Local Structural Bias

    PubMed Central

    Hamelryck, Thomas; Kent, John T; Krogh, Anders

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of protein structure from sequence remains a major unsolved problem in biology. The most successful protein structure prediction methods make use of a divide-and-conquer strategy to attack the problem: a conformational sampling method generates plausible candidate structures, which are subsequently accepted or rejected using an energy function. Conceptually, this often corresponds to separating local structural bias from the long-range interactions that stabilize the compact, native state. However, sampling protein conformations that are compatible with the local structural bias encoded in a given protein sequence is a long-standing open problem, especially in continuous space. We describe an elegant and mathematically rigorous method to do this, and show that it readily generates native-like protein conformations simply by enforcing compactness. Our results have far-reaching implications for protein structure prediction, determination, simulation, and design. PMID:17002495

  3. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Haibo

    2003-01-01

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches.

  4. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Jade; Nobrega, R. Paul; Schwantes, Christian; ...

    2017-03-08

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. We report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structuremore » of the excited state ensemble. The resulting prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. We then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments, using these results, as a means of model validation. Our study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments.« less

  5. Multiple protein structure alignment.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Flores, T. P.; Orengo, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed to compare protein structures and to combine them into a multiple structure consensus. Previous methods of multiple structure comparison have only concatenated pairwise alignments or produced a consensus structure by averaging coordinate sets. The current method is a fusion of the fast structure comparison program SSAP and the multiple sequence alignment program MULTAL. As in MULTAL, structures are progressively combined, producing intermediate consensus structures that are compared directly to each other and all remaining single structures. This leads to a hierarchic "condensation," continually evaluated in the light of the emerging conserved core regions. Following the SSAP approach, all interatomic vectors were retained with well-conserved regions distinguished by coherent vector bundles (the structural equivalent of a conserved sequence position). Each bundle of vectors is summarized by a resultant, whereas vector coherence is captured in an error term, which is the only distinction between conserved and variable positions. Resultant vectors are used directly in the comparison, which is weighted by their error values, giving greater importance to the matching of conserved positions. The resultant vectors and their errors can also be used directly in molecular modeling. Applications of the method were assessed by the quality of the resulting sequence alignments, phylogenetic tree construction, and databank scanning with the consensus. Visual assessment of the structural superpositions and consensus structure for various well-characterized families confirmed that the consensus had identified a reasonable core. PMID:7849601

  6. Guanidine-HCl Dependent Structural Unfolding of M-Crystallin: Fluctuating Native State Like Topologies and Intermolecular Association

    PubMed Central

    Barnwal, Ravi Pratap; Agarwal, Geetika; Chary, Kandala V. R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous experimental techniques and computational studies, proposed in recent times, have revolutionized the understanding of protein-folding paradigm. The complete understanding of protein folding and intermediates are of medical relevance, as the aggregation of misfolding proteins underlies various diseases, including some neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we describe the unfolding of M-crystallin, a βγ-crystallin homologue protein from archaea, from its native state to its denatured state using multidimensional NMR and other biophysical techniques. The protein, which was earlier characterized to be a predominantly β-sheet protein in its native state, shows different structural propensities (α and β), under different denaturing conditions. In 2 M GdmCl, the protein starts showing two distinct sets of peaks, with one arising from a partially unfolded state and the other from a completely folded state. The native secondary structural elements start disappearing as the denaturant concentration approaches 4 M. Subsequently, the protein is completely unfolded when the denaturant concentration is 6 M. The 15N relaxation data (T1/T2), heteronuclear 1H-15N Overhauser effects (nOes), NOESY data, and other biophysical data taken together indicate that the protein shows a consistent, gradual change in its structural and motional preferences with increasing GdmCl concentration. PMID:23284604

  7. Insights into Lysine Deacetylation of Natively Folded Substrate Proteins by Sirtuins*

    PubMed Central

    Knyphausen, Philipp; de Boor, Susanne; Kuhlmann, Nora; Scislowski, Lukas; Extra, Antje; Baldus, Linda; Schacherl, Magdalena; Baumann, Ulrich; Neundorf, Ines; Lammers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent lysine deacylases, regulating a variety of cellular processes. The nuclear Sirt1, the cytosolic Sirt2, and the mitochondrial Sirt3 are robust deacetylases, whereas the other sirtuins have preferences for longer acyl chains. Most previous studies investigated sirtuin-catalyzed deacylation on peptide substrates only. We used the genetic code expansion concept to produce natively folded, site-specific, and lysine-acetylated Sirt1–3 substrate proteins, namely Ras-related nuclear, p53, PEPCK1, superoxide dismutase, cyclophilin D, and Hsp10, and analyzed the deacetylation reaction. Some acetylated proteins such as Ras-related nuclear, p53, and Hsp10 were robustly deacetylated by Sirt1–3. However, other reported sirtuin substrate proteins such as cyclophilin D, superoxide dismutase, and PEPCK1 were not deacetylated. Using a structural and functional approach, we describe the ability of Sirt1–3 to deacetylate two adjacent acetylated lysine residues. The dynamics of this process have implications for the lifetime of acetyl modifications on di-lysine acetylation sites and thus constitute a new mechanism for the regulation of proteins by acetylation. Our studies support that, besides the primary sequence context, the protein structure is a major determinant of sirtuin substrate specificity. PMID:27226597

  8. Charge site assignment in native proteins by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Lindsay J.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of all gas-phase charge sites of natively sprayed proteins and peptides is demonstrated using 193 nm UVPD. The high sequence coverage offered by UVPD is exploited for the accurate determination of charge sites in protein systems up to 18 kDa, allowing charge site to be studied as a function of protein conformation and the presence of disulfide bonds. Charging protons are found on both basic sidechains and on the amide backbone of less basic amino acids such as serine, glutamine, and proline. UVPD analysis was performed on the 3+ charge state of melittin, the 5+ to 8+ charge states of ubiquitin, and the 8+ charge state of reduced and oxidized β-lactoglobulin. The location of charges in gas-phase proteins is known to impact structure; molecular modeling of different charge site motifs of 3+ melittin demonstrates how placement of protons in simulations can dramatically impact the predicted structure of the molecule. The location of positive charge sites in ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin are additionally found to depend on the presence or absence of salt-bridges, columbic repulsion across the length of the peptide, and protein conformation. Charge site isomers are demonstrated for ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin but found to be much less numerous than previously predicted. PMID:26596460

  9. Solid-State NMR Studies Reveal Native-like β-Sheet Structures in Transthyretin Amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K. R.; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Wright, Peter E.; Wemmer, David E.

    2016-09-20

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Structural characterization of amyloid rich in cross-β structures is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of protein misfolding and amyloid formation associated with a wide range of human disorders. Elucidation of the β-sheet structure in noncrystalline amyloid has, however, remained an enormous challenge. Here we report structural analyses of the β-sheet structure in a full-length transthyretin amyloid using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was employed to investigate native-like β-sheet structures in the amyloid state using selective labeling schemes for more efficient solid-state NMR studies. Analyses of extensive long-range 13 C- 13 C correlation MAS spectra obtained with selectively 13 CO- and 13 Cα-labeled TTR reveal that the two main β-structures in the native state, the CBEF and DAGH β-sheets, remain intact after amyloid formation. The tertiary structural information would be of great use for examining the quaternary structure of TTR amyloid.

  10. Solid-State NMR Studies Reveal Native-like β-Sheet Structures in Transthyretin Amyloid

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Kwang Hun; Dasari, Anvesh K. R.; Hung, Ivan; ...

    2016-09-20

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Structural characterization of amyloid rich in cross-β structures is crucial for unraveling the molecular basis of protein misfolding and amyloid formation associated with a wide range of human disorders. Elucidation of the β-sheet structure in noncrystalline amyloid has, however, remained an enormous challenge. Here we report structural analyses of the β-sheet structure in a full-length transthyretin amyloid using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR was employed to investigate native-like β-sheet structures in the amyloid state using selective labeling schemes for more efficient solid-state NMR studies. Analyses of extensive long-range 13 C- 13 C correlationmore » MAS spectra obtained with selectively 13 CO- and 13 Cα-labeled TTR reveal that the two main β-structures in the native state, the CBEF and DAGH β-sheets, remain intact after amyloid formation. The tertiary structural information would be of great use for examining the quaternary structure of TTR amyloid.« less

  11. Protein mechanical unfolding: Importance of non-native interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Hu, Chin-Kun; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2009-12-01

    Mechanical unfolding of the fourth domain of Distyostelium discoideum filamin (DDFLN4) was studied by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, using the GROMOS96 force field 43a1 and the simple point charge explicit water solvent. Our study reveals an important role of non-native interactions in the unfolding process. Namely, the existence of a peak centered at the end-to-end extension ΔR ˜22 nm in the force-extension curve is associated with breaking of non-native hydrogen bonds. Such a peak has been observed in experiments but not in Go models, where non-native interactions are neglected. We predict that an additional peak occurs at ΔR ˜2 nm using not only GROMOS96 force field 43a1 but also Amber 94 and OPLS force fields. This result would stimulate further experimental studies on elastic properties of DDFLN4.

  12. Label-free detection of native proteins by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using iodide-modified nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Jia; Zong, Cheng; Zheng, Xiao-Shan; Hu, Pei; Feng, Jia-Min; Ren, Bin

    2014-02-18

    Proteins perform vital functional and structural duties in living systems, and the in-depth investigation of protein in its native state is one of the most important challenges in the postgenomic era. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can provide the intrinsic fingerprint information of samples with ultrahigh sensitivity but suffers from the reproducibility and reliability issues. In this paper, we proposed an iodide-modified Ag nanoparticles method (Ag IMNPs) for label-free detection of proteins. The silver nanoparticles provide the huge enhancement to boost the Raman signal of proteins, and the coated iodide layer offers a barrier to prevent the direct interaction between the proteins and the metal surface, helping to keep the native structures of proteins. With this method, highly reproducible and high-quality SERS signals of five typical proteins (lysozyme, avidin, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome c, and hemoglobin) have been obtained, and the SERS features of the proteins without chromophore were almost identical to the respective normal Raman spectra. This unique feature allows the qualitative identification of them by simply taking the intensity ratio of the Raman peaks of tryptophan to phenylalanine residues. We further demonstrated that the method can also be used for label-free multiplex analysis of protein mixture as well as to study the dynamic process of protein damage stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. This method proves to be very promising for further applications in proteomics and biomedical research.

  13. The Role of Negative Selection in Protein Evolution Revealed through the Energetics of the Native State Ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jordan; Wrabl, James O.; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the determinants of conformational specificity is essential for understanding protein structure, stability, and fold evolution. To address this issue, a novel statistical measure of energetic compatibility between sequence and structure was developed, using an experimentally validated model of the energetics of the native state ensemble. This approach successfully matched sequences from a diverse subset of the human proteome to their respective folds. Unexpectedly, significant energetic compatibility between ostensibly unrelated sequences and structures was also observed. Interrogation of these matches revealed a general framework for understanding the origins of conformational specificity within a proteome: specificity is a complex function of both the ability of a sequence to adopt folds other than the native, and ability of a fold to accommodate sequences other than the native. The regional variation in energetic compatibility indicates that the compatibility is dominated by incompatibility of sequence for alternative fold segments, suggesting that evolution of protein sequences has involved substantial negative selection, with certain segments serving as “gatekeepers” that presumably prevent alternative structures. Beyond these global trends, a size dependence exists in the degree to which the energetic compatibility is determined from negative selection, with smaller proteins displaying more negative selection. This partially explains how short sequences can adopt unique folds, despite the higher probability in shorter proteins for small numbers of mutations to increase compatibility with other folds. In providing evolutionary ground rules for the thermodynamic relationship between sequence and fold, this framework imparts valuable insight for rational design of unique folds or fold switches. PMID:26800099

  14. Native-sized spider silk proteins synthesized in planta via intein-based multimerization.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Valeska; Weichert, Nicola; Menzel, Matthias; Knoch, Dominic; Paege, Norman; Scheller, Jürgen; Spohn, Uwe; Conrad, Udo; Gils, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of native-sized proteins is a pre-requisite for exploiting the potential of spider silk as a bio-based material. The unique properties of spider silk, such as extraordinary tensile strength and elasticity, result from the highly repetitive nature of spider silk protein motifs. The present report describes the combination of spider silk flagelliform protein (FLAG) production in the endoplasmic reticulum of tobacco plant leaf cells with an intein-based posttranslational protein fusion technology. The repeated ligation of FLAG monomers resulted in the formation of large multimers. This method avoids the need for highly repetitive transgenes, which may result in a higher genetic and transcriptional stability. Here we show, for the first time, the production of synthetic, high molecular weight spider silk proteins larger than 250 kDa based on the assembly of protein monomers via intein-mediated trans-splicing in planta. The resulting multimeric structures form microfibers, thereby demonstrating their great potential as a biomaterial.

  15. Protein-protein structure prediction by scoring molecular dynamics trajectories of putative poses.

    PubMed

    Sarti, Edoardo; Gladich, Ivan; Zamuner, Stefano; Correia, Bruno E; Laio, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of protein-protein interactions and their structural configuration remains a largely unsolved problem. Most of the algorithms aimed at finding the native conformation of a protein complex starting from the structure of its monomers are based on searching the structure corresponding to the global minimum of a suitable scoring function. However, protein complexes are often highly flexible, with mobile side chains and transient contacts due to thermal fluctuations. Flexibility can be neglected if one aims at finding quickly the approximate structure of the native complex, but may play a role in structure refinement, and in discriminating solutions characterized by similar scores. We here benchmark the capability of some state-of-the-art scoring functions (BACH-SixthSense, PIE/PISA and Rosetta) in discriminating finite-temperature ensembles of structures corresponding to the native state and to non-native configurations. We produce the ensembles by running thousands of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent starting from poses generated by rigid docking and optimized in vacuum. We find that while Rosetta outperformed the other two scoring functions in scoring the structures in vacuum, BACH-SixthSense and PIE/PISA perform better in distinguishing near-native ensembles of structures generated by molecular dynamics in explicit solvent. Proteins 2016; 84:1312-1320. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen's dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity. "One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity." Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903) PMID:20534114

  17. Are Charge-State Distributions a Reliable Tool Describing Molecular Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Native MS?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalello, Antonino; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a central tool of structural proteomics, but its applicability to the peculiar class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is still object of debate. IDPs lack an ordered tridimensional structure and are characterized by high conformational plasticity. Since they represent valuable targets for cancer and neurodegeneration research, there is an urgent need of methodological advances for description of the conformational ensembles populated by these proteins in solution. However, structural rearrangements during electrospray-ionization (ESI) or after the transfer to the gas phase could affect data obtained by native ESI-MS. In particular, charge-state distributions (CSDs) are affected by protein conformation inside ESI droplets, while ion mobility (IM) reflects protein conformation in the gas phase. This review focuses on the available evidence relating IDP solution ensembles with CSDs, trying to summarize cases of apparent consistency or discrepancy. The protein-specificity of ionization patterns and their responses to ligands and buffer conditions suggests that CSDs are imprinted to protein structural features also in the case of IDPs. Nevertheless, it seems that these proteins are more easily affected by electrospray conditions, leading in some cases to rearrangements of the conformational ensembles.

  18. Role of native-state structure in rubredoxin native-state hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    LeMaster, David M; Anderson, Janet S; Hernández, Griselda

    2006-08-22

    Amide exchange rates were measured for Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) rubredoxin substituted with either Zn(II), Ga(III), or Ge(IV). Base-catalyzed exchange rate constants increase up to 3000-fold per unit charge for the highly protected amides surrounding the active site metal, yielding apparent residue-specific conformational energy decreases of more than 8 kcal/mol in a comparison of the Zn(II)- and Ge(IV)-substituted proteins. However, the exchange kinetics for many of the other amides of the protein are insensitive to these metal substitutions. These differential rates are inversely correlated with the distance between the amide nitrogen and the metal in the X-ray structure, out to a distance of at least 12 A, consistent with an electrostatic potential-dependent shifting of the amide nitrogen pK. This strongly correlated distance dependence is consistent with a nativelike structure for the exchange-competent conformations. The electric field potential within the interior of the rubredoxin structure gives rise to a change of as much as a million-fold in the rate for the exchange-competent state of the individual amide hydrogens. Nevertheless, the strength of these electrostatic interactions in Pf rubredoxin appears to be comparable to those previously reported within other proteins. As a result, contrary to the conventional analysis of hydrogen exchange data, for exchange processes that occur via nonglobal transitions, the residual conformational structure will often modulate the observed rates. Although this necessarily complicates the estimation of the conformational equilibria of these exchange-competent states, this dependence on residual structure can provide insight into the conformation of these transient states.

  19. Functional NifD-K fusion protein in Azotobacter vinelandii is a homodimeric complex equivalent to the native heterotetrameric MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara . E-mail: gavini@biology.msstate.edu

    2005-11-18

    The MoFe protein of the complex metalloenzyme nitrogenase folds as a heterotetramer containing two copies each of the homologous {alpha} and {beta} subunits, encoded by the nifD and the nifK genes respectively. Recently, the functional expression of a fusion NifD-K protein of nitrogenase was demonstrated in Azotobacter vinelandii, strongly implying that the MoFe protein is flexible as it could accommodate major structural changes, yet remain functional [M.H. Suh, L. Pulakat, N. Gavini, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 5353-5360]. This finding led us to further explore the type of interaction between the fused MoFe protein units. We aimed to determine whether an interaction exists between the two fusion MoFe proteins to form a homodimer that is equivalent to native heterotetrameric MoFe protein. Using the Bacteriomatch Two-Hybrid System, translationally fused constructs of NifD-K (fusion) with the full-length {lambda}CI of the pBT bait vector and also NifD-K (fusion) with the N-terminal {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG target vector were made. To compare the extent of interaction between the fused NifD-K proteins to that of the {beta}-{beta} interactions in the native MoFe protein, we proceeded to generate translationally fused constructs of NifK with the {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG vector and {lambda}CI protein of the pBT vector. The strength of the interaction between the proteins in study was determined by measuring the {beta}-galactosidase activity and extent of ampicillin resistance of the colonies expressing these proteins. This analysis demonstrated that direct protein-protein interaction exists between NifD-K fusion proteins, suggesting that they exist as homodimers. As the interaction takes place at the {beta}-interfaces of the NifD-K fusion proteins, we propose that these homodimers of NifD-K fusion protein may function in a similar manner as that of the heterotetrameric native MoFe protein. The observation that the extent of protein-protein interaction between the {beta

  20. Isolation of Native Soluble and Membrane-Bound Protein Complexes from Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tobias; Chan, Anna; Schröter, Thomas; Schwerter, Daniel; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation is a traditional approach to isolate single proteins or native protein complexes from a complex sample mixture. The original method makes use of specific antibodies against endogenous proteins or epitope tags, which are first bound to the target protein and then isolated with protein A beads. An advancement of this method is the application of a protein A tag fused to the target protein and the affinity-purification of the tagged protein with human Immunoglobulin G chemically cross-linked to a sepharose matrix. This method will be described exemplified by the purification of protein complexes of the peroxisomal membrane from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  1. Atomic Interaction Networks in the Core of Protein Domains and Their Native Folds

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Raguram, S.; Sasisekharan, V.; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Vastly divergent sequences populate a majority of protein folds. In the quest to identify features that are conserved within protein domains belonging to the same fold, we set out to examine the entire protein universe on a fold-by-fold basis. We report that the atomic interaction network in the solvent-unexposed core of protein domains are fold-conserved, extraordinary sequence divergence notwithstanding. Further, we find that this feature, termed protein core atomic interaction network (or PCAIN) is significantly distinguishable across different folds, thus appearing to be “signature” of a domain's native fold. As part of this study, we computed the PCAINs for 8698 representative protein domains from families across the 1018 known protein folds to construct our seed database and an automated framework was developed for PCAIN-based characterization of the protein fold universe. A test set of randomly selected domains that are not in the seed database was classified with over 97% accuracy, independent of sequence divergence. As an application of this novel fold signature, a PCAIN-based scoring scheme was developed for comparative (homology-based) structure prediction, with 1–2 angstroms (mean 1.61A) Cα RMSD generally observed between computed structures and reference crystal structures. Our results are consistent across the full spectrum of test domains including those from recent CASP experiments and most notably in the ‘twilight’ and ‘midnight’ zones wherein <30% and <10% target-template sequence identity prevails (mean twilight RMSD of 1.69A). We further demonstrate the utility of the PCAIN protocol to derive biological insight into protein structure-function relationships, by modeling the structure of the YopM effector novel E3 ligase (NEL) domain from plague-causative bacterium Yersinia Pestis and discussing its implications for host adaptive and innate immune modulation by the pathogen. Considering the several high-throughput, sequence

  2. Machine-learning scoring functions for identifying native poses of ligands docked to known and novel proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular docking is a widely-employed method in structure-based drug design. An essential component of molecular docking programs is a scoring function (SF) that can be used to identify the most stable binding pose of a ligand, when bound to a receptor protein, from among a large set of candidate poses. Despite intense efforts in developing conventional SFs, which are either force-field based, knowledge-based, or empirical, their limited docking power (or ability to successfully identify the correct pose) has been a major impediment to cost-effective drug discovery. Therefore, in this work, we explore a range of novel SFs employing different machine-learning (ML) approaches in conjunction with physicochemical and geometrical features characterizing protein-ligand complexes to predict the native or near-native pose of a ligand docked to a receptor protein's binding site. We assess the docking accuracies of these new ML SFs as well as those of conventional SFs in the context of the 2007 PDBbind benchmark dataset on both diverse and homogeneous (protein-family-specific) test sets. Further, we perform a systematic analysis of the performance of the proposed SFs in identifying native poses of ligands that are docked to novel protein targets. Results and conclusion We find that the best performing ML SF has a success rate of 80% in identifying poses that are within 1 Å root-mean-square deviation from the native poses of 65 different protein families. This is in comparison to a success rate of only 70% achieved by the best conventional SF, ASP, employed in the commercial docking software GOLD. In addition, the proposed ML SFs perform better on novel proteins that they were never trained on before. We also observed steady gains in the performance of these scoring functions as the training set size and number of features were increased by considering more protein-ligand complexes and/or more computationally-generated poses for each complex. PMID:25916860

  3. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  4. Modeling Protein Aggregate Assembly and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun-tao; Hall, Carol K.; Xu, Ying; Wetzel, Ronald

    One might say that "protein science" got its start in the domestic arts, built around the abilities of proteins to aggregate in response to environmental stresses such as heating (boiled eggs), heating and cooling (gelatin), and pH (cheese). Characterization of proteins in the late nineteenth century likewise focused on the ability of proteins to precipitate in response to certain salts and to aggregate in response to heating. Investigations by Chick and Martin (Chick and Martin, 1910) showed that the inactivating response of proteins to heat or solvent treatment is a two-step process involving separate denaturation and precipitation steps. Monitoring the coagulation and flocculation responses of proteins to heat and other stresses remained a major approach to understanding protein structure for decades, with solubility, or susceptibility to aggregation, serving as a kind of benchmark against which results of other methods, such as viscosity, chemical susceptibility, immune activity, crystallizability, and susceptibility to proteolysis, were compared (Mirsky and Pauling, 1936;Wu, 1931). Toward the middle of the last century, protein aggregation studies were largely left behind, as improved methods allowed elucidation of the primary sequence of proteins, reversible unfolding studies, and ultimately high-resolution structures. Curiously, the field of protein science, and in particular protein folding, is now gravitating back to a closer look at protein aggregation and protein aggregates. Unfortunately, the means developed during the second half of the twentieth century for studying native, globular proteins have not proved immediately amenable to the study of aggregate structures. Great progress is being made, however, to modify classical methods, including NMR and X-ray diffraction, as well as to develop newer techniques, that together should continue to expand our picture of aggregate structure (Kheterpal and Wetzel, 2006; Wetzel, 1999).

  5. Supercharging Protein Complexes from Aqueous Solution Disrupts their Native Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Harry J.; Kintzer, Alexander F.; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Cassou, Catherine A.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of aqueous solution supercharging on the solution- and gas-phase structures of two protein complexes were investigated using traveling-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS). Low initial concentrations of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) in the electrospray ionization (ESI) solution can effectively increase the charge of concanavalin A dimers and tetramers, but at higher m-NBA concentrations, the increases in charge are accompanied by solution-phase dissociation of the dimers and up to a ~22% increase in the collision cross section (CCS) of the tetramers. With just 0.8% m-NBA added to the ESI solution of a ~630 kDa anthrax toxin octamer complex, the average charge is increased by only ~4% compared to the “native” complex, but it is sufficiently destabilized so that extensive gas-phase fragmentation occurs in the relatively high pressure regions of the TWIMS device. Anthrax toxin complexes exist in either a pre-channel or a transmembrane channel state. With m-NBA, the prechannel state of the complex has the same CCS/charge ratio in the gas phase as the transmembrane channel state of the same complex formed without m-NBA, yet undergoes extensive dissociation, indicating that destabilization from supercharging occurs in the ESI droplet prior to ion formation and is not a result of coulombic destabilization in the gas phase as a result of higher charging. These results demonstrate that the supercharging of large protein complexes is the result of conformational changes induced by the reagents in the ESI droplets where enrichment of the supercharging reagent during droplet evaporation occurs. PMID:22161509

  6. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  7. High-resolution structure of the native histone octamer

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Christopher M.; Nicholson, James M.; Lambert, Stanley J.; Chantalat, Laurent; Reynolds, Colin D.; Baldwin, John P.

    2005-06-01

    The high-resolution (1.90 Å) model of the native histone octamer allows structural comparisons to be made with the nucleosome-core particle, along with an identification of a likely core-histone binding site. Crystals of native histone octamers (H2A–H2B)–(H4–H3)–(H3′–H4′)–(H2B′–H2A′) from chick erythrocytes in 2 M KCl, 1.35 M potassium phosphate pH 6.9 diffract X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution, yielding a structure with an R{sub work} value of 18.7% and an R{sub free} of 22.2%. The crystal space group is P6{sub 5}, the asymmetric unit of which contains one complete octamer. This high-resolution model of the histone-core octamer allows further insight into intermolecular interactions, including water molecules, that dock the histone dimers to the tetramer in the nucleosome-core particle and have relevance to nucleosome remodelling. The three key areas analysed are the H2A′–H3–H4 molecular cluster (also H2A–H3′–H4′), the H4–H2B′ interaction (also H4′–H2B) and the H2A′–H4 β-sheet interaction (also H2A–H4′). The latter of these three regions is important to nucleosome remodelling by RNA polymerase II, as it is shown to be a likely core-histone binding site, and its disruption creates an instability in the nucleosome-core particle. A majority of the water molecules in the high-resolution octamer have positions that correlate to similar positions in the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle structure, suggesting that the high-resolution octamer model can be used for comparative studies with the high-resolution nucleosome-core particle.

  8. Model Building and Refinement of a Natively Glycosylated HIV-1 Env Protein by High-Resolution Cryoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-10-06

    Secretory and membrane proteins from mammalian cells undergo post-translational modifications, including N-linked glycosylation, which can result in a large number of possible glycoforms. This sample heterogeneity can be problematic for structural studies, particularly X-ray crystallography. Thus, crystal structures of heavily glycosylated proteins such as the HIV-1 Env viral spike protein have been determined by removing the majority of glycans. This step is most frequently carried out using Endoglycosidase H (EndoH) and requires that all expressed glycans be in the high-mannose form, which is often not the native glycoform. With significantly improved technologies in single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we demonstrate that it is now possible to refine and build natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structures in solution to 4.36 Å resolution. At this resolution we can now analyze the complete epitope of a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb), PGT128, in the context of the trimer expressed with native glycans.

  9. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution.

