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Sample records for natural anaerobic groundwaters

  1. Prevalence of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara A; Xing, Yangping; Lazenby, Brent; Lynch, Michael D J; Schiff, Sherry; Robertson, William D; Timlin, Robert; Lanza, Sadia; Ryan, M Cathryn; Aravena, Ramon; Fortin, Danielle; Clark, Ian D; Neufeld, Josh D

    2011-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria perform an important step in the global nitrogen cycle: anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and reduction of nitrite to form dinitrogen gas (N(2)). Anammox organisms appear to be widely distributed in natural and artificial environments. However, their roles in groundwater ammonium attenuation remain unclear and only limited biomarker-based data confirmed their presence prior to this study. We used complementary molecular and isotope-based methods to assess anammox diversity and activity occurring at three ammonium-contaminated groundwater sites: quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and (15)N-tracer incubations. Here we show that anammox performing organisms were abundant bacterial community members. Although all sites were dominated by Candidatus Brocadia-like sequences, the community at one site was particularly diverse, possessing four of five known genera of anammox bacteria. Isotope data showed that anammox produced up to 18 and 36% of N(2) at these sites. By combining molecular and isotopic results we have demonstrated the diversity, abundance, and activity of these autotrophic bacteria. Our results provide strong evidence for their important biogeochemical role in attenuating groundwater ammonium contamination.

  2. Isolation of an aerobic vinyl chloride oxidizer from anaerobic groundwater.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Heather; Rogers, Rebecca; Freedman, David L; Zinder, Stephen H

    2014-11-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a known human carcinogen and common groundwater contaminant. Reductive dechlorination of VC to non-toxic ethene under anaerobic conditions has been demonstrated at numerous hazardous waste sites. However, VC disappearance without stoichiometric production of ethene has also been observed at some sites and in microcosms. In this study we identify an organism responsible for this observation in presumably anaerobic microcosms and conclude that oxygen was not detectable based on a lack of color change from added resazurin. This organism, a Mycobacterium sp. closely related to known VC oxidizing strains, was present in high numbers in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from a groundwater microcosm. Although the oxidation/reduction indicator resazurin remained in the clear reduced state in these studies, these results suggest inadvertent oxygen contamination occurred. This study helps to elucidate the dynamic behavior of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated groundwater, through the isolation of a strictly aerobic organism that may be responsible for at least some disappearance of VC without the concomitant production of ethene in groundwater considered anaerobic.

  3. Carbon limitation of denitrification rates in an anaerobic groundwater system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Fernandez, M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    Rates of potential denitrification were determined for anaerobic aquifer sediments collected at a site where groundwater NO3 concentrations ranged from 0.7 ??M to 8.6 mM. A significant relation (p = 0.046) was observed between denitrification rates and the in situ concentration of NO3, but NO3 concentration only accounted for approximately 34% (r2) of the variation in activity. The highly significant relation (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.80) between potential denitrification and sediment total organic content and the enhanced activity of sediments amended with glucose indicated that denitrification rates in this aquifer system were carbon limited. No significant relation was observed between denitrification and the in situ groundwater pH, but short-term variations in pH influenced both the magnitude and the end products of denitrification. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  4. Natural radioactivity in Brazilian groundwater.

    PubMed

    Godoy, José Marcus; Godoy, Maria Luiza

    2006-01-01

    More than 220 groundwater samples were analyzed for 228Ra, 226Ra, 222Rn, 210Pb, U(nat), Th(nat), pH, conductivity, fluoride and some additional elements determined by ICP-MS. Since samples from several Brazilian states were taken, involving areas with quite different geologies, no general trend was observed relating the chemical composition and the natural radionuclide content. On the other hand, 210Pb strongly depends on the water content of its progenitor, 222Rn. The values obtained during the present work were compared with those reported by Hainberger et al. [Hainberger, P.L., de Oliveira Paiva, I.R., Salles Andrade, H.A., Zundel, G., Cullen, T.L., 1974. Radioactivity in Brazilian mineral waters. Radiation Data and Reports, 483-488.], when more than 270 groundwater samples were analyzed, mainly, for 226Ra. Based on the results of both works, it was possible to build a database including the results of both works, generating a set with the radium content of circa 350 groundwater sources. It was demonstrated that 228Ra, 226Ra, 222Rn, 210Pb and U(nat) content in Brazilian groundwater follows a lognormal distribution and the obtained geometric mean were 0.045, 0.014, 57.7, 0.040 BqL(-1) and 1.2 microgL(-1), respectively.

  5. In situ biodegradation potential of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, D. W.; Barker, J. F.

    1992-04-01

    Three types of experiments were conducted to assess the potential for enhancing the in situ biodegradation of nine aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic, leachate-impacted aquifers at North Bay, Ontario, and at Canada Forces Base Borden. Laboratory micrososms containing authentic aquifer material and groundwater from the North Bay site were amended with nitrate and glucose. No significant losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed compared to unamended controls, over a period of 187 days. A total of eight in situ biodegradation columns were installed in the North Bay and Borden aquifers. Remedial additions included electron acceptors (nitrate and sulphate) and primary substrates (acetate, lactate and yeast extract). Six aromatic hydrocarbons [toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, cumene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene ( 1,2,4-TMB)] were completely degraded in at least one in situ column at the North Bay site. Only toluene was degraded in the Borden aquifer. In all cases, aromatic hydrocarbon attenuation was attributed to biodegradation by methanogenic and fermentative bacteria. No evidence of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation was observed in columns remediated with nitrate or primary substrates. A continuous forced gradient injection experiment with sulphate addition was conducted at the North Bay site over a period of 51 days. The concentration of six aromatic hydrocarbons was monitored over time in the injection wells and at piezometer fences located 2, 5 and 10 m downgradient. All compounds except toluene reached injection concentration between 14 and 26 days after pumping began, and showed some evidence of selective retardation. Toluene broke through at a subdued concentration (˜ 50% of injection levels), and eventually declined to undetectable levels on day 43. This attenuation was attributed to adaptation and biodegradation by anaerobic bacteria. The results from these experiments indicate that considerable anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in

  6. Bioremediation of trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater using anaerobic process.

    PubMed

    Chomsurin, Cheema; Kajorntraidej, Juthathip; Luangmuang, Kongrit

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated soil and groundwater was studied in laboratory setups. In this process fermentation of polymeric organic materials (POMS) produced volatile fatty acids (VFAs) that were electron donors in reductive dechlorination of TCE. Shredded peanut shell was selected as low cost POM and the experiments were set up in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks. In the setups, approximately 25 mg of leachate contaminated soil was used as the main source of microorganisms and about 5 g of shredded peanut shell (0.5-2.36 mm) was added to produce VFAs for dechlorination of TCE. In the first set of experiments, fermentation of soil and shredded peanut shell was studied and it was found that VFAs were produced continuously with increasing concentration (5.63 mM as CH3COOH from the first day to 17.17 in the 10th day of the experiment). During the fermentation, concentration of ammonia-nitrogen was 22-50 mg/L, the ratio of VFA to NH3 was 15.29-23.44 and pH was 5.24-6.00. These results show that the system was appropriate for microorganism activities. In the second set of experiments, TCE (approximately 48 mg/L) was added to the fermentation system and remediation of TCE by reductive dechlorination was studied. It was found that 0.04(+/-0.01) mg TCE adsorbed to a gram of soil and peanut shells at the beginning of the experiment and based on mass balance of the system, TCE concentration in water was linearly reduced at the rate of 0.0098 mg/hr.

  7. The variability and intrinsic remediation of a BTEX plume in anaerobic sulphate-rich groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G. B.; Barber, C.; Power, T. R.; Thierrin, J.; Patterson, B. M.; Rayner, J. L.; Wu, Qinglong

    1999-03-01

    Data from long-term groundwater sampling, limited coring, and associated studies are synthesised to assess the variability and intrinsic remediation/natural attenuation of a dissolved hydrocarbon plume in sulphate-rich anaerobic groundwater. Fine vertical scale (0.25- and 0.5-m depth intervals) and horizontal plume-scale (>400 m) characteristics of the plume were mapped over a 5-year period from 1991 to 1996. The plume of dissolved BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene) and other organic compounds originated from leakage of gasoline from a subsurface fuel storage tank. The plume was up to 420 m long, less than 50 m wide and 3 m thick. In the first few years of monitoring, BTEX concentrations near the point of leakage were in approximate equilibrium with non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) gasoline. NAPL composition of core material and long-term trends in ratios of BTEX concentrations in groundwater indicated significant depletion (water washing, volatilisation and possibly biodegradation) of benzene from residual NAPL after 1992. Large fluctuations in BTEX concentrations in individual boreholes were shown to be largely attributable to seasonal groundwater flow variations. A combination of temporal and spatial groundwater quality data was required to adequately assess the stationarity of plumes, so as to allow inference of intrinsic remediation. Contoured concentration data for the period 1991 to 1996 indicated that plumes of toluene and o-xylene were, at best, only partially steady state (pseudo-steady state) due to seasonal groundwater flow changes. From this analysis, it was inferred that significant remediation by natural biodegradation was occurring for BTEX component plumes such as toluene and o-xylene, but provided no conclusive evidence of benzene biodegradation. Issues associated with field quantification of intrinsic remediation from groundwater sampling are highlighted. Preferential intrinsic biodegradation of selected organic compounds within the

  8. [Chlorinate solvents natural biodegradation in shallow groundwater].

    PubMed

    He, Jiang-tao; Li, Ye; Liu, Shi; Chen, Hong-han

    2005-03-01

    Chlorinated solvents contaminations are most popular in shallow groundwater. A serious local groundwater contamination of chlorinated solvents is founded in a north city of China during the organic pollution investigation. On the basis of the available data and the determining methods of chlorinated solvents biodegradation in groundwater under natural conditions, research on chlorinated solvents biodegrading potential is carried out. The results show that the ground water environment parameters, Eh and pH of the groundwater, indirect sign of biodegradation, i.e. NO3- changing, and concentration variation of biodegradation intermediate products of PCE and TCE all proved that chlorinated solvents can be degraded by microorganism in groundwater. The results of simulating experiment also reveal that, co-metabolism biodegradation of chlorinated solvent was possible under the groundwater circumstances in this sample. Therefore, admitting there is biotransformation from PCE to TCE can explain the present situation more reasonably.

  9. Highly organic natural media as permeable reactive barriers: TCE partitioning and anaerobic degradation profile in eucalyptus mulch and compost.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Zuhal; Tansel, Berrin; Katsenovich, Yelena; Sukop, Michael; Laha, Shonali

    2012-10-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted with eucalyptus mulch and commercial compost to evaluate suitability of highly organic natural media to support anaerobic decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater. Experimental data for TCE and its dechlorination byproducts were analyzed with Hydrus-1D model to estimate the partitioning and kinetic parameters for the sequential dechlorination reactions during TCE decomposition. The highly organic natural media allowed development of a bioactive zone capable of decomposing TCE under anaerobic conditions. The first order TCE biodecomposition reaction rates were 0.23 and 1.2d(-1) in eucalyptus mulch and compost media, respectively. The retardation factors in the eucalyptus mulch and compost columns for TCE were 35 and 301, respectively. The results showed that natural organic soil amendments can effectively support the anaerobic bioactive zone for remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater. The natural organic media are effective environmentally sustainable materials for use in permeable reactive barriers.

  10. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism

    PubMed Central

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH4) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH4 and hydrogen (H2) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH4, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H2 was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H2 decreased, rapid CH4 production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH4 production. For H2 production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H2 was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H2-producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  11. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism.

    PubMed

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH₄) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH₄ and hydrogen (H₂) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH₄, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H₂ was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H₂ decreased, rapid CH₄ production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH₄ production. For H₂ production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H₂ was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  12. Natural biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W W; Rice, D W

    1998-09-23

    There has recently been a growing awareness that natural processes are degrading contaminants of concern, and that the contribution these natural processes make to achieving cleanup goals needs to be formally considered during site-specific cleanup. Historical case data from a large number of releases has been used to evaluate the expectation for natural attenuation to contribute to the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. The use of historical case data has several advantages, among them: 1) sites can reduce characterization costs by sharing information on key hydrogeologic parameters controlling contaminant fate and transport, and 2) standard reference frameworks can be developed that individual sites can use as a basis of comparison regarding plume behavior. Definition of cleanup times must take into account basic constraints imposed by natural laws governing the transport and natural degradation process of petroleum hydrocarbons. The actual time to reach groundwater cleanup goals is determined by these laws and the limitations on residual subsurface contamination attenuation rates, through either active or natural biological processes. These limitations will practically constrain the time to achieve low concentration cleanup goals. Recognition is needed that sites will need to be transitioned to remediation by natural processes at some point following implementation of active remediation options. The results of an analysis of approximately 1800 California and 600 Texas fuel hydrocarbon (FHC) releases and 2.50 chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) plumes will be summarized. Plume lengths and natural biodegradation potential were evaluated. For FHC releases, 90% of benzene groundwater plumes were less than 280 feet in length and evidence of natural biodegradation was found to be present at all sites studied in detail. For CVOC releases, source strength and groundwater flow velocity are dominant factors controlling groundwater plume

  13. Contamination valuation of soil and groundwater source at anaerobic municipal solid waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Shuokr Qarani; Maulood, Yousif Ismael

    2015-12-01

    The present work aimed to determine the risks that formed landfill leachate from anaerobic Erbil Landfill Site (ELS) poses on groundwater source and to observe the effects of disposed municipal solid waste (MSW) on soil properties. The study further aims to fill the gap in studies on the effects of disposed MSW and produced leachate on the groundwater characteristics and soil quality at ELS, Iraq. Soil, leachate, and groundwater samples were collected from ELS for use as samples in this study. Unpolluted groundwater samples were collected from an area outside of the landfill. Field and laboratory experiments for the soil samples were conducted. Chemical analyses for the soil samples such as organic matter, total salts, and SO4 (=) were also performed. Raw leachate and groundwater samples were analyzed using physical and chemical experiments. The yields for sorptivity, steady-state infiltration rate, and hydraulic conductivity of the soil samples were 0.0006 m/√s, 0.00004 m/s, and 2.17 × 10(-5) m/s, respectively. The soil at ELS was found to be light brown clayey gravel with sand and light brown gravely lean clay layers with low permeability. Unprocessed leachate analysis identified the leachate as stabilized. Findings showed that the soil and groundwater at the anaerobic ELS were contaminated.

  14. Contamination valuation of soil and groundwater source at anaerobic municipal solid waste landfill site.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Shuokr Qarani; Maulood, Yousif Ismael

    2015-12-01

    The present work aimed to determine the risks that formed landfill leachate from anaerobic Erbil Landfill Site (ELS) poses on groundwater source and to observe the effects of disposed municipal solid waste (MSW) on soil properties. The study further aims to fill the gap in studies on the effects of disposed MSW and produced leachate on the groundwater characteristics and soil quality at ELS, Iraq. Soil, leachate, and groundwater samples were collected from ELS for use as samples in this study. Unpolluted groundwater samples were collected from an area outside of the landfill. Field and laboratory experiments for the soil samples were conducted. Chemical analyses for the soil samples such as organic matter, total salts, and SO4 (=) were also performed. Raw leachate and groundwater samples were analyzed using physical and chemical experiments. The yields for sorptivity, steady-state infiltration rate, and hydraulic conductivity of the soil samples were 0.0006 m/√s, 0.00004 m/s, and 2.17 × 10(-5) m/s, respectively. The soil at ELS was found to be light brown clayey gravel with sand and light brown gravely lean clay layers with low permeability. Unprocessed leachate analysis identified the leachate as stabilized. Findings showed that the soil and groundwater at the anaerobic ELS were contaminated. PMID:26577215

  15. Natural radioactivity in groundwater--a review.

    PubMed

    Dinh Chau, Nguyen; Dulinski, Marek; Jodlowski, Pawel; Nowak, Jakub; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Sleziak, Monika; Wachniew, Przemyslaw

    2011-12-01

    The issue of natural radioactivity in groundwater is reviewed, with emphasis on those radioisotopes which contribute in a significant way to the overall effective dose received by members of the public due to the intake of drinking water originating from groundwater systems. The term 'natural radioactivity' is used in this context to cover all radioactivity present in the environment, including man-made (anthropogenic) radioactivity. Comprehensive discussion of radiological aspects of the presence of natural radionuclides in groundwater, including an overview of current regulations dealing with radioactivity in drinking water, is provided. The presented data indicate that thorough assessments of the committed doses resulting from the presence of natural radioactivity in groundwater are needed, particularly when such water is envisaged for regular intake by infants. They should be based on a precise determination of radioactivity concentration levels of the whole suite of radionuclides, including characterisation of their temporal variability. Equally important is a realistic assessment of water intake values for specific age groups. Only such an evaluation may provide the basis for possible remedial actions.

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer.

    PubMed

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-11-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ(13) CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed ((34) ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment. PMID:25039851

  17. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer.

    PubMed

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-11-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ(13) CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed ((34) ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment.

  18. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: Groundwater biogeochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, M.E.; Klecka, G.M.; Lutz, E.J.; Ei, T.A.; Grosso, N.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally attenuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: groundwater biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Witt, Michael E; Klecka, Gary M; Lutz, Edward J; Ei, Tom A; Grosso, Nancy R; Chapelle, Francis H

    2002-07-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/ aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally atteuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes.

  20. Natural attenuation of perchlorate in denitrified groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William D; Roy, James W; Brown, Susan J; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of a well-defined septic system groundwater plume and groundwater discharging to two urban streams located in southern Ontario, Canada, provided evidence of natural attenuation of background low level (ng/L) perchlorate (ClO4⁻) under denitrifying conditions in the field. The septic system site at Long Point contains ClO4⁻ from a mix of waste water, atmospheric deposition, and periodic use of fireworks, while the nitrate plume indicates active denitrification. Plume nitrate (NO3⁻ -N) concentrations of up to 103 mg/L declined with depth and downgradient of the tile bed due to denitrification and anammox activity, and the plume was almost completely denitrified beyond 35 m from the tile bed. The ClO4⁻ natural attenuation occurs at the site only when NO3⁻ -N concentrations are <0.3 mg/L, after which ClO4⁻ concentrations decline abruptly from 187 ± 202 to 11 ± 15 ng/L. A similar pattern between NO3⁻ -N and ClO4⁻ was found in groundwater discharging to the two urban streams. These findings suggest that natural attenuation (i.e., biodegradation) of ClO4⁻ may be commonplace in denitrified aquifers with appropriate electron donors present, and thus, should be considered as a remediation option for ClO4⁻ contaminated groundwater. PMID:23448242

  1. Natural attenuation of perchlorate in denitrified groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William D; Roy, James W; Brown, Susan J; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of a well-defined septic system groundwater plume and groundwater discharging to two urban streams located in southern Ontario, Canada, provided evidence of natural attenuation of background low level (ng/L) perchlorate (ClO4⁻) under denitrifying conditions in the field. The septic system site at Long Point contains ClO4⁻ from a mix of waste water, atmospheric deposition, and periodic use of fireworks, while the nitrate plume indicates active denitrification. Plume nitrate (NO3⁻ -N) concentrations of up to 103 mg/L declined with depth and downgradient of the tile bed due to denitrification and anammox activity, and the plume was almost completely denitrified beyond 35 m from the tile bed. The ClO4⁻ natural attenuation occurs at the site only when NO3⁻ -N concentrations are <0.3 mg/L, after which ClO4⁻ concentrations decline abruptly from 187 ± 202 to 11 ± 15 ng/L. A similar pattern between NO3⁻ -N and ClO4⁻ was found in groundwater discharging to the two urban streams. These findings suggest that natural attenuation (i.e., biodegradation) of ClO4⁻ may be commonplace in denitrified aquifers with appropriate electron donors present, and thus, should be considered as a remediation option for ClO4⁻ contaminated groundwater.

  2. Bacterial community and groundwater quality changes in an anaerobic aquifer during groundwater recharge with aerobic recycled water.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Morris, Christina; Shackelton, Mark; Patterson, Bradley M

    2013-09-01

    Managed aquifer recharge offers the opportunity to manage groundwater resources by storing water in aquifers when in surplus and thus increase the amount of groundwater available for abstraction during high demand. The Water Corporation of Western Australia (WA) is undertaking a Groundwater Replenishment Trial to evaluate the effects of recharging aerobic recycled water (secondary treated wastewater subjected to ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultraviolet disinfection) into the anaerobic Leederville aquifer in Perth, WA. Using culture-independent methods, this study showed the presence of Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Betaproteobacteria, Cytophaga, Flavobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria, and a decrease in microbial diversity with an increase in depth of aquifer. Assessment of physico-chemical and microbiological properties of groundwater before and after recharge revealed that recharging the aquifer with aerobic recycled water resulted in elevated redox potentials in the aquifer and increased bacterial numbers, but reduced microbial diversity. The increase in bacterial numbers and reduced microbial diversity in groundwater could be a reflection of an increased denitrifier and sulfur-oxidizing populations in the aquifer, as a result of the increased availability of nitrate, oxygen, and residual organic matter. This is consistent with the geochemical data that showed pyrite oxidation and denitrification within the aquifer after recycled water recharge commenced.

  3. Anaerobic bioremediation of hexavalent uranium in groundwater by reductive precipitation with methanogenic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rodriguez, Aida; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2010-04-01

    Uranium has been responsible for extensive contamination of groundwater due to releases from mill tailings and other uranium processing waste. Past evidence has confirmed that certain bacteria can enzymatically reduce soluble hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to insoluble tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) under anaerobic conditions in the presence of appropriate electron donors. This paper focuses on the evaluation of anaerobic granular sludge as a source of inoculum for the bioremediation of uranium in water. Batch experiments were performed with several methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge samples and different electron donors. Abiotic controls consisting of heat-killed inoculum and non-inoculated treatments confirmed the biological removal process. In this study, unadapted anaerobic granular sludge immediately reduced U(VI), suggesting an intrinsic capacity of the sludge to support this process. The high biodiversity of anaerobic granular sludge most likely accounts for the presence of specific microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI). Oxidation by O(2) was shown to resolubilize the uranium. This observation combined with X-ray diffraction evidence of uraninite confirmed that the removal during anaerobic treatment was due to reductive precipitation. The anaerobic removal activity could be sustained after several respikes of U(VI). The U(VI) removal was feasible without addition of electron donors, indicating that the decay of endogenous biomass substrates was contributing electron equivalents to the process. Addition of electron donors, such as H(2) stimulated the removal of U(VI) to varying degrees. The stimulation was greater in sludge samples with lower endogenous substrate levels. The present work reveals the potential application of anaerobic granular sludge for continuous bioremediation schemes to treat uranium-contaminated water.

  4. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ13CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed (34ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment. PMID:25039851

  5. Assessment of microbial natural attenuation in groundwater polluted with gasworks residues.

    PubMed

    Schulze, S; Tiehm, A

    2004-01-01

    Intrinsic biodegradation, representing the key process in Natural Attenuation, was examined at a tar-oil polluted disposal site. Methods to assess microbial natural attenuation of BTEX and PAH included analysis of groundwater hydrochemistry, pollutant profiles, composition of the microflora, and microcosm studies. In the polluted groundwater downgradient the disposal site, oxygen and nitrate were only available adjacent to the groundwater table and at the plume fringes. In the anaerobic core of the plume, a sequence of predominating redox zones (methanogenic, sulphate-reducing, Fe(III)-reducing) was observed. Changing pollutant profiles in the plume indicated active biodegradation processes, e.g. biodegradation of toluene and naphthalene in the anaerobic zones. High numbers of microorganisms capable of growing under anaerobic conditions and of aerobic pollutant degrading organisms confirmed the impact of biodegradation at this site. In microcosm studies, the autochthonous microflora utilised toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene under sulfate- and Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Additionally, benzene and phenanthrene were degraded in the presence of Fe(III). Under aerobic conditions, all BTEX and PAH were rapidly degraded. The microcosm studies in particular were suitable to examine the role of specific electron acceptors, and represented an important component of the multiple line of evidence concept to assess natural attenuation. PMID:15497868

  6. Bacteria associated with deep, alkaline, anaerobic groundwaters in Southeast Washington.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T O; McKinley, J P; Fredrickson, J K

    1993-01-01

    The microbial diversity in two deep, confined aquifers, the Grande Ronde (1270 m) and the Priest Rapids (316 m), Hanford Reservation, Washington, USA, was investigated by sampling from artesian wells. These basaltic aquifers were alkaline (pH 8.5 to 10.5) and anaerobic (Eh -200 to -450 mV). The wells were allowed to free-flow until pH and Eh stabilized, then the microflora was sampled with water filtration and flow-through sandtrap methods. Direct microscopic counts showed 7.6 × 10(5) and 3.6 × 10(3) bacteria ml(-1) in water from the Grande Ronde and Priest Rapids aquifers, respectively. The sand filter method yielded 5.7 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(5) cells g(-1) wet weight of sand. The numbers of bacteria did not decrease as increasing volumes of water were flushed out. The heterotrophic diversity of these bacterial populations was assessed using enrichments for 20 functional groups. These groups were defined by their ability to grow in a matrix of five different electron acceptors (O2, Fe(III), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-)) and four groups of electron donors (fermentation products, monomers, polymers, aromatics) in a mineral salts medium at pH 9.5. Growth was assessed by protein production. Culture media were subsequently analyzed to determine substrate utilization patterns. Substrate utilization patterns proved to be more reliable indicators of the presence of a particular physiological group than was protein production. The sand-trap method obtained a greater diversity of bacteria than did water filtration, presumably by enriching the proportion of normally sessile bacteria relative to planktonic bacteria. Substrate utilization patterns were different for microflora from the two aquifers and corresponded to their different geochemistries. Activities in the filtered water enrichments more closely matched those predicted by aquifer geochemistry than did the sand-trap enrichments. The greatest activities were found in Fe(III)-reducing enrichments from both wells, SO4

  7. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland: Field evidence of anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Olsen, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Field evidence collected along two groundwater flow paths shows that anaerobic biodegradation naturally attenuates a plume of chlorinated volatile organic compounds as it discharges from an aerobic sand aquifer through wetland sediments. A decrease in concentrations of two parent contaminants, trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA), and a concomitant increase in concentrations of anaerobic daughter products occurs along upward flow paths through the Wetland sediments. The daughter products 1,2-dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane are produced from hydrogenolysis of TCE and from PCA degradation through hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination (reductive dechlorination) pathways. Total concentrations of TCE, PCA, and their degradation products, however, decrease to below detection levels within 0.15-0.30 m of land surface. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of TCE and PCA in the wetland sediments is associated with the naturally higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and the lower redox state of the groundwater compared to the aquifer. This field study indicates that wetlands and similar organic-rich environments at groundwater/surface-water interfaces may be important in intercepting groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organics and in naturally reducing concentrations and toxicity before sensitive surface-water receptors are reached.

  8. Anaerobic biodegradation and hydrogeochemical controls on natural attenuation of trichloroethene in an inland forested wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Dyer, L.J.; Burris, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation was conducted in a forested wetland where a plume of trichloroethylene discharges from a sand aquifer through organic-rich wetland and stream-bottom sediments. The rapid response of the wetland hydrology to precipitation events altered groundwater flow and geochemistry during wet conditions in the spring compared to the drier conditions in the summer and fall. During dry conditions, partial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene to cis-1,2-dichloroethylene occurred in methanogenic wetland porewater. Influx of oxygenated recharge during wet conditions led to a change from methanogenic to iron-reducing conditions and a lack of 1,2-dichloroethylene production in the wet spring conditions. During these wet conditions, dilution was the primary attenuation mechanism evident for trichloroethylene in the wetland porewater. Trichloroethylene degradation was insignificant in anaerobic microcosms constructed with the shallow wetland sediment. Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents by anaerobic biodegradation may not be efficient at all wetland sites, despite organic-rich characteristics of the sediment.

  9. Vinegar-amended anaerobic biosand filter for the removal of arsenic and nitrate from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kathryn V; Webster, Tara M; Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-04-15

    The performance of a vinegar-amended anaerobic biosand filter was evaluated for future application as point-of-use water treatment in rural areas for the removal of arsenic and nitrate from groundwater containing common ions. Due to the importance of sulfate and iron in arsenic removal and their variable concentrations in groundwater, influent sulfate and iron concentrations were varied. Complete removal of influent nitrate (50 mg/L) and over 50% removal of influent arsenic (200 μg/L) occurred. Of all conditions tested, the lowest median effluent arsenic concentration was 88 μg/L. Iron removal occurred completely when 4 mg/L was added, and sulfate concentrations were lowered to a median concentration <2 mg/L from influent concentrations of 22 and 50 mg/L. Despite iron and sulfate removal and the establishment of reducing conditions, arsenic concentrations remained above the World Health Organization's arsenic drinking water standard. Further research is necessary to determine if anaerobic biosand filters can be improved to meet the arsenic drinking water standard and to evaluate practical implementation challenges.

  10. An anaerobic two-layer permeable reactive biobarrier for the remediation of nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, She-Jiang; Zhao, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Jie; Wang, Juan; Qi, Yun

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, an anaerobic two-layer permeable reactive biobarrier system consisting of an oxygen-capturing layer followed by a biodegradation layer was designed firstly for evaluating the remediation effectiveness of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. The first layer filling with granular oxygen-capturing materials is used to capture dissolved oxygen (DO) in groundwater in order to create an anaerobic condition for the microbial denitrification. Furthermore, it can also provide nutrition, such as carbon and phosphorus, for the normal metabolism of immobilized denitrifying bacteria filled in the second layer. The second layer using granular activated carbon as microbial carrier is able to biodegrade nitrate entering the barrier system. Batch experiments were conducted to identify the effect of DO on microbial denitrification, oxygen-capturing performance of zero valent iron (ZVI) powder and the characteristics of the prepared oxygen-capturing materials used to stimulate growth of denitrifying bacteria. A laboratory-scale experiment using two continuous upflow stainless-steel columns was then performed to evaluate the feasibility of this designed system. The first column was filled with granular oxygen-capturing materials prepared by ZVI powder, sodium citrate as well as other inorganic salts, etc. The second column was filled with activated carbon immobilizing denitrifying microbial consortium. Simulated nitrate-contaminated groundwater (40 mg NO3-N/L, pH 7.0) with 6 mg/L of DO content was pumped into this system at a flow rate of 235 mL/d. Samples from the second column were analyzed for nitrate and its major degradation byproduct. Results showed that nitrate could be removed more than 94%, and its metabolic intermediate, nitrite, could also be biodegraded further in this passive system. Further study is necessary in order to evaluate performance of its field application.

  11. Nature's Helpers: Using Microorganisms to Remove Trichloroethene (TCE) from Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. G.; Krajmlanik-Brown, R.; Fajardo-Williams, D.; Halloum, I.

    2015-12-01

    Organic chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), are toxic pollutants threatening ground water quality worldwide and present at many superfund sites. Bioremediation using microorganisms is a promising, green, efficient, and sustainable approach to remove PCE and TCE contamination from soil and groundwater. Under anaerobic conditions, specialized microorganisms (dechlorinators) can reduce these chlorinated ethenes to ethene, an innocuous product, and gain energy for growth by a process known as reductive dechlorination. Dechlorinators are most often present in the environment and in dechlorinating cultures alongside other microbes such as fermenters, methanogens, and acetogens. Fermenters, methanogens, and acetogens syntrophically provide essential nutrients and growth factors to dechlorinators, most specifically to the only members able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene: Dehalococcoides; unfortunately, they also compete with dechlorinators for electron donors. My laboratory devises reductive chlorination platforms to study competition and syntrophy among Dehalococcoides, and other microbes to optimize remediation reactions and transport in the subsurface. We look at competing processes present as part of the natural soil chemistry and microbiology and address these challenges through a combination of enrichment techniques, molecular microbial ecology (deep sequencing), water chemistry, and electron balances. We have applied knowledge gathered in my laboratory to: 1) enrich microbial dechlorinating cultures capable of some of the fastest rates of TCE to ethene dechlorination ever reported, and 2) successfully design and operate three different continuous dechlorinating reactor types. We attribute our successful reactor operations to our multidisciplinary approach which links microbiology and engineering. Our reactors produce robust dechlorinating cultures used for in-situ bioaugmentation of PCE and TCE at contaminated sites

  12. NATURAL BIOLOGICAL ATTENUATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is little consistent difference in the calculated half-lives of aromatic hydrocarbons in different anaerobic environments, but methanogenic environments might be generally the least supportive of rapid biotransformation. Toluene was usually the most rapidly biotransformed...

  13. Analytical model for BTEX natural attenuation in the presence of fuel ethanol and its anaerobic metabolite acetate.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcio L B; Gomez, Diego E; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2013-03-01

    Flow-through column studies were conducted to mimic the natural attenuation of ethanol and BTEX mixtures, and to consider potential inhibitory effects of ethanol and its anaerobic metabolite acetate on BTEX biodegradation. Results were analyzed using a one-dimensional analytical model that was developed using consecutive reaction differential equations based on first-order kinetics. Decrease in pH due to acetogenesis was also modeled, using charge balance equations under CaCO(3) dissolution conditions. Delay in BTEX removal was observed and simulated in the presence of ethanol and acetate. Acetate was the major volatile fatty acid intermediate produced during anaerobic ethanol biodegradation (accounting for about 58% of the volatile fatty acid mass) as suggested by the model data fit. Acetate accumulation (up to 1.1 g/L) near the source zone contributed to a pH decrease by almost one unit. The anaerobic degradation of ethanol (2 g/L influent concentration) at the source zone produced methane at concentrations exceeding its solubility (~/=26mg/L). Overall, this simple analytical model adequately described ethanol degradation, acetate accumulation and methane production patterns, suggesting that it could be used as a screening tool to simulate lag times in BTEX biodegradation, changes in groundwater pH and methane generation following ethanol-blended fuel releases.

  14. Analytical model for BTEX natural attenuation in the presence of fuel ethanol and its anaerobic metabolite acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Marcio L. B.; Gomez, Diego E.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Flow-through column studies were conducted to mimic the natural attenuation of ethanol and BTEX mixtures, and to consider potential inhibitory effects of ethanol and its anaerobic metabolite acetate on BTEX biodegradation. Results were analyzed using a one-dimensional analytical model that was developed using consecutive reaction differential equations based on first-order kinetics. Decrease in pH due to acetogenesis was also modeled, using charge balance equations under CaCO3 dissolution conditions. Delay in BTEX removal was observed and simulated in the presence of ethanol and acetate. Acetate was the major volatile fatty acid intermediate produced during anaerobic ethanol biodegradation (accounting for about 58% of the volatile fatty acid mass) as suggested by the model data fit. Acetate accumulation (up to 1.1 g/L) near the source zone contributed to a pH decrease by almost one unit. The anaerobic degradation of ethanol (2 g/L influent concentration) at the source zone produced methane at concentrations exceeding its solubility (≅ 26 mg/L). Overall, this simple analytical model adequately described ethanol degradation, acetate accumulation and methane production patterns, suggesting that it could be used as a screening tool to simulate lag times in BTEX biodegradation, changes in groundwater pH and methane generation following ethanol-blended fuel releases.

  15. Enhanced anaerobic bioremediation of groundwater contaminated by fuel hydrocarbons at Seal Beach, California.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J A; Hopkins, G D; Lebron, C A; Reinhard, M

    2000-01-01

    Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of groundwater contaminated by fuel hydrocarbons has been evaluated at a field experiment conducted at the Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California. This experiment included the establishment of three different remediation zones in situ: one zone was augmented with sulfate, one was augmented with sulfate and nitrate, and the third was unaugmented. This enables a comparison of hydrocarbon biodegradation under sulfate-reducing, sequential denitrifying/sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions, respectively. In general, the results from the field experiment are: (1) Certain fuel hydrocarbons were removed preferentially over others, but the order of preference is dependent upon the geochemical conditions; and (2) In the zones that were augmented with sulfate and/or nitrate, the added electron acceptors were consumed quickly, indicating that enhancement via electron acceptor injection accelerates the biodegradation process. More specifically, in the sulfate-reducing zone, sulfate was utilized with an apparent first-order rate coefficient of approximately 0.1 day(-1). In the combined denitrifying/sulfate-reducing zone, nitrate was utilized preferentially over sulfate, with an apparent first-order rate coefficient of 0.1-0.6 day(-1). However, the data suggest that slow sulfate utilization does occur in the presence of nitrate, i.e., the two processes are not strictly sequential. With regard to the aromatic BTEX hydrocarbons, toluene was preferentially removed under intrinsic conditions; biodegradation of benzene was slow if it occurred at all; augmentation with sulfate preferentially stimulated biodegradation of o-xylene; and ethylbenzene appeared recalcitrant under sulfate-reducing conditions but readily degradable under denitrifying conditions.

  16. Groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    , including nutrients and dissolved oxygen. Groundwater withdrawals can negatively impact riparian habitats by depriving ecosystems of adequate fresh water and fragmenting communities when streams go dry. Biochemical reactions in shallow groundwater can remove anthropogenically elevated nitrogen compounds and reduce—but only to a point—the greening of waterways and shorelines with periphyton and harmful algal blooms. Groundwater extraction for beneficial use is increasingly limited by water-quality constraints imposed by naturally occurring and introduced substances. Overdrafting can cause land-surface subsidence, damaging buildings and roads and disrupting canals, sewers, and other gravity-flow conveyances. Increases in groundwater levels can cause soil salinization in dry regions and erosive sapping and flooding in wet regions. Coastal saltwater intrusion, groundwater flooding, salinization associated with groundwater-irrigated agriculture, induced seismicity from injected wastes, and the detrimental impacts of groundwater depletion are among the major environmental challenges of our time.

  17. Natural discharge : a key to sustainable utilization of fossil groundwater.

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, M.; Yan, E.; Sturchio, N.; Wagdy, A.; Abdel Gelil, K.; Becker, R.; Manocha, N.; Milewski, A.; Environmental Science Division; Western Michigan Univ.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Cairo Univ.; Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigagion

    2007-01-01

    Rising demands for fresh water supplies in arid lands are leading to excessive exploitation and unsustainable mining of non-renewable fossil groundwater. Using the Nubian Aquifer of Saharan Africa as a test site, we demonstrate an integrated approach to identify areas of discharge that could have gone undetected, and to model extraction that is sustained by natural discharge. Using isotopic and geochemical analyses along with field and remote sensing data we show that discharge of the Nubian Aquifer is occurring on a larger scale, primarily through deep-seated fault systems, and that ascending groundwater discharges into relatively thick alluvial aquifers proximal to the fault complex that defines the River Nile and the Gulf of Suez. We develop a hydrologic model to assess the discharge and to constrain sustainable extraction in the Asyuti area along the River Nile and to demonstrate a replicable model for similar reservoirs. A two-dimensional groundwater flow model was constructed and calibrated against head data from 19 wells. Results point to a significant contribution to the Asyuti groundwater system from rising Nubian groundwater (3.19 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}/yr: 75% of incoming flow) and a modest contribution (1.08 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}/yr: 25% of incoming flow) from surface runoff. Approximately 2.5 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}/yr of groundwater could be used in a sustainable manner in Asyuti. Assuming geologic settings and discharge rates similar to those at Asyuti, we estimate that 70 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}/yr of groundwater may be available for sustainable development in similar settings around the River Nile and the Gulf of Suez.

  18. Microbial reduction and precipitation of vanadium (V) in groundwater by immobilized mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Liting; Tian, Caixing; Yuan, Songhu; Feng, Chuanping; Ni, Jinren; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2015-09-01

    Vanadium is an important contaminant impacted by natural and industrial activities. Vanadium (V) reduction efficiency as high as 87.0% was achieved by employing immobilized mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculated seed within 12h operation, while V(IV) was the main reduction product which precipitated instantly. Increasing initial V(V) concentration resulted in the decrease of V(V) removal efficiency, while this index increased first and then decreased with the increase of initial COD concentration, pH and conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicated the decreased microbial diversity. V(V) reduction was realized through dissimilatory reduction process by significantly enhanced Lactococcus and Enterobacter with oxidation of lactic and acetic acids from fermentative microorganisms such as the enriched Paludibacter and the newly appeared Acetobacterium, Oscillibacter. This study is helpful to detect new functional species for V(V) reduction and constitutes a step ahead in developing in situ bioremediations of vanadium contamination.

  19. Estimating natural background groundwater chemistry, Questa molybdenum mine, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Phillip L.; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Walker, Bruce M.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Quane, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    This 2 1/2 day field trip will present an overview of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project whose objective was to estimate pre-mining groundwater chemistry at the Questa molybdenum mine, New Mexico. Because of intense debate among stakeholders regarding pre-mining groundwater chemistry standards, the New Mexico Environment Department and Chevron Mining Inc. (formerly Molycorp) agreed that the USGS should determine pre-mining groundwater quality at the site. In 2001, the USGS began a 5-year, multidisciplinary investigation to estimate pre-mining groundwater chemistry utilizing a detailed assessment of a proximal natural analog site and applied an interdisciplinary approach to infer pre-mining conditions. The trip will include a surface tour of the Questa mine and key locations in the erosion scar areas and along the Red River. The trip will provide participants with a detailed understanding of geochemical processes that influence pre-mining environmental baselines in mineralized areas and estimation techniques for determining pre-mining baseline conditions.

  20. Naturally Occurring Bacteria Similar to the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-Degrading Strain PM1 Are Present in MTBE-Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Krassimira; Gebreyesus, Binyam; Mackay, Douglas; Scow, Kate M.

    2003-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widespread groundwater contaminant that does not respond well to conventional treatment technologies. Growing evidence indicates that microbial communities indigenous to groundwater can degrade MTBE under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Although pure cultures of microorganisms able to degrade or cometabolize MTBE have been reported, to date the specific organisms responsible for MTBE degradation in various field studies have not be identified. We report that DNA sequences almost identical (99% homology) to those of strain PM1, originally isolated from a biofilter in southern California, are naturally occurring in an MTBE-polluted aquifer in Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), Lompoc, California. Cell densities of native PM1 (measured by TaqMan quantitative PCR) in VAFB groundwater samples ranged from below the detection limit (in anaerobic sites) to 103 to 104 cells/ml (in oxygen-amended sites). In groundwater from anaerobic or aerobic sites incubated in microcosms spiked with 10 μg of MTBE/liter, densities of native PM1 increased to approximately 105 cells/ml. Native PM1 densities also increased during incubation of VAFB sediments during MTBE degradation. In controlled field plots amended with oxygen, artificially increasing the MTBE concentration was followed by an increase in the in situ native PM1 cell density. This is the first reported relationship between in situ MTBE biodegradation and densities of MTBE-degrading bacteria by quantitative molecular methods. PMID:12732529

  1. [Recovery of facultatives and anaerobes from frozen specimens with a polymicrobial nature].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Chizuko; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological examination of frozen specimens is sometimes carried out in clinical microbiology and the result is used as an aid of diagnosis and/or treatment of polymicrobial infections. The study was carried out to reevaluate the merit of freezing specimens in clinical microbiology. A total of 10 specimens with a polymicrobial nature were included in this study. Before and after freezing specimens, we isolated facultative and anaerobic bacteria using a set of primary isolation media, consisting of three aerobic agar plates (MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar) and four pre-reduced anaerobic agar plates (HK Blood agar, HK blood agar with paromomycin (PM) and vancomycin (VM), phenyl ethyl-alcohol (PEA) agar and Bacteroides bile esculin (BBE) agar). All the procedures were done in a properly controlled anaerobic chamber. The number of isolates before and after freezing was 79 and 70, respectively. Among the strains isolated before freezing, 33 strains were recovered on the same kin of media artery freezing, without a remarkable decrease in the quantity. But 26 strains were not recovered and 2 strains were recovered with a remarkable decrease. Among 26 strains, 15 strains could be successfully backed up on the different kind of media. In conclusion, an anaerobic technique with an anaerobic chamber and a set of isolatin plates including blood agar, chocolate agar, HK blood agar, PEA blood agar, HK blood agar with PM and VM enable us to estimate the bacteriology before freezing from frozen specimens.

  2. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate. A concern has been raised that the presence of ethanol from a spill of gasoline may inhibit the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzene. Ethanol is miscible in water, and ethanol is readily metabolized by micr...

  3. SITE BULLETIN, ATTENUATED ANAEROBIC DECHLORINATION OF GROUNDWATER USING HRC MACTEC - HARDING ESE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A SITE demonstration of the Harding ESE permeable reactive barrier wall (PRBW) was conducted on the contaminated groundwater from the Fisherville Mill site in Grafton, MA beginning June 2000 to July 2003. Installation of the PRBW was accomplished by injecting HRC into a series of...

  4. Bacterial community analysis of shallow groundwater undergoing sequential anaerobic and aerobic chloroethene biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Todd R; Franklin, Mark P; Halden, Rolf U

    2007-05-01

    At Department of Energy Site 300, beneficial hydrocarbon cocontaminants and favorable subsurface conditions facilitate sequential reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) and rapid oxidation of the resultant cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) upon periodic oxygen influx. We assessed the geochemistry and microbial community of groundwater from across the site. Removal of cis-DCE was shown to coincide with oxygen influx in hydrocarbon-containing groundwater near the source area. Principal component analysis of contaminants and inorganic compounds showed that monitoring wells could be differentiated based upon concentrations of TCE, cis-DCE, and nitrate. Structurally similar communities were detected in groundwater from wells containing cis-DCE, high TCE, and low nitrate levels. Bacteria identified by sequencing 16S rRNA genes belonged to seven phylogenetic groups, including Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Firmicutes and Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroidetes (CFB). Whereas members of the Burkholderiales and CFB group were abundant in all wells (10(4)-10(9) 16S rRNA gene copies L(-1)), quantitative PCR showed that Alphaproteobacteria were elevated (>10(6) L(-1)) only in wells containing hydrocarbon cocontaminants. The study shows that bacterial community structure is related to groundwater geochemistry and that Alphaproteobacteria are enriched in locales where cis-DCE removal occurs.

  5. Mobilization Of Polonium-210 In Naturally-Contaminated Groundwater, Churchill County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, R. L.; Stillings, L. L.; Cutler, N.

    2009-12-01

    Polonium-210 activities in groundwater rarely exceed about 40 mBq/L because it strongly binds to sediments. The recent discovery of natural 210Po at levels ranging from below 1 to 6,300±280 mBq/L in 62 drinking-water wells in Lahontan Valley, Churchill County, Nevada, led to a geochemical investigation of the processes responsible for its mobilization from the aquifer sediments. The source of the 210Po is radioactive decay of uranium in sediments transported into the valley by erosion of granitic rocks in the Sierra Nevada during the Pleistocene. There is little spatial or depth variability in 210Pb activity in study-area sediments (average 35 Bq/kg) and detailed analysis at a contaminated well indicates mobilization of <0.5 percent of the 210Po in the sediments would account for all of the 210Po in the well water. Elevated 210Po activities (>200 mBq/L) are associated with anoxic water (DO <0.1 mg/L) with high pH (commonly >9.0). Investigations in the 1980s by William Burnett and colleagues of naturally-contaminated wells in Florida showed that 210Po was mobilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria and remained in solution as long as sulfides did not accumulate above certain levels. Similarly, δ34SSO4 values in Lahontan Valley indicate that significant sulfate reduction has occurred in wells containing >200 mBq/L of 210Po, but sulfide is not accumulating and its concentrations are low (<0.03 mg/L) in 25 of 28 of those wells. In our working hypothesis, mobilization of 210Po in Lahontan Valley is linked to reduction of Mn oxides by sulfide in an anaerobic sulfur cycle (Figure 1). Such a sulfur cycle is consistent with the high pH, less than predicted δ18OSO4 values, low sulfide concentrations, and presence of elemental sulfur in the water. Results from the Nevada and Florida investigations suggest that 210Po contamination may be more widespread than previously recognized, occurring in groundwater near uranium-mine operations and other uranium containing sediments when

  6. Natural attenuation potential of phenylarsenicals in anoxic groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Michael; Daus, Birgit; Vogt, Carsten; Weiss, Holger

    2009-09-15

    The extensive production of chemical warfare agents in the 20th century has led to serious contamination of soil and groundwater with phenyl arsenicals at former ammunition depots or warfare agent production sites worldwide. Most phenyl arsenicals are highly toxic for humans. The microbial degradation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) and diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was investigated in microcosms made of anoxic groundwater/sediment mixtures taken from different depths of an anoxic, phenyl arsenical contaminated aquifer in Central Germany. DPAA was not transformed within 91 days incubation time in any of the microcosms. The removal of PAA can be described by a first order kinetics without a lag-phase (rate: 0.037 d(-1)). In sterilized microcosms, PAA concentrations always remained stable, demonstrating that PAA transformation was a biologically mediated process. PAA transformation occurred under sulfate-reducing conditions due to sulfate consumption and production of sulfide. The addition of lactate (1 mM), a typical substrate of sulfate-reducing bacteria, increased the transformation rate of PAA significantly up to 0.134 d(-1). The content of total arsenic was considerably reduced (> 75%). Intermediates of PAA transformation were detected by high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Experiments with a pure strain and sterile controls of Desulfovibrio gigas spiked with PAA showed that the elimination process is linked to the presence of sulfide formed through bacterial activity. Phenyl arsenicals were likely immobilized in the sedimentthrough sulfur substitution and a subsequent sulfur bond under the prevailing sulfate reducing condition. The results of this study indicate that PAA can undergo microbiologically mediated transformation in anoxic aquifers, leading to reduced concentrations in groundwater, which indicate a (enhancend) natural attenuation potential. PMID:19806732

  7. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Devic, Gordana; Djordjevic, Dragana; Sakan, Sanja

    2014-01-15

    Various chemometric techniques were used to analyze the quality of groundwater data sets. Seventeen water quality parameters: the cations Na, K, Ca, Mg, the anions Cl, SO4, NO3, HCO3 and nine trace elements Pb, As, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cd, Fe, Zn and Cr were measured at 66 different key sampling sites in ten representative areas (low land-Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina and central Serbia) for the summer period of 2009. HCA grouped the sample sites into four clusters based on the similarities of the characteristics of the groundwater quality. DA showed two parameters, HCO3 and Zn, affording more than 90% correct assignments in the spatial analysis of four/three different regions in Serbia. Factor analysis was applied on the log-transformed data sets and allowed the identification of a reduced number of factors with hydrochemical meaning. The results showed severe pollution with Mn, As, NO3, Ni, Pb whereby anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The pollution comes from both scattered point sources (industrial and urban effluent) and diffuse source agricultural activity. These samples may not be suitable for human consumption; the water quality belongs to class III/IV (contaminated). The Fe anomalies (7.1mg/L) in the water from the Vetrnica site can be attributed to natural sources, such as the dissolution of rock masses and rock fragments. The serious groundwater contamination with As (25.7-137.8 μg/L) in the area of Banat (Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina) and a sample No. 9 at the Great Morava River requires urgent attention.