  10. Effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on native starch granule structure.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jaroslav; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2010-12-13

    Enzymatic digestion of six starches of different botanical origin was studied in real time by in situ time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and complemented by the analysis of native and digested material by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and scanning electron microscopy with the aim of following changes in starch granule nanostructure during enzymatic digestion. This range of techniques enables coverage over five orders of length-scale, as is necessary for this hierarchically structured material. Starches studied varied in their digestibility and displayed structural differences in the course of enzymatic digestion. The use of time-resolved SANS showed that solvent-drying of digested residues does not induce any structural artifacts on the length scale followed by small-angle scattering. In the course of digestion, the lamellar peak intensity gradually decreased and low-q scattering increased. These trends were more substantial for A-type than for B-type starches. These observations were explained by preferential digestion of the amorphous growth rings. Hydrolysis of the semicrystalline growth rings was explained on the basis of a liquid-crystalline model for starch considering differences between A-type and B-type starches in the length and rigidity of amylopectin spacers and branches. As evidenced by differing morphologies of enzymatic attack among varieties, the existence of granular pores and channels and physical penetrability of the amorphous growth ring affect the accessibility of the enzyme to the substrate. The combined effects of the granule microstructure and the nanostructure of the growth rings influence the opportunity of the enzyme to access its substrate; as a consequence, these structures determine the enzymatic digestibility of granular starches more than the absolute physical densities of the amorphous growth rings and amorphous and crystalline regions of the semicrystalline

  11. SYNTHESIS OF PROTEINS BY NATIVE CHEMICAL LIGATION USING FMOC-BASED CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A; Mitchell, A R

    2005-01-20

    C-terminal peptide {alpha}-thioesters are valuable intermediates in the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins by native chemical ligation. They are prepared either by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. The present paper reviews the different methods available for the chemical synthesis of peptide {alpha}-thioesters using Fmoc-based SPPS.

  12. Blind Test of Physics-Based Prediction of Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Shell, M. Scott; Ozkan, S. Banu; Voelz, Vincent; Wu, Guohong Albert; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    We report here a multiprotein blind test of a computer method to predict native protein structures based solely on an all-atom physics-based force field. We use the AMBER 96 potential function with an implicit (GB/SA) model of solvation, combined with replica-exchange molecular-dynamics simulations. Coarse conformational sampling is performed using the zipping and assembly method (ZAM), an approach that is designed to mimic the putative physical routes of protein folding. ZAM was applied to the folding of six proteins, from 76 to 112 monomers in length, in CASP7, a community-wide blind test of protein structure prediction. Because these predictions have about the same level of accuracy as typical bioinformatics methods, and do not utilize information from databases of known native structures, this work opens up the possibility of predicting the structures of membrane proteins, synthetic peptides, or other foldable polymers, for which there is little prior knowledge of native structures. This approach may also be useful for predicting physical protein folding routes, non-native conformations, and other physical properties from amino acid sequences. PMID:19186130

  13. Blind test of physics-based prediction of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Shell, M Scott; Ozkan, S Banu; Voelz, Vincent; Wu, Guohong Albert; Dill, Ken A

    2009-02-01

    We report here a multiprotein blind test of a computer method to predict native protein structures based solely on an all-atom physics-based force field. We use the AMBER 96 potential function with an implicit (GB/SA) model of solvation, combined with replica-exchange molecular-dynamics simulations. Coarse conformational sampling is performed using the zipping and assembly method (ZAM), an approach that is designed to mimic the putative physical routes of protein folding. ZAM was applied to the folding of six proteins, from 76 to 112 monomers in length, in CASP7, a community-wide blind test of protein structure prediction. Because these predictions have about the same level of accuracy as typical bioinformatics methods, and do not utilize information from databases of known native structures, this work opens up the possibility of predicting the structures of membrane proteins, synthetic peptides, or other foldable polymers, for which there is little prior knowledge of native structures. This approach may also be useful for predicting physical protein folding routes, non-native conformations, and other physical properties from amino acid sequences.

  14. Different Properties of the Native and Reconstituted Heterotrimeric G Protein Transducin†

    PubMed Central

    Goc, Anna; Angel, Thomas E.; Jastrzebska, Beata; Wang, Benlian; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Visual signal transduction serves as one of the best understood G protein-coupled receptor signaling systems. Signaling is initiated when a photon strikes rhodopsin (Rho) causing a conformational change leading to productive interaction of this G protein-coupled receptor with the heterotrimeric G protein, transducin (Gt). Here we describe a new method for Gt purification from native bovine rod photoreceptor membranes without subunit dissociation caused by exposure to photoactivated rhodopsin (Rho*). Native electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting revealed that Gt purified by this method formed more stable heterotrimers and interacted more efficiently with membranes containing Rho* or its target, phosphodiesterase 6, than did Gt purified by a traditional method involving subunit dissociation and reconstitution in solution without membranes. Because these differences could result from selective extraction, we characterized the type and amount of posttranslational modifications on both purified native and reconstituted Gt preparations. Similar N-terminal acylation of the Gtα subunit was observed for both proteins as was farnesylation and methylation of the terminal Gtγ subunit Cys residue. However, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed less incorporation of deuterium into the Gtα and Gtβ subunits of native Gt as compared to reconstituted Gt. These findings may indicate differences in conformation and heterotrimer complex formation between the two preparations or altered stability of the reconstituted Gt that assembles differently than the native protein. Therefore, Gt extracted and purified without subunit dissociation appears to be more appropriate for future studies. PMID:18975915

  15. Hierarchical, Self-Similar Structure in Native Squid Pen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei-Chi; Peters, Robert; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Proteins, chitin and keratin form the elementary building blocks of many biomaterials. How these molecules assemble into larger, macroscopic structures with very different properties is the fundamental question we are trying to answer. Squid pen is a transparent backbone inside the squid, which supports the mantle of the squid. The pens show a hierarchical, self-similar structure under the microscope and the AFM with fibers from 500 μm to 0.2 μm in diameter. The chitin molecules form nano-crystallites of monoclinic lattice symmetry surrounded by a protein layer, resulting in β-chitin nano-fibrils. Signals corresponding to the α-coil protein phase and β-chitin were observed in X-ray experiments in-situ. The molecular structure is highly anisotropic with 90% of the α-coils and β-chitin crystallites oriented along the fiber-axis indicating a strong correlation between the structures on millimeters down to the molecular scale. This research was funded by NSERC, NRC, CFI, and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation.

  16. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better prediction of protein yield, demonstrates the effect of the different types of N-glycosylation of protein yield, and can be used to predict potential targets for strain improvement. The model represents a step towards a more complete description of protein production in P. pastoris, which is required for using these models to understand and optimize protein production processes.

  17. Improved purification of native meningococcal porin PorB and studies on its structure/function.

    PubMed

    Massari, Paola; King, Carol A; MacLeod, Heather; Wetzler, Lee M

    2005-12-01

    The outer membrane protein PorB of Neisseria meningitidis is a pore-forming protein which has various effects on eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to (1) up-regulate the surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 and of MHC class II (which are TLR2/MyD88 dependent and related to the porin's immune-potentiating ability), (2) be involved in prevention of apoptosis by modulating the mitochondrial membrane potential, and (3) form pores in eukaryotic cells. As an outer membrane protein, its native trimeric form isolation is complicated by its insoluble nature, requiring the presence of detergent throughout the whole procedure, and by its tight association with other outer membrane components, such as neisserial LOS or lipoproteins. In this study, an improved chromatographic purification method to obtain an homogeneous product free of endotoxin and lipoprotein is described, without loss of any of the above-mentioned properties of the porin. Furthermore, we have investigated the requirement of the native trimeric structure for the porin's activity. Inactivation of functional PorB trimers into non-functional monomers was achieved by incubation on ice. Thus, routine long- and medium-term storage at low temperature may be a cause of porin inactivation.

  18. Eukaryotic expression, purification and structure/function analysis of native, recombinant CRISP3 from human and mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpert, Marianna; Mangum, Jonathan E.; Jamsai, Duangporn; D'Sylva, Rebecca; O'Bryan, Moira K.; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-02-01

    While the Cysteine-Rich Secretory Proteins (CRISPs) have been broadly proposed as regulators of reproduction and immunity, physiological roles have yet to be established for individual members of this family. Past efforts to investigate their functions have been limited by the difficulty of purifying correctly folded CRISPs from bacterial expression systems, which yield low quantities of correctly folded protein containing the eight disulfide bonds that define the CRISP family. Here we report the expression and purification of native, glycosylated CRISP3 from human and mouse, expressed in HEK 293 cells and isolated using ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Functional authenticity was verified by substrate-affinity, native glycosylation characteristics and quaternary structure (monomer in solution). Validated protein was used in comparative structure/function studies to characterise sites and patterns of N-glycosylation in CRISP3, revealing interesting inter-species differences.

  19. Eukaryotic expression, purification and structure/function analysis of native, recombinant CRISP3 from human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Volpert, Marianna; Mangum, Jonathan E; Jamsai, Duangporn; D'Sylva, Rebecca; O'Bryan, Moira K; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-02-27

    While the Cysteine-Rich Secretory Proteins (CRISPs) have been broadly proposed as regulators of reproduction and immunity, physiological roles have yet to be established for individual members of this family. Past efforts to investigate their functions have been limited by the difficulty of purifying correctly folded CRISPs from bacterial expression systems, which yield low quantities of correctly folded protein containing the eight disulfide bonds that define the CRISP family. Here we report the expression and purification of native, glycosylated CRISP3 from human and mouse, expressed in HEK 293 cells and isolated using ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Functional authenticity was verified by substrate-affinity, native glycosylation characteristics and quaternary structure (monomer in solution). Validated protein was used in comparative structure/function studies to characterise sites and patterns of N-glycosylation in CRISP3, revealing interesting inter-species differences.

  20. Natively Inhibited Trypanosoma brucei Cathepsin B Structure Determined by Using an X-ray Laser

    PubMed Central

    DePonte, Daniel P.; White, Thomas A.; Rehders, Dirk; Barty, Anton; Stellato, Francesco; Liang, Mengning; Barends, Thomas R.M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Sasa; Barth, Torsten; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Doak, R. Bruce; Fleckenstein, Holger; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Galli, Lorenzo; Grotjohann, Ingo; Hunter, Mark S.; Johansson, Linda C.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Katona, Gergely; Kirian, Richard A.; Koopmann, Rudolf; Kupitz, Chris; Lomb, Lukas; Martin, Andrew V.; Mogk, Stefan; Neutze, Richard; Shoeman, Robert L.; Steinbrener, Jan; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Schlichting, Ilme; Duszenko, Michael; Betzel, Christian; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei cysteine protease cathepsin B (TbCatB), which is involved in host protein degradation, is a promising target to develop new treatments against sleeping sickness, a fatal disease caused by this protozoan parasite. The structure of the mature, active form of TbCatB has so far not provided sufficient information for the design of a safe and specific drug against T. brucei. By combining two recent innovations, in vivo crystallization and serial femtosecond crystallography, we obtained the room-temperature 2.1 angstrom resolution structure of the fully glycosylated precursor complex of TbCatB. The structure reveals the mechanism of native TbCatB inhibition and demonstrates that new biomolecular information can be obtained by the “diffraction-before-destruction” approach of x-ray free-electron lasers from hundreds of thousands of individual microcrystals. PMID:23196907

  1. Structural Correlates for Lexical Efficiency and Number of Languages in Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan, A.; Parker Jones, O.; Ali, N.; Crinion, J.; Orabona, S.; Mechias, M. L.; Ramsden, S.; Green, D. W.; Price, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) to investigate whether the efficiency of word processing in the non-native language (lexical efficiency) and the number of non-native languages spoken (2+ versus 1) were related to local differences in the brain structure of bilingual and multilingual speakers.…

  2. The structures of native celluloses, and the origin of their variability

    Treesearch

    R. H. Atalla

    1999-01-01

    The structures of native celluloses have traditionally been presented in terms of two-domain models consisting of crystalline and non-crystalline fractions. Such models have been of little help in advancing understanding of enzyme-substrate interactions. In this report we first address issues that complicate characterization of the structure of native celluloses...

  3. Structural Correlates for Lexical Efficiency and Number of Languages in Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan, A.; Parker Jones, O.; Ali, N.; Crinion, J.; Orabona, S.; Mechias, M. L.; Ramsden, S.; Green, D. W.; Price, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) to investigate whether the efficiency of word processing in the non-native language (lexical efficiency) and the number of non-native languages spoken (2+ versus 1) were related to local differences in the brain structure of bilingual and multilingual speakers.…

  4. Genetic diversity and structure of native and non-native populations of the endangered plant Pinus dabeshanensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y; Wang, H; Chen, W; Pang, X M; Li, Y Y

    2016-06-10

    Owing to a severe decline in its abundance, Pinus dabeshanensis has been listed as an endangered species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Although several restoration events have been undertaken since the 1960s, the natural population genetic structure of this species remains to be investigated. Herein, we examined the level of genetic diversity and structure of two native and two non-native populations using 10 microsatellite loci. A relatively high level of genetic variation (HO = 0.586 ± 0.039) and a low level of population differentiation (FST = 0.016 ± 0.011) were revealed. For forensic investigation, an assignment test was performed. To better understand the genetic differentiation between the native and non-native populations, the individuals in the transplanted and cultivated populations may have derived from populations that were not surveyed in this study. In light of our results, we discuss the real problems faced by all four populations and provide useful information for management decision-making.

  5. The "intracellular" poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) depolymerase of Rhodospirillum rubrum is a periplasm-located protein with specificity for native PHB and with structural similarity to extracellular PHB depolymerases.

    PubMed

    Handrick, René; Reinhardt, Simone; Kimmig, Philipp; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2004-11-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum possesses a putative intracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) depolymerase system consisting of a soluble PHB depolymerase, a heat-stable activator, and a 3-hydroxybutyrate dimer hydrolase (J. M. Merrick and M. Doudoroff, J. Bacteriol. 88:60-71, 1964). In this study we reinvestigated the soluble R. rubrum PHB depolymerase (PhaZ1). It turned out that PhaZ1 is a novel type of PHB depolymerase with unique properties. Purified PhaZ1 was specific for amorphous short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) such as native PHB, artificial PHB, and oligomer esters of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate with 3 or more 3-hydroxybutyrate units. Atactic PHB, (S)-3-hydroxybutyrate oligomers, medium-chain-length PHA, and lipase substrates (triolein, tributyrin) were not hydrolyzed. The PHB depolymerase structural gene (phaZ1) was cloned. Its deduced amino acid sequence (37,704 Da) had no significant similarity to those of intracellular PHB depolymerases of Wautersia eutropha or of other PHB-accumulating bacteria. PhaZ1 was found to have strong amino acid homology with type-II catalytic domains of extracellular PHB depolymerases, and Ser(42), Asp(138), and His(178) were identified as catalytic-triad amino acids, with Ser(42) as the putative active site. Surprisingly, the first 23 amino acids of the PHB depolymerase previously assumed to be intracellular revealed features of classical signal peptides, and Edman sequencing of purified PhaZ1 confirmed the functionality of the predicted cleavage site. Extracellular PHB depolymerase activity was absent, and analysis of cell fractions unequivocally showed that PhaZ1 is a periplasm-located enzyme. The previously assumed intracellular activator/depolymerase system is unlikely to have a physiological function in PHB mobilization in vivo. A second gene, encoding the putative true intracellular PHB depolymerase (PhaZ2), was identified in the genome sequence of R. rubrum.

  6. Voltage sensor ring in a native structure of a membrane-embedded potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Zheng, Hongjin; Zheng, Hui; Borkowski, Brian A.; Shi, Dan; Gonen, Tamir; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels support electrochemical activity in cells and are largely responsible for information flow throughout the nervous systems. The voltage sensor domains in these channels sense changes in transmembrane potential and control ion flux across membranes. The X-ray structures of a few voltage-gated ion channels in detergents have been determined and have revealed clear structural variations among their respective voltage sensor domains. More recent studies demonstrated that lipids around a voltage-gated channel could directly alter its conformational state in membrane. Because of these disparities, the structural basis for voltage sensing in native membranes remains elusive. Here, through electron-crystallographic analysis of membrane-embedded proteins, we present the detailed view of a voltage-gated potassium channel in its inactivated state. Contrary to all known structures of voltage-gated ion channels in detergents, our data revealed a unique conformation in which the four voltage sensor domains of a voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) form a ring structure that completely surrounds the pore domain of the channel. Such a structure is named the voltage sensor ring. Our biochemical and electrophysiological studies support that the voltage sensor ring represents a physiological conformation. These data together suggest that lipids exert strong effects on the channel structure and that these effects may be changed upon membrane disruption. Our results have wide implications for lipid–protein interactions in general and for the mechanism of voltage sensing in particular. PMID:23401554

  7. Elucidating the native sources of an invasive tree species, Acacia pycnantha, reveals unexpected native range diversity and structure

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Joice; Richardson, David M.; Wilson, John R. U.; O'Leary, Martin; Le Roux, Johannes J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Understanding the introduction history of invasive plant species is important for their management and identifying effective host-specific biological control agents. However, uncertain taxonomy, intra- and interspecific hybridization, and cryptic speciation may obscure introduction histories, making it difficult to identify native regions to explore for host-specific agents. The overall aim of this study was to identify the native source populations of Acacia pycnantha, a tree native to south-eastern Australia and invasive in South Africa, Western Australia and Portugal. Using a phylogeographical approach also allowed an exploration of the historical processes that have shaped the genetic structure of A. pycnantha in its native range. Methods Nuclear (nDNA) and plastid DNA sequence data were used in network and tree-building analyses to reconstruct phylogeographical relationships between native and invasive A. pycnantha populations. In addition, mismatch distributions, relative rates and Bayesian analyses were used to infer recent demographic processes and timing of events in Australia that led to population structure and diversification. Key Results The plastid network indicated that Australian populations of A. pycnantha are geographically structured into two informally recognized lineages, the wetland and dryland forms, whereas the nuclear phylogeny showed little geographical structure between these two forms. Moreover, the dryland form of A. pycnantha showed close genetic similarity to the wetland form based on nDNA sequence data. Hybrid zones may explain these findings, supported here by incongruent phylogenetic placement of some of these taxa between nuclear and plastid genealogies. Conclusions It is hypothesized that habitat fragmentation due to cycles of aridity inter-dispersed with periods of abundant rainfall during the Pleistocene (approx. 100 kya) probably gave rise to native dryland and wetland forms of A. pycnantha. Although the

  8. Quantitation of the Noncovalent Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein, Type 1 Complex Through Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Yu, Jianshi; Kane, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a valuable tool in probing noncovalent protein-ligand interactions in a sample-efficient way, yet the quantitative application potential of native MS has not been fully explored. Cellular retinol binding protein, type I (CrbpI) chaperones retinol and retinal in the cell, protecting them from nonspecific oxidation and delivering them to biosynthesis enzymes where the bound (holo-) and unbound (apo-) forms of CrbpI exert distinct biological functions. Using nanoelectrospray, we developed a native MS assay for probing apo- and holo-CrbpI abundance to facilitate exploring their biological functions in retinoid metabolism and signaling. The methods were developed on two platforms, an Orbitrap-based Thermo Exactive and a Q-IMS-TOF-based Waters Synapt G2S, where similar ion behaviors under optimized conditions were observed. Overall, our results suggested that within the working range ( 1-10 μM), gas-phase ions in the native state linearly correspond to solution concentration and relative ion intensities of the apo- and holo-protein ions can linearly respond to the solution ratios, suggesting native MS is a viable tool for relative quantitation in this system.

  9. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  10. Analyzing protein micro-heterogeneity in chicken ovalbumin by high-resolution native mass spectrometry exposes qualitatively and semi-quantitatively 59 proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Barendregt, Arjan; Kamerling, Johannis P; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-12-17

    Taking chicken Ovalbumin as a prototypical example of a eukaryotic protein we use high-resolution native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry on a modified Exactive Orbitrap mass analyzer to qualitatively and semiquantitatively dissect 59 proteoforms in the natural protein. This variety is largely induced by the presence of multiple phosphorylation sites and a glycosylation site that we find to be occupied by at least 45 different glycan structures. Mass analysis of the intact protein in its native state is straightforward and fast, requires very little sample preparation, and provides a direct view on the stoichiometry of all different coappearing modifications that are distinguishable in mass. As such, this proof-of-principal analysis shows that native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in combination with an Orbitrap mass analyzer offers a means to characterize proteins in a manner highly complementary to standard bottom-up shot-gun proteome analysis.

  11. Three phase partitioning leads to subtle structural changes in proteins.

    PubMed

    Rather, Gulam Mohmad; Gupta, Munishwar Nath

    2013-09-01

    Three phase partitioning consists of precipitation of proteins due to simultaneous presence of ammonium sulphate and t-butanol. The technique has been successfully used for purification and refolding of proteins. There are however indications that the structures of proteins subjected to three phase partitioning are different from native structure of proteins. Taking several proteins, the present work examines the structural changes in proteins by comparing their thermal stabilities, secondary structure contents, surface hydrophobicities, hydrodynamic radii and solubilities in the presence of ammonium sulphate. The results show that while the nature or extent of structural changes may vary, in all the cases the changes are rather subtle and not drastic in nature. Hence, the technique can be safely used for protein purification and refolding.

  12. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  13. Total chemical synthesis of dengue 2 virus capsid protein via native chemical ligation: role of the conserved salt-bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changyou; Zhao, Le; Chen, Xishan; Lu, Wei-Yue; Lu, Wuyuan

    2013-06-15

    The dengue capsid protein C is a highly basic alpha-helical protein of ~100 amino acid residues that forms an emphipathic homodimer to encapsidate the viral genome and to interact with viral membranes. The solution structure of dengue 2 capsid protein C (DEN2C) has been determined by NMR spectroscopy, revealing a large dimer interface formed almost exclusively by hydrophobic residues. The only acidic residue (Glu87) conserved in the capsid proteins of all four serotypes of dengue virus forms a salt bridge with the side chains of Lys45 and Arg55'. To understand the structural and functional significance of this conserved salt bridge, we chemically synthesized an N-terminally truncated form of DEN2C ((WT)DEN2C) and its salt bridge-void analog (E87A)DEN2C using the native chemical ligation technique developed by Kent and colleagues. Comparative biochemical and biophysical studies of these two synthetic proteins using circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, protein thermal denaturation, and proteolytic susceptibility assay demonstrated that the conserved salt bridge contributed to DEN2C dimerization and stability as well as its resistance to proteolytic degradation. Our work provided insight into the role of a fully conserved structural element of the dengue capsid protein C and paved the way for additional functional studies of this important viral protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Markus E; Scheid, Anika; Weinberg, Frank

    2011-10-12

    Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform) random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure). Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold) ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2) for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n) while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2). Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with logarithmized probabilities. A number of

  15. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. Results In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform) random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure). Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold) ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2) for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n) while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2). Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with logarithmized probabilities

  16. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  17. VPDB: Viral Protein Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Jadhav, Ankush; Hussain, Afzal; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Viral Protein Database is an interactive database for three dimensional viral proteins. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive resource to the community of structural virology, with an emphasis on the description of derived data from structural biology. Currently, VPDB includes ˜1,670 viral protein structures from >277 viruses with more than 465 virus strains. The whole database can be easily accessed through the user convenience text search. Interactivity has been enhanced by using Jmol, WebMol and Strap to visualize the viral protein molecular structure. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.vpdb.bicpu.edu.in PMID:21769196

  18. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  19. Temperature-Induced Misfolding in Prion Protein: Evidence of Multiple Partially Disordered States Stabilized by Non-Native Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman

    2017-02-14

    The structural basis of pathways of misfolding of a cellular prion (PrP(C)) into the toxic scrapie form (PrP(SC)) and identification of possible intermediates (e.g., PrP*) still eludes us. In this work, we have used a cumulative ∼65 μs of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation data to construct the conformational free energy landscapes and capture the structural and thermodynamic characteristics associated with various stages of the thermal denaturation process in human prion protein. The temperature-dependent free energy surfaces consist of multiple metastable states stabilized by non-native contacts and hydrogen bonds, thus rendering the protein prone to misfolding. We have been able to identify metastable conformational states with high β-content (∼30-40%) and low α-content (∼10-20%) that might be precursors of PrP(SC) oligomer formation. These conformations also involve participation of the unstructured N-terminal domain, and its role in misfolding has been investigated. All the misfolded or partially unfolded states are quite compact in nature despite having large deviations from the native structure. Although the number of native contacts decreases dramatically at higher temperatures, the radius of gyration and number of intraprotein hydrogen bonds and contacts remain relatively unchanged, leading to stabilization of the misfolded conformations by non-native interactions. Our results are in good agreement with the established view that the C-terminal regions of the second and third helices (H2 and H3, respectively) of mammal prions might be the Achilles heels of their stability, while separation of B1-H1-B2 and H2-H3 domains seems to play a key role, as well.

  20. New perspectives for use of native and engineered recombinant food proteins in treatment of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2007-02-01

    Food allergy has emerged as an important target for research on curative treatment and prevention, with most efforts focusing on peanut, cow's milk, and egg allergy. This article reviews the recent developments in the potential treatments for IgE-mediated food allergy using native and engineered recombinant food proteins.

  1. Calcium and magnesium binding in native and structurally perturbed purple membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.A.; King, J.; Yang, D.; Browner, R.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1996-01-10

    The number and identity of the metal cations bound to wild-type bacteriorhodopsin (bR) are determined by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ICP emission techniques. The results indicate that there at = 2 total Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} per bR molecule with a ratio of = 3:1 Ca{sup 2+} to Mg{sup 2+}. This observed ratio is found to agree with the calculated ratio using previously determined binding constants for the two high affinity sites of Ca{sup 2+} to deionized bR. This suggests that the high-affinity binding sites in deionized bR are similar to those in native bR. Structural perturbation of the native membrane by cleavage of the C-terminus decreases the number of ions per bR to 1.4. The observed ratio of total ions in this sample to total ions in bR is found to agree with that calculated using known binding constants for each. The results on the number of metal cations/bR and their ratio in bacteriorhodopsin agree with the calculated number using previously observed binding constants in deionized bO only if one assumes that the second high-affinity site (not the first) is removed by retinal removal. Removal of 75% of the lipids from the purple membrane is found to greatly reduce the number of metal cations from 2 to 0.16. This suggest that if metal cations are in the two high-affinity sites (which are the only type of binding sites evident in our native bR sample), the removal of lipids, known to change the protein tertiary structure, changes also the metal ion binding sites. 37 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. The Interest Structure of Native American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Scullard, Mark G.; Haviland, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    Strong Interest Inventory scores of 103 female and 73 male Native American college students were submitted to multidimensional scaling analysis. Results supported the circular order and two-dimensional relationship of career interests. Females' results were more consistent with Holland's hexagonal model than were males' scores. (SK)

  3. A coarse-grained protein force field for folding and structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Maupetit, Julien; Tuffery, P; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    We have revisited the protein coarse-grained optimized potential for efficient structure prediction (OPEP). The training and validation sets consist of 13 and 16 protein targets. Because optimization depends on details of how the ensemble of decoys is sampled, trial conformations are generated by molecular dynamics, threading, greedy, and Monte Carlo simulations, or taken from publicly available databases. The OPEP parameters are varied by a genetic algorithm using a scoring function which requires that the native structure has the lowest energy, and the native-like structures have energy higher than the native structure but lower than the remote conformations. Overall, we find that OPEP correctly identifies 24 native or native-like states for 29 targets and has very similar capability to the all-atom discrete optimized protein energy model (DOPE), found recently to outperform five currently used energy models.

  4. Peptic and tryptic hydrolysis of native and heated whey protein to reduce its antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Ki, K S; Khan, M A; Lee, W S; Lee, H J; Ahn, B S; Kim, H S

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the effects of enzymes on the production and antigenicity of native and heated whey protein concentrate (WPC) hydrolysates. Native and heated (10 min at 100 degrees C) WPC (2% protein solution) were incubated at 50 degrees C for 30, 60, 90, and 120 min with 0.1, 0.5, and 1% pepsin and then with 0.1, 0.5, and 1% trypsin on a protein-equivalent basis. A greater degree of hydrolysis was achieved and greater nonprotein nitrogen concentrations were obtained in heated WPC than in native WPC at all incubation times. Hydrolysis of WPC was increased with an increasing level of enzymes and higher incubation times. The highest hydrolysis (25.23%) was observed in heated WPC incubated with 1% pepsin and then with 1% trypsin for 120 min. High molecular weight bands, such as BSA, were completely eliminated from sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE of both native and heated WPC hydrolysates produced with pepsin for the 30-min incubation. The alpha-lactalbumin in native WPC was slightly degraded when incubated with 0.1% pepsin and then with 0.1% trypsin; however, it was almost completely hydrolyzed within 60 min of incubation with 0.5% pepsin and then with 0.5% trypsin. Incubation of native WPC with 1% pepsin and then with 1% trypsin for 30 min completely removed the BSA and alpha-lactalbumin. The beta-lactoglobulin in native WPC was not affected by the pepsin and trypsin treatments. The beta-lactoglobulin in heated WPC was partially hydrolyzed by the 0.1 and 0.5% pepsin and trypsin treatments and was completely degraded by the 1% pepsin and trypsin treatment. Antigenicity reversibly mimicked the hydrolysis of WPC and the removal of beta-lactoglobulin from hydrolysates. Antigenicity in heated and native WPC was reduced with an increasing level of enzymes. A low antigenic response was observed in heated WPC compared with native WPC. The lowest antigenicity was observed when heated WPC was incubated with 1% pepsin and then with 1% trypsin. These results suggested that

  5. Dimethylformamide interferes with Coomassie dye staining of proteins on blue native gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, V; Oommen, Anna; Ramachandran, Anup

    2014-06-15

    Blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) is used extensively for characterization of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and uses the binding of Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 to visualize proteins. Oxidative modification of sulfhydryl groups of such proteins can be evaluated by labeling with iodoacetamide conjugated to biotin (BIAM) and detected with streptavidin peroxidase on Western blots following BN-PAGE. However, dissolving BIAM in dimethylformamide, a recommended solvent, reduces Coomassie blue G staining to proteins during BN-PAGE. This interference is prevented by dissolving BIAM in dimethyl sulfoxide. Precautions in the use of the dye for protein staining subsequent to BIAM labeling are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Structures of the human mitochondrial ribosome in native states of assembly.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Rathore, Sorbhi; Kimanius, Dari; Aibara, Shintaro; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Rorbach, Joanna; Amunts, Alexey; Ramakrishnan, V

    2017-09-11

    Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) have less rRNA content and 36 additional proteins compared with the evolutionarily related bacterial ribosome. These differences make the assembly of mitoribosomes more complex than the assembly of bacterial ribosomes, but the molecular details of mitoribosomal biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we report the structures of two late-stage assembly intermediates of the human mitoribosomal large subunit (mt-LSU) isolated from a native pool within a human cell line and solved by cryo-EM to ∼3-Å resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals insights into the timing of rRNA folding and protein incorporation during the final steps of ribosomal maturation and the evolutionary adaptations that are required to preserve biogenesis after the structural diversification of mitoribosomes. Furthermore, the structures redefine the ribosome silencing factor (RsfS) family as multifunctional biogenesis factors and identify two new assembly factors (L0R8F8 and mt-ACP) not previously implicated in mitoribosomal biogenesis.

  7. Native signal peptide of human ERp57 disulfide isomerase mediates secretion of active native recombinant ERp57 protein in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Slibinskas, Rimantas

    2013-06-01

    Human ERp57 protein is disulfide isomerase, facilitating proper folding of glycoprotein precursors in the concert with ER lectin chaperones calreticulin and calnexin. Growing amount of data also associates ERp57 with many different functions in subcellular locations outside the ER. Analysis of protein functions requires substantial amounts of correctly folded, biologically active protein, and in this study we introduce yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a perfect host for production of human ERp57. Our data suggest that native signal peptide of human ERp57 protein is recognized and correctly processed in the yeast cells, which leads to protein secretion. Secreted recombinant ERp57 protein possesses native amino acid sequence and is biologically active. Moreover, secretion allows simple one-step purification of recombinant ERp57 protein with the yields reaching up to 10mg/L. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detecting internally symmetric protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhoon; Basner, Jodi; Lee, Byungkook

    2010-06-03

    Many functional proteins have a symmetric structure. Most of these are multimeric complexes, which are made of non-symmetric monomers arranged in a symmetric manner. However, there are also a large number of proteins that have a symmetric structure in the monomeric state. These internally symmetric proteins are interesting objects from the point of view of their folding, function, and evolution. Most algorithms that detect the internally symmetric proteins depend on finding repeating units of similar structure and do not use the symmetry information. We describe a new method, called SymD, for detecting symmetric protein structures. The SymD procedure works by comparing the structure to its own copy after the copy is circularly permuted by all possible number of residues. The procedure is relatively insensitive to symmetry-breaking insertions and deletions and amplifies positive signals from symmetry. It finds 70% to 80% of the TIM barrel fold domains in the ASTRAL 40 domain database and 100% of the beta-propellers as symmetric. More globally, 10% to 15% of the proteins in the ASTRAL 40 domain database may be considered symmetric according to this procedure depending on the precise cutoff value used to measure the degree of perfection of the symmetry. Symmetrical proteins occur in all structural classes and can have a closed, circular structure, a cylindrical barrel-like structure, or an open, helical structure. SymD is a sensitive procedure for detecting internally symmetric protein structures. Using this procedure, we estimate that 10% to 15% of the known protein domains may be considered symmetric. We also report an initial, overall view of the types of symmetries and symmetric folds that occur in the protein domain structure universe.

  9. Detecting internally symmetric protein structures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many functional proteins have a symmetric structure. Most of these are multimeric complexes, which are made of non-symmetric monomers arranged in a symmetric manner. However, there are also a large number of proteins that have a symmetric structure in the monomeric state. These internally symmetric proteins are interesting objects from the point of view of their folding, function, and evolution. Most algorithms that detect the internally symmetric proteins depend on finding repeating units of similar structure and do not use the symmetry information. Results We describe a new method, called SymD, for detecting symmetric protein structures. The SymD procedure works by comparing the structure to its own copy after the copy is circularly permuted by all possible number of residues. The procedure is relatively insensitive to symmetry-breaking insertions and deletions and amplifies positive signals from symmetry. It finds 70% to 80% of the TIM barrel fold domains in the ASTRAL 40 domain database and 100% of the beta-propellers as symmetric. More globally, 10% to 15% of the proteins in the ASTRAL 40 domain database may be considered symmetric according to this procedure depending on the precise cutoff value used to measure the degree of perfection of the symmetry. Symmetrical proteins occur in all structural classes and can have a closed, circular structure, a cylindrical barrel-like structure, or an open, helical structure. Conclusions SymD is a sensitive procedure for detecting internally symmetric protein structures. Using this procedure, we estimate that 10% to 15% of the known protein domains may be considered symmetric. We also report an initial, overall view of the types of symmetries and symmetric folds that occur in the protein domain structure universe. PMID:20525292

  10. Direct Evidence of Imino Acid-Aromatic Interactions in Native Collagen Protein by DNP-Enhanced Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Aussenac, Fabien; Sinha, Neeraj

    2014-11-20

    Aromatic amino acids (AAAs) have rare presence (∼1.4% abundance of Phe) inside of collagen protein, which is the most abundant animal protein playing a functional role in skin, bone, and connective tissues. The role of AAAs is very crucial and has been debated. We present here experimental results depicting interaction of AAAs with imino acids in a native collagen protein sample. The interaction is probed by solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy experiments such as (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) performed on a native collagen sample. The natural abundance (13)C spectrum was obtained by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) sensitivity enhancement coupled with ssNMR, providing ∼30-fold signal enhancement. Our results also open up new avenues of probing collagen structure/dynamics closest to the native state by ssNMR experiments coupled with DNP.

  11. Reconstruction of 3D structures from protein contact maps.

    PubMed

    Vassura, Marco; Margara, Luciano; Di Lena, Pietro; Medri, Filippo; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2008-01-01

    The prediction of the protein tertiary structure from solely its residue sequence (the so called Protein Folding Problem) is one of the most challenging problems in Structural Bioinformatics. We focus on the protein residue contact map. When this map is assigned it is possible to reconstruct the 3D structure of the protein backbone. The general problem of recovering a set of 3D coordinates consistent with some given contact map is known as a unit-disk-graph realization problem and it has been recently proven to be NP-Hard. In this paper we describe a heuristic method (COMAR) that is able to reconstruct with an unprecedented rate (3-15 seconds) a 3D model that exactly matches the target contact map of a protein. Working with a non-redundant set of 1760 proteins, we find that the scoring efficiency of finding a 3D model very close to the protein native structure depends on the threshold value adopted to compute the protein residue contact map. Contact maps whose threshold values range from 10 to 18 Angstroms allow reconstructing 3D models that are very similar to the proteins native structure.

  12. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  13. Compact Structure Patterns in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chitturi, Bhadrachalam; Shi, Shuoyong; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-10-23

    Globular proteins typically fold into tightly packed arrays of regular secondary structures. We developed a model to approximate the compact parallel and antiparallel arrangement of α-helices and β-strands, enumerated all possible topologies formed by up to five secondary structural elements (SSEs), searched for their occurrence in spatial structures of proteins, and documented their frequencies of occurrence in the PDB. The enumeration model grows larger super-secondary structure patterns (SSPs) by combining pairs of smaller patterns, a process that approximates a potential path of protein fold evolution. The most prevalent SSPs are typically present in superfolds such as the Rossmann-like fold, the ferredoxin-like fold, and the Greek key motif, whereas the less frequent SSPs often possess uncommon structure features such as split β-sheets, left-handed connections, and crossing loops. This complete SSP enumeration model, for the first time, allows us to investigate which theoretically possible SSPs are not observed in available protein structures. All SSPs with up to four SSEs occurred in proteins. However, among the SSPs with five SSEs, approximately 20% (218) are absent from existing folds. Of these unobserved SSPs, 80% contain two or more uncommon structure features. To facilitate future efforts in protein structure classification, engineering, and design, we provide the resulting patterns and their frequency of occurrence in proteins at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/ssps/. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. BAYESIAN PROTEIN STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT1

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUEZ, ABEL; SCHMIDLER, SCOTT C.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the three-dimensional structure of proteins is an important topic in molecular biochemistry. Structure plays a critical role in defining the function of proteins and is more strongly conserved than amino acid sequence over evolutionary timescales. A key challenge is the identification and evaluation of structural similarity between proteins; such analysis can aid in understanding the role of newly discovered proteins and help elucidate evolutionary relationships between organisms. Computational biologists have developed many clever algorithmic techniques for comparing protein structures, however, all are based on heuristic optimization criteria, making statistical interpretation somewhat difficult. Here we present a fully probabilistic framework for pairwise structural alignment of proteins. Our approach has several advantages, including the ability to capture alignment uncertainty and to estimate key “gap” parameters which critically affect the quality of the alignment. We show that several existing alignment methods arise as maximum a posteriori estimates under specific choices of prior distributions and error models. Our probabilistic framework is also easily extended to incorporate additional information, which we demonstrate by including primary sequence information to generate simultaneous sequence–structure alignments that can resolve ambiguities obtained using structure alone. This combined model also provides a natural approach for the difficult task of estimating evolutionary distance based on structural alignments. The model is illustrated by comparison with well-established methods on several challenging protein alignment examples. PMID:26925188

  15. Residual ordered structure in denatured proteins and the problem of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Basharov, Mahmud A

    2012-02-01

    Structural characteristics of numerous globular proteins in the denatured state have been reviewed using literature data. Recent more precise experiments show that in contrast to the conventional standpoint, proteins under strongly denaturing conditions do not unfold completely and adopt a random coil state, but contain significant residual ordered structure. These results cast doubt on the basis of the conventional approach representing the process of protein folding as a spontaneous transition of a polypeptide chain from the random coil state to the unique globular structure. The denaturation of proteins is explained in terms of the physical properties of proteins such as stability, conformational change, elasticity, irreversible denaturation, etc. The spontaneous renaturation of some denatured proteins most probably is merely the manifestation of the physical properties (e.g., the elasticity) of the proteins per se, caused by the residual structure present in the denatured state. The pieces of the ordered structure might be the centers of the initiation of renaturation, where the restoration of the initial native conformation of denatured proteins begins. Studies on the denaturation of proteins hardly clarify how the proteins fold into the native conformation during the successive residue-by-residue elongation of the polypeptide chain on the ribosome.

  16. A Blue Native-PAGE analysis of membrane protein complexes in Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clostridium thermocellum is a Gram-positive thermophilic anaerobic bacterium with the unusual capacity to convert cellulosic biomass into ethanol and hydrogen. Identification and characterization of protein complexes in C. thermocellum are important toward understanding its metabolism and physiology. Results A two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE procedure was developed to separate membrane protein complexes of C. thermocellum. Proteins spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass spectrometry. 24 proteins were identified representing 13 distinct protein complexes, including several putative intact complexes. Interestingly, subunits of both the F1-F0-ATP synthase and the V1-V0-ATP synthase were detected in the membrane sample, indicating C. thermocellum may use alternative mechanisms for ATP generation. Conclusion Two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE was used to detect membrane protein complexes in C. thermocellum. More than a dozen putative protein complexes were identified, revealing the simultaneous expression of two sets of ATP synthase. The protocol developed in this work paves the way for further functional characterization of these protein complexes. PMID:21269440

  17. Improved prediction of RNA tertiary structure with insights into native state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bida, John Paul; Maher, L James

    2012-03-01

    The importance of RNA tertiary structure is evident from the growing number of published high resolution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of RNA molecules. These structures provide insights into function and create a knowledge base that is leveraged by programs such as Assemble, ModeRNA, RNABuilder, NAST, FARNA, Mc-Sym, RNA2D3D, and iFoldRNA for tertiary structure prediction and design. While these methods sample native-like RNA structures during simulations, all struggle to capture the native RNA conformation after scoring. We propose RSIM, an improved RNA fragment assembly method that preserves RNA global secondary structure while sampling conformations. This approach enhances the quality of predicted RNA tertiary structure, provides insights into the native state dynamics, and generates a powerful visualization of the RNA conformational space. RSIM is available for download from http://www.github.com/jpbida/rsim.

  18. Detection of protein complex interactions via a Blue Native-PAGE retardation assay.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mahima; Molnar, Eszter; Bock, Thomas; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Wollscheid, Bernd; Schamel, Wolfgang W A

    2009-09-15

    We describe the Blue Native (BN)-PAGE retardation assay for the detection of interactions of biomolecules with protein complexes. Potential interactors of proteins are included in the BN gel matrix, resulting in retardation of proteins that interact with the added molecule. After validation using the T-cell antigen receptor, we applied the assay for a general identification of dextran interactors in combination with mass spectroscopy. The proteomic screen revealed triosephosphate isomerase oligomer as a dextran-binding, high M(R) complex.

  19. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  20. Comparison of Replica Exchange Simulations of a Kinetically Trapped Protein Conformational State and its Native Form.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark A; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2016-03-10

    Recently an X-ray crystallographic structure of a single-domain antibody was reported with the protein chain trapped in a rare homodimeric form. One of the conformers appears to exhibit a misfolded region, and thus presumably the configurational stability is less favorable. To investigate whether simulation methods can detect any difference between the conformers and buttress the notion that one conformation is trapped on a pathway that incurs lower activation energy to unfold, adaptive temperature-based replica exchange simulations were applied to each chain to model conformational transitions. Simulation results found that the observed crystallographic difference between the two chains in the complementarity determining region CDR2 induces a stark distinction in conformational populations on the energy landscape. An appraisal of the energetic difference between the CDR2 conformations at 300 K revealed a localized order-disorder free-energy transition of roughly equivalent to two peptide hydrogen bonds in solution. It was also found that interconversion between the conformers is slower than the rate to unfold and that near an unfolding transition temperature one conformer retained a greater fraction of native-like contacts and energy over a longer time span before fully populating the denatured state, thus verifying the coexistence of a metastable conformation in the crystallographic assembly.

  1. Target selection of soluble protein complexes for structural proteomics studies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Weiping; Yun, Steven; Tam, Bonny; Dalal, Kush; Pio, Frederic F

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein expression in E. coli is the most commonly used system to produce protein for structural studies, because it is fast and inexpensive and can produce large quantity of proteins. However, when proteins from other species such as mammalian are produced in this system, problems of protein expression and solubility arise [1]. Structural genomics project are currently investigating proteomics pipelines that would produce sufficient quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies of protein complexes. To investigate how the E. coli protein expression system could be used for this purpose, we purified apoptotic binary protein complexes formed between members of the Caspase Associated Recruitment Domain (CARD) family. Results A combinatorial approach to the generation of protein complexes was performed between members of the CARD domain protein family that have the ability to form hetero-dimers between each other. In our method, each gene coding for a specific protein partner is cloned in pET-28b (Novagen) and PGEX2T (Amersham) expression vectors. All combinations of protein complexes are then obtained by reconstituting complexes from purified components in native conditions, after denaturation-renaturation or co-expression. Our study applied to 14 soluble CARD domain proteins revealed that co-expression studies perform better than native and denaturation-renaturation methods. In this study, we confirm existing interactions obtained in vivoin mammalian cells and also predict new interactions. Conclusion The simplicity of this screening method could be easily scaled up to identify soluble protein complexes for structural genomic projects. This study reports informative statistics on the solubility of human protein complexes expressed in E.coli belonging to the human CARD protein family. PMID:15904526

  2. Understanding the structural ensembles of a highly extended disordered protein.

    PubMed

    Daughdrill, Gary W; Kashtanov, Stepan; Stancik, Amber; Hill, Shannon E; Helms, Gregory; Muschol, Martin; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2012-01-01

    Developing a comprehensive description of the equilibrium structural ensembles for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is essential to understanding their function. The p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) is an IDP that interacts with multiple protein partners and contains numerous phosphorylation sites. Multiple techniques were used to investigate the equilibrium structural ensemble of p53TAD in its native and chemically unfolded states. The results from these experiments show that the native state of p53TAD has dimensions similar to a classical random coil while the chemically unfolded state is more extended. To investigate the molecular properties responsible for this behavior, a novel algorithm that generates diverse and unbiased structural ensembles of IDPs was developed. This algorithm was used to generate a large pool of plausible p53TAD structures that were reweighted to identify a subset of structures with the best fit to small angle X-ray scattering data. High weight structures in the native state ensemble show features that are localized to protein binding sites and regions with high proline content. The features localized to the protein binding sites are mostly eliminated in the chemically unfolded ensemble; while, the regions with high proline content remain relatively unaffected. Data from NMR experiments support these results, showing that residues from the protein binding sites experience larger environmental changes upon unfolding by urea than regions with high proline content. This behavior is consistent with the urea-induced exposure of nonpolar and aromatic side-chains in the protein binding sites that are partially excluded from solvent in the native state ensemble.

  3. Affinity biosensors using recombinant native membrane proteins displayed on exosomes: application to botulinum neurotoxin B receptor.

    PubMed

    Desplantes, Richard; Lévêque, Christian; Muller, Benjamin; Lotierzo, Manuela; Ferracci, Géraldine; Popoff, Michel; Seagar, Michael; Mamoun, Robert; El Far, Oussama

    2017-04-21

    The development of simple molecular assays with membrane protein receptors in a native conformation still represents a challenging task. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles which, due to their stability and small size, are suited for analysis in various assay formats. Here, we describe a novel approach to sort recombinant fully native and functional membrane proteins to exosomes using a targeting peptide. Specific binding of high affinity ligands to the potassium channel Kv1.2, the G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4, and the botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) receptor, indicated their correct assembly and outside out orientation in exosomes. We then developed, using a label-free optical biosensor, a new method to determine the kinetic constants of BoNT/B holotoxin binding to its receptor synaptotagmin2/GT1b ganglioside (kon = 2.3 ×10(5) M(-1).s(-1), koff = 1.3 10(-4) s(-1)), yielding an affinity constant (KD = 0.6 nM) similar to values determined from native tissue. In addition, the recombinant binding domain of BoNT/B, a potential vector for neuronal delivery, bound quasi-irreversibly to synaptotagmin 2/GT1b exosomes. Engineered exosomes provide thus a novel means to study membrane proteins for biotechnology and clinical applications.

  4. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  5. Nest paper absorbency, toughness, and protein concentration of a native vs. an invasive social wasp.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tracy R; Aponte, Yaira; Stamp, Nancy E

    2005-05-01

    The amount of proteinaceous food that was allocated to nest construction by a native wasp (Polistes fuscatus) vs. an invasive wasp (Polistes dominulus) in North America was examined following a field experiment under natural and surplus prey foraging conditions. Wasps of the surplus prey foraging conditions were provided with prey ad libitum within an enclosed area, while wasps of the natural treatment foraged in an adjacent field-woodland site. At the end of the field experiment, each nest was tested for water absorbency, toughness, and protein concentration. The hypotheses were: (1) When all nests are equally sheltered, the invasive P. dominulus (PD) allocates less protein to nest paper construction (for waterproofing and strengthening) and more protein to developing larvae than the native P. fuscatus (PF). (2) Nests of P. dominulus are more absorbent (less waterproof) and less tough than nests of P. fuscatus. Results indicate that P. fuscatus nests from surplus prey foraging conditions were more absorbent (less waterproof) to artificial rain drops than P. dominulus nests. The toughness of nests was similar between wasp species. However, nests from the natural treatment were tougher than those from the surplus prey treatment. Nests from the natural foraging conditions had half as much protein as those from surplus prey foraging conditions. There was no correlation between nest protein concentration and the number of prey taken, the number of cells, the number of adult offspring produced, or the total wasp biomass produced per colony. For PF under surplus prey conditions, protein concentration and absorbency were negatively correlated, but for PD the correlation was positive. In conclusion, when prey were scarce, Polistes wasps allocated less protein to nest construction. Also, the introduced P. dominulus may increase production of offspring by allocating less to nest construction than that of the native P. fuscatus, and so more protein to offspring production.

  6. Native capillary isoelectric focusing for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes.

    PubMed

    Fonslow, Bryan R; Kang, Seong A; Gestaut, Daniel R; Graczyk, Beth; Davis, Trisha N; Sabatini, David M; Yates, John R

    2010-08-01

    Here we report the use of capillary isoelectric focusing under native conditions for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes. Using biologically relevant HIS-tag and FLAG-tag purified protein complexes, we demonstrate the separations of protein complex isoforms of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 and 2) and the subcomplexes and different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex. The high efficiency capillary isoelectric focusing separation allowed for resolution of protein complexes and subcomplexes similar in size and biochemical composition. By performing separations with native buffers and reduced temperature (15 degrees C) we were able to maintain the complex integrity of the more thermolabile mTORC2 during isoelectric focusing and detection (<45 min). Increasing the separation temperature allowed us to monitor dissociation of the Dam1 complex into its subcomplexes (25 degrees C) and eventually its individual protein components (30 degrees C). The separation of two different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex, generated from an in vitro kinase assay with Mps1 kinase, was straightforward due to the large pI shift upon multiple phosphorylation events. The separation of the protein complex isoforms of mTORC, on the other hand, required the addition of a small pI range (4-6.5) of ampholytes to improve resolution and stability of the complexes. We show that native capillary isoelectric focusing is a powerful method for the difficult separations of large, similar, unstable protein complexes. This method shows potential for differentiation of protein complex isoform and subcomplex compositions, post-translational modifications, architectures, stabilities, equilibria, and relative abundances under biologically relevant conditions.

  7. Native capillary isoelectric focusing for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Kang, Seong A.; Gestaut, Daniel R.; Graczyk, Beth; Davis, Trisha N.; Sabatini, David M.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the use of capillary isoelectric focusing under native conditions for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes. Using biologically relevant HIS-tag and FLAG-tag purified protein complexes, we demonstrate the separations of protein complex isoforms of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 and 2) and the subcomplexes and different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex. The high efficiency capillary isoelectric focusing separation allowed for resolution of protein complexes and subcomplexes similar in size and biochemical composition. By performing separations with native buffers and reduced temperature (15°C) we were able to maintain the complex integrity of the more thermolabile mTORC2 during isoelectric focusing and detection (< 45 min). Increasing the separation temperature allowed us to monitor dissociation of the Dam1 complex into its subcomplexes (25°C) and eventually its individual protein components (30°C). The separation of two different phosphorylation states of the Dam1 complex, generated from an in vitro kinase assay with Mps1 kinase, was straightforward due to the large pI shift upon multiple phosphorylation events. The separation of the protein complex isoforms of mTORC, on the other hand, required the addition of a small pI range (4 – 6.5) of ampholytes to improve resolution and stability of the complexes. We show that native capillary isoelectric focusing is a powerful method for the difficult separations of large, similar, unstable protein complexes. This method shows potential for differentiation of protein complex isoform and subcomplex compositions, post-translational modifications, architectures, stabilities, equilibria, and relative abundances under biologically relevant conditions. PMID:20614870

  8. Volumetrically Derived Thermodynamic Profile of Interactions of Urea with a Native Protein.

    PubMed

    Son, Ikbae; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2016-11-29

    We report the first experimental characterization of the full thermodynamic profile for binding of urea to a native protein. We measured the volumetric parameters of lysozyme at pH 7.0 as a function of urea within a temperature range of 18-45 °C. At neutral pH, lysozyme retains its native conformation between 0 and 8 M urea over the entire range of temperatures studied. Consequently, our measured volumetric properties reflect solely the interactions of urea with the native protein and do not involve contributions from urea-induced conformational transitions. We analyzed our data within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic analytical model in which urea-protein interactions are viewed as solvent exchange in the vicinity of the protein. The analysis produced the equilibrium constant, k, for an elementary reaction of urea-protein binding with a change in standard state free energy (ΔG° = -RT ln k) at each experimental temperature. We used the van't Hoff equation to compute from the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constant, k, changes in enthalpy, ΔH°, and entropy, ΔS°, accompanying binding. The thermodynamic profile of urea-protein interactions, in conjunction with published molecular dynamics simulation results, is consistent with the picture in which urea molecules, being underhydrated in the bulk, form strong, enthalpically favorable interactions with the surface protein groups while paying a high entropic price. We discuss ramifications of our results for providing insights into the combined effects of urea, temperature, and pressure on the conformational preferences of proteins.

  9. Novel glutaredoxin activity of the yeast prion protein Ure2 reveals a native-like dimer within fibrils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zai-Rong; Perrett, Sarah

    2009-05-22

    Ure2 is the protein determinant of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion [URE3]. Ure2 has structural similarity to glutathione transferases, protects cells against heavy metal and oxidant toxicity in vivo, and shows glutathione-dependent peroxidase activity in vitro. Here we report that Ure2 (which has no cysteine residues) also shows thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity similar to that of glutaredoxin enzymes. This demonstrates that disulfide reductase activity can be independent of the classical glutaredoxin CXXC/CXXS motif or indeed an intrinsic catalytic cysteine residue. The kinetics of the glutaredoxin activity of Ure2 showed positive cooperativity for the substrate glutathione in both the soluble native state and in amyloid-like fibrils, indicating native-like dimeric structure within Ure2 fibrils. Characterization of the glutaredoxin activity of Ure2 sheds light on its ability to protect yeast from heavy metal ion and oxidant toxicity and suggests a role in reversible protein glutathionylation signal transduction. Observation of allosteric enzyme behavior within amyloid-like Ure2 fibrils not only provides insight into the molecular structure of the fibrils but also has implications for the mechanism of [URE3] prion formation.

  10. Definition of antigen specificity for antimitochondrial proteins detected by Western blotting using native mitochondrial proteins in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, H; Kawaguchi, N; Kikuchi, K; Fujikawa, H; Kitazawa, E; Matsushita, M

    2001-10-01

    The major autoantigens to anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have previously been identified to be PDC-E2, BCOADC-E2, and OGDC-E2. However, analysis of these autoantigens to AMA cannot be examined using the two routine assays; immmunofluorescence and ELISA. Moreover, there are some problems in specificity and sensitivity in these routine assays. So, analysis with Western blotting using native mitochondrial protein as the antigen is required; it allows the identification of the molecular weights for the proteins which react with AMA in patients' sera. However, since the antigen-proteins used are not unified, molecular weights of AMA corresponding proteins vary among laboratories. In the present study, as the first step to help address this issue, we investigated the antigen specificity of protein bands detected by Western blotting using our in-house bovine and porcine heart mitochondrial proteins. Three major recombinant mitochondrial proteins were prepared. The antigen specificity was examined by the absorption tests preincubated with the three recombinant mitochondrial proteins. The molecular weights of developing our bovine and porcine heart mitochondrial proteins using SDS-PAGE were multiple protein bands including 74, 52, 50, and 43 kDa protein bands. Of them, the 74, 50, and 43 kDa protein bands were absorbed with preincubations of recombinant PDC-E2, BCOADC-E2, and OGDC-E2 protein, respectively. AMA specificity of these three major proteins with our Western blotting was confirmed.