  8. Natural attenuation potential of phenylarsenicals in anoxic groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Michael; Daus, Birgit; Vogt, Carsten; Weiss, Holger

    2009-09-15

    The extensive production of chemical warfare agents in the 20th century has led to serious contamination of soil and groundwater with phenyl arsenicals at former ammunition depots or warfare agent production sites worldwide. Most phenyl arsenicals are highly toxic for humans. The microbial degradation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) and diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was investigated in microcosms made of anoxic groundwater/sediment mixtures taken from different depths of an anoxic, phenyl arsenical contaminated aquifer in Central Germany. DPAA was not transformed within 91 days incubation time in any of the microcosms. The removal of PAA can be described by a first order kinetics without a lag-phase (rate: 0.037 d(-1)). In sterilized microcosms, PAA concentrations always remained stable, demonstrating that PAA transformation was a biologically mediated process. PAA transformation occurred under sulfate-reducing conditions due to sulfate consumption and production of sulfide. The addition of lactate (1 mM), a typical substrate of sulfate-reducing bacteria, increased the transformation rate of PAA significantly up to 0.134 d(-1). The content of total arsenic was considerably reduced (> 75%). Intermediates of PAA transformation were detected by high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Experiments with a pure strain and sterile controls of Desulfovibrio gigas spiked with PAA showed that the elimination process is linked to the presence of sulfide formed through bacterial activity. Phenyl arsenicals were likely immobilized in the sedimentthrough sulfur substitution and a subsequent sulfur bond under the prevailing sulfate reducing condition. The results of this study indicate that PAA can undergo microbiologically mediated transformation in anoxic aquifers, leading to reduced concentrations in groundwater, which indicate a (enhancend) natural attenuation potential.

  9. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Devic, Gordana; Djordjevic, Dragana; Sakan, Sanja

    2014-01-15

    Various chemometric techniques were used to analyze the quality of groundwater data sets. Seventeen water quality parameters: the cations Na, K, Ca, Mg, the anions Cl, SO4, NO3, HCO3 and nine trace elements Pb, As, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cd, Fe, Zn and Cr were measured at 66 different key sampling sites in ten representative areas (low land-Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina and central Serbia) for the summer period of 2009. HCA grouped the sample sites into four clusters based on the similarities of the characteristics of the groundwater quality. DA showed two parameters, HCO3 and Zn, affording more than 90% correct assignments in the spatial analysis of four/three different regions in Serbia. Factor analysis was applied on the log-transformed data sets and allowed the identification of a reduced number of factors with hydrochemical meaning. The results showed severe pollution with Mn, As, NO3, Ni, Pb whereby anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The pollution comes from both scattered point sources (industrial and urban effluent) and diffuse source agricultural activity. These samples may not be suitable for human consumption; the water quality belongs to class III/IV (contaminated). The Fe anomalies (7.1mg/L) in the water from the Vetrnica site can be attributed to natural sources, such as the dissolution of rock masses and rock fragments. The serious groundwater contamination with As (25.7-137.8 μg/L) in the area of Banat (Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina) and a sample No. 9 at the Great Morava River requires urgent attention. PMID:24080418

  10. Groundwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Klaus-Dieter; Zhu, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and river water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant purification and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth’s surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative and quantitative advantages. The contamination of infiltrated river water will be reduced by natural attenuation. Clay minerals, iron hydroxide and humic matter as well as microorganisms located in the subsurface have high decontamination capacities. By this, a final water treatment, if necessary, becomes much easier and cheaper. The quantitative effect concerns the seasonally changing river discharge that influences the possibility of water extraction for drinking water purposes. Such changes can be equalised by seasonally adapted infiltration/extraction of water in/out of the aquifer according to the river discharge and the water need. This method enables a continuous water supply over the whole year. Generally, artificially recharged groundwater is better protected against pollution than surface water, and the delimitation of water protection zones makes it even more save. PMID:18357624

  12. Natural water purification and water management by artificial groundwater recharge.

    PubMed

    Balke, Klaus-Dieter; Zhu, Yan

    2008-03-01

    Worldwide, several regions suffer from water scarcity and contamination. The infiltration and subsurface storage of rain and river water can reduce water stress. Artificial groundwater recharge, possibly combined with bank filtration, plant purification and/or the use of subsurface dams and artificial aquifers, is especially advantageous in areas where layers of gravel and sand exist below the earth's surface. Artificial infiltration of surface water into the uppermost aquifer has qualitative and quantitative advantages. The contamination of infiltrated river water will be reduced by natural attenuation. Clay minerals, iron hydroxide and humic matter as well as microorganisms located in the subsurface have high decontamination capacities. By this, a final water treatment, if necessary, becomes much easier and cheaper. The quantitative effect concerns the seasonally changing river discharge that influences the possibility of water extraction for drinking water purposes. Such changes can be equalised by seasonally adapted infiltration/extraction of water in/out of the aquifer according to the river discharge and the water need. This method enables a continuous water supply over the whole year. Generally, artificially recharged groundwater is better protected against pollution than surface water, and the delimitation of water protection zones makes it even more save.

  13. Modeling of natural organic matter transport processes in groundwater.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, T C; Mas-Pla, J; McCarthy, J F; Williams, T M

    1995-01-01

    A forced-gradient tracer test was conducted at the Georgetown site to study the transport of natural organic matter (NOM) in groundwater. In particular, the goal of this experiment was to investigate the interactions between NOM and the aquifer matrix. A detailed three-dimensional characterization of the hydrologic conductivity heterogeneity of the site was obtained using slug tests. The transport of a conservative tracer (chloride) was successfully reproduced using these conductivity data. Despite the good simulation of the flow field, NOM breakthrough curves could not be reproduced using a two-site sorption model with spatially constant parameters. Preliminary results suggest that different mechanisms for the adsorption/desorption processes, as well as their spatial variability, may significantly affect the transport and fate of NOM. PMID:7621798

  14. Natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Scow, Kate M; Hicks, Kristin A

    2005-06-01

    An area of intense scientific and practical interest is the biogeochemical and microbial processes determining the success of natural attenuation, biostimulation and/or bioaugmentation treatments for organic contaminants in groundwater. Recent studies in this area have focused on the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents, the degradation of the fuel additive methyl tert-butyl ether, and the removal of long-term hydrocarbon contamination. These studies have been facilitated by the use of stable isotope analysis to demonstrate in situ bioremediation and push-pull tests, in which isotopes are injected into aquifers and then quickly retrieved and analyzed, to measure in situ activity. Molecular tools such as quantitative PCR, the detection of mRNA expression, and numerous DNA fingerprinting methods have also proved valuable, being employed to identify and sometimes quantify environmentally important organisms or changes in communities. Methods to track bacteria and tools to characterize bacterial attachment properties have also offered insight into bacterial transport in situ.

  15. A case study of the natural attenuation of gas condensate hydrocarbons in soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Barker, G W; Raterman, K T; Fisher, J B; Corgan, J M; Trent, G L; Brown, D R; Kemp, N; Sublette, K L

    1996-01-01

    Condensate liquids have been found to contaminate soil and groundwater at two gas production sites in the Denver Basin operated by Amoco Production Co. These sites have been closely monitored since July 1993 to determine whether intrinsic aerobic or anaerobic bioremediation of hydrocarbons occurs at a sufficient rate and to an adequate end point to support a no-intervention decision. Groundwater monitoring and analysis of soil cores suggest that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at these sites by multiple pathways, including aerobic oxidation, Fe(III) reduction, and sulfate reduction.

  16. Enhancement of Taihu blue algae anaerobic digestion efficiency by natural storage.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hengfeng; Lu, Minfeng; Zhao, Mingxing; Huang, Zhenxing; Ren, Hongyan; Yan, Qun; Ruan, Wenquan

    2013-12-01

    Taihu blue algae after different storage time from 0 to 60 d were anaerobic fermented to evaluate their digestibility and process stability. Results showed that anaerobic digestion (AD) of blue algae under 15 d natural storage led to the highest CH4 production of 287.6 mL g(-1) VS at inoculum substrate ratio 2.0, demonstrating 36.69% improvement comparing with that from fresh algae. Storage of blue algae led to cell death, microcystins (MCs) release and VS reduction by spontaneous fermentation. However, it also played an important role in removing algal cell wall barrier, pre-hydrolysis and pre-acidification, leading to the improvement in CH4 yield. Closer examination of volatile fatty acids (VFA) variation, VS removal rates and key enzymes change during AD proved short storage time (≤ 15 d) of blue algae had higher efficiencies in biodegradation and methanation. Furthermore, AD presented significant biodegradation potential for MCs released from Taihu blue algae.

  17. Natural Arsenic Pollution of Groundwater in Mining Zones of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, M. A.; Rodriguez, R.; Villasennor, G.; Romero, F.; Talavera, O.; Ceniceros, N.; Aguayo, A.; Cruz, O.

    2007-05-01

    Arsenic concentrations exceeding drinking-water standards have been measured in groundwater of various areas of Mexico. This is a relevant public health problem since groundwater supplies most drinking water of the country. Although a natural source has been proposed as the cause of water contamination at most sites, the specific processes releasing As have only been identified in a few aquifers. The geological characteristics of Mexico including volcanic, geothermal, and highly mineralized zones constitute favorable environments for As occurrence. Furthermore, As-abundance in bedrock has lead Mexico to be one of the major world As-producers. As-bearing minerals like arsenopyrite, scorodite, mimetite, adamite, tennantite and nickeline can be found in several zones. Besides, arsenic may be a minor component of Fe, Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, and Au ores. While thousands of people have been chronically exposed to As, arsenic-related health effects have been documented only for residents at some Mexican locations, like Comarca Lagunera, Zimapan, and Acambaro. Water-rock interactions may release As to water in mining areas, but ore extraction and processing produce surface wastes that can also release As to groundwater. Investigations developed in two historical mining zones revealed different As contents in groundwater. At Zimapan, a semi-arid area about 250 km NE of Mexico City, abundant arsenopyrite and hydrogeological conditions produced high As concentrations in deep wells exploited for drinking water supply. Oxidation and dissolution of As-bearing minerals mainly arsenopyrite, scorodite and tennantite released As to the fractured deep limestone aquifer. In addition, mining operations polluted shallow wells. In contrast, low levels of As were detected in wells near mine tailings in the warm sub-humid zone of Taxco, Guerrero. To explain those differences, the mineralogy and the geochemical processes occurring in tailings at both areas were studied. Results showed that besides

  18. Unraveling the heat island effect observed in urban groundwater bodies - Definition of a potential natural state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epting, Jannis; Huggenberger, Peter

    2013-09-01

    A superposition of several thermal processes leads to an elevation of groundwater temperatures of up to 9 °C above the natural state in the city of Basel, Switzerland. The urban thermal groundwater regime is influenced by: (1) urbanization and annual heating periods; (2) thermal groundwater use; (3) seasonal trends; (4) river-groundwater interaction; and (5) climate change and consequences thereof. The combination of short- and long-term data analysis, including conventional and high-resolution multilevel groundwater temperature monitoring, as well as 3D numerical groundwater flow and heat-transport modeling allowed quantifying the thermal influences on the investigated urban groundwater body. Results facilitate to describe the “present state” of the urban thermal groundwater regime and to derive a “potential natural state” of the investigated groundwater body. The study originated from a request of the executive council to provide a basis for cost estimates of infrastructure adaptation measures necessary to mitigate the impact of climate change. It is shown that the principal trigger for the observed thermal development is not climate change but that local and regional anthropogenic factors are dominating. Although in urban areas, groundwater is increasingly used for cooling purposes; the geothermal potential, resulting from elevated groundwater temperatures, is generally not exploited. The presented approach provides a basis for the setup of combined and thermally balanced heating and cooling systems.

  19. Groundwater dynamics converted to a groundwater classification as a tool for nature development programs in the dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Kristine; Van Camp, Marc; Van Damme, Dirk; Walraevens, Kristine

    2013-08-01

    Within the European Union, Habitat Directives are developed with the aim of restoration and preservation of endangered species. The level of biodiversity in coastal dune systems is generally very high compared to other natural ecosystems, but suffers from deterioration. Groundwater extraction and urbanisation are the main reasons for the decrease in biodiversity. Many restoration actions are being carried out and are focusing on the restoration of groundwater level with the aim of re-establishing rare species. These actions have different degrees of success. The evaluation of the actions is mainly based on the appearance of red list species. The groundwater classes, developed in the Netherlands, are used for the evaluation of opportunities for vegetation, while the natural variability of the groundwater level and quality are under-estimated. Vegetation is used as a seepage indicator. The existing classification is not valid in the Belgian dunes, as the vegetation observed in the study area is not in correspondence with this classification. Therefore, a new classification is needed. The new classification is based on the variability of the groundwater level on a long term with integration of ecological factors. Based on the new classification, the importance of seasonal and inter-yearly fluctuations of the water table can be deduced. Inter-yearly fluctuations are more important in recharge areas while seasonal fluctuations are dominant in discharge areas. The new classification opens opportunities for relating vegetation and groundwater dynamics.

  20. The natural radioactivity in Guarani aquifer groundwater, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bonotto, D M; Bueno, T O

    2008-10-01

    The measurements of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in groundwater samples from Guarani aquifer in Brazil are reported in this paper together with the activity concentration of the natural dissolved radionuclides (40)K, (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (232)Th, (228Th), and (228)Ra. Most of the gross alpha radioactivity values were below the critical level of detection corresponding to 1 mBq/L, however, the whole data set for the gross beta radioactivity and radionuclides (40)K, (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, (210)Po, (210)Pb, and (228)Ra was submitted to a statistical treatment, considering class intervals arranged in geometric progression, because of the great variability of the activity. The analysis indicated lognormal distribution of the data, as usually observed in samples taken from the natural context. An inverse relationship between the gross alpha and gross beta activity has been identified and is related to an increase in the K content in the water. The mobility coefficient has been estimated for (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (228)Ra in Guarani aquifer and the results indicated that the radioelement solubility in the studied system varies according to the following order: radium>uranium>thorium. The implications of the data obtained in terms of standards established for defining the drinking water quality have also been discussed.

  1. Geostatistical Inverse Modeling for Natural Attenuation of Hydrocarbons in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, A. H.; Deutsch, C. V.; Mendoza, C. A.; Biggar, K. W.

    2008-12-01

    Parameter uncertainty for natural attenuation has been previously studied in the context of characterizing the uncertainty in the field measured biodegradation rate constant. Natural attenuation response variables (e.g. solute concentrations) should be stated in terms of a number of model parameters in such a way that (1) the most important mechanisms contributing to natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons are simulated, (2) the independent variables (model parameters) and their uncertainty can be estimated using the available observations and prior information and (3) the model is not over-parameterized. Extensive sensitivity analyses show that the source term, aquifer heterogeneity and biodegradation rate of contaminants are the most important factors affecting the fate of dissolved petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminants in groundwater. A geostatistical inverse modeling approach is developed to quantify uncertainty in source geometry, source dissolution rate, aquifer heterogeneity and biodegradation rate constant. Multiple joint realizations of source geometry and aquifer transmissivity are constructed by distance function (DF) algorithm and sequential self calibration (SSC) approach. A gradient-based optimization approach is then adapted to condition the joint realizations to a number of observed concentrations recorded over a specific monitoring period. The conditioned joint realizations are then ranked based on their goodness of fit and used in the subsequent prediction of uncertainty in the response variables such as downstream concentrations, plume length and contaminant mass loaded into the aquifer. The inverse modeling approach and its associated calculation of sensitivity coefficients show that an extended monitoring period is significantly important in well-posedness of the problem; and an uncertainty in occurrence of the spill can have a minor impact on the modeling results as long as the observation data are collected while the contaminant

  2. Influence of different natural zeolite concentrations on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; Sánchez, E; Weiland, P; Borja, R; Martín, A; Ilangovan, K

    2001-10-01

    The effect of different natural zeolite concentrations on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste was studied. Natural zeolite doses in the range 0.2-10 g/l of wastewater were used in batch experiments, which were carried out at temperatures between 27 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Total chemical oxygen demand (COD), total and volatile solids, ammonia and organic nitrogen, pH, total volatile fatty acids (TVFA), alkalinity (Alk) and accumulative methane production were determined during 30 days of digestion. The anaerobic digestion process was favored by the addition of natural zeolite at doses between 2 and 4 g/l and increasingly inhibited at doses beyond 6 g/l. A first-order kinetic model of COD removal was used to determine the apparent kinetic constants of the process. The kinetic constant values increased with the zeolite amount up to a concentration of 4 g/l. The values of the maximum accumulative methane production (Gm) increased until zeolite concentrations of 2-4 g/l. The addition of zeolite reduced the values of the TVFA/ Alk ratio while increasing the pH values, and these facts could contribute to the process failure at zeolite doses of 10 g/l. PMID:11554599

  3. Influence of different natural zeolite concentrations on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste.

    PubMed

    Milán, Z; Sánchez, E; Weiland, P; Borja, R; Martín, A; Ilangovan, K

    2001-10-01

    The effect of different natural zeolite concentrations on the anaerobic digestion of piggery waste was studied. Natural zeolite doses in the range 0.2-10 g/l of wastewater were used in batch experiments, which were carried out at temperatures between 27 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Total chemical oxygen demand (COD), total and volatile solids, ammonia and organic nitrogen, pH, total volatile fatty acids (TVFA), alkalinity (Alk) and accumulative methane production were determined during 30 days of digestion. The anaerobic digestion process was favored by the addition of natural zeolite at doses between 2 and 4 g/l and increasingly inhibited at doses beyond 6 g/l. A first-order kinetic model of COD removal was used to determine the apparent kinetic constants of the process. The kinetic constant values increased with the zeolite amount up to a concentration of 4 g/l. The values of the maximum accumulative methane production (Gm) increased until zeolite concentrations of 2-4 g/l. The addition of zeolite reduced the values of the TVFA/ Alk ratio while increasing the pH values, and these facts could contribute to the process failure at zeolite doses of 10 g/l.

  4. Natural radioactivity and chemical concentrations in Egyptian groundwater.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rafat M; Khalil, F A; El Fayoumi, M A K

    2011-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity in drinking water have been performed in many parts of the world, mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming water. A study of the radionuclide and chemical components in groundwater from Beni Suef Governate, Egypt has been carried out. Fifty water samples were analyzed by gamma ray spectroscopy to determine the 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K concentrations; major elements, pH, alkalinity, and conductivity were also measured. The specific activity values ranged from 0.008 to 0.040 Bq/l for 226Ra, from 0.003 to 0.019 Bq/l for 232Th, and from 0.025 to 0.344 Bq/l for 40K. The annual ingestions of these radionuclides, using local consumption rates (average over the whole population) of 1.5 l day(-1), were estimated to be 8.59, 4.86, and 83.47 Bq year(-1) for 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K, respectively. The estimated values and weighted means of these radionuclides compare well with the world average. The estimated effective doses from drinking water were found to be 2.4 μSv year(-1) (226Ra), 1.1 μSv year(-1) (232Th), and 0.51 μSv year(-1) (40K). Contribution of these radionuclides to the committed effective dose from 1 year consumption of drinking water is estimated to be only 4%.

  5. Site Characterization To Support Use Of Monitored Natural Attentuation For Remediation Of Inorganic Contaminants In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical recommendations have recently been published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address site characterization needed to support selection of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for cleanup of inorganic contaminant plumes in groundwater. Immobilization onto ...

  6. Assessment of natural attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in groundwater near a former manufactured-gas plant, South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.; Petkewich, M.D.; Bradley, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Shallow, anaerobic groundwater near a former manufactured-gas plant (MGP) in Charleston, South Carolina, USA, contains mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs, respectively). Between 1994 and 1997, a combination of field, laboratory, and numerical-flow and transport-model investigations were made to assess natural attenuation processes affecting MAH and PAH distributions. This assessment included determination of adsorption coefficients (K(ad)) and first-order biodegradation rate constants (K(bio)) using aquifer material from the MGP site and adjacent properties. Naphthalene adsorption (K(ad) = 1.35 x 10-7 m3/mg) to aquifer sediments was higher than toluene adsorption (K(ad) = 9.34 x 10-10 m3/mg), suggesting preferential toluene transport relative to naphthalene. However, toluene and benzene distributions measured in January 1994 were smaller than the naphthalene distribution. This scenario can be explained, in part, by the differences between biodegradation rates of the compounds. Aerobic first-order rate constants of 14C-toluene, 14C-benzene, and 14C-naphthalene degradation were similar (-0.84, -0.03, and 0.88 day-1, respectively), but anaerobic rate constants were higher for toluene and benzene (-0.002 and -0.00014 day-1, respectively) than for naphthalene (-0.000046 day-1). Both areal and cross-sectional numerical simulations were used to test the hypothesis suggested by these rate differences that MAH compounds will be contained relative to PAHs. Predictive simulations indicated that the distributions of toluene and benzene reach steady-state conditions before groundwater flow lines discharge to an adjacent surface-water body, but do discharge low concentrations of naphthalene. Numerical predictions were 'audited' by measuring concentrations of naphthalene, toluene, and benzene at the site in early 1997. Measured naphthalene and toluene concentrations were substantially reduced and the areal extent of contamination smaller than was both

  7. Use of activated carbon and natural zeolite as support materials, in an anaerobic fluidised bed reactor, for vinasse treatment.

    PubMed

    Fernández, N; Fdz-Polanco, F; Montalvo, S J; Toledano, D

    2001-01-01

    In Cuba, the alcohol distillation process from cane sugar molasses, produces a final waste (vinasse), with an enormous polluting potential and a high sulfate content. Applying the anaerobic technology, most of the biodegradable organic matter can turn into biogas, rich in methane but with concentrations of sulfide above 1%. The present work develops two experiences with anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBR) using both Cuban raw material, activated carbon and natural zeolite, as support media, with the purpose of obtaining high organic matter removal rates and keeping sulfide and ammonium concentrations in the permissible ranges. The reactors were operated during 120 days, achieving an organic loading rate of 10 kg COD/m3 day, with COD removal above 70%, and a methane production of 2 L/d. The activated carbon and natural zeolite used support materials in anaerobic fluidized bed reactors, and showed good results of distillery waste removal. PMID:11575071

  8. Hydrogeological interpretation of natural radionuclide contents in Austrian groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Gerhard; Berka, Rudolf; Hörhan, Thomas; Katzlberger, Christian; Landstetter, Claudia; Philippitsch, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) stores comprehensive data sets of radionuclide contents in Austrian groundwater. There are several analyses concerning Rn-222, Ra-226, gross alpha and gross beta as well as selected analyses of Ra-228, Pb-210, Po-210, Uranium and U-234/U-238. In a current project financed by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management, AGES and the Geological Survey of Austria (GBA) are evaluating these data sets with regard to the geological backgrounds. Several similar studies based on groundwater monitoring have been made in the USA (for instance by Focazio, M.J., Szabo, Z., Kraemer, T.F., Mullin, A.H., Barringer, T.H., De Paul, V.T. (2001): Occurrence of selected radionuclides in groundwater used for drinking water in the United States: a reconnaissance survey, 1998. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 00-4273). The geological background for the radionuclide contents of groundwater will be derived from geological maps in combination with existing Thorium and Uranium analyses of the country rocks and stream-sediments and from airborne radiometric maps. Airborne radiometric data could contribute to identify potential radionuclide hot spot areas as only airborne radiometric mapping could provide countrywide Thorium and Uranium data coverage in high resolution. The project will also focus on the habit of the sampled wells and springs and the hydrological situation during the sampling as these factors can have an important influence on the Radon content of the sampled groundwater (Schubert, G., Alletsgruber, I., Finger, F., Gasser, V., Hobiger, G. and Lettner, H. (2010): Radon im Grundwasser des Mühlviertels (Oberösterreich) Grundwasser. - Springer (in print). Based on the project results an overview map (1:500,000) concerning the radionuclide potential should be produced. The first version should be available in February 2011.

  9. Hydrochemistry of the natural low pH groundwater in the coastal aquifers near Beihai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xun; Shen, Ye; Zhang, Hua; Song, Chao; Li, Jingwei; Liu, Yan

    2015-06-01

    Natural weak acidic groundwater occurs in the unconfined and confined aquifers consisting of Quaternary and Neogene unconsolidated sediments near Beihai in southern Guangxi, China. Under natural conditions the groundwater has low TDS (less than 200 mg L-1) and low concentrations of trace elements (less than 100 µg L-1) with a deceasing tend in contents of the Lanthanides (rare earth elements, less than 1 µg L-1) towards higher atomic number. The groundwater ranges in pH from 3.33 to 7.0 with an average value of 5.12 (even lower than that of local rainwater, 5.88). pH values in the groundwater are a bit higher in rainy seasons than those in dry seasons and do not show significant increasing or decreasing trend with time. The average pH value in groundwater in the confined aquifers is even a bit lower than that in the unconfined aquifer. Comprehensive analyses of the groundwater environment suggest that H+ in the groundwater may be derived from dissociation of H2CO3, release of the absorbed H3O+ in clay layers and the acidity of rainwater. The H2CO3 in the groundwater may be formed by dissolution of CO2 (g). Minerals in the unconsolidated sediment are predominated by quartz with small amount of clay minerals. The sediments undergoing a long-term weathering contain low levels of soluble constitutes. Lack of alkaline substances in the groundwater system is also helpful in the accumulation of acidity of the groundwater.

  10. Natural Gas Occurrence in Groundwater near Oil and Gas Drilling Sites Environmental Concerns in Northeast Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, S.; Abad, J. D.; Liang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling techniques have been extensively used to extract unconventional natural gas in the northeast of the United States. Over the past few years, the presence of contaminants in shallow groundwater near drilling sites has created higher awareness of drinking water quality. One key question has been recently raised about the origin and pathways of the contaminants, especially natural gas found in groundwater in neighboring areas of gas drilling sites in northeast Pennsylvania. Methane (CH4), which is the main component of natural gas, is not currently classified as a health hazard when dissolved in drinking water. Yet, it is a threat for explosion and fire hazards. In the Bradford, Susquehanna, Tioga, and Wyoming counties located in northeast Pennsylvania, dissolved methane concentration was measured to be 19.2 mg/l. Maximum concentration was recorded up to 64 mg/l when a warning level of concentration of natural gas in groundwater is only 10 mg/l. Recent studies have been investigating the origin of natural gas found in water wells in these counties based on the isotopic composition of methane, ethane and dissolved inorganic carbon. While Breen et al. (2007) and Osborn et al. (2010 and 2011) claim that the isotopic analysis of methane confirms the thermogenic origin of methane in groundwater in Susquehanna and Wyoming counties, Molofsky et al. (2011) claim that the natural gas origin in the groundwater is not related to fracking activities in the Marcellus Shale but to a geologic origin instead. To better understand the origin of dissolved methane, an integral computer model will be implemented. The model will analyze the potential migration of natural gas to shallow groundwater by using available data. Potential scenarios will include outgassing from wells casing and preferential flow through deep fractures. Currently, the lack of a proper model prevents the prediction and explanation of several of the existing questions

  11. Comparison of selection methods to deduce natural background levels for groundwater units.

    PubMed

    Griffioen, Jasper; Passier, Hilde F; Klein, Janneke

    2008-07-01

    Establishment of natural background levels (NBL) for groundwater is commonly performed to serve as reference when assessing the contamination status of groundwater units. We compare various selection methods to establish NBLs using groundwater quality data for four hydrogeologically different areas in the highly populated and developed subcatchment Western River Rhine, The Netherlands: selection of old groundwater (before 1945), of tritium-free groundwater (i.e., infiltrated before 1950), and of groundwater having no agricultural contamination by NO3 and SO4. Differences as well as similarities in percentile values for Cl, NH4, and SO4 concentrations are observed among the selection methods as well as the spatial units, pointing out that selection of the data setis a crucial step in deducing NBLs. The following general points of attention are deduced: (1) reference to composition of recharge water (rain or river infiltrate) is necessary to confirm the statistical outcomes, (2) old analyses are affected by conservation errors after sampling for redox-sensitive solutes and may be obtained by selective sampling, (3) old analyses are the only direct reference for NBLs for groundwater units having only anthropogenically influenced, young groundwater at present, and (4) establishment of a priori percentile values as maximum NBL is not right and confirmation by additional process-based insight in the controls on water composition is necessary.

  12. Groundwater flow system in the valley of Toluca, Mexico: an assay of natural radionuclide specific activities.

    PubMed

    Segovia, N; Tamez, E; Peña, P; Carrillo, J; Acosta, E; Armienta, M A; Iturbe, J L

    1999-03-01

    Natural radionuclides and physicochemical parameters have been evaluated in groundwater samples from boreholes belonging to the drinking water supply system of the Toluca City, Mexico. The results obtained for radon and radium, together with the physicochemical parameters of the studied samples, indicate a fast and efficient recharge pattern. The presence of a local and a regional groundwater flows was also observed. The local flow belongs to shallower water, recognized by its low radon content and dissolved ions, as compared with the regional, deeper groundwater flow with a longer residence time.

  13. Distribution and environmental significance of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidising bacteria in natural ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) is a recently discovered process that is performed by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera). This process constitutes a unique association between the two major global elements essential to life, carbon and nitrogen, and may act as an important and overlooked sink of the greenhouse gas methane. In recent years, more and more studies have reported the distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria and the occurrence of N-DAMO process in different natural ecosystems, including freshwater lakes, rivers, wetlands and marine ecosystems. Previous studies have estimated that a total of 2%-6% of current worldwide methane flux in wetlands could be consumed via the N-DAMO process. These findings indicate that N-DAMO is indeed a previously overlooked methane sink in natural ecosystems. Given the worldwide increase in anthropogenic nitrogen pollution, the N-DAMO process as a methane sink in reducing global warming could become more important in the future. The present mini-review summarises the current knowledge of the ecological distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria and the potential importance of the N-DAMO process in reducing methane emissions in various natural ecosystems. The potential influence of environmental factors on the N-DAMO process is also discussed. PMID:25398284

  14. Groundwater ''fast paths'' in the Snake River plain aquifer: Radiogenic isotope ratios as natural groundwater tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas M.; Roback, Robert C.; McLing, Travis L.; Bullen, Thomas D.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Doughty, Christine; Hunt, Randall J.; Smith, Robert W.; Cecil, L. DeWayne; Murrell, Michael T.

    2000-09-01

    Preferential flow paths are expected in many groundwater systems and must be located because they can greatly affect contaminant transport. The fundamental characteristics of radiogenic isotope ratios in chemically evolving waters make them highly effective as preferential flow path indicators. These ratios tend to be more easily interpreted than solute-concentration data because their response to water-rock interaction is less complex. We demonstrate this approach with groundwater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the Snake River Plain aquifer within and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These data reveal slow-flow zones as lower {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr areas created by prolonged interaction with the host basalts and a relatively fast flowing zone as a high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr area.

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Peer HA; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons JM; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with 13C-labeled CH4 (13CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, 13C-labeled CO2 (13CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with 13CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for 13CO2 production from 13CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Peer Ha; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons Jm; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with (13)C-labeled CH4 ((13)CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, (13)C-labeled CO2 ((13)CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with (13)CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for (13)CO2 production from (13)CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  17. Natural denitrification in the Kakamigahara groundwater basin, Gifu prefecture, central Japan.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed A A; Terao, H; Suzuki, Ryo; Babiker, Insaf S; Ohta, Keiichi; Kaori, K; Kato, Kikuo

    2003-05-20

    Although nitrate is recognized as the most common groundwater contaminant due to growing anthropogenic sources, such as agriculture in particular, its adverse effects on human and animal health are debatable. The current issue, however, is to control and reduce nitrate contamination with regards to the long residence time of groundwater within aquifers. Denitrification has recently been recognized for its ability to reduce high nitrate concentrations in groundwater. The Kakamigahara groundwater basin, Gifu prefecture, Japan, witnessed rising levels of nitrate (>12 mg/l NO(3)-N) originating from agricultural sources. Chemical analyses for the determination of major constituents of groundwater and delta(15)N of residual nitrate were performed on representative groundwater samples in order to fulfill two main objectives. One is to investigate the current situation of nitrate groundwater pollution. The second objective is to determine whether the denitrification is a potential natural mechanism, which eliminates nitrate pollution in the Kakamigahara aquifer. Agricultural nitrate contamination of groundwater was obvious from characteristically high concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-). High nitrate concentrations were found on the eastern side of the basin in association with vegetable cultivation fields, and decreased gradually towards the west of the basin along the direction of groundwater flow. The decrease of nitrate concentration was conveniently coupled with increase of HCO(3)(-) (the heterotrophic denitrification product), pH and delta(15)N of residual nitrate (due to isotopic fractionation) from east to west. Therefore, denitrification in situ is continuously removing nitrate from the Kakamigahara groundwater system.

  18. Nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents from reclaimed water in groundwater, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Barber, L.B.; Schroeder, R.A.; Anders, R.; Davisson, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents in reclaimed water (tertiary-treated municipal wastewater) before, during, and after recharge into groundwater at the Montebello Forebay in Los Angeles County, CA, was the focus of this study. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in reclaimed water from this site is primarily a mixture of aromatic sulfonates from anionic surfactant degradation, N-acetyl amino sugars and proteins from bacterial activity, and natural fulvic acid, whereas DOM from native groundwaters in the aquifer to which reclaimed water was recharged consists of natural fulvic acids. The hydrophilic neutral N-acetyl amino sugars that constitute 40% of the DOM in reclaimed water are removed during the first 3 m of vertical infiltration in the recharge basin. Groundwater age dating with 3H and 3He isotopes, and determinations of organic and inorganic C isotopes, enabled clear differentiation of recent recharged water from older native groundwater. Phenol structures in natural fulvic acids in DOM isolated from groundwater produced significant trihalomethanes (THM) and total organic halogen (TOX) yields upon chlorination, and these structures also were responsible for the enhanced SUVA and specific fluorescence characteristics relative to DOM in reclaimed water. Aromatic sulfonates and fulvic acids in reclaimed water DOM produced minimal THM and TOX yields.

  19. Groundwater ages and mixing in the Piceance Basin natural gas province, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.; Thomas, Judith C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    Reliably identifying the effects of energy development on groundwater quality can be difficult because baseline assessments of water quality completed before the onset of energy development are rare and because interactions between hydrocarbon reservoirs and aquifers can be complex, involving both natural and human processes. Groundwater age and mixing data can strengthen interpretations of monitoring data from those areas by providing better understanding of the groundwater flow systems. Chemical, isotopic, and age tracers were used to characterize groundwater ages and mixing with deeper saline water in three areas of the Piceance Basin natural gas province. The data revealed a complex array of groundwater ages (50,000 years) and mixing patterns in the basin that helped explain concentrations and sources of methane in groundwater. Age and mixing data also can strengthen the design of monitoring programs by providing information on time scales at which water quality changes in aquifers might be expected to occur. This information could be used to establish maximum allowable distances of monitoring wells from energy development activity and the appropriate duration of monitoring.

  20. Identification of manganese as a toxicant in a groundwater treatment system: Addressing naturally occurring toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfellow, W. Jr.; Sohn, V.; Richey, M.; Yost, J.

    1995-12-31

    Effluent from a groundwater remediation system at a bulk oil storage and distribution terminal has been chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The remediation system was designed in response to a hydrocarbon plume in the area of the terminal. The remediation system consists of a series of groundwater recovery wells and groundwater intercept trench systems with groundwater treatment and phased-separated hydrocarbon recovery systems. The groundwater treatment and petroleum recovery systems consist of oil/water separators, product recovery tanks, air strippers, filters, and carbon adsorption units. The characteristics of this effluent are low total suspended solids, total dissolved solids, and hardness concentrations as well as meeting stringent NPDES permit requirements for lead, copper, zinc, mercury, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX. Additional priority pollutant evaluations revealed no compounds of concern. Performance of a Toxicity identification Evaluation (TIE) indicated that manganese was the principle toxicant in the effluent. Manganese is a naturally occurring constituent in this groundwater source and is not added to the treatment system. This paper will present the results of the TIE with a discussion of treatability/control options for manganese control at this facility. Recommendations for addressing naturally occurring toxicants that are not a result of the facility`s operations will also be presented.

  1. Temporal variations in natural attenuation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in eutrophic river sediments impacted by a contaminated groundwater plume.

    PubMed

    Hamonts, Kelly; Kuhn, Thomas; Vos, Johan; Maesen, Miranda; Kalka, Harald; Smidt, Hauke; Springael, Dirk; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Dejonghe, Winnie

    2012-04-15

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) often discharge into rivers as contaminated groundwater baseflow. Biotransformation, sorption and dilution of CAHs in the impacted river sediments have been reported to reduce discharge, but the effect of temporal variations in environmental conditions on the occurrence and extent of those processes in river sediments is largely unknown. We monitored the reduction of CAH discharge into the Zenne River during a 21-month period. Despite a relatively stable influx of CAHs from the groundwater, the total reduction in CAH discharge from 120 to 20 cm depth in the river sediments, on average 74 ± 21%, showed moderate to large temporal variations, depending on the riverbed location. High organic carbon and anaerobic conditions in the river sediments allowed microbial reductive dechlorination of both chlorinated ethenes and chlorinated ethanes. δ(13)C values of the CAHs showed that this biotransformation was remarkably stable over time, despite fluctuating pore water temperatures. Daughter products of the CAHs, however, were not detected in stoichiometric amounts and suggested the co-occurrence of a physical process reducing the concentrations of CAHs in the riverbed. This process was the main process causing temporal variations in natural attenuation of the CAHs and was most likely dilution by surface water-mixing. However, higher spatial resolution monitoring of flow transients in the riverbed is required to prove dilution contributions due to dynamic surface water-groundwater flow exchanges. δ(13)C values and a site-specific isotope enrichment factor for reductive dechlorination of the main groundwater pollutant vinyl chloride (VC) allowed assessment of changes over time in the extent of both biotransformation and dilution of VC for different scenarios in which those processes either occurred consecutively or simultaneously between 120 and 20 cm depth in the riverbed. The extent of reductive dechlorination of VC ranged from 27

  2. Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: a novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater.

    PubMed

    Pous, Narcis; Casentini, Barbara; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano; Puig, Sebastià; Aulenta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment.

  4. An integrated anaerobic/aerobic bioprocess for the remediation of chlorinated phenol-contaminated soil and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, George A; Rose, Peter D

    2006-07-01

    An investigation of biodegradation of chlorinated phenol in an anaerobic/aerobic bioprocess environment was made. The reactor configuration used consisted of linked anaerobic and aerobic reactors, which served as a model for a proposed bioremediation strategy. The proposed strategy was studied in two reactors before linkage. In the anaerobic compartment, the transformation of the model contaminant, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), to lesser-chlorinated metabolites was shown to occur during reductive dechlorination under sulfate-reducing conditions. The consortium was also shown to desorb and mobilize 2,4,6-TCP in soils. This was followed, in the aerobic compartment, by biodegradation of the pollutant and metabolites, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, and phenol, by immobilized white-rot fungi. The integrated process achieved elimination of the compound by more than 99% through fungal degradation of metabolites produced in the dechlorination stage. pH correction to the anaerobic reactor was found to be necessary because acidic effluent from the fungal reactor inhibited sulfate reduction and dechlorination.

  5. Gamma-ray induced degradation of diazinon and atrazine in natural groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, K A; Basfar, A A; Al-Shahrani, A A

    2009-07-30

    Degradation of diazinon and atrazine pesticides present in natural groundwaters was investigated on a laboratory scale upon gamma-irradiation from a (60)Co source. The effects of pesticide type, initial concentration, characteristics of natural groundwater, potential radical scavengers and absorbed dose on efficiency of pesticide degradation were investigated using GC-MS. gamma-Irradiation experiments were carried out for three concentrations (i.e. 0.329, 1.643 and 3.286 microM/diazinon and 0.464, 2.318 and 4.636 microM/atrazine) with irradiation doses over the range 0.5-5.6 kGy for diazinon and 0.2-21 kGy for atrazine. gamma-Radiolysis showed that diazinon was much easier to degrade by ionizing radiation compared to atrazine in all natural groundwater samples. This was observed at the three initial concentrations over the range irradiation doses. The irradiation doses required for degradation of 50 and 90% diazinon (distilled water) and atrazine (humic aqueous solution) at the three concentrations were not sufficient to degrade the same concentrations in different natural groundwater samples. Moreover, the presence of naturally occurring inorganic scavengers in solutions of diazinon and atrazine decreased significantly the efficiency of radiolytic degradation of pesticides, especially at higher concentrations.

  6. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets.

  7. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  8. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Abbott, Joshua K.; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M. K.; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996−2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996–2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state’s 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas’ depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  9. Natural background concentrations and threshold values of chemical species for groundwater in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Y.; Lee, S.; Lee, H.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze natural background concentrations and determine threshold values of chemical species (NO3-N, Cl, As, Pb, Cr) for groundwater using Groundwater Quality Monitoring Network (GQMN) data operated by Korea Ministry of Environment (ME). GQMN data are divided into two groups, A and B. Group A consists of samples collected in aquifers where anthropogenic inputs are forced to be excluded by aquifer typology. Group B consists of samples in aquifers where purely anthropogenic chemicals (e.g., pesticide, PAC) are introduced at the downgradient. Group A is used to derive nationwide natural background concentrations for groundwater in specific aquifer geology under concern, which represents a reference system. Group B is used for deriving site-specific background concentrations for groundwater. For both groups of data, the samples with anthropogenic inputs are forced to be excluded, thus background concentrations are derived based on a pre-selection method accordingly. We determine threshold values according to EU GroundWater Daughter Directive(GWDD 2006/11/EC). For As, Pb, and Cr and some other trace elements, survival analyses are used for estimating background concentrations due to non-detect data. The results show that high concentration values of NO3-N and Cr are related to high natural background concentrations due to rock-water interactions for Group A. In particular, NO3-N concentrations vary with depth, which are consistent with natural attenuation processes. For Group B, some anthropogenic chemical species such as BTEX are observed and site-specific background concentrations of those elements are non-zero, which is apparently not naturally occurred at all. Natural background concentrations and threshold values derived from Group A can be used for setting up reference values for managing groundwater quality on a level of either domestic or drinking water stands. Meanwhile results from Group B provide a useful guidance for managing groundwater quality in

  10. Distribution and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria in natural freshwater wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu; Cheng, Hai-xiang; Li, Ji; Liu, Xu; Ren, Qian-qi

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process plays a significant role in the marine nitrogen cycle. However, the quantitative importance of this process in nitrogen removal in wetland systems, particularly in natural freshwater wetlands, is still not determined. In the present study, we provided the evidence of the distribution and activity of anammox bacteria in a natural freshwater wetland, located in southeastern China, by using (15)N stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The potential anammox rates measured in this wetland system ranged between 2.5 and 25.5 nmol N2 g(-1) soil day(-1), and up to 20% soil dinitrogen gas production could be attributed to the anammox process. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that anammox bacteria related to Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Anammoxoglobus and two novel anammox clusters coexisted in the collected soil cores, with Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Kuenenia being the dominant anammox genera. Quantitative PCR of hydrazine synthase genes showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.3 × 10(5) to 2.2 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil in the examined soil cores. Correlation analyses suggested that the soil ammonium concentration had significant influence on the activity of anammox bacteria. On the basis of (15)N tracing technology, it is estimated that a total loss of 31.1 g N m(-2) per year could be linked the anammox process in the examined wetland. PMID:26621804

  11. Natural zeolite permeable treatment wall for removing Sr-90 from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Shannon M; Rabideau, Alan J

    2013-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were completed to investigate the potential performance of a sorbing permeable treatment wall (PTW) comprised of natural zeolite for removal of strontium-90 (Sr-90) from groundwater at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) near Buffalo, NY. Multiple column tests were performed at the University at Buffalo (UB) and WVDP for periods ranging from 6 months to 2 years; UB columns were supplied with synthetic groundwater referenced to anticipated field conditions, while radioactive groundwater obtained on site was used for the WVDP columns. The primary focus was on quantifying the competitive cation reactions among five cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Sr(2+)) and Sr-90 with data obtained from the column studies used to estimate Gaines-Thomas (GT) selectivity coefficients. The resulting six-solute transport model provided flexibility to explore the influence of PTW parameters on long-term PTW performance, including variations in Sr-90 concentrations and groundwater geochemistry. The natural zeolite PTW is a viable method for in situ removal of Sr-90 from groundwater and potentially applicable to other sites contaminated by Sr-90. PMID:23276160

  12. Natural zeolite permeable treatment wall for removing Sr-90 from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Shannon M; Rabideau, Alan J

    2013-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were completed to investigate the potential performance of a sorbing permeable treatment wall (PTW) comprised of natural zeolite for removal of strontium-90 (Sr-90) from groundwater at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) near Buffalo, NY. Multiple column tests were performed at the University at Buffalo (UB) and WVDP for periods ranging from 6 months to 2 years; UB columns were supplied with synthetic groundwater referenced to anticipated field conditions, while radioactive groundwater obtained on site was used for the WVDP columns. The primary focus was on quantifying the competitive cation reactions among five cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Sr(2+)) and Sr-90 with data obtained from the column studies used to estimate Gaines-Thomas (GT) selectivity coefficients. The resulting six-solute transport model provided flexibility to explore the influence of PTW parameters on long-term PTW performance, including variations in Sr-90 concentrations and groundwater geochemistry. The natural zeolite PTW is a viable method for in situ removal of Sr-90 from groundwater and potentially applicable to other sites contaminated by Sr-90.

  13. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Berndtsson, R.; Kompani-Zare, M.; Persson, M.

    2012-08-01

    Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  14. Natural vs. artificial groundwater recharge, quantification through inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, H.; Berndtsson, R.; Kompani-Zare, M.; Persson, M.

    2013-02-01

    Estimating the change in groundwater recharge from an introduced artificial recharge system is important in order to evaluate future water availability. This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to quantify the recharge contribution from both an ephemeral river channel and an introduced artificial recharge system based on floodwater spreading in arid Iran. The study used the MODFLOW-2000 to estimate recharge for both steady- and unsteady-state conditions. The model was calibrated and verified based on the observed hydraulic head in observation wells and model precision, uncertainty, and model sensitivity were analyzed in all modeling steps. The results showed that in a normal year without extreme events, the floodwater spreading system is the main contributor to recharge with 80% and the ephemeral river channel with 20% of total recharge in the studied area. Uncertainty analysis revealed that the river channel recharge estimation represents relatively more uncertainty in comparison to the artificial recharge zones. The model is also less sensitive to the river channel. The results show that by expanding the artificial recharge system, the recharge volume can be increased even for small flood events, while the recharge through the river channel increases only for major flood events.

  15. Natural attenuation model and biodegradation for 1,1,1-trichloroethane contaminant in shallow groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiang; Zhu, Rui-Li; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui; Liu, Yong-Di; Lu, Shu-Guang; Luo, Qi-Shi; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation is an effective and feasible technology for controlling groundwater contamination. This study investigated the potential effectiveness and mechanisms of natural attenuation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) contaminants in shallow groundwater in Shanghai by using a column simulation experiment, reactive transport model, and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results indicated that the majority of the contaminant mass was present at 2–6 m in depth, the contaminated area was approximately 1000 m × 1000 m, and natural attenuation processes were occurring at the site. The effluent breakthrough curves from the column experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of TCA natural attenuation in the groundwater accorded with the advection-dispersion-reaction equation. The kinetic parameter of adsorption and biotic dehydrochlorination of TCA was 0.068 m3/kg and 0.0045 d–1. The contamination plume was predicted to diminish and the maximum concentration of TCA decreased to 280 μg/L. The bacterial community during TCA degradation in groundwater belonged to Trichococcus, Geobacteraceae, Geobacter, Mucilaginibacter, and Arthrobacter. PMID:26379629

  16. Natural attenuation model and biodegradation for 1,1,1-trichloroethane contaminant in shallow groundwater.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Zhu, Rui-Li; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui; Liu, Yong-Di; Lu, Shu-Guang; Luo, Qi-Shi; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation is an effective and feasible technology for controlling groundwater contamination. This study investigated the potential effectiveness and mechanisms of natural attenuation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) contaminants in shallow groundwater in Shanghai by using a column simulation experiment, reactive transport model, and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results indicated that the majority of the contaminant mass was present at 2-6 m in depth, the contaminated area was approximately 1000 m × 1000 m, and natural attenuation processes were occurring at the site. The effluent breakthrough curves from the column experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of TCA natural attenuation in the groundwater accorded with the advection-dispersion-reaction equation. The kinetic parameter of adsorption and biotic dehydrochlorination of TCA was 0.068 m(3)/kg and 0.0045 d(-1). The contamination plume was predicted to diminish and the maximum concentration of TCA decreased to 280 μg/L. The bacterial community during TCA degradation in groundwater belonged to Trichococcus, Geobacteraceae, Geobacter, Mucilaginibacter, and Arthrobacter. PMID:26379629

  17. Natural attenuation model and biodegradation for 1,1,1-trichloroethane contaminant in shallow groundwater.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Zhu, Rui-Li; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui; Liu, Yong-Di; Lu, Shu-Guang; Luo, Qi-Shi; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation is an effective and feasible technology for controlling groundwater contamination. This study investigated the potential effectiveness and mechanisms of natural attenuation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) contaminants in shallow groundwater in Shanghai by using a column simulation experiment, reactive transport model, and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results indicated that the majority of the contaminant mass was present at 2-6 m in depth, the contaminated area was approximately 1000 m × 1000 m, and natural attenuation processes were occurring at the site. The effluent breakthrough curves from the column experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of TCA natural attenuation in the groundwater accorded with the advection-dispersion-reaction equation. The kinetic parameter of adsorption and biotic dehydrochlorination of TCA was 0.068 m(3)/kg and 0.0045 d(-1). The contamination plume was predicted to diminish and the maximum concentration of TCA decreased to 280 μg/L. The bacterial community during TCA degradation in groundwater belonged to Trichococcus, Geobacteraceae, Geobacter, Mucilaginibacter, and Arthrobacter.

  18. Demonstrating a natural origin of chloroform in groundwater using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Hunkeler, Daniel; Laier, Troels; Breider, Florian; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2012-06-01

    Chloroform has been for a long time considered only as an anthropogenic contaminant. The presence of chloroform in forest soil and groundwater has been widely demonstrated. The frequent detection of chloroform in groundwater in absence of other contaminants suggests that chloroform is likely produced naturally. Compound-specific isotope analysis of chloroform was performed on soil-gas and groundwater samples to elucidate whether its source is natural or anthropogenic. The δ(13)C values of chloroform (-22.8 to -26.2‰) present in soil gas collected in a forested area are within the same range as the soil organic matter (-22.6 to -28.2‰) but are more enriched in (13)C compared to industrial chloroform (-43.2 to -63.6‰). The δ(13)C values of chloroform at the water table (-22.0‰) corresponded well to the δ(13)C of soil gas chloroform, demonstrating that the isotope signature of chloroform is maintained during transport through the unsaturated zone. Generally, the isotope signature of chloroform is conserved also during longer range transport in the aquifer. These δ(13)C data support the hypothesis that chloroform is naturally formed in some forest soils. These results may be particularly relevant for authorities' regulation of chloroform which in the case of Denmark was very strict for groundwater (<1 μg/L).

  19. Mobilization of arsenic and other naturally occurring contaminants in groundwater of the Main Ethiopian Rift aquifers.