  11. A Historical Perspective and Overview of Protein Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooley, John C.; Ye, Yuzhen

    Carrying on many different biological functions, proteins are all composed of one or more polypeptide chains, each containing from several to hundreds or even thousands of the 20 amino acids. During the 1950s at the dawn of modern biochemistry, an essential question for biochemists was to understand the structure and function of these polypeptide chains. The sequences of protein, also referred to as their primary structures, determine the different chemical properties for different proteins, and thus continue to captivate much of the attention of biochemists. As an early step in characterizing protein chemistry, British biochemist Frederick Sanger designed an experimental method to identify the sequence of insulin (Sanger et al., 1955). He became the first person to obtain the primary structure of a protein and in 1958 won his first Nobel Price in Chemistry. This important progress in sequencing did not answer the question of whether a single (individual) protein has a distinctive shape in three dimensions (3D), and if so, what factors determine its 3D architecture. However, during the period when Sanger was studying the primary structure of proteins, American biochemist Christian Anfinsen observed that the active polypeptide chain of a model protein, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase), could fold spontaneously into a unique 3D structure, which was later called native conformation of the protein (Anfinsen et al., 1954). Anfinsen also studied the refolding of RNase enzyme and observed that an enzyme unfolded under extreme chemical environment could refold spontaneously back into its native conformation upon changing the environment back to natural conditions (Anfinsen et al., 1961). By 1962, Anfinsen had developed his theory of protein folding (which was summarized in his 1972 Nobel acceptance speech): "The native conformation is determined by the totality of interatomic interactions and hence, by the amino acid sequence, in a given environment."

  12. [Protein phosphatases: structure and function].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagian, V M

    1994-01-01

    The process of protein and enzyme systems phosphorylation is necessary for cell growth, differentiation and preparation for division and mitosis. The conformation changes of protein as a result of phosphorylation lead to increased enzyme activity and enhanced affinity to substrates. A large group of enzymes--protein kinases--is responsible for phosphorylation process in cell, which are divided into tyrosine- and serine-threonine-kinases depending on their ability to phosphorylate appropriate amino acid residues. In this review has been considered the functional importance and structure of protein phosphatases--enzymes, which are functional antagonists of protein kinases.

  13. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein is a molten globule under native conditions: implications for its physiological activities.

    PubMed

    Sutovsky, Hadar; Gazit, Ehud

    2004-04-23

    The von-Hippel Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) is conserved throughout evolution, as its homologues are found in organisms ranging from mammals to the Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae insects and the Caenorhabditis elegans nematode. Although the physiological role of pVHL is not fully understood, it has been shown to interact with a large number of unrelated proteins and was suggested to play a role in protein degradation as an E3 ubiquitin ligase component in the ubiquitin pathway. To gain insight into the molecular basis of pVHL activity, we analyzed its folding and stability in solution under physiologically relevant conditions. Dynamic light-scattering and gel filtration chromatography of the purified pVHL clearly indicated that the Stokes radius of the protein is larger than what would be expected from its crystal structure. However, under these conditions, the protein shows a clear secondary structure as determined by far-UV circular dichroism. Yet, the near-UV CD experiments show an absence of a tertiary structure. Upon the addition of urea, even at very low concentrations, the protein unfolds in a non-reversible manner, leading to the formation of amorphous aggregates. Furthermore, a large increase in fluorescence (>50-fold) is observed upon the addition of pVHL into a solution containing 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid. We therefore conclude that, under native conditions, the non-bound pVHL has a molten globule configuration with marginal stability. Although molten globular structures can be induced in many proteins under extreme conditions, this is one of the few reported cases of such a structure under the physiological conditions of pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The significance of the pVHL structural properties is being discussed in the context of its physiological activities.

  14. Native electrospray mass spectrometry reveals the nature and stoichiometry of pigments in the FMO photosynthetic antenna protein.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hao; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2011-05-03

    The nature and stoichiometry of pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic antenna protein complex were determined by native electrospray mass spectrometry. The FMO antenna complex was the first chlorophyll-containing protein that was crystallized. Previous results indicate that the FMO protein forms a trimer with seven bacteriochlorophyll a in each monomer. This model has long been a working basis to understand the molecular mechanism of energy transfer through pigment/pigment and pigment/protein coupling. Recent results have suggested, however, that an eighth bacteriochlorophyll is present in some subunits. In this report, a direct mass spectrometry measurement of the molecular weight of the intact FMO protein complex clearly indicates the existence of an eighth pigment, which is assigned as a bacteriochlorophyll a by mass analysis of the complex and HPLC analysis of the pigment. The eighth pigment is found to be easily lost during purification, which results in its partial occupancy in the mass spectra of the intact complex prepared by different procedures. The results are consistent with the recent X-ray structural models. The existence of the eighth bacteriochlorophyll a in this model antenna protein gives new insights into the functional role of the FMO protein and motivates the need for new theoretical and spectroscopic assignments of spectral features of the FMO protein.

  15. Native Electrospray Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Nature and Stoichiometry of Pigments in the FMO Photosynthetic Antenna Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hao; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-05-03

    The nature and stoichiometry of pigments in the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) photosynthetic antenna protein complex were determined by native electrospray mass spectrometry. The FMO antenna complex was the first chlorophyll-containing protein that was crystallized. Previous results indicate that the FMO protein forms a trimer with seven bacteriochlorophyll a in each monomer. This model has long been a working basis to understand the molecular mechanism of energy transfer through pigment/pigment and pigment/protein coupling. Recent results have suggested, however, that an eighth bacteriochlorophyll is present in some subunits. In this report, a direct mass spectrometry measurement of the molecular weight of the intact FMO protein complex clearly indicates the existence of an eighth pigment, which is assigned as a bacteriochlorophyll a by mass analysis of the complex and HPLC analysis of the pigment. The eighth pigment is found to be easily lost during purification, which results in its partial occupancy in the mass spectra of the intact complex prepared by different procedures. The results are consistent with the recent X-ray structural models. The existence of the eighth bacteriochlorophyll a in this model antenna protein gives new insights into the functional role of the FMO protein and motivates the need for new theoretical and spectroscopic assignments of spectral features of the FMO protein.

  16. Influence of Alkylammonium Acetate Buffers on Protein-Ligand Noncovalent Interactions Using Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Gavriilidou, Agni F. M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the influence of three volatile alkylammonium acetate buffers on binding affinities for protein-ligand interactions determined by native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Four different types of proteins were chosen for this study. A charge-reduction effect was observed for all the cases studied, in comparison to the ions formed in ammonium acetate solution. When increasing the collision energy, the complexes of trypsin and the ligand were found to be more stable when sprayed from alkylammonium acetate buffers than from ammonium acetate. The determined dissociation constant (Kd) also exhibited a drop (up to 40%) when ammonium acetate was replaced by alkylammonium acetate buffers for the case of lysozyme and the ligand. The prospective uses of these ammonium acetate analogs in native ESI-MS are discussed in this paper as well.

  17. Mechanism of the stabilization of ribonuclease A by sorbitol: preferential hydration is greater for the denatured then for the native protein.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, G.; Timasheff, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of interactions of sorbitol with ribonuclease A (RNase A) and the resulting stabilization of structure was examined in parallel thermal unfolding and preferential binding studies with the application of multicomponent thermodynamic theory. The protein was stabilized by sorbitol both at pH 2.0 and pH 5.5 as the transition temperature, Tm, was increased. The enthalpy of the thermal denaturation had a small dependence on sorbitol concentration, which was reflected in the values of the standard free energy change of denaturation, delta delta G(o) = delta G(o) (sorbitol) - delta G(o)(water). Measurements of preferential interactions at 48 degrees C at pH 5.5, where protein is native, and pH 2.0 where it is denatured, showed that sorbitol is preferentially excluded from the denatured protein up to 40%, but becomes preferentially bound to native protein above 20% sorbitol. The chemical potential change on transferring the denatured RNase A from water to sorbitol solution is larger than that for the native protein, delta mu(2D) > delta mu(2N), which is consistent with the effect of sorbitol on the free energy change of denaturation. The conformity of these results to the thermodynamic expression of the effect of a co-solvent on denaturation, delta G(o)(W) + delta mu(D)(2)delta G(o)(S) + delta mu(2D), indicates that the stabilization of the protein by sorbitol can be fully accounted for by weak thermodynamic interactions at the protein surface that involve water reversible co-solvent exchange at thermodynamically non-neutral sites. The protein structure stabilizing action of sorbitol is driven by stronger exclusion from the unfolded protein than from the native structure. PMID:9007993

  18. Crystal structure of native RPE65, the retinoid isomerase of the visual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, Philip D.; Golczak, Marcin; Lodowski, David T.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-12-01

    Vertebrate vision is maintained by the retinoid (visual) cycle, a complex enzymatic pathway that operates in the retina to regenerate the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal. A key enzyme in this pathway is the microsomal membrane protein RPE65. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of all-trans-retinyl esters to 11-cis-retinol in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mutations in RPE65 are known to be responsible for a subset of cases of the most common form of childhood blindness, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Although retinoid isomerase activity has been attributed to RPE65, its catalytic mechanism remains a matter of debate. Also, the manner in which RPE65 binds to membranes and extracts retinoid substrates is unclear. To gain insight into these questions, we determined the crystal structure of native bovine RPE65 at 2.14-{angstrom} resolution. The structural, biophysical, and biochemical data presented here provide the framework needed for an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of catalytic isomerization and membrane association, in addition to the role mutations that cause LCA have in disrupting protein function.

  19. Colony social structure in native and invasive populations of the social wasp Vespula pensylvanica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanna, Cause; Cook, Erin D.; Thompson, Ariel R.; Dare, Lyndzey E.; Palaski, Amanda L.; Foote, David; Goodisman, Michael A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Social insects rank among the most invasive of terrestrial species. The success of invasive social insects stems, in part, from the flexibility derived from their social behaviors. We used genetic markers to investigate if the social system of the invasive wasp, Vespula pensylvanica, differed in its introduced and native habitats in order to better understand variation in social phenotype in invasive social species. We found that (1) nestmate workers showed lower levels of relatedness in introduced populations than native populations, (2) introduced colonies contained workers produced by multiple queens whereas native colonies contained workers produced by only a single queen, (3) queen mate number did not differ significantly between introduced and native colonies, and (4) workers from introduced colonies were frequently produced by queens that originated from foreign nests. Thus, overall, native and introduced colonies differed substantially in social phenotype because introduced colonies more frequently contained workers produced by multiple, foreign queens. In addition, the similarity in levels of genetic variation in introduced and native habitats, as well as observed variation in colony social phenotype in native populations, suggest that colony structure in invasive populations may be partially associated with social plasticity. Overall, the differences in social structure observed in invasive V. pensylvanica parallel those in other, distantly related invasive social insects, suggesting that insect societies often develop similar social phenotypes upon introduction into new habitats.

  20. Why and how does native topology dictate the folding speed of a protein?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, Mark; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2012-11-01

    Since the pioneering work of Plaxco, Simons, and Baker, it is now well known that the rates of protein folding strongly correlate with the average sequence separation (absolute contact order (ACO)) of native contacts. In spite of multitude of papers, our understanding to the basis of the relation between folding speed and ACO is still lacking. We model the transition state as a Gaussian polymer chain decorated with weak springs between native contacts while the unfolded state is modeled as a Gaussian chain only. Using these hamiltonians, our perturbative calculation explicitly shows folding speed and ACO are linearly related when only the first order term in the series is considered. However, to the second order, we notice the existence of two new topological metrics, termed COC1 and COC2 (COC stands for contact order correction). These additional correction terms are needed to properly account for the entropy loss due to overlapping (nested or linked) loops that are not well described by simple addition of entropies in ACO. COC1 and COC2 are related to fluctuations and correlations among different sequence separations. The new metric combining ACO, COC1, and COC2 improves folding speed dependence on native topology when applied to three different databases: (i) two-state proteins with only α/β and β proteins, (ii) two-state proteins (α/β, β and purely helical proteins all combined), and (iii) master set (multi-state and two-state) folding proteins. Furthermore, the first principle calculation provides us direct physical insights to the meaning of the fit parameters. The coefficient of ACO, for example, is related to the average strength of the contacts, while the constant term is related to the protein folding speed limit. With the new scaling law, our estimate of the folding speed limit is in close agreement with the widely accepted value of 1 μs observed in proteins and RNA. Analyzing an exhaustive set (7367) of monomeric proteins from protein data bank

  1. Gradual disordering of the native state on a slow two-state folding protein monitored by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR.

    PubMed

    Campos, Luis A; Sadqi, Mourad; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Xiang; English, Douglas S; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-10-24

    Theory predicts that folding free energy landscapes are intrinsically malleable and as such are expected to respond to perturbations in topographically complex ways. Structural changes upon perturbation have been observed experimentally for unfolded ensembles, folding transition states, and fast downhill folding proteins. However, the native state of proteins that fold in a two-state fashion is conventionally assumed to be structurally invariant during unfolding. Here we investigate how the native and unfolded states of the chicken α-spectrin SH3 domain (a well characterized slow two-state folder) change in response to chemical denaturants and/or temperature. We can resolve the individual properties of the two end-states across the chemical unfolding transition employing single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SM-FRET) and across the thermal unfolding transition by NMR because SH3 folds-unfolds in the slow chemical exchange regime. Our results demonstrate that α-spectrin SH3 unfolds in a canonical way in the sense that it converts between the native state and an unfolded ensemble that expands in response to chemical denaturants. However, as conditions become increasingly destabilizing, the native state also expands gradually, and a large fraction of its native intramolecular hydrogen bonds break up. This gradual disordering of the native state takes place in times shorter than the 100 μs resolution of our SM-FRET experiments. α-Spectrin SH3 thus showcases the extreme plasticity of folding landscapes, which extends to the native state of slow two-state proteins. Our results point to the idea that folding mechanisms under physiological conditions might be quite different from those obtained by linear extrapolation from denaturing conditions. Furthermore, they highlight a pressing need for re-evaluating the conventional procedures for analyzing and interpreting folding experiments, which may be based on too-simplistic assumptions.

  2. Photoinduced structural changes to protein kinase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The importance of porphyrins in organisms is underscored by the ubiquitous biological and biochemical functions that are mediated by these compounds and by their potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is the precursor to heme and has biomedical applications such as its use as a photosensitizer in phototherapy and photodetection of cancer. Among other applications, our group has demonstrated that low-irradiance exposure to laser irradiation of PPIX, Fe-PPIX, or meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) non-covalently docked to a protein causes conformational changes in the polypeptide. Such approach can have remarkable consequences in the study of protein structure/function relationship and can be used to prompt non-native protein properties. Therefore we have investigated protein kinase A (PKA), a more relevant protein model towards the photo-treatment of cancer. PKA's enzymatic functions are regulated by the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate for intracellular signal transduction involved in, among other things, stimulation of transcription, tumorigenesis in Carney complex and migration of breast carcinoma cells. Since phosphorylation is a necessary step in some cancers and inflammatory diseases, inhibiting the protein kinase, and therefore phosphorylation, may serve to treat these diseases. Changes in absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime indicate: 1) both TSPP and PPIX non-covalently bind to PKA where they maintain photoreactivity; 2) absorptive photoproduct formation occurs only when PKA is bound to TSPP and irradiated; and 3) PKA undergoes secondary structural changes after irradiation with either porphyrin bound. These photoinduced changes could affect the protein's enzymatic and signaling capabilities.

  3. Differences in ecological structure, function, and native species abundance between native and invaded Hawaiian streams

    Treesearch

    Tara Holitzki; Richard A. MacKenzie; Tracy N. Wiegner; Karla J. McDermid

    2013-01-01

    Poeciliids, one of the most invasive species worldwide, are found on almost every continent and have been identified as an ‘‘invasive species of concern’’ in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Despite their global prevalence, few studies have quantified their impacts on tropical stream ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity. Utilizing Hawaiian...

  4. Influences of heterogeneous native contact energy and many-body interactions on the prediction of protein folding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuqing; Ouyang, Yanhua; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-16

    Since single-point mutant perturbation has been used to probe protein folding mechanisms in experiments, the ϕ-value has become a critical parameter to infer the transition state (TS) for two-state proteins. Experimentally, large scale analysis has shown a nearly single uniform ϕ-value with normally distributed error from 24 different proteins; moreover, in zero stability conditions, the intrinsic variable ϕ(0) is around 0.36. To explore how and to what extent theoretical models can capture experimental phenomena, we here use structure-based explicit chain coarse-grained models to investigate the influence of single-point mutant perturbation on protein folding for single domain two-state proteins. Our results indicate that uniform, additive contact energetic interactions cannot predict experimental Brønsted plots well. Those points deviate largely from the main data sets in Brønsted plots, are mostly hydrophobic, and are located in N- and C-terminal contacting regions. Heterogenous contact energy, which is dependent on sequence separation, can narrow the point dispersion in a Brønsted plot. Moreover, we demonstrate that combining many-body interactions with heterogeneous native contact energy can present mean ϕ-values consistent with experimental findings, with a comparable distributed error. This indicates that for more accurate elucidation of protein folding mechanisms by residue-level structure-based models, these elements should be considered.

  5. Assembly of protein tertiary structures from secondary structures using optimized potentials.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R; Cieplak, Marek; Maritan, Amos

    2003-08-01

    We present a simulated annealing-based method for the prediction of the tertiary structures of proteins given knowledge of the secondary structure associated with each amino acid in the sequence. The backbone is represented in a detailed fashion whereas the sidechains and pairwise interactions are modeled in a simplified way, following the LINUS model of Srinivasan and Rose. A perceptron-based technique is used to optimize the interaction potentials for a training set of three proteins. For these proteins, the procedure is able to reproduce the tertiary structures to below 3 A in root mean square deviation (rmsd) from the PDB targets. We present the results of tests on twelve other proteins. For half of these, the lowest energy decoy has a rmsd from the native state below 6 A and, in 9 out of 12 cases, we obtain decoys whose rmsd from the native states are also well below 5 A.

  6. The Receptor-Binding Domain of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Produced in Escherichia coli Folds into Its Native, Immunogenic Structure

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Aguilar-Yañez, José Manuel; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein promotes influenza virus entry and is the key protective antigen in natural immunity and vaccines. The HA protein is a trimeric envelope glycoprotein consisting of a globular receptor-binding domain (HA-RBD) that is inserted into a membrane fusion-mediating stalk domain. Similar to other class I viral fusion proteins, the fusogenic stalk domain spontaneously refolds into its postfusion conformation when expressed in isolation, consistent with this domain being trapped in a metastable conformation. Using X-ray crystallography, we show that the influenza virus HA-RBD refolds spontaneously into its native, immunogenic structure even when expressed in an unglycosylated form in Escherichia coli. In the 2.10-Å structure of the HA-RBD, the receptor-binding pocket is intact and its conformational epitopes are preserved. Recombinant HA-RBD is immunogenic and protective in ferrets, and the protein also binds with specificity to sera from influenza virus-infected humans. Overall, the data provide a structural basis for the rapid production of influenza vaccines in E. coli. From an evolutionary standpoint, the ability of the HA-RBD to refold spontaneously into its native conformation suggests that influenza virus acquired this domain as an insertion into an ancestral membrane-fusion domain. The insertion of independently folding domains into fusogenic stalk domains may be a common feature of class I viral fusion proteins. PMID:21068239

  7. The Role of Conformational Flexibility on Protein Supercharging in Native Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Harry J.; Cassou, Catherine A.; Trnka, Michael J.; Burlingame, A. L.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of covalent intramolecular bonds, either native disulfide bridges or chemical crosslinks, on ESI supercharging of proteins from aqueous solutions were investigated. Chemically modifying cytochrome c with up to seven crosslinks or ubiquitin with up to two crosslinks did not affect the average or maximum charge states of these proteins in the absence of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), but the extent of supercharging induced by m-NBA increased with decreasing numbers of crosslinks. For the model random coil polypeptide reduced/alkylated RNase A, a decrease in charging with increasing m-NBA concentration attributable to reduced surface tension of the ESI droplet was observed, whereas native RNase A electrosprayed from these same solutions exhibited enhanced charging. The inverse relationship between the extent of supercharging and the number of intramolecular crosslinks for folded proteins, as well as the absence of supercharging for proteins that are random coils in aqueous solution, indicate that conformational restrictions induced by the crosslinks reduce the extent of supercharging. These results provide additional evidence that protein and protein complex supercharging from aqueous solution is primarily due to partial or significant unfolding that occurs as a result of chemical and/or thermal denaturation induced by the supercharging reagent late in the ESI droplet lifetime. PMID:21399817

  8. Enhancing Accuracy in Molecular Weight Determination of Highly Heterogeneously Glycosylated Proteins by Native Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanbo; de Jong, Rob N; van den Bremer, Ewald T J; Parren, Paul W H I; Heck, Albert J R

    2017-05-02

    The determination of molecular weights (MWs) of heavily glycosylated proteins is seriously hampered by the physicochemical characteristics and heterogeneity of the attached carbohydrates. Glycosylation impacts protein migration during sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. Standard electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry does not provide a direct solution as this approach is hindered by extensive interference of ion signals caused by closely spaced charge states of broadly distributed glycoforms. Here, we introduce a native tandem MS-based approach, enabling charge-state resolution and charge assignment of protein ions including those that escape mass analysis under standard MS conditions. Using this method, we determined the MW of two model glycoproteins, the extra-cellular domains of the highly and heterogeneously glycosylated proteins CD38 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as well as the overall MW and binding stoichiometries of these proteins in complex with a specific antibody.

  9. Characterization of the near native conformational states of the SAM domain of Ste11 protein by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sebanti; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-11-01

    The sterile alpha motif or SAM domain is one of the most frequently present protein interaction modules with diverse functional attributions. SAM domain of the Ste11 protein of budding yeast plays important roles in mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. In the current study, urea-induced, at subdenaturing concentrations, structural, and dynamical changes in the Ste11 SAM domain have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our study revealed that a number of residues from Helix 1 and Helix 5 of the Ste11 SAM domain display plausible alternate conformational states and largest chemical shift perturbations at low urea concentrations. Amide proton (H/D) exchange experiments indicated that Helix 1, loop, and Helix 5 become more susceptible to solvent exchange with increased concentrations of urea. Notably, Helix 1 and Helix 5 are directly involved in binding interactions of the Ste11 SAM domain. Our data further demonstrate that the existence of alternate conformational states around the regions involved in dimeric interactions in native or near native conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Slide preparation for single-cell-resolution imaging of fluorescent proteins in their three-dimensional near-native environment.

    PubMed

    Snippert, Hugo J; Schepers, Arnout G; Delconte, Gabriele; Siersema, Peter D; Clevers, Hans

    2011-07-28

    In recent years, many mouse models have been developed to mark and trace the fate of adult cell populations using fluorescent proteins. High-resolution visualization of such fluorescent markers in their physiological setting is thus an important aspect of adult stem cell research. Here we describe a protocol to produce sections (150-200 μm) of near-native tissue with optimal tissue and cellular morphology by avoiding artifacts inherent in standard freezing or embedding procedures. The activity of genetically expressed fluorescent proteins is maintained, thereby enabling high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of fluorescent structures in virtually all types of tissues. The procedure allows immunofluorescence labeling of proteins to depths up to 50 μm, as well as a chemical 'Click-iT' reaction to detect DNA-intercalating analogs such as ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU). Generation of near-native sections ready for imaging analysis takes approximately 2-3 h. Postsectioning processes, such as antibody labeling or EdU detection, take up to 10 h.

  11. Detection and analysis of protein-protein interactions in organellar and prokaryotic proteomes by native gel electrophoresis: (Membrane) protein complexes and supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Frank

    2006-07-01

    It is an essential and challenging task to unravel protein-protein interactions in their actual in vivo context. Native gel systems provide a separation platform allowing the analysis of protein complexes on a rather proteome-wide scale in a single experiment. This review focus on blue-native (BN)-PAGE as the most versatile and successful gel-based approach to separate soluble and membrane protein complexes of intricate protein mixtures derived from all biological sources. BN-PAGE is a charge-shift method with a running pH of 7.5 relying on the gentle binding of anionic CBB dye to all membrane and many soluble protein complexes, leading to separation of protein species essentially according to their size and superior resolution than other fractionation techniques can offer. The closely related colorless-native (CN)-PAGE, whose applicability is restricted to protein species with intrinsic negative net charge, proved to provide an especially mild separation capable of preserving weak protein-protein interactions better than BN-PAGE. The essential conditions determining the success of detecting protein-protein interactions are the sample preparations, e.g. the efficiency/mildness of the detergent solubilization of membrane protein complexes. A broad overview about the achievements of BN- and CN-PAGE studies to elucidate protein-protein interactions in organelles and prokaryotes is presented, e.g. the mitochondrial protein import machinery and oxidative phosphorylation supercomplexes. In many cases, solubilization with digitonin was demonstrated to facilitate an efficient and particularly gentle extraction of membrane protein complexes prone to dissociation by treatment with other detergents. In general, analyses of protein interactomes should be carried out by both BN- and CN-PAGE.

  12. Molecular modeling and conformational analysis of native and refolded viral genome-linked protein of cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Jose, M; Yadunandam, A Kasin; Backiyarani, S; Srividhya, K V; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2011-10-01

    The viral genome-linked protein (VPg) of Potyviruses is covalently attached to the 5' end of the genomic RNA. Towards biophysical characterization, the VPg coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) was amplified from the cDNA and expressed in E. coli. Most of the expressed VPg aggregated as inclusion bodies that were solubilized with urea and refolded with L-arginine hydrochloride. The various forms of CdMV VPg (native, denatured and refolded) were purified and the conformational variations between these forms were observed with fluorescence spectroscopy. Native and refolded CdMV VPg showed unordered secondary structure in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. The model of CdMV VPg was built based on the crystal structure of phosphotriesterase (from Pseudomonas diminuta), which had the maximum sequence homology with VPg to identify the arrangement of conserved amino acids in the protein to study the functional diversity of VPg. This is the first report on the VPg of CdMV, which is classified as a new member of the Macluravirus genus of the Potyviridae family.

  13. Synthesis of thioester peptides for the incorporation of thioamides into proteins by native chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    Batjargal, Solongo; Huang, Yun; Wang, Yanxin J; Petersson, E James

    2014-02-01

    Thioamides can be used as photoswitches, as reporters of local environment, as inhibitors of enzymes, and as fluorescence quenchers. We have recently demonstrated the incorporation of thioamides into polypeptides and proteins using native chemical ligation (NCL). In this protocol, we describe procedures for the synthesis of a thioamide precursor and an NCL-ready thioamide-containing peptide using Dawson's N-acyl-benzimidazolinone (Nbz) process. We include a description of the synthesis by NCL of a thioamide-labeled fragment of the neuronal protein α-synuclein. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Synthesis of thioester peptides for the incorporation of thioamides into proteins by native chemical ligation‡

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Solongo; Huang, Yun; Wang, Yanxin J.; Petersson, E. James

    2014-01-01

    Thioamides can be used as photoswitches, as reporters of local environment, as inhibitors of enzymes, and as fluorescence quenchers. We have recently demonstrated the incorporation of thioamides into polypeptides and proteins using native chemical ligation (NCL). In this protocol, we describe procedures for the synthesis of a thioamide precursor and an NCL-ready thioamide-containing peptide using Dawson’s N-acyl-benzimidazolinone (Nbz) process. We include a description of the synthesis by NCL of a thioamide-labeled fragment of the neuronal protein α-synuclein. PMID:24408658

  15. Structural Symmetry in Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Symmetry is a common feature among natural systems, including protein structures. A strong propensity toward symmetric architectures has long been recognized for water-soluble proteins, and this propensity has been rationalized from an evolutionary standpoint. Proteins residing in cellular membranes, however, have traditionally been less amenable to structural studies, and thus the prevalence and significance of symmetry in this important class of molecules is not as well understood. In the past two decades, researchers have made great strides in this area, and these advances have provided exciting insights into the range of architectures adopted by membrane proteins. These structural studies have revealed a similarly strong bias toward symmetric arrangements, which were often unexpected and which occurred despite the restrictions imposed by the membrane environment on the possible symmetry groups. Moreover, membrane proteins disproportionately contain internal structural repeats resulting from duplication and fusion of smaller segments. This article discusses the types and origins of symmetry in membrane proteins and the implications of symmetry for protein function.