    PubMed

    Rango, Tewodros; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary; Bianchini, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of arsenic (As) and other naturally occurring contaminants (F(-), U, V, B, and Mo) mobilization from Quaternary sedimentary aquifers of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and their enrichment in the local groundwater. The study is based on systematic measurements of major and trace elements as well as stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in groundwater, coupled with geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the aquifer rocks. The Rift Valley aquifer is composed of rhyolitic volcanics and Quaternary lacustrine sediments. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results revealed that MER rhyolites (ash, tuff, pumice and ignimbrite) and sediments contain on average 72 wt. % and 65 wt. % SiO2, respectively. Petrographic studies of the rhyolites indicate predominance of volcanic glass, sanidine, pyroxene, Fe-oxides and plagioclase. The As content in the lacustrine sediments (mean = 6.6 mg/kg) was higher than that of the rhyolites (mean: 2.5 mg/kg). The lacustrine aquifers of the Ziway-Shala basin in the northern part of MER were identified as high As risk zones, where mean As concentration in groundwater was 22.4 ± 33.5 (range of 0.60-190 μg/L) and 54% of samples had As above the WHO drinking water guideline value of 10 μg/L. Field As speciation measurements showed that most of the groundwater samples contain predominantly (~80%) arsenate-As(V) over arsenite-As(III) species. The As speciation together with field data of redox potential (mean Eh = +73 ± 65 mV) and dissolved-O2 (6.6 ± 2.2 mg/L) suggest that the aquifer is predominantly oxidative. Water-rock interactions, including the dissolution of volcanic glass produces groundwater with near-neutral to alkaline pH (range 6.9-8.9), predominance of Na-HCO3 ions, and high concentration of SiO2 (mean: 85.8 ± 11.3 mg/L). The groundwater data show high positive correlation of As with Na, HCO3, U, B, V, and Mo (R(2) > 0.5; p < 0.001). Chemical modeling of the groundwater indicates that Fe-oxides and

  20. Mobilization of arsenic and other naturally occurring contaminants in groundwater of the Main Ethiopian Rift aquifers.

    PubMed

    Rango, Tewodros; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary; Bianchini, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of arsenic (As) and other naturally occurring contaminants (F(-), U, V, B, and Mo) mobilization from Quaternary sedimentary aquifers of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and their enrichment in the local groundwater. The study is based on systematic measurements of major and trace elements as well as stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in groundwater, coupled with geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the aquifer rocks. The Rift Valley aquifer is composed of rhyolitic volcanics and Quaternary lacustrine sediments. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results revealed that MER rhyolites (ash, tuff, pumice and ignimbrite) and sediments contain on average 72 wt. % and 65 wt. % SiO2, respectively. Petrographic studies of the rhyolites indicate predominance of volcanic glass, sanidine, pyroxene, Fe-oxides and plagioclase. The As content in the lacustrine sediments (mean = 6.6 mg/kg) was higher than that of the rhyolites (mean: 2.5 mg/kg). The lacustrine aquifers of the Ziway-Shala basin in the northern part of MER were identified as high As risk zones, where mean As concentration in groundwater was 22.4 ± 33.5 (range of 0.60-190 μg/L) and 54% of samples had As above the WHO drinking water guideline value of 10 μg/L. Field As speciation measurements showed that most of the groundwater samples contain predominantly (~80%) arsenate-As(V) over arsenite-As(III) species. The As speciation together with field data of redox potential (mean Eh = +73 ± 65 mV) and dissolved-O2 (6.6 ± 2.2 mg/L) suggest that the aquifer is predominantly oxidative. Water-rock interactions, including the dissolution of volcanic glass produces groundwater with near-neutral to alkaline pH (range 6.9-8.9), predominance of Na-HCO3 ions, and high concentration of SiO2 (mean: 85.8 ± 11.3 mg/L). The groundwater data show high positive correlation of As with Na, HCO3, U, B, V, and Mo (R(2) > 0.5; p < 0.001). Chemical modeling of the groundwater indicates that Fe-oxides and

  1. Pulsed gas injection: a minimum effort approach for enhanced natural attenuation of chlorobenzene in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Balcke, Gerd Ulrich; Paschke, Heidrun; Vogt, Carsten; Schirmer, Mario

    2009-07-01

    Chlorobenzene-contaminated groundwater was used to assess pulsed gas sparging as a minimum effort aeration strategy to enhance intrinsic natural attenuation. In contrast to existing biosparging operations, oxygen was supplied at minimum rate by reducing the gas injection frequency to 0.33 day(-1). Field tests in a model aquifer were conducted in a 12 m long reactor, filled with indigenous aquifer material and continuously recharged with polluted groundwater over 3 years. The closed arrangement allowed yield balances, cost accounting as well as the investigation of spatial distributions of parameters which are sensitive to the biodegradation process. Depending on the injection frequency and on the gas chosen for injection (pure oxygen or air) oxygen-deficient conditions prevailed in the aquifer. Despite the limiting availability of dissolved oxygen in the groundwater, chlorobenzene degradation under oxygen-deficient conditions proved to be more effective than under conditions with dissolved oxygen being available in high concentrations.

  2. High naturally occurring radioactivity in fossil groundwater from the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Vengosh, Avner; Hirschfeld, Daniella; Vinson, David; Dwyer, Gary; Raanan, Hadas; Rimawi, Omar; Al-Zoubi, Abdallah; Akkawi, Emad; Marie, Amer; Haquin, Gustavo; Zaarur, Shikma; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2009-03-15

    High levels of naturally occurring and carcinogenic radium isotopes have been measured in low-saline and oxic groundwater from the Rum Group of the Disi sandstone aquifer in Jordan. The combined 228Ra and 226Ra activities are up to 2000% higher than international drinking water standards. Analyses of the host sandstone aquifer rocks show 228Ra and 226Ra activities and ratios that are consistent with previous reports of sandstone rocks from different parts of the world. A compilation of previous data in groundwater from worldwide sandstone aquifers shows large variations in Ra activities regardless of the groundwater salinity. On the basis of the distribution of the four Ra isotopes and the ratios of the short- to long-lived Ra isotopes, we postulate that Ra activity in groundwater is controlled by the balance of radioactive decay of parent Th isotopes on aquifer solids, decay of the dissolved radium isotopes, and adsorption of dissolved Ra on solid surfaces. The availability of surface adsorption sites, which depends on the clay content in the aquifer rocks, is therefore an important constraint for Ra activity in sandstone aquifers. These findings raise concerns about the safety of this and similar nonrenewable groundwater reservoirs, exacerbating the already severe water crisis in the Middle East.

  3. Batch technique to evaluate the efficiency of different natural adsorbents for defluoridation from groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Saraswat, Chitresh; Mishra, Binaya Kumar; Avtar, Ram; Patel, Hiral; Patel, Asha; Sharma, Tejal; Patel, Roshni

    2016-09-01

    Fluoride pollution (with concentration >1.0 mg/L) in groundwater has become a global threat in the recent past due to the lesser availability of potable groundwater resource. In between several defluoridation techniques discovered so far, the adsorption process proved to be most economic and efficient. This study is an effort to evaluate defluoridation efficiency of powdered rice husk, fine chopped rice husk and sawdust by the batch adsorption process. Optimum defluoridation capacity is achieved by optimizing various parameters, viz. dose of adsorbent, pH, contact time and initial concentration. It was found that all three materials can be employed for the defluoridation technique, but powdered rice husk is the best adsorbent in the midst of all three. Powdered rice husk showed fluoride removal efficiency ranging between 85 and 90 % in the contact period of 7 h only in conditions of all optimized parameter. Following this parameter optimization, adsorption efficiency was also evaluated at natural pH of groundwater to minimize the cost of defluoridation. No significant difference was found between fluoride adsorption at optimized pH (pH = 4) and natural one (pH = 7), which concludes that powdered rice husk can be efficiently used for the defluoridation technique at field scale. The adsorption isotherm using this adsorbent perfectly followed Langmuir isotherms. The value of calculated separation factor also suggests the favourable adsorption of fluoride onto this adsorbent under the conditions used for the experiments. The field application for defluoridation of groundwater using this adsorbent (based on pH of natural groundwater there and seasonal variation of temperature) showed the high success rate.

  4. Natural free convection in porous media: First field documentation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Remke L.; Simmons, Craig T.; Hyndman, David W.; Wood, Warren W.

    2009-06-01

    Natural free convection is a process of great importance in disciplines from hydrology to meteorology, oceanography, planetary sciences, and economic geology, and for applications in carbon sequestration and nuclear waste disposal. It has been studied for over a century - but almost exclusively in theoretical and laboratory settings. Despite its importance, conclusive primary evidence of free convection in porous media does not currently exist in a natural field setting. Here, we present recent electrical resistivity measurements from a sabkha aquifer near Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, where large density inversions exist. The geophysical images from this site provide, for the first time, compelling field evidence of fingering associated with natural free convection in groundwater.

  5. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  6. Environmental water requirements of groundwater dependent ecosystems: conflict between nature and man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witczak, S.; Kania, J.; Rozanski, K.; Wachniew, P.; Zurek, A.; Dulinski, M.

    2012-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at investigating possible interactions between the porous sandy aquifer intensively exploited for drinking water purposes and the groundwater dependent ecosystem (GDE) consisting of a valuable forest stand. The investigated aquifer (Bogucice Sands) and the associated GDE (Niepolomice Forest) are located in the south of Poland. The aquifer covers the area of ca. 200 km2 and belongs to the category of medium groundwater basins in Poland. The Niepolomice Forest is a lowland forest covering around 110 km2. This relic of once vast forests is protected as a Natura 2000 Special Protection Area "Puszcza Niepolomicka" (PLB120002) that supports bird populations of European importance. Additionally, a fen in the western part of the Niepolomice Forest comprises a separate Natura 2000 area "Torfowisko Wielkie Bloto" (PLH120080), a significant habitat of endangered butterfly species associated with wet meadows. The Niepolomice Forest contains also several nature reserves and the European bison breeding centre and has an important recreational value as the largest forest complex in the vicinity of Krakow. Due to spatially variable lithologies and groundwater levels, the Niepolomice Forest is a mosaic of various forest and non-forest habitats, including wetlands, marsh forests, humid forests and fresh forests. Dependence of the Niepolomice Forest stands on groundwater is enhanced by low available water capacity and low capillary rise of soils in the area. Groundwater conditions in the Niepolomice Forest, including Wielkie Bloto fen have been affected by meliorations carried out mostly in the period 1900-1930 and after the Second World War and by forest management. Due to artesian conditions in the area and relatively thin clay layer separating Tertiary aquifer layers from shallow Quaternary aquifer, the upward leaching of deeper groundwater may contribute in a significant way to the water balance of the investigated GDE. In September 2009 a cluster of

  7. Environmental water requirements of groundwater dependent ecosystems: conflict between nature and man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witczak, S.; Kania, J.; Rozanski, K.; Wachniew, P.; Zurek, A.; Dulinski, M.

    2012-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at investigating possible interactions between the porous sandy aquifer intensively exploited for drinking water purposes and the groundwater dependent ecosystem (GDE) consisting of a valuable forest stand. The investigated aquifer (Bogucice Sands) and the associated GDE (Niepolomice Forest) are located in the south of Poland. The aquifer covers the area of ca. 200 km2 and belongs to the category of medium groundwater basins in Poland. The Niepolomice Forest is a lowland forest covering around 110 km2. This relic of once vast forests is protected as a Natura 2000 Special Protection Area "Puszcza Niepolomicka" (PLB120002) that supports bird populations of European importance. Additionally, a fen in the western part of the Niepolomice Forest comprises a separate Natura 2000 area "Torfowisko Wielkie Bloto" (PLH120080), a significant habitat of endangered butterfly species associated with wet meadows. The Niepolomice Forest contains also several nature reserves and the European bison breeding centre and has an important recreational value as the largest forest complex in the vicinity of Krakow. Due to spatially variable lithologies and groundwater levels, the Niepolomice Forest is a mosaic of various forest and non-forest habitats, including wetlands, marsh forests, humid forests and fresh forests. Dependence of the Niepolomice Forest stands on groundwater is enhanced by low available water capacity and low capillary rise of soils in the area. Groundwater conditions in the Niepolomice Forest, including Wielkie Bloto fen have been affected by meliorations carried out mostly in the period 1900-1930 and after the Second World War and by forest management. Due to artesian conditions in the area and relatively thin clay layer separating Tertiary aquifer layers from shallow Quaternary aquifer, the upward leaching of deeper groundwater may contribute in a significant way to the water balance of the investigated GDE. In September 2009 a cluster of

  8. Natural releases from contaminated groundwater, Example Reference Biosphere 2B.

    PubMed

    Simón, I; Naito, M; Thorne, M C; Walke, R

    2005-01-01

    Safety assessment is a tool which, by means of an iterative procedure, allows the evaluation of the performance of a disposal system and its potential impact on human health and the environment. Radionuclides from a deep geological disposal facility may not reach the surface environment until many tens of thousands of years after closure of the facility. The BIOMASS Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment developed Examples of "Reference Biospheres" to illustrate the use of the methodology and to demonstrate how biosphere models can be developed and justified as being fit for purpose. The practical examples are also intended to be useful in their own right. The Example Reference Biosphere 2B presented here involves the consideration of alternative types of geosphere-biosphere interfaces and calculation of doses to members of hypothetical exposure groups arising from a wide range of exposure pathways within agricultural and semi-natural environments, but without allowing for evolution of the corresponding biosphere system. The example presented can be used as a generic analysis in some situations although it was developed around a relatively specific conceptual model. It should be a useful practical example, but the above numerical results are not intended to be understood as prescribed biosphere 'conversion factors'.

  9. Characterization of Ground-Water Quality, Upper Republican Natural Resources District, Nebraska, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankforter, Jill D.; Chafin, Daniele T.

    2004-01-01

    Nearly all rural inhabitants and livestock in the Upper Republican Natural Resources District (URNRD) in southwestern Nebraska use ground water that can be affected by elevated nitrate concentrations. The development of ground-water irrigation in this area has increased the vulnerability of ground water to the introduction of fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals. In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Upper Republican Natural Resources District, began a study to characterize the quality of ground water in the Upper Republican Natural Resources District area with respect to physical properties and concentrations of major ions, coliform bacteria, nitrate, and pesticides, and to assess the presence of nitrogen concentrations in the unsaturated zone. At selected well sites, the ground-water characterization also included tritium and nitrogen-isotope analyses to provide information about the approximate age of the ground water and potential sources of nitrogen detected in ground-water samples, respectively. In 1998, ground-water samples were collected from 101 randomly selected domestic-well sites. Of the 101 samples collected, 26 tested positive for total coliform bacteria, exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of zero colonies. In 1999, ground-water samples were collected from 31 of the 101 well sites, and 16 tested positive for coliform bacteria. Nitrates were detected in ground water from all domestic-well samples and from all but four of the irrigation-well samples collected from 1998 to 2001. Eight percent of the domestic-well samples and 3 percent of the irrigation-well samples had nitrate concentrations exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's MCL for drinking water of 10 milligrams per liter. Areas with nitrate concentrations exceeding 6 milligrams per liter, the URNRD's ground-water management-plan action level, were found predominantly in north-central Chase, western and

  10. Ra and Rn isotopes as natural tracers of submarine groundwater discharge in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.; Kroeger, K.D.; Baskaran, M.

    2007-01-01

    A suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during wet and dry conditions in Tampa Bay, Florida, to evaluate their utility as groundwater discharge tracers, both within the bay proper and within the Alafia River/estuary — a prominent free-flowing river that empties into the bay. In Tampa Bay, almost 30% of the combined riverine inputs still remain ungauged. Consequently, groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange in the discharging coastal rivers, as well as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) within the bay, are still unresolved components of this system's water and material budgets. Based on known inputs and sinks, there exists an excess of 226Ra in the water column of Tampa Bay, which can be evaluated in terms of a submarine groundwater contribution to the bay proper. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess 226Ra ranged from 2.2 to 14.5 L m− 2 day− 1, depending on whether the estuarine residence time was calculated using 224Ra/xs228Ra isotope ratios, or whether a long term, averaged model-derived estuarine residence time was used. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 1.6 to 10.3 m3 m− 1 day− 1. Activities of 222Rn were also elevated in surface water and shallow groundwater of the bay, as well as in the Alafia River estuary, where upstream activities as high as 250 dpm L− 1 indicate enhanced groundwater/surface water exchange, facilitated by an active spring vent. From average nutrient concentrations of 39 shallow, brackish, groundwater samples, rates of nutrient loading into Tampa Bay by SGD rates were estimated, and these ranged from 0.2 to 1.4 × 105 mol day− 1 (PO43−), 0.9–6.2 × 105 mol day− 1 (SiO4−), 0.7–5.0 × 105 mol day− 1 (dissolved organic nitrogen, DON), and 0.2–1.4 × 106 mol day− 1 (total dissolved nitrogen, TDN). Such nutrient loading estimates, when compared

  11. Effect of natural organic matter on arsenic release from soils and sediments into groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiling; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2006-06-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in groundwater has received significant attention recently. Natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the worldwide occurrence of As contamination. As speciation is an important factor related to its toxic and mobile behavior. The release of As from soils and sediments into groundwater is governed by several geophysicochemical processes, of which, As sorption behavior is of principle significance. This review paper summarizes existing information regarding the effects of natural organic matter (NOM) on the fate and mobility of As species in the environment. NOM may enhance the release of As from soils and sediments into the soil solution, thereby facilitating As leaching into the groundwater. The main influencing mechanisms include competition for available adsorption sites, formation of aqueous complexes, and/or changes in the redox potential of site surfaces and As redox speciation. NOM may also serve as binding agents, thereby reducing As mobility. However, comparably little research has been performed on this aspect. Since most investigations have been done on purified minerals under laboratory conditions, further research involving various geological materials under natural environmental conditions is required. Development of proper geochemical conceptual models may provide means of predicting the role of NOM in arsenic leaching and/or immobilization.

  12. Using geochemistry to identify the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in Central Arizona, USA: Part 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed; Wirt, Laurie; Manning, Andrew H.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Montezuma Well is a unique natural spring located in a sinkhole surrounded by travertine. Montezuma Well is managed by the National Park Service, and groundwater development in the area is a potential threat to the water source for Montezuma Well. This research was undertaken to better understand the sources of groundwater to Montezuma Well. Strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) indicate that groundwater in the recharge area has flowed through surficial basalts with subsequent contact with the underlying Permian aged sandstones and the deeper, karstic, Mississippian Redwall Limestone. The distinctive geochemistry in Montezuma Well and nearby Soda Springs (higher concentrations of alkalinity, As, B, Cl, and Li) is coincident with added carbon dioxide and mantle-sourced He. The geochemistry and isotopic data from Montezuma Well and Soda Springs allow for the separation of groundwater samples into four categories: (1) upgradient, (2) deep groundwater with carbon dioxide, (3) shallow Verde Formation, and (4) mixing zone. δ18O and δD values, along with noble gas recharge elevation data, indicate that the higher elevation areas to the north and east of Montezuma Well are the groundwater recharge zones for Montezuma Well and most of the groundwater in this portion of the Verde Valley. Adjusted groundwater age dating using likely 14C and δ13C sources indicate an age for Montezuma Well and Soda Springs groundwaters at 5,400–13,300 years, while shallow groundwater in the Verde Formation appears to be older (18,900). Based on water chemistry and isotopic evidence, groundwater flow to Montezuma Well is consistent with a hydrogeologic framework that indicates groundwater flow by (1) recharge in higher elevation basalts to the north and east of Montezuma Well, (2) movement through the upgradient Permian and Mississippian units, especially the Redwall Limestone, and (3) contact with a basalt dike/fracture system that provides a mechanism for groundwater to flow to the surface

  13. Evaluation of various organic fertilizer substrates and hydraulic retention times for enhancing anaerobic degradation of explosives-contaminated groundwater while using constructed wetlands at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrends, L.L.; Almond, R.A.; Kelly, D.A.; Phillips, W.D.; Rogers, W.J.

    1998-05-01

    This document describes studies conducted at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP) to improve the design, operation, and cost of gravel-based anaerobic cells when phytoremediating explosives-contaminated groundwater. To conduct this study, small-scale anaerobic test cells were used to determine: (1) If the hydraulic retention time of a large demonstration-scale anaerobic cell at MAAP could be reduced, and (2) if other carbon sources could be used as an anaerobic feedstock. The study results indicated that: (1) The existing anaerobic cell`s 7.5-day retention time should not be reduced since residual explosive by-products were present in the effluent of treatments with a 3.5-day retention time. (2) Daily application of a relatively soluble substrate, such as molasses syrup, will provide better explosives removal than periodic application of less soluble substrates like milk replacement starter and sewage sludge. (3) Molasses syrup could be, and should be, used as a substitute for milk replacement power. The recommendation to use molasses syrup was based on: (1) The lower cost of molasses syrup as compared to milk replacement starter, (2) molasses syrup`s higher solubility (which makes it easier to apply), and (3) molasses syrup`s ability to provide enhanced explosives removal.

  14. Comparison of different methods to assess natural backgrond levels in groundwater bodies in southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi, Elisabetta; Parrone, Daniele; Ghergo, Stefano; Ducci, Daniela; Sellerino, Mariangela; Condesso de Melo, Maria Teresa; Oliveira, Juana; Ribeiro, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of the natural background levels (NBLs) of a substance or element is important to distinguish anthropogenic pollution from contamination of natural origin in groundwater bodies. NBLs are the result of different atmospheric, geological, chemical and biological interaction processes during groundwater infiltration and circulation. Rainfall composition, water-rock interactions in both vadose and saturated zone, exchanges with other water bodies and residence time also contribute to determine the groundwater natural composition. Nowadays there are different methods to assess NBLs but the main concern is that they may provide different results. In the European legislative context, the Groundwater Directive (2006/118/EC) requests to EU Member States to derive appropriate threshold values (TV) for several potentially harmful substances, taking into account NBLs when necessary, in order to assess the chemical status of groundwater bodies. In the framework of a common project between Italy (CNR) and Portugal (FCT), several groundwater bodies were taken into account in different regions of Italy (Latium and Campania) and Portugal. The general objective is the definition of a sound comprehensive methodology for NBL assessment at groundwater body scale, suitable to different hydrogeological settings through comparing diverse case studies and different approaches. The Italian case studies are located in volcanic or volcano-sedimentary geological contexts, where high concentrations of substances such as As, F, Fe, Mn among others in groundwater are well known. The Portuguese case studies are located in carbonate and porous media aquifers. Several data sets were explored with the use of statistical as well as mathematical procedures in order to determine a threshold between natural and anthropogenic concentration. Today essentially two groups of methods are proposed, the first ascribed to the probability plots (PP method), the second based on the selection of the

  15. Natural background groundwater composition in the Azores archipelago (Portugal): a hydrogeochemical study and threshold value determination.

    PubMed

    Cruz, J V; Andrade, C

    2015-07-01

    Groundwater discharges were sampled in selected springs from São Miguel (Furnas and Fogo trachytic central volcanoes) and Santa Maria islands (Azores, Portugal), in order to characterize natural background levels (NBLs) and proceed to the determination of threshold values (TVs). Besides being a key issue in order to fully assess the anthropogenic pressures, NBLs are also instrumental to derive TVs, therefore complying with requirements from the European Union Groundwater Directive. The composition of groundwater corresponds mainly to low mineralized Na-HCO3 to Na-Cl water types, the latter dominant in Santa Maria island, with a decreasing order of Na>Ca>Mg>K and Cl>HCO3>SO4>NO3 for cations and anion respectively. The majority of the samples are slightly acid to slightly alkaline (pH range of 5.45-7.43), and the electrical conductivity range between 180 and 1458 μS/cm. Groundwater composition is controlled by two major drivers, addition of sea salts and dissolution of silicate minerals. Results shown that TVs established along the present study are in general in the lower rank when compared to the range of values proposed by the several EU member states, with the main exception of NO3, reflecting the impact of agriculture activities over water quality in the Azores, and lower than the national ones. The comparison between the estimated NBL and TV with values derived with another dataset from the Azores, usually higher, depicts the effect of a larger and diverse number of groundwater sources over calculations. On the other hand, all samples which show a contribution from volcanic/hydrothermal systems were excluded from the dataset, which explains why the derived NBLs and TVs are lower comparing to other active volcanic areas, which is also a conservative approach on a subject that has regulatory implications. PMID:25813965

  16. Natural attenuation processes for remediation of arsenic contaminated soils and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiling; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination presents a hazard in many countries. Natural attenuation (NA) of As-contaminated soils and groundwater may be a cost-effective in situ remedial option. It relies on the site intrinsic assimilative capacity and allows in-place cleanup. Sorption to solid phases is the principal mechanism immobilizing As in soils and removing it from groundwater. Hydroxides of iron, aluminum and manganese, clay and sulfide minerals, and natural organic matter are commonly associated with soils and aquifer sediments, and have been shown to be significant As adsorbents. The extent of sorption is influenced by As speciation and the site geochemical conditions such as pH, redox potential, and the co-occurring ions. Microbial activity may catalyze the transformation of As species, or mediate redox reactions thus influencing As mobility. Plants that are capable of hyperaccumulating As may translocate As from contaminated soils and groundwater to their tissues, providing the basis for phytoremediation. However, NA is subject to hydrological changes and may take substantial periods of time, thus requiring long-term monitoring. The current understanding of As NA processes remains limited. Sufficient site characterization is critical to the success of NA. Further research is required to develop conceptual and mathematical models to predict the fate and transport of As and to evaluate the site NA capacity. Engineering enhanced NA using environmentally benign products may be an effective alternative.

  17. Preliminary studies of groundwater flow and migration of uranium isotopes around the Oklo natural reactors (Gabon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulhoat, Pierre; Gallien, Jean Paul; Louvat, Didier; Moulin, Valérie; l'Henoret, Pascal; Guérin, Roland; Ledoux, Emmanuel; Gurban, Ioana; Smellie, John A. T.; Winberg, Anders

    1996-02-01

    In specific zones of the Oklo uranium deposit, critically was naturally reached 2 Ga ago. This site thus provides a unique opportunity to show whether the stable nuclear reaction end-products have remained or not in the vicinity of the reactor zones after the termination of nuclear reactions. In addition, the evaluation of the stability of the uraninite matrix over very long periods of time provides information on the possible long-term stability of waste forms such as spent fuel. The Commission of the European Communities initiated in 1991 the Oklo Natural Analogue Programme, a part of which is devoted to present-day migration studies. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) supports this programme, with special interest in the Bangombe reactor, a shallow reaction zone possibly affected by surficial alteration processes. The Oklo study comprises hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry, isotopic analyses (environmental isotopes, U series, 235U/ 238U), and modelling. Two sites are being thoroughly investigated: the less perturbed OK84 reactor zone in Okelobondo (200 m south from Oklo) and the Bangombe reactor zone, 30 km south of Oklo. We focus our study on uranium migration from these reactor zones, using tracers such as the 235U/ 238U isotope ratio. After preliminary field campaigns, a conceptual model was constructed, both for Okelobondo and Bangombe. For this purpose, groundwaters have been characterised for three years in different areas around Oklo: Okelobondo groundwaters in mines and boreholes and surface waters, and Bangombe, both in boreholes and surface waters. Detailed investigations were then conducted in order to validate our conceptual models, and finally to enabling us to model U migration from the reaction zones, and to evaluate the performance assessment of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. After the presentation of regional and local geology and hydrogeology, we give a complete description and interpretation of

  18. The nature and role of physical models in enhancing sixth grade students' mental models of groundwater and groundwater processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Debra Lynne Foster

    Through a non-experimental descriptive and comparative mixed-methods approach, this study investigated the experiences of sixth grade earth science students with groundwater physical models through an extended SE learning cycle format. The data collection was based on a series of quantitative and qualitative research tools intended to investigate students' ideas and changes in ideas rather than measure their achievement. The measures included a groundwater survey, classroom observations, and one-on-one follow-up student interviews for triangulation of data sources. The research was carried out at a K-12 independent school in eastern Virginia using two classes of sixth grade earth science students (n=30). The findings suggest that physical models help students identify the components porosity and permeability with respect to water flow in groundwater systems. Higher levels of system thinking were best demonstrated in model components that allowed students to experience groundwater pollution activities and pumping groundwater wells. However, the results also indicated that due to model constraints, students can develop misconceptions during the use of physical models, specifically more complex physical models as in the Groundwater Exploration Activity Model. A pure discovery learning format while using physical models without guidance or formative assessment probes can lead to misconceptions about groundwater processes as well as confusion between model attributes and real world groundwater systems. The implications of this study relate directly to the inclusion of groundwater in the new national science standards released in 2011; A Framework for K-12 Science Standard; Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (NRC, 2011). The new national standards, as in other educational reform efforts, will have the ability to affect curricular and instructional strategies in science education. From the results of this study, it was concluded that best practices for using

  19. [Effect of natural and hydrothermal synthetic goethite on the release of methane in the anaerobic decomposition process of organic matter].

    PubMed

    Yao, Dun-Fan; Chen, Tian-Hu; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo

    2013-02-01

    The effects of natural goethite (NGt) and synthetic goethite (SGt) on the release of methane in the anaerobic biochemical system consisted of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) and methane-producing bacteria (MPB) were investigated through batch tests with sodium acetate as the carbon source. To explore the effects and mechanisms of both mineral materials on the release of methane in the anaerobic decomposition process of organic matter in the presence of DIRB, the main gas components and total organic carbon (TOC) , total inorganic carbon (TIC), and Fe2+ in the aqueous phase of the experimental process were determined and XRD analyses were conducted for the solid-phase product. Moreover, the minerals were analyzed by specific surface area (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Modified Gompertz equation was used to fit the cumulative methane and carbon dioxide. Results showed that the maximum cumulative production of methane was brought forward by 60-78 days by the addition of goethite and CO2 was effectively reduced by 30% - 67% compared with the control samples. SGt was more effective than NGt in promoting the release of CH4 and reducing the CO, emission. Furthermore, the analysis of the solid product showed that the addition of goethite can fix part of CO2 by the formation of siderite.

  20. Natural Attenuation Software (NAS): A computer program for estimating remediation times of contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, E.; Widdowson, M.; Brauner, S.; Chapelle, F.; Casey, C.; ,

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a modeling system called Natural Attenuation Software (NAS). NAS was designed as a screening tool to estimate times of remediation (TORs), associated with monitored natural attenuation (MNA), to lower groundwater contaminant concentrations to regulatory limits. Natural attenuation processes that NAS models include advection, dispersion, sorption, biodegradation, and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution. This paper discusses the three main interactive components of NAS: 1) estimation of the target source concentration required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits, 2) estimation of the time required for NAFL contaminants in the source area to attenuate to a predetermined target source concentration, and 3) estimation of the time required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits after source reduction. The model's capability is illustrated by results from a case study at a MNA site, where NAS time of remediation estimates compared well with observed monitoring data over multiple years.

  1. The role of groundwater governance in emergencies during different phases of natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    The establishment of water governance in emergency situations supports timely and effective reaction with regard to the risk and impact of natural disasters on drinking-water supplies and populations. Under such governance, emergency activities of governmental authorities, rescue and aid teams, water stakeholders, local communities and individuals are coordinated with the objective to prevent and/or mitigate disaster impact on water supplies, to reduce human suffering due to drinking-water failure during and in the post-disaster period, and to manage drinking-water services in emergency situations in an equitable manner. The availability of low-vulnerability groundwater resources that have been proven safe and protected by geological features, and with long residence time, can make water-related relief and rehabilitation activities during and after an emergency more rapid and effective. Such groundwater resources have to be included in water governance and their exploration must be coordinated with overall management of drinking-water services in emergencies. This paper discusses institutional and technical capacities needed for building effective groundwater governance policy and drinking-water risk and demand management in emergencies. Disaster-risk mitigation plans are described, along with relief measures and post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction activities, which support gradual renewal of drinking-water services on the level prior to the disaster. The role of groundwater governance in emergencies differs in individual phases of disaster (preparedness, warning, impact/relief, rehabilitation). Suggested activities and actions associated with these phases are summarized and analysed, and a mode of their implementation is proposed.

  2. Natural Recharge Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of an Adjudicated Groundwater Basin using a Regional-Scale Groundwater Flow and Subsidence Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Nishikawa, T.; Martin, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Superior Court of California recently ruled that the Antelope Valley groundwater basin is in overdraft-groundwater extractions are in excess of the "safe yield" of the groundwater basin. As defined by the Court, "safe yield is the amount of annual extractions of water from an aquifer over time equal to the amount of water needed to recharge the groundwater aquifer and maintain it in equilibrium, plus any temporary surplus." Natural recharge is an important component of total groundwater recharge in Antelope Valley; however, the exact quantity and distribution of natural recharge is uncertain with estimates ranging from 30,000 to 160,000 acre-feet per year. Weighing the evidence presented by experts, the Court determined that the "safe yield" of the adjudicated area of the basin was 110,000 acre-feet per year. Knowledge of the quantity and distribution of natural recharge is needed to evaluate whether the Court-defined "safe yield" estimate for the basin will minimize additional storage depletion, and related land subsidence, resulting from continued groundwater extraction. The objective of this study is to systematically address the uncertainty in estimates of natural recharge and related aquifer parameters using a groundwater-flow and land-subsidence model with observational data and expert knowledge. Observational data include measured water levels, land-surface deformation, and estimates of transmissivity throughout the basin. An example of expert knowledge is the distribution of artesian conditions for pre-development times. Even though a great wealth of data is available, the problem of non-uniqueness remains present throughout the calibration process. Regularization is used to systematically identify combinations of parameters that can be uniquely estimated as well as to impose expert knowledge onto the parameter identification process. Once the model was calibrated with a reasonable parameter set, the parameter null-space was identified (i.e., the

  3. In situ bioremediation of monoaromatic pollutants in groundwater: a review.

    PubMed

    Farhadian, Mehrdad; Vachelard, Cédric; Duchez, David; Larroche, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Monoaromatic pollutants such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and mixture of xylenes are now considered as widespread contaminants of groundwater. In situ bioremediation under natural attenuation or enhanced remediation has been successfully used for removal of organic pollutants, including monoaromatic compounds, from groundwater. Results published indicate that in some sites, intrinsic bioremediation can reduce the monoaromatic compounds content of contaminated water to reach standard levels of potable water. However, engineering bioremediation is faster and more efficient. Also, studies have shown that enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can be applied for many BTEX contaminated groundwaters, as it is simple, applicable and economical. This paper reviews microbiology and metabolism of monoaromatic biodegradation and in situ bioremediation for BTEX removal from groundwater under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. It also discusses the factors affecting and limiting bioremediation processes and interactions between monoaromatic pollutants and other compounds during the remediation processes.

  4. Effectiveness of zerovalent iron and nickel catalysts for degrading chlorinated solvents and n-nitrosodimethylamine in natural groundwater.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; Topoleski, Corinne; Fuller, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of nickel catalysts, nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) doped with palladium, and microscale ZVI for treatment of tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, and n-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in soil-groundwater slurries. Results indicated that the presence of NDMA inhibited degradation of chlorinated solvents. Although both the nickel catalyst and nZVI were able to degrade NDMA in deionized water, neither of these metals was effective at degrading NDMA in the soil-groundwater system evaluated in this study. The effectiveness of the nickel catalyst and nZVI, with respect to treatment of the chlorinated solvents, also appeared to be highly dependent on the groundwater geochemical conditions. Overall results of this study suggest that the degradation mechanisms involving nickel catalysts and nZVI in natural soil/groundwater systems are not well-understood, and addition of metal catalysts to ZVI may not necessarily enhance observed degradation rates in natural systems.

  5. Investigation of As, Mn and Fe fixation inside the aquifer during groundwater exploitation in the experimental system imitated natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Dung, Nguyen Thi Kim; Con, Tran Hong; Cam, Bui Duy; Kang, Yumei

    2012-06-01

    Water-dissolved oxygen was supplied into anaerobic aquifer , which oxidized Fe(II), Mn(II) and trivalent arsenic and changed them into undissolved solid matter through hydrolysis, precipitation, co-precipitation and adsorption processes. The experiment was carried out on the column imitated a bore core of anaerobic aquifer with water phase containing Fe(II), Mn(II), As(III) concentration of 45.12 mg/L, 14.52 mg/L, 219.4 μg/L, respectively and other ions similarly composition in groundwater. After 6 days of air supply, concentration of iron reduced to 0.38 mg/L, manganese to 0.4 mg/L, arsenic to 9.8 μg/L (equivalent 99.16% of iron, 97.25% of manganese and 95.53% of arsenic fixed), and for other ions, the concentration changed almost according to general principles. Ion phosphate and silicate strongly influenced on arsenic removal but supported iron and manganese precipitation from water phase. Based on the experimental results, new model of groundwater exploitation was proposed.

  6. Application of first order kinetics to characterize MTBE natural attenuation in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Meredith J; Stevens, Graham J; Robbins, Gary A

    2016-04-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was a gasoline oxygenate that became widely used in reformulated gasoline as a means to reduce air pollution in the 1990s. Unfortunately, many of the underground storage tanks containing reformulated gasoline experienced subsurface releases which soon became a health concern given the increase in public and private water supplies containing MTBE. Many states responded to this by banning the use of MTBE as an additive, including Connecticut. Although MTBE dissipates by natural attenuation, it continues to be prevalent in groundwater long after the Connecticut ban in 2004. This study estimated the rate of the natural attenuation in groundwater following the Connecticut ban by evaluating the MTBE concentration two years prior to and two years after the MTBE ban at eighty-three monitoring wells from twenty-two retail gasoline stations where MTBE contamination was observed. Sites chosen for this study had not undergone active remediation ensuring no artificial influence to the natural attenuation processes that controls the migration and dissipation of MTBE. Results indicate that MTBE has dissipated in the natural environment, at more than 80% of the sites and at approximately 82% of the individual monitoring wells. In general, dissipation approximated first order kinetics. Dissipation half-lives, calculated using concentration data from the two year period after the ban, ranged from approximately three weeks to just over seven years with an average half-life of 7.3 months with little variability in estimates for different site characteristics. The accuracy of first order estimates to predict further MTBE dissipation were tested by comparing predicted concentrations with those observed after the two year post-ban period; the predicted concentrations closely match the observed concentrations which supports the use of first order kinetics for predictions of this nature.

  7. Application of first order kinetics to characterize MTBE natural attenuation in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Meredith J; Stevens, Graham J; Robbins, Gary A

    2016-04-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was a gasoline oxygenate that became widely used in reformulated gasoline as a means to reduce air pollution in the 1990s. Unfortunately, many of the underground storage tanks containing reformulated gasoline experienced subsurface releases which soon became a health concern given the increase in public and private water supplies containing MTBE. Many states responded to this by banning the use of MTBE as an additive, including Connecticut. Although MTBE dissipates by natural attenuation, it continues to be prevalent in groundwater long after the Connecticut ban in 2004. This study estimated the rate of the natural attenuation in groundwater following the Connecticut ban by evaluating the MTBE concentration two years prior to and two years after the MTBE ban at eighty-three monitoring wells from twenty-two retail gasoline stations where MTBE contamination was observed. Sites chosen for this study had not undergone active remediation ensuring no artificial influence to the natural attenuation processes that controls the migration and dissipation of MTBE. Results indicate that MTBE has dissipated in the natural environment, at more than 80% of the sites and at approximately 82% of the individual monitoring wells. In general, dissipation approximated first order kinetics. Dissipation half-lives, calculated using concentration data from the two year period after the ban, ranged from approximately three weeks to just over seven years with an average half-life of 7.3 months with little variability in estimates for different site characteristics. The accuracy of first order estimates to predict further MTBE dissipation were tested by comparing predicted concentrations with those observed after the two year post-ban period; the predicted concentrations closely match the observed concentrations which supports the use of first order kinetics for predictions of this nature. PMID:26878650

  8. Application of first order kinetics to characterize MTBE natural attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Meredith J.; Stevens, Graham J.; Robbins, Gary A.

    2016-04-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was a gasoline oxygenate that became widely used in reformulated gasoline as a means to reduce air pollution in the 1990s. Unfortunately, many of the underground storage tanks containing reformulated gasoline experienced subsurface releases which soon became a health concern given the increase in public and private water supplies containing MTBE. Many states responded to this by banning the use of MTBE as an additive, including Connecticut. Although MTBE dissipates by natural attenuation, it continues to be prevalent in groundwater long after the Connecticut ban in 2004. This study estimated the rate of the natural attenuation in groundwater following the Connecticut ban by evaluating the MTBE concentration two years prior to and two years after the MTBE ban at eighty-three monitoring wells from twenty-two retail gasoline stations where MTBE contamination was observed. Sites chosen for this study had not undergone active remediation ensuring no artificial influence to the natural attenuation processes that controls the migration and dissipation of MTBE. Results indicate that MTBE has dissipated in the natural environment, at more than 80% of the sites and at approximately 82% of the individual monitoring wells. In general, dissipation approximated first order kinetics. Dissipation half-lives, calculated using concentration data from the two year period after the ban, ranged from approximately three weeks to just over seven years with an average half-life of 7.3 months with little variability in estimates for different site characteristics. The accuracy of first order estimates to predict further MTBE dissipation were tested by comparing predicted concentrations with those observed after the two year post-ban period; the predicted concentrations closely match the observed concentrations which supports the use of first order kinetics for predictions of this nature.

  9. Impact of human activity and natural processes on groundwater arsenic in an urbanized area (South China) using multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanxing; Chen, Zongyu; Liu, Fan; Sun, Jichao; Wang, Jincui

    2014-11-01

    Anthropogenic factors resulted from the urbanization may affect the groundwater As in urbanized areas. Groundwater samples from the Guangzhou city (South China) were collected for As and other parameter analysis, in order to assess the impact of urbanization and natural processes on As distribution in aquifers. Nearly 25.5 % of groundwater samples were above the WHO drinking water standard for As, and the As concentrations in the granular aquifer (GA) were generally far higher than that in the fractured bedrock aquifer (FBA). Samples were classified into four clusters by using hierarchical cluster analysis. Cluster 1 is mainly located in the FBA and controlled by natural processes. Anthropogenic pollution resulted from the urbanization is responsible for high As concentrations identified in cluster 2. Clusters 3 and 4 are mainly located in the GA and controlled by both natural processes and anthropogenic factors. Three main mechanisms control the source and mobilization of groundwater As in the study area. Firstly, the interaction of water and calcareous rocks appears to be responsible for As release in the FBA. Secondly, reduction of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxides and decomposition of organic matter are probably responsible for high As concentrations in the GA. Thirdly, during the process of urbanization, the infiltration of wastewater/leachate with a high As content is likely to be the main source for groundwater As, while NO3 (-) contamination diminishes groundwater As.

  10. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluoroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A V(max) for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The K(m) values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 ??M for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems.

  11. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Howes, B L; Garabedian, S P

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A Vmax for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional adevection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The Km values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 microM for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems. PMID:1892389

  12. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in the Nandong karst underground river system in Yunan, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongjun; Wu, Yuexia; Groves, Chris; Yuan, Daoxian; Kambesis, Pat

    2009-10-13

    The Nandong Underground River System (NURS) is located in a typical karst agriculture dominated area in the southeast Yunnan Province, China. Groundwater plays an important role for social and economical development in the area. However, with the rapid increase in population and expansion of farm land, groundwater quality has degraded. 42 groundwater samples collected from springs in the NURS showed great variation of chemical compositions across the study basin. With increased anthropogenic contamination in the area, the groundwater chemistry has changed from the typical Ca-HCO(3) or Ca (Mg)-HCO(3) type in karst groundwater to the Ca-Cl (+NO(3)) or Ca (Mg)-Cl (+NO(3)), and Ca-Cl (+NO(3)+SO(4)) or Ca (Mg)-Cl (+NO(3)+SO(4)) type, indicating increases in NO(3)(-), Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-) concentrations that were caused most likely by human activities in the region. This study implemented the R-mode factor analysis to investigate the chemical characteristics of groundwater and to distinguish the natural and anthropogenic processes affecting groundwater quality in the system. The R-mode factor analysis together with geology and land uses revealed that: (a) contamination from human activities such as sewage effluents and agricultural fertilizers; (b) water-rock interaction in the limestone-dominated system; and (c) water-rock interaction in the dolomite-dominated system were the three major factors contributing to groundwater quality. Natural dissolution of carbonate rock (water-rock interaction) was the primary source of Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) in groundwater, water-rock interaction in dolomite-dominated system resulted in higher Mg(2+) in the groundwater, and human activities were likely others sources. Sewage effluents and fertilizers could be the main contributor of Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Na(+) and K(+) to the groundwater system in the area. This study suggested that both natural and anthropogenic processes contributed to chemical composition of groundwater in the

  13. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in the Nandong karst underground river system in Yunan, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongjun; Wu, Yuexia; Groves, Chris; Yuan, Daoxian; Kambesis, Pat

    2009-10-13

    The Nandong Underground River System (NURS) is located in a typical karst agriculture dominated area in the southeast Yunnan Province, China. Groundwater plays an important role for social and economical development in the area. However, with the rapid increase in population and expansion of farm land, groundwater quality has degraded. 42 groundwater samples collected from springs in the NURS showed great variation of chemical compositions across the study basin. With increased anthropogenic contamination in the area, the groundwater chemistry has changed from the typical Ca-HCO(3) or Ca (Mg)-HCO(3) type in karst groundwater to the Ca-Cl (+NO(3)) or Ca (Mg)-Cl (+NO(3)), and Ca-Cl (+NO(3)+SO(4)) or Ca (Mg)-Cl (+NO(3)+SO(4)) type, indicating increases in NO(3)(-), Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-) concentrations that were caused most likely by human activities in the region. This study implemented the R-mode factor analysis to investigate the chemical characteristics of groundwater and to distinguish the natural and anthropogenic processes affecting groundwater quality in the system. The R-mode factor analysis together with geology and land uses revealed that: (a) contamination from human activities such as sewage effluents and agricultural fertilizers; (b) water-rock interaction in the limestone-dominated system; and (c) water-rock interaction in the dolomite-dominated system were the three major factors contributing to groundwater quality. Natural dissolution of carbonate rock (water-rock interaction) was the primary source of Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) in groundwater, water-rock interaction in dolomite-dominated system resulted in higher Mg(2+) in the groundwater, and human activities were likely others sources. Sewage effluents and fertilizers could be the main contributor of Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Na(+) and K(+) to the groundwater system in the area. This study suggested that both natural and anthropogenic processes contributed to chemical composition of groundwater in the

  14. Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in the Nandong karst underground river system in Yunan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongjun; Wu, Yuexia; Groves, Chris; Yuan, Daoxian; Kambesis, Pat

    2009-10-01

    The Nandong Underground River System (NURS) is located in a typical karst agriculture dominated area in the southeast Yunnan Province, China. Groundwater plays an important role for social and economical development in the area. However, with the rapid increase in population and expansion of farm land, groundwater quality has degraded. 42 groundwater samples collected from springs in the NURS showed great variation of chemical compositions across the study basin. With increased anthropogenic contamination in the area, the groundwater chemistry has changed from the typical Ca-HCO 3 or Ca (Mg)-HCO 3 type in karst groundwater to the Ca-Cl (+ NO 3) or Ca (Mg)-Cl (+ NO 3), and Ca-Cl (+ NO 3 + SO 4) or Ca (Mg)-Cl (+ NO 3 + SO 4) type, indicating increases in NO 3-, Cl - and SO 42- concentrations that were caused most likely by human activities in the region. This study implemented the R-mode factor analysis to investigate the chemical characteristics of groundwater and to distinguish the natural and anthropogenic processes affecting groundwater quality in the system. The R-mode factor analysis together with geology and land uses revealed that: (a) contamination from human activities such as sewage effluents and agricultural fertilizers; (b) water-rock interaction in the limestone-dominated system; and (c) water-rock interaction in the dolomite-dominated system were the three major factors contributing to groundwater quality. Natural dissolution of carbonate rock (water-rock interaction) was the primary source of Ca 2+ and HCO 3- in groundwater, water-rock interaction in dolomite-dominated system resulted in higher Mg 2+ in the groundwater, and human activities were likely others sources. Sewage effluents and fertilizers could be the main contributor of Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Na + and K + to the groundwater system in the area. This study suggested that both natural and anthropogenic processes contributed to chemical composition of groundwater in the NURS, human activities

  15. Evaluation of Natural Attenuation as One Component of Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    K.S. Sorenson; L.N. Peterson; T.S. Green

    1998-10-01

    Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the site of a large trichloroethene (TCE) plume resulting from the historical injection of wastewater into the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The TAN Record of Decision (ROD) selected pump and treat as the final remedy and included a contingency for post-ROD treatability studies of alternative technologies. The technologies still under consideration are in-situ bioremediation, in-situ chemical oxidation, and natural attenuation. Both anaerobic and aerobic laboratory microcosm studies indicate the presence of microorganisms capable of chloroethene degradation. Field data indicate that TCE concentrations decrease relative to tritium and tetrachloroethene indicating an as yet unknown process is contributing to natural attenuation of TCE. Several methods for analyzing the field data have been evaluated and important limitations identified. Early results from the continued evaluation of the three alternative technologies suggest the combined approach of active remediation of the source area (in situ bioremediation and/or chemical oxidation replacing or augmenting pump and treat) and natural attenuation within the dissolved phase plume may be more cost and schedule effective than the base case pump and treat.

  16. Evaluation of Natural Attenuation as One Component of Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, K.S.; Peterson, L.N.; Green, T.S.

    1998-10-01

    Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the site of a large trichloroethene (TCE) plume resulting from the historical injection of wastewater into the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The TAN Record of Decision (ROD) selected pump and treat as the final remedy and included a contingency for post-ROD treatability studies of alternative technologies. The technologies still under consideration are in situ bioremediation, in situ chemical oxidation, and natural attenuation. Both anaerobic and aerobic laboratory microcosm studies indicate the presence of microorganisms capable of chloroethene degradation. Field data indicate that TCE concentrations decrease relative to tritium and tetrachloroethene indicating an as yet unknown process is contributing to natural attenuation of TCE. Several methods for analyzing the field data have been evaluated and important limitations identified. Early results from the continued evaluation of the three alternative technologies suggest the combined approach of active remediation of the source area (in situ bioremediation and/or chemical oxidation replacing or augmenting pump and treat) and natural attenuation within the dissolved phase plume may be more cost and schedule effective than the base case pump and treat.

  17. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  18. Using hydrogeology to identify the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in central Arizona: part 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Arnold, L. Rick

    2012-01-01

    Montezuma Well is a natural spring located within a “sinkhole” in the desert environment of the Verde Valley in Central Arizona. It is managed by the National Park Service as part of Montezuma Castle National Monument. Because of increasing development of groundwater in the area, this research was undertaken to better understand the sources of groundwater to Montezuma Well. The use of well logs and geophysics provides details on the geology in the area around Montezuma Well. This includes characterizing the extent and position of a basalt dike that intruded a deep fracture zone. This low permeability barrier forces groundwater to the surface at the Montezuma Well “pool” with sufficient velocity to entrain sand-sized particles from underlying bedrock. Permeable fractures along and above the basalt dike provide conduits that carry deep sourced carbon dioxide to the surface, which can dissolve carbonate minerals along the transport path in response to the added carbon dioxide. At the ground surface, CO2 degasses, depositing travertine. Geologic cross sections, rock geochemistry, and semi-quantitative groundwater flow modeling provide a hydrogeologic framework that indicates groundwater flow through a karstic limestone at depth (Redwall Limestone) as the most significant source of groundwater to Montezuma Well. Additional groundwater flow from the overlying formations (Verde Formation and Permian Sandstones) is a possibility, but significant flow from these units is not indicated.