  16. Structural Dynamics of Native-Like Ions in the Gas Phase: Results from Tandem Ion Mobility of Cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Allen, Samuel J; Eaton, Rachel M; Bush, Matthew F

    2017-07-18

    Ion mobility (IM) is a gas-phase separation technique that is used to determine the collision cross sections of native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, which are in turn used as restraints for modeling the structures of those analytes in solution. Here, we evaluate the stability of native-like ions using tandem IM experiments implemented using structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM). In this implementation of tandem IM, ions undergo a first dimension of IM up to a switch that is used to selectively transmit ions of a desired mobility. Selected ions are accumulated in a trap and then released after a delay to initiate the second dimension of IM. For delays ranging from 16 to 33 231 ms, the collision cross sections of native-like, 7+ cytochrome c ions increase monotonically from 15.1 to 17.1 nm(2). The largest products formed in these experiments at near-ambient temperature are still far smaller than those formed in energy-dependent experiments (∼21 nm(2)). However, the collision cross section increases by ∼2% between delay times of 16 and 211 ms, which may have implications for other IM experiments on these time scales. Finally, two subpopulations from the full population were each mobility selected and analyzed as a function of delay time, showing that the three populations can be differentiated for at least 1 s. Together, these results suggest that elements of native-like structure can have long lifetimes at near-ambient temperature in the gas phase but that gas-phase dynamics should be considered when interpreting results from IM.

  17. Protein synthesis by native chemical ligation: Expanded scope by using straightforward methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hackeng, Tilman M.; Griffin, John H.; Dawson, Philip E.

    1999-01-01

    The total chemical synthesis of proteins has great potential for increasing our understanding of the molecular basis of protein function. The introduction of native chemical ligation techniques to join unprotected peptides next to a cysteine residue has greatly facilitated the synthesis of proteins of moderate size. Here, we describe a straightforward methodology that has enabled us to rapidly analyze the compatibility of the native chemical ligation strategy for X–Cys ligation sites, where X is any of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. The simplified methodology avoids the necessity of specific amino acid thioester linkers or alkylation of C-terminal thioacid peptides. Experiments using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization MS analysis of combinatorial ligations of LYRAX-C-terminal thioester peptides to the peptide CRANK show that all 20 amino acids are suitable for ligation, with Val, Ile, and Pro representing less favorable choices because of slow ligation rates. To illustrate the method’s utility, two 124-aa proteins were manually synthesized by using a three-step, four-piece ligation to yield a fully active human secretory phospholipase A2 and a catalytically inactive analog. The combination of flexibility in design with general access because of simplified methodology broadens the applicability and versatility of chemical protein synthesis. PMID:10468563

  18. Structural inferences for the native skeletal muscle sodium channel as derived from patterns of endogenous proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, S.; Yang, J.; Barchi, R. )

    1989-08-05

    The alpha subunit (Mr approximately 260,000) of the rat skeletal muscle sodium channel is sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases during the isolation of muscle surface membrane. Antisera against synthetic oligopeptides were used to map the resultant fragments in order to identify protease-sensitive regions of the channel's structure in its native membrane environment. Antibodies to the amino terminus labeled major fragments of Mr approximately 130,000 and 90,000 and lesser amounts of other peptides as small as Mr approximately 12,000. Antisera to epitopes within the carboxyl-terminal half of the primary sequence recognized two fragments of Mr approximately 110,000 and 78,000. Individual antisera also selectively labeled smaller polypeptides in the most extensively cleaved preparations. The immunoreactivity patterns of monoclonal antibodies previously raised against the purified channel were then surveyed. The binding sites for one group of monoclonals, including several that recognize subtype-specific epitopes in the channel structure, were localized within a 12-kDa fragment near the amino terminus. The distribution of carbohydrate along the primary structure of the channel was also assessed by quantitating {sup 125}I-wheat germ agglutinin and 125I-concanavalin A binding to the proteolytic peptides. Most of the carbohydrate detected by these lectins was located between 22 and 90 kDa from the amino terminus of the protein. No lectin binding was detected to fragments arising from carboxyl-terminal half of the protein. These results were analyzed in terms of current models of sodium channel tertiary structure. In its normal membrane environment, the skeletal muscle sodium channel appears sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases in regions predicted to link the four repeat domains on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane while the repeat domains themselves are resistant to proteolysis.

  19. Structural complexity of macroalgae influences epifaunal assemblages associated with native and invasive species.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Puri; Rubal, Marcos; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Habitat structure is a primary factor determining the organism distribution. Here, two native and one invasive macroalgal species, apparently different in morphology, were sampled to examine the effects of habitat complexity on the abundance (N), taxon richness (S) and structure of their associated epifaunal assemblages by means of univariate and multivariate techniques. Dry weight and fractal measures were used as proxies of habitat quantity and habitat architecture respectively. Results revealed significant differences in the complexity and in N, S and the structure of epifaunal assemblages among macroalgae and significant correlations between complexity and epifauna. Results suggested that, beside the effect of habitat quantity, the habitat architecture also seems to play a significant role in shaping epifaunal assemblages. Complexity of the studied invasive macroalga significantly differed from that of native species and hosted also different assemblages. Therefore, our findings suggest that invasive macroalgae, if structurally different from native species, induce changes in the associated epifauna. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Production and characterization of a panel of monoclonal antibodies against native human cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael; McLoughlin, Victoria; Connolly, John G; Farquhar, Christine F; MacGregor, Ian R; Head, Mark W

    2009-02-01

    The human prion diseases, such as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), are characterized by the conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into an abnormal disease associated form (PrP(Sc)). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize these different PrP isoforms are valuable reagents both in the diagnosis of these diseases and in prion disease research in general but we know of no attempts to raise MAbs against native human PrP(C). We immunized prion protein gene ablated (PrP(-/-)) mice with native human PrP(C) purified from platelets (pHuPrP) generating a predominantly IgG isotype anti-pHuPrP polyclonal antibody response in all mice. Following fusion of splenocytes from the immunized mice with SP2/0 myeloma cells, we were able to identify single cell clone and cryopreserve 14 stable hybridoma cell lines producing MAbs that reacted with pHuPrP. The properties of these MAbs (such as isotype, binding to native/denatured pHuPrP, and HuPrP epitopes recognized) are described. Furthermore, several of these MAbs showed a selectivity in their ability to immunoprecipitate disease associated PrP(Sc) and its corresponding protease resistant core (PrP(res)).

  1. Analyzing modifiers of protein aggregation in C. elegans by native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of specific aggregation-prone proteins during aging is thought to be involved in several diseases, most notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease as well as polyglutamine expansion disorders such as Huntington's disease. Caenorhabditis elegans disease models with transgenic expression of fluorescently tagged aggregation-prone proteins have been used to screen for genetic modifiers of aggregation. To establish the role of modifying factors in the generation of aggregation intermediates, a method has been developed using native agarose gel electrophoresis (NAGE) that enables parallel screening of aggregation patterns of fluorescently labeled aggregation-prone proteins. Together with microscopy-based genetic screens this method can be used to identify modifiers of protein aggregation and characterize their molecular function. Although described here for analyzing aggregates in C. elegans, NAGE can be adjusted for use in other model organisms as well as for cultured cells.

  2. FlexAID: Revisiting Docking on Non-Native-Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael J

    2015-07-27

    Small-molecule protein docking is an essential tool in drug design and to understand molecular recognition. In the present work we introduce FlexAID, a small-molecule docking algorithm that accounts for target side-chain flexibility and utilizes a soft scoring function, i.e. one that is not highly dependent on specific geometric criteria, based on surface complementarity. The pairwise energy parameters were derived from a large dataset of true positive poses and negative decoys from the PDBbind database through an iterative process using Monte Carlo simulations. The prediction of binding poses is tested using the widely used Astex dataset as well as the HAP2 dataset, while performance in virtual screening is evaluated using a subset of the DUD dataset. We compare FlexAID to AutoDock Vina, FlexX, and rDock in an extensive number of scenarios to understand the strengths and limitations of the different programs as well as to reported results for Glide, GOLD, and DOCK6 where applicable. The most relevant among these scenarios is that of docking on flexible non-native-complex structures where as is the case in reality, the target conformation in the bound form is not known a priori. We demonstrate that FlexAID, unlike other programs, is robust against increasing structural variability. FlexAID obtains equivalent sampling success as GOLD and performs better than AutoDock Vina or FlexX in all scenarios against non-native-complex structures. FlexAID is better than rDock when there is at least one critical side-chain movement required upon ligand binding. In virtual screening, FlexAID results are lower on average than those of AutoDock Vina and rDock. The higher accuracy in flexible targets where critical movements are required, intuitive PyMOL-integrated graphical user interface and free source code as well as precompiled executables for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS make FlexAID a welcome addition to the arsenal of existing small-molecule protein docking methods.

  3. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W.; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  4. A novel approach to decoy set generation: designing a physical energy function having local minima with native structure characteristics.

    PubMed

    Keasar, Chen; Levitt, Michael

    2003-05-23

    We suggest a new approach to the generation of candidate structures (decoys) for ab initio prediction of protein structures. Our method is based on random sampling of conformation space and subsequent local energy minimization. At the core of this approach lies the design of a novel type of energy function. This energy function has local minima with native structure characteristics and wide basins of attraction. The current work presents our motivation for deriving such an energy function and also tests the derived energy function. Our approach is novel in that it takes advantage of the inherently rough energy landscape of proteins, which is generally considered a major obstacle for protein structure prediction. When local minima have wide basins of attraction, the protein's conformation space can be greatly reduced by the convergence of large regions of the space into single points, namely the local minima corresponding to these funnels. We have implemented this concept by an iterative process. The potential is first used to generate decoy sets and then we study these sets of decoys to guide further development of the potential. A key feature of our potential is the use of cooperative multi-body interactions that mimic the role of the entropic and solvent contributions to the free energy. The validity and value of our approach is demonstrated by applying it to 14 diverse, small proteins. We show that, for these proteins, the size of conformation space is considerably reduced by the new energy function. In fact, the reduction is so substantial as to allow efficient conformational sampling. As a result we are able to find a significant number of near-native conformations in random searches performed with limited computational resources.

  5. Structural correlates for lexical efficiency and number of languages in non-native speakers of English.

    PubMed

    Grogan, A; Parker Jones, O; Ali, N; Crinion, J; Orabona, S; Mechias, M L; Ramsden, S; Green, D W; Price, C J

    2012-06-01

    We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel based morphometry (VBM) to investigate whether the efficiency of word processing in the non-native language (lexical efficiency) and the number of non-native languages spoken (2+ versus 1) were related to local differences in the brain structure of bilingual and multilingual speakers. We dissociate two different correlates for non-native language processing. Firstly, multilinguals who spoke 2 or more non-native languages had higher grey matter density in the right posterior supramarginal gyrus compared to bilinguals who only spoke one non-native language. This is interpreted in relation to previous studies that have shown that grey matter density in this region is related to the number of words learnt in bilinguals relative to monolinguals and in monolingual adolescents with high versus low vocabulary. Our second result was that, in bilinguals, grey matter density in the left pars opercularis was positively related to lexical efficiency in second language use, as measured by the speed and accuracy of lexical decisions and the number of words produced in a timed verbal fluency task. Grey matter in the same region was also negatively related to the age at which the second language was acquired. This is interpreted in terms of previous findings that associated the left pars opercularis with phonetic expertise in the native language.

  6. How main-chains of proteins explore the free-energy landscape in native states.

    PubMed

    Senet, Patrick; Maisuradze, Gia G; Foulie, Colette; Delarue, Patrice; Scheraga, Harold A

    2008-12-16

    Understanding how a single native protein diffuses on its free-energy landscape is essential to understand protein kinetics and function. The dynamics of a protein is complex, with multiple relaxation times reflecting a hierarchical free-energy landscape. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of an alpha/beta protein (crambin) and a beta-sheet polypeptide (BS2) in their "native" states, we demonstrate that the mean-square displacement of dihedral angles, defined by 4 successive C(alpha) atoms, increases as a power law of time, t(alpha), with an exponent alpha between 0.08 and 0.39 (alpha = 1 corresponds to Brownian diffusion), at 300 K. Residues with low exponents are located mainly in well-defined secondary elements and adopt 1 conformational substate. Residues with high exponents are found in loops/turns and chain ends and exist in multiple conformational substates, i.e., they move on multiple-minima free-energy profiles.

  7. Recombinant chymosin used for exact and complete removal of a prochymosin derived fusion tag releasing intact native target protein

    PubMed Central

    Justesen, Sune F L; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Fusion tags add desirable properties to recombinant proteins, but they are not necessarily acceptable in the final products. Ideally, fusion tags should be removed releasing the intact native protein with no trace of the tag. Unique endoproteinases with the ability to cleave outside their own recognition sequence can potentially cleave at the boundary of any native protein. Chymosin was recently shown to cleave a pro-chymosin derived fusion tag releasing native target proteins. In our hands, however, not all proteins are chymosin-resistant under the acidic cleavage conditions (pH 4.5) used in this system. Here, we have modified the pro-chymosin fusion tag and demonstrated that chymosin can remove this tag at more neutral pH (pH 6.2); conditions, that are less prone to compromise the integrity of target proteins. Chymosin was successfully used to produce intact native target protein both at the level of small and large-scale preparations. Using short peptide substrates, we further examined the influence of P1′ amino acid (the N-terminus of the native target protein) and found that chymosin accepts many different, although not all, amino acids. We conclude that chymosin has several appealing characteristics for the exact removal of fusion tags. It is readily available in highly purified recombinant versions approved by the FDA for preparation of food for human consumption. We suggest that one should consider extending the use of chymosin to the preparation of pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:19388053

  8. Structural and functional analysis of native peroxiredoxin 2 in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Ohminato, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Peroxiredoxin 2, a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin, is the third most abundant protein in erythrocytes. It is understood that the physiologically functional state of peroxiredoxin 2 is the monomer, and that its role in scavenging low levels of H(2)O(2) results in the formation of disulfide-linked dimers, which are reversibly reduced to monomers by the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system. Additionally, peroxiredoxins are highly susceptible to sulfinic acid formation through reactions with various peroxides. This overoxidized form, which is thought to convert peroxiredoxins into molecular chaperones and to be accompanied by a transition to polymeric forms, can be reversed by sulfiredoxins. However, physiological conformational changes and the antioxidant role of erythrocyte peroxiredoxin 2 are still unclear because there is low sulfiredoxin and thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase activity in erythrocytes. In this study, we examined the structural and redox states of peroxiredoxin 2 in fresh hemolysates and estimated the activities of native and overoxidized peroxiredoxin 2 purified from red blood cells to clear the physiological roles of peroxiredoxin 2 in erythrocyte. Our findings demonstrate that native peroxiredoxin 2 exists as high molecular weight (>160 kDa) oligomers and that decamers or higher order molecular weight oligomers (260-460 kDa) have peroxidase activity. We further showed that peroxiredoxin 2 oligomers, which were predominantly composed of monomers in the reduced form, exert a chaperone activity equal to that of overoxidized peroxiredoxin 2 polymers. These results provide the novel insight that redox-active peroxiredoxin 2 functions in human red blood cells as high molecular weight oligomers that possess peroxidase and chaperone activities.

  9. Caring for our own: the role of institutionalized support structures in Native American nursing student success.

    PubMed

    Cech, Erin A; Metz, Anneke M; Babcock, Tracy; Smith, Jessi L

    2011-09-01

    In this project, the authors asked 19 Native American baccalaureate nursing students to discuss their experiences with a formal institutionalized student support program called "Caring for Our Own: A Reservation/University Partnership Program." The authors investigated the importance of different types of support structures within this program, as viewed by Native American nursing students. They distinguished between four institutionalized support structures: tangible, informational, emotional, and belonging. The authors found that students consider tangible support (such as stipends) to be comparatively less important than other types of support, particularly emotional and belonging support. Responses also revealed the importance of a fifth type of institutionalized support-motivational. The authors further discuss how these institutionalized support structures might lead to successful outcomes for Native American nursing students.

  10. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

    SciTech Connect

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.B.; Yang, J.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  11. Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Cationized Immunoglobulin G: Enhanced Delivery Compared to Native Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triguero, Domingo; Buciak, Jody B.; Yang, Jing; Pardridge, William M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to >10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 ± 0.37 μ M; Bmax, 1.4 ± 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  12. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: enhanced delivery compared to native protein.

    PubMed Central

    Triguero, D; Buciak, J B; Yang, J; Pardridge, W M

    1989-01-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB. Images PMID:2734318

  13. Native flagellin does not protect mice against an experimental Proteus mirabilis ascending urinary tract infection and neutralizes the protective effect of MrpA fimbrial protein.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Umpiérrez, Ana; Rial, Analía; Chabalgoity, José A; Zunino, Pablo

    2014-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis expresses several virulence factors including MR/P fimbriae and flagella. Bacterial flagellin has frequently shown interesting adjuvant and protective properties in vaccine formulations. However, native P. mirabilis flagellin has not been analyzed so far. Native P. mirabilis flagellin was evaluated as a protective antigen and as an adjuvant in co-immunizations with MrpA (structural subunit of MR/P fimbriae) using an ascending UTI model in the mouse. Four groups of mice were intranasally treated with either MrpA, native flagellin, both proteins and PBS. Urine and blood samples were collected before and after immunization for specific antibodies determination. Cytokine production was assessed in immunized mice splenocytes cultures. Mice were challenged with P. mirabilis, and bacteria quantified in kidneys and bladders. MrpA immunization induced serum and urine specific anti-MrpA antibodies while MrpA coadministered with native flagellin did not. None of the animals developed significant anti-flagellin antibodies. Only MrpA-immunized mice showed a significant decrease of P. mirabilis in bladders and kidneys. Instead, infection levels in MrpA-flagellin or flagellin-treated mice showed no significant differences with the control group. IL-10 was significantly induced in splenocytes of mice that received native flagellin or MrpA-flagellin. Native P. mirabilis flagellin did not protect mice against an ascending UTI. Moreover, it showed an immunomodulatory effect, neutralizing the protective role of MrpA. P. mirabilis flagellin exhibits particular immunological properties compared to other bacterial flagellins.

  14. The structure of Lactobacillus brevis surface layer reassembled on liposomes differs from native structure as revealed by SAXS.

    PubMed

    Kontro, Inkeri; Wiedmer, Susanne K; Hynönen, Ulla; Penttilä, Paavo A; Palva, Airi; Serimaa, Ritva

    2014-08-01

    The reassembly of the S-layer protein SlpA of Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 8287 on positively charged liposomes was studied by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and zeta potential measurements. SlpA was reassembled on unilamellar liposomes consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, prepared by extrusion through membranes with pore sizes of 50nm and 100nm. Similarly extruded samples without SlpA were used as a reference. The SlpA-containing samples showed clear diffraction peaks in their SAXS intensities. The lattice constants were calculated from the diffraction pattern and compared to those determined for SlpA on native cell wall fragments. Lattice constants for SlpA reassembled on liposomes (a=9.29nm, b=8.03nm, and γ=84.9°) showed a marked change in the lattice constants b and γ when compared to those determined for SlpA on native cell wall fragments (a=9.41nm, b=6.48nm, and γ=77.0°). The latter are in good agreement with values previously determined by electron microscopy. This indicates that the structure formed by SlpA is stable on the bacterial cell wall, but SlpA reassembles into a different structure on cationic liposomes. From the (10) reflection, the lower limit of crystallite size of SlpA on liposomes was determined to be 92nm, corresponding to approximately ten aligned lattice planes.

  15. Structural state of native molybdenum in the lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, A. V.; Gornostaeva, T. A.; Kartashov, P. M.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Sakharov, O. A.; Trubkin, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    The structural state was determined for zero-valence molybdenum in the lunar regolith. The body- and face-centered molybdenum forms (BCC and FCC, respectively) were identified. Disruption of the structure down to complete amorphization was noted. This might be caused by the long-term influence of the solar wind.

  16. Native disulfide bonds in plasma retinol-binding protein are not essential for all-trans-retinol-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Gabriel O; Yu, Yong; Tarr, George E; Cantor, Charles R

    2003-01-01

    A human plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP) mutant, named RBP-S, has been designed and produced in which the six native cysteine residues, involved in the formation of three disulfide bonds, have been replaced with serine. A hexa-histidine tag was also added to the C-terminus of RBP for ease of purification. The removal of the disulfide bonds led to a decrease in the affinity of RBP for all trans-retinol. Data indicates all-trans-retinol binds RBP and RBP-S with Kd = 4 x 10(-8) M and 1 x 10(-7) M, respectively, at approximately 20 degrees C. RBP-S has reduced stability as compared to natural RBP below pH 8.0 and at room temperature. Circular dichroism in the far-UV shows that there is a relaxation of the RBP structure upon the removal of its disulfide bonds. Circular dichroism in the near-UV shows that in the absence of the disulfide bonds, the optical activity of RBP is higher in the 310-330 nm than in the 280-290 nm range. This work suggests that the three native disulfide bonds aid in the folding of RBP but are not essential to produce a soluble, active protein.

  17. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  18. Insights into native epitopes of proliferating cell nuclear antigen using recombinant DNA protein products

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding full-length human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to generate a panel of in vitro translated labeled protein products with COOH-terminal deletions and to construct a set of fusion proteins with COOH- and NH2-terminal deletions. A rabbit antiserum raised against an NH2-terminal peptide, a well- characterized murine monoclonal antibody (mAb), and 14 human lupus sera with autoantibody to PCNA were analyzed for their reactivity with the constructs using both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques. The rabbit antiserum reacted in immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with constructs containing the appropriate NH2-terminal sequence and mAb reacted with a sequence from the midregion of PCNA. These experimentally induced antibodies also reacted with 15-mer synthetic peptides in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In contrast, none of the lupus sera reacted with synthetic peptides in ELISA. 9 of the 14 lupus sera also failed to react in Western immunoblotting with any recombinant fusion protein, although they all immunoprecipitated in vitro translated full-length protein. Four of the nine had variable patterns of immunoprecipitation with shorter constructs. The remaining five lupus sera were able to immunoprecipitate translation products as well as Western blot recombinant fusion proteins. From analysis of the patterns of reactivity of human lupus sera, it was deduced that the apparent heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to PCNA could be explained by immune response to highly conformational epitopes. These observations demonstrate that there might be special features in "native" epitopes of intranuclear antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies, and that these special features of native epitopes might not be present in prepared antigen used for experimental immunization. These features may be related to protein folding or to association of the antigen with other intranuclear proteins or nucleic acids, as

  19. Organization, Structure and Activity of Proteins in Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher,J.; Trudel, E.; Methot, M.; Desmeules, P.; Salesse, C.

    2007-01-01

    Many different processes take place at the cell membrane interface. Indeed, for instance, ligands bind membrane proteins which in turn activate peripheral membrane proteins, some of which are enzymes whose action is also located at the membrane interface. Native cell membranes are difficult to use to gain information on the activity of individual proteins at the membrane interface because of the large number of different proteins involved in membranous processes. Model membrane systems, such as monolayers at the air-water interface, have thus been extensively used during the last 50 years to reconstitute proteins and to gain information on their organization, structure and activity in membranes. In the present paper, we review the recent work we have performed with membrane and peripheral proteins as well as enzymes in monolayers at the air-water interface. We show that the structure and orientation of gramicidin has been determined by combining different methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin is indistinguishable from that in native membranes when appropriate conditions are used. We also show that the kinetics and extent of monolayer binding of myristoylated recoverin is much faster than that of the nonmyristoylated form and that this binding is highly favored by the presence polyunsaturated phospholipids. Moreover, we show that the use of fragments of RPE65 allow determine which region of this protein is most likely involved in membrane binding. Monomolecular films were also used to further understand the hydrolysis of organized phospholipids by phospholipases A2 and C.

  20. Protein structure prediction and potential energy landscape analysis using continuous global minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.A.; Phillips, A.T.; Rosen, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    Proteins require specific three-dimensional conformations to function properly. These {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} conformations result primarily from intramolecular interactions between the atoms in the macromolecule, and also intermolecular interactions between the macromolecule and the surrounding solvent. Although the folding process can be quite complex, the instructions guiding this process are specified by the one-dimensional primary sequence of the protein or nucleic acid: external factors, such as helper (chaperone) proteins, present at the time of folding have no effect on the final state of the protein. Many denatured proteins spontaneously refold into functional conformations once denaturing conditions are removed. Indeed, the existence of a unique native conformation, in which residues distant in sequence but close in proximity exhibit a densely packed hydrophobic core, suggests that this three-dimensional structure is largely encoded within the sequential arrangement of these specific amino acids. In any case, the native structure is often the conformation at the global minimum energy. In addition to the unique native (minimum energy) structure, other less stable structures exist as well, each with a corresponding potential energy. These structures, in conjunction with the native structure, make up an energy landscape that can be used to characterize various aspects of the protein structure. 22 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Structural reconstruction of protein ancestry.

    PubMed

    Rouet, Romain; Langley, David B; Schofield, Peter; Christie, Mary; Roome, Brendan; Porebski, Benjamin T; Buckle, Ashley M; Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J; Stock, Daniela; Christ, Daniel

    2017-03-29

    Ancestral protein reconstruction allows the resurrection and characterization of ancient proteins based on computational analyses of sequences of modern-day proteins. Unfortunately, many protein families are highly divergent and not suitable for sequence-based reconstruction approaches. This limitation is exemplified by the antigen receptors of jawed vertebrates (B- and T-cell receptors), heterodimers formed by pairs of Ig domains. These receptors are believed to have evolved from an extinct homodimeric ancestor through a process of gene duplication and diversification; however molecular evidence has so far remained elusive. Here, we use a structural approach and laboratory evolution to reconstruct such molecules and characterize their interaction with antigen. High-resolution crystal structures of reconstructed homodimeric receptors in complex with hen-egg white lysozyme demonstrate how nanomolar affinity binding of asymmetrical antigen is enabled through selective recruitment and structural plasticity within the receptor-binding site. Our results provide structural evidence in support of long-held theories concerning the evolution of antigen receptors, and provide a blueprint for the experimental reconstruction of protein ancestry in the absence of phylogenetic evidence.

  2. Small heat shock proteins sequester misfolding proteins in near-native conformation for cellular protection and efficient refolding

    PubMed Central

    Ungelenk, Sophia; Moayed, Fatemeh; Ho, Chi-Ting; Grousl, Tomas; Scharf, Annette; Mashaghi, Alireza; Tans, Sander; Mayer, Matthias P.; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) constitute an evolutionary conserved yet diverse family of chaperones acting as first line of defence against proteotoxic stress. sHsps coaggregate with misfolded proteins but the molecular basis and functional implications of these interactions, as well as potential sHsp specific differences, are poorly explored. In a comparative analysis of the two yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, we show in vitro that model substrates retain near-native state and are kept physically separated when complexed with either sHsp, while being completely unfolded when aggregated without sHsps. Hsp42 acts as aggregase to promote protein aggregation and specifically ensures cellular fitness during heat stress. Hsp26 in contrast lacks aggregase function but is superior in facilitating Hsp70/Hsp100-dependent post-stress refolding. Our findings indicate the sHsps of a cell functionally diversify in stress defence, but share the working principle to promote sequestration of misfolding proteins for storage in native-like conformation. PMID:27901028

  3. Improved cryoEM-Guided Iterative Molecular Dynamics–Rosetta Protein Structure Refinement Protocol for High Precision Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many excellent methods exist that incorporate cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) data to constrain computational protein structure prediction and refinement. Previously, it was shown that iteration of two such orthogonal sampling and scoring methods – Rosetta and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations – facilitated exploration of conformational space in principle. Here, we go beyond a proof-of-concept study and address significant remaining limitations of the iterative MD–Rosetta protein structure refinement protocol. Specifically, all parts of the iterative refinement protocol are now guided by medium-resolution cryoEM density maps, and previous knowledge about the native structure of the protein is no longer necessary. Models are identified solely based on score or simulation time. All four benchmark proteins showed substantial improvement through three rounds of the iterative refinement protocol. The best-scoring final models of two proteins had sub-Ångstrom RMSD to the native structure over residues in secondary structure elements. Molecular dynamics was most efficient in refining secondary structure elements and was thus highly complementary to the Rosetta refinement which is most powerful in refining side chains and loop regions. PMID:25883538

  4. Improved cryoEM-Guided Iterative Molecular Dynamics--Rosetta Protein Structure Refinement Protocol for High Precision Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-03-10

    Many excellent methods exist that incorporate cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) data to constrain computational protein structure prediction and refinement. Previously, it was shown that iteration of two such orthogonal sampling and scoring methods – Rosetta and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations – facilitated exploration of conformational space in principle. Here, we go beyond a proof-of-concept study and address significant remaining limitations of the iterative MD–Rosetta protein structure refinement protocol. Specifically, all parts of the iterative refinement protocol are now guided by medium-resolution cryoEM density maps, and previous knowledge about the native structure of the protein is no longer necessary. Models are identified solely based on score or simulation time. All four benchmark proteins showed substantial improvement through three rounds of the iterative refinement protocol. The best-scoring final models of two proteins had sub-Ångstrom RMSD to the native structure over residues in secondary structure elements. Molecular dynamics was most efficient in refining secondary structure elements and was thus highly complementary to the Rosetta refinement which is most powerful in refining side chains and loop regions.

  5. Method for protein structure alignment

    DOEpatents

    Blankenbecler, Richard; Ohlsson, Mattias; Peterson, Carsten; Ringner, Markus

    2005-02-22

    This invention provides a method for protein structure alignment. More particularly, the present invention provides a method for identification, classification and prediction of protein structures. The present invention involves two key ingredients. First, an energy or cost function formulation of the problem simultaneously in terms of binary (Potts) assignment variables and real-valued atomic coordinates. Second, a minimization of the energy or cost function by an iterative method, where in each iteration (1) a mean field method is employed for the assignment variables and (2) exact rotation and/or translation of atomic coordinates is performed, weighted with the corresponding assignment variables.

  6. Aboriginal overkill : The role of Native Americans in structuring western ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kay, C E

    1994-12-01

    Prior to European influence, predation by Native Americans was the major factor limiting the numbers and distribution of ungulates in the Intermountain West. This hypothesis is based on analyses of (1) the efficiency of Native American predation, including cooperative hunting, use of dogs, food storage, use of nonungulate foods, and hunting methods; (2) optimal-foraging studies; (3) tribal territory boundary zones as prey reservoirs; (4) species ratios, and sex and age of aboriginal ungulate kills; (5) impact of European diseases on aboriginal populations; and (6) synergism between aboriginal and carnivore predation. Native Americans had no effective conservation practices, and the manner in which they harvested ungulates was the exact opposite of any predicted conservation strategy. Native Americans acted in ways that maximized their individual fitness regardless of the impact on the environment. For humans, conservation is seldom an evolutionarily stable strategy. By limiting ungulate numbers and purposefully modifying the vegetation with fire, Native Americans structured entire plant and animal communities. Because ecosystems with native peoples are entirely different than those lacking aboriginal populations, a "hands-off" or "natural regulation" approach by today's land managers will not duplicate the ecological conditions under which those ecosystems developed. The modern concept of wilderness as areas without human influence is a myth. North America was not a "wilderness" waiting to be discovered, instead it was home to tens of millions of aboriginal peoples before European-introduced diseases decimated their numbers.

  7. Native and Heated Hydrolysates of Milk Proteins and Their Capacity to Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation in the Zebrafish Larvae Model.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Wilman; Guzmán, Xavier; Vilcacundo, Edgar

    2017-09-14

    Casein and whey proteins with and without heat treatment were obtained of whole milk and four commercial milks in Ecuador, and were hydrolyzed. Then, their capacity to inhibit the lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method was evaluated at concentrations of 0.02, 0.04, 0.2, and, 0.4 mg/mL. Native and heated hydrolysates of milk proteins present high inhibitions of lipid peroxidation with a dose dependent effect both in vivo and in vitro tests. Casein and whey proteins obtained from whole milk were the ones with the highest anti-oxidant activity in vitro and in vivo test. Native casein hydrolysate at 0.4 mg/mL present a value of 55.55% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and heated casein hydrolysate at 0.4 mg/mL presents a value of 58.00% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Native whey protein at 0.4 mg/mL present a value of 34.84% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and heated whey protein at 0.4 mg/mL presents a value of 40.86% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Native and heated casein hydrolysates were more active than native and heated whey protein hydrolysates. Heat treatments have an effect of increasing the in vitro inhibition of lipid peroxidation of hydrolysates of milk protein. Casein and whey hydrolysates were able to inhibiting lipid peroxidation in the zebrafish larvae model. Native casein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk presents 48.35% of inhibition TBARS in vivo, this activity was higher in heated casein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk with a value of 56.28% of inhibition TBARS in vivo. Native whey protein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk presents 35.30% of inhibition TBARS, and heated whey protein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk was higher, with a value of 43.60% of inhibition TBARS in vivo.

  8. Native and Heated Hydrolysates of Milk Proteins and Their Capacity to Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation in the Zebrafish Larvae Model

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Wilman; Guzmán, Xavier; Vilcacundo, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    Casein and whey proteins with and without heat treatment were obtained of whole milk and four commercial milks in Ecuador, and were hydrolyzed. Then, their capacity to inhibit the lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method was evaluated at concentrations of 0.02, 0.04, 0.2, and, 0.4 mg/mL. Native and heated hydrolysates of milk proteins present high inhibitions of lipid peroxidation with a dose dependent effect both in vivo and in vitro tests. Casein and whey proteins obtained from whole milk were the ones with the highest anti-oxidant activity in vitro and in vivo test. Native casein hydrolysate at 0.4 mg/mL present a value of 55.55% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and heated casein hydrolysate at 0.4 mg/mL presents a value of 58.00% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Native whey protein at 0.4 mg/mL present a value of 34.84% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and heated whey protein at 0.4 mg/mL presents a value of 40.86% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Native and heated casein hydrolysates were more active than native and heated whey protein hydrolysates. Heat treatments have an effect of increasing the in vitro inhibition of lipid peroxidation of hydrolysates of milk protein. Casein and whey hydrolysates were able to inhibiting lipid peroxidation in the zebrafish larvae model. Native casein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk presents 48.35% of inhibition TBARS in vivo, this activity was higher in heated casein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk with a value of 56.28% of inhibition TBARS in vivo. Native whey protein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk presents 35.30% of inhibition TBARS, and heated whey protein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk was higher, with a value of 43.60% of inhibition TBARS in vivo. PMID:28906440

  9. Structure and Age Jointly Influence Rates of Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Toll-Riera, Macarena; Bostick, David; Albà, M. Mar; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2012-01-01

    What factors determine a protein's rate of evolution are actively debated. Especially unclear is the relative role of intrinsic factors of present-day proteins versus historical factors such as protein age. Here we study the interplay of structural properties and evolutionary age, as determinants of protein evolutionary rate. We use a large set of one-to-one orthologs between human and mouse proteins, with mapped PDB structures. We report that previously observed structural correlations also hold within each age group – including relationships between solvent accessibility, designabililty, and evolutionary rates. However, age also plays a crucial role: age modulates the relationship between solvent accessibility and rate. Additionally, younger proteins, despite being less designable, tend to evolve faster than older proteins. We show that previously reported relationships between age and rate cannot be explained by structural biases among age groups. Finally, we introduce a knowledge-based potential function to study the stability of proteins through large-scale computation. We find that older proteins are more stable for their native structure, and more robust to mutations, than younger ones. Our results underscore that several determinants, both intrinsic and historical, can interact to determine rates of protein evolution. PMID:22693443

  10. Oxidative modification of native protein residues using cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Seim, Kristen L; Obermeyer, Allie C; Francis, Matthew B

    2011-10-26

    A new protein modification strategy has been developed that is based on an oxidative coupling reaction that targets electron-rich amino acids. This strategy relies on cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) as an oxidation reagent and results in the coupling of tyrosine and tryptophan residues to phenylene diamine and anisidine derivatives. The methodology was first identified and characterized on peptides and small molecules, and was subsequently adapted for protein modification by determining appropriate buffer conditions. Using the optimized procedure, native and introduced solvent-accessible residues on proteins were selectively modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and small peptides. This unprecedented bioconjugation strategy targets these under-utilized amino acids with excellent chemoselectivity and affords good-to-high yields using low concentrations of the oxidant and coupling partners, short reaction times, and mild conditions.

  11. Quality assessment of modeled protein structure using physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Prashant Singh; Sharma, Harish; Bhattacharya, Mahua; Shukla, Anupam

    2015-04-01

    Physicochemical properties of proteins always guide to determine the quality of the protein structure, therefore it has been rigorously used to distinguish native or native-like structure from other predicted structures. In this work, we explore nine machine learning methods with six physicochemical properties to predict the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD), Template Modeling (TM-score), and Global Distance Test (GDT_TS-score) of modeled protein structure in the absence of its true native state. Physicochemical properties namely total surface area, euclidean distance (ED), total empirical energy, secondary structure penalty (SS), sequence length (SL), and pair number (PN) are used. There are a total of 95,091 modeled structures of 4896 native targets. A real coded Self-adaptive Differential Evolution algorithm (SaDE) is used to determine the feature importance. The K-fold cross validation is used to measure the robustness of the best predictive method. Through the intensive experiments, it is found that Random Forest method outperforms over other machine learning methods. This work makes the prediction faster and inexpensive. The performance result shows the prediction of RMSD, TM-score, and GDT_TS-score on Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) as 1.20, 0.06, and 0.06 respectively; correlation scores are 0.96, 0.92, and 0.91 respectively; R(2) are 0.92, 0.85, and 0.84 respectively; and accuracy are 78.82% (with ± 0.1 err), 86.56% (with ± 0.1 err), and 87.37% (with ± 0.1 err) respectively on the testing data set. The data set used in the study is available as supplement at http://bit.ly/RF-PCP-DataSets.

  12. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  13. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  14. Structural difficulty index: a reliable measure for modelability of protein tertiary structures.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Rahul; Jayaram, B

    2016-09-01

    The success in protein tertiary-structure prediction is considered to be a function of coverage and similarity/identity of their sequences with suitable templates in the structural databases. However, this measure of modelability of a protein sequence into its structure may be misleading. Addressing this limitation, we propose here a 'structural difficulty (SD)' index, which is derived from secondary structures, homology and physicochemical features of protein sequences. The SD index reflects the capability of predicting accurate structures and helps to assess the potential for developing proteome level structural databases for various organisms with some of the best methodologies available currently. For instance, the plausibility of populating the structural database of human proteome with reliable quality structures under 3 Å root mean square deviation from the corresponding natives is found to be ∼37% of a total of 11 084 manually curated soluble proteins and ∼64% for all annotated and reviewed unique soluble protein (344 661 sequences) of UniProtKB. Also for 77 human pathogenic viruses comprising 2365 globular viral proteins out of which only 162 structures are solved experimentally, SD index scores 1336 proteins in the modelable zone. Availability of reliable protein structures may prove a crucial aid in developing species-wise structural proteomic databases for accelerating function annotation and for drug development endeavors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Post-Assembly Functionalization of Supramolecular Nanostructures with Bioactive Peptides and Fluorescent Proteins by Native Chemical Ligation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Post-assembly functionalization of supramolecular nanostructures has the potential to expand the range of their applications. We report here the use of the chemoselective native chemical ligation (NCL) reaction to functionalize self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers. This strategy can be used to incorporate specific bioactivity on the nanofibers, and as a model, we demonstrate functionalization with the RGDS peptide following self-assembly. Incorporation of bioactivity is verified by the observation of characteristic changes in fibroblast morphology following NCL-mediated attachment of the signal to PA nanofibers. The NCL reaction does not alter the PA nanofiber morphology, and biotinylated RGDS peptide was found to be accessible on the nanofiber surface after ligation for binding with streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In order to show that this strategy is not limited to short peptides, we utilized NCL to conjugate yellow fluorescent protein and/or cyan fluorescent protein to self-assembled PA nanofibers. Förster resonance energy transfer and fluorescence anisotropy measurements are consistent with the immobilization of the protein on the PA nanofibers. The change in electrophoretic mobility of the protein upon conjugation with PA molecules confirmed the formation of a covalent linkage. NCL-mediated attachment of bioactive peptides and proteins to self-assembled PA nanofibers allows the independent control of self-assembly and bioactivity while retaining the biodegradable peptide structure of the PA molecule and thus can be useful in tailoring design of biomaterials. PMID:24670265

  16. Separation of thylakoid membrane proteins by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation or blue native-SDS-PAGE two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    D'Amici, Gian Maria; Huber, Christian G; Zolla, Lello

    2009-01-01

    Generally, a combination of two or more chromatographic and/or electrophoretic methods is conducted to separate membrane protein complexes. Here we describe how thylakoid membrane protein complexes from the photosynthetic apparatus can be successfully separated by two main steps: preparative methods that enable purification of membrane protein complexes in the native (intact) form, and analytical methods that allow resolution of each membrane protein. Thus, separation of intact supercomplexes was achieved by solubilisation of the sample using mild detergents followed either by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation or by blue native gel (BNG) electrophoresis. Complexes, thus, recovered were then resolved further using either reversed phase liquid chromatography or SDS-PAGE respectively.

  17. Mapping local structural perturbations in the native state of stefin B (cystatin B) under amyloid forming conditions

    PubMed Central

    Paramore, Robert; Morgan, Gareth J.; Davis, Peter J.; Sharma, Carrie-anne; Hounslow, Andrea; Taler-Verčič, Ajda; Žerovnik, Eva; Waltho, Jonathan P.; Cliff, Matthew J.; Staniforth, Rosemary A.

    2012-01-01

    Unlike a number of amyloid-forming proteins, stefins, and in particular stefin B (cystatin B) form amyloids under conditions where the native state predominates. In order to trigger oligomerization processes, the stability of the protein needs to be compromised, favoring structural re-arrangement however, accelerating fibril formation is not a simple function of protein stability. We report here on how optimal conditions for amyloid formation lead to the destabilization of dimeric and tetrameric states of the protein in favor of the monomer. Small, highly localized structural changes can be mapped out that allow us to visualize directly areas of the protein which eventually become responsible for triggering amyloid formation. These regions of the protein overlap with the Cu (II)-binding sites which we identify here for the first time. We hypothesize that in vivo modulators of amyloid formation may act similarly to painstakingly optimized solvent conditions developed in vitro. We discuss these data in the light of current structural models of stefin B amyloid fibrils based on H-exchange data, where the detachment of the helical part and the extension of loops were observed. PMID:23091450

  18. Nonspecific native elution of proteins and mumps virus in immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brgles, Marija; Sviben, Dora; Forčić, Dubravko; Halassy, Beata

    2016-05-20

    Immunoaffinity chromatography, based on the antigen-antibody recognition, enables specific purification of any antigen (protein, virus) by its antibody. The problem with immunoaffinity chromatography is the harsh elution conditions required for disrupting strong antigen-antibody interactions, such as low pH buffers, which are often deleterious for the immobilized protein and the protein to be isolated since they can also disrupt the intramolecular forces. Therefore, immunoaffinity chromatography can only be partially used for protein and virus purification. Here we report on a nonspecific elution in immunoaffinity chromatography using native conditions by elution with amino acid solution at physiological pH for which we suppose possible competing mechanism of action. Elution potential of various amino acid solutions was tested using immunoaffinity columns specific for ovalbumin and mumps virus, and protein G affinity column. Results have shown that the most successful elution solutions were those containing imidazole and arginine of high molarity. Imidazole represents aromatic residues readily found at the antigen-antibody interaction surface and arginine is most frequently found on protein surface in general. Therefore, results on their eluting power in immunoaffinity chromatography, which increases with increasing molarity, are in line with the competing mechanism of action. Virus immunoaffinity chromatography resulted in removal on nonviable virus particles, which is important for research and biotechnology purposes. In addition, amino acids are proven stabilizers for proteins and viruses making approach presented in this work a very convenient purification method.

  19. Expression in Escherichia coli of full-length and mutant rat brain calbindin D28. Comparison with the purified native protein.

    PubMed

    Gross, M D; Kumar, R; Hunziker, W

    1988-10-05

    Studies of vitamin D-dependent 28-kilodalton calcium binding protein (calbindin D28) have been hindered by difficulties in purifying large amounts of the protein. In order to overcome this problem, we cloned and expressed a full-length rat brain calbindin D28 cDNA. In addition, we isolated and purified to homogeneity, native rat brain calbindin D28. The isolated native protein has an apparent molecular mass of 27 kDa and properties similar to those of the well-characterized chicken calbindin D28. It has an acidic isoelectric point (approximately 4.5), a high affinity for calcium, and an amino terminus blocked to Edman degradation. The properties of the native and the recombinant proteins were examined by gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, protein sequencing, amino acid composition analysis, and calcium binding assays. We demonstrated that: (i) the authentic and the full-length recombinant proteins have similar molecular weights and isoelectric points; (ii) the proteins have the same amino acid composition; (iii) the proteins bind calcium in a similar manner; (iv) the absence of a blocking NH2-terminal group in the recombinant protein does not appreciably influence the binding of calcium. To further examine the calcium binding properties of this protein, we constructed deletion mutants lacking one or both of the two putative degenerated calcium binding sites (EF hand regions). These deletions resulted in smaller proteins that still bound calcium. The ability to express and purify calbindin D28 and mutants thereof should allow the systematic elucidation of structure-function relationships in this class of calcium binding proteins.

  20. Assessment of IgE binding to native and hydrolyzed soy protein in serum obtained from dogs with experimentally induced soy protein hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Serra, Montserrat; Brazís, Pilar; Fondati, Alessandra; Puigdemont, Anna

    2006-11-01

    To assess binding of IgE to native, whole hydrolyzed, and separated hydrolyzed fractions of soy protein in serum obtained from dogs with experimentally induced soy protein hypersensitivity. 8 naïve Beagles (6 experimentally sensitized to native soy protein and 2 control dogs). 6 dogs were sensitized against soy protein by administration of allergens during a 90-day period. After the sensitization protocol was completed, serum concentrations of soy-specific IgE were measured and intradermal skin tests were performed in all 6 dogs to confirm that the dogs were sensitized against soy protein. Serum samples from each sensitized and control dog underwent western blot analysis to assess the molecular mass band pattern of the different allergenic soy fractions and evaluate reactivities to native and hydrolyzed soy protein. In sera from sensitized dogs, a characteristic band pattern with 2 major bands (approx 75 and 50 kd) and 2 minor bands (approx 31 and 20 kd) was detected, whereas only a diffuse band pattern associated with whole hydrolyzed soy protein was detected in the most reactive dog. Reactivity was evident only for the higher molecular mass peptide fraction. In control dogs, no IgE reaction to native or hydrolyzed soy protein was detected. Data suggest that the binding of soy-specific IgE to the hydrolyzed soy protein used in the study was significantly reduced, compared with binding of soy-specific IgE to the native soy protein, in dogs with experimentally induced soy hypersensitivity.

  1. Native Contact Density and Nonnative Hydrophobic Effects in the Folding of Bacterial Immunity Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate. PMID:26016652

  2. Native contact density and nonnative hydrophobic effects in the folding of bacterial immunity proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate.

  3. Competitive advantage and higher fitness in native populations of genetically structured planktonic diatoms.

    PubMed

    Sildever, Sirje; Sefbom, Josefin; Lips, Inga; Godhe, Anna

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that the planktonic diatom Skeletonema from neighbouring areas are genetically differentiated despite absence of physical dispersal barriers. We revisited two sites, Mariager Fjord and Kattegat, NE Atlantic, and isolated new strains. Microsatellite genotyping and F-statistics revealed that the populations were genetically differentiated. An experiment was designed to investigate if populations are locally adapted and have a native competitive advantage. Ten strains from each location were grown individually in native and foreign water to investigate differences in produced biomass. Additionally, we mixed six pairs, one strain from each site, and let them grow together in native and foreign water. Strains from Mariager Fjord and Kattegat produced higher biomass in native water. In the competition experiment, strains from both sites displayed higher relative abundance and demonstrated competitive advantage in their native water. The cause of the differentiated growth is unknown, but could possibly be attributed to differences in silica concentration or viruses in the two water types. Our data show that dispersal potential does not influence the genetic structure of the populations. We conclude that genetic adaptation has not been overruled by gene flow, but instead the responses to different selection conditions are enforcing the observed genetic structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of two types of soy protein isolates, native and preheated whey protein isolates on emulsified meat batters prepared at different protein levels.

    PubMed

    Youssef, M K; Barbut, S

    2011-01-01

    The effects of substituting 1.5% of the meat proteins with low gelling soy protein isolate (LGS), high gelling soy protein isolate (HGS), native whey protein isolate (NWP), and preheated whey protein isolate (PWP) were compared at varying levels of proteins (12, 13 and 14%), with all meat control batters prepared with canola oil. Cooking losses were lower for all the non-meat protein treatments compared to the all meat controls. When raising the protein level from 12 to 14%, cooking losses increased in all treatments except for the NWP treatments. Using LGS increased emulsification and resulted in a more stable meat batters at the 13 and 14% protein treatments. Textural profile analysis results showed that elevating protein level increased hardness and cohesiveness. The highest hardness values were obtained for the PWP treatments and the lowest for the HGS, indicating a strong non-meat protein effect on texture modification. Non-meat protein addition resulted in lighter and less red products (i.e., lower red meat content) compared to the all meat controls; color affected by non-meat protein type. Light microscopy revealed that non-meat proteins decreased the frequency of fat globules' agglomeration and protein aggregation. The whey protein preparations and HGS formed distinct "islands" within the meat batters' matrices, which appeared to interact with the meat protein matrix. Copyright © 2010 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein Structure Comparison and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çamoǧlu, Orhan; Singh, Ambuj K.

    The success of genome projects has generated an enormous amount of sequence data. In order to realize the full value of the data, we need to understand its functional role and its evolutionary origin. Sequence comparison methods are incredibly valuable for this task. However, for sequences falling in the twilight zone (usually between 20 and 35% sequence similarity), we need to resort to structural alignment and comparison for a meaningful analysis. Such a structural approach can be used for classification of proteins, isolation of structural motifs, and discovery of drug targets.

  6. Ranking the quality of protein structure models using sidechain based network properties

    PubMed Central

    Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2014-01-01

    Determining the correct structure of a protein given its sequence still remains an arduous task with many researchers working towards this goal. Most structure prediction methodologies result in the generation of a large number of probable candidates with the final challenge being to select the best amongst these. In this work, we have used Protein Structure Networks of native and modeled proteins in combination with Support Vector Machines to estimate the quality of a protein structure model and finally to provide ranks for these models. Model ranking is performed using regression analysis and helps in model selection from a group of many similar and good quality structures. Our results show that structures with a rank greater than 16 exhibit native protein-like properties while those below 10 are non-native like. The tool is also made available as a web-server ( http://vishgraph.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/GraProStr/native_non_native_ranking.html), where, 5 modelled structures can be evaluated at a given time. PMID:25580218

  7. Servers for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Daniel

    2006-04-01

    The 1990s cultivated a generation of protein structure human predictors. As a result of structural genomics and genome sequencing projects, and significant improvements in the performance of protein structure prediction methods, a generation of automated servers has evolved in the past few years. Servers for close and distant homology modeling are now routinely used by many biologists, and have already been applied to the experimental structure determination process itself, and to the interpretation and annotation of genome sequences. Because dozens of servers are currently available, it is hard for a biologist to know which server(s) to use; however, the state of the art of these methods is now assessed through the LiveBench and CAFASP experiments. Meta-servers--servers that use the results of other autonomous servers to produce a consensus prediction--have proven to be the best performers, and are already challenging all but a handful of expert human predictors. The difference in performance of the top ten autonomous (non-meta) servers is small and hard to assess using relatively small test sets. Recent experiments suggest that servers will soon free humans from most of the burden of protein structure prediction.

  8. Protein Delivery into Plant Cells: Toward In vivo Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Cedeño, Cesyen; Pauwels, Kris; Tompa, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biologically relevant structural and functional behavior of proteins inside living plant cells is only possible through the combination of structural biology and cell biology. The state-of-the-art structural biology techniques are typically applied to molecules that are isolated from their native context. Although most experimental conditions can be easily controlled while dealing with an isolated, purified protein, a serious shortcoming of such in vitro work is that we cannot mimic the extremely complex intracellular environment in which the protein exists and functions. Therefore, it is highly desirable to investigate proteins in their natural habitat, i.e., within live cells. This is the major ambition of in-cell NMR, which aims to approach structure-function relationship under true in vivo conditions following delivery of labeled proteins into cells under physiological conditions. With a multidisciplinary approach that includes recombinant protein production, confocal fluorescence microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and different intracellular protein delivery strategies, we explore the possibility to develop in-cell NMR studies in living plant cells. While we provide a comprehensive framework to set-up in-cell NMR, we identified the efficient intracellular introduction of isotope-labeled proteins as the major bottleneck. Based on experiments with the paradigmatic intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) Early Response to Dehydration protein 10 and 14, we also established the subcellular localization of ERD14 under abiotic stress.

  9. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data.

    PubMed

    Bratholm, Lars A; Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction.

  10. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    PubMed Central

    Bratholm, Lars A.; Christensen, Anders S.; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction. PMID:25825683

  11. Native FKBP12 engineering by ligand-directed tosyl chemistry: labeling properties and application to photo-cross-linking of protein complexes in vitro and in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomonori; Tsukiji, Shinya; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-02-01

    The ability to modify target "native" (endogenous) proteins selectively in living cells with synthetic molecules should provide powerful tools for chemical biology. To this end, we recently developed a novel protein labeling technique termed ligand-directed tosyl (LDT) chemistry. This method uses labeling reagents in which a protein ligand and a synthetic probe are connected by a tosylate ester group. We previously demonstrated its applicability to the selective chemical labeling of several native proteins in living cells and mice. However, many fundamental features of this chemistry remain to be studied. In this work, we investigated the relationship between the LDT reagent structure and labeling properties by using native FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12) as a target protein. In vitro experiments revealed that the length and rigidity of the spacer structure linking the protein ligand and the tosylate group have significant effects on the overall labeling yield and labeling site. In addition to histidine, which we reported previously, tyrosine and glutamate residues were identified as amino acids that are modified by LDT-mediated labeling. Through the screening of various spacer structures, piperazine was found to be optimal for FKBP12 labeling in terms of labeling efficiency and site specificity. Using a piperazine-based LDT reagent containing a photoreactive probe, we successfully demonstrated the labeling and UV-induced covalent cross-linking of FKBP12 and its interacting proteins in vitro and in living cells. This study not only furthers our understanding of the basic reaction properties of LDT chemistry but also extends the applicability of this method to the investigation of biological processes in mammalian cells.

  12. Immobilised native plant cysteine proteases: packed-bed reactor for white wine protein stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Lombardelli, Claudio; Liburdi, Katia; Acciaro, Giuseppe; Zappino, Matteo; Esti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a feasibility study of using a continuous packed-bed reactor (PBR), containing immobilised native plant cysteine proteases, as a specific and mild alternative technique relative to the usual bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. The operational parameters for a PBR containing immobilised bromelain (PBR-br) or immobilised papain (PBR-pa) were optimised using model wine fortified with synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA). The effectiveness of PBR-br, both in terms of hazing potential and total protein decrease, was significantly higher than PBR-pa, in all the seven unfined, white wines used. Among the wines tested, Sauvignon Blanc, given its total protein content as well as its very high intrinsic instability, was selected as a control wine to evaluate the effect of the treatment on wine as to its soluble protein profile, phenolic composition, mineral component, and sensory properties. The treatment in a PBR containing immobilised bromelain appeared effective in decreasing both wine hazing potential and total protein amount, while it did not significantly affect the phenol compounds, the mineral component nor the sensory quality of wine. The enzymatic treatment in PBR was shown to be a specific and mild technique for use as an alternative to bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation.