  19. POSTCLOSURE GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION AND MONITORING AT THE SANITARY LANDFILL, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TRANSITIONING TO MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J; Walt Kubilius, W; Thomas Kmetz, T; D Noffsinger, D; Karen M Adams, K

    2006-11-17

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements for hazardous waste facilities include 30 years of post-closure monitoring. The use of an objective-based monitoring strategy allows for a significant reduction in the amount of groundwater monitoring required, as the groundwater remediation transitions from an active biosparging system to monitored natural attenuation. The lifecycle of groundwater activities at the landfill has progressed from detection monitoring and plume characterization, to active groundwater remediation, and now to monitored natural attenuation and postclosure monitoring. Thus, the objectives of the groundwater monitoring have changed accordingly. Characterization monitoring evaluated what biogeochemical natural attenuation processes were occurring and determined that elevated levels of radium were naturally occurring. Process monitoring of the biosparging system required comprehensive sampling network up- and down-gradient of the horizontal wells to verify its effectiveness. Currently, the scope of monitoring and reporting can be significantly reduced as the objective is to demonstrate that the alternate concentration limits (ACL) are being met at the point of compliance wells and the maximum contaminant level (MCL) is being met at the surface water point of exposure. The proposed reduction is estimated to save about $2M over the course of the remaining 25 years of postclosure monitoring.

  20. The natural vegetation responses to the groundwater change resulting from ecological water conveyances to the lower Tarim River.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hailiang; Ye, Mao; Song, Yudong; Chen, Yaning

    2007-08-01

    This paper takes the ecological water conveyance project (EWCP) that transfers water from the Bosten Lake, to Daxihaizi Reservoir, and finally to the Taitema Lake as a case study to analyze the dynamic change of the groundwater depth, the vegetation responses to the elevation of the groundwater depth as well as the relationship between the groundwater depth and the natural vegetation. The results from many years' monitoring in field indicate: (1) the groundwater depth has been elevating gradually with the increase in the times of watering and the elevation range has been expanding continuously in the lower reaches of Tarim River. Correspondingly, the natural vegetation has a favorable response to the elevation of the groundwater depth. The change of the natural vegetation has accordance with that of the groundwater depth. Such facts not only show that groundwater is a key factor to the growth of the native vegetation but also prove it is feasible that the degraded ecosystem can be restored and protected by the EWCP; (2) the results of analysis of the spatial-temporal response of the natural vegetation to watering reveals that the beneficial influence of the EWCP on the ecosystem in the lower Tarim River is a long-term process; (3) in terms of the function and structure of ecosystem after watering in the lower reaches of Tarim River, the EWCP does not still reach the goal of ecological restoration at a large spatial scale at present. Based on such monitoring results, some countermeasures and suggestions for the future restoration strategy are proposed so as to provide a theoretical basis for restoring and protecting the ecosystem in Tarim River, and meanwhile it can also provide some scientific references for implementing the similar ecological projects in other areas.

  1. Probability of detecting perchlorate under natural conditions in deep groundwater in California and the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    We use data from 1626 groundwater samples collected in California, primarily from public drinking water supply wells, to investigate the distribution of perchlorate in deep groundwater under natural conditions. The wells were sampled for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Priority Basin Project. We develop a logistic regression model for predicting probabilities of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than multiple threshold concentrations as a function of climate (represented by an aridity index) and potential anthropogenic contributions of perchlorate (quantified as an anthropogenic score, AS). AS is a composite categorical variable including terms for nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Incorporating water-quality parameters in AS permits identification of perturbation of natural occurrence patterns by flushing of natural perchlorate salts from unsaturated zones by irrigation recharge as well as addition of perchlorate from industrial and agricultural sources. The data and model results indicate low concentrations (0.1-0.5 μg/L) of perchlorate occur under natural conditions in groundwater across a wide range of climates, beyond the arid to semiarid climates in which they mostly have been previously reported. The probability of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg/L under natural conditions ranges from 50-70% in semiarid to arid regions of California and the Southwestern United States to 5-15% in the wettest regions sampled (the Northern California coast). The probability of concentrations above 1 μg/L under natural conditions is low (generally <3%).

  2. Probability of detecting perchlorate under natural conditions in deep groundwater in California and the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-02-15

    We use data from 1626 groundwater samples collected in California, primarily from public drinking water supply wells, to investigate the distribution of perchlorate in deep groundwater under natural conditions. The wells were sampled for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Priority Basin Project. We develop a logistic regression model for predicting probabilities of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than multiple threshold concentrations as a function of climate (represented by an aridity index) and potential anthropogenic contributions of perchlorate (quantified as an anthropogenic score, AS). AS is a composite categorical variable including terms for nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Incorporating water-quality parameters in AS permits identification of perturbation of natural occurrence patterns by flushing of natural perchlorate salts from unsaturated zones by irrigation recharge as well as addition of perchlorate from industrial and agricultural sources. The data and model results indicate low concentrations (0.1-0.5 μg/L) of perchlorate occur under natural conditions in groundwater across a wide range of climates, beyond the arid to semiarid climates in which they mostly have been previously reported. The probability of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg/L under natural conditions ranges from 50-70% in semiarid to arid regions of California and the Southwestern United States to 5-15% in the wettest regions sampled (the Northern California coast). The probability of concentrations above 1 μg/L under natural conditions is low (generally <3%).

  3. Evaluation of barrier materials for removing pollutants from groundwater rich in natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Kozyatnyk, I; Haglund, P; Lövgren, L; Tysklind, M; Gustafsson, A; Törneman, N

    2014-01-01

    Permeable barriers are used for passive remediation of groundwater and can be constructed from a range of materials. The optimal material depends on the types of contaminants and physico-chemical parameters present at the site, as well as the hydraulic conductivity, environmental safety, availability, cost and long-term stability of the material itself. The aim of the presented study was to test a number of materials for their ability to remove heavy metals and organic pollutants from groundwater with a high (140 mg L(-1)) content of natural organic matter (NOM). The following materials were included in the study: sand, peat, fly ash, iron powder, lignin and combinations thereof. Polluted water was fed into glass columns loaded with each sorbent and the contaminant removal efficiency of the material was evaluated through chemical analysis of the percolate. Materials based on fly ash and zero-valent iron were found to be the most effective for heavy metal removal, while fly ash and peat were the most effective for removing aliphatic compounds. Filtration through lignin and peat led to leaching of NOM. Although the leaching decreased over time, it remained high throughout the experiments. The results indicate that remediation of contaminated land at disused industrial sites is a complex task that often requires the use of mixed materials or a minimum of two sequential barriers.

  4. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in paleomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a two year long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multi-domain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  5. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  6. Greenhouse gases generated from the anaerobic biodegradation of natural offshore asphalt seepages in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; Wong, Florence L.; Dartnell, Peter; Sliter, Ray W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant offshore asphaltic deposits with active seepage occur in the Santa Barbara Channel offshore southern California. The composition and isotopic signatures of gases sampled from the oil and gas seeps reveal that the coexisting oil in the shallow subsurface is anaerobically biodegraded, generating CO2 with secondary CH4 production. Biomineralization can result in the consumption of as much as 60% by weight of the original oil, with 13C enrichment of CO2. Analyses of gas emitted from asphaltic accumulations or seeps on the seafloor indicate up to 11% CO2 with 13C enrichment reaching +24.8‰. Methane concentrations range from less than 30% up to 98% with isotopic compositions of –34.9 to –66.1‰. Higher molecular weight hydrocarbon gases are present in strongly varying concentrations reflecting both oil-associated gas and biodegradation; propane is preferentially biodegraded, resulting in an enriched 13C isotopic composition as enriched as –19.5‰. Assuming the 132 million barrels of asphaltic residues on the seafloor represent ~40% of the original oil volume and mass, the estimated gas generated is 5.0×1010 kg (~76×109 m3) CH4 and/or 1.4×1011 kg CO2 over the lifetime of seepage needed to produce the volume of these deposits. Geologic relationships and oil weathering inferences suggest the deposits are of early Holocene age or even younger. Assuming an age of ~1,000 years, annual fluxes are on the order of 5.0×107 kg (~76×106 m3) and/or 1.4×108 kg for CH4 and CO2, respectively. The daily volumetric emission rate (2.1×105 m3) is comparable to current CH4 emission from Coal Oil Point seeps (1.5×105 m3/day), and may be a significant source of both CH4 and CO2 to the atmosphere provided that the gas can be transported through the water column.

  7. Mapping of natural and man-made groundwater mineralization by helicopter-borne electromagnetics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, A.; Siemon, B.; Meyer, U.

    2010-12-01

    Helicopter-borne electromagnetics (HEM) is an important tool for hydrogeological questions. HEM investigations enable the differentiation of sandy and clayey sediments as well as saltwater and freshwater saturated sediments down to about 150 meters depth. The frequency-domain HEM system operated at the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) is the RESOLVE system manufactured by Fugro Airborne Surveys. In 2008 and 2009, BGR conducted airborne geophysical measurements for saltwater-freshwater investigation at several survey areas at the German North Sea coast. The surveys were carried out in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences (LIAG) in frame of the project D-AERO. One of these survey areas covers the estuary of the Elbe river to the north-west of the city of Hamburg. Parts of the results of this survey are involved in the project KLIMZUG-NORD, where the Technical University Hamburg-Harburg investigates the environmental effects of the climate change on the estuary of the Elbe river. The HEM measurements reveal both the course of the Geest ridge (high-lying hinterland consisting of pleistocenic moraine sediments) and the swamp belt due to their elevated resistivities, whereas the Marsch land (plain holocenic wet land, alluvium) occurred more conductive. Here, an electrical conductivity anomaly was detected witch could neither be related with seawater intrusion nor with anthropogenic sources. The significant low-resistivity zone of about three square kilometers was identified as a saltwater-rising zone by water analyses of surface water and is an example for natural groundwater mineralization. A man-made groundwater mineralization was investigated by HEM in the Werra river valley in central Germany. About 1000 million cubic meters saline waste water from potash mining have been stored in a karstic limestone and dolomite bed to reduce the amount of saline water emissions directly into the river. BGR conducted surveys in

  8. Combining natural background levels (NBLs) assessment with indicator kriging analysis to improve groundwater quality data interpretation and management.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Daniela; de Melo, M Teresa Condesso; Preziosi, Elisabetta; Sellerino, Mariangela; Parrone, Daniele; Ribeiro, Luis

    2016-11-01

    The natural background level (NBL) concept is revisited and combined with indicator kriging method to analyze the spatial distribution of groundwater quality within a groundwater body (GWB). The aim is to provide a methodology to easily identify areas with the same probability of exceeding a given threshold (which may be a groundwater quality criteria, standards, or recommended limits for selected properties and constituents). Three case studies with different hydrogeological settings and located in two countries (Portugal and Italy) are used to derive NBL using the preselection method and validate the proposed methodology illustrating its main advantages over conventional statistical water quality analysis. Indicator kriging analysis was used to create probability maps of the three potential groundwater contaminants. The results clearly indicate the areas within a groundwater body that are potentially contaminated because the concentrations exceed the drinking water standards or even the local NBL, and cannot be justified by geogenic origin. The combined methodology developed facilitates the management of groundwater quality because it allows for the spatial interpretation of NBL values. PMID:27371772

  9. Combining natural background levels (NBLs) assessment with indicator kriging analysis to improve groundwater quality data interpretation and management.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Daniela; de Melo, M Teresa Condesso; Preziosi, Elisabetta; Sellerino, Mariangela; Parrone, Daniele; Ribeiro, Luis

    2016-11-01

    The natural background level (NBL) concept is revisited and combined with indicator kriging method to analyze the spatial distribution of groundwater quality within a groundwater body (GWB). The aim is to provide a methodology to easily identify areas with the same probability of exceeding a given threshold (which may be a groundwater quality criteria, standards, or recommended limits for selected properties and constituents). Three case studies with different hydrogeological settings and located in two countries (Portugal and Italy) are used to derive NBL using the preselection method and validate the proposed methodology illustrating its main advantages over conventional statistical water quality analysis. Indicator kriging analysis was used to create probability maps of the three potential groundwater contaminants. The results clearly indicate the areas within a groundwater body that are potentially contaminated because the concentrations exceed the drinking water standards or even the local NBL, and cannot be justified by geogenic origin. The combined methodology developed facilitates the management of groundwater quality because it allows for the spatial interpretation of NBL values.

  10. Evidence on Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (AOM) in a boreal cultivated peatland with natural and added electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Martikainen, Pertti; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a process of methane (CH4) consumption under anoxic conditions driven by microorganisms, which oxidize CH4 with various alternate electron acceptors (AEA): sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, metals-(Fe, Mn, Cu), organic compounds. AOM is common in marine ecosystems, where microbial sulfate reduction (SR) consumes most of the CH4 produced in sediments. Despite the global significance of AOM, the exact mechanisms and relevance of the process in terrestrial ecosystems are almost unknown. In the current study the occurrence of AOM was tested for two organic soil horizons (30 and 40 cm depth) and one mineral sub-soil (sand, 50 cm depth) of a cultivated boreal peatland (Linnansuo, Eastern Finland, energy crop Phalaris arundinacea - reed canarygrass) under controlled conditions with the addition of 13C-labeled CH4 and two common AEAs - SO4-2 and Fe+3. Concentrations of CH4, CO2 and O2 were continuously measured during 10 days of incubation and CO2 was sampled periodically under anaerobic conditions for stable 13C analysis. Oxygen dynamics revealed negligible O2 contamination during incubation and its trace amounts (0.05-0.8% from the atmospheric) were accounted in the net CH4 uptake. Application of 13C-enriched CH4 (4.9 atom%) allowed to track the label in CO2 as the end-product of AOM. The highest 13CO2 enrichment (up to 60‰) was observed in mineral sub-soil, however AOM was quantitatively more pronounced in the upper 30 cm horizon (2.1 vs. 0.2 μg CO2 g soil DW-1 in the 50 cm sub-soil). The highest AOM rate of 8.9 ng CO2 g soil DW-1 h-1 was estimated for the control treatment where no AEAs were added indicating sufficient amount of naturally available AEAs, likely organic compounds. This rate was 50 times more intensive (on the C basis) than the CH4 production potential of the same soil. In contrast, external AEAs decreased AOM rates but added Fe+3 stimulated decomposition of native SOM (as seen from the most depleted 13CO2 signatures

  11. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge.

  12. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge. PMID:25799955

  13. U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Modeling Software: Making Sense of a Complex Natural Resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Provost, Alden M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.; Pollock, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Computer models of groundwater systems simulate the flow of groundwater, including water levels, and the transport of chemical constituents and thermal energy. Groundwater models afford hydrologists a framework on which to organize their knowledge and understanding of groundwater systems, and they provide insights water-resources managers need to plan effectively for future water demands. Building on decades of experience, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to lead in the development and application of computer software that allows groundwater models to address scientific and management questions of increasing complexity.

  14. Hydrochemistry and boron isotopes as natural tracers in the study of groundwaters from North Chianan Plain, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsueh-Yu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, hydrochemistry and boron isotopes are successfully applied to elucidate hydrogeological processes by the use of natural tracers. The hydrochemical analysis identifies four end-members in the hydrochemical evolution of groundwater from the North Chianan plain groundwater district. A few groundwater contain extraordinary chlorine concentrations of up to 48,000 mg l(-1). However, the hydrochemistry of groundwater only reveals that high saline water is a dominant factor in groundwater hydrochemistry. It is thought that these groundwater experienced precipitation of carbonates during seawater evaporation that did not involve the precipitation of gypsum. Boron isotopes are very efficient tracers in determining the source of salinisation. The boron isotopes reveal the results of mixing of evaporated seawater and water-sediment interaction. In general, the boron isotope ratio of the groundwater is controlled by a two-end-member mixing system, which is composed of evaporated seawater (isotopically heavy) and fresh surface water (isotopically light). Due to a long lagoonal period in the coastal plain, the groundwaters in the downstream area generally have high Cl/B ratios and relatively heavy boron isotope ratios while those in the upstream area are composed of low Cl/B and light boron isotopes. However, there is not a resolvable mixing trend between the Cl/B ratio and the isotopic composition of boron. It is probably obscured by a highly variable boron isotope ratio in fresh surface water and through fractionation associated with water-rock interaction. Both factors would decrease the boron isotope ratio but one effect cannot be distinguished from the other.

  15. The role of anthropogenic and natural factors in shaping the geochemical evolution of groundwater in the Subei Lake basin, Ordos energy base, Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Song, Xianfang; Yang, Lihu; Han, Dongmei; Zhang, Yinghua; Ma, Ying; Bu, Hongmei

    2015-12-15

    Groundwater resources are increasingly exploited for industrial and agricultural purposes in many arid regions globally, it is urgent to gain the impact of the enhanced anthropogenic pressure on the groundwater chemistry. The aim of this study was to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of groundwater chemistry and to identify the impact of natural and anthropogenic factors on the groundwater chemistry in the Subei Lake basin, Northwestern China. A total of 153 groundwater samples were collected and major ions were measured during the three campaigns (August and December 2013, May 2014). At present, the major hydrochemical facies in unconfined groundwater are Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-Na-HCO3, Na-Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3, Ca-Mg-SO4 and Na-SO4-Cl types, while the main hydrochemical facies in confined groundwater are Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-Na-HCO3, Na-Ca-HCO3, Ca-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 types. Relatively greater seasonal variation can be observed in the chemical constituents of confined groundwater than that of unconfined groundwater. Rock weathering predominates the evolution of groundwater chemistry in conjunction with the cation exchange, and the dissolution/precipitation of gypsum, halite, feldspar, calcite and dolomite are responsible for the chemical constituents of groundwater. Anthropogenic activities can be classified as: (1) groundwater overexploitation; (2) excessive application of fertilizers in agricultural areas. Due to intensive groundwater pumping, the accelerated groundwater mineralization resulted in the local changes in hydrochemical facies of unconfined groundwater, while the strong mixture, especially a large influx of downward leakage from the unconfined aquifer into the confined aquifer, played a vital role in the fundamental variation of hydrochemical facies in confined aquifer. The nitrate contamination is mainly controlled by the local hydrogeological settings coupled with the traditional flood irrigation. The deeper insight into geochemical evolution of

  16. Quantification of Natural Attenuation of N-S-O Heteroaromatic Compounds in Groundwater at Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, T.; Piepenbrink, M.; Grathwohl, P.

    2005-12-01

    N-S-O heteroaromatic compounds (HET) can typically be found in groundwater at tar oil contaminated sites. Despite the fact that most of these substances are toxic and potentially carcinogenic, they are not yet routinely monitored. Goal of this contribution is to present results from the investigation of the in-situ natural attenuation potential of HET in groundwater at field-scale. The research has been performed at the `Testfeld-Sed' (TFS) experimental site, a former gasworks site in southern Germany. At the TFS site, the ongoing quantitative determination of the natural attenuation potential of HET is performed using an integral investigation approach at multiple control planes (integral pumping tests, based on the inversion of concentration time series measured during pumping), which are positioned at different distances downgradient of the source zone. Natural attenuation processes result in a reduction of the total contaminant mass flow with increasing transport distance. Degradation rates can be obtained from (multi-)process-based reactive transport modeling which considers all processes contributing to mass flow reduction. Two control planes (CPs) at a distance of about 150 m were used for the integral measurements at the TFS site. The concentration time series already indicate that contaminants like BTEX and PAH almost vanished on their way from the upstream to the downstream CP, while HET were still present. The determined mass flow rates further indicate that some of the HET (especially Methylbenzofurane and Dimethylbenzofurane) are not only very mobile, but also highly persistent. This confirms the dominating role of HET as major contaminants at the TFS site. However, the observed decrease in the total Dimethylbenzofurane mass flow rates already indicates good chances for enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) measures (e.g. injection of H2O2 as additional electron acceptor to stimulate biodegradation) which are planned as next steps. Acknowledgement: The

  17. Arsenate and Arsenite Sorption on Magnetite: Relations to Groundwater Arsenic Treatment Using Zerovalent Iron and Natural Attenuation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a zerovalent iron corrosion product; it is also formed in natural soil and sediment. Sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on magnetite is an important process of arsenic removal from groundwater using zerovalent iron-based permeable reactive ba...

  18. Does phosphate enhance the natural attenuation of crude oil in groundwater under defined redox conditions?

    PubMed

    Ponsin, Violaine; Mouloubou, Olsen Raïnness; Prudent, Pascale; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-11-15

    After a crude oil spill caused by a broken pipeline in 2009 to a gravel aquifer in southern France, degradation processes under various redox conditions progressively established, but at rates that predict a long life-time of the source under natural attenuation after partial source removal. In this study, we aimed at identifying the rate-limiting factors for each redox condition, with special emphasis on phosphate as limiting nutrient. The study was conducted in laboratory microcosms assembled with material collected on site: sediments, water from monitoring wells, oil and microbial sludge. Redox conditions were promoted by adding electron acceptors (either oxygen, nitrate, limonite (FeO(OH)), cryptomelane (K(Mn(4+),Mn(2+))8O16), or sulfate). For each condition, the role of phosphate was studied by repeated additions for up to 290days. The results showed a very strong stimulation of aerobic and denitrifying rates of oil degradation by phosphate, provided that oxygen and nitrate were repeatedly supplied. Phosphate caused also a marked stimulation of methanogenic degradation, and a relatively small stimulation of metal reduction. These anaerobic processes started only after marked lag phases, and phosphate shortened the lag phase for methanogenic degradation. Degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with less than 8 carbons, including benzene, was confirmed even under unstimulated conditions. It is concluded that degradation rates at the site are limited by both, availability of electron acceptors and availability of phosphate needed for promoting microbial growth. PMID:24795042

  19. Does phosphate enhance the natural attenuation of crude oil in groundwater under defined redox conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsin, Violaine; Mouloubou, Olsen Raïnness; Prudent, Pascale; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    After a crude oil spill caused by a broken pipeline in 2009 to a gravel aquifer in southern France, degradation processes under various redox conditions progressively established, but at rates that predict a long life-time of the source under natural attenuation after partial source removal. In this study, we aimed at identifying the rate-limiting factors for each redox condition, with special emphasis on phosphate as limiting nutrient. The study was conducted in laboratory microcosms assembled with material collected on site: sediments, water from monitoring wells, oil and microbial sludge. Redox conditions were promoted by adding electron acceptors (either oxygen, nitrate, limonite (FeO(OH)), cryptomelane (K(Mn4 +,Mn2 +)8O16), or sulfate). For each condition, the role of phosphate was studied by repeated additions for up to 290 days. The results showed a very strong stimulation of aerobic and denitrifying rates of oil degradation by phosphate, provided that oxygen and nitrate were repeatedly supplied. Phosphate caused also a marked stimulation of methanogenic degradation, and a relatively small stimulation of metal reduction. These anaerobic processes started only after marked lag phases, and phosphate shortened the lag phase for methanogenic degradation. Degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with less than 8 carbons, including benzene, was confirmed even under unstimulated conditions. It is concluded that degradation rates at the site are limited by both, availability of electron acceptors and availability of phosphate needed for promoting microbial growth.

  20. Does phosphate enhance the natural attenuation of crude oil in groundwater under defined redox conditions?

    PubMed

    Ponsin, Violaine; Mouloubou, Olsen Raïnness; Prudent, Pascale; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-11-15

    After a crude oil spill caused by a broken pipeline in 2009 to a gravel aquifer in southern France, degradation processes under various redox conditions progressively established, but at rates that predict a long life-time of the source under natural attenuation after partial source removal. In this study, we aimed at identifying the rate-limiting factors for each redox condition, with special emphasis on phosphate as limiting nutrient. The study was conducted in laboratory microcosms assembled with material collected on site: sediments, water from monitoring wells, oil and microbial sludge. Redox conditions were promoted by adding electron acceptors (either oxygen, nitrate, limonite (FeO(OH)), cryptomelane (K(Mn(4+),Mn(2+))8O16), or sulfate). For each condition, the role of phosphate was studied by repeated additions for up to 290days. The results showed a very strong stimulation of aerobic and denitrifying rates of oil degradation by phosphate, provided that oxygen and nitrate were repeatedly supplied. Phosphate caused also a marked stimulation of methanogenic degradation, and a relatively small stimulation of metal reduction. These anaerobic processes started only after marked lag phases, and phosphate shortened the lag phase for methanogenic degradation. Degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons with less than 8 carbons, including benzene, was confirmed even under unstimulated conditions. It is concluded that degradation rates at the site are limited by both, availability of electron acceptors and availability of phosphate needed for promoting microbial growth.

  1. Evaluation of occurrence and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwater of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. W.; Lee, J. Y.; Park, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwater of Korea. For this purpose, we collected the groundwater radionuclides data of 2000-2011 from National Institute of Environmental Research and available literatures. The sample data were classified into five groups according to the rock types and radionuclide levels were used to construct detailed concentration maps. Radon, uranium, gross-α and radium concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 64,688 pCi/L (mean: 4,907 pCi/L), 0 to 2,297 µg/L (mean: 27.5 µg/L), 0 to 312.0 (mean: 3.9 pCi/L) and 0 to 17.4 pCi/L (mean: 0.2 pCi/L), respectively. Radon concentrations in 562 (53.5%) of 1,501 wells exceeded 4,000 pCi/L, which is the maximum contaminant level by the US environmental protection agency. Uranium, gross-α, and radium concentrations in 121 (11.9%) of 1,031 wells, 34 (3.5%) of 978 wells and 4 (4.5%) of 89 wells exceeded 30 µg/L, 15 pCi/L and 5 pCi/L, respectively. Radionuclide mean concentration in igneous and metamorphic rocks showed higher levels than those of other rocks such as volcanic, carbonate and sedimentary rocks. However, we found that correlations among radionuclides were weak or not significant. This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "the GAIA project".

  2. A statistical F test for the natural attenuation of contaminants in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Aristeo M; Evangelista, Fe S

    2003-03-01

    Natural attenuation (NA) is a catchall explanation for the overall decay and slowed movement of the contaminants in the subsurface. One direct support to NA is to demonstrate that contaminant concentrations from monitoring wells located near the source are decreasing over time. The decrease is summarily expressed in terms of an apparent half-life that is determined from the line best fitting the observed log-transformed concentration data and time. This simple (time-only) decay model assumes other factors are invariant, and so is flawed when complicating factors--such as a fluctuating water table--are present. A history of the water-table fluctuation can track changes in important NA factors like recharge, groundwater flow direction and velocity, as well as other non-NA factors like volume of water in and purged from the well before a sample is collected. When the trend in the concentrations is better associated with the water table rising or falling, any conclusion about degradation rate may be premature. We develop simple regressions to predict contaminant concentration (c) by two line models: one involving time (c approximately c(t)), and another involving groundwater elevation (c approximately c(z)). We develop a third model that includes both factors (c approximately c(t, z)). Using an F-test to compare the fits to the models, we determine which model is statistically better in explaining the observed concentrations. We applied the test to sites where benzene degradation rates had previously been estimated. The F-test can be used to determine the suitability of applying non-parametric statistics, like the Mann-Kendall, to the concentration data, because the result from the F-test can indicate instability of the contaminant plume that may be masked when the water table fluctuates.

  3. Groundwater contamination and natural attenuation capacity at a petroleum spilled facility in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2011-01-01

    As a remedial option, the natural attenuation capacity of a petroleum contaminated groundwater at a military facility was examined. Hydrogeological conditions, such as high water level, permeable uppermost layer and frequent heavy rainfall, were favorable to natural attenuation at this site. The changes in the concentrations of electron acceptors and donors, as well as the relevant hydrochemical conditions, indicated the occurrence of aerobic respiration, denitrification, iron reduction, manganese reduction and sulfate reduction. The calculated BTEX expressed biodegradation capacity ranged between 20.52 and 33.67 mg/L, which appeared effective for the reduction of the contaminants levels. The contribution of each electron accepting process to the total biodegradation was in the order: denitrification > iron reduction > sulfate reduction > aerobic respiration > manganese reduction. The BTEX and benzene point attenuation rates were 0.0058-0.0064 and 0.0005-0.0032 day(-1), respectively, and the remediation time was 0.7-1.2 and 2.5-30 years, respectively. The BTEX and benzene bulk attenuation rates were 8.69 x 10(-4) and 1.05 x 10(-3) day(-1), respectively, and the remediation times for BTEX and benzene were 7.2 and 17.5 years, respectively. However, most of the natural attenuation occurring in this site can be attributed to dilution and dispersion. Consequently, the biodegradation and natural attenuation capacities were good enough to lower the contaminants levels, but their rates appeared to be insufficient to reach the remediation goal within a reasonable time frame. Therefore, some active remedial measures would be required.

  4. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, D.A.; Laase, A.D. ); Locke, D.A. )

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended.

  5. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, D.A.; Laase, A.D.; Locke, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy`s Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended.

  6. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  7. Comparison of Groundwater Recharge under Irrigated Cropland versus Natural Land in Clayey Soils under Mediterranean Climate in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, D.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Land use change from natural ecosystems to cropland influences groundwater recharge, including water quantity and quality. Soil core samples (0-11 m depth) from 6 boreholes beneath irrigated cropland (field crops) and 2 boreholes beneath natural ecosystems, in clayey soils undelain by sands, were analyzed for grain-size distribution, water content, and water-extractable Cl. Chloride mass balance and numerical 1D unsaturated zone flow and transport modeling were used for assessing average and transient recharge fluxes, and for testing matrix versus preferential flow hypotheses. Water contents under irrigated cropland are significantly higher than those found under natural land with similar grain-size distribution. Pore water Cl concentrations in deep unsaturated zone under irrigated cropland (900-2000 mg/L) are similar to recent local groundwater Cl and significantly lower than pore water Cl in deep unsaturated zone under natural ecosystems (3000 and 6000 mg/L, Figure 1). Calibrated models’ recharge rates through the soil matrix are much higher under irrigated cropland (90-230 mm/yr) than under natural ecosystems (0-2 mm/yr) and are consistent with groundwater balance estimates of average recharge (110-160 mm/yr). In contrast, matrix-recharge rates under natural ecosystems are much lower than those based on groundwater balance (50-80 mm/yr). While matrix flow in the unsaturated zone under irrigated cropland explains both groundwater and unsaturated zone observations, under natural land, preferential flow paths are needed for supporting unsaturated zone observations and pre-extensive-cultivation groundwater Cl concentrations. Plowing and irrigation prevent development of crack networks and promote matrix percolation through the clay, which flushes salts from previously immobile unsaturated zone pore-water. After flushing is completed, water recharge fluxes are correlated to precipitation of the recent and previous year, while the salinity of recharging water

  8. Groundwater level response in U.S. Principal Aquifers to natural climate variability on interannual to multidecadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Gurdak, J. J.; Dickinson, J.; Hanson, R. T.; Ferré, T. P. A.; Maurer, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Natural climate variability on interannual to multidecadal timescales are important controls on precipitation, drought, evapotranspiration, streamflow, and groundwater recharge. Climate variability can also augment or diminish human stresses on water resources. Thus, understanding climate variability has particular relevance for groundwater management. Findings will be presented from a national scale study of groundwater level response to natural climate variability in principal aquifers (PAs) of the U.S., including the California Coastal Basin, Rio Grande, Coastal Lowlands, Mississippi Embayment, Floridan, and Glacial aquifer systems. We use the U.S. Geological Survey hydroclimatic analysis toolkit HydroClimATe to perform singular spectrum analysis and identify quasi-periodic signals in precipitation and groundwater time series that are coincident with the Arctic Oscillation (AO) (6-12 mo cycle), Pacific/North American oscillation (PNA) (<1-4 yr cycle), El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (2-7 yr cycle), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) (3-6 yr cycle), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) (15-30 yr cycle), and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) (50-70 yr cycle). Nearly all of the quasi-periodic signals in the precipitation and groundwater levels have a statistically significant lag correlation (95% confidence interval) with the AO, PNA, ENSO, NAO, PDO, and AMO indices. The largest amount of variance in precipitation and groundwater levels was attributed to the PDO, accounting for more than 90% of the variance in many PAs. The next largest amount of variance in precipitation and groundwater levels was attributed to ENSO, accounting for more than 50% of the variance in many PAs. The AMO was the least frequently detected signal in all time series but accounted for as much as 95% of the variance when detected. Thus, climate variability on interannual to multidecadal timescales has a statistically significant and measurable effect on the lagged responses of

  9. Impact of anthropogenic and natural processes on the evolution of groundwater chemistry in a rapidly urbanized coastal area, South China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanxing; Sun, Jichao; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Zongyu; Liu, Fan

    2013-10-01

    The moving of manufacturing industry from developed countries to Dongguan, China, promoted the semi-urbanization and rural industrialization in this area. It is urgent to acquire the impact of the enhanced anthropogenic pressure on the evolution of groundwater chemistry in this area. The objectives, in this study, were to understand the evolution of groundwater chemistry in Dongguan area based on the comparison of hydrochemical data variations and land use changes during the urbanization, to distinguish the impact of natural processes and anthropogenic activities on the groundwater chemistry by using principal components analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and to discuss the origins of trace elements in groundwater. Eighteen physico-chemical parameters were investigated at 73 groundwater sites during July 2006. By analyzing the hydrochemical data, it shows that lateral flow from rivers and agricultural irrigation are the mechanisms controlling the groundwater chemistry in the river network area where the cation exchange of Na(+) in sediments taken up by the exchanger Ca(2+) occurs. Seawater intrusion is the mechanism controlling the groundwater chemistry in the coast area where the cation exchange of Ca(2+) in sediments taken up by the exchanger Na(+) occurs. The ion exchange reaction for fissured aquifer is weak in the study area. In addition, the comparison of hydrochemical data between in 2006 and in 1980 shows that anthropogenic activities such as excessive application of agricultural fertilizers, inappropriate emissions of domestic sewage and excessive emissions of SO2 are responsible for the occurrences of groundwater with NO3(-), SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) types. Four principal components (PCs) were extracted from PCA, which explain 80.86% of the total parameters in water chemistry: PC1, the seawater intrusion and As contamination; PC2, the water-rock interaction, surface water recharge and acidic precipitation; PC3, heavy metal pollution from

  10. Naturally occurring arsenic in groundwater and identification of the geochemical sources in the Duero Cenozoic Basin, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. J.; Lillo, J.; Sahún, B.

    2006-09-01

    Arsenic concentrations surpassing potability limit of 10 μg/L in the groundwater supplies of an extensive area in the Duero Cenozoic Basin (central Spain) have been detected and the main sources of arsenic identified. Arsenic in 514 samples of groundwater, having mean values of 40.8 μg/L, is natural in origin. Geochemical analysis of 553 rock samples, assaying arsenic mean values of 23 mg/kg, was performed. Spatial coincidence between the arsenic anomaly in groundwater and the arsenic lithogeochemical distribution recorded in the Middle Miocene clayey organic-rich Zaratan facies illustrates that the rocks of this unit are the main source of arsenic in groundwater. The ferricretes associated to the Late Cretaceous-Middle Miocene siliciclastics also constitute a potential arsenic source. Mineralogical study has identified the presence of arsenic in iron oxides, authigenic pyrite, manganese oxides, inherited titanium-iron oxides, phyllosilicates and organomineral compounds. Arsenic mobilization to groundwater corresponds to arsenic desorption from iron and manganese oxides and from organic matter.

  11. A Method for Catchment Scale Mapping of Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems to Support Natural Resource Management (Queensland, Australia).

    PubMed

    Glanville, K; Ryan, T; Tomlinson, M; Muriuki, G; Ronan, M; Pollett, A

    2016-02-01

    Immediate and foreseeable threats to groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) are widely acknowledged, many linked to altered groundwater regimes including changes in groundwater flow, flux, pressure, level and/or quality (Eamus et al. in Aust J Bot 54:97-114, 2006a). Natural resource managers and other decision-makers often lack sufficient information at an appropriate scale to understand the groundwater dependency of ecosystems and ensure that GDEs are adequately considered in decision-making processes. This paper describes a new catchment scale mapping method for GDEs based on the integration of local expert knowledge with detailed spatial datasets to delineate GDEs at a scale compatible with management and planning activities. This overcomes one of the key criticisms often levelled at broader scale mapping methods-that information from local and regional experts, with significant understanding of landscape processes and ecosystems, is not incorporated into the datasets used by decision-makers. Expert knowledge is conveyed in the form of pictorial conceptual models representing the components, processes and interrelationships of groundwater within a catchment and the ecosystems dependent on it. Each mapped GDE is linked to a pictorial conceptual model and a mapping rule-set to provide decision-makers with valuable information about where, how and why GDEs exist in a landscape.

  12. Anomalous fluoride concentration in groundwater - is it natural or pollution? A stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Marimon, Maria Paula Casagrande; Knöller, Kay; Roisenberg, Ari

    2007-06-01

    Fluoride anomalies (up to 11 mg/l) have been detected in groundwater of the central region of Rio Grande do Sul State, Southern Brazil, in an area where fluorosis is endemic. Two hypotheses are investigated concerning the fluoride origin: lithochemical affiliation from regional rock or contamination by fertilisers application. These hypotheses are discussed based on the stable isotope data of water, nitrate, and sulphate, which indicates that the local precipitation is the main groundwater recharge source. The isotopic composition of groundwater sulphate is similar to that of fertiliser sulphate. However, a conclusive assignment of groundwater sulphate to fertiliser origin is not indicated because further possible sulphate sources fall into the same isotopic range. In contrast, the isotopic composition of dissolved nitrate suggests that there is no direct relationship to the use of NPK fertilisers. Hence, an origin of the high fluoride content in groundwater related to long-term rock-water interactions seems likely.

  13. Experimental studies in natural groundwater recharge dynamics: Assessment of recent advances in instrumentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Perry, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    To quantify and model the natural groundwater-recharge process, two sites in south-central Kansas, U.S.A., were instrumented with various modern sensors and data microloggers. The atmospheric-boundary layer and the unsaturated and saturated soil zones were monitored as a unified regime. Data from the various sensors were collected using microloggers in combination with magnetic-cassette tape, graphical and digital recorders, analog paper-tape recorders, and direct observations to evaluate and automate data collection and processing. Atmospheric sensors included an anemometer, a tipping-bucket raingage, an air-temperature thermistor, a relative-humidity probe, a net radiometer, and a barometric-pressure transducer. Sensors in the unsaturated zone consisted of soil-temperature thermocouples, tensiometers coupled with pressure transducers and dial gages, gypsum blocks, and a neutron moisture probe operated by an observer. The saturated-zone sensors consisted of a water-level pressure transducer, a conventional float gage connected to a variable potentiometer, soil thermocouples, and a number of multiple-depth piezometers. Evaluation of the operation of these sensors and recorders indicated that certain types of equipment such as pressure transducers are very sensitive to environmental conditions. Extraordinary steps had to be taken to protect some of the equipment, whereas other equipment seemed to be reliable under all conditions. Based on such experiences, a number of suggestions aimed at improving such investigations are outlined. ?? 1984.

  14. Prospecting for groundwater discharge in the canals of Bangkok via natural radon and thoron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Burnett, William C.; Lane-Smith, Derek; Simko, Jesse

    2014-11-01

    We conducted surveys of several canals in Bangkok, Thailand using continuous measurements of naturally occurring 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron"). Shallow groundwater seeping into these canals is an important pathway for contamination of surface waters. Radon, with a half-life (3.82 days) shorter than the suspected flushing time of the canals, is widely distributed throughout the waterway. It can thus be used to estimate discharge via a mass balance approach but cannot specify precisely where the discharge is occurring. Thoron, on the other hand, with its rapid decay (56 s half-life) will only occur very close to points of entry. Thus, if one detects thoron in the environment, there must be a source nearby - a good 'prospecting' tool. We found thoron spikes in Klong Bangkok Noi during a survey in August 2009. We repeated the same survey route in June 2013 and found essentially the same pattern of high thoron peaks (indicating points of discharge) adjacent to several temples along the canal. The connection to temples is thought to be a consequence of these structures being built on relatively higher ground and having sandy substrates.

  15. Modeling of arsenic adsorption kinetics of synthetic and contaminated groundwater on natural laterite.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Sharma, Himanshu; Basu, Jayanta Kumar; De, Sirshendu

    2009-12-30

    A simple shrinking core model is applied to predict the adsorption kinetics of arsenite and arsenate species onto natural laterite (NL) in a stirred tank adsorber. The proposed model is a two-resistance model, in which two unknown parameters, external mass transfer coefficient (K(f)) and pore diffusion coefficient (D(e)) are estimated by comparing the simulation concentration profile with the experimental data using a nonlinear optimization technique. The model is applied under various operating conditions, e.g., initial arsenic concentration, NL dose, NL particle size, temperature, stirring speed, etc. Estimated values of D(e) and K(f) are found to be in the range of 2.2-2.6 x 10(-11)m(2)/s and 1.0-1.4 x 10(-6)m/s at 305K for different operating conditions, respectively. D(e) and K(f) values are found to be increasing with temperature and stirrer speed, respectively. Calculated values of Biot numbers indicate that both external mass transfer and pore diffusion are important during the adsorption. The model is also applied satisfactorily to predict the arsenic adsorption kinetics of arsenic contaminated groundwater-NL system and can be used to scale up. PMID:19717233

  16. Experimental studies in natural groundwater-recharge dynamics: The analysis of observed recharge events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Perry, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The amounts and time distribution of groundwater recharge from precipitation over an approximately 19-month period were investigated at two instrumented sites in south-central Kansas. Precipitation and evapotranspiration sequences, soil-moisture profiles and storage changes, water fluxes in the unsaturated zone and hydraulic gradients in the saturated zone at various depths, soil temperatures, water-table hydrographs, and water-level changes in nearby wells clearly depict the recharge process. Antecedent moisture conditions and the thickness and nature of the unsaturated zone were found to be the major factors affecting recharge. Although the two instrumented sites are located in sand-dune environments in areas characterized by shallow water table and subhumid continental climate, a significant difference was observed in the estimated effective recharge. The estimates ranged from less than 2.5 to approximately 154 mm at the two sites from February to June 1983. The main reasons for this large difference in recharge estimates were the greater thickness of the unsaturated zone and the lower moisture content in that zone resulting from lower precipitation and higher potential evapotranspiration for one of the sites. Effective recharge took place only during late winter and spring. No summer or fall recharge was observed at either site during the observation period of this study. ?? 1985.

  17. Modeling of arsenic adsorption kinetics of synthetic and contaminated groundwater on natural laterite.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Sharma, Himanshu; Basu, Jayanta Kumar; De, Sirshendu

    2009-12-30

    A simple shrinking core model is applied to predict the adsorption kinetics of arsenite and arsenate species onto natural laterite (NL) in a stirred tank adsorber. The proposed model is a two-resistance model, in which two unknown parameters, external mass transfer coefficient (K(f)) and pore diffusion coefficient (D(e)) are estimated by comparing the simulation concentration profile with the experimental data using a nonlinear optimization technique. The model is applied under various operating conditions, e.g., initial arsenic concentration, NL dose, NL particle size, temperature, stirring speed, etc. Estimated values of D(e) and K(f) are found to be in the range of 2.2-2.6 x 10(-11)m(2)/s and 1.0-1.4 x 10(-6)m/s at 305K for different operating conditions, respectively. D(e) and K(f) values are found to be increasing with temperature and stirrer speed, respectively. Calculated values of Biot numbers indicate that both external mass transfer and pore diffusion are important during the adsorption. The model is also applied satisfactorily to predict the arsenic adsorption kinetics of arsenic contaminated groundwater-NL system and can be used to scale up.

  18. SITE CHARACTERIZATION OF AREA 6, DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, IN SUPPORT OF NATURAL ATTENUATION AND ENHANCED ANAEROBIC BIOREMEDIATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field program for site characterization of targeted study areas at the Dover Air Force Base was conducted between January 16, 1995, and March 9, 1995. The stated objectives of the investigation, "to characterize the stratigraphy, depth to groundwater, groundwater flow directio...

  19. Evolution of a pathway for chlorobenzene metabolism leads to natural attenuation in contaminated groundwater

    PubMed

    van der Meer JR; Werlen; Nishino; Spain

    1998-11-01

    Complete metabolism of chlorinated benzenes is not a feature that is generally found in aerobic bacteria but is thought to be due to a novel recombination of two separate gene clusters. Such a recombination could be responsible for adaptation of a natural microbial community in response to contamination with synthetic chemicals. This hypothesis was tested in a chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated aquifer. CB-degrading bacteria from a contaminated site were characterized for a number of years by examining a combination of growth characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR, and DNA sequence data. The genetic information obtained for the CB pathway of the predominant microorganism, Ralstonia sp. strain JS705, revealed a unique combination of (partially duplicated) genes for chlorocatechol degradation and genes for a benzene-toluene type of aromatic ring dioxygenase. The organism was detected in CB-polluted groundwater by hybridizing colonies cultivated on low-strength heterotrophic media with probes for the CB pathway. Southern hybridizations performed to determine the organization of the CB pathway genes and the 16S ribosomal DNA indicated that CB-degrading organisms isolated from different wells at the site were identical to JS705. Physiological characterization by the Biolog test system revealed some differences. The genes for the aromatic ring dioxygenase and dihydrodiol dehydrogenase of JS705 were detected in toluene and benzene degraders from the same site. Our results suggest that recent horizontal gene transfer and genetic recombination of existing genes between indigenous microorganisms were the mechanisms for evolution of the catabolic pathway. Evolution of the CB pathway seems to have created the capacity for natural attenuation of CB at the contaminated site.

  20. Natural radioactive nuclides and chemical components in the groundwater of Beni Suef Governate, Middle Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khalil, F A; Amin, Rafat M; El Fayoumi, M A K

    2009-03-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity in drinking water have been performed in many parts of the world, mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming water. A study of the radionuclide and chemical components in groundwater from Beni Suef Governate, Egypt has been carried out. Fifty water samples were analysed by gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K concentrations; major elements, pH, alkalinity and conductivity were also measured. The activity concentration values ranged from 0.008 to 0.040 Bq l(-1) for (226)Ra, from 0.003 to 0.019 Bq l(-1) for (232)Th and from 0.025 to 0.344 Bq l(-1) for (40)K. The annual ingestion of these radionuclides, using local consumption rates (averaged over the whole population) of 1.5 l d(-1), was estimated to be 8.59, 4.86 and 83.47 Bq y(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The estimated effective doses from drinking water were found to be 2.4 microSv y(-1) ((226)Ra), 1.1 microSv y(-1) ((232)Th) and 0.5 microSv y(-1) ((40)K). The contribution of these radionuclides to the committed effective dose from a year's consumption of drinking water is therefore estimated to be only 4% of the WHO value (0.1 mSv y(-1)). The moderate pH value is the most important parameter, and there was no observed correlation between natural radioactivity and electrical conductivity or concentrations of major ions.

  1. Hydrogeophysical Characterizations of Streambed Sedimentology and Stream-Groundwater Interactions in a Natural Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Y.; Lee, S.; Kim, H.; Lee, K.

    2011-12-01

    than values at 10 cm depth due to, getting to deep, existence of low permeable sediments like loamy sand and silt loam. Depositional features of streambed in a natural stream are predicted to affect both vertical water flux and pattern on surface water-groundwater interaction. This subject is supported by Brain Korea 21 and Korea Ministry of Environment as 'The GAIA Project (173-092-009)'

  2. Determining natural groundwater influx to a tropical river using Rn-222, CFCs and ionic environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, G.; Cook, P. G.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of Rn-222, CFC-11, CFC-12, major ions and temperature of river water and springs are used to quantify rates of groundwater inflow to a tropical lowland river in the Northern Territory of Australia. Groundwater inflow results in increases in Rn-222 concentrations within the river, but decreases in concentrations of CFCs, because the inflowing groundwater is relatively old. Rn-222 and CFC concentrations are affected by gas exchange with the atmosphere, while ion concentrations are not. Additionally, CFC concentrations in the river appear to have been increased by air entrapment and dissolution during turbulent flow at river rapids. Because the regional groundwater is old, CFC concentrations in groundwater inflow are zero. In contrast, Rn-222 and ion concentrations in the river are very sensitive to concentrations of these tracers in groundwater inflow. Numerical simulation of Rn-222, CFC-11 and CFC-12 stream concentrations allows the groundwater inflow rate, gas transfer velocity and air entrapment coefficient to be reasonably accurately constrained.

  3. Determining natural groundwater influx to a tropical river using radon, chlorofluorocarbons and ionic environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, P. G.; Favreau, G.; Dighton, J. C.; Tickell, S.

    2003-06-01

    Measurements of 222Rn, CFC-11, CFC-12, major ions and temperature of river water and springs are used to quantify rates of groundwater inflow to a tropical lowland river in the Northern Territory of Australia. Groundwater inflow results in increases in 222Rn concentrations within the river, but decreases in concentrations of CFC-11 and CFC-12, because the inflowing groundwater is relatively old. 222Rn, CFC-11 and CFC-12 concentrations are affected by gas exchange with the atmosphere, while ion concentrations are not. Additionally, CFC concentrations in the river appear to have been increased by air entrapment and dissolution during turbulent flow at river rapids. Because the regional groundwater is old, CFC concentrations in groundwater inflow are zero. In contrast, 222Rn and ion concentrations in the river are very sensitive to concentrations of these tracers in groundwater inflow. Numerical simulation of 222Rn, CFC-11 and CFC-12 stream concentrations allows the groundwater inflow rate, gas transfer velocity and air entrapment coefficient to be reasonably accurately constrained.

  4. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  5. Application Of Monitored Natural Attenuation For Cleanup Of Radionuclides In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the unsuccessful performance of an MNA remedy for uranium contamination in groundwater at a Superfund site in Richland, Washington. The primary factors that limited the accuracy of contaminant transport model projections at this...

  6. Characterizing hydrology and the importance of ground-water discharge in natural and constructed wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Walker, John F.; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Although considered the most important component for the establishment and persistence of wetlands, hydrology has been hard to characterize and linkages between hydrology and other environmental conditions are often poorly understood. In this work, methods for characterizing a wetland’s hydrology from hydrographs were developed, and the importance of ground water to the physical and geochemical conditions in the root zone was investigated. Detailed sampling of nearly continuous hydrographs showed that sites with greater ground-water discharge had higher water tables and more stable hydrographs. Subsampling of the continuous hydrograph failed to characterize the sites correctly, even though the wetland complex is located in a strong regional ground-water-discharge area. By comparing soil-moisture-potential measurements to the water-table hydrograph at one site, we noted that the amount of root-zone saturation was not necessarily driven by the water-table hydrograph but can be a result of other soil parameters (i.e., soil texture and associated capillary fringe). Ground-water discharge was not a significant determinant of maximum or average temperatures in the root zone. High ground-water discharge was associated with earliest date of thaw and shortest period of time that the root zone was frozen, however. Finally, the direction and magnitude of shallow ground-water flow was found to affect the migration and importance of a geochemical species. Areas of higher ground-water discharge had less downward penetration of CO2 generated in the root zone. In contrast, biotically derived CO2 was able to penetrate the deeper ground-water system in areas of ground-water recharge. Although ground-water flows are difficult to characterize, understanding these components is critical to the success of wetland restoration and creation efforts.