  13. Information Structure of Native English-Speaking ESOL Teachers in Grammar Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malupa-Kim, Miralynn Faigao

    2011-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the information structure of native-English speaking (NES) ESOL teachers in giving explanations in a grammar class at an Intensive English Program (IEP) at a university in southern California Method: This mixed-method study employed a sequential-exploratory design. Six grammar…

  14. Acid hydrolysis of native and annealed starches and branch-structure of their Naegeli dextrins.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yuta; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2003-11-21

    Eight commercial starches, including common corn, waxy corn, wheat, tapioca, potato, Hylon V, Hylon VII, and mung bean starch, were annealed by a multiple-step process, and their gelatinization characteristics were determined. Annealed starches had higher gelatinization temperatures, reduced gelatinization ranges, and increased gelatinization enthalpies than their native starches. The annealed starches with the highest gelatinization enthalpies were subjected to acid hydrolysis with 15.3% H2SO4, and Naegeli dextrins were prepared after 10 days' hydrolysis. Annealing increased the acid susceptibility of native starches in the first (rapid) and the second (slow) phases with potato starch showing the greatest and high amylose starches showing the least changes. Starches with a larger shift in onset gelatinization temperature also displayed a greater percent hydrolysis. The increase in susceptibility to acid hydrolysis was proposed to result from defective and porous structures that resulted after annealing. Although annealing perfected the crystalline structure, it also produced void space, which led to porous structures and possible starch granule defects. The molecular size distribution and chain length distribution of Naegeli dextrins of annealed and native starches were analyzed. The reorganization of the starch molecule during annealing occurred mainly within the crystalline lamellae. Imperfect double helices in the crystalline lamellae improved after annealing, and the branch linkages at the imperfect double helices became protected by the improved crystalline structure. Therefore, more long chains were observed in the Naegeli dextrins of annealed starches than in native starches.

  15. Native herbivore exerts contrasting effects on fire regime and vegetation structure

    Treesearch

    Jose L. Hierro; Kenneth L. Clark; Lyn C. Branch; Diego. Villarreal

    2011-01-01

    Although native herbivores can alter fire regimes by consuming herbaceous vegetation that serves as fine fuel and, less commonly, accumulating fuel as nest material and other structures, simultaneous considerations of contrasting effects of herbivores on fire have scarcely been addressed. We proposed that a colonial rodent, vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus...

  16. Elastic network normal modes provide a basis for protein structure refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniewek, Pawel; Kolinski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2012-05-01

    It is well recognized that thermal motions of atoms in the protein native state, the fluctuations about the minimum of the global free energy, are well reproduced by the simple elastic network models (ENMs) such as the anisotropic network model (ANM). Elastic network models represent protein dynamics as vibrations of a network of nodes (usually represented by positions of the heavy atoms or by the Cα atoms only for coarse-grained representations) in which the spatially close nodes are connected by harmonic springs. These models provide a reliable representation of the fluctuational dynamics of proteins and RNA, and explain various conformational changes in protein structures including those important for ligand binding. In the present paper, we study the problem of protein structure refinement by analyzing thermal motions of proteins in non-native states. We represent the conformational space close to the native state by a set of decoys generated by the I-TASSER protein structure prediction server utilizing template-free modeling. The protein substates are selected by hierarchical structure clustering. The main finding is that thermal motions for some substates, overlap significantly with the deformations necessary to reach the native state. Additionally, more mobile residues yield higher overlaps with the required deformations than do the less mobile ones. These findings suggest that structural refinement of poorly resolved protein models can be significantly enhanced by reduction of the conformational space to the motions imposed by the dominant normal modes.

  17. Rubber particle proteins REF1 and SRPP1 interact differently with native lipids extracted from Hevea brasiliensis latex.

    PubMed

    Wadeesirisak, Kanthida; Castano, Sabine; Berthelot, Karine; Vaysse, Laurent; Bonfils, Frédéric; Peruch, Frédéric; Rattanaporn, Kittipong; Liengprayoon, Siriluck; Lecomte, Sophie; Bottier, Céline

    2017-02-01

    Rubber particle membranes from the Hevea latex contain predominantly two proteins, REF1 and SRPP1 involved in poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) synthesis or rubber quality. The repartition of both proteins on the small or large rubber particles seems to differ, but their role in the irreversible coagulation of the rubber particle is still unknown. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with different classes of lipids extracted from Hevea brasiliensis latex, and defined as phospholipids (PL), glycolipids (GL) and neutral lipids (NL). We combined two biophysical methods, polarization modulated-infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and ellipsometry to elucidate their interactions with monolayers of each class of lipids. REF1 and SRPP1 interactions with native lipids are clearly different; SRPP1 interacts mostly in surface with PL, GL or NL, without modification of its structure. In contrast REF1 inserts deeply in the lipid monolayers with all lipid classes. With NL, REF1 is even able to switch from α-helice conformation to β-sheet structure, as in its aggregated form (amyloid form). Interaction between REF1 and NL may therefore have a specific role in the irreversible coagulation of rubber particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Native Myocardial T1 as a Biomarker of Cardiac Structure in Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Kato, Shingo; Roujol, Sebastien; Murthy, Venkatesh; Bellm, Steven; Kashem, Abyaad; Basha, Tamer; Jang, Jihye; Eisman, Aaron S; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2016-01-15

    Diffuse myocardial fibrosis is involved in the pathology of nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NIC). Recently, the application of native (noncontrast) myocardial T1 measurement has been proposed as a method for characterizing diffuse interstitial fibrosis. To determine the association of native T1 with myocardial structure and function, we prospectively studied 39 patients with NIC (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 50% without cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evidence of previous infarction) and 27 subjects with normal LVEF without known overt cardiovascular disease. T1, T2, and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) were determined over 16 segments across the base, mid, and apical left ventricular (LV). NIC participants (57 ± 15 years) were predominantly men (74%), with a mean LVEF 34 ± 10%. Subjects with NIC had a greater native T1 (1,131 ± 51 vs 1,069 ± 29 ms; p <0.0001), a greater ECV (0.28 ± 0.04 vs 0.25 ± 0.02, p = 0.002), and a longer myocardial T2 (52 ± 8 vs 47 ± 5 ms; p = 0.02). After multivariate adjustment, a lower global native T1 time in NIC was associated with a greater LVEF (β = -0.59, p = 0.0003), greater right ventricular ejection fraction (β = -0.47, p = 0.006), and smaller left atrial volume index (β = 0.51, p = 0.001). The regional distribution of native myocardial T1 was similar in patients with and without NIC. In NIC, native myocardial T1 is elevated in all myocardial segments, suggesting a global (not regional) abnormality of myocardial tissue composition. In conclusion, native T1 may represent a rapid, noncontrast alternative to ECV for delineating myocardial tissue remodeling in NIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure and serology of the native polysaccharide antigen of type Ia group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Harold J.; Rosell, Karl-Gunnar; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1980-01-01

    The native polysaccharide antigen isolated from type Ia group B Streptococcus by using pH-controlled growth conditions and extraction procedures contains D-galactose, D-glucose, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and sialic acid in the molar ratio of 2:1:1:1. The structure of the native type Ia antigen has been elucidated; it can be represented by the following repeating unit in which all the side-chain β-D-galactopyranose units are masked by sialic acid residues: [Formula: see text] Removal of all the sialic acid groups yields the incomplete type Ia polysacharide antigen with exposed terminal β-D-galactopyranose residues. Antisera to type Ia organisms produced in rabbits according to the Lancefield procedures contain antibodies specific for both the native and incomplete antigens. Although sialic acid is not itself a determinant in the formation of antibodies to the native polysaccharide, it is an essential part of a larger determinant. In order to maintain the high degree of immunologic specificity of the native antigen, this determinant must be at least a trisaccharide unit, because the native polysaccharide as isolated has terminal disaccharide units [α-D-NeuAcp-(2→3)-β-D-Galp] identical to those found in the human M and N blood group substances and fetuin. Formation of antibodies to the incomplete antigen is due to determinants terminating in β-D-galactopyranose residues. These determinants are probably generated by the removal of the masking sialic acid residues from the cell-associated native polysaccharide by degradative processes that occur in organisms grown without pH control. Images PMID:6156459

  20. Protein Profile in Corpus Luteum during Pregnancy in Korean Native Cows

    PubMed Central

    Chung, H. J.; Kim, K. W.; Han, D. W.; Lee, H. C.; Yang, B. C.; Chung, H. K.; Shim, M. R.; Choi, M. S.; Jo, E. B.; Jo, Y. M.; Oh, M. Y.; Jo, S. J.; Hong, S. K.; Park, J. K.; Chang, W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenesis requires coordination of the anabolic and catabolic pathways of lipid metabolism, but the profile of proteins associated with progesterone synthesis in cyclic and pregnant corpus luteum (CL) is not well-known in cattle. In Experiment 1, plasma progesterone level was monitored in cyclic cows (n = 5) and pregnant cows (n = 6; until d-90). A significant decline in the plasma progesterone level occurred at d-19 of cyclic cows. Progesterone level in abbatoir-derived luteal tissues was also determined at d 1 to 5, 6 to 13 and 14 to 20 of cyclic cows, and d-60 and -90 of pregnant cows (n = 5 each). Progesterone level in d-60 CL was not different from those in d 6 to 13 CL and d-90 CL, although the difference between d 6 to 13 and d-90 was significant. In Experiment 2, protein expression pattern in CL at d-90 (n = 4) was compared with that in CL of cyclic cows at d 6 to 13 (n = 5). Significant changes in the level of protein expression were detected in 32 protein spots by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and 23 of them were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Six proteins were found only in pregnant CL, while the other 17 proteins were found only in cyclic CL. Among the above 6 proteins, vimentin which is involved in the regulation of post-implantation development was included. Thus, the protein expression pattern in CL was disorientated from cyclic luteal phase to mid pregnancy, and alterations in specific CL protein expression may contribute to the maintenance of pregnancy in Korean native cows. PMID:25049514

  1. Native Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Noncovalent Protein Complexes Directly from Dried Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Griffiths, Rian L.; Edwards, Rebecca L.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is a promising tool for the analysis of intact proteins from biological substrates. Here, we demonstrate native LESA mass spectrometry of noncovalent protein complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin from a range of surfaces. Holomyoglobin, in which apomyoglobin is noncovalently bound to the prosthetic heme group, was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of myoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride surfaces. Tetrameric hemoglobin [(αβ)2 4H] was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of hemoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) surfaces, and from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. Heme-bound dimers and monomers were also observed. The `contact' LESA approach was particularly suitable for the analysis of hemoglobin tetramers from DBS.

  2. Molecular mechanics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in native thick filaments.

    PubMed

    Previs, M J; Beck Previs, S; Gulick, J; Robbins, J; Warshaw, D M

    2012-09-07

    The heart's pumping capacity results from highly regulated interactions of actomyosin molecular motors. Mutations in the gene for a potential regulator of these motors, cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, cMyBP-C's ability to modulate cardiac contractility is not well understood. Using single-particle fluorescence imaging techniques, transgenic protein expression, proteomics, and modeling, we found that cMyBP-C slowed actomyosin motion generation in native cardiac thick filaments. This mechanical effect was localized to where cMyBP-C resides within the thick filament (i.e., the C-zones) and was modulated by phosphorylation and site-specific proteolytic degradation. These results provide molecular insight into why cMyBP-C should be considered a member of a tripartite complex with actin and myosin that allows fine tuning of cardiac muscle contraction.

  3. Optimized distance-dependent atom-pair-based potential DOOP for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Chae, Myong-Ho; Krull, Florian; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2015-05-01

    The DOcking decoy-based Optimized Potential (DOOP) energy function for protein structure prediction is based on empirical distance-dependent atom-pair interactions. To optimize the atom-pair interactions, native protein structures are decomposed into polypeptide chain segments that correspond to structural motives involving complete secondary structure elements. They constitute near native ligand-receptor systems (or just pairs). Thus, a total of 8609 ligand-receptor systems were prepared from 954 selected proteins. For each of these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems, 1000 evenly sampled docking decoys with 0-10 Å interface root-mean-square-deviation (iRMSD) were generated with a method used before for protein-protein docking. A neural network-based optimization method was applied to derive the optimized energy parameters using these decoys so that the energy function mimics the funnel-like energy landscape for the interaction between these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems. Thus, our method hierarchically models the overall funnel-like energy landscape of native protein structures. The resulting energy function was tested on several commonly used decoy sets for native protein structure recognition and compared with other statistical potentials. In combination with a torsion potential term which describes the local conformational preference, the atom-pair-based potential outperforms other reported statistical energy functions in correct ranking of native protein structures for a variety of decoy sets. This is especially the case for the most challenging ROSETTA decoy set, although it does not take into account side chain orientation-dependence explicitly. The DOOP energy function for protein structure prediction, the underlying database of protein structures with hypothetical ligand-receptor systems and their decoys are freely available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/doop/. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Identification of Small Molecule-binding Proteins in a Native Cellular Environment by Live-cell Photoaffinity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Head, Sarah A; Liu, Jun O

    2016-09-20

    Identifying the molecular target(s) of small molecules is a challenging but necessary step towards understanding their mechanism of action. While several target identification methods have been developed and used to successfully elucidate the binding proteins of a variety of small molecules, these techniques have drawbacks that make them unsuitable for detecting certain types of small molecule-target interactions. In particular, non-covalent interactions that depend on native cellular conditions, such as those of membrane proteins whose structures may be perturbed upon cell lysis, are often not amenable to affinity-based target identification methods. Here, we demonstrate a method wherein a probe containing a photolabile group is used to covalently crosslink to the small molecule binding protein within the environment of the live cell, allowing the detection and isolation of the target protein without the need for maintenance of the interaction after cell lysis. This technique is a valuable tool for studying biologically interesting small molecules with unknown mechanisms, both in the context of basic biology as well as drug discovery.

  5. The genetic structure of native Americans in North America based on the Globalfiler® STRs.

    PubMed

    McCulloh, Kelly L; Ng, Jillian; Oldt, Robert F; Weise, Jessica A; Viray, Joy; Budowle, Bruce; Glenn Smith, David; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan

    2016-11-01

    Current forensic STR databases, such as CODIS, lack population genetic data on Native American populations. Information from a geographically diverse array of tribes is necessary to provide improved statistical estimates of the strength of associations with DNA evidence. The Globalfiler® STR markers were used to characterize the genetic structure of ten tribal populations from seven geographic regions in North America, including those not presently represented in forensic databases. Samples from the Arctic region, Baja California, California/Great Basin, the Southeast, Mexico, the Midwest, and the Southwest were analyzed for allele frequencies, observed and expected heterozygosities, and F-statistics. The tribal samples exhibited an FST or θ value above the conservative 0.03 estimate recommended by the National Research Council (NRC) for calculating random match probabilities among Native Americans. The greater differentiation among tribal populations computed here (θ=0.04) warrants the inclusion of additional regional Native American samples into STR databases.

  6. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  7. Relationship between native-state solubility and non-native aggregation of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor: practical implications for protein therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Banks, Douglas D; Zhang, Jun; Siska, Christine C

    2014-10-06

    Prescreening methods are needed in the biotechnology industry for rapid selection of protein therapeutic candidates and formulations of low aggregation propensity. In recent reports solubility measurements have shown promise as one such method, although the connection between protein solubility and non-native aggregation is not well understood. In the present investigation, recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhGCSF) was used to explore this relationship since it was previously shown to rapidly undergo non-native aggregation/precipitation under physiological conditions in a reaction attenuated by the addition of sucrose [Krishnan, S.; et al. Biochemistry 2002, 41, 6422-6431]. Strong correlations were found between rhGCSF non-native aggregation and both solubility and thermal stability as a function of sucrose concentration. We believe these results make sense in the context of an rhGCSF aggregation mechanism where loss of monomer to insoluble aggregate is limited by association to an observable dimer from a less soluble (and aggregation competent) intermediate species that exists in a temperature sensitive pre-equilibrium with the native monomer. Both solubility and measures of conformational stability report on the position of this equilibrium and therefore the concentration of reactive intermediate. Interestingly, aggregation also correlated with rhGCSF solubility as a function of salting-in concentrations of phosphate since both are dependent on the colloidal stability of the reactive intermediate but not with conformational stability. In lieu of a complete understanding of the aggregation processes that limit protein therapeutic shelf life, these results highlight the potential of using simple solubility measurements as an additional tool in the biotechnology prescreening repertoire.

  8. Rhizobacterial Community Structures Associated with Native Plants Grown in Chilean Extreme Environments.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Milko A; Maruyama, Fumito; Ogram, Andrew V; Navarrete, Oscar U; Lagos, Lorena M; Inostroza, Nitza G; Acuña, Jacquelinne J; Rilling, Joaquín I; de La Luz Mora, María

    2016-10-01

    Chile is topographically and climatically diverse, with a wide array of diverse undisturbed ecosystems that include native plants that are highly adapted to local conditions. However, our understanding of the diversity, activity, and role of rhizobacteria associated with natural vegetation in undisturbed Chilean extreme ecosystems is very poor. In the present study, the combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing approaches was used to describe the rhizobacterial community structures of native plants grown in three representative Chilean extreme environments: Atacama Desert (ATA), Andes Mountains (AND), and Antarctic (ANT). Both molecular approaches revealed the presence of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria as the dominant phyla in the rhizospheres of native plants. Lower numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed in rhizosphere soils from ATA compared with AND and ANT. Both approaches also showed differences in rhizobacterial community structures between extreme environments and between plant species. The differences among plant species grown in the same environment were attributed to the higher relative abundance of classes Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. However, further studies are needed to determine which environmental factors regulate the structures of rhizobacterial communities, and how (or if) specific bacterial groups may contribute to the growth and survival of native plants in each Chilean extreme environments.

  9. Microfluidic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with in situ immunoblotting for native protein analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; Herr, Amy E

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an automated immunoblotting method that reports protein electrophoretic mobility and identity in a single streamlined microfluidic assay. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was integrated with subsequent in situ immunoblotting. Integration of three PA gel elements into a glass microfluidic chip achieved multiple functions, including (1) rapid protein separation via on-chip PAGE, (2) directed electrophoretic transfer of resolved protein peaks to an in-line blotting membrane, and (3) high-efficiency identification of the transferred proteins using antibody-functionalized blotting membranes. In-chip blotting membranes were photopatterned with biotinylated antibody using streptavidin polyacrylamide (PA) thus yielding postseparation sample analysis. No pressure driven flow or fluid valving was required, as the assay was operated by electrokinetically programmed control. A model sample of fluorescently labeled BSA (negative control), alpha-actinin, and prostate specific antigen (PSA) was selected to develop and characterize the assay. A 5 min assay time was required without operator intervention. Optimization of the blotting membrane (geometry, operation, and composition) yielded a detection limit of approximately 0.05 pg (alpha-actinin peak). An important additional blotting fabrication strategy was developed and characterized to allow vanishingly small antibody consumption (approximately 1 microg), as well as end-user customization of the blotting membrane after device fabrication and storage. This first report of rapid on-chip protein PAGE integrated with in situ immunoblotting forms the basis for a sensitive, automated approach applicable to numerous forms of immunoblotting.

  10. SNARE-fusion mediated insertion of membrane proteins into native and artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Gustav; Brzezinski, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2014-07-02

    Membrane proteins carry out functions such as nutrient uptake, ATP synthesis or transmembrane signal transduction. An increasing number of reports indicate that cellular processes are underpinned by regulated interactions between these proteins. Consequently, functional studies of these networks at a molecular level require co-reconstitution of the interacting components. Here, we report a SNARE protein-based method for incorporation of multiple membrane proteins into artificial membrane vesicles of well-defined composition, and for delivery of large water-soluble substrates into these vesicles. The approach is used for in vitro reconstruction of a fully functional bacterial respiratory chain from purified components. Furthermore, the method is used for functional incorporation of the entire F1F0 ATP synthase complex into native bacterial membranes from which this component had been genetically removed. The novel methodology offers a tool to investigate complex interaction networks between membrane-bound proteins at a molecular level, which is expected to generate functional insights into key cellular functions.

  11. Why Is There a Glass Ceiling for Threading Based Protein Structure Prediction Methods?

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Zhou, Hongyi

    2017-04-20

    Despite their different implementations, comparison of the best threading approaches to the prediction of evolutionary distant protein structures reveals that they tend to succeed or fail on the same protein targets. This is true despite the fact that the structural template library has good templates for all cases. Thus, a key question is why are certain protein structures threadable while others are not. Comparison with threading results on a set of artificial sequences selected for stability further argues that the failure of threading is due to the nature of the protein structures themselves. Using a new contact map based alignment algorithm, we demonstrate that certain folds are highly degenerate in that they can have very similar coarse grained fractions of native contacts aligned and yet differ significantly from the native structure. For threadable proteins, this is not the case. Thus, contemporary threading approaches appear to have reached a plateau, and new approaches to structure prediction are required.

  12. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Koski, Raymond A; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  13. The interaction of platinum-based drugs with native biologically relevant proteins.

    PubMed

    Brauckmann, Christine; Wehe, Christoph A; Kieshauer, Michael; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2013-02-01

    This study focuses on the identification of the products that are formed upon binding of therapeutically relevant platinum complexes to proteins like β-lactoglobulin A (LGA), human serum albumin (HSA), or human hemoglobin (HB). The respective proteins were incubated with the platinum-based anticancer drugs cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin. LGA was selected as the model protein in addition to the two most abundant blood proteins HSA and HB. In case of the model protein, the effect of free thiol groups on the affinity of cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin was investigated by means of liquid chromatography electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-ToF-MS). The reduced form of LGA, which contains four free thiol groups more than the native LGA, shows a much higher affinity to the platinum-based drugs. By means of liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, the reaction behavior of the platinum-based drugs towards HSA and HB was investigated under different conditions considering the chloride concentration (4 or 100 mM) and the incubation time (24 and 48 h). In case of carboplatin, less than 6 % protein-bound platinum was detected. However, both cisplatin and oxaliplatin display a high affinity to the proteins investigated. Further information was obtained by means of LC/ESI-ToF-MS. In case of oxaliplatin, the complex [Pt(DACH)](2+) (DACH=C(6)N(2)H(14)) was identified interacting with HSA and HB. For cisplatin, different results were observed for the two proteins. The complex [Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl](+) interacted predominantly with HSA and [Pt(NH(3))(2)](2+) with HB.

  14. The Structure-Forming Juncture in Oxidative Protein Folding: What Happens in the ER?

    PubMed

    Narayan, Mahesh

    2017-08-17

    The folding of disulfide bond containing proteins proceeds in a biphasic manner. Initially, cysteines are oxidized to form disulfide bonds. Structure is largely absent during this phase. Next, when a minimally correct number of native linkages of disulfide bonds have been acquired, the biopolymer conformationally folds into the native, or a native-like, state. Thus, at the end of this "oxidative folding" process, a stable and biologically active protein is formed. This review focuses on dissecting the "structure-forming step" in oxidative protein folding. The ability to follow this pivotal step in protein maturation in somewhat detail is uniquely facilitated in "oxidative" folding scenarios. We review this step using bovine pancreatic Ribonuclease A as a model while recognizing the impact that this step has in subcellular trafficking and protein aggregation.

  15. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS < 1 and gamma-distributed rates across sites. Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model. PMID:22171550

  16. Knotted proteins: A tangled tale of Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Faísca, Patrícia F.N.

    2015-01-01

    Knotted proteins have their native structures arranged in the form of an open knot. In the last ten years researchers have been making significant efforts to reveal their folding mechanism and understand which functional advantage(s) knots convey to their carriers. Molecular simulations have been playing a fundamental role in this endeavor, and early computational predictions about the knotting mechanism have just been confirmed in wet lab experiments. Here we review a collection of simulation results that allow outlining the current status of the field of knotted proteins, and discuss directions for future research. PMID:26380658

  17. Protein painting reveals solvent-excluded drug targets hidden within native protein–protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Alessandra; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the contact regions between a protein and its binding partners is essential for creating therapies that block the interaction. Unfortunately, such contact regions are extremely difficult to characterize because they are hidden inside the binding interface. Here we introduce protein painting as a new tool that employs small molecules as molecular paints to tightly coat the surface of protein–protein complexes. The molecular paints, which block trypsin cleavage sites, are excluded from the binding interface. Following mass spectrometry, only peptides hidden in the interface emerge as positive hits, revealing the functional contact regions that are drug targets. We use protein painting to discover contact regions between the three-way interaction of IL1β ligand, the receptor IL1RI and the accessory protein IL1RAcP. We then use this information to create peptides and monoclonal antibodies that block the interaction and abolish IL1β cell signalling. The technology is broadly applicable to discover protein interaction drug targets. PMID:25048602

  18. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L.; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250–320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  19. Prion protein gene polymorphism and genetic risk evaluation for scrapie in all Turkish native sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Meydan, H; Yüceer, B; Degirmenci, R; Özkan, M M; Yildiz, M A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the prion protein (PrP) gene polymorphism in a total of 1,110 healthy sheep from 18 Turkish native sheep breeds. There were nine alleles and 22 genotypes observed based on codons 136, 154, and 171 of the PrP gene. The ARQ allele was predominant for all breeds. The most resistant allele to scrapie, ARR, was present in all breeds. The VRQ allele, associated with the highest susceptibility to scrapie, was detected at low frequencies in İvesi (0.06), Kıvırcık (0.021), Sakız (0.010), Karayaka (0.011), Çine Çaparı (0.012), and Güneykaraman (0.017). In general, the ARQ/ARQ genotype was predominant in all breeds. The most resistant genotype to scrapie, ARR/ARR, was found with the frequency lower than 0.180. The most susceptible genotype, VRQ/VRQ, was found in only Kıvırcık. The TRR and TRH alleles and the genotypes of ARR/TRR, ARR/ARK, and ARH/TRH have been found for the first time in Turkish native sheep breeds. According to these results, all breeds belong to risk group R3 followed by R2. It is propounded that the susceptibility to scrapie increased from eastern to western part of Turkey. Our findings of Turkish native sheep breeds with PrP gene polymorphisms will assist the sheep breeding program for selection of scrapie resistance genotypes to reduce the risk of scrapie.

  20. Engineering tissue constructs to mimic native aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets' structures and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Nafiseh

    There are several disadvantages correlated with current heart valve replacement, including anticoagulation therapy for patients with mechanical valves and the low durability of bioprosthetic valves. The non-viable nature of such devices is a critical drawback especially for pediatric cases due to the inability of the graft to grow in vivo with the patients. A tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) with remodeling and growth ability, is conceptually appealing to use in the surgical repair and could serve as a permanent replacements when operating for pediatric valvular lesions. It is critical that scaffolds for functional heart valve tissue engineering, be capable of mimicking the native leaflet's structure and mechanical properties at the time of implantation. Meanwhile, the scaffolds should be able to support cellular proliferation and native-like tissue formation as the TEHV remodels toward a scaffold-free state. Our overall hypothesis is that an "ideal" engineered construct, designed based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics, will complement a native heart valve leaflet in providing benchmarks for use in the design of clinically-applicable TEHV. This hypothesis was addressed through several experiments conducted in the present study. To establish a functional biomimetic TEHV, we developed scaffolds capable of matching the anisotropic stiffness of native leaflet while promoting native-like cell and collagen content and supporting the ECM generation. Scaffolds with various polymer contents (e.g., poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly (epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL)) and structural designs (e.g., microfabricated and microfibrous scaffolds), were fabricated based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics. It was found that the tri-layered scaffold, designed with assembly of microfabricated PGS and microfibrous PGS/PCL was a functional leaflet capable of promoting tissue formation. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of cyclic stress and flexure

  1. Characterization of intact protein conjugates and biopharmaceuticals using ion-exchange chromatography with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and top-down tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muneeruddin, Khaja; Nazzaro, Mark; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2015-10-06

    Characterization of biopharmaceutical products is a challenging task, which needs to be carried out at several different levels (including both primary structure and conformation). An additional difficulty frequently arises due to the structural heterogeneity inherent to many protein-based therapeutics (e.g., extensive glycosylation or "designer" modifications such as chemical conjugation) or introduced postproduction as a result of stress (e.g., oxidation and deamidation). A combination of ion-exchange chromatography (IXC) with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) allows characterization of complex and heterogeneous therapeutic proteins and protein conjugates to be accomplished at a variety of levels without compromising their conformational integrity. The IXC/ESI MS measurements allow protein conjugates to be profiled by analyzing conjugation stoichiometry and the presence of multiple positional isomers, as well as to establish the effect of chemical modifications on the conformational integrity of each species. While mass profiling alone is not sufficient for identification of nonenzymatic post-translational modifications (PTMs) that result in a very small mass change of the eluting species (e.g., deamidation), this task can be completed using online top-down structural analysis, as demonstrated using stressed interferon-β as an example. The wealth of information that can be provided by IXC/native ESI MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on protein-based therapeutics will undoubtedly make it a very valuable addition to the experimental toolbox of biopharmaceutical analysis.