  7. Characterization of hot spots for natural chloroform formation: Relevance for groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Ole S.; Albers, Christian N.; Laier, Troels

    2015-04-01

    Chloroform soil hot spot may deteriorate groundwater quality and may even result in chloroform concentration exceeding the Danish maximum limit of 1 µg/L in groundwater for potable use. In order to characterize the soil properties important for the chloroform production, various ecosystems were examined with respect to soil air chloroform and soil organic matter type and content. Coniferous forest areas, responsible for highest chloroform concentrations, were examined on widely different scales from km to cm scale. Furthermore, regular soil gas measurements including chloroform were performed during 4 seasons at various depths, together with various meteorological measurements and soil temperature recordings. Laboratory incubation experiments were also performed on undisturbed soil samples in order to examine the role of various microbiota, fungi and bacteria. To identify hot spots responsible for the natural contamination we have measured the production of chloroform in the upper soil from different terrestrial systems. Field measurements of chloroform in top soil air were used as production indicators. The production was however not evenly distributed at any scale. The ecosystems seem to have quite different net-productions of chloroform from very low in grassland to very high in some coniferous forests. Within the forest ecosystem we found large variation in chloroform concentrations depending on vegetation. In beech forest we found the lowest values, somewhat higher in an open pine forest, but the highest concentrations were detected in spruce forest without any vegetation beneath. Within this ecotype, it appeared that the variation was also large; hot spots with 2-4 decades higher production than the surrounding area. These hot spots were not in any way visually different from the surroundings and were of variable size from 3 to 20 meters in diameter. Besides this, measurements within a seemingly homogenous hot spot showed that there was still high

  8. Natural radioactivity in groundwater from the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula and environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Murad, A; Zhou, X D; Yi, P; Alshamsi, D; Aldahan, A; Hou, X L; Yu, Z B

    2014-10-01

    Groundwater is the most valuable resource in arid regions, and recognizing radiological criteria among other water quality parameters is essential for sustainable use. In the investigation presented here, gross-α and gross-β were measured in groundwater samples collected in the south-eastern Arabian Peninsula, 67 wells in Unite Arab Emirates (UAE), as well as two wells and one spring in Oman. The results show a wide gross-α and gross-β activities range in the groundwater samples that vary at 0.01∼19.5 Bq/l and 0.13∼6.6 Bq/l, respectively. The data show gross-β and gross-α values below the WHO permissible limits for drinking water in the majority of the investigated samples except those in region 4 (Jabel Hafit and surroundings). No correlation between groundwater pH and the gross-α and gross-β, while high temperatures probably enhance leaching of radionuclides from the aquifer body and thereby increase the radioactivity in the groundwater. This conclusion is also supported by the positive correlation between radioactivity and amount of total dissolved solid. Particular water purification technology and environmental impact assessments are essential for sustainable and secure use of the groundwater in regions that show radioactivity values far above the WHO permissible limit for drinking water.

  9. Comparison of denitrification activity measurements in groundwater using cores and natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Garabedian, S.P.; Brooks, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of many solutes in groundwater is dependent upon the relative rates of physical flow and microbial metabolism. Quantifying rates of microbial processes under subsurface conditions is difficult and is most commonly approximated using laboratory studies with aquifer materials. In this study, we measured in situ rates of denitrification in a nitrate- contaminated aquifer using small-scale, natural-gradient tracer tests and compared the results with rates obtained from laboratory incubations with aquifer core material. Activity was measured using the acetylene block technique. For the tracer tests, co-injection of acetylene and bromide into the aquifer produced a 30 ??M increase in nitrous oxide after 10 m of transport (23-30 days). An advection-dispersion transport model was modified to include an acetylene-dependent nitrous oxide production term and used to simulate the tracer breakthrough curves. The model required a 4-day lag period and a relatively low sensitivity to acetylene to match the narrow nitrous oxide breakthrough curves. Estimates of in situ denitrification rates were 0.60 and 1.51 nmol of N2O produced cm-3 aquifer day-1 for two successive tests. Aquifer core material collected from the tracer test site and incubated as mixed slurries in flasks and as intact cores yielded rates that were 1.2-26 times higher than the tracer test rate estimates. Results with the coring-dependent techniques were variable and subject to the small- scale heterogeneity within the aquifer, while the tracer tests integrated the heterogeneity along a flow path, giving a rate estimate that is more applicable to transport at the scale of the aquifer.

  10. Waste-to-wheel analysis of anaerobic-digestion-based renewable natural gas pathways with the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M.

    2011-12-14

    In 2009, manure management accounted for 2,356 Gg or 107 billion standard cubic ft of methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions in the United States, equivalent to 0.5% of U.S. natural gas (NG) consumption. Owing to the high global warming potential of methane, capturing and utilizing this methane source could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The extent of that reduction depends on several factors - most notably, how much of this manure-based methane can be captured, how much GHG is produced in the course of converting it to vehicular fuel, and how much GHG was produced by the fossil fuel it might displace. A life-cycle analysis was conducted to quantify these factors and, in so doing, assess the impact of converting methane from animal manure into renewable NG (RNG) and utilizing the gas in vehicles. Several manure-based RNG pathways were characterized in the GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation) model, and their fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions were compared to petroleum-based pathways as well as to conventional fossil NG pathways. Results show that despite increased total energy use, both fossil fuel use and GHG emissions decline for most RNG pathways as compared with fossil NG and petroleum. However, GHG emissions for RNG pathways are highly dependent on the specifics of the reference case, as well as on the process energy emissions and methane conversion factors assumed for the RNG pathways. The most critical factors are the share of flared controllable CH{sub 4} and the quantity of CH{sub 4} lost during NG extraction in the reference case, the magnitude of N{sub 2}O lost in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process and in AD residue, and the amount of carbon sequestered in AD residue. In many cases, data for these parameters are limited and uncertain. Therefore, more research is needed to gain a better understanding of the range and magnitude of environmental benefits from converting animal manure to RNG via AD.

  11. Natural attenuation processes of arsenic in the groundwater of the Brahmaputra floodplain of Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Sailo, Lalsangzela; Mahanta, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    Natural attenuation of higher arsenic (As) concentration in the groundwater of the Brahmaputra valley of Assam can be a viable option for its remediation. The assessment of attenuation capacities in aquifers was done using three sediment core samples (namely C_50, C_70 and C_150) representing the commonly found sediments and characterized as viz. reduced, oxidized and moderately oxidized sediments, respectively. The feasability of aquifers to release low As water depends on the sorption capacity of the sediments to directly adsorbed as As(III) and/or oxidation to As(V) on oxidative sites. The various batch sorption experiments along with competition of other anions for adsorption sites at different concentrations were investigated. The sediments were observed to adsorb both As(III) and As(V) with varying magnitudes depending on the species of As, pH and concentrations of competing anions. The Elovich kinetic model best described kinetic test data. The oxidized sediment (C_70) with the highest Fe and Mn content has the highest adsorption capacity. The competition for adsorption sites with As(V) in the sediment samples followed the order PO4(3-) > SiO2 > HCO3(-). The oxidation of As(III) to As(V) by the sediments was analyzed as it is also the most effective pathway to reduce the toxicity as well as the mobility of As in the subsurface environment. Sediment C_70 showed the highest potential to oxidize As(III) to As(V) in the oxidative sites of the sediments. The removal of As(III) in the oxidative site via As(V) was the dominant As removal mechanism for the oxidized sediment (C_70) and moderately oxidized sediment (C_150) than the direct adsorption of As(III) on the adsorptive sites as on reduced sediment sample C_50. Therefore, targeting the oxidized sediment with a high concentration of Fe-oxides and Mn-oxides might make natural attenuation of As viable in the study areas.

  12. Kinetics of scheelite dissolution in groundwater: defining the release rate of tungsten contamination from a natural source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, S. D.; Mckibben, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Tungsten, an emerging contaminant, has no EPA standard for its permissible levels in drinking water. At sites in California, Nevada, and Arizona there may be a correlation between elevated levels of tungsten in drinking water and clusters of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Developing a better understanding of how tungsten is released from rocks into surface and groundwaters is therefore of growing environmental interest. Knowledge of tungstate ore mineral weathering processes, particularly the rates of dissolution of scheelite (CaWO4) in groundwater, could improve models of how tungsten is released and transported in natural waters. Our research is focusing on experimental determination of the rates and products of tungstate mineral dissolution in synthetic groundwater, as a function of temperature, pH and mineral surface area. The initial rate method is being used to develop rate laws. Batch reactor experiments are conducted within constant temperature circulation baths over a pH range of 2-9. Cleaned scheelite powder with grain diameters of 106-150um is placed between two screens in a sample platform and then placed inside a two liter Teflon vessel filled with synthetic groundwater. Ports on the vessel allow sample extraction, temperature and pH measurement, gas inflow, and water circulation. Aliquots of solution are taken periodically for product analysis by ICP -MS. Changes in mineral surface characteristics are monitored using SEM and EDS methods. Results so far reveal that the dissolution of scheelite is incongruent at both neutral and low pH. Solid tungstic acid forms on scheelite mineral surfaces under acidic conditions, implying that this phase controls the dissolution rate in acidic environments. The influence of dissolved CO2 and resultant calcium carbonate precipitation on the dissolution of scheelite at higher pH is also being investigated. The rate law being developed for scheelite dissolution will be useful in reactive-transport computer

  13. Stratigraphic and geochemical controls on naturally occurring arsenic in groundwater, eastern Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, M. E.; Simo, J. A.; Freiberg, P. G.

    High arsenic concentrations (up to 12,000μg/L) have been measured in groundwater from a confined sandstone aquifer in eastern Wisconsin. The main arsenic source is a sulfide-bearing secondary cement horizon (SCH) that has variable thickness, morphology, and arsenic concentrations. Arsenic occurs in pyrite and marcasite as well as in iron oxyhydroxides but not as a separate arsenopyrite phase. Nearly identical sulfur isotopic signatures in pyrite and dissolved sulfate and the correlation between dissolved sulfate, iron, and arsenic concentrations suggest that sulfide oxidation is the dominant process controlling arsenic release to groundwater. However, arsenic-bearing oxyhydroxides can potentially provide another arsenic source if reducing conditions develop or if they are transported as colloids in the aquifer. Analysis of well data indicates that the intersection of the SCH with static water levels measured in residential wells is strongly correlated with high concentrations of arsenic in groundwater. Field and laboratory data suggest that the most severe arsenic contamination is caused by localized borehole interactions of air, water, and sulfides. Although arsenic contamination is caused by oxidation of naturally occurring sulfides, it is influenced by water-level fluctuations caused by municipal well pumping or climate changes, which can shift geographic areas in which contamination occurs. Résumé De fortes concentrations en arsenic, jusqu'à 12000μg/L, ont été mesurées dans l'eau souterraine d'un aquifère gréseux captif, dans l'est du Wisconsin. La principale source d'arsenic est un horizon à cimentation secondaire (SCH) comportant des sulfures, dont l'épaisseur, la morphologie et les concentrations en arsenic sont variables. L'arsenic est présent dans la pyrite et dans la marcassite, de même que dans des oxy-hydroxydes de fer, mais non pas dans une phase séparée d'arsénopyrite. Les signatures isotopiques du soufre presque identiques dans la

  14. Stable lead isotopes reveal a natural source of high lead concentrations to gasoline-contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.; Bullen, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of total lead as high as 1,600 ??g/L were detected in gasoline-contaminated and uncontaminated groundwater at three gasoline-release sites in South Carolina. Total lead concentrations were highest in turbid groundwater samples from gasoline-contaminated and uncontaminated wells, whereas lower turbidity groundwater samples (collected using low-flow methods) had lower total lead concentrations. Dissolved lead concentrations in all wells sampled, however, were less than 15 ??g total lead/L, the current United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL). Because many total lead concentrations exceeded the MCL, the source of lead to the groundwater system at two of the three sites was investigated using a stable lead isotope ratio approach. Plots of the stable isotope ratios of lead (Pb) in groundwater as 207Pb/206Pb versus 208Pb/206Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb versus 206Pb/204Pb were similar to ratios characteristic of lead-based minerals in local rocks of the southeastern US, and were not similar to the stable lead isotopes ratios characteristic of distant lead ore deposits such as Broken Hill, Australia, used to produce tetraethyl lead in gasoline products prior to its phase-out and ban in the United States. Moreover, the isotopic composition of dissolved lead was equivalent to the isotopic composition of total lead in turbid samples collected from the same well, suggesting that the majority of the lead detected in the groundwater samples was associated with sediment particulates of indigenous aquifer material, rather than lead associated with spilled leaded gasoline. The results of this investigation indicate that (1) lead detected at some gasoline-release sites may be derived from the local aquifer material, rather than the gasoline release, and consequently may affect site-specific remediation goals; (2) non-low flow groundwater sampling methods, such as a disposable bailer, may result in turbid groundwater samples and

  15. In situ source zone sediment mixing coupled to groundwater biostimulation to enhance phenol natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcio Luis Busi; Wendt, Marcos Felipe; de Oliveira, José Carlos Silveira; Schneider, Marcio Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Phenol is an industrially key compound that has a wide range of applications and also one of the most commonly found toxic pollutants in wastewaters and groundwater. This paper demonstrates the applicability of in situ remediation at a deactivated industrial site using source zone excavation and sediment mixing associated with nutrients delivery into groundwater. Sediment excavation and mixing displaced the entrapped source zone enhancing mass transfer into groundwater and contaminant bioavailability. A nutrient solution prepared with nitrate, phosphate, sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide was continuously delivered into groundwater to stimulate biodegradation and restrict plume migration. The observed correlation between phenol-dependent Enterobacteriaceae concentrations throughout the remediation time frame supported circumstantial evidence of biodegradation. Phenol concentration in groundwater (up to 1,300 mg/L) was reduced >99% after 5 months following remediation and remained under the established site specific target level (4 mg/L). Nitrate and phosphate concentrations returned to background concentrations levels at the end of the remediation. Overall, the proposed in situ remediation scheme was effective to remediate this particular aquifer contaminated with phenol for over 20 years.

  16. The role of anthropogenic and natural factors in shaping the geochemical evolution of groundwater in the Subei Lake basin, Ordos energy base, Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Song, Xianfang; Yang, Lihu; Han, Dongmei; Zhang, Yinghua; Ma, Ying; Bu, Hongmei

    2015-12-15

    Groundwater resources are increasingly exploited for industrial and agricultural purposes in many arid regions globally, it is urgent to gain the impact of the enhanced anthropogenic pressure on the groundwater chemistry. The aim of this study was to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of groundwater chemistry and to identify the impact of natural and anthropogenic factors on the groundwater chemistry in the Subei Lake basin, Northwestern China. A total of 153 groundwater samples were collected and major ions were measured during the three campaigns (August and December 2013, May 2014). At present, the major hydrochemical facies in unconfined groundwater are Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-Na-HCO3, Na-Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3, Ca-Mg-SO4 and Na-SO4-Cl types, while the main hydrochemical facies in confined groundwater are Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-Na-HCO3, Na-Ca-HCO3, Ca-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 types. Relatively greater seasonal variation can be observed in the chemical constituents of confined groundwater than that of unconfined groundwater. Rock weathering predominates the evolution of groundwater chemistry in conjunction with the cation exchange, and the dissolution/precipitation of gypsum, halite, feldspar, calcite and dolomite are responsible for the chemical constituents of groundwater. Anthropogenic activities can be classified as: (1) groundwater overexploitation; (2) excessive application of fertilizers in agricultural areas. Due to intensive groundwater pumping, the accelerated groundwater mineralization resulted in the local changes in hydrochemical facies of unconfined groundwater, while the strong mixture, especially a large influx of downward leakage from the unconfined aquifer into the confined aquifer, played a vital role in the fundamental variation of hydrochemical facies in confined aquifer. The nitrate contamination is mainly controlled by the local hydrogeological settings coupled with the traditional flood irrigation. The deeper insight into geochemical evolution of

  17. Chitin and chitosan as multipurpose natural polymers for groundwater arsenic removal and AS2O3 delivery in tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Da Sacco, Letizia; Masotti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Chitin and chitosan are natural polysaccharide polymers. These polymers have been used in several agricultural, food protection and nutraceutical applications. Moreover, chitin and chitosan have been also used in biomedical and biotechnological applications as drug delivery systems or in pharmaceutical formulations. So far, there are only few studies dealing with arsenic (As) removal from groundwater using chitin or chitosan and no evidence of the use of these natural polymers for arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) delivery in tumor therapy. Here we suggest that chitin and/or chitosan might have the right properties to be employed as efficient polymers for such applications. Besides, nanotechnology offers suitable tools for the fabrication of novel nanostructured materials of natural origin. Since different nanostructured materials have already been employed successfully in various multidisciplinary fields, we expect that the integration of nanotechnology and natural polymer chemistry will further lead to innovative applications for environment and medicine.

  18. Mobility of nanosized cerium dioxide and polymeric capsules in quartz and loamy sands saturated with model and natural groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Petosa, Adamo Riccardo; Ohl, Carolin; Rajput, Faraz; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-10-01

    The environmental and health risks posed by emerging engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) released into aquatic environments are largely dependent on their aggregation, transport, and deposition behavior. Herein, laboratory-scale columns were used to examine the mobility of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated cerium dioxide nanoparticles (nCeO2) and an analogous nanosized polymeric capsule (nCAP) in water saturated quartz sand or loamy sand. The influence of solution ionic strength (IS) and cation type (Na(+), Ca(2+), or Mg(2+)) on the transport potential of these ENPs was examined in both granular matrices and results were also compared to measurements obtained using a natural groundwater. ENP suspensions were characterized using dynamic light scattering and nanoparticle tracking analysis to establish aggregate size, and laser Doppler electrophoresis to determine ENP electrophoretic mobility. Regardless of IS, virtually all nCeO2 particles suspended in NaNO3 eluted from the quartz sand-packed columns. In contrast, heightened nCeO2 and nCAP particle retention and dynamic (time-dependent) transport behavior was observed with increasing concentrations of the divalent salts and in the presence of natural groundwater. Enhanced particle retention was also observed in loamy sand in comparison to the quartz sand, emphasizing the need to consider the nature of the aqueous matrix and granular medium in evaluating contamination risks associated with the release of ENPs in natural and engineered aquatic environments.

  19. Measuring and computing natural ground-water recharge at sites in south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.A.; Perry, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    To measure the natural groundwater recharge process, two sites in south-central Kansas were instrumented with sensors and data microloggers. The atmospheric-boundary layer and the unsaturated and saturated soil zones were monitored as a single regime. Direct observations also were used to evaluate the measurements. Atmospheric sensors included an anemometer, a tipping-bucket rain gage, an air-temperature thermistor, a relative-humidity probe, a net radiometer, and a barometric-pressure transducer. Sensors in the unsaturated zone consisted of soil-temperature thermocouples, tensiometers coupled with pressure transducers and dial gages, gypsum blocks, and a neutron-moisture probe. The saturated-zone sensors consisted of a water-level pressure transducer, a conventional float gage connected to a variable potentiometer, soil thermocouples, and a number of multiple-depth piezometers. Evaluation of the operation of these sensors and recorders indicates that certain types of equipment, such as pressure transducers, are very sensitive to environmental conditions. A number of suggestions aimed at improving instrumentation of recharge investigations are outlined. Precipitation and evapotranspiration data, taken together with soil moisture profiles and storage changes, water fluxes in the unsaturated zone and hydraulic gradients in the saturated zone at various depths, soil temperature, water table hydrographs, and water level changes in nearby wells, describe the recharge process. Although the two instrumented sites are located in sand-dune environments in area characterized by a shallow water table and a sub-humid continental climate, a significant difference was observed in the estimated total recharge. The estimates ranged from less than 2.5 mm at the Zenith site to approximately 154 mm at the Burrton site from February to June 1983. The principal reasons that the Burrton site had more recharge than the Zenith site were more precipitation, less evapotranspiration, and a

  20. Saturated zone denitrification: potential for natural attenuation of nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater under dairy operations.

    PubMed

    Singleton, M J; Esser, B K; Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; McNab, W W; Harter, T

    2007-02-01

    We present results from field studies at two central California dairies that demonstrate the prevalence of saturated-zone denitrification in shallow groundwater with 3H/ 3He apparent ages of < 35 years. Concentrated animal feeding operations are suspected to be major contributors of nitrate to groundwater, but saturated zone denitrification could mitigate their impact to groundwater quality. Denitrification is identified and quantified using N and O stable isotope compositions of nitrate coupled with measurements of excess N2 and residual NO3(-) concentrations. Nitrate in dairy groundwater from this study has delta15N values (4.3-61 per thousand), and delta18O values (-4.5-24.5 per thousand) that plot with delta18O/delta15N slopes of 0.47-0.66, consistent with denitrification. Noble gas mass spectrometry is used to quantify recharge temperature and excess air content. Dissolved N2 is found at concentrations well above those expected for equilibrium with air or incorporation of excess air, consistent with reduction of nitrate to N2. Fractionation factors for nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate appear to be highly variable at a dairy site where denitrification is found in a laterally extensive anoxic zone 5 m below the water table, and at a second dairy site where denitrification occurs near the water table and is strongly influenced by localized lagoon seepage.

  1. Contribution of groundwater and overland flows to storm flow generation in a cultivated Mediterranean catchment. Quantification by natural chemical tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribolzi, O.; Andrieux, P.; Valles, V.; Bouzigues, R.; Bariac, T.; Voltz, M.

    2000-06-01

    Little work has up to now been done on the mechanisms of storm flow generation in Mediterranean cultivated environments. The present work analysed such mechanisms by natural chemical tracing in a small Mediterranean wine-growing catchment (0.91 km 2): Roujan, Hérault, France. Two autumn runoff events with very different characteristics were studied. The first, a minor one (specific peak flow=28 l/s/km 2), was used to evaluate the sensitivity of the environment to low intensity rainfall. The second was significantly larger (specific peak flow=944 l/s/km 2) and was used to analyse the response of the catchment to heavy downpours. Tracer concentrations at the catchment outlet, for the groundwater of two distinct geomorphological units (depression and plateau) and in an experimental plot are presented. A mixing model involving three reservoirs and two tracers (chloride and nitrate) is then used to estimate the contributions of the three main storm flow components: (a) the pre-event water deriving from the depression groundwater; (b) the event water of the precipitations; and (c) the pre-event water of the plateau groundwater. The event water end member basically corresponds to infiltration-excess overland flow plus direct precipitation on saturated areas. The imprecision of the calculations was estimated by the Monte Carlo method. During both runoff events, there was little variation in the rate at which the stream was fed by pre-existing water deriving from the groundwater, although the water tables rose rapidly. Overland flow dominated in the rapid storm flow. Its contribution varied between 12 and 82% according to the importance of the event. When the water level rose, particularly in the case of the heavy runoff event, the overland flows concentrated in the man-made network of ditches running down towards the main ditch. This wave of overland flow spread, expelling the pre-event water into the ditches located downstream, which were initially fed by the groundwater

  2. Accumulation of natural SF6 in the sedimentary aquifers of the North China Plain as a restriction on groundwater dating.

    PubMed

    von Rohden, Christoph; Kreuzer, Andreas; Chen, Zongyu; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    2010-09-01

    We employed environmental tracers ((3)H-(3)He, SF(6)) in a study investigating the groundwater recharge in the North China Plain (NCP), a sedimentary aquifer system consisting of fluvial and alluvial river deposits near the city of Shijiazhuang. The (3)H-(3)He dating method revealed reasonable results for the young groundwater with ages covering the range of recent to ~40 a. SF(6) samples were taken in parallel for independent dating and to compare the applicability of both methods. However, the SF(6)-results are influenced and, in part, dominated by a systematic non-atmospheric component, revealing that the dating with SF(6) is unreliable in this region. A correlation of non-atmospheric SF(6) and (3)H-(3)He ages suggests a continuous accumulation of natural SF(6) in the groundwater of the NCP aquifers. Although terrigenic SF(6) has previously been associated with crystalline or igneous rocks, our results indicate that it can also be accumulated in sandy aquifers on the timescale relevant for SF(6) dating.

  3. Accumulation of natural SF6 in the sedimentary aquifers of the North China Plain as a restriction on groundwater dating.

    PubMed

    von Rohden, Christoph; Kreuzer, Andreas; Chen, Zongyu; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    2010-09-01

    We employed environmental tracers ((3)H-(3)He, SF(6)) in a study investigating the groundwater recharge in the North China Plain (NCP), a sedimentary aquifer system consisting of fluvial and alluvial river deposits near the city of Shijiazhuang. The (3)H-(3)He dating method revealed reasonable results for the young groundwater with ages covering the range of recent to ~40 a. SF(6) samples were taken in parallel for independent dating and to compare the applicability of both methods. However, the SF(6)-results are influenced and, in part, dominated by a systematic non-atmospheric component, revealing that the dating with SF(6) is unreliable in this region. A correlation of non-atmospheric SF(6) and (3)H-(3)He ages suggests a continuous accumulation of natural SF(6) in the groundwater of the NCP aquifers. Although terrigenic SF(6) has previously been associated with crystalline or igneous rocks, our results indicate that it can also be accumulated in sandy aquifers on the timescale relevant for SF(6) dating. PMID:20603738

  4. Long-term natural attenuation of carbon and nitrogen within a groundwater plume after removal of the treated wastewater source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repert, D.A.; Barber, L.B.; Hess, K.M.; Keefe, S.H.; Kent, D.B.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Smith, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    Disposal of treated wastewater for more than 60 years onto infiltration beds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts produced a groundwater contaminant plume greater than 6 km long in a surficial sand and gravel aquifer. In December 1995 the wastewater disposal ceased. A long-term, continuous study was conducted to characterize the post-cessation attenuation of the plume from the source to 0.6 km downgradient. Concentrations and total pools of mobile constituents, such as boron and nitrate, steadily decreased within 1-4 years along the transect. Dissolved organic carbon loads also decreased, but to a lesser extent, particularly downgradient of the infiltration beds. After 4 years, concentrations and pools of carbon and nitrogen in groundwater were relatively constant with time and distance, but substantially elevated above background. The contaminant plume core remained anoxic for the entire 10-year study period; temporal patterns of integrated oxygen deficit decreased slowly at all sites. In 2004, substantial amounts of total dissolved carbon (7 mol C m-2) and fixed (dissolved plus sorbed) inorganic nitrogen (0.5 mol N m-2) were still present in a 28-m vertical interval at the disposal site. Sorbed constituents have contributed substantially to the dissolved carbon and nitrogen pools and are responsible for the long-term persistence of the contaminant plume. Natural aquifer restoration at the discharge location will take at least several decades, even though groundwater flow rates and the potential for contaminant flushing are relatively high.

  5. Combined estimation of specific yield and natural recharge in a semi-arid groundwater basin with irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, J. C.; Dewandel, B.; Ahmed, S.; Galeazzi, L.; Zaidi, F. K.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryA water budget approach is developed to jointly estimate specific yield and natural recharge in an unconfined aquifer with significant seasonal water table fluctuations. Water table fluctuations are due to distinct seasonality in groundwater recharge. The separation of the hydrologic year into two (or more) extended seasons of recharge (wet season) and no-recharge (dry season) with accompanying changes in water table allows for a split use of the water table fluctuation (WTF) method, first to estimate specific yield from the water table drop during the dry season (no recharge) and, second, to estimate recharge from the water table rise during the wet season, after considering all other water budget components explicitly. The latter includes explicit computation of groundwater storage with the WTF method. The application of the WTF method requires a large number of water level measurements throughout the unconfined aquifer before and after each season. The advantage of the method is that specific yield and recharge are estimated at the scale of interest to basin hydrologic studies and that the method requires no extensive in situ instrumentation network. Here, the method is demonstrated through a case study in a fractured hard-rock aquifer subject to intensive groundwater pumping for irrigation purposes.

  6. Long-term natural attenuation of carbon and nitrogen within a groundwater plume after removal of the treated wastewater source.

    PubMed

    Repert, Deborah A; Barber, Larry B; Hess, Kathryn M; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kent, Douglas B; LeBlanc, Denis R; Smith, Richard L

    2006-02-15

    Disposal of treated wastewater for more than 60 years onto infiltration beds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts produced a groundwater contaminant plume greater than 6 km long in a surficial sand and gravel aquifer. In December 1995 the wastewater disposal ceased. A long-term, continuous study was conducted to characterize the post-cessation attenuation of the plume from the source to 0.6 km downgradient. Concentrations and total pools of mobile constituents, such as boron and nitrate, steadily decreased within 1-4 years along the transect. Dissolved organic carbon loads also decreased, but to a lesser extent, particularly downgradient of the infiltration beds. After 4 years, concentrations and pools of carbon and nitrogen in groundwater were relatively constant with time and distance, but substantially elevated above background. The contaminant plume core remained anoxic for the entire 10-year study period; temporal patterns of integrated oxygen deficit decreased slowly at all sites. In 2004, substantial amounts of total dissolved carbon (7 mol C m(-2)) and fixed (dissolved plus sorbed) inorganic nitrogen (0.5 mol N m(-2)) were still present in a 28-m vertical interval at the disposal site. Sorbed constituents have contributed substantially to the dissolved carbon and nitrogen pools and are responsible for the long-term persistence of the contaminant plume. Natural aquifer restoration at the discharge location will take at least several decades, even though groundwater flow rates and the potential for contaminant flushing are relatively high.

  7. Using natural distributions of short-lived radium isotopes to quantify groundwater discharge and recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krest, J.M.; Harvey, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Radium activity in pore water of wetland sediments often differs from the amount expected from local production, decay, and exchange with solid phases. This disequilibrium results from vertical transport of radium with groundwater that flows between the underlying aquifer and surface water. In situations where groundwater recharge or discharge is significant, the rate of vertical water flow through wetland sediment can be determined from the radium disequilibrium by a combined model of transport, production, decay, and exchange with solid phases. We have developed and tested this technique at three sites in the freshwater portion of the Everglades by quantifying vertical advective velocities in areas with persistent groundwater recharge or discharge and estimating a coefficient of dispersion at a site that is subject to reversals between recharge and discharge. Groundwater velocities (v) were determined to be between 0 and -0.5 cm d-1 for a recharge site and 1.5 ?? 0.4 cm d-1 for a discharge site near Levee 39 in the Everglades. Strong gradients in 223Ra and 224Ra usually occurred at the base of the peat layer, which avoided the problems of other tracers (e.g., chloride) for which greatest sensitivity occurs near the peat surface - a zone readily disturbed by processes unrelated to groundwater flow. This technique should be easily applicable to any wetland system with different production rates of these isotopes in distinct sedimentary layers or surface water. The approach is most straightforward in systems where constant pore-water ionic strength can be assumed, simplifying the modeling of radium exchange.

  8. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  9. Naturally-Occurring Radionuclides In Drinking Water From Surface And Groundwater Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, F. P.; Madruga, M. J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Lopes, I.; Ferrador, G.; Sequeira, M. M.

    2008-08-07

    Radioactivity in water for human consumption is under closer scrutiny than ever before and many countries adopted guideline values based on total alpha and total beta activity measurements. Although most waters from surface circulation meet these guidelines, it is frequently found that groundwater exceed guideline values. Results of water analyses by alpha spectrometry clarified that the main radionuclides present are from the uranium decay series, such as uranium isotopes, radium ({sup 226}Ra), radon ({sup 222}Rn), and also {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Occasionally, groundwater displayed {sup 226}Ra concentrations higher than 1 Bq L{sup -1} and {sup 222}Rn concentrations above 1000 Bq L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, lack of conformity of these waters with guidelines adopted, generally, is not due to anthropogenic inputs.

  10. Naturally-Occurring Radionuclides In Drinking Water From Surface And Groundwater Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, F. P.; Madruga, M. J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Lopes, I.; Ferrador, G.; Sequeira, M. M.

    2008-08-01

    Radioactivity in water for human consumption is under closer scrutiny than ever before and many countries adopted guideline values based on total alpha and total beta activity measurements. Although most waters from surface circulation meet these guidelines, it is frequently found that groundwater exceed guideline values. Results of water analyses by alpha spectrometry clarified that the main radionuclides present are from the uranium decay series, such as uranium isotopes, radium (226Ra), radon (222Rn), and also 210Pb and 210Po. Occasionally, groundwater displayed 226Ra concentrations higher than 1 Bq L-1 and 222Rn concentrations above 1000 Bq L-1. Nevertheless, lack of conformity of these waters with guidelines adopted, generally, is not due to anthropogenic inputs.

  11. Monitored natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Kirsten S; Salminen, Jani M; Björklöf, Katarina

    2010-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) is an in situ remediation technology that relies on naturally occurring and demonstrable processes in soil and groundwater which reduce the mass and concentration of the contaminants. Natural attenuation (NA) involves both aerobic and anaerobic degradation of the contaminants due to the fact that oxygen is used up near the core of the contaminant plume. The aerobic and anaerobic microbial processes can be assessed by microbial activity measurements and molecular biology methods in combination with chemical analyses. The sampling and knowledge on the site conditions are of major importance for the linkage of the results obtained to the conditions in situ. Rates obtained from activity measurements can, with certain limitations, be used in modeling of the fate of contaminants whereas most molecular methods mainly give qualitative information on the microbial community and gene abundances. However, molecular biology methods are fast and describe the in situ communities and avoid the biases inherent to activity assays requiring laboratory incubations.

  12. Analysis of the groundwater monitoring controversy at the Pavillion, Wyoming natural gas field.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was contacted by citizens of Pavillion, Wyoming 6 years ago regarding taste and odor in their water wells in an area where hydraulic fracturing operations were occurring. EPA conducted a field investigation, including drilling two deep monitor wells, and concluded in a draft report that constituents associated with hydraulic fracturing had impacted the drinking water aquifer. Following extensive media coverage, pressure from state and other federal agencies, and extensive technical criticism from industry, EPA stated the draft report would not undergo peer review, that it would not rely on the conclusions, and that it had relinquished its lead role in the investigation to the State of Wyoming for further investigation without resolving the source of the taste and odor problem. Review of the events leading up to EPA's decision suggests that much of the criticism could have been avoided through improved preproject planning with clear objectives. Such planning would have identified the high national significance and potential implications of the proposed work. Expanded stakeholder involvement and technical input could have eliminated some of the difficulties that plagued the investigation. However, collecting baseline groundwater quality data prior to initiating hydraulic fracturing likely would have been an effective way to evaluate potential impacts. The Pavillion groundwater investigation provides an excellent opportunity for improving field methods, report transparency, clarity of communication, and the peer review process in future investigations of the impacts of hydraulic fracturing on groundwater. PMID:25231140

  13. Potential effects of existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals on water levels and natural groundwater discharge in Snake Valley, Juab and Millard Counties, Utah, White Pine County, Nevada, and surrounding areas in Utah and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Gardner, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Applications have been filed for several water-right changes and new water rights, with total withdrawals of about 1,800 acre-feet per year, in Snake Valley near Eskdale and Partoun, Utah. The Bureau of Land Management has identified 11 sites where the Bureau of Land Management holds water rights and 7 other springs of interest that could be affected by these proposed groundwater withdrawals. This report presents a hydrogeologic analysis of areas within Snake Valley to assess the potential effects on Bureau of Land Management water rights and other springs of interest resulting from existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals. A previously developed numerical groundwater-flow model was used to quantify potential groundwater drawdown and the capture, or groundwater withdrawals that results in depletion, of natural discharge resulting from existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals within Snake Valley. Existing groundwater withdrawals were simulated for a 50-year period prior to adding the newly proposed withdrawals to bring the model from pre-development conditions to the start of 2014. After this initial 50-year period, existing withdrawals, additional proposed withdrawals, and consequent effects were simulated for periods of 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years. Downward trends in water levels measured in wells indicate that the existing groundwater withdrawals in Snake Valley are affecting water levels. The numerical model simulated similar downward trends in water levels. The largest simulated drawdowns caused by existing groundwater withdrawals ranged between 10 and 26 feet and were near the centers of the agricultural areas by Callao, Eskdale, Baker, Garrison, and along the Utah-Nevada state line in southern Snake Valley. The largest simulated water-level declines were at the Bureau of Land Management water-rights sites near Eskdale, Utah, where simulated drawdowns ranged between 2 and 8 feet at the start of 2014. These results were consistent with, but lower

  14. Natural recharge estimation and uncertainty analysis of an adjudicated groundwater basin using a regional-scale flow and subsidence model (Antelope Valley, California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, Adam; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Groundwater has provided 50-90 % of the total water supply in Antelope Valley, California (USA). The associated groundwater-level declines have led the Los Angeles County Superior Court of California to recently rule that the Antelope Valley groundwater basin is in overdraft, i.e., annual pumpage exceeds annual recharge. Natural recharge consists primarily of mountain-front recharge and is an important component of the total groundwater budget in Antelope Valley. Therefore, natural recharge plays a major role in the Court's decision. The exact quantity and distribution of natural recharge is uncertain, with total estimates from previous studies ranging from 37 to 200 gigaliters per year (GL/year). In order to better understand the uncertainty associated with natural recharge and to provide a tool for groundwater management, a numerical model of groundwater flow and land subsidence was developed. The transient model was calibrated using PEST with water-level and subsidence data; prior information was incorporated through the use of Tikhonov regularization. The calibrated estimate of natural recharge was 36 GL/year, which is appreciably less than the value used by the court (74 GL/year). The effect of parameter uncertainty on the estimation of natural recharge was addressed using the Null-Space Monte Carlo method. A Pareto trade-off method was also used to portray the reasonableness of larger natural recharge rates. The reasonableness of the 74 GL/year value and the effect of uncertain pumpage rates were also evaluated. The uncertainty analyses indicate that the total natural recharge likely ranges between 34.5 and 54.3 GL/year.

  15. Natural recharge estimation and uncertainty analysis of an adjudicated groundwater basin using a regional-scale flow and subsidence model (Antelope Valley, California, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siade, Adam J.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater has provided 50–90 % of the total water supply in Antelope Valley, California (USA). The associated groundwater-level declines have led the Los Angeles County Superior Court of California to recently rule that the Antelope Valley groundwater basin is in overdraft, i.e., annual pumpage exceeds annual recharge. Natural recharge consists primarily of mountain-front recharge and is an important component of the total groundwater budget in Antelope Valley. Therefore, natural recharge plays a major role in the Court’s decision. The exact quantity and distribution of natural recharge is uncertain, with total estimates from previous studies ranging from 37 to 200 gigaliters per year (GL/year). In order to better understand the uncertainty associated with natural recharge and to provide a tool for groundwater management, a numerical model of groundwater flow and land subsidence was developed. The transient model was calibrated using PEST with water-level and subsidence data; prior information was incorporated through the use of Tikhonov regularization. The calibrated estimate of natural recharge was 36 GL/year, which is appreciably less than the value used by the court (74 GL/year). The effect of parameter uncertainty on the estimation of natural recharge was addressed using the Null-Space Monte Carlo method. A Pareto trade-off method was also used to portray the reasonableness of larger natural recharge rates. The reasonableness of the 74 GL/year value and the effect of uncertain pumpage rates were also evaluated. The uncertainty analyses indicate that the total natural recharge likely ranges between 34.5 and 54.3 GL/year.

  16. Natural Oxidant Demand Variability, Potential Controls, and Implications for in Situ, Oxidation-Based Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, A.; Cruz, S.; Dungan, B.; Holguin, F. O.; Ulery, A. L.; Hunter, B.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring reduced species associated with subsurface materials can impose a significant natural oxidant demand (NOD), which is the bulk consumption of oxidants by soil water, minerals, and organic matter. Although injection of oxidants has been used for chemical transformation of organic contaminants, NOD represents a challenge for the in-situ delivery of oxidants as a remediation alternative. Co-injection of complexation agents with oxidants has been proposed to facilitate the delivery of oxidants for in situ chemical oxidation remediation of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates variability of NOD for different oxidants and sediments. The effect of the addition of various complexation agents, including EDTA, tween 80, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD), humic acid, and four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, on the NOD was also examined. NOD was measured for a clay loam (collected from Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, AZ). Varying amounts of biosolids were mixed with subsamples of the clay loam to create three additional reference soils in order to study the effect of organic matter and other soil characteristics on the NOD. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the NOD for various oxidants, using the four soils, and replicated with and without various delivery agents. Measured NOD showed variability for each soil and oxidant composition. Additionally, significant differences were observed in NOD with the addition of delivery agents. The results support the elucidation of potential controls over NOD and have implications for in situ, oxidation-based remediation of contaminated groundwater.

  17. Natural and enhanced anaerobic degradation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane and its degradation products in the subsurface--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Durant, Neal D; Hansen, Maria H; Bjerg, Poul L

    2011-04-01

    1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) in groundwater is susceptible to a variety of natural degradation mechanisms. Evidence of intrinsic decay of TCA in aquifers is commonly observed; however, TCA remains a persistent pollutant at many sites and some of the daughter products that accumulate from intrinsic decay of TCA have been determined to be more toxic than the parent compound. Research advances from the past decade indicate that in situ enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) offers promise as a cost-effective solution toward the cleanup of groundwater contaminated with TCA and its transformation daughter products. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that pure or mixed cultures containing certain Dehalobacter (Dhb) bacteria can catalyze respiratory dechlorination of TCA and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA) to monochloroethane (CA) in groundwater systems. 16S rRNA Dhb gene probes have been used as biomarkers in groundwater samples to both assess ERD potential and quantify growth of Dhb in ERD applications at TCA sites. Laboratory findings suggest that iron-bearing minerals and methanogenic bacteria that co-occur in reduced aquifers may synergistically affect dechlorination of TCA. Despite these advances, a number of significant challenges remain, including an inability of any known cultures to completely dechlorinate TCA to ethane. CA is commonly observed as a terminal product of the biological reductive dechlorination of TCA and 1,1-DCA. Also important is the lack of rigorous field studies demonstrating the utility of bioaugmentation with Dhb cultures for remediation of TCA in the field. In this paper we review the state-of-the-science of TCA degradation in aquifers, examining results from both laboratory experiments and twenty-two field case studies, focusing on the capabilities and limits of ERD technology, and identifying aspects of the technology that warrant further development.

  18. Escherichia coli Attenuation by Fe Electrocoagulation in Synthetic Bengal Groundwater: Effect of pH and Natural Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M; Nelson, Kara L; Amrose, Susan E; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2015-08-18

    Technologies addressing both arsenic and microbial contamination of Bengal groundwater are needed. Fe electrocoagulation (Fe-EC), a simple process relying on the dissolution of an Fe(0) anode to produce Fe(III) precipitates, has been shown to efficiently remove arsenic from groundwater at low cost. We investigated Escherichia coli (E. coli) attenuation by Fe-EC in synthetic Bengal groundwater as a function of Fe dosage rate, total Fe dosed, pH, and presence of natural organic matter (NOM). A 2.5 mM Fe dosage simultaneously achieved over 4-log E. coli attenuation and arsenic removal from 450 to below 10 μg/L. E. coli reduction was significantly enhanced at pH 6.6 compared to pH 7.5, which we linked to the decreased rate of Fe(II) oxidation at lower pH. 3 mg/L-C of NOM (Suwanee River fulvic acid) did not significantly affect E. coli attenuation. Live-dead staining and comparisons of Fe-EC with chemical coagulation controls showed that the primary mechanism of E. coli attenuation is physical removal with Fe(III) precipitates, with inactivation likely contributing as well at lower pH. Transmission electron microscopy showed that EC precipitates adhere to and bridge individual E. coli cells, resulting in large bacteria-Fe aggregates that can be removed by gravitational settling. Our results point to the promising ability of Fe-EC to treat arsenic and bacterial contamination simultaneously at low cost.

  19. Altitude, age, and quality of groundwater, Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District, eastern Nebraska, 1992 to 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Virginia L.; Ryter, Derek W.; Flynn, Amanda S.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District (PMRNRD), conducted this study to map the water-level altitude of 2009 within the Elkhorn River Valley, Missouri River Valley, and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers; to present the predevelopment potentiometric-surface altitude within the Dakota aquifer; and to describe the age and quality of groundwater in the five principal aquifers of the PMRNRD in eastern Nebraska using data collected from 1992 to 2009. In addition, implications of alternatives to the current PMRNRD groundwater-quality monitoring approach are discussed. In the PMRNRD, groundwater altitude, relative to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929, ranged from about 1,080 feet (ft) to 1,180 ft in the Elkhorn River Valley alluvial aquifer and from about 960 ft to 1,080 ft in the Missouri River Valley and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers. In the PMRNRD, the estimated altitude of the potentiometric surface of the Dakota aquifer, predevelopment, ranged from about 1,100 ft to 1,200 ft. To assess groundwater age and quality, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 217 wells from 1992 to 2009 for analysis of various analytes. Groundwater samples collected in the PMRNRD from 1992 to 2009 and interpreted in this report were analyzed for age-dating analytes (chlorofluorocarbons), dissolved gases, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, stable isotope ratios, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, explosives, and 222radon. Apparent groundwater age was estimated from concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons measured in samples collected in 2000. Apparent groundwater-recharge dates ranged from older than 1940 in samples from wells screened in the Missouri River Valley alluvial aquifer to the early 1980s in samples from wells screened in the Dakota aquifer. Concentrations of major ions in the most recent sample per well collected from 1992 to 2009 indicate that the

  20. Reduction of iron(III) minerals by natural organic matter in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banwart, Steven A.

    1999-10-01

    Construction of the entrance tunnel to the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, a prototype repository in Sweden for research into the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, has resulted in increased transport of organic carbon from the surface into the groundwater. This increased input of organic matter has induced accelerated oxidation of organic carbon associated with reduction of iron(III) minerals as the terminal electron acceptor in microbial respiration. Hydrochemical modeling of major solute ions at the site indicates an apparent first-order decay constant for organic carbon of 3.7 ± 2.6/yr. This rapid turnover is not accompanied by an equivalent mobilization of ferrous iron. Thermodynamic calculation of iron mineral solubility suggests that ferrous clay minerals may form in hydraulically transmissive fractures. The conditional potentials for the oxidation-reduction of such phases coincide with measured redox potentials at the site. The calculated potential is sufficiently low so that such phases would provide reducing capacity against future intrusion of O2 into the groundwater, thus buffering a repository against oxic corrosion of the engineered barriers.

  1. Anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, E.R.; Humphrey, W.J.; Cave, J.P.

    1982-12-28

    This invention provides for the anaerobic treatment of acidic petrochemical wastes in an anaerobic filter at high loadings and high recycle rates. The effluent from the top of the filter passes into a gas-disengaging/solids-settling zone containing a quiescent body of the effluent liquid. The settled solids are withdrawn and recycled to the base of the filter together with fresh acidic waste and an inorganic alkaline material (preferably magnesium oxide or carbonate) to maintain a neutral pH. The liquid portion of the effluent is sent to an aerobic digester to remove the rest of the organic material, which is used to support the growth of bacteria and fed back to the anaerobic system.

  2. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing a technical refer...

  3. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE & ORGANIC CONTAMINATION IN GROUNDWATER (SALT LAKE CITY, UT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for radionuclides and inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing ...

  4. An Approach for Evaluating the Progress of Natural Attenuation in Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) remedies monitor the results of natural processes and utilize these data to predict future conditions in the aquifer. Performance monitoring to evaluate MNA effectiveness is a critical element for MNA remedies. Monitoring over time insures th...

  5. Assessing the transformation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifers with limited potential for natural attenuation: added values of compound-specific carbon isotope analysis and groundwater dating.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Helena I F; Aeppli, Christoph; Kipfer, Rolf; Berg, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The evaluation of biotransformation of chlorinated ethenes (CEs) in contaminated aquifers is challenging when variable redox conditions and groundwater flow regime are limiting factors. By using compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis (C-CSIA) and ³H-³He based groundwater dating, we assessed three CE-contaminated field sites that differed in groundwater flow velocities, redox conditions, and level of contamination. CE isotopic signatures and carbon isotopic mass balances were applied to quantify CE transformation, whereas groundwater dating allowed determining degradation timescales and assessing hydrodynamic regimes. The combination of these techniques enabled at all field sites to indicate zones within the aquifers where CE dechlorination preferably occurred, sometimes even to metabolites of no toxic concern. However, the natural transformation processes were insufficient to mitigate the entire CE contamination at the studied sites. Such situations of limited transformation are worldwide far more common than sites where optimal natural (mainly redox) conditions are enabling complete CEs degradation. Despite such constraints for natural transformation, this study showed that even under non-favorable biogeochemical CEs degradation, the combination of CSIA and groundwater dating provide valuable information to the understanding of the fate of the CEs, thus, being an important contribution in the definition of efficient remediation measures at any given biogeochemical conditions.

  6. Natural bioreclamation of alkylbenzenes (BTEX) from a gasoline spill in methanogenic groundwater. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.T.; Kampbell, D.H.; Armstrong, J.

    1994-01-01

    A spill of gasoline from underground storage tanks (USTS) at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Benzie County, Michigan, produced a plume of contamination that reached the banks of the Platte River. The plume was short (70 feet) and it had a short residence time (5 to 53 weeks). The plume was in transmissive glacial sands and gravels. The groundwater is cold (10 to 11 C), hard (alkalinity 200 to 350 milligrams/L), and well buffered (pH 6.1 to 7.6). Along the most contaminated flow path, methanogenesis, nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction, iron reduction, and oxygen respiration accepted enough electrons to destroy 30, 14, 4.2, 1.1, and 0.8 milligrams/L of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX compounds) respectively. The actual concentration of BTEX compounds consumed was 42 milligrams/L.

  7. Ground-water pumpage and artificial recharge estimates for calendar year 2000 and average annual natural recharge and interbasin flow by hydrographic area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Evetts, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Nevada's reliance on ground-water resources has increased because of increased development and surface-water resources being fully appropriated. The need to accurately quantify Nevada's water resources and water use is more critical than ever to meet future demands. Estimated ground-water pumpage, artificial and natural recharge, and interbasin flow can be used to help evaluate stresses on aquifer systems. In this report, estimates of ground-water pumpage and artificial recharge during calendar year 2000 were made using data from a variety of sources, such as reported estimates and estimates made using Landsat satellite imagery. Average annual natural recharge and interbasin flow were compiled from published reports. An estimated 1,427,100 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in Nevada during calendar year 2000. This total was calculated by summing six categories of ground-water pumpage, based on water use. Total artificial recharge during 2000 was about 145,970 acre-feet. At least one estimate of natural recharge was available for 209 of the 232 hydrographic areas (HAs). Natural recharge for the 209 HAs ranges from 1,793,420 to 2,583,150 acre-feet. Estimates of interbasin flow were available for 151 HAs. The categories and their percentage of the total ground-water pumpage are irrigation and stock watering (47 percent), mining (26 percent), water systems (14 percent), geothermal production (8 percent), self-supplied domestic (4 percent), and miscellaneous (less than 1 percent). Pumpage in the top 10 HAs accounted for about 49 percent of the total ground-water pumpage. The most ground-water pumpage in an HA was due to mining in Pumpernickel Valley (HA 65), Boulder Flat (HA 61), and Lower Reese River Valley (HA 59). Pumpage by water systems in Las Vegas Valley (HA 212) and Truckee Meadows (HA 87) were the fourth and fifth highest pumpage in 2000, respectively. Irrigation and stock watering pumpage accounted for most ground-water withdrawals in the HAs with the sixth

  8. Kinetics of anaerobic degradation of screened dairy manure by upflow fixed bed digesters: effect of natural zeolite addition.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, S; Sánchez, E; Borja, R; Raposo, F; Colmenarejo, M F; Montalvo, S; Jiménez-Rodríguez, A M

    2009-02-01

    The effect of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the performance of two up-flow anaerobic fixed bed digesters (UFAFBDs) packed with waste tire rubber (D1) and waste tire rubber and zeolite (D2) as micro-organism immobilization supports was studied. It was found that a first-order kinetic model described well the experimental results obtained. The kinetic constants for COD, BOD5, total solids (TS) and volatile solids (VS) removal were determined to be higher in digester D2 than in digester D1 or control. Specifically, they were 0.28 +/- 0.01, 0.32 +/- 0.02, 0.16 +/- 0.01 and 0.24 +/- 0.01 d(- 1) respectively for D1 and 0.33 +/- 0.02, 0.40 +/- 0.02, 0.21 +/- 0.01 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 d(- 1) respectively for D2. This was significant at the 95% confidence level. In addition, the first-order model was also adequate for assessing the effect of the HRT on the removal efficiency and methane production. Maximum methane yield and the first-order constant for methane production were determined and the results obtained were comparable with those obtained by other authors but operating at higher HRTs. Maximum methane yields and the kinetic constant for methane production were 11.1% and 29.4% higher in digester D2 than in D1.

  9. High-frequency transfer of a naturally occurring chromosomal tetracycline resistance element in the ruminal anaerobe Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K P; Barbosa, T M; Forbes, K J; Flint, H J

    1997-01-01

    Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens strains resistant to tetracycline were isolated from the bovine rumen. Two of three Tcr B. fibrisolvens tested were able to donate tetracycline resistance at frequencies ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-1) per donor cell in anaerobic filter matings to a rifampin-resistant mutant of the type strain of B.fibrisolvens, 2221R. The recipient strain 2221R exhibited rapid autoaggregation, which might be a factor in the high transfer rates observed. Tcr transconjugants of B. fibrisolvens 2221R were also capable of further transferring tetracycline resistance to a fusidic acid-resistant mutant, 2221F. Comparison of genomic DNAs by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated altered band profiles in transconjugants, consistent with the acquisition of a large mobile chromosomal element. The transferable elements from the two B. fibrisolvens donors 1.23 and 1.230 (TnB123 and TnB1230, respectively) showed the same preferred insertion site in the B. fibrisolvens 2221R chromosome and are likely to be similar, or identical, elements. Hybridization experiments showed no close relationship between TnB1230 and int-xis regions from Tn916 or Tn5253. Although DNA from the B. fibrisolvens donor strains hybridized with probes carrying tet(M) or tet(O) sequences, transconjugants were found to have acquired a distinct band that hybridized only weakly with these probes, suggesting that a second, distantly related Tcr determinant had been transferred. PMID:9292992

  10. Enhanced Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene-Ethanol Mixtures in Bioaugmented Aquifer Columns

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Marcio L. B.; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2004-01-01

    Methanogenic flowthrough aquifer columns were used to investigate the potential of bioaugmentation to enhance anaerobic benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-xylene (BTEX) degradation in groundwater contaminated with ethanol-blended gasoline. Two different methanogenic consortia (enriched with benzene or toluene and o-xylene) were used as inocula. Toluene was the only hydrocarbon degraded within 3 years in columns that were not bioaugmented, although anaerobic toluene degradation was observed after only 2 years of acclimation. Significant benzene biodegradation (up to 88%) was observed only in a column bioaugmented with the benzene-enriched methanogenic consortium, and this removal efficiency was sustained for 1 year with no significant decrease in permeability due to bioaugmentation. Benzene removal was hindered by the presence of toluene, which is a more labile substrate under anaerobic conditions. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the highest numbers of bssA gene copies (coding for benzylsuccinate synthase) occurred in aquifer samples exhibiting the highest rate of toluene degradation, which suggests that this gene could be a useful biomarker for environmental forensic analysis of anaerobic toluene bioremediation potential. bssA continued to be detected in the columns 1 year after column feeding ceased, indicating the robustness of the added catabolic potential. Overall, these results suggest that anaerobic bioaugmentation might enhance the natural attenuation of BTEX in groundwater contaminated with ethanol-blended gasoline, although field trials would be needed to demonstrate its feasibility. This approach may be especially attractive for removing benzene, which is the most toxic and commonly the most persistent BTEX compound under anaerobic conditions. PMID:15294807

  11. Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site—10281

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Miller, D.E.; Morris, S.A.; Sheader, L.R.; Glenn, E.P.; Moore, D.; Carroll, K.C.; Benally, L.; Roanhorse, M.; Bush, R.P.; none,

    2010-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial groundwater plume spreading from the soil source where tailings were removed. Planting and irrigating two native shrubs, fourwing saltbush and black greasewood, markedly reduced both nitrate and ammonium in the source area over an 8-year period. Total nitrogen dropped from 350 mg/kg in 2000 to less than 200 mg/kg in 2008. Most of the reduction is attributable to irrigation-enhanced microbial denitrification rather than plant uptake. However, soil moisture and percolation flux monitoring show that the plantings control the soil water balance in the source area, preventing additional leaching of nitrogen compounds. Enhanced denitrification and phytoremediation also look promising for plume remediation. Microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling results suggest that (1) up to 70 percent of nitrate in the plume has been lost through natural denitrification since the mill was closed in 1968, and (2) injection of ethanol may accelerate microbial denitrification in plume hot spots. A field-scale ethanol injection pilot study is underway. Landscape-scale remote sensing methods developed for the project suggest that transpiration from restored native phreatophyte populations rooted in the aquifer could limit further expansion of the plume. An evaluation of landfarm phytoremediation, the irrigation of native shrub plantings with high nitrate water pumped from the alluvial aquifer, is also underway.

  12. Plasmid DNA in a groundwater aquifer microcosm--adsorption, DNAase resistance and natural genetic transformation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, G; Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

    1993-06-01

    Prokaryotes can exchange chromosomal and plasmid genes via extracellular DNA in a process termed genetic transformation. This process has been observed in the test tube for several bacterial species living in the environment but it is not clear whether transformation occurs in natural bacterial habitats. A major constituent of terrestrial environments are solid particles such as quartz, silt and clay, which have considerable surface areas and which make up the solid-liquid interfaces of the habitat. In previous experiments the adsorption of DNA to chemically purified quartz and clay minerals was shown and the partial protection of adsorbed DNA against DNAase I. In a microcosm consisting of natural groundwater aquifer material (GWA) sampled directly from the environment and groundwater (GW) both linear duplex and supercoiled plasmid DNA molecules bound rapidly and quantitatively to the minerals. The divalent cations required to form the association were those present in the GWA/GW microcosm. The association was stable to extended elution over one week at 23 degrees C. Upon adsorption, the DNA became highly resistant against enzymatic degradation. About 1000 times higher DNAase I concentrations were needed to degrade bound DNA to the same extent as DNA dissolved in GW. Furthermore, chromosomal and plasmid DNA bound on GWA transformed competent cells of Bacillus subtilis. However, in contrast to DNA in solution, on GWA the chromosomal DNA was more active in transformation than the plasmid DNA. The studies also revealed that in the transformation of B. subtilis Mg2+ can be replaced by Na+, K+ or NH4+. The observations suggest that in soil and sediment environments, mineral material with inorganic precipitates and organic matter can harbour extracellular DNA leaving it available for genetic transformation.

  13. Characterisation of microbial activity in the framework of natural attenuation without groundwater monitoring wells?: a new Direct-Push probe.

    PubMed

    Schurig, Christian; Melo, Vinicio Alejandro; Miltner, Anja; Kaestner, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    At many contaminated field sites in Europe, monitored natural attenuation is a feasible site remediation option. Natural attenuation includes several processes but only the microbial degradation leads to real contaminant removal and very few methods are accepted by the authorities providing real evidence of microbial contaminant degradation activity. One of those methods is the recently developed in situ microcosm approach (BACTRAP®). These in situ microcosms consist of perforated stainless steel cages or PTFE tubes filled with an activated carbon matrix that is amended with 13C-labelled contaminants; the microcosms are then exposed within groundwater monitoring wells. Based on this approach, natural attenuation was accepted by authorities as a site remediation option for the BTEX-polluted site Zeitz in Germany. Currently, the in situ microcosms are restricted to the use inside groundwater monitoring wells at the level of the aquifer. The (classical) system therefore is only applicable on field sites with a network of monitoring wells, and only microbial activity inside the monitoring wells at the level of the aquifer can be assessed. In order to overcome these limitations, a new Direct-Push BACTRAP probe was developed on the basis of the Geoprobe® equipment. With respect to the mechanical boundary conditions of the DP technique, these new probes were constructed in a rugged and segmented manner and are adaptable to various sampling concepts. With this new probe, the approach can be extended to field sites without existing monitoring wells, and microbial activity was demonstrated to be measureable even under very dry conditions inside the vadose zone above the aquifer. In a field test, classical and Direct-Push BACTRAPs were applied in the BTEX-contaminated aquifer at the ModelPROBE reference site Zeitz (Germany). Both types of BACTRAPs were incubated in the centre and at the fringe of the BTEX plume. Analysis of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) patterns showed

  14. Estimates of natural ground-water discharge and characterization of water quality in Dry Valley, Washoe County, West-Central Nevada, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, David L.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Lopes, Thomas J.; Halford, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    The Dry Valley Hydrographic Area is being considered as a potential source area for additional water supplies for the Reno-Sparks area, which is about 25 miles south of Dry Valley. Current estimates of annual ground-water recharge to Dry Valley have a considerable range. In undeveloped valleys, such as Dry Valley, long-term ground-water discharge can be assumed the same as long-term ground-water recharge. Because estimating ground-water discharge has more certainty than estimating ground-water recharge from precipitation, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Washoe County, began a three-year study to re-evaluate the ground-water resources by estimating natural ground-water discharge and characterize ground-water quality in Dry Valley. In Dry Valley, natural ground-water discharge occurs as subsurface outflow and by ground-water evapotranspiration. The amount of subsurface outflow from the upper part of Dry Valley to Winnemucca and Honey Lake Valleys likely is small. Subsurface outflow from Dry Valley westward to Long Valley, California was estimated using Darcy's Law. Analysis of two aquifer tests show the transmissivity of poorly sorted sediments near the western side of Dry Valley is 1,200 to 1,500 square feet per day. The width of unconsolidated sediments is about 4,000 feet between exposures of tuffaceous deposits along the State line, and decreases to about 1,500 feet (0.5 mile) west of the State line. The hydraulic gradient east and west of the State line ranges from 0.003 to 0.005 foot per foot. Using these values, subsurface outflow to Long Valley is estimated to be 50 to 250 acre-feet per year. Areas of ground-water evapotranspiration were field mapped and partitioned into zones of plant cover using relations derived from Landsat imagery acquired July 8, 2002. Evapotranspiration rates for each plant-cover zone were multiplied by the corresponding area and summed to estimate annual ground-water evapotranspiration. About 640 to 790 acre-feet per

  15. Groundwater and Associated Solute Contribution to a Pristine Semi-Arid Estuary Using Resistivity Imaging, Naturally Occurring Radioactive Tracers, and Geochemical Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalt, N.; Murgulet, D.; Douglas, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical, geochemical, and Naturally Occurring Radioactive Tracers (NORTs) were used in a semi-arid National Estuarine Research Reserve to estimate Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) rates and nutrient fluxes. SGD has been identified as an important source of limiting nutrients to coastal ecosystems, and is conceivably even more critical in a dry climate. Groundwater inflows are rarely considered in estuary mass budgets, therefore sampling stations were chosen over the entire bay system to identify spatial differences in SGD and to estimate direct groundwater contributions. This interdisciplinary approach proved necessary to differentiate between the bay recirculation and terrestrial components of SGD. Resistivity measurements using a towed electrode array were used to identify sampling stations at areas favorable to SGD. While NORTs may provide an estimate of basin-wide groundwater input, these sampling stations ascertain the favorable geologic environment for hydraulic interconnectivity between surface water and groundwater in the system. A sampling suite (including metals and nutrients) of surface, bottom, and pore waters during winter and summer months display spatio-temporal changes in nutrient fluxes. This study reinforces the understanding of the necessity to use multiple methods to accurately quantify SGD and associated solute fluxes and advances the knowledge of coastal groundwater interaction in semi-arid environments.

  16. Altitude, age, and quality of groundwater, Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District, eastern Nebraska, 1992 to 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Virginia L.; Ryter, Derek W.; Flynn, Amanda S.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District (PMRNRD), conducted this study to map the water-level altitude of 2009 within the Elkhorn River Valley, Missouri River Valley, and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers; to present the predevelopment potentiometric-surface altitude within the Dakota aquifer; and to describe the age and quality of groundwater in the five principal aquifers of the PMRNRD in eastern Nebraska using data collected from 1992 to 2009. In addition, implications of alternatives to the current PMRNRD groundwater-quality monitoring approach are discussed. In the PMRNRD, groundwater altitude, relative to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929, ranged from about 1,080 feet (ft) to 1,180 ft in the Elkhorn River Valley alluvial aquifer and from about 960 ft to 1,080 ft in the Missouri River Valley and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers. In the PMRNRD, the estimated altitude of the potentiometric surface of the Dakota aquifer, predevelopment, ranged from about 1,100 ft to 1,200 ft. To assess groundwater age and quality, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 217 wells from 1992 to 2009 for analysis of various analytes. Groundwater samples collected in the PMRNRD from 1992 to 2009 and interpreted in this report were analyzed for age-dating analytes (chlorofluorocarbons), dissolved gases, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, stable isotope ratios, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, explosives, and 222radon. Apparent groundwater age was estimated from concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons measured in samples collected in 2000. Apparent groundwater-recharge dates ranged from older than 1940 in samples from wells screened in the Missouri River Valley alluvial aquifer to the early 1980s in samples from wells screened in the Dakota aquifer. Concentrations of major ions in the most recent sample per well collected from 1992 to 2009 indicate that the

  17. Water and rock geochemistry, geologic cross sections, geochemical modeling, and groundwater flow modeling for identifying the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed; Wirt, Laurie; Arnold, L. Rick; Horton, John D.

    2011-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) seeks additional information to better understand the source(s) of groundwater and associated groundwater flow paths to Montezuma Well in Montezuma Castle National Monument, central Arizona. The source of water to Montezuma Well, a flowing sinkhole in a desert setting, is poorly understood. Water emerges from the middle limestone facies of the lacustrine Verde Formation, but the precise origin of the water and its travel path are largely unknown. Some have proposed artesian flow to Montezuma Well through the Supai Formation, which is exposed along the eastern margin of the Verde Valley and underlies the Verde Formation. The groundwater recharge zone likely lies above the floor of the Verde Valley somewhere to the north or east of Montezuma Well, where precipitation is more abundant. Additional data from groundwater, surface water, and bedrock geology are required for Montezuma Well and the surrounding region to test the current conceptual ideas, to provide new details on the groundwater flow in the area, and to assist in future management decisions. The results of this research will provide information for long-term water resource management and the protection of water rights.

  18. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures. II: Infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater at Maqarin, Jordan, a natural analogue site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steefel, C. I.; Lichtner, P. C.

    1998-08-01

    A numerical multicomponent reactive transport model described fully in Steefel and Lichtner (1998)[Steefel, C.I., Lichtner, P.C., 1998. Multicomponent reactive transport in discrete fractures, I. Controls on reaction front geometry. J. Hydrol. (in press)] is used to simulate the infiltration of hyperalkaline groundwater along discrete fractures at Maqarin, Jordan, a site considered as a natural analogue to cement-bearing nuclear waste repositories. In the Eastern Springs area at Maqarin, two prominent sets of sub-parallel fractures trending NW-SE are approximately perpendicular to the local water table contours, with the slope of the water table indicating north-westward flow. Extensive mineralogic investigations [Alexander W.R. (Ed.), 1992. A natural analogue study of cement-buffered, hyperalkaline groundwaters and their interaction with a sedimentary host rock. NAgrA Technical Report (NTB 91-10), Wettingen, Switzerland; Milodowski, A.E., Hyslop, E.K., Pearce, J.M., Wetton, P.D., Kemp, S.J., Longworth, G., Hodginson, E., and Hughes, C.R., 1998. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the western springs area. In: Smellie, J.A.T. (ed.), 1998: Maqarin Natural Analogue Study: Phase III. SKB Technical Report TR98-04, Stockholm, Sweden] indicate that the width of intense rock alteration zone bordering the fractures changes from about 4 mm at one locality (the M1 sampling site) to approximately 1 mm 100 m to the north-west in the flow direction (the M2 site), suggesting a lessening of alteration intensity in that direction. Using this information, the dimensionless parameter δ v/φ D' (φ=porosity, D'=effective diffusion coefficient in rock matrix, δ=fracture aperture, and v=fluid velocity in the fracture) and measurements of the local hydraulic head gradient and effective diffusion coefficient in the rock matrix, a mean fracture aperture of 0.194 mm is calculated assuming the cubic law applies. This information, in combination with measured groundwater compositions at the

  19. Natural background levels and threshold values of chemical species in three large-scale groundwater bodies in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Antonio; Guadagnini, Laura; Marcaccio, Marco; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2012-05-15

    We analyze natural background levels (NBLs) and threshold values (TVs) of spatially distributed chemical species (NH(4), B and As) which may be a potential pressure and concern in three large scale alluvial and fluvio-deltaic aquifers at different depths of the Apennines and Po river plains in Emilia-Romagna, Northern Italy. Our results are based on statistical methodologies designed to separate the natural and anthropogenic contributions in monitored concentrations by modeling the empirical distribution of the detected concentration with a mixture of probability density functions. Available chemical observations are taken over a 20 years period and are associated with different depths and cover planar investigation scales of the order of hundreds of kilometers. High concentration values detected for NH(4) and B appear to be related to high natural background levels. Due to interaction with the host rock in different geochemical environments we observed that concentration vary in time and space (including in depth) consistently with the hydrogeochemical features and the occurrence of natural attenuation mechanisms in the analyzed reservoirs. Conversely, estimated As NBLs are not consistent with the conceptual model of the hydrogeochemical behavior of the systems analyzed and experimental evidences of As content in aquifer cores. This is due to the inability of these techniques to incorporate the complex dynamics of the processes associated with the specific hydrogeochemical setting. Statistical analyses performed upon aggregating the concentration data according to different time observation windows allow identifying temporal dynamics of NBLs and TVs of target compounds within the observation time frame. Our results highlight the benefit of a dynamic monitoring process and analysis of well demarcated groundwater bodies to update the associated NBLs as a function of the temporal dependence of natural processes occurring in the subsurface. Monitoring protocols could

  20. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote contaminants in natural and simulated ground-water ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald; Grbic-Galic, Dunja

    1992-01-01

    Wastes from a wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near-surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. Contamination resulted from the discharge of plant waste waters to and subsequent seepage from unlined surface impoundments that were in direct hydraulic contact with the ground water. Two distinct phases resulted when the creosote and water mixed: a denser than water hydrocarbon phase that moved vertically downward, and an organic-rich aqueous phase that moved laterally with the ground-water flow. The aqueous phase is enriched in organic acids, phenolic compounds, single- and double-ring nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen containing compounds, and single- and double-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The ground water is devoid of dissolved O2, is 60-70% saturated with CH4 and contains H2S. Field analyses document a greater decrease in concentration of organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, and 2(1H)-isoquinolinone during downgradient movement in the aquifer than could be explained by dilution and/or dispersion. Laboratory microcosm studies have shown that within the study region, this effect can be attributed to microbial degradation to CH4 and CO2. A small but active methanogenic population was found on sediment materials taken from highly contaminated parts of the aquifer.

  1. Treatment of natural rubber processing wastewater using a combination system of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and down-flow hanging sponge system.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, D; Syutsubo, K; Hatamoto, M; Fukuda, M; Takahashi, M; Choeisai, P K; Yamaguchi, T

    2016-01-01

    A pilot-scale experiment of natural rubber processing wastewater treatment was conducted using a combination system consisting of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor for more than 10 months. The system achieved a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 95.7% ± 1.3% at an organic loading rate of 0.8 kg COD/(m(3).d). Bacterial activity measurement of retained sludge from the UASB showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), especially hydrogen-utilizing SRB, possessed high activity compared with methane-producing bacteria (MPB). Conversely, the acetate-utilizing activity of MPB was superior to SRB in the second stage of the reactor. The two-stage UASB-DHS system can reduce power consumption by 95% and excess sludge by 98%. In addition, it is possible to prevent emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), such as methane, using this system. Furthermore, recovered methane from the two-stage UASB can completely cover the electricity needs for the operation of the two-stage UASB-DHS system, accounting for approximately 15% of the electricity used in the natural rubber manufacturing process.

  2. Treatment of natural rubber processing wastewater using a combination system of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and down-flow hanging sponge system.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, D; Syutsubo, K; Hatamoto, M; Fukuda, M; Takahashi, M; Choeisai, P K; Yamaguchi, T

    2016-01-01

    A pilot-scale experiment of natural rubber processing wastewater treatment was conducted using a combination system consisting of a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor for more than 10 months. The system achieved a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 95.7% ± 1.3% at an organic loading rate of 0.8 kg COD/(m(3).d). Bacterial activity measurement of retained sludge from the UASB showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), especially hydrogen-utilizing SRB, possessed high activity compared with methane-producing bacteria (MPB). Conversely, the acetate-utilizing activity of MPB was superior to SRB in the second stage of the reactor. The two-stage UASB-DHS system can reduce power consumption by 95% and excess sludge by 98%. In addition, it is possible to prevent emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), such as methane, using this system. Furthermore, recovered methane from the two-stage UASB can completely cover the electricity needs for the operation of the two-stage UASB-DHS system, accounting for approximately 15% of the electricity used in the natural rubber manufacturing process. PMID:27120630

  3. Changes in groundwater levels and the response of natural vegetation to transfer of water to the lower reaches of the Tarim River.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-liang; Ye, Mao; Li, Ji-mei

    2007-01-01

    Restoration and reconstruction of the degraded Tarim River ecosystem is an important challenge. A goal of an ecological water conveyance project is to protect and restore the natural vegetation in the lower reaches of Tarim River by transferring water from Bosten Lake, through the river channel, to the lower reaches. This study describes the changes in groundwater depth during the water transfer and the respondence of riparian vegetation to alterations in groundwater levels. The results indicate that groundwater depth along the Tarim River channel has a significant spatial-temporal component. Groundwater levels closest to the river channel show the most immediate and pronounced changes as a response to water transfer while those further away respond more slowly, although the observed change appears to be longer in duration. With a rise in the groundwater level, natural vegetation responded with higher growth rates, biomass and biodiversity. These favorable changes show that it is feasible to protect and restore the degraded natural vegetation by raising the groundwater depth. Plant communities are likely to reflect the hysteresis phenomenon, requiring higher water levels to initiate and stimulate desired growth than what may be needed to maintain the plant community. Because different species have different ecologies, including different root depths and densities and water needs, their response to increasing water availability will be spatially and temporally heterogenous. The response of vegetation is also influenced by microtopography and watering style. This paper discusses strategies for the protection and restoration of the degraded vegetation in the lower reaches of the Tarim River and provides information to complement ongoing theoretical research into ecological restoration in arid or semi-arid ecosystems.

  4. Groundwater Sustainability in the Michigan Lowlands - Understanding the Complex Interplay of Natural Brine Upwelling, Human Activity, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Z. K.; Li, S. G.; Sampath, P. V.; Liao, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    /analysis to simulate the complex interplay of human activity, natural upwelling, and climate change. Insight from the modeling effort will be used to inform resource planners and policy makers of various groundwater management options available to vulnerable communities across the Lower Peninsula of Michigan in years to come.

  5. Estimated natural ground-water recharge, discharge, and budget for the Dixie Valley area, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrill, J.R.; Hines, L.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Dixie Valley area includes seven valleys in west-central Nevada (Dixie, Fairview, Stingaree, Cowkick, Eastgate, Pleasant, and Jersey Valleys; total, 2,380 square miles). Dixie Valley receives surface-water and ground-water flow from Stingaree, Cowkick, Eastgate, Pleasant, and Jersey Valleys and subsurface flow from Fairview Valley, which is a topographically closed basin. The relation between precipitation and altitude was re-evaluated for the Dixie Valley area using new data, and empirical estimates of recharge were revised accordingly. The revised estimate of total recharge is 23,000 acre-feet per Re-evaluation of ground-water discharge focused on Dixie Valley as the largest basin in the study area. Phreatophytic vegetation was mapped and partitioned into nine zones on the basis of species composition and foliage density. For woody phreatophytes, annual evapotranspiration rates of 0.7 cubic feet of water per cubic foot of foliage for greasewood and 1.1 cubic feet of water per cubic foot of foliage for rabbitbrush were adapted from lysimeter studies near Winnemucca, Nevada. These rates were multiplied by the foliage density of the respective phreatophytes in each zone to estimate a specific rate for that zone. Rates for salt-grass (0.5 to 0.8 foot per year) and the playa surface (0.1 to 0.3 foot per year) were based on a range of rates. used in other recent studies in western and central Nevada. These rates were multiplied by the areas of the zones to produce estimates of the annual volume of ground water discharged. The discharge estimated for Dixie Valley is between 17,000 and 28,000 acre-feet per year. The revised discharge estimate for the entire Dixie Valley area is between 20,000 and 31,000 acre-feet per year. The revised ground-water budget for the entire Dixie Valley study area has a total recharge of about 23,000 acre-feet per year. This is within the range of estimates of natural discharge--from 20,000 to 31,000 acre-feet per year. For Dixie Valley

  6. Natural groundwater recharge in an upland area of central North Dakota, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehm, B.W.; Moran, S.R.; Groenewold, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    The magnitude of groundwater recharge to coal aquifers in a 150-km2 area in west-central North Dakota was determined using three separate approaches: (1) the net water level rise in water-table wells; (2) calculations of the fluid flux between nested piezometers, using the Darcy equation and measured values of hydraulic conductivity and vertical gradients; and (3) evaluation of the inputs to and outputs from the coal aquifer, using a steady-state control volume approach in which the aquifer was divided into semi-rectangular cells bounded by equipotential lines and flow lines. Measurements of potential gradients and hydraulic conductivity permitted indirect determination of all components of flow into and out of the cell except the recharge input, which was determined by difference. All methods yielded consistent results on the order of 0.04-0.01 m yr.-1 These values, which represent 2-9% of the annual precipitation, are consistent with results of other studies on recharge throughout the prairies of North America. Evaluation of site hydrology and stable-isotope data indicates that recharge is restricted in both time and place. Most recharge occurs in late spring and in the fall following heavy rainfall events. During these seasons the ground is not frozen and vegetation is not transpiring large amounts of water. Some recharge may occur during very heavy localized summer storms, but it is not considered volumetrically significant. Major permanent depressions on the site are a source of significant recharge. In addition, the extensive area of ephemeral standing water bodies that result from snowmelt can produce significant amounts of infiltration over the entire site. ?? 1982.

  7. Using Multi-Isotopic Analysis To Track The Origin Of NO3 In Groundwater And To Trace Natural Attenuation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, N.; Soler, A.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrate pollution has become a major threat to groundwater quality as the maximum nitrate concentration allowed by the European Directive 98/83/CE in waters for human consumption, 50 mg/L, is reached in most of the regional aquifers in Europe. In Catalonia, according to the nitrate directive, nine areas have been declared as vulnerable to nitrate pollution from agricultural sources. Five of these areas have been studied coupling hydro chemical data with a multi-isotopic approach, in an ongoing research project looking for an integrated application of classical hydrochemistry data, with a comprehensive isotopic characterisation (δ15N and δ18O of dissolved nitrate, δ34S and δ18O of dissolved sulphate, δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon, and δ D and δ18O of water) in order to assess groundwater management in this area. The nitrogen isotopes have allowed to determine the origin of nitrate pollution for the different areas: fertilisers in the Maresme area, animal manure in the Osona and Empordà areas, and a mixed origin in Selva and Garrotxa areas. The coupled use of δ15N and δ18O permitted to determine the existence of denitrification processes (natural attenuation of pollution), and showed that this process is effective in the Osona, Selva and the Empordà areas, but not significant in the Maresme and Garrotxa areas. The multi-isotopic approach, coupling δ15N and δ18O of nitrate, with the isotopic composition of the ions involved in denitrification reactions (δ34S, δ18O, and δ13C ), showed the relationship between sulphide oxidation and nitrate attenuation in the Osona area. In the Empordà and Selva areas, the denitrification is not linked to sulphide oxidation, and organic matter must be the electron donor for denitrification, though further research is needed to confirm the role of organic matter. The observed denitrification processes reveal optional strategies for nitrogen attenuation.

  8. The Nature and Role of Physical Models in Enhancing Sixth Grade Students' Mental Models of Groundwater and Groundwater Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Debra Lynne Foster

    2012-01-01

    Through a non-experimental descriptive and comparative mixed-methods approach, this study investigated the experiences of sixth grade earth science students with groundwater physical models through an extended SE learning cycle format. The data collection was based on a series of quantitative and qualitative research tools intended to investigate…

  9. Regional patterns in the isotopic composition of natural and anthropogenic nitrate in groundwater, High Plains, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    McMahon, P B; Böhlke, J K

    2006-05-01

    Mobilization of natural nitrate (NO3-) deposits in the subsoil by irrigation water in arid and semiarid regions has the potential to produce large groundwater NO3-concentrations. The use of isotopes to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic NO3- sources in these settings could be complicated by the wide range in delta15N values of natural NO3-. An approximately 10 000 year record of paleorecharge from the regionally extensive High Plains aquifer indicates that delta15N values for NO3- derived from natural sources ranged from 1.3 to 12.3 per thousand and increased systematically from the northern to the southern High Plains. This collective range in delta15N values spans the range that might be interpreted as evidence for fertilizer and animal-waste sources of NO3-; however, the delta15N values for NO3- in modern recharge (< 50 years) under irrigated fields were, for the most part, distinctly different from those of paleorecharge when viewed in the overall regional context. An inverse relation was observed between the delta15N[NO3-] values and the NO3-/Cl- ratios in paleorecharge that is qualitatively consistent with fractionating losses of N increasing from north to south in the High Plains. N and O isotope data for NO3- are consistent with both NH3 volatilization and denitrification, having contributed to fractionating losses of N prior to recharge. The relative importance of different isotope fractionating processes may be influenced by regional climate patterns as well as by local variation in soils, vegetation, topography, and moisture conditions. PMID:16719098

  10. Cr stable isotopes in Snake River Plain aquifer groundwater: evidence for natural reduction of dissolved Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Amanda L; Johnson, Thomas M; McLing, Travis L

    2011-01-15

    At Idaho National Laboratory, Cr(VI) concentrations in a groundwater plume once exceeded regulatory limits in some monitoring wells but have generally decreased over time. This study used Cr stable isotope measurements to determine if part of this decrease resulted from removal of Cr(VI) via reduction to insoluble Cr(III). Although waters in the study area contain dissolved oxygen, the basalt host rock contains abundant Fe(II) and may contain reducing microenvironments or aerobic microbes that reduce Cr(VI). In some contaminated locations, (53)Cr/(52)Cr ratios are close to that of the contaminant source, indicating a lack of Cr(VI) reduction. In other locations, ratios are elevated. Part of this shift may be caused by mixing with natural background Cr(VI), which is present at low concentrations but in some locations has elevated (53)Cr/(52)Cr. Some contaminated wells have (53)Cr/(52)Cr ratios greater than the maximum attainable by mixing between the inferred contaminant and the range of natural background observed in several uncontaminated wells, suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred. Definitive proof of reduction would require additional evidence. Depth profiles of (53)Cr/(52)Cr suggest that reduction occurs immediately below the water table, where basalts are likely least weathered and most reactive, and is weak or nonexistent at greater depth.

  11. Arsenic removal from groundwater of the Chaco-Pampean plain (Argentina) using natural geological materials as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Jochen; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Sracek, Ondra; Mellano, M Fernanda; Ramírez, Antonio E; Storniolo, Angel del R; Martín, Raúl A; Cortés, Julia; Litter, Marta I; Jean, Jiin-Shuh

    2011-01-01

    Use of natural geological materials for arsenic (As) removal is an emerging solution at a household level for poor people in remote rural settlements, especially when the materials are locally available and can be collected by the local population. Their low or zero cost makes these materials very attractive compared with synthetic or commercial materials. Sometimes, this may be the only option to provide safe water to very poor settlements. Their suitability for As removal from water is mainly due to adsorption, co-precipitation and ion exchange processes involving Fe- and Al-rich minerals and clay minerals present in the soils or sediments. In the present study, various clay-rich soils from the Santiago del Estero province (SDE, NW Argentina) and, for comparison, a laterite from the Misiones province have been tested as adsorbents for As in shallow naturally contaminated groundwaters of the Río Dulce alluvial aquifer in SDE. Batch adsorption experiments showed higher As(V) removal for the Misiones laterite sample (99 %) as compared with the soils from SDE (40-53 %), which can be related to lower contents of water-soluble and oxalate extractable Al and Fe in the last samples. These results suggest the application of the Misiones laterite soil as an alternative for As removal. However, high transportation costs from Misiones to SDE can be an economical restriction for the low-income population of SDE. PMID:21879863

  12. Cr Stable Isotopes in Snake River Plain Aquifer Groundwater: Evidence for Natural Reduction of Dissolved Cr(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Amanda L. Raddatz; Thomas M. Johnson; Travis L. McLing

    2011-01-01

    At Idaho National Laboratory, Cr(VI) concentrations in a groundwater plume once exceeded regulatory limits in some monitoring wells but have generally decreased over time. This study used Cr stable isotope measurements to determine if part of this decrease resulted from removal of Cr(VI) via reduction to insoluble Cr(III). Although waters in the study area contain dissolved oxygen, the basalt host rock contains abundant Fe(II) and may contain reducing microenvironments or aerobic microbes that reduce Cr(VI). Insomecontaminated locations, 53Cr/52Cr ratios are close to that of the contaminant source, indicating a lack of Cr(VI) reduction. In other locations, ratios are elevated. Part of this shift may be caused by mixing with natural background Cr(VI), which is present at low concentrations but insomelocations has elevated 53Cr/52Cr.Somecontaminated wells have 53Cr/52Cr ratios greater than the maximum attainable by mixing between the inferred contaminant and the range of natural background observed in several uncontaminated wells, suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred. Definitive proof of reduction would require additional evidence. Depth profiles of 53Cr/52Cr suggest that reduction occurs immediately below the water table, where basalts are likely least weathered and most reactive, and is weak or nonexistent at greater depth.

  13. Arsenic removal from groundwater of the Chaco-Pampean plain (Argentina) using natural geological materials as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Jochen; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Sracek, Ondra; Mellano, M Fernanda; Ramírez, Antonio E; Storniolo, Angel del R; Martín, Raúl A; Cortés, Julia; Litter, Marta I; Jean, Jiin-Shuh

    2011-01-01

    Use of natural geological materials for arsenic (As) removal is an emerging solution at a household level for poor people in remote rural settlements, especially when the materials are locally available and can be collected by the local population. Their low or zero cost makes these materials very attractive compared with synthetic or commercial materials. Sometimes, this may be the only option to provide safe water to very poor settlements. Their suitability for As removal from water is mainly due to adsorption, co-precipitation and ion exchange processes involving Fe- and Al-rich minerals and clay minerals present in the soils or sediments. In the present study, various clay-rich soils from the Santiago del Estero province (SDE, NW Argentina) and, for comparison, a laterite from the Misiones province have been tested as adsorbents for As in shallow naturally contaminated groundwaters of the Río Dulce alluvial aquifer in SDE. Batch adsorption experiments showed higher As(V) removal for the Misiones laterite sample (99 %) as compared with the soils from SDE (40-53 %), which can be related to lower contents of water-soluble and oxalate extractable Al and Fe in the last samples. These results suggest the application of the Misiones laterite soil as an alternative for As removal. However, high transportation costs from Misiones to SDE can be an economical restriction for the low-income population of SDE.

  14. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL FERMENTATION OF BENZENE IN GROUNDWATER (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate in California and in the mid continent area around the Great Lakes. The presence of ethanol in a gasoline spill has raised concerns about the effects of the additive on the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzen...

  15. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL FERMENTATION OF BENZENE IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate in California and in the mid continent area around the Great Lakes. The presence of ethanol in a gasoline spill has raised concerns about the effects of the additive on the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzen...

  16. An Approach for Evaluating the Progress of Natural Attenuation in Groundwater (Web Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied to ground water contamination at hazardous waste sites. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), MNA is considered to be a remedy like any other remedy. When MNA has been select...

  17. Features of natural environment and occurrence of groundwater in cold artesian basins in permafrost areas, China

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Fengtong, L. )

    1988-08-01

    This article is a report on features of the natural environment of the Huola River artesian water basin in Guilan District, Mohe county, in the Xin-an Region and the interrelationship of various factors of underground water under glacial conditions. Formations, recharge, distribution, drainage, and transfer, as compared with nonperennial frozen areas, are described.

  18. EVALUATION OF THE ROLE OF DEHALOCOCCOIDES ORGANISMS IN THE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED ETHYLENES IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    At most hazardous waste sites where monitored natural attenuation (MNA) of chlorinated solvents in ground water is successful as a remedy, the chlorinated solvents are biologically degraded to harmless end products such as ethylene or ethane. Many organisms can degrade chlorinat...

  19. Using Isomap to differentiate between anthropogenic and natural effects on groundwater dynamics in a complex geological setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Steven; Merz, Christoph; Lischeid, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    control the system. The method was applied on a data set of groundwater head and lake water level. Two factors explaining more than 95 percent of the observed spatial variations were identified: (1) the anthropogenic impact of a waterworks in the study area and (2) natural groundwater recharge dynamics of different degrees of dampening at the respective sites of observation. The spatial variation of the identified processes revealed previously unknown hydraulic connections between two aquifers and between surface water bodies and groundwater. The obtained information can be used to reduce model structure uncertainty and a more efficient process-based modeling of hydraulic system behavior. Thus, the approach provides essential information to evaluate and adapt strategies for an integrated water resources management in complex landscapes. Bloschl, G., Sivapalan, M., 1995. Scale Issues in Hydrological Modeling - a Review. Hydrological Processes, 9(3-4): 251-290. Tenenbaum, J.B., de Silva, V., Langford, J.C., 2000. A global geometric framework for nonlinear dimensionality reduction. Science, 290: 2319-2323. Wood, E.F., Sivapalan, M., Beven, K., Band, L., 1988. Effects of Spatial Variability and Scale with Implications to Hydrologic Modeling. Journal of Hydrology, 102(1-4): 29-47.

  20. Groundwater capture processes under a seasonal variation in natural recharge and discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddock, Thomas, III.; Vionnet, Leticia Beatriz

    "Capture" is the increase in recharge and the decrease in discharge that occurs when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system that was in a previous state of approximate dynamic equilibrium. Regional groundwater models are usually used to calculate capture in a two-step procedure. A steady-state solution provides an initial-head configuration, a set of flows through the boundaries for the modeled region, and the initial basis for the capture calculation. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions renders the capture calculation. When seasonality is a modeling issue, the use of a single initial hydraulic head and a single set of boundary flows leads to miscalculations of capture. Instead, an initial condition for each season should be used. This approach may be accomplished by determining steady oscillatory solutions, which vary through the seasons but repeat from year to year. A regional groundwater model previously developed for a portion of the San Pedro River basin, Arizona, USA, is modified to illustrate the effect that different initial conditions have on transient solutions and on capture calculations. Résumé Les "prélèvements" sont constitués par l'augmentation de la recharge et par la diminution de l'écoulement qui se produit lorsqu'un pompage est imposéà un système aquifère qui était auparavant dans un état proche de l'équilibre dynamique. Les modèles régionaux de nappe sont en général utilisés pour calculer les prélèvements dans une procédure à deux étapes. Une solution en régime permanent donne la configuration piézométrique initiale, un jeu de conditions aux limites pour la région modélisée et les données de base pour le calcul des prélèvements. Les solutions transitoires donnent les modifications globales des conditions aux limites. Lorsque des variations saisonnières sont produites en sortie du modèle, le recours à une

  1. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    , with Fe(II) oxidation taking place in the soil surrounding the ditch during summer and in the surface water during winter. The dynamics in Fe(II) oxidation did not affect the dissolved P concentrations. The dissolved P concentrations of the in-stream reservoirs water were an order of magnitude lower than observed in the groundwater and have no seasonal trend. Our data showed preferential binding of P during initial stage of the Fe(II) oxidation process, indicating the formation of Fe(III)-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III)-phosphates at the groundwater-surface water interface is an important geochemical mechanism in the transformation of dissolved phosphate to particulate phosphate and therefore a major control on the P retention in natural waters that drain anaerobic aquifers.

  2. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Estimated Mean Annual Natural Groundwater Recharge, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This data set represents the mean annual natural groundwater recharge, in millimeters, compiled for every catchment of NHDPlus for the conterminous United States. The source data set is Estimated Mean Annual Natural Ground-Water Recharge in the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The NHDPlus Version 1.1 is an integrated suite of application-ready geospatial datasets that incorporates many of the best features of the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and the National Elevation Dataset (NED). The NHDPlus includes a stream network (based on the 1:100,00-scale NHD), improved networking, naming, and value-added attributes (VAAs). NHDPlus also includes elevation-derived catchments (drainage areas) produced using a drainage enforcement technique first widely used in New England, and thus referred to as "the New England Method." This technique involves "burning in" the 1:100,000-scale NHD and when available building "walls" using the National Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD). The resulting modified digital elevation model (HydroDEM) is used to produce hydrologic derivatives that agree with the NHD and WBD. Over the past two years, an interdisciplinary team from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and contractors, found that this method produces the best quality NHD catchments using an automated process (USEPA, 2007). The NHDPlus dataset is organized by 18 Production Units that cover the conterminous United States. The NHDPlus version 1.1 data are grouped by the U.S. Geologic Survey's Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). MRB1, covering the New England and Mid-Atlantic River basins, containing NHDPlus Production Units 1 and 2. MRB2, covering the South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee River basins, contains NHDPlus Production Units 3 and 6. MRB3, covering the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy River basins, contains NHDPlus Production Units 4, 5, 7 and 9. MRB4, covering the

  3. Long-term ground penetrating radar monitoring of a small volume DNAPL release in a natural groundwater flow field.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Keun; Endres, Anthony L; Piggott, Scott D; Parker, Beth L

    2008-04-01

    An earlier field experiment at Canadian Forces Base Borden by Brewster and Annan [Geophysics 59 (1994) 1211] clearly demonstrated the capability of ground penetrating radar (GPR) reflection profiling to detect and monitor the formation of DNAPL layers in the subsurface. Their experiment involved a large volume release (770 L) of tetrachloroethylene into a portion of the sand aquifer that was hydraulically isolated from groundwater flow by sheet pile walls. In this study, we evaluated the ability of GPR profiling to detect and monitor much smaller volume releases (50 L). No subsurface confining structure was used in this experiment; hence, the DNAPL impacted zone was subjected to the natural groundwater flow regime. This condition allowed us to geophysically monitor the DNAPL mass loss over a 66 month period. Reflectivity variations on the GPR profiles were used to infer the presence and evolution of the solvent layers. GPR imaging found significant reflectivity increases due to solvent layer formation during the two week period immediately after the release. These results demonstrated the capacity of GPR profiling for the detection and monitoring of lesser volume DNAPL releases that are more representative of small-scale industrial spills. The GPR imaged solvent layers subsequently reduced in both areal extent and reflectivity after 29 months and almost completely disappeared by the end of the 66 month monitoring period. Total DNAPL mass estimates based on GPR profiling data indicated that the solvent mass was reduced to 34%-36% of its maximum value after 29 months; only 4%-9% of the solvent mass remained in the study area after 66 months. These results are consistent with independent hydrogeological estimates of remaining DNAPL mass based on the downgradient monitoring of the dissolved solvent phase. Hence, we have concluded that the long-term GPR reflectivity changes of the DNAPL layers are likely the result from the dissolution of chlorinated solvents residing

  4. Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater remediation with simulated permeable reactive barrier (PRB) filled with natural pyrite as reactive material: Environmental factors and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Mou, Haiyan; Chen, Liqun; Mirza, Zakaria A; Liu, Li

    2015-11-15

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are efficient technologies for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater, the effectiveness of which greatly depends on the reactive media filled. Natural pyrite is an iron sulfide material with a very low content of iron and sulfur, and a mining waste which is a potential material for Cr(VI) immobilization. In this study, we conducted a series of batch tests to research the effects of typical environmental factors on Cr(VI) removal and also simulated PRB filled with natural pyrite to investigate its effectiveness, in order to find a both environmentally and economically fine method for groundwater remediation. Batch tests showed that pH had the significant impact on Cr(VI) removal with an apparently higher efficiency under acidic conditions, and dissolved oxygen (DO) would inhibit Cr(VI) reduction; a relatively high initial Cr(VI) concentration would decrease the rate of Cr(VI) sorption; ionic strength and natural organic matter resulted in no significant effects on Cr(VI) removal. Column tests demonstrated that the simulated PRB with natural pyrite as the reactive media was considerably effective for removing Cr(VI) from groundwater, with a sorption capability of 0.6222 mg Cr per gram of natural pyrite at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 10mg/L at pH 5.5 in an anoxic environment. PMID:26026959

  5. Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater remediation with simulated permeable reactive barrier (PRB) filled with natural pyrite as reactive material: Environmental factors and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Mou, Haiyan; Chen, Liqun; Mirza, Zakaria A; Liu, Li

    2015-11-15

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are efficient technologies for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater, the effectiveness of which greatly depends on the reactive media filled. Natural pyrite is an iron sulfide material with a very low content of iron and sulfur, and a mining waste which is a potential material for Cr(VI) immobilization. In this study, we conducted a series of batch tests to research the effects of typical environmental factors on Cr(VI) removal and also simulated PRB filled with natural pyrite to investigate its effectiveness, in order to find a both environmentally and economically fine method for groundwater remediation. Batch tests showed that pH had the significant impact on Cr(VI) removal with an apparently higher efficiency under acidic conditions, and dissolved oxygen (DO) would inhibit Cr(VI) reduction; a relatively high initial Cr(VI) concentration would decrease the rate of Cr(VI) sorption; ionic strength and natural organic matter resulted in no significant effects on Cr(VI) removal. Column tests demonstrated that the simulated PRB with natural pyrite as the reactive media was considerably effective for removing Cr(VI) from groundwater, with a sorption capability of 0.6222 mg Cr per gram of natural pyrite at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 10mg/L at pH 5.5 in an anoxic environment.

  6. Impact of aluminum chloride on process performance and microbial community structure of granular sludge in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for natural rubber processing wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Thi; Watari, Takahiro; Thao, Tran Phuong; Hatamoto, Masashi; Tanikawa, Daisuke; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Masao; Tan, Nguyen Minh; Anh, To Kim; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Huong, Nguyen Lan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, granular sludge formation was carried out using an aluminum chloride supplement in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating natural rubber processing wastewater. Results show that during the first 75 days after the start-up of the UASB reactor with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.65 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), it performed stably with a removal of 90% of the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sludge still remained in small dispersed flocs. However, after aluminum chloride was added at a concentration of 300 mg·L(-1) and the OLR range was increased up to 5.32 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), the total COD removal efficiency rose to 96.5 ± 2.6%, with a methane recovery rate of 84.9 ± 13.4%, and the flocs began to form granules. Massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the sludge retained in the UASB reactor showed that total sequence reads of Methanosaeta sp. and Methanosarcina sp., reported to be the key organisms for granulation, increased after 311 days of operation. This indicates that the microbial community structure of the retained sludge in the UASB reactor at the end of the experiment gave a good account of itself in not only COD removal, but also granule formation.

  7. Development of a natural treatment system consisting of red ball earth and alfalfa for the post-treatment of anaerobically digested livestock wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochen; Fukushi, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    With the objective of developing a post-treatment process for anaerobically digested livestock wastewater, an innovative natural treatment system composed of two units is proposed. The first trickling filter unit further reduced biochemical oxygen demand and achieved a certain degree of nitrification. The second soil-plant unit was targeted at the removal and recovery of nutrients N, P and K. For the feasibility study, a bench-scale soil column test was carried out, in which red ball earth and alfalfa were utilized for treating synthetic nutrient-enriched wastewater. Through long-term operation, the nitrification function was well established in the top layers, especially the top 20 cm, although a supplementary denitrification process was still required before discharge. P and K were retained by the soil through different mechanisms, and their plant-available forms that remained in the soil were considered suitable for indirect nutrient reuse. As for alfalfa, with wastewater application it fixed more N from the atmosphere, and directly recovered 6% of P and 4% of K input from wastewater. More importantly, alfalfa was verified to have an indispensable role in stimulating the soil nitrifying microorganisms by sustaining their abundance during substrate (NH3) and oxygen scarcity, and enhancing cell-specific nitrification potential during substrate (NH3) and oxygen sufficiency. The proposed system is expected to be further improved, and adopted as a sound countermeasure for livestock wastewater pollution.

  8. Impact of aluminum chloride on process performance and microbial community structure of granular sludge in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for natural rubber processing wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Thi; Watari, Takahiro; Thao, Tran Phuong; Hatamoto, Masashi; Tanikawa, Daisuke; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Fukuda, Masao; Tan, Nguyen Minh; Anh, To Kim; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Huong, Nguyen Lan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, granular sludge formation was carried out using an aluminum chloride supplement in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating natural rubber processing wastewater. Results show that during the first 75 days after the start-up of the UASB reactor with an organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.65 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), it performed stably with a removal of 90% of the total chemical oxygen demand (COD) and sludge still remained in small dispersed flocs. However, after aluminum chloride was added at a concentration of 300 mg·L(-1) and the OLR range was increased up to 5.32 kg-COD·m(-3)·day(-1), the total COD removal efficiency rose to 96.5 ± 2.6%, with a methane recovery rate of 84.9 ± 13.4%, and the flocs began to form granules. Massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the sludge retained in the UASB reactor showed that total sequence reads of Methanosaeta sp. and Methanosarcina sp., reported to be the key organisms for granulation, increased after 311 days of operation. This indicates that the microbial community structure of the retained sludge in the UASB reactor at the end of the experiment gave a good account of itself in not only COD removal, but also granule formation. PMID:27438256

  9. Effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements at water-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, J.D.; Szabo, Z.; Focazio, M.J.; Eberts, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of human-induced alteration of groundwater flow patterns on concentrations of naturally-occurring trace elements were examined in five hydrologically distinct aquifer systems in the USA. Although naturally occurring, these trace elements can exceed concentrations that are considered harmful to human health. The results show that pumping-induced hydraulic gradient changes and artificial connection of aquifers by well screens can mix chemically distinct groundwater. Chemical reactions between these mixed groundwaters and solid aquifer materials can result in the mobilization of trace elements such as U, As and Ra, with subsequent transport to water-supply wells. For example, in the High Plains aquifer near York, Nebraska, mixing of shallow, oxygenated, lower-pH water from an unconfined aquifer with deeper, confined, anoxic, higher-pH water is facilitated by wells screened across both aquifers. The resulting higher-O2, lower-pH mixed groundwater facilitated the mobilization of U from solid aquifer materials, and dissolved U concentrations were observed to increase significantly in nearby supply wells. Similar instances of trace element mobilization due to human-induced mixing of groundwaters were documented in: (1) the Floridan aquifer system near Tampa, Florida (As and U), (2) Paleozoic sedimentary aquifers in eastern Wisconsin (As), (3) the basin-fill aquifer underlying the California Central Valley near Modesto (U), and (4) Coastal Plain aquifers of New Jersey (Ra). Adverse water-quality impacts attributed to human activities are commonly assumed to be related solely to the release of the various anthropogenic contaminants to the environment. The results show that human activities including various land uses, well drilling, and pumping rates and volumes can adversely impact the quality of water in supply wells, when associated with naturally-occurring trace elements in aquifer materials. This occurs by causing subtle but significant changes in

  10. The impact of CO2 on shallow groundwater chemistry: observations at a natural analog site and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth; Fessenden, Julianna; Kanjorski, Nancy; Koning, Dan; Pawar, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    In a natural analog study of risks associated with carbon sequestration, impacts of CO{sub 2} on shallow groundwater quality have been measured in a sandstone aquifer in New Mexico, USA. Despite relatively high levels of dissolved CO{sub 2}, originating from depth and producing geysering at one well, pH depression and consequent trace element mobility are relatively minor effects due to the buffering capacity of the aquifer. However, local contamination due to influx of saline waters in a subset of wells is significant. Geochemical modeling of major ion concentrations suggests that high alkalinity and carbonate mineral dissolution buffers pH changes due to CO{sub 2} influx. Analysis oftrends in dissolved trace elements, chloride, and CO2 reveal no evidence of in-situ trace element mobilization. There is clear evidence, however, that As, U, and Pb are locally co-transported into the aquifer with CO{sub 2}-rich saline water. This study illustrates the role that local geochemical conditions will play in determining the effectiveness of monitoring strategies for CO{sub 2} leakage. For example, if buffering is significant, pH monitoring may not effectively detect CO2 leakage. This study also highlights potential complications that CO{sub 2}carrier fluids, such as saline waters, pose in monitoring impacts ofgeologic sequestration.