  2. How main-chains of proteins explore the free-energy landscape in native states

    PubMed Central

    Senet, Patrick; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Foulie, Colette; Delarue, Patrice; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding how a single native protein diffuses on its free-energy landscape is essential to understand protein kinetics and function. The dynamics of a protein is complex, with multiple relaxation times reflecting a hierarchical free-energy landscape. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of an α/β protein (crambin) and a β-sheet polypeptide (BS2) in their “native” states, we demonstrate that the mean-square displacement of dihedral angles, defined by 4 successive Cα atoms, increases as a power law of time, tα, with an exponent α between 0.08 and 0.39 (α = 1 corresponds to Brownian diffusion), at 300 K. Residues with low exponents are located mainly in well-defined secondary elements and adopt 1 conformational substate. Residues with high exponents are found in loops/turns and chain ends and exist in multiple conformational substates, i.e., they move on multiple-minima free-energy profiles. PMID:19073932

  3. Dual labeling of a binding protein allows for specific fluorescence detection of native protein.

    PubMed

    Karlström, A; Nygren, P A

    2001-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer has been investigated in the context of specific detection of unlabeled proteins. A model system based on the staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-IgG interaction was designed, in which a single domain was engineered to facilitate site-specific incorporation of fluorophores. An Asn23Cys mutant of the B domain from SPA was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently labeled at the introduced unique thiol and at an amino group, using N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (1,5-IAEDANS) and succinimidyl 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoate (NBD-X, SE), respectively. Biosensor analysis of purified doubly labeled protein showed that high-affinity binding to the Fc region of IgG was retained. The fluorescence emission spectrum of the doubly labeled protein showed a shift in the relative emission of the two fluorophores in the presence of Fc3(1) fragments, which bind specifically to the B domain. In addition, the fluorescence emission ratio 480/525 nm was shown to increase with increasing concentration of Fc3(1), whereas the presence of a control protein did not affect the emission ratio over the same concentration range.

  4. A protein structure data and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Weber, Irene; Wang, Haibin; Yang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a protein structure data and analysis system that is only used in the lab for analyzing the proprietary data. It is capable of storing public protein data, such as the data in Protein Data Bank (PDB) [1], and life scientists' proprietary data. This toolkit is targeted at life scientists who want to maintain proprietary protein structure data (may be incomplete), to search and query publicly known protein structures and to compare their structure data with others. The comparison functions can be used to find structure differences between two proteins at atom level, especially in mutant versions of proteins. The system can also be used as a tool of choosing better protein structure template in new protein's tertiary structure prediction. The system is developed in Java and the protein data is stored in a relational database (Oracle 9i).

  5. Food web structure in exotic and native mangroves: A Hawaii-Puerto Rico comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, A.W.J.; Fry, B.; Smith, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Plant invasions can fundamentally alter detrital inputs and the structure of detritus-based food webs. We examined the detrital pathways in mangrove food webs in native (Puerto Rican) and introduced (Hawaiian) Rhizophora mangle forests using a dual isotope approach and a mixing model. Based on trophic-level fractionation of 0-1??? for ?? 13C and 2-3??? for ?? 15N, among the invertebrates, only nematodes, oligochaetes, and nereid polychaetes from native mangroves exhibited stable isotopes consistent with a mangrove-derived diet. Certain fauna, in particular tubificid oligochaetes, had ?? 13C values consistent with the consumption of mangrove leaves, but they were depleted in 15N, suggesting their primary nitrogen source was low in 15N, and was possibly N 2-fixing bacteria. In introduced mangroves, all feeding groups appeared to rely heavily on non-mangrove sources, especially phytoplankton inputs. Mixing model results and discriminant analysis showed clear separation of introduced and native mangrove sites based on differential food source utilization within feeding groups, with stronger and more diverse use of benthic foods observed in native forests. Observed differences between native and invasive mangrove food webs may be due to Hawaiian detritivores being poorly adapted to utilizing the tannin-rich, nitrogen-poor mangrove detritus. In addition, differential utilization of mangrove detritus between native and introduced mangroves may be a consequence of forest age. We postulate that increasing mangrove forest age may promote diversification of bacterial food webs important in N and S cycling. Our results also suggest a potentially important role for sulfur bacteria in supporting the most abundant infaunal consumers, nematodes, in the most mature systems. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Evaluation of interspecimen trypsin digestion efficiency prior to multiple reaction monitoring-based absolute protein quantification with native protein calibrators.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Irene; Smit, Nico P M; Romijn, Fred P H T M; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Deelder, André M; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Cobbaert, Christa M

    2013-12-06

    Implementation of quantitative clinical chemistry proteomics (qCCP) requires targeted proteomics approaches, usually involving bottom-up multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) with stable-isotope labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to move toward more accurate measurements. Two aspects of qCCP that deserve special attention are (1) proper calibration and (2) the assurance of consistent digestion. Here, we describe the evaluation of tryptic digestion efficiency by monitoring various signature peptides, missed cleavages, and modifications during proteolysis of apolipoprotein A-I and B in normo- and hypertriglyceridemic specimens. Absolute quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B was performed by LC-MRM-MS with SIS peptide internal standards at two time points (4 and 20 h), using three native protein calibrators. Comparison with an immunoturbidimetric assay revealed recoveries of 99.4 ± 6.5% for apolipoprotein A-I and 102.6 ± 7.2% for apolipoprotein B after 4 h of trypsin digestion. Protein recoveries after 20 h trypsin incubation equaled 95.9 ± 6.9% and 106.0 ± 10.0% for apolipoproteins A-I and B, respectively. In conclusion, the use of metrologically traceable, native protein calibrators looks promising for accurate quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B. Selection of rapidly formed peptides, that is, with no or minor missed cleavages, and the use of short trypsin incubation times for these efficiently cleaved peptides are likely to further reduce the variability introduced by trypsin digestion and to improve the traceability of test results to reach the desirable analytical performance for clinical chemistry application.

  7. Atomic-Level Structure Characterization of an Ultrafast Folding Mini-Protein Denatured State

    PubMed Central

    Rogne, Per; Ozdowy, Przemysław; Richter, Christian; Saxena, Krishna; Schwalbe, Harald; Kuhn, Lars T.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic-level analyses of non-native protein ensembles constitute an important aspect of protein folding studies to reach a more complete understanding of how proteins attain their native form exhibiting biological activity. Previously, formation of hydrophobic clusters in the 6 M urea-denatured state of an ultrafast folding mini-protein known as TC5b from both photo-CIDNP NOE transfer studies and FCS measurements was observed. Here, we elucidate the structural properties of this mini-protein denatured in 6 M urea performing 15N NMR relaxation studies together with a thorough NOE analysis. Even though our results demonstrate that no elements of secondary structure persist in the denatured state, the heterogeneous distribution of R2 rate constants together with observing pronounced heteronuclear NOEs along the peptide backbone reveals specific regions of urea-denatured TC5b exhibiting a high degree of structural rigidity more frequently observed for native proteins. The data are complemented with studies on two TC5b point mutants to verify the importance of hydrophobic interactions for fast folding. Our results corroborate earlier findings of a hydrophobic cluster present in urea-denatured TC5b comprising both native and non-native contacts underscoring their importance for ultra rapid folding. The data assist in finding ways of interpreting the effects of pre-existing native and/or non-native interactions on the ultrafast folding of proteins; a fact, which might have to be considered when defining the starting conditions for molecular dynamics simulation studies of protein folding. PMID:22848459

  8. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Trevizani, Raphael; Custódio, Fábio Lima; Dos Santos, Karina Baptista; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  9. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Karina Baptista

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction. PMID:28085928

  10. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  11. MUFOLD: A new solution for protein 3D structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfen; Wang, Qingguo; Barz, Bogdan; He, Zhiquan; Kosztin, Ioan; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2010-04-01

    There have been steady improvements in protein structure prediction during the past 2 decades. However, current methods are still far from consistently predicting structural models accurately with computing power accessible to common users. Toward achieving more accurate and efficient structure prediction, we developed a number of novel methods and integrated them into a software package, MUFOLD. First, a systematic protocol was developed to identify useful templates and fragments from Protein Data Bank for a given target protein. Then, an efficient process was applied for iterative coarse-grain model generation and evaluation at the Calpha or backbone level. In this process, we construct models using interresidue spatial restraints derived from alignments by multidimensional scaling, evaluate and select models through clustering and static scoring functions, and iteratively improve the selected models by integrating spatial restraints and previous models. Finally, the full-atom models were evaluated using molecular dynamics simulations based on structural changes under simulated heating. We have continuously improved the performance of MUFOLD by using a benchmark of 200 proteins from the Astral database, where no template with >25% sequence identity to any target protein is included. The average root-mean-square deviation of the best models from the native structures is 4.28 A, which shows significant and systematic improvement over our previous methods. The computing time of MUFOLD is much shorter than many other tools, such as Rosetta. MUFOLD demonstrated some success in the 2008 community-wide experiment for protein structure prediction CASP8.

  12. Surfactant-free purification of membrane proteins with intact native membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Jamshad, Mohammed; Lin, Yu-Pin; Knowles, Timothy J; Parslow, Rosemary A; Harris, Craig; Wheatley, Mark; Poyner, David R; Bill, Roslyn M; Thomas, Owen R T; Overduin, Michael; Dafforn, Tim R

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the structure and function of a protein, it is generally required that the protein in question is purified away from all others. For soluble proteins, this process is greatly aided by the lack of any restriction on the free and independent diffusion of individual protein particles in three dimensions. This is not the case for membrane proteins, as the membrane itself forms a continuum that joins the proteins within the membrane with one another. It is therefore essential that the membrane is disrupted in order to allow separation and hence purification of membrane proteins. In the present review, we examine recent advances in the methods employed to separate membrane proteins before purification. These approaches move away from solubilization methods based on the use of small surfactants, which have been shown to suffer from significant practical problems. Instead, the present review focuses on methods that stem from the field of nanotechnology and use a range of reagents that fragment the membrane into nanometre-scale particles containing the protein complete with the local membrane environment. In particular, we examine a method employing the amphipathic polymer poly(styrene-co-maleic acid), which is able to reversibly encapsulate the membrane protein in a 10 nm disc-like structure ideally suited to purification and further biochemical study.

  13. Protein structure quality assessment based on the distance profiles of consecutive backbone Cα atoms

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the three dimensional native state structure of a protein from its primary sequence is an unsolved grand challenge in molecular biology. Two main computational approaches have evolved to obtain the structure from the protein sequence - ab initio/de novo methods and template-based modeling - both of which typically generate multiple possible native state structures. Model quality assessment programs (MQAP) validate these predicted structures in order to identify the correct native state structure. Here, we propose a MQAP for assessing the quality of protein structures based on the distances of consecutive Cα atoms. We hypothesize that the root-mean-square deviation of the distance of consecutive Cα (RDCC) atoms from the ideal value of 3.8 Å, derived from a statistical analysis of high quality protein structures (top100H database), is minimized in native structures. Based on tests with the top100H set, we propose a RDCC cutoff value of 0.012 Å, above which a structure can be filtered out as a non-native structure. We applied the RDCC discriminator on decoy sets from the Decoys 'R' Us database to show that the native structures in all decoy sets tested have RDCC below the 0.012 Å cutoff. While most decoy sets were either indistinguishable using this discriminator or had very few violations, all the decoy structures in the fisa decoy set were discriminated by applying the RDCC criterion. This highlights the physical non-viability of the fisa decoy set, and possible issues in benchmarking other methods using this set. The source code and manual is made available at https://github.com/sanchak/mqap and permanently available on 10.5281/zenodo.7134. PMID:24555103

  14. Variations in native protein glycation and plasma antioxidants in several birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Tana; Zuck, Jessica; Borges, Chad R; Redig, Patrick; Sweazea, Karen L

    2017-08-01

    Birds are an anomaly among vertebrates as they are remarkably long-lived despite having naturally high blood glucose and metabolic rates. For mammals, hyperglycemia leads to oxidative stress and protein glycation. In contrast, many studies have shown that domestic and wild birds are relatively resistant to these glucose-mediated pathologies. Surprisingly very little research has examined protein glycation in birds of prey, which by nature consume a diet high in protein and fat that promotes gluconeogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate protein glycation and antioxidant concentrations in serum samples from several birds of prey (bald eagle (BAEA), red-tailed hawk (RTHA), barred owl (BAOW), great horned owl (GHOW)) as protein glycation can accelerate oxidative stress and vice versa. Serum glucose was measured using a commercially available assay, native albumin glycation was measured by mass spectrometry and various antioxidants (uric acid, vitamin E, retinol and several carotenoids) were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Although glucose concentrations were not significantly different between species (p=0.340), albumin glycation was significantly higher (p=0.004) in BAEA (23.67±1.90%) and BAOW (24.28±1.43%) compared to RTHA (14.31±0.63%). Of the antioxidants examined, lutein was significantly higher in BAOW (p=0.008). BAEA had the highest beta-cryptoxanthin and beta-carotene concentrations (p<0.005). The high concentrations of antioxidants in these birds of prey relative to other birds likely helps protect from complications that may otherwise arise from having high glucose and protein glycation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Population genetic structure of the predatory, social wasp Vespula pensylvanica in its native and invasive range.

    PubMed

    Chau, Linh M; Hanna, Cause; Jenkins, Laurel T; Kutner, Rachel E; Burns, Elizabeth A; Kremen, Claire; Goodisman, Michael A D

    2015-12-01

    Invasive species cause extensive damage to their introduced ranges. Ocean archipelagos are particularly vulnerable to invasive taxa. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic structure of the social wasp Vespula pensylvanica in its native range of North America and its introduced range in the archipelago of Hawaii. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the invasion dynamics of social species and the processes affecting biological invasions. We found that V. pensylvanica showed no significant genetic isolation by distance and little genetic structure over a span of 2000 km in its native range. This result suggests that V. pensylvanica can successfully disperse across large distances either through natural- or human-mediated mechanisms. In contrast to the genetic patterns observed in the native range, we found substantial genetic structure in the invasive V. pensylvanica range in Hawaii. The strong patterns of genetic differentiation within and between the Hawaiian Islands may reflect the effects of geographic barriers and invasion history on gene flow. We also found some evidence for gene flow between the different islands of Hawaii which was likely mediated through human activity. Overall, this study provides insight on how geographic barriers, invasion history, and human activity can shape population genetic structure of invasive species.

  16. A mathematical framework for protein structure comparison.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Srivastava, Anuj; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2011-02-03

    Comparison of protein structures is important for revealing the evolutionary relationship among proteins, predicting protein functions and predicting protein structures. Many methods have been developed in the past to align two or multiple protein structures. Despite the importance of this problem, rigorous mathematical or statistical frameworks have seldom been pursued for general protein structure comparison. One notable issue in this field is that with many different distances used to measure the similarity between protein structures, none of them are proper distances when protein structures of different sequences are compared. Statistical approaches based on those non-proper distances or similarity scores as random variables are thus not mathematically rigorous. In this work, we develop a mathematical framework for protein structure comparison by treating protein structures as three-dimensional curves. Using an elastic Riemannian metric on spaces of curves, geodesic distance, a proper distance on spaces of curves, can be computed for any two protein structures. In this framework, protein structures can be treated as random variables on the shape manifold, and means and covariance can be computed for populations of protein structures. Furthermore, these moments can be used to build Gaussian-type probability distributions of protein structures for use in hypothesis testing. The covariance of a population of protein structures can reveal the population-specific variations and be helpful in improving structure classification. With curves representing protein structures, the matching is performed using elastic shape analysis of curves, which can effectively model conformational changes and insertions/deletions. We show that our method performs comparably with commonly used methods in protein structure classification on a large manually annotated data set.

  17. Union of geometric constraint-based simulations with molecular dynamics for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Glembo, Tyler J; Ozkan, S Banu

    2010-03-17

    Although proteins are a fundamental unit in biology, the mechanism by which proteins fold into their native state is not well understood. In this work, we explore the assembly of secondary structure units via geometric constraint-based simulations and the effect of refinement of assembled structures using reservoir replica exchange molecular dynamics. Our approach uses two crucial features of these methods: i), geometric simulations speed up the search for nativelike topologies as there are no energy barriers to overcome; and ii), molecular dynamics identifies the low free energy structures and further refines these structures toward the actual native conformation. We use eight alpha-, beta-, and alpha/beta-proteins to test our method. The geometric simulations of our test set result in an average RMSD from native of 3.7 A and this further reduces to 2.7 A after refinement. We also explore the question of robustness of assembly for inaccurate (shifted and shortened) secondary structure. We find that the RMSD from native is highly dependent on the accuracy of secondary structure input, and even slightly shifting the location of secondary structure along the amino acid sequence can lead to a rapid decrease in RMSD to native due to incorrect packing.

  18. Structure comparison of native and mutant human recombinant FKBP12 complexes with the immunosuppressant drug FK506 (tacrolimus).

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, S.; Navia, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    The consequences of site-directed mutagenesis experiments are often anticipated by empirical rules regarding the expected effects of a given amino acid substitution. Here, we examine the effects of "conservative" and "nonconservative" substitutions on the X-ray crystal structures of human recombinant FKBP12 mutants in complex with the immunosuppressant drug FK506 (tacrolimus). R42K and R42I mutant complexes show 110-fold and 180-fold decreased calcineurin (CN) inhibition, respectively, versus the native complex, yet retain full peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity, FK506 binding, and FK506-mediated PPIase inhibition. Interestingly, the structure of the R42I mutant complex is better conserved than that of the R42K mutant complex when compared to the native complex structure, within both the FKBP12 protein and FK506 ligand regions of the complexes, and with respect to temperature factors and RMS coordinate differences. This is due to compensatory interactions mediated by two newly ordered water molecules in the R42I complex structure, molecules that act as surrogates for the missing arginine guanidino nitrogens of R42. The absence of such surrogate solvent interactions in the R42K complex leads to some disorder in the so-called "40s loop" that encompasses the substituent. One rationalization proposed for the observed loss in CN inhibition in these R42 mutant complexes invokes indirect effects leading to a misorientation of FKBP12 and FK506 structural elements that normally interact with calcineurin. Our results with the structure of the R42I complex in particular suggest that the observed loss of CN inhibition might also be explained by the loss of a specific R42-mediated interaction with CN that cannot be mimicked effectively by the solvent molecules that otherwise stabilize the conformation of the 40s loop in that structure. PMID:8563622

  19. Native SILAC: Metabolic Labeling of Proteins in Prototroph Microorganisms Based on Lysine Synthesis Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Florian; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics has matured into a methodology able to detect and quantitate essentially all proteins of model microorganisms, allowing for unprecedented depth in systematic protein analyses. The most accurate quantitation approaches currently require lysine auxotrophic strains, which precludes analysis of most existing mutants, strain collections, or commercially important strains (e.g. those used for brewing or for the biotechnological production of metabolites). Here, we used MS-based proteomics to determine the global response of prototrophic yeast and bacteria to exogenous lysine. Unexpectedly, down-regulation of lysine synthesis in the presence of exogenous lysine is achieved via different mechanisms in different yeast strains. In each case, however, lysine in the medium down-regulates its biosynthesis, allowing for metabolic proteome labeling with heavy-isotope-containing lysine. This strategy of native stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (nSILAC) overcomes the limitations of previous approaches and can be used for the efficient production of protein standards for absolute SILAC quantitation in model microorganisms. As proof of principle, we have used nSILAC to globally analyze yeast proteome changes during salt stress. PMID:23592334

  20. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  1. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  2. Population structure in the native range predicts the spread of introduced marine species

    PubMed Central

    Gaither, Michelle R.; Bowen, Brian W.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting invasion success remains a fundamental challenge in invasion biology. The effort to identify universal characteristics that predict which species become invasive has faltered in part because of the diversity of taxa and systems considered. Here, we use an alternative approach focused on the spread stage of invasions. FST, a measure of alternative fixation of alleles, is a common proxy for realized dispersal among natural populations, summarizing the combined influences of life history, behaviour, habitat requirements, population size, history and ecology. We test the hypothesis that population structure in the native range (FST) is negatively correlated with the geographical extent of spread of marine species in an introduced range. An analysis of the available data (29 species, nine phyla) revealed a significant negative correlation (R2 = 0.245–0.464) between FST and the extent of spread of non-native species. Mode FST among pairwise comparisons between populations in the native range demonstrated the highest predictive power (R2 = 0.464, p < 0.001). There was significant improvement when marker type was considered, with mtDNA datasets providing the strongest relationship (n = 21, R2 = 0.333–0.516). This study shows that FST can be used to make qualitative predictions concerning the geographical extent to which a non-native marine species will spread once established in a new area. PMID:23595272

  3. Population structure in the native range predicts the spread of introduced marine species.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Michelle R; Bowen, Brian W; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-06-07

    Forecasting invasion success remains a fundamental challenge in invasion biology. The effort to identify universal characteristics that predict which species become invasive has faltered in part because of the diversity of taxa and systems considered. Here, we use an alternative approach focused on the spread stage of invasions. FST, a measure of alternative fixation of alleles, is a common proxy for realized dispersal among natural populations, summarizing the combined influences of life history, behaviour, habitat requirements, population size, history and ecology. We test the hypothesis that population structure in the native range (FST) is negatively correlated with the geographical extent of spread of marine species in an introduced range. An analysis of the available data (29 species, nine phyla) revealed a significant negative correlation (R(2) = 0.245-0.464) between FST and the extent of spread of non-native species. Mode FST among pairwise comparisons between populations in the native range demonstrated the highest predictive power (R(2) = 0.464, p < 0.001). There was significant improvement when marker type was considered, with mtDNA datasets providing the strongest relationship (n = 21, R(2) = 0.333-0.516). This study shows that FST can be used to make qualitative predictions concerning the geographical extent to which a non-native marine species will spread once established in a new area.

  4. Edaphic, salinity, and stand structural trends in chronosequences of native and non-native dominated riparian forests along the Colorado River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritt, David M.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2012-01-01

    Tamarix spp. are introduced shrubs that have become among the most abundant woody plants growing along western North American rivers. We sought to empirically test the long-held belief that Tamarix actively displaces native species through elevating soil salinity via salt exudation. We measured chemical and physical attributes of soils (e.g., salinity, major cations and anions, texture), litter cover and depth, and stand structure along chronosequences dominated by Tamarix and those dominated by native riparian species (Populus or Salix) along the upper and lower Colorado River in Colorado and Arizona/California, USA. We tested four hypotheses: (1) the rate of salt accumulation in soils is faster in Tamarix-dominated stands than stands dominated by native species, (2) the concentration of salts in the soil is higher in mature stands dominated by Tamarix compared to native stands, (3) soil salinity is a function of Tamarix abundance, and (4) available nutrients are more concentrated in native-dominated stands compared to Tamarix-dominated stands. We found that salt concentration increases at a faster rate in Tamarix-dominated stands along the relatively free-flowing upper Colorado but not along the heavily-regulated lower Colorado. Concentrations of ions that are known to be preferentially exuded by Tamarix (e.g., B, Na, and Cl) were higher in Tamarix stands than in native stands. Soil salt concentrations in older Tamarix stands along the upper Colorado were sufficiently high to inhibit germination, establishment, or growth of some native species. On the lower Colorado, salinity was very high in all stands and is likely due to factors associated with floodplain development and the hydrologic effects of river regulation, such as reduced overbank flooding, evaporation of shallow ground water, higher salt concentrations in surface and ground water due to agricultural practices, and higher salt concentrations in fine-textured sediments derived from naturally saline

  5. Introduction to Protein Structure through Genetic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tanya L.; Linton, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An illuminating way to learn about protein function is to explore high-resolution protein structures. Analysis of the proteins involved in genetic diseases has been used to introduce students to protein structure and the role that individual mutations can play in the onset of disease. Known mutations can be correlated to changes in protein…

  6. Introduction to Protein Structure through Genetic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tanya L.; Linton, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An illuminating way to learn about protein function is to explore high-resolution protein structures. Analysis of the proteins involved in genetic diseases has been used to introduce students to protein structure and the role that individual mutations can play in the onset of disease. Known mutations can be correlated to changes in protein…

  7. Relationships between milks differentiated on native milk fat globule characteristics and fat, protein and calcium compositions.

    PubMed

    Couvreur, S; Hurtaud, C

    2017-03-01

    Many studies have shown that milk fat globule (MFG) diameter varies in dairy cows in relation to diet and/or breed. However, the mechanisms governing the size of the fat globules remain hypothetical. Our objective was to determine the variable biochemical characteristics (fat, protein, fatty acids (FA), casein and calcium (Ca) contents) between individual milk which differed in both MFG diameter and membrane content, in order to speculate about the links between milk synthesis and MFG secretion. With this aim, we built five databases of individual milk samples from 21 experiments performed between 2003 and 2011. Three of them grouped data from trials dealing with breed/diet effects and included information about: (i) MFG size/membrane, fat and protein contents (n=982), (ii) previous parameters plus FA profile (n=529) and (iii) previous parameters plus true protein composition and calcium contents (n=101). A hierarchical clustering analysis performed on these three databases yielded four groups differing in the MFG characteristics. We observed significant differences among groups for the following parameters: (i) fat content and fat : protein ratio; (ii) de novo and polyunsaturated FA contents; (iii) Ca contents. These relationships could result from potential process regulating the synthesis and secretion of MFG: (i) the apical membrane turnover for MFG secretion and (ii) cytoplasmic lipid droplet formation in the lactocyte during its migration from the basal to the apical pole. The two other databases grouped data from trials dealing with milking frequency (n=211), milking kinetics and milk type (residual v. cisternal) (n=224). They were used to study the relationships between the size of the MFG and milk composition for high native fat contents (from 60 up to 100 g/kg in residual milks). We observed curvilinear relationships between the size of the MFG and fat content, as well as with the fat : protein ratio. This result suggests that MFG diameter reaches a

  8. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures.

  9. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  10. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  11. PRISM: protein interactions by structural matching.

    PubMed

    Ogmen, Utkan; Keskin, Ozlem; Aytuna, A Selim; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2005-07-01

    Prism (http://gordion.hpc.eng.ku.edu.tr/prism) is a website for protein interface analysis and prediction of putative protein-protein interactions. It is composed of a database holding protein interface structures derived from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The server also includes summary information about related proteins and an interactive protein interface viewer. A list of putative protein-protein interactions obtained by running our prediction algorithm can also be accessed. These results are applied to a set of protein structures obtained from the PDB at the time of algorithm execution (January 2004). Users can browse through the non-redundant dataset of representative interfaces on which the prediction algorithm depends, retrieve the list of similar structures to these interfaces or see the results of interaction predictions for a particular protein. Another service provided is interactive prediction. This is done by running the algorithm for user input structures.

  12. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  13. Structure of the native (unligated) mannose-specific bulb lectin from Scilla campanulata (bluebell) at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J

    1999-07-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of native Scilla campanulata agglutinin, a mannose-specific lectin from bluebell bulbs and a member of the Liliaceae family, has been determined by molecular replacement and refined to an R value of 0.186 at 1.7 A resolution. The lectin crystallizes in space group P21212 with unit-cell parameters a = 70. 42, b = 92.95, c = 46.64 A. The unit cell contains eight protein molecules of Mr = 13143 Da (119 amino-acid residues). The asymmetric unit comprises two chemically identical molecules, A and B, related by a non-crystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to c. This dimer further associates by crystallographic twofold symmetry to form a tetramer. The fold of the polypeptide backbone closely resembles that found in the lectins from Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) and Hippeastrum (amaryllis) and contains a threefold symmetric beta-prism made up of three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets. Each of the four-stranded beta-sheets (I, II and III) possesses a potential saccharide-binding site containing conserved residues; however, site II has two mutations relative to sites I and III which may prevent ligation at this site. Our study provides the first accurate and detailed description of a native (unligated) structure from this superfamily of mannose-specific bulb lectins and will all