  11. Characteristic of pollution with groundwater inflow (90)Sr natural waters and terrestrial ecosystems near a radioactive waste storage.

    PubMed

    Lavrentyeva, G V

    2014-09-01

    The studies were conducted in the territory contaminated by (90)Sr with groundwater inflow as a result of leakage from the near-surface trench-type radioactive waste storage. The vertical soil (90)Sr distribution up to the depth of 2-3 m is analyzed. The area of radioactive contamination to be calculated with a value which exceeds the minimum significant activity 1 kBq/kg for the tested soil layers: the contaminated area for the 0-5 cm soil layer amounted to 1800 ± 85 m(2), for the 5-10 cm soil layer amounted to 300 ± 12 m(2), for the 10-15 cm soil layer amounted to 180 ± 10 m(2). It is found that (90)Sr accumulation proceeds in a natural sorption geochemical barrier of the marshy terrace near flood plain. The exposure doses for terrestrial mollusks Bradybaena fruticum are presented. The excess (90)Sr interference level was registered both in the ground and surface water during winter and summer low-water periods and autumn heavy rains.

  12. Characteristic of pollution with groundwater inflow (90)Sr natural waters and terrestrial ecosystems near a radioactive waste storage.

    PubMed

    Lavrentyeva, G V

    2014-09-01

    The studies were conducted in the territory contaminated by (90)Sr with groundwater inflow as a result of leakage from the near-surface trench-type radioactive waste storage. The vertical soil (90)Sr distribution up to the depth of 2-3 m is analyzed. The area of radioactive contamination to be calculated with a value which exceeds the minimum significant activity 1 kBq/kg for the tested soil layers: the contaminated area for the 0-5 cm soil layer amounted to 1800 ± 85 m(2), for the 5-10 cm soil layer amounted to 300 ± 12 m(2), for the 10-15 cm soil layer amounted to 180 ± 10 m(2). It is found that (90)Sr accumulation proceeds in a natural sorption geochemical barrier of the marshy terrace near flood plain. The exposure doses for terrestrial mollusks Bradybaena fruticum are presented. The excess (90)Sr interference level was registered both in the ground and surface water during winter and summer low-water periods and autumn heavy rains. PMID:24832768

  13. CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING OF NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS IN GROUNDWATER: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B; Michael Heitkamp, M; Gary Wein , G; Christopher Bagwell, C; Karen Vangelas, K; Karen-M Adams, K; Tyler Gilmore; Norman Cutshall; David Major; Mike Truex; Todd Wiedemeier; Francis H. Chapelle; Tom Early; Jody Waugh; David Peterson; Mark Ankeny; Claire H. Sink

    2006-08-10

    The objective of this document is to examine the use of a phased approach to characterizing and monitoring (C&M) natural attenuation processes and enhanced attenuation processes and to identify promising tools and techniques by which to accomplish the C&M. We will investigate developing techniques, such as molecular-based assessment tools, and existing tools that traditionally have not been used for monitoring the performance of environmental remediation technologies. Case studies will be used to provide examples of how non-traditional methods are being employed as characterization and monitoring tools to support MNA and EA. The document is not focused on a specific group of readers but rather is broadly directed with the intent that readers may gain information useful to their purposes. Thus, regulators may see some future characterization and monitoring techniques; end users may find novel ways to make MNA or EA more effective or efficient at their site; researchers may identify new areas for development or new and better combinations of existing methods. One consequence of this broad approach is that some readers may find certain sections either too rudimentary or too advanced for their needs. Hopefully, all will be able to use at least some of the document.

  14. Microbial diversity and dynamics of a groundwater and a still bottled natural mineral water.

    PubMed

    França, Luís; Lopéz-Lopéz, Arantxa; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; da Costa, Milton S

    2015-03-01

    The microbial abundance and diversity at source, after bottling and through 6 months of storage of a commercial still natural mineral water were assessed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The results revealed clear shifts of the dominant communities present in the three different stages. The borehole waters displayed low cell densities that increased 1.5-fold upon bottling and storage, reaching a maximum (6.2 × 10(8)  cells l(-1) ) within 15 days after bottling, but experienced a significant decrease in diversity. In all cases, communities were largely dominated by Bacteria. The culturable heterotrophic community was characterized by recovering 3626 isolates, which were primarily affiliated with the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. This study indicates that bottling and storage induce quantitative and qualitative changes in the microbial assemblages that seem to be similar as revealed by the two sample batches collected on 2 consecutive years. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining culture-independent with culture-dependent methods, and repeated tests to reveal the microbial dynamics occurring from source to stored bottled water.

  15. Nitrogen-isotope analysis of groundwater nitrate in carbonate aquifers: Natural sources versus human pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitler, Charles W.; Browning, Lawrence A.

    1983-02-01

    Results of nitrogen-isotope analyses of nitrate in the waters of the Cretaceous Edwards aquifer in Texas, U.S.A., indicate that the source of the nitrate is naturally-occurring nitrogen compounds in the recharge streams. In contrast, nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the fresh waters of the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation on Grand Cayman Island, West Indies, indicate that human wastes are the source of the nitrate. The Cretaceous Edwards Limestone is a prolific aquifer that produces principally from fracture porosity along the Balcones Fault Zone. Recharge is primarily by streams crossing the fault zone. Rainfall is ˜ 70 cm yr. -1, and the water table is generally deeper than 30 m below land surface. The δ15 N of 73 samples of nitrate from Edwards waters ranged from + 1.9 to + 10‰ with an average of + 6.2‰. This δ15 N range is within the range of nitrate in surface water in the recharge streams ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 8.3‰ ) and within the range of nitrate in surface water from the Colorado River, Texas, ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 11‰ ). No sample was found to be enriched in 15N, which would suggest the presence of nitrate from animal waste ( δ 15N range = + 10 to + 22‰ ). The Ironshore Formation contains a small freshwater lens that is recharged entirely by percolation through the soil. Average rainfall is 165 cm yr. -1, and the water table is within 3 m of land surface. The δ15 N of four nitrate samples from water samples of the Ironshore Formation ranged from + 18 to + 23.9‰, which indicates a cesspool/septictank source of the nitrate. Limestone aquifers in humid environments that are recharged by percolation through the soil appear to be more susceptible to contamination by septic tanks than are aquifers in subhumid environments that feature thick unsaturated sections and are recharged by streams.

  16. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  17. Effects of natural and human factors on groundwater quality of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States-conceptual models for selected contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Thiros, Susan A.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the factors that affect water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States. The SWPA study area includes four principal aquifers of the United States: the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; and the California Coastal Basin and Central Valley aquifer systems in California. Similarities in the hydrogeology, land- and water-use practices, and water-quality issues for alluvial basins within the study area allow for regional analysis through synthesis of the baseline knowledge of groundwater-quality conditions in basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. Resulting improvements in the understanding of the sources, movement, and fate of contaminants are assisting in the development of tools used to assess aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability. This report synthesizes previously published information about the groundwater systems and water quality of 15 information-rich basin-fill aquifers (SWPA case-study basins) into conceptual models of the primary natural and human factors commonly affecting groundwater quality with respect to selected contaminants, thereby helping to build a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to those contaminants. Four relatively common contaminants (dissolved solids, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium) and two contaminant classes (volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticide compounds) were investigated for sources and controls affecting their occurrence and distribution above specified levels of concern in groundwater of the case-study basins. Conceptual models of factors that are important to aquifer vulnerability with respect to those contaminants and contaminant classes were subsequently formed. The

  18. BIOVENTING - Groundwater Aeration by Discontinuous Oxygen Gas Pulse Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater aeration by discontinuous oxygen gas pulse injections appears to be a promising concept for enhanced natural attenuation of dissolved contaminants that are susceptible for oxygenase enzyme attacks. Oxygen amendments facilitate indigenous microbiota to catabolize groundwater pollutants, such as aromatics, that are considered to be recalcitrant in absence of dissolved oxygen. As a rule, natural attenuation of many pollutants under aerobic conditions is considerably faster than under anaerobic conditions. Thus, enhancing the dissolved oxygen level appears to be worthwhile. In situ aeration of groundwater has been accomplished by air sparging, H2O2-supply, or by utilization of oxygen release compounds. However, continuous aeration of previously anaerobic groundwater is not desirable for several reasons: (a) economic efforts too high, (b) pollutant dislocation towards surface (desired only in air sparging), (c) risk of aquifer clogging (gas clogging, oxidation of ferrous iron, formation of bioslimes). In contrast, discontinuous oxygen gas sparging provides only for periodical groundwater aeration which is followed by microaerobic and suboxic conditions. Microaerobic conditions can prevail spatially (e.g., at plume fringes or within biofilms) or temporarily (e.g., at discontinuous bioventing). They still allow adapted bacteria to transform environmental pollutants to less toxic compounds, e.g., aromatic ring cleavage after dioxygenasis attack. Ring cleavage products, on the other hand, may be degraded more easily by anaerobic consortia than the initial aromatic compounds, making oxygen depletion periods highly intriguing in regard to an initiation of natural attenuation processes at plume fringes. In our work we outline the effect of oxygen depletion conditions on biodegradation of monchlorobenzene (MCB) as they occur subsequently to temporary aeration periods. For microaerobic conditions, relative to the oxygen supply, a stoichiometric transformation of MCB

  19. Natural contamination with arsenic and other trace elements in groundwater of the Central-West region of Chaco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Blanes, Patricia S; Buchhamer, Edgar E; Giménez, María C

    2011-01-01

    This study covered the central agricultural region of the Chaco province, which lacks a permanent river networks. However, during the rainy period there is localized groundwater recharge. About 84 groundwater samples were taken during the period April-December 2007. These groundwater samples were collected from two different depths: 62 samples from shallow wells (4 to 20 m) and 24 samples from deep wells (20 to 100 m). Chemical variables were determined: pH, specific conductance, total dissolved solid, hardness, alkalinity, HCO(3)-, CO(3)(2-), SO(4)(2-), Cl-, NO(3)-, NO(2) -, NH(4)+, F-, As((tot)), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The chemical composition of groundwater in the study area is dominantly sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride bicarbonate, comprising more than 60% (52/86) of shallow and deep groundwater samples. Of the 86 analyzed groundwater samples, 88% exceeded the WHO (World Health Organization) and CAA (Código Alimentario Argentino) standards (10 μg/L) for As (arsenic) and 9% exceeded the WHO standard (1.5 mg/L) for F(-).Groundwater highly contaminated with As (max. 1,073 μg/L) and F- (max. 4.2 mg/L) was found in shallow aquifer. The contaminated groundwater is characterized by high pH (max. 8.9), alkalinity (max. HCO(3)- 1,932 mg/L), SO(4)(2-) (max. 11,862 mg/L), Na(+) (max. 3,158 mg/L), Cl(-) (max. 10,493 mg/L) and electric conductivity greater than 33.3 μS/cm. Other associated elements (Ni, Pb, Cu and Zn) are present in low concentrations, except for Fe that in 32% of samples exceeded the guideline value of 0.3 mg/L suggested by the CAA.

  20. Simulations of groundwater flow, transport, and age in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a study of transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Vulnerability to contamination from manmade and natural sources can be characterized by the groundwater-age distribution measured in a supply well and the associated implications for the source depths of the withdrawn water. Coupled groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the transport of the geochemical age-tracers carbon-14, tritium, and three chlorofluorocarbon species to public-supply wells in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A separate, regional-scale simulation of transport of carbon-14 that used the flow-field computed by a previously documented regional groundwater flow model was calibrated and used to specify the initial concentrations of carbon-14 in the local-scale transport model. Observations of the concentrations of each of the five chemical species, in addition to water-level observations and measurements of intra-borehole flow within a public-supply well, were used to calibrate parameters of the local-scale groundwater flow and transport models. The calibrated groundwater flow model simulates the mixing of “young” groundwater, which entered the groundwater flow system after 1950 as recharge at the water table, with older resident groundwater that is more likely associated with natural contaminants. Complexity of the aquifer system in the zone of transport between the water table and public-supply well screens was simulated with a geostatistically generated stratigraphic realization based upon observed lithologic transitions at borehole control locations. Because effective porosity was simulated as spatially uniform, the simulated age tracers are more efficiently transported through the portions of the simulated aquifer with relatively higher simulated hydraulic conductivity. Non-pumping groundwater wells with long screens that connect aquifer intervals having different hydraulic heads can provide alternate pathways for contaminant transport that are faster than the advective transport through the aquifer material. Simulation of

  1. Groundwater-fed irrigation impacts spatially distributed temporal scaling behavior of the natural system: a spatio-temporal framework for understanding water management impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, Laura E.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-03-01

    Regional scale water management analysis increasingly relies on integrated modeling tools. Much recent work has focused on groundwater-surface water interactions and feedbacks. However, to our knowledge, no study has explicitly considered impacts of management operations on the temporal dynamics of the natural system. Here, we simulate twenty years of hourly moisture dependent, groundwater-fed irrigation using a three-dimensional, fully integrated, hydrologic model (ParFlow-CLM). Results highlight interconnections between irrigation demand, groundwater oscillation frequency and latent heat flux variability not previously demonstrated. Additionally, the three-dimensional model used allows for novel consideration of spatial patterns in temporal dynamics. Latent heat flux and water table depth both display spatial organization in temporal scaling, an important finding given the spatial homogeneity and weak scaling observed in atmospheric forcings. Pumping and irrigation amplify high frequency (sub-annual) variability while attenuating low frequency (inter-annual) variability. Irrigation also intensifies scaling within irrigated areas, essentially increasing temporal memory in both the surface and the subsurface. These findings demonstrate management impacts that extend beyond traditional water balance considerations to the fundamental behavior of the system itself. This is an important step to better understanding groundwater’s role as a buffer for natural variability and the impact that water management has on this capacity.

  2. Hydrogeologic Settings and Ground-Water Flow Simulations for Regional Studies of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to Public-Supply Wells - Studies Begun in 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2007-01-01

    This study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) is being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and was designed to increase understanding of the most important factors to consider in ground-water vulnerability assessments. The seven TANC studies that began in 2001 used retrospective data and ground-water flow models to evaluate hydrogeologic variables that affect aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability at a regional scale. Ground-water flow characteristics, regional water budgets, pumping-well information, and water-quality data were compiled from existing data and used to develop conceptual models of ground-water conditions for each study area. Steady-state regional ground-water flow models were used to represent the conceptual models, and advective particle-tracking simulations were used to compute areas contributing recharge and traveltimes from recharge to selected public-supply wells. Retrospective data and modeling results were tabulated into a relational database for future analysis. Seven study areas were selected to evaluate a range of hydrogeologic settings and management practices across the Nation: the Salt Lake Valley, Utah; the Eagle Valley and Spanish Springs Valley, Nevada; the San Joaquin Valley, California; the Northern Tampa Bay region, Florida; the Pomperaug River Basin, Connecticut; the Great Miami River Basin, Ohio; and the Eastern High Plains, Nebraska. This Professional Paper Chapter presents the hydrogeologic settings and documents the ground-water flow models for each of the NAWQA TANC regional study areas that began work in 2001. Methods used to compile retrospective data, determine contributing areas of public-supply wells, and characterize oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions also are presented. This Professional Paper Chapter provides the foundation for future susceptibility and vulnerability analyses in the TANC

  3. Simulated response of the High Plains aquifer to ground-water withdrawals in the Upper Republican Natural Resources District, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peckenpaugh, J.M.; Kern, R.A.; Dugan, J.T.; Kilpatrick, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    finished drinking water. In the upland subwatersheds, ground-water flow from the tiles appears to have been the primary means of transport to the streams. Concentrations in tileflow and streamflow generally were 4 to 16 milligrams per liter, with the lower concen- trations often the result of dilution by surface runoff. Loss ratios, chemical yields expressed as a percentage of average application rates of nitrate as nitrogen for October 1992-September 1993, were about 10 percent for surface flow and more than 100 percent for tileflow from the 366-hectare basin and were more than 200 percent for streamflow from the downstream subwatershed. Concentrations of atrazine and metolachlor in streamflow, typically, were less than the Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter, but were as high as 59 and 80 micrograms per liter, respectively, during stormflow. Concentrations as high as 170 micrograms per liter occurred in tileflow, but these were related to surface flow through surface inlets. The transport of herbicides was extremely variable, with most of the loads occurring during stormflow. Atrazine appeared more susceptable to transport losses to streamflow than did metolachlor. Loss ratios for streamflow from the subwatersheds for April- September periods were 0.3 to 20 percent for atrazine and 0.1 to 2.9 percent for metolachlor. Chemical loss ratios indicated differences in the transport characteristics of the three subwatersheds. The downstream subwatershed, which has steeper terrain, a more-developed natural drainage system, and fewer tiles than the two upland subwatersheds, had the largest loss rates for all three chemicals--206 percent for nitrate as nitrogen (October 1992-September 1993) and 20 percent for atrazine and 2.9 percent for metolachlor (April-September 1993). For May-July 1993, when most of the herbicides were transported, the downstream subwatershed also had the largest cumulative unit discharge and the largest streamflow-to-precipitation ra

  4. Evaluation of Groundwater Recharge Estimates in a Partially Metamorphosed Sedimentary Basin in a Tropical Environment: Application of Natural Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Oteng Mensah, Felix; Alo, Clement

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the representativeness of groundwater recharge estimates through the chloride mass balance (CMB) method in a tropical environment. The representativeness of recharge estimates using this methodology is tested using evaporation estimates from isotope data, the general spatial distribution of the potential field, and the topographical variations in the area. This study suggests that annual groundwater recharge rates in the area ranges between 0.9% and 21% of annual precipitation. These estimates are consistent with evaporation rates computed from stable isotope data of groundwater and surface water in the Voltaian Basin. Moreover, estimates of groundwater recharge through numerical model calibration in other parts of the terrain appear to be consistent with the current data in this study. A spatial distribution of groundwater recharge in the area based on the estimated data takes a pattern akin to the spatial pattern of distribution of the hydraulic head, the local topography, and geology of the terrain. This suggests that the estimates at least qualitatively predicts the local recharge and discharge locations in the terrain. PMID:24772021

  5. Groundwater contamination in coastal urban areas: Anthropogenic pressure and natural attenuation processes. Example of Recife (PE State, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Hirata, R.; Pauwels, H.; Cary, L.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Chatton, E.; Aquilina, L.; Labasque, T.; Martins, V.; Montenegro, S.; Batista, J.; Aurouet, A.; Santos, J.; Bertolo, R.; Picot, G.; Franzen, M.; Hochreutener, R.; Braibant, G.

    2016-09-01

    In a context of increasing land use pressure (over-exploitation, surface-water contamination) and repeated droughts, identifying the processes affecting groundwater quality in coastal megacities of the tropical and arid countries will condition their long-term social and environmental sustainability. The present study focuses on the Brazilian Recife Metropolitan Region (RMR), which is a highly urbanized area (3,743,854 inhabitants in 2010) on the Atlantic coast located next to an estuarial zone and overlying a multi-layered sedimentary system featured by a variable sediment texture and organic content. It investigates the contamination and redox status patterns conditioning potential attenuation within the shallow aquifers that constitute the interface between the city and the strategic deeper semi-confined aquifers. These latter are increasingly exploited, leading to high drawdown in potenciometric levels of 20-30 m and up to 70 m in some high well density places, and potentially connected to the surface through leakage. From a multi-tracer approach (major ions, major gases, δ11B, δ18O-SO4, δ34S-SO4) carried out during two field campaigns in September 2012 and March 2013 (sampling of 19 wells and 3 surface waters), it has been possible to assess the contamination sources and the redox processes. The increasing trend for mineralization from inland to coastal and estuarial wells (from 119 to around 10,000 μS/cm) is at first attributed to water-rock interactions combined with natural and human-induced potentiometric gradients. Secondly, along with this trend, one finds an environmental pressure gradient related to sewage and/or surface-channel network impacts (typically depleted δ11B within the range of 10-15‰) that are purveyors of chloride, nitrate, ammonium and sulfate. Nitrate, ammonium and sulfate (ranging from 0 to 1.70 mmol/L, from 0 to 0,65 mmol/L, from 0.03 to 3.91 mmol/L respectively are also potentially produced or consumed through various redox

  6. Groundwater contamination in coastal urban areas: Anthropogenic pressure and natural attenuation processes. Example of Recife (PE State, NE Brazil).

    PubMed

    Bertrand, G; Hirata, R; Pauwels, H; Cary, L; Petelet-Giraud, E; Chatton, E; Aquilina, L; Labasque, T; Martins, V; Montenegro, S; Batista, J; Aurouet, A; Santos, J; Bertolo, R; Picot, G; Franzen, M; Hochreutener, R; Braibant, G

    2016-09-01

    In a context of increasing land use pressure (over-exploitation, surface-water contamination) and repeated droughts, identifying the processes affecting groundwater quality in coastal megacities of the tropical and arid countries will condition their long-term social and environmental sustainability. The present study focuses on the Brazilian Recife Metropolitan Region (RMR), which is a highly urbanized area (3,743,854 inhabitants in 2010) on the Atlantic coast located next to an estuarial zone and overlying a multi-layered sedimentary system featured by a variable sediment texture and organic content. It investigates the contamination and redox status patterns conditioning potential attenuation within the shallow aquifers that constitute the interface between the city and the strategic deeper semi-confined aquifers. These latter are increasingly exploited, leading to high drawdown in potenciometric levels of 20-30m and up to 70m in some high well density places, and potentially connected to the surface through leakage. From a multi-tracer approach (major ions, major gases, δ(11)B, δ(18)O-SO4, δ(34)S-SO4) carried out during two field campaigns in September 2012 and March 2013 (sampling of 19 wells and 3 surface waters), it has been possible to assess the contamination sources and the redox processes. The increasing trend for mineralization from inland to coastal and estuarial wells (from 119 to around 10,000μS/cm) is at first attributed to water-rock interactions combined with natural and human-induced potentiometric gradients. Secondly, along with this trend, one finds an environmental pressure gradient related to sewage and/or surface-channel network impacts (typically depleted δ(11)B within the range of 10-15‰) that are purveyors of chloride, nitrate, ammonium and sulfate. Nitrate, ammonium and sulfate (ranging from 0 to 1.70mmol/L, from 0 to 0,65mmol/L, from 0.03 to 3.91mmol/L respectively are also potentially produced or consumed through various redox

  7. Groundwater contamination in coastal urban areas: Anthropogenic pressure and natural attenuation processes. Example of Recife (PE State, NE Brazil).

    PubMed

    Bertrand, G; Hirata, R; Pauwels, H; Cary, L; Petelet-Giraud, E; Chatton, E; Aquilina, L; Labasque, T; Martins, V; Montenegro, S; Batista, J; Aurouet, A; Santos, J; Bertolo, R; Picot, G; Franzen, M; Hochreutener, R; Braibant, G

    2016-09-01

    In a context of increasing land use pressure (over-exploitation, surface-water contamination) and repeated droughts, identifying the processes affecting groundwater quality in coastal megacities of the tropical and arid countries will condition their long-term social and environmental sustainability. The present study focuses on the Brazilian Recife Metropolitan Region (RMR), which is a highly urbanized area (3,743,854 inhabitants in 2010) on the Atlantic coast located next to an estuarial zone and overlying a multi-layered sedimentary system featured by a variable sediment texture and organic content. It investigates the contamination and redox status patterns conditioning potential attenuation within the shallow aquifers that constitute the interface between the city and the strategic deeper semi-confined aquifers. These latter are increasingly exploited, leading to high drawdown in potenciometric levels of 20-30m and up to 70m in some high well density places, and potentially connected to the surface through leakage. From a multi-tracer approach (major ions, major gases, δ(11)B, δ(18)O-SO4, δ(34)S-SO4) carried out during two field campaigns in September 2012 and March 2013 (sampling of 19 wells and 3 surface waters), it has been possible to assess the contamination sources and the redox processes. The increasing trend for mineralization from inland to coastal and estuarial wells (from 119 to around 10,000μS/cm) is at first attributed to water-rock interactions combined with natural and human-induced potentiometric gradients. Secondly, along with this trend, one finds an environmental pressure gradient related to sewage and/or surface-channel network impacts (typically depleted δ(11)B within the range of 10-15‰) that are purveyors of chloride, nitrate, ammonium and sulfate. Nitrate, ammonium and sulfate (ranging from 0 to 1.70mmol/L, from 0 to 0,65mmol/L, from 0.03 to 3.91mmol/L respectively are also potentially produced or consumed through various redox

  8. Spectrum and treatment of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobes are the most predominant components of the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are a frequent cause of endogenous bacterial infections. Anaerobic infections can occur in all body locations: the central nervous system, oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin, and soft tissues. Treatment of anaerobic infection is complicated by their slow growth in culture, by their polymicrobial nature and by their growing resistance to antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy is frequently the only form of therapy needed, whereas in others it is an important adjunct to drainage and surgery. Because anaerobes generally are isolated mixed with aerobes, the antimicrobial chosen should provide for adequate coverage of both. The most effective antimicrobials against anaerobes are: metronidazole, the carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem), chloramphenicol, the combinations of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitors (ampicillin or ticarcillin plus clavulanate, amoxicillin plus sulbactam, piperacillin plus tazobactam), tigecycline, cefoxitin and clindamycin. PMID:26620376

  9. Assessment of groundwater input and water quality changes impacting natural vegetation in the Loxahatchee River and floodplain ecosystem, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William H.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; McPherson, Benjamin F.; Hedgepath, Marion; Lerch, Harry E.; Reich, Christopher; Torres, Arturo E.; Corum, Margo D.; Roberts, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The Loxahatchee River and Estuary are small, shallow, water bodies located in southeastern Florida. Historically, the Northwest Branch (Fork) of the Loxahatchee River was primarily a freshwater system. In 1947, the river inlet at Jupiter was dredged for navigation and has remained permanently open since that time. Drainage patterns within the basin have also been altered significantly due to land development, road construction (e.g., Florida Turnpike), and construction of the C-18 and other canals. These anthropogenic activities along with sea level rise have resulted in significant adverse impacts on the ecosystem over the last several decades, including increased saltwater encroachment and undesired vegetation changes in the floodplain. The problem of saltwater intrusion and vegetation degradation in the Loxahatchee River may be partly induced by diminished freshwater input, from both surface water and ground water into the River system. The overall objective of this project was to assess the seasonal surface water and groundwater interaction and the influence of the biogeochemical characteristics of shallow groundwater and porewater on vegetation health in the Loxahatchee floodplain. The hypothesis tested are: (1) groundwater influx constitutes a significant component of the overall flow of water into the Loxahatchee River; (2) salinity and other chemical constituents in shallow groundwater and porewater of the river floodplain may affect the distribution and health of the floodplain vegetation.

  10. Assessment of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at sites FT03, LF13, and WP14/LF15, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality, aquifer-sediment, and hydro-logic data were used to assess the effectiveness of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at Fire Training Area Three, the Rubble Area Landfill, the Liquid Waste Disposal Landfill, and the Receiver Station Landfill in the East Management Unit of Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. These sites, which are contaminated with chlorinated solvents and fuel hydrocarbons, are under-going long-term monitoring to determine if natural attenuation continues to sufficiently reduce contaminant concentrations to meet regulatory requirements. This report is the first assessment of the effectiveness of natural attenuation at these sites since long-term monitoring began in 1999, and follows a preliminary investigation done in 1995?96. This assessment was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force.Since 1995?96, additional information has been collected and used in the current assessment. The conclusions in this report are based primarily on ground-water samples collected from January through March 2000. Previous analytical results from selected wells, available geologic and geo-physical well logs, and newly acquired information such as sediment organic-carbon measurements, hydraulic-conductivity measurements determined from slug tests on wells in the natural attenuation study area, and water-level measurements from surficial-aquifer wells also were used in this assessment. This information was used to: (1) calculate retardation factors and estimate contaminant migration velocities, (2) improve estimates of ground-water flow directions and inferred contaminant migration pathways, (3) better define the areal extent of contamination and the proximity of contaminants to discharge areas and the Base boundary, (4) develop a better under-standing of the vertical variability of contaminant concentrations and redox conditions, (5) evaluate the effects of temporal changes on concentrations in the plumes and

  11. Hydrogeologic settings and groundwater-flow simulations for regional investigations of the transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants to public-supply wells—Investigations begun in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) was begun in 2001 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The study was designed to shed light on factors that affect the vulnerability of groundwater and, more specifically, water from public-supply wells to contamination to provide a context for the NAWQA Program's earlier finding of mixtures of contaminants at low concentrations in groundwater near the water table in urban areas across the Nation. The TANC study has included investigations at both the regional (tens to thousands of square kilometers) and local (generally less than 25 square kilometers) scales. At the regional scale, the approach to investigation involves refining conceptual models of groundwater flow in hydrologically distinct settings and then constructing or updating a groundwater-flow model with particle tracking for each setting to help quantify regional water budgets, public-supply well contributing areas (areas contributing recharge to wells and zones of contribution for wells), and traveltimes from recharge areas to selected wells. A great deal of information about each contributing area is captured from the model output, including values for 170 variables that describe physical and (or) geochemical characteristics of the contributing areas. The information is subsequently stored in a relational database. Retrospective water-quality data from monitoring, domestic, and many of the public-supply wells, as well as data from newly collected samples at selected public-supply wells, also are stored in the database and are used with the model output to help discern the more important factors affecting vulnerability in many, if not most, settings. The study began with investigations in seven regional areas, and it benefits from being conducted as part of the NAWQA Program, in which consistent methods are used so that meaningful comparisons can be

  12. Mechanisms of Virus Adsorption Following Land Application of Anaerobically Treated Flushed Dairy Manure Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil adsorption mechanisms of viruses in untreated and anaerobically treated animal manure wastewater and groundwater was investigated. Batch adsorption studies were performed using cationic (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, HTAB), anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS), and nonionic (polyoxy...

  13. Tracking natural and anthropogenic origins of dissolved arsenic during surface and groundwater interaction in a post-closure mining context: Isotopic constraints.

    PubMed

    Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Verdoux, Patrick; Boutin, René

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of stream waters and groundwater is a real issue in Au-As mine environments. At the Salsigne Au-As mine, southern France, arsenic contamination persists after closure and remediation of the site. In this study, natural and anthropogenic arsenic inputs in surface water and groundwater are identified based on (87)Sr/(86)Sr, and δ(18)O and δ(2)H isotopic composition of water. In the wet season, downstream of the remediated zone, the arsenic contents in stream water and alluvial aquifer groundwater are high, with values in the order of 36 μg/L and 40 μg/L respectively, while upstream natural background average concentrations are around 4 μg/L. Locally down-gradient of the reclaimed area, arsenic concentrations in stream water showed 2 peaks, one during an important rainy event (101 mm) in the wet season in May, and a longer one over the dry period, reaching 120 and 110 μg/L respectively. The temporal variations in arsenic content in stream water can be explained i) during the dry season, by release of arsenic stored in the alluvial sediments through increased contribution from base flow and decreased stream flow and ii) during major rainy events, by mobilization of arsenic associated with important surface runoff. The (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios associated with increasing arsenic content in stream waters downstream of the reclaimed area are significantly lower than that of the natural Sr inherited from Variscan formations. These low (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios are likely to be associated with the decontaminating water treatment processes, used in the past and still at present, where CaO, produced from marine limestone and therefore showing a low (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, is used to precipitate Ca3(AsO4)2. The low Sr isotope signatures will then impact on the Sr isotope ratio of (1) the Ca-arsenate stored in tailing dams, (2) effluent currently produced by water treatment process and (3) groundwater draining from the overall site. Furthermore, Δ(2)H shows

  14. Tracking natural and anthropogenic origins of dissolved arsenic during surface and groundwater interaction in a post-closure mining context: Isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Verdoux, Patrick; Boutin, René

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic contamination of stream waters and groundwater is a real issue in Au-As mine environments. At the Salsigne Au-As mine, southern France, arsenic contamination persists after closure and remediation of the site. In this study, natural and anthropogenic arsenic inputs in surface water and groundwater are identified based on 87Sr/86Sr, and δ18O and δ2H isotopic composition of water. In the wet season, downstream of the remediated zone, the arsenic contents in stream water and alluvial aquifer groundwater are high, with values in the order of 36 μg/L and 40 μg/L respectively, while upstream natural background average concentrations are around 4 μg/L. Locally down-gradient of the reclaimed area, arsenic concentrations in stream water showed 2 peaks, one during an important rainy event (101 mm) in the wet season in May, and a longer one over the dry period, reaching 120 and 110 μg/L respectively. The temporal variations in arsenic content in stream water can be explained i) during the dry season, by release of arsenic stored in the alluvial sediments through increased contribution from base flow and decreased stream flow and ii) during major rainy events, by mobilization of arsenic associated with important surface runoff. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios associated with increasing arsenic content in stream waters downstream of the reclaimed area are significantly lower than that of the natural Sr inherited from Variscan formations. These low 87Sr/86Sr ratios are likely to be associated with the decontaminating water treatment processes, used in the past and still at present, where CaO, produced from marine limestone and therefore showing a low 87Sr/86Sr ratios, is used to precipitate Ca3(AsO4)2. The low Sr isotope signatures will then impact on the Sr isotope ratio of (1) the Ca-arsenate stored in tailing dams, (2) effluent currently produced by water treatment process and (3) groundwater draining from the overall site. Furthermore, Δ2H shows that the low 87Sr/86Sr

  15. Tracking natural and anthropogenic origins of dissolved arsenic during surface and groundwater interaction in a post-closure mining context: Isotopic constraints.

    PubMed

    Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Verdoux, Patrick; Boutin, René

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of stream waters and groundwater is a real issue in Au-As mine environments. At the Salsigne Au-As mine, southern France, arsenic contamination persists after closure and remediation of the site. In this study, natural and anthropogenic arsenic inputs in surface water and groundwater are identified based on (87)Sr/(86)Sr, and δ(18)O and δ(2)H isotopic composition of water. In the wet season, downstream of the remediated zone, the arsenic contents in stream water and alluvial aquifer groundwater are high, with values in the order of 36 μg/L and 40 μg/L respectively, while upstream natural background average concentrations are around 4 μg/L. Locally down-gradient of the reclaimed area, arsenic concentrations in stream water showed 2 peaks, one during an important rainy event (101 mm) in the wet season in May, and a longer one over the dry period, reaching 120 and 110 μg/L respectively. The temporal variations in arsenic content in stream water can be explained i) during the dry season, by release of arsenic stored in the alluvial sediments through increased contribution from base flow and decreased stream flow and ii) during major rainy events, by mobilization of arsenic associated with important surface runoff. The (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios associated with increasing arsenic content in stream waters downstream of the reclaimed area are significantly lower than that of the natural Sr inherited from Variscan formations. These low (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios are likely to be associated with the decontaminating water treatment processes, used in the past and still at present, where CaO, produced from marine limestone and therefore showing a low (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, is used to precipitate Ca3(AsO4)2. The low Sr isotope signatures will then impact on the Sr isotope ratio of (1) the Ca-arsenate stored in tailing dams, (2) effluent currently produced by water treatment process and (3) groundwater draining from the overall site. Furthermore, Δ(2)H shows

  16. The Groundwater Geochemistry of Waste Disposal Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerg, P. L.; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Christensen, T. H.; Cozzarelli, I. M.

    2003-12-01

    Landfills of solid waste are abundant sources of groundwater pollution. The potential for generatingstrongly contaminated leachate from landfill waste is very substantial. Even for small landfills the timescale can be measured in decades or centuries. This indicates that waste dumps with no measures to control leachate entrance into the groundwater may constitute a source of groundwater contamination long after dumping has ceased. In addition to these dumps, engineered landfills with liners and leachate collection systems may also constitute a source of groundwater contamination due to inadequate design, construction, and maintenance, resulting in the leakage of leachate.Landfills may pose several environmental problems (explosion hazards, vegetation damage, dust and air emissions, etc.), but groundwater pollution by leachate is considered to be the most important one and the focus of this chapter. Landfills differ significantly depending on the waste they receive: mineral waste landfills for combustion ashes, hazardous waste landfills, specific industrial landfills serving a single industry, or municipal waste landfills receiving a mixture of municipal waste, construction, and demolition waste, waste from small industries and minor quantities of hazardous waste. The latter type of landfill (termed "old landfills" in this chapter) is very common all over the world. Municipal landfills are characterized by a high content of organic waste that affects the biogeochemical processes in the landfill body and the generation of strongly anaerobic leachate with a high content of dissolved organic carbon, salts, ammonium, and organic compounds and metals released from the waste.This chapter describes the biogeochemistry of a landfill leachate plume as it emerges from the bottom of a landfill and migrates in an aquifer. The landfill hydrology, source composition, and spreading of contaminants are described in introductory sections. The focus of this chapter is on

  17. Groundwater management in France

    SciTech Connect

    Margat, J. )

    1987-01-01

    Groundwater, like other extensive natural and renewable resources, easily accessible and, at the same time, vulnerable, has to be managed so as to reconcile the unique resource with its many users, and its long-term preservation with short-term utilization requirements. Under the natural, legal, and economic conditions prevailing in France, where groundwater constitutes a large part of water production and resources, where there are tens of thousands of economic developers and users of a few hundred natural groundwater management units, such management concerns these users as well as the public and collective authorities that control the users activities for the common present and future good at all. Legislative, financial, and educational means are applied simultaneously to preserve and protect the quality and quantity of the groundwater and at times to encourage its use and stimulate its development.

  18. Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Villalba, L; Montero-Cabrera, M E; Manjón-Collado, G; Colmenero-Sujo, L; Rentería-Villalobos, M; Cano-Jiménez, A; Rodríguez-Pineda, A; Dávila-Rangel, I; Quirino-Torres, L; Herrera-Peraza, E F

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222Rn, 226Ra and total uranium in groundwater samples collected from wells distributed throughout the state of Chihuahua has been measured. The values obtained of total uranium activity concentration in groundwater throughout the state run from <0.03 up to 1.34 Bq l-1. Generally, radium activity concentration was <0.16 Bq l-1, with some exceptions; in spring water of San Diego de Alcalá, in contrast, the value reached approximately 5.3 Bq l-1. Radon activity concentration obtained throughout the state was from 1.0 to 39.8 Bq l-1. A linear correlation between uranium and radon dissolved in groundwater of individual wells was observed near Chihuahua City. Committed effective dose estimates for reference individuals were performed, with results as high as 134 microSv for infants in Aldama city. In Aldama and Chihuahua cities the average and many individual wells showed activity concentration values of uranium exceeding the Mexican norm of drinking water quality.

  19. Combining the soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation methods to estimate natural groundwater recharge: Practical aspects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively simple and practical approach for calculating groundwater recharge in semiarid plain environments with a relatively shallow water table, such as the Kansas Prairies, is outlined. Major uncertainties in the Darcian, water balance, and groundwater fluctuation analysis approaches are outlined, and a combination methodology for reducing some of the uncertainties is proposed. By combining a storm-based soilwater balance (lasting several days) with the resulting water table rise, effective storativity values of the region near the water table are obtained. This combination method is termed the 'hybrid water-fluctuation method'. Using a simple average of several such estimates results in a site-calibrated effective storativity value that can be used to translate each major water-table rise tied to a specific storm period into a corresponding amount of groundwater recharge. Examples of soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation analyses based on field-measured data from Kansas show that the proposed methodology gives better and more reliable results than either of the two well-established approaches used singly. ?? 1991.

  20. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  1. Arsenic Cycling in Hydrocarbon Plumes: Secondary Effects of Natural Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Schreiber, Madeline E; Erickson, Melinda L; Ziegler, Brady A

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  2. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Estimated Mean Annual Natural Groundwater Recharge, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents the mean annual natural groundwater recharge, in millimeters, compiled for every MRB_E2RF1catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). The source data set is Estimated Mean Annual Natural Ground-Water Recharge in the Conterminous United States (Wolock, 2003). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  3. Persistent source influences on the trailing edge of a groundwater plume, and natural attenuation timeframes: the F-Area Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Dong, Wenming; Denham, Miles E; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-04-17

    At the Savannah River Site's F-Area, wastewaters containing radionuclides were disposed into seepage basins for decades. After closure and capping in 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has being monitoring and remediating the groundwater plume. Despite numerous studies of the plume, its persistence for over 20 years has not been well understood. To better understand the plume dynamics, a limited number of deep boreholes were drilled to determine the current plume characteristics. A mixing model was developed to predict plume tritium and nitrate concentrations. We found that the plume trailing edges have emerged for some contaminants, and that contaminant recharge from the basin's vadose zone is still important. The model's estimated time-dependent basin drainage rates combined with dilution from natural recharge successfully predicted plume tritium and nitrate concentrations. This new understanding of source zone influences can help guide science-based remediation, and improve predictions of the natural attenuation timeframes.

  4. Anaerobic transformations and bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J F; Pietari, J M

    2000-02-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic compounds, notably the chlorinated solvents, are common contaminants in soil and groundwater at hazardous waste sites. While these compounds are often recalcitrant, under favorable conditions they can be transformed and degraded through microbially mediated processes. There is great interest in understanding the transformations that are observed at contaminated sites and in manipulating these systems to achieve remediation. An important class of transformations occurs in anaerobic environments. Many of the transformations are reductive, and many yield useful energy to specific anaerobic bacteria. They include reductive dechlorination, dehydrochlorination and dichloroelemination. Of these, reductive dechlorination is often a growth-supporting reaction, while the others may be abiological or catalyzed by biological molecules. The reactions may result in chlorinated products, but there are often reaction sequences leading to completely dechlorinated products. The behavior of carbon tetrachloride (CT), 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA) and the chloroethenes, perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), illustrate the range of anaerobic transformations that are possible, as well as the limited transformation that often is seen in the environment. CT undergoes reductive and substitutive reactions that are catalyzed by biological molecules but do not support bacterial growth. The anaerobic degradation of TeCA, which is a major contaminant at a site near Tacoma, WA, USA, provides examples of each type of transformation, and the products formed are consistent with the chlorinated compounds that are found in groundwater extraction wells. A laboratory study, using anaerobic sludge that had been fed chlorinated compounds, a cell-free extract from the sludge, and killed controls, showed that TeCA was transformed to four products and that these were further transformed, suggesting that it might be possible to degrade TeCA to innocuous products

  5. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  6. Monitoring Anaerobic TCE Degradation by Evanite Cultre in Column Packed with TCE-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Han, K.; Ahn, G.; Park, S.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a long-term common groundwater pollutant because the compound with high density is slowly released into groundwater. Physical and chemical remediation processes have been used to clean-up the contaminant, but novel remediation technology is required to overcome a low efficiency of the traditional treatment process. Many researchers focused on biological process using an anaerobic TCE degrading culture, dehalococcoides spp., but it still needs to evaluate whether the process can be applied into field scale under aerobic condition. Therefore, in this work we examined two different types (i.e., Natural attenuation and bioaugmentation) of biological remediation process in anaerobic column packed with TCE-contaminated soil. A TCE degradation by indigenous microorganisms was confirmed by monitoring TCE and the metabolites (c-DCE, VC, ETH). However, TCE was transformed and stoichiometry amount of c-DCE was produced, and VC and ETH was not detected. To test bioaugmentation of Evanite culture containing dehalococcoides spp., Evanite culture was injected into the column and TCE degradation to c-DCE, VC, ETH was monitored. We are evaluating the transport of the Evanite culture in the column by measuring TCE and VC reductases. In the result, the TCE was completely degraded to ETH using hydrogen as electron donor generate by hydrogen-production fermentation from formate.

  7. Biodegradation of soluble aromatic compounds of jet fuel under anaerobic conditions: laboratory batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z; Breedveld, G; Aagaard, P

    2001-11-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were performed with contaminated aquifer sediments and four soluble aromatic components of jet fuel to assess their biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. The biodegradation of four aromatic compounds, toluene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (TMB), and naphthalene, separately or together, was investigated under strictly anaerobic conditions in the dark for a period of 160 days. Of the aromatic compounds, toluene and o-xylene were degraded both as a single substrate and in a mixture with the other aromatic compounds, while TMB was not biodegraded as a single substrate, but was biodegraded in the presence of the other aromatic hydrocarbons. Substrate interaction is thus significant in the biodegradation of TMB. Biodegradation of naphthalene was not observed, either as a single substrate or in a mixture of other aromatic hydrocarbons. Although redox conditions were dominated by iron reduction, a clear relation between degradation and sulfate reduction was observed. Methanogenesis took place during the later stages of incubation. However, the large background of Fe(II) masked the increase of Fe(II) concentration due to iron reduction. Thus, although microbial reduction of Fe(III) is an important process, the evidence is not conclusive. Our results have shown that a better understanding of the degradation of complex mixtures of hydrocarbons under anaerobic conditions is important in the application of natural attenuation as a remedial method for soil and groundwater contamination.

  8. Identification of anthropogenic and natural inputs of sulfate into a karstic coastal groundwater system in northeast China: evidence from major ions, δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D.; Song, X.; Currell, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    The hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater evolution in the Daweijia area of Dalian, northeast China, were characterized using hydrochemistry and isotopes of carbon and sulfur (δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4). The aim was to distinguish anthropogenic impacts as distinct from natural processes, with a particular focus on sulfate, which is found at elevated levels (range: 54.4 to 368.8 mg L-1; mean: 174.4 mg L-1) in fresh and brackish groundwater. The current investigation reveals minor seawater intrusion impact (not exceeding 5 % of overall solute load), in contrast with extensive impacts observed in 1982 during the height of intensive abstraction. This indicates that measures to restrict groundwater abstraction have been effective. However, hydrochemical facies analysis shows that the groundwater remains in a state of ongoing hydrochemical evolution (towards Ca-Cl type water) and quality degradation (increasing nitrate and sulphate concentrations). The wide range of NO3 concentrations (74.7-579 mg L-1) in the Quaternary aquifer indicates considerable input of fertilizers and/or leakage from septic systems. Both δ13C (-14.5 to -5.9 ‰) and δ34SSO4 (+5.4-+13.1 ‰) values in groundwater show increasing trends along groundwater flow paths. While carbonate minerals may contribute to increasing δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4 values in deep karstic groundwater, high loads of agricultural fertilizers reaching the aquifer via irrigation return flow are likely the main source of the dissolved sulfate in Quaternary groundwater, as shown by distinctive isotopic ratios and a lack of evidence for other sources in the major ion chemistry. According to isotope mass balance calculations, the fertilizer contribution to overall sulfate has reached an average of 62.1 % in the Quaternary aquifer, which has a strong hydraulic connection to the underlying carbonate aquifer. The results point to an alarming level of impact from the local intensive agriculture on the groundwater system, a

  9. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    DOE PAGES

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactivemore » transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be relatively small, yet persistent over 100 a.« less

  10. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactive transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be

  11. Enhancement of the biodegradability of aromatic groundwater contaminants.

    PubMed

    Bittkau, Anke; Geyer, Roland; Bhatt, Manish; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2004-12-15

    Groundwater (GW) from the Bitterfeld industrial region, Central Germany, is contaminated mainly with monochlorobenzene (MCB). Accordingly, current research addresses the development of feasible in situ groundwater remediation technologies. Although easily degradable under aerobic conditions, MCB persists in the essentially anaerobic Bitterfeld aquifer. Therefore, we focused on primary oxidation of MCB and the subsequent anaerobic biodegradability of MCB oxidation products by the indigenous microbial community. In groundwater microcosms, most efficient MCB removal was observed upon treatment with Fenton's reagent (H2O2 + Fe2+), which produces the highly reactive hydroxyl radical and Fe3+ simultaneously. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis following different treatments suggested respective shifts of the microbial community compositions, and indicated that Fenton's reagent had a rather beneficial than an adverse effect on biomass development. Potential metabolites of hydroxyl radical attack on MCB such as chlorohydroquinone, hydroquinone, catechol, resorcinol, and phenol were anaerobically degraded by the groundwater microbial community under Fe3+ -reducing conditions.

  12. Integrating the Sciences to Investigate Groundwater Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Julie R.; Madden, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations that integrate concepts from geological sciences with biology and chemistry are rare. The authors present an investigation that introduces high school students to microbe-mineral interactions by tying together anaerobic respiration, reduction reactions, metal ion solubility, and groundwater pollution. During the investigation,…

  13. Monitoring in Situ Anaerobic Alkylbenzene Biodegradation Based on Mass Spectrometric Detection of Unique Metabolites or Real-Time PCR Detection of a Catabolic Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a cost-effective and viable approach for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater. However, regulatory acceptance of the approach is often contingent on monitoring that can convincingly demonstrate the role of microbial degradation. Recent advances in anaerobic hydrocarbon biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and molecular biology have fostered the development of powerful new techniques that can be applied to MNA of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Here we report two independent methods that have been developed to monitor in situ, anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and xylenes. A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and highly selective detection of distinctive indicators of anaerobic alkylbenzene metabolism. The target metabolites, benzylsuccinic acid (BS) and methylbenzylsuccinic acid (MeBS) isomers, have no known sources other than anaerobic toluene or xylene degradation; thus, their mere presence in groundwater provides definitive evidence of in situ metabolism. The method, which involves small sample size (<1 mL) and no extraction/concentration steps, relies on isotope dilution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring. Detection limits for benzylsuccinates were determined to be ca. 0.3 μg/L and accuracy and precision were favorable in a groundwater matrix. The LC/MS/MS method was used to characterize geographic and temporal distributions of benzylsuccinates in an anaerobic, hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. BS was never detected and MeBS isomers were detected in the three wells with the highest concentrations of BTEX; MeBS concentrations ranged from <0.3 to 205 μg/L. A strong linear correlation was found between concentrations of total MeBS isomers and their parent compounds, xylenes. A monitoring method based on real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis has been developed to specifically quantify populations of

  14. The effect of salinization and freshening events in coastal aquifers on nutrient characteristics as deduced from column experiments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russak, A.; Sivan, O.; Herut, B.; Lazar, B.; Yechieli, Y.

    2015-10-01

    This study experimentally quantified the effect of seawater intrusion (salinization) and freshening events in coastal aquifers on nutrient (N, P and DSi) dynamics across the fresh-saline groundwater interface. Laboratory column experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in order to simulate the processes occurring in the fresh-saline interface. They were performed with aquifer sediments, simulating the natural conditions during alterations of natural fresh groundwater to seawater and vice versa. The salinization and freshening experiments showed that NH4+ and PO43- and DSi were affected mainly by ion exchange processes while microbial activity controlled the nitrogen species NO3- and NO2-. Due to the cation exchange, salinization generated enrichment (above the expected conservative behavior) of NH4+, up to 80 μmol L-1 (an order of magnitude higher than in seawater or fresh groundwater). Under anaerobic conditions NO3- was removed by denitrification, as demonstrated by the decrease in NO3- concentrations, the increase in NO2- concentrations, and the increase in δ15N by 15-25‰. Clear evidence was shown for anion exchange of PO43-, which competes with HCO3- and boron on adsorption sites. DSi seems to take part in the exchange process, similar to PO43-.

  15. Methodology for applying monitored natural attenuation to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground-water systems with examples from South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Frank H.; Robertson, John F.; Landmeyer, James E.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2000-01-01

    These two sites illustrate how the efficiency of natural attenuation processes acting on petroleum hydrocarbons can be systematically evaluated using hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiologic methods.  These methods, in turn, can be used to assess the role that the natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons can play in achieving overall site remediation.

  16. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  17. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  18. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  19. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and TCE to the less chlorinated daughter products dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Although recent laboratory studies conducted with halorespiring microorganisms suggest that complete reduction to ethene is possible, in the majority of groundwater systems reductive dechlorination apparently stops at DCE or VC. However, recent investigations conducted with aquifer and stream-bed sediments have demonstrated that microbial oxidation of these reduced daughter products can be significant under anaerobic redox conditions. The combination of reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE under anaerobic conditions followed by anaerobic microbial oxidation of DCE and VC provides a possible microbial pathway for complete degradation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater systems.

  20. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Radon levels in groundwaters and natural radioactivity in soils of the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain.

    PubMed

    Moreno, V; Bach, J; Baixeras, C; Font, Ll

    2014-02-01

    Groundwater radon level and soil radionuclide concentration have been measured in the volcanic region of La Garrotxa (Catalonia, Spain) to further research on the origin and dynamics of high radon levels over volcanic materials found in this region. Water samples from different aquifers have been collected from wells and springs and the water radon levels obtained have been lower than 30 Bq l(-1). Soil samples have been collected from different geological formations (volcanic and non-volcanic), being Quaternary sedimentary deposits those that have presented the highest mean values of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th concentrations (448 ± 70 Bq kg(-1), 35 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 38 ± 5 Bq kg(-1), respectively). Additionally, indoor/outdoor terrestrial radiation absorbed dose rate in air have been measured to better characterize the region from the radiological point of view. Terrestrial radiation absorbed dose rates measurement points have been chosen on the basis of geological and demographical considerations and the results obtained, from 27 to 91 nGy h(-1), show a clear relation with geological formation materials. The highest terrestrial gamma absorbed dose rate is observed over Quaternary sedimentary deposits as well. All these results help to better understand previous surveys related with indoor and outdoor radon levels and to reinforce the hypotheses of a radon transport through the fissure network.

  2. Feasibility analysis of using inverse modeling for estimating natural groundwater recharge from a large-scale soil moisture monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Yue, Weifeng; Szilagyi, Jozsef; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; You, Jinsheng; Chen, Xunhong; Shulski, Martha D.; Young, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Despite the importance of groundwater recharge (GR), its accurate estimation still remains one of the most challenging tasks in the field of hydrology. In this study, with the help of inverse modeling, long-term (6 years) soil moisture data at 34 sites from the Automated Weather Data Network (AWDN) were used to estimate the spatial distribution of GR across Nebraska, USA, where significant spatial variability exists in soil properties and precipitation (P). To ensure the generality of this study and its potential broad applications, data from public domains and literature were used to parameterize the standard Hydrus-1D model. Although observed soil moisture differed significantly across the AWDN sites mainly due to the variations in P and soil properties, the simulations were able to capture the dynamics of observed soil moisture under different climatic and soil conditions. The inferred mean annual GR from the calibrated models varied over three orders of magnitude across the study area. To assess the uncertainties of the approach, estimates of GR and actual evapotranspiration (ETa) from the calibrated models were compared to the GR and ETa obtained from other techniques in the study area (e.g., remote sensing, tracers, and regional water balance). Comparison clearly demonstrated the feasibility of inverse modeling and large-scale (>104 km2) soil moisture monitoring networks for estimating GR. In addition, the model results were used to further examine the impacts of climate and soil on GR. The data showed that both P and soil properties had significant impacts on GR in the study area with coarser soils generating higher GR; however, different relationships between GR and P emerged at the AWDN sites, defined by local climatic and soil conditions. In general, positive correlations existed between annual GR and P for the sites with coarser-textured soils or under wetter climatic conditions. With the rapidly expanding soil moisture monitoring networks around the

  3. Biogeochemical factors affecting the presence of 210Po in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Stillings, L.L.; Cutler, N.; Salonen, L.; Outola, I.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of natural 210Po enrichment at levels exceeding 500 mBq/L in numerous domestic wells in northern Nevada, USA, led to a geochemical investigation of the processes responsible for its mobilization. 210Po activities in 63 domestic and public-supply wells ranged from below 1 mBq/L to 6590 ± 590 mBq/L, among the highest reported levels in the USA. There is little spatial or depth variability in 210Pb activity in study-area sediments and mobilization of a few percent of the 210Po in the sediments would account for all of the 210Po in water. Stable-isotope measurements indicate SO4 reduction has occurred in all 210Po contaminated wells. Sulfide species are not accumulating in the groundwater in much of Lahontan Valley, probably because of S cycling involving microbial SO4 reduction, abiotic oxidation of H2S to S0 by Mn(IV), followed by microbial disproportionation of S0 to H2S and SO4. The high pH, Ca depletion, MnCO3 saturation, and presence of S0 in Lahontan Valley groundwater may be consequences of the anaerobic S cycling. Consistent with data from naturally-enriched wells in Florida, 210Po activities begin to decrease when aqueous sulfide species begin to accumulate. This may be due to formation and precipitation of PoS, however, Eh–pH diagrams suggest PoS would not be stable in study-area groundwater. An alternative explanation for the study area is that H2S accumulation begins when anaerobic S cycling stops because Mn oxides are depleted and their reduction is no longer releasing 210Po. Common features of 210Po-enriched groundwater were identified by comparing the radiological and geochemical data from Nevada with data from naturally-enriched wells in Finland, and Florida and Maryland in the USA. Values of pH ranged from 9 in Nevada wells, indicating that pH is not critical in determining whether 210Po is present. Where U is present in the sediments, the data suggest 210Po levels may be elevated in aquifers with (1) SO4-reducing waters with low H2S

  4. Biogas production improvement and C/N control by natural clinoptilolite addition into anaerobic co-digestion of Phragmites australis, feces and kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lieyu; Xi, Beidou; Sun, Wenjun; Xia, Xunfeng; Zhu, Chaowei; He, Xiaosong; Li, Mingxiao; Yang, Tianxue; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhonglei

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion (A co-D) performance of Phragmites australis, feces and kitchen waste with addition of clinoptilolite (one main kind of zeolite) was investigated to evaluate the improvement of biogas/methane production and internal mechanism of nitrogen and organics control. A better biogas/methane production was observed by 10% clinoptilolite (v/v) than bentonite and diatomite, with the shortest lag phase of 0.070d(-1), the max rate of 15.89L/(kgVSday) and ultimate biogas production of 308.2L/kgVS as the modified Gompertz equation predicted. Accordingly, the content of methane in the biogas was increased from 44.10% to 65.30%. Furthermore, the clinoptilolite inhibited the acidification of digestion liquid (optimum pH 7.0-7.5) and enhanced the VFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid) destruction. Moreover, 10% of clinoptilolite optimally enhanced the microbial utilization of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), controlled the C/N ratio, and improved the biogas production as well as NH3-N/NO3-N inhibition efficiency.

  5. Biogas production improvement and C/N control by natural clinoptilolite addition into anaerobic co-digestion of Phragmites australis, feces and kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lieyu; Xi, Beidou; Sun, Wenjun; Xia, Xunfeng; Zhu, Chaowei; He, Xiaosong; Li, Mingxiao; Yang, Tianxue; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhonglei

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion (A co-D) performance of Phragmites australis, feces and kitchen waste with addition of clinoptilolite (one main kind of zeolite) was investigated to evaluate the improvement of biogas/methane production and internal mechanism of nitrogen and organics control. A better biogas/methane production was observed by 10% clinoptilolite (v/v) than bentonite and diatomite, with the shortest lag phase of 0.070d(-1), the max rate of 15.89L/(kgVSday) and ultimate biogas production of 308.2L/kgVS as the modified Gompertz equation predicted. Accordingly, the content of methane in the biogas was increased from 44.10% to 65.30%. Furthermore, the clinoptilolite inhibited the acidification of digestion liquid (optimum pH 7.0-7.5) and enhanced the VFAs (acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid) destruction. Moreover, 10% of clinoptilolite optimally enhanced the microbial utilization of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+), controlled the C/N ratio, and improved the biogas production as well as NH3-N/NO3-N inhibition efficiency. PMID:25603527

  6. Assessing the impact of CO2 and brine leakage on shallow groundwater quality: Results from a natural analog study in New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, E. H.; Hakala, A.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Fessenden, J. E.; Pawar, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    A vital aspect to public and regulatory acceptance of carbon sequestration is assurance that drinking water in overlying aquifers will be protected. Direct observations of CO2 flowing through shallow drinking water aquifers are invaluable for informing credible risk assessments. To this end, we have sampled shallow wells in a natural analog site in New Mexico, USA, where CO2 from natural sources is upwelling from depth, and have conducted laboratory experiments on aquifer sediments. Collectively, this work has generated insights into the processes controlling major ion and trace element geochemistry in a CO2-rich system. One finding has been that impacts related to upwelling saline water far exceed those related to in-situ CO2-induced trace metal mobilization. We have also developed 3-D reactive-transport simulations to represent the key aspects of this particular type of drinking water aquifer. In this paper we will summarize field and laboratory findings, and compare reactive-transport simulations with field data. We will then show how field-tested simulations can be used to predict the temporal evolution of shallow groundwater in hypothetical CO2 leakage scenarios. These simulations highlight the importance of transient, non-equilibrium effects. These effects should be carefully considered in risk assessments and monitoring network design. We conclude by presenting sensitivity analysis results showing the most important uncertain model parameters; these results can be used to guide future laboratory and field studies.

  7. Applications of Groundwater Helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Hilton, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Helium abundance and isotope variations have widespread application in groundwater-related studies. This stems from the inert nature of this noble gas and the fact that its two isotopes ? helium-3 and helium-4 ? have distinct origins and vary widely in different terrestrial reservoirs. These attributes allow He concentrations and 3He/4He isotope ratios to be used to recognize and quantify the influence of a number of potential contributors to the total He budget of a groundwater sample. These are atmospheric components, such as air-equilibrated and air-entrained He, as well as terrigenic components, including in situ (aquifer) He, deep crustal and/or mantle He and tritiogenic 3He. Each of these components can be exploited to reveal information on a number of topics, from groundwater chronology, through degassing of the Earth?s crust to the role of faults in the transfer of mantle-derived volatiles to the surface. In this review, we present a guide to how groundwater He is collected from aquifer systems and quantitatively measured in the laboratory. We then illustrate the approach of resolving the measured He characteristics into its component structures using assumptions of endmember compositions. This is followed by a discussion of the application of groundwater He to the types of topics mentioned above using case studies from aquifers in California and Australia. Finally, we present possible future research directions involving dissolved He in groundwater.

  8. Simulation of groundwater flow and analysis of the effects of water-management options in the North Platte Natural Resources District, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Steven M.; Flynn, Amanda T.; Vrabel, Joseph; Ryter, Derek W.

    2015-08-12

    The calibrated groundwater-flow model was used with the Groundwater-Management Process for the 2005 version of the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional groundwater model, MODFLOW–2005, to provide a tool for the NPNRD to better understand how water-management decisions could affect stream base flows of the North Platte River at Bridgeport, Nebr., streamgage in a future per

  9. Groundwater Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Sean A.

    A good introductory groundwater textbook must strike a delicate balance in presenting the basics of the physical, chemical, geological, mathematical, and engineering aspects of the groundwater field without being too lengthy or overly detailed. Charles Fitts states that his motivation for writing Groundwater Science was to be able to “…teach concepts and quantitative analyses with a clear, lean, but thorough book.” He has succeeded in striking this balance of having just the right amount of information, and has met his goals of producing a concise book that can be used to teach the concepts and analyses necessary for the study of groundwater.Overall, Groundwater Science would serve well as the text for an introductory groundwater course at the college senior or first-year graduate level. The author and the publisher have made excellent use of two-color, gray and blue-scale images throughout the book. The graphics are crisp and explanatory. Data sets needed to work some of the problems in the book are available as text files from its Web site (http://www.academicpress.com/groundwater). I found these files to be complete and easy to understand. The references are up to date and point the reader to additional information across a wide range of groundwater issues, and also provide a number of examples to illustrate different points made in the book.

  10. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  11. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  12. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  13. Mercury speciation and mobilization in a wastewater-contaminated groundwater plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamborg, Carl H.; Kent, Doug B.; Swarr, Gretchen J.; Munson, Kathleen M.; Kading, Tristan; O'Connor, Alison E.; Fairchild, Gillian M.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Wiatrowski, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the concentration and speciation of mercury (Hg) in groundwater down-gradient from the site of wastewater infiltration beds operated by the Massachusetts Military Reservation, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Total mercury concentrations in oxic, mildly acidic, uncontaminated groundwater are 0.5–1 pM, and aquifer sediments have 0.5–1 ppb mercury. The plume of impacted groundwater created by the wastewater disposal is still evident, although inputs ceased in 1995, as indicated by anoxia extending at least 3 km down-gradient from the disposal site. Solutes indicative of a progression of anaerobic metabolisms are observed vertically and horizontally within the plume, with elevated nitrate concentrations and nitrate reduction surrounding a region with elevated iron concentrations indicating iron reduction. Mercury concentrations up to 800 pM were observed in shallow groundwater directly under the former infiltration beds, but concentrations decreased with depth and with distance down-gradient. Mercury speciation showed significant connections to the redox and metabolic state of the groundwater, with relatively little methylated Hg within the iron reducing sector of the plume, and dominance of this form within the higher nitrate/ammonium zone. Furthermore, substantial reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0 within the core of the anoxic zone was observed when iron reduction was evident. These trends not only provide insight into the biogeochemical factors controlling the interplay of Hg species in natural waters, but also support hypotheses that anoxia and eutrophication in groundwater facilitate the mobilization of natural and anthropogenic Hg from watersheds/aquifers, which can be transported down-gradient to freshwaters and the coastal zone.

  14. Reconnaissance of ground-water quality in the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District, eastern Nebraska, July through September 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Ellis, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A reconnaissance of ground-water quality was conducted in the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District of eastern Nebraska. Sixty-one irrigation, municipal, domestic, and industrial wells completed in the principal aquifers--the unconfined Elkhorn, Missouri, and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers, the upland area alluvial aquifers, and the Dakota aquifer--were selected for water-quality sampling during July, August, and September 1992. Analyses of water samples from the wells included determination of dissolved nitrate as nitrogen and triazine and acetanilide herbicides. Waterquality analyses of a subset of 42 water samples included dissolved solids, major ions, metals, trace elements, and radionuclides. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate as nitrogen in water samples from 2 of 13 wells completed in the upland area alluvial aquifers exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level for drinking water of 10 milligrams per liter. Thirty-nine percent of the dissolved nitrate-as-nitrogen concentrations were less than the detection level of 0.05 milligram per liter. The largest median dissolved nitrate-as-nitrogen concentrations were in water from the upland area alluvial aquifers and the Dakota aquifer. Water from all principal aquifers, except the Dakota aquifer, had detectable concentrations of herbicides. Herbicides detected included alachlor (1 detection), atrazine (13 detections), cyanazine (5 detections), deisopropylatrazine (6 detections), deethylatrazine (9 detections), metolachlor (6 detections), metribuzin (1 detection), prometon (6 detections), and simazine (2 detections). Herbicide concentrations did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels for drinking water. In areas where the hydraulic gradient favors loss of surface water to ground water, the detection of herbicides in water from wells along the banks of the Platte River indicates that the river could act as a line source of

  15. Natural attenuation of trichloroethylene in fractured shale bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenczewski, M.; Jardine, P.; McKay, L.; Layton, A.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes one of the first well-documented field examples of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater in a fractured shale bedrock. The study was carried out adjacent to a former waste burial site in Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. A contaminant plume containing TCE and its daughter products were detected downgradient from the buried waste pits, with most of the contamination occurring in the upper 6 m of the bedrock. The monitoring well array consists of a 35-m-long transect of multilevel sampling wells, situated along a line between the waste pits and a seep which discharges into a small stream. Concentrations of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) were highest in the waste trenches and decreased with distance downgradient towards the seep. Sampling wells indicated the presence of overlapping plumes of TCE, cis-dichloroethylene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethylene, ethane, and methane, with the daughter products extending further downgradient than the parent (TCE). This type of distribution suggests anaerobic biodegradation. Measurements of redox potential at the site indicated that iron-reduction, sulfate reduction, and potentially methanogensis were occurring and are conducive to dechlorination of TCE. Bacteria enrichment of groundwater samples revealed the presence of methanotrophs, methanogens, iron-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which have previously been implicated in anaerobic biodegradation of TCE. 16S rDNA sequence from DNA extracted from two wells were similar to sequences of organisms previously implicated in the anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents. The combined data strongly suggest that anaerobic biodegradation of the highly chlorinated compounds is occurring. Aerobic biodegradation may also be occurring in oxygenated zones, including near a seep where groundwater exits the site, or in the upper bedrock during seasonal fluctuations in water

  16. Natural attenuation of trichloroethylene in fractured shale bedrock.

    PubMed

    Lenczewski, M; Jardine, P; McKay, L; Layton, A

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes one of the first well-documented field examples of natural attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater in a fractured shale bedrock. The study was carried out adjacent to a former waste burial site in Waste Area Grouping 5 (WAG5) on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. A contaminant plume containing TCE and its daughter products were detected downgradient from the buried waste pits, with most of the contamination occurring in the upper 6 m of the bedrock. The monitoring well array consists of a 35-m-long transect of multilevel sampling wells, situated along a line between the waste pits and a seep which discharges into a small stream. Concentrations of volatile organic carbons (VOCs) were highest in the waste trenches and decreased with distance downgradient towards the seep. Sampling wells indicated the presence of overlapping plumes of TCE, cis-dichloroethylene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethylene, ethane, and methane, with the daughter products extending further downgradient than the parent (TCE). This type of distribution suggests anaerobic biodegradation. Measurements of redox potential at the site indicated that iron-reduction, sulfate reduction, and potentially methanogensis were occurring and are conducive to dechlorination of TCE. Bacteria enrichment of groundwater samples revealed the presence of methanotrophs, methanogens, iron-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which have previously been implicated in anaerobic biodegradation of TCE. 16S rDNA sequence from DNA extracted from two wells were similar to sequences of organisms previously implicated in the anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents. The combined data strongly suggest that anaerobic biodegradation of the highly chlorinated compounds is occurring. Aerobic biodegradation may also be occurring in oxygenated zones, including near a seep where groundwater exits the site, or in the upper bedrock during seasonal fluctuations in water

  17. Identification of anthropogenic and natural inputs of sulfate into a karstic coastal groundwater system in northeast China: evidence from major ions, δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongmei; Song, Xianfang; Currell, Matthew J.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater evolution in the Daweijia area of Dalian, northeast China, were characterised using hydrochemistry and isotopes of carbon and sulfur (δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4). The aim was to distinguish anthropogenic impacts as distinct from natural processes, with a particular focus on sulfate, which is found at elevated levels (range: 54.4 to 368.8 mg L-1; mean: 174.4 mg L-1) in fresh and brackish groundwater. The current investigation reveals minor seawater intrusion impact (not exceeding 5 % of the overall solute load), in contrast with extensive impacts observed in 1982 during the height of intensive abstraction. This indicates that measures to restrict groundwater abstraction have been effective. However, hydrochemical facies analysis shows that the groundwater remains in a state of ongoing hydrochemical evolution (towards Ca-Cl type water) and quality degradation (increasing nitrate and sulfate concentrations). The wide range of NO3 concentrations (74.7-579 mg L-1) in the Quaternary aquifer indicates considerable input of fertilisers and/or leakage from septic systems. Both δ13C (-14.5 to -5.9 permil) and δ34SSO4 (+5.4 to +13.1 permil) values in groundwater show increasing trends along groundwater flow paths. While carbonate minerals may contribute to increasing δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4 values in deep karstic groundwater, high loads of agricultural fertilisers reaching the aquifer via irrigation return flow are likely the main source of the dissolved sulfate in Quaternary groundwater, as shown by distinctive isotopic ratios and a lack of evidence for other sources in the major ion chemistry. According to isotope mass balance calculations, the fertiliser contribution to overall sulfate has reached an average of 62.1 % in the Quaternary aquifer, which has a strong hydraulic connection to the underlying carbonate aquifer. The results point to an alarming level of impact from the local intensive agriculture on the groundwater

  18. The influence of diffuse pollution on groundwater content patterns for the groundwater bodies of Germany.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, R; Wendland, F; Hannappel, S; Voigt, H J; Wolter, R

    2007-01-01

    Commissioned by Germany's Working Group of the Federal States on Water Problems (LAWA) the authors developed a procedure to define natural groundwater conditions from groundwater monitoring data. The distribution pattern of a specific groundwater parameter observed by a number of groundwater monitoring stations within a petrographically comparable groundwater typology is reproduced by two statistical distribution functions, representing the "natural" and "influenced" component. The range of natural groundwater concentrations is characterized by confidence intervals of the distribution function of the natural component. The applicability of the approach was established for 17 hydrochemical different groundwater typologies occurring throughout Germany. Based on groundwater monitoring data from ca. 26,000 groundwater-monitoring stations, 40 different hydrochemical parameters were evaluated for each groundwater typology. For all investigated parameters the range of natural groundwater concentrations has been identified. According to the requirements of the EC Water Framework Directive (article 17) (WFD) this study is a basis for the German position to propose criteria for assessing a reference state for a "good groundwater chemical status".

  19. Characterization of the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in groundwater contaminated with (60)Co and (137)Cs using ultrafiltration, Solid Phase Extraction and fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Caron, François; Siemann, Stefan; Riopel, Rémi

    2014-12-01

    Spot samples of shallow groundwaters have been taken between the years 2004 and 2010 near a site formerly used for the dispersal of radioactive liquid wastes. Three sampling points, one clean (upstream), and two downstream of the contamination source, were processed by ultrafiltration (5000 Da cut-off) and Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to determine the association of selected artificial radionuclides ((60)Co, (137)Cs) with Natural Organic Matter (NOM). The last two sampling episodes (2008 and 2010) also benefited from fluorescence analysis to determine the major character of the NOM. The fluorescence signals are reported as humic-like, fulvic-like and protein-like, which are used to characterize the different NOM types. The NOM from the clean site comprised mostly fine material, whereas the colloidal content (retained by ultrafiltration) was higher (e.g., 15-40% of the Total Organic Carbon - TOC). Most of the 137Cs was present in the colloidal fraction, whereas (60)Co was found in the filtered fraction. Fluorescence analysis, on the other hand, indicated a contrasting behavior between the clean and contaminated sites, with a dominance of protein-like material, a feature usually associated with human impacts. Finally, SPE removed almost quantitatively the protein-like material (>90%), whereas it removed a much smaller fraction of the (137)Cs (<28%). This finding indicates that the (137)Cs preferential binding occurs with a fraction other than the protein-like NOM, likely the fulvic-like or humic-like portion. PMID:24476752

  20. Groundwater well inventory and assessment in the area of the proposed Normally Pressured Lance natural gas development project, Green River Basin, Wyoming, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweat, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    During May through September 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, inventoried and assessed existing water wells in southwestern Wyoming for inclusion in a possible groundwater-monitor network. Records were located for 3,282 wells in the upper Green River Basin, which includes the U.S. Geological Survey study area and the proposed Normally Pressured Lance natural gas development project area. Records for 2,713 upper Green River Basin wells were determined to be unique (not duplicated) and to have a Wyoming State Engineers Office permit. Further, 376 of these wells were within the U.S. Geological Survey Normally Pressured Lance study area. Of the 376 wells in the U.S. Geological Survey Normally Pressured Lance study area, 141 well records had sufficient documentation, such as well depth, open interval, geologic log, and depth to water, to meet many, but not always all, established monitor well criteria. Efforts were made to locate each of the 141 wells and to document their current condition. Field crews were able to locate 121 of the wells, and the remaining 20 wells either were not located as described, or had been abandoned and the site reclaimed. Of the 121 wells located, 92 were found to meet established monitor well criteria. Results of the field efforts during May through September 2012, and specific physical characteristics of the 92 wells, are presented in this report.

  1. Characterization of the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in groundwater contaminated with (60)Co and (137)Cs using ultrafiltration, Solid Phase Extraction and fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Caron, François; Siemann, Stefan; Riopel, Rémi

    2014-12-01

    Spot samples of shallow groundwaters have been taken between the years 2004 and 2010 near a site formerly used for the dispersal of radioactive liquid wastes. Three sampling points, one clean (upstream), and two downstream of the contamination source, were processed by ultrafiltration (5000 Da cut-off) and Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to determine the association of selected artificial radionuclides ((60)Co, (137)Cs) with Natural Organic Matter (NOM). The last two sampling episodes (2008 and 2010) also benefited from fluorescence analysis to determine the major character of the NOM. The fluorescence signals are reported as humic-like, fulvic-like and protein-like, which are used to characterize the different NOM types. The NOM from the clean site comprised mostly fine material, whereas the colloidal content (retained by ultrafiltration) was higher (e.g., 15-40% of the Total Organic Carbon - TOC). Most of the 137Cs was present in the colloidal fraction, whereas (60)Co was found in the filtered fraction. Fluorescence analysis, on the other hand, indicated a contrasting behavior between the clean and contaminated sites, with a dominance of protein-like material, a feature usually associated with human impacts. Finally, SPE removed almost quantitatively the protein-like material (>90%), whereas it removed a much smaller fraction of the (137)Cs (<28%). This finding indicates that the (137)Cs preferential binding occurs with a fraction other than the protein-like NOM, likely the fulvic-like or humic-like portion.

  2. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  3. Uranium and thorium behavior in groundwater of the natural spa area “Choygan mineral water” (East Tuva)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Y.; Guseva, N.; Shestakova, A.; Khvaschevskaya, A.; Arakchaa, K.

    2015-11-01

    The natural spa area “Choygan mineral waters”, a unique deposit of natural carbon dioxide mineral waters in Siberia, is located in the Eastern Sayan Mountains. There are 33 spring discharges in this area. Spring waters are mainly of HCO3-Na-Ca type. TDS varies from 300 mg/L to 2600 mg/L, the temperature ranges from 7 °C (in spring 33) to 39 °C (in spring 12), pH varies from 5.9 to 8.3, and the value of the oxidation-reduction potential is from -170 mV to 236 mV. All studied waters were divided into two groups according to their temperature and geochemical conditions: cold fresh water in oxidizing environment and warm slightly brackish water in reducing environment. The uranium concentration varies from 0.7 to 14 μg/l and the thorium concentration varies from 0.001 to 0.33 μg/l in the studied waters. The predominant uranium complexes are (UO2(CO3)3)4-, (UO2(CO3)2)2-, UO2CO3, (UO2(PO4)2)4- in the waters in oxidizing and reducing environments. It was found that acid-alkaline and oxidizing-reducing conditions were the determining factors for uranium behavior and speciation in the studied waters. The pH conditions are determining factors for thorium behavior and speciation in the studied waters. In slightly acidic water the predominant thorium species is negatively charge complex (ThCO3(OH)3)- (more than 95%).

  4. In-situ wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation at a sugar beet processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.L.; Fuller-Pratt, P.R.; Mielke, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Groundwater monitoring data collected at the Western Sugar Company sugar beet processing plant, in Billings, Montana identified groundwater mounding and groundwater nitrogen concentration increases associated with lime slurry discharge to an on-site storage pile. The nitrogen impacts (primarily ammonia) likely originated through decomposition of organic matter in the slurry. Initially, Western Sugar considered constructing an expensive anaerobic and nitrification-denitrification wastewater treatment system. However, further investigation of the lime pile revealed that it was already serving as an efficient filter and anaerobic reactor. Comparisons of slurry application with other land application systems suggested that groundwater nitrogen impacts could be minimized through groundwater capture, re-application, and improved slurry management. The resultant system required little capitol and maintenance cost. The immediate effect was to substantially decrease the groundwater mound. Subsequent monitoring has demonstrated a gradual decline in nitrogen concentrations under the lime pile and a considerable concentration decrease downgradient of the groundwater recovery system.

  5. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  6. Degradation of nitrates with the participation of Fe(II) and Fe(0) in groundwater: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Mineev, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    Nitrates from soil and nitrogen fertilizers unused by plants become hazardous pollutants and contaminate surface and ground waters. In the water-saturated layers, into which nitrates are leached, the content of organic matter (i.e., electron donors necessary for nitrification) can be insufficient. The deficiency of electrons in the groundwater can be eliminated by Fe(II) minerals that remained in the heavy rocks and are available to microorganisms due to dispersion. However, when the groundwater table is shallow (less than at 10 m), the natural denitrification develops poorly; therefore, remediation is needed to enrich the contaminated water with electron donors. Zerovalent iron is most frequently used for this purpose. The efficiency of the Fe0 barriers for the purification of groundwater from nitrates increases due to the activation of anaerobic denitrifying bacteria. In addition, the geochemical conditions and the composition of the bacterial community change in the Fe0 barrier zone, which favors the development of a wide range of anaerobic hydrogenotrophic bacteria (primarily Fe(III) reductants).

  7. Metabolic biomarkers for monitoring anaerobic naphthalene biodegradation in situ.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Craig D; Battistelli, Joseph; Young, L Y

    2002-09-01

    During the anaerobic biodegradation of naphthalene and methylnaphthalene, unique metabolites are formed by specific microbial carboxylation and ring-reduction reactions. Groundwater samples from an anoxic, shallow aquifer contaminated with gasoline were examined for the presence of these metabolites by extraction, derivatization and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. Several metabolites [2-naphthoic acid (2-NA), tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid (TH-2-NA), hexahydro-2-naphthoic acid (HH-2-NA) and methylnaphthoic acid (MNA)] were found to be present in the groundwater samples. The concentration of 2-NA at each monitoring well was quantified and correlated to the zones of contamination. The presence of the other metabolites in the same wells as 2-NA was used as confirmation that the anaerobic pathway was indeed active. The distribution of metabolites at this site shows that they can be used as biomarkers for demonstrating in situ biodegradation.

  8. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  9. Anthropogenic and natural lead isotopes in Fe-hydroxides and Fe-sulphates in a watershed associated with arsenic-enriched groundwater, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Foley, Nora K.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of the natural and anthropogenic sources of lead contributing to secondary minerals in sulphidic schists associated with arsenic-enriched groundwater in Coastal Maine shows that the most likely source is natural Pb, particularly from coexisting sulphide minerals. The secondary minerals also reflect notable contributions from anthropogenic Pb. The Pb isotopes establish pathways by which Pb, and by inference As, could have been transported from As-bearing minerals (arsenian pyrite, arsenopyrite, lollingite, orpiment, arsenic oxide and others), via sulphide oxidation or carbonation reactions into multiple generations of secondary minerals (goethite, hematite, jarosite, natrojarosite and others). Lead isotopic compositions of the sulphides and secondary minerals determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (n=53) range widely. Lead and As contents of the sulphides and secondary minerals overlap, and are generally positively correlated. Pyrite, the dominant sulphide in sulphidic schists associated with As-enriched groundwater in Coastal Maine, has values of 206Pb/204Pb from 18.186 to 18.391, 207Pb/204Pb from 15.617 to 15.657, 208Pb/204Pb from 38.052 to 38.210, 206Pb/207Pb from c. 1.1625 to 1.1760 and 208Pb/207Pb from c. 2.4276 to 2.4394. Mixtures of Fe-hydroxide and oxide minerals (predominantly goethite and hematite) and secondary Fe-sulphate minerals (jarosite, natrojarosite, rozenite and melanterite) in the sulphidic schists have overlapping but generally higher values of 206Pb/204Pb from 18.495 to 19.747 (one sample at 21.495), 207Pb/204Pb from 15.595 to 15.722 (one sample at 15.839), 208Pb/204Pb from 38.186 to 39.162,206Pb/207Pb from c.1.1860 to 1.2575 (one sample at 1.3855) and 208Pb/207Pb from c. 2.4441 to 2.4865 than the sulphides. Sulphides from Zn-Pb metal mines are somewhat less radiogenic than sulphides from the schists. Other sulphides (mostly pyrite) associated with pegmatites and granitic rocks are heterogeneous and more

  10. Developments of anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Two modifications of anaerobic fermentation of biomass were studied: separation of acid and CH4 phases of the anaerobic process used in CH4 production from the biomass and the use of attached growth methanogenesis. A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used for the acid phase. Effluent from the acid reactor was fed simultaneously to a conventional CSTR and an anaerobic rotating biological contactor (ARBC) operating in parallel for the CH4 phase. The temperature of all the reactors was 35 plus or minus 1 degree, the pH of the acid phase was 4.3, and the CH4 phase was studied at pH 7.5. The retention time for the acid phase CSTR was 4.5 h, and that for the ARBC and CSTR in the CH4 phase was 36 h.

  11. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters through co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and surface water, we investigated Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II) oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer) resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than a week before complete oxidation of Fe(II) is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilization of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II) oxidation process which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II) is completely depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III)-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III)-phosphates at redox gradients

  12. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater to surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we investigated Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II) oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer) resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than one week before complete oxidation of Fe(II) is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilisation of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II) oxidation proces which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II) is competly depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III)-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III)-phosphates at redox gradients seems an

  13. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  14. Anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds: a genetic and genomic view.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F; Valderrama, J Andrés; Barragán, María J L; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach.

  15. Anaerobic transformations of complex organic compounds in subsurface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, B.L. )

    1988-09-01

    This study was initiated following increased observations of man-made organic chemicals in groundwater. In the US, over 40% of the population depends on groundwater for drinking purposes. Soil is often the receptacle for organic chemicals, and there is a danger that they may reach the groundwater in a toxic form. Once contamination of the soil and vadose water has occurred, the compound may not be detected and/or degraded for decades. Limited, if any, information is available on the biotic-abiotic transformations of complex organic compounds in subsurface soils. The purpose of this study was to determine for each test compound (phenothiazine, 1-chloronaphthalene, 2-trifluoromethyl phenothiazine, 2-chloro-5 trifluoromethyl benzophenone and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime} tetrachlorobiphenyl) the following: (A) the soil sorption capacity for untreated subsurface soil, acid-treated, base-treated, mercuric chloride-treated, and calcium chloride treated subsurface soil; (B) transformation of the test compound in EPA soft water under anaerobic biotic and abiotic conditions; (C) transformation of the test compound in subsurface soils microcosms under anaerobic biotic and abiotic conditions; and (D) comparison of the results form the soil and water anaerobic biotic and abiotic studies.

  16. The groundwater subsidy to vegetation: groundwater exchanges between landcover patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, L. I.; Gimenez, R.; Jobbagy, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Gran Chaco is a hot, dry plain, that spans over 60 million hectares across Bolivia, Paraguay, Brazil and Argentina. It supports high biodiversity in its dry forest and savannahs, but is rapidly being converted to agriculture in response to growing soy demand and technology including genetic modification and zero-till, that has made cultivation in drier landscapes more viable. Under natural conditions, the deep-rooted, native vegetation of the Chaco effectively captured all rainfall for evapotranspiration resulting in near zero groundwater recharge under the dry forest. Conversion to shallower rooted soy and corn, combined with the fallow period prior to the growing season, reduces evapotranspiration and allows some water to percolate through the root zone and recharge the groundwater system. When this groundwater recharge occurs, it creates groundwater mounding and a hydraulic gradient that drives flow to adjacent landcover patches where recharge does not occur. As the watertable rises, groundwater becomes available to the deep-rooted, dry forest vegetation. We develop a soil and groundwater flow model to simulate infiltration, percolation, evaporation, rootwater uptake, groundwater recharge and the lateral transfer of water between adjacent landcover patches to quantify this groundwater subsidy from converted agricultural lands to remnant patches of dry forest.

  17. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  18. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  19. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  20. Treatment of landfill leachate-impacted groundwater using cascade aeration and constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Loer, J.; O`Flanagan, B.; Fellows, W.

    1995-12-31

    At an unlined municipal solid waste landfill, heavy metal and toxic organic compounds present in leachate have impacted groundwater, necessitating extraction and treatment of the contaminated groundwater. A remedial design relying on a natural systems engineering approach will take advantage of existing contours (gravity flow) and surroundings (wetlands), and will limit energy inputs and eliminate chemical inputs. Impacted groundwater will be extracted, and aerated via a cascade constructed of polypropylene sheets fabricated into {open_quotes}step{close_quotes} sections and set into a side slope of the landfill. Volatilization of organics and oxidation of iron and heavy metals to insoluble compounds will occur during cascading and will continue within a sedimentation basin where settling of iron precipitates will induce co-settling of heavy metal precipitates. Following the sedimentation basin, a constructed wetland containing both aerobic zones and anaerobic zones will provide additional treatment of remaining solids and heavy metals, before surface discharge. Use of a natural systems approach significantly reduces operating costs compared to a mechanical-aeration, chemical-precipitation system, and is more aesthetically pleasing and suited to the remote locale. The system is under construction and seasonal operation will begin in spring 1996.

  1. Anaerobic bacterial quantitation of Yucca Mountain, Nevada DOE site samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, W.W.; Krumholz, L.R.; Suflita, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were studied from samples of excavated rock material as one phase of the overall Yucca Mountain site characterization effort. An indication of the abundance of important groups of anaerobic bacteria would enable inferences to be made regarding the natural history of the site and allow for more complete risk evaluation of the site as a nuclear repository. Six bacterial groups were investigated including anaerobic heterotrophs, acetogens, methanogens, sulfate-, nitrate-, and iron-reducing bacteria. The purpose of this portion of the study was to detect and quantify the aforementioned bacterial groups.

  2. Simulations of Ground-Water Flow, Transport, Age, and Particle Tracking near York, Nebraska, for a Study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants (TANC) to Public-Supply Wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Landon, Matthew K.; Kauffman, Leon J.; Hornberger, George Z.

    2008-01-01

    Contamination of public-supply wells has resulted in public-health threats and negative economic effects for communities that must treat contaminated water or find alternative water supplies. To investigate factors controlling vulnerability of public-supply wells to anthropogenic and natural contaminants using consistent and systematic data collected in a variety of principal aquifer settings in the United States, a study of Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells was begun in 2001 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The area simulated by the ground-water flow model described in this report was selected for a study of processes influencing contaminant distribution and transport along the direction of ground-water flow towards a public-supply well in southeastern York, Nebraska. Ground-water flow is simulated for a 60-year period from September 1, 1944, to August 31, 2004. Steady-state conditions are simulated prior to September 1, 1944, and represent conditions prior to use of ground water for irrigation. Irrigation, municipal, and industrial wells were simulated using the Multi-Node Well package of the modular three-dimensional ground-water flow model code, MODFLOW-2000, which allows simulation of flow and solutes through wells that are simulated in multiple nodes or layers. Ground-water flow, age, and transport of selected tracers were simulated using the Ground-Water Transport process of MODFLOW-2000. Simulated ground-water age was compared to interpreted ground-water age in six monitoring wells in the unconfined aquifer. The tracer chlorofluorocarbon-11 was simulated directly using Ground-Water Transport for comparison with concentrations measured in six monitoring wells and one public supply well screened in the upper confined aquifer. Three alternative model simulations indicate that simulation results are highly sensitive to the distribution of multilayer well bores where leakage

  3. Lindane biodegradation in groundwater using semi-continuous soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    LaPat-Polasko, L.T.; Lazarr, N.C.; Reker, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the potential for bioremediation of various isomers of benzene hexachloride (BHC) including lindane (gamma BHC)-contaminated groundwater, a bench-scale study was conducted using site groundwater and soil collected from a chemical manufacturing facility located in southwest Missouri. Three soil columns were prepared to evaluate various conditions under which contaminant biodegredation is known to occur: Column 1 (the hydrogen peroxide and nutrient column) received site groundwater, hydrogen peroxide (an oxygen source to promote aerobic conditions) and ammonium polyphosphate (nutrients); Column 2 received site groundwater, nutrients and sodium sulfite (a reductant to promote anaerobic conditions); and Column 3 received the same amendments as Column 1 but under sterile conditions. Column 3 was used to evaluate abiotic losses of contaminants. The indigenous soil and/or groundwater microbial population removed more than 99 percent of the BHC isomers present in the hydrogen peroxide and nutrient column influent in 24 hours. Abiotic losses of contaminants were less than 20 percent after initial column exchanges based on the results of sterile column data. Anaerobic conditions were not as conducive to contaminant degradation. During the 24-hour exchange periods, less than 80 percent BHC removal was observed in the groundwater effluents from the anaerobic column.

  4. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  5. Simulation of groundwater flow and analysis of the effects of water-management options in the North Platte Natural Resources District, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Steven M.; Flynn, Amanda T.; Vrabel, Joseph; Ryter, Derek W.

    2015-08-12

    The calibrated groundwater-flow model was used with the Groundwater-Management Process for the 2005 version of the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional groundwater model, MODFLOW–2005, to provide a tool for the NPNRD to better understand how water-management decisions could affect stream base flows of the North Platte River at Bridgeport, Nebr., streamgage in a future period from 2008 to 2019 under varying climatic conditions. The simulation-optimization model was constructed to analyze the maximum increase in simulated stream base flow that could be obtained with the minimum amount of reductions in groundwater withdrawals for irrigation. A second analysis extended the first to analyze the simulated base-flow benefit of groundwater withdrawals along with application of intentional recharge, that is, water from canals being released into rangeland areas with sandy soils. With optimized groundwater withdrawals and intentional recharge, the maximum simulated stream base flow was 15–23 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) greater than with no management at all, or 10–15 ft3/s larger than with managed groundwater withdrawals only. These results indicate not only the amount that simulated stream base flow can be increased by these management options, but also the locations where the management options provide the most or least benefit to the simulated stream base flow. For the analyses in this report, simulated base flow was best optimized by reductions in groundwater withdrawals north of the North Platte River and in the western half of the area. Intentional recharge sites selected by the optimization had a complex distribution but were more likely to be closer to the North Platte River or its tributaries. Future users of the simulation-optimization model will be able to modify the input files as to type, location, and timing of constraints, decision variables of groundwater withdrawals by zone, and other variables to explore other feasible management

  6. Human health risk assessment for ingestion exposure to groundwater contaminated by naturally occurring mixtures of toxic heavy metals in the Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Chanpiwat, Penradee; Lee, Byung-Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong

    2014-08-01

    This study constitutes the first systematic risk assessment in the Lao PDR of the safety of groundwater for consumption. Groundwater and hair samples were collected from seven Lao provinces to determine the quantitative health impact of heavy metals through ingestion exposure. Contamination levels for arsenic (As; 46.0 %) and barium (Ba; 16.2 %) exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, especially in Mekong River floodplains. A USEPA assessment model for health risks from daily groundwater ingestion, with adjustments for local water consumption values, was applied to estimate the size of the population at risk for noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic health problems. As was the only element contributing to noncarcinogenic health risks in all contaminated areas. The populations of Bolikhamxai, Savannakhet, Saravane, Champasak, and Attapeu, moreover, were at risks of cancer. In addition to the As groundwater concentration factor, noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic risks were positively correlated with the average daily dose of As, exposure duration, and subject body weight. The level of As in hair correlated with groundwater consumption and average daily dose of As. 25.5 % of the population (n = 228) showed As levels in hair above the toxicity level.

  7. Human health risk assessment for ingestion exposure to groundwater contaminated by naturally occurring mixtures of toxic heavy metals in the Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Chanpiwat, Penradee; Lee, Byung-Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong

    2014-08-01

    This study constitutes the first systematic risk assessment in the Lao PDR of the safety of groundwater for consumption. Groundwater and hair samples were collected from seven Lao provinces to determine the quantitative health impact of heavy metals through ingestion exposure. Contamination levels for arsenic (As; 46.0 %) and barium (Ba; 16.2 %) exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, especially in Mekong River floodplains. A USEPA assessment model for health risks from daily groundwater ingestion, with adjustments for local water consumption values, was applied to estimate the size of the population at risk for noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic health problems. As was the only element contributing to noncarcinogenic health risks in all contaminated areas. The populations of Bolikhamxai, Savannakhet, Saravane, Champasak, and Attapeu, moreover, were at risks of cancer. In addition to the As groundwater concentration factor, noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic risks were positively correlated with the average daily dose of As, exposure duration, and subject body weight. The level of As in hair correlated with groundwater consumption and average daily dose of As. 25.5 % of the population (n = 228) showed As levels in hair above the toxicity level. PMID:24760657

  8. U.S. Geological Survey ground-water studies in Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettinger, M.D.; Van Denburgh, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater is an important natural resource in Nevada. In 1985, groundwater provided 24% of the total water withdrawn, and supplied about 40% of the State 's population. Public supply and self-supplied domestic use accounted for about 12% of the groundwater withdrawn, and self-supplied industrial and mining use was about 3%. The major issues related to groundwater in Nevada are: groundwater availability; natural and artificial groundwater recharge; underground storage of hazardous wastes; organic and inorganic trace constituents in groundwater; and geothermal groundwater systems. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is actively conducting 30 hydrologic investigations in Nevada, of which 18 are related to groundwater quantity and quality. Three examples of ongoing groundwater studies by the USGS that are designed to address specific groundwater issues in Nevada are discussed: carbonate-rock aquifers in eastern and southern Nevada; groundwater quality in the Carson River basin, Nevada-California; and groundwater in Honey Lake Valley, Nevada-California. (Lantz-PTT)

  9. Anaerobic expanded bed treatment of whey

    SciTech Connect

    Switzenbaum, M.S.; Danskin, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of anaerobic attached film expanded bed (AAFEB) for whey treatment is described and the potential for implementation of substitute natural gas from whey is discussed. A significant portion (less than or equal to 46%) of the energy needs at cheese-production plants could be recovered by CH/sub 4/ manufactured from whey. Efficient treatment of whey is possible by AAFEB at low retention times and at high organic loading rates.

  10. Groundwater Screen

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore » the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  11. Natural versus anthropogenic sources in the surface- and groundwater dissolved load of the Dommel river (Meuse basin): Constraints by boron and strontium isotopes and gadolinium anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Klaver, Gerard; Negrel, Philippe

    2009-05-01

    SummaryThe river Dommel, a tributary of the Meuse River, drains an area of intensive agriculture (livestock farming, maize and grassland over 50% of the basin), and a dense population of about 600,000 people representing 20% of the total area. The combined human activities in the Dommel catchment lead to a large amount of dissolved elements and compounds released in surface- and groundwaters. The aim of this study was to discriminate the natural (including infiltration of Meuse water) versus anthropogenic sources of the dissolved load, and to identify the various pollution sources such as agriculture, industrial activity, and wastewater treatment plants, using geochemical tools including major- and trace elements, Sr and B isotopes, and rare earth elements (REE). For that purpose, a same-day geochemical "Snapshot" picture of the entire basin was combined with monthly monitoring in strategic points. The major- and trace elements analyses allowed discriminating the main pollution sources affecting the basin, i.e. point versus diffuse sources. Strontium isotopes helped to identify each tributary and to calculate mixing proportions. Combining these calculations with the Sr-isotopic data obtained from the "Snapshot" sampling campaign during a low-flow period, shows that Meuse water infiltration represents 25% of the total Dommel discharge. Boron isotopes used for assessing the amount of water affected by anthropogenic input cannot discriminate between the two main anthropogenic inputs, i.e. urban wastewater and the zinc-smelter effluent, as they have similar δ11B values. Finally, the REE, and especially the use of Gd anomalies (Gd ∗), demonstrated the generalized impact of urban wastewater on the streams of the Dommel Basin. The coupled use of different geochemical tracers (Sr and B isotopes together with Gd ∗) in addition to the standard major-element analyses, led to discriminating the various anthropogenic components influencing the Dommel Basin water quality

  12. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR).

  13. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  14. Identification of temporal and small-scale spatial variations of phosphate concentration in the near-shore groundwater of an oligotrophic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschke, Franziska; Schlichting, Hendrik; Lewandowski, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Lake Stechlin is one of the last oligotrophic lakes in the German North-Eastern Lake District. In recent years there was some worry over a small but continuous increase of phosphate concentrations in the open water body. The reasons remain unclear. Since the lake obtains its water only from groundwater and precipitation there is the assumption that the former can be a significant source of phosphate inputs into the lake. In the present study, three different groundwater sampling settings on different scales in time and space were used to investigate the phosphate concentration in the near-shore groundwater. A multi-level sampling grid of twelve samplers and 60 sampling ports was installed to study the temporal small-scale fluctuations of P concentration in the groundwater and the interstitial water. Furthermore, a one-time sampling campaign of shallow near-shore groundwater was conducted every 500 m along the lake shore. Additionally, nests of permanent groundwater wells were sampled monthly for one year to identify concentration patterns in the deeper aquifer. The results indicate a large spatial and small temporal heterogeneity of P concentrations. The range of P concentration is < 0.01 mg/l up to 0.2 mg/l. There was no significant increase of P concentrations downstream of the small near-shore village Neuglobsow. Since the groundwater catchment belongs since 1938 to a natural protected area other anthropogenic impacts are quite unlikely. Hence, the main source for phosphate is probably the decomposition of naturally present organic material under anaerobic and warm conditions.

  15. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  16. Flow and storage in groundwater systems.

    PubMed

    Alley, William M; Healy, Richard W; LaBaugh, James W; Reilly, Thomas E

    2002-06-14

    The dynamic nature of groundwater is not readily apparent, except where discharge is focused at springs or where recharge enters sinkholes. Yet groundwater flow and storage are continually changing in response to human and climatic stresses. Wise development of groundwater resources requires a more complete understanding of these changes in flow and storage and of their effects on the terrestrial environment and on numerous surface-water features and their biota.

  17. Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Dinicola, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene to14CO2 under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that oxidative degradation of partially chlorinated solvents like dichloroethene can be significant even under anoxic conditions and demonstrate the potential importance of Mn(IV) reduction for remediation of chlorinated groundwater contaminants.

  18. Anaerobic Oxidation of [1,2-C]Dichloroethene under Mn(IV)-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bradley, P M; Landmeyer, J E; Dinicola, R S

    1998-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-C]dichloroethene to CO(2) under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that oxidative degradation of partially chlorinated solvents like dichloroethene can be significant even under anoxic conditions and demonstrate the potential importance of Mn(IV) reduction for remediation of chlorinated groundwater contaminants.

  19. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column returned to aerobic

  20. Natural attenuation study at Columbus AFB MS

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, T.; Libelo, E.; MacIntyre, W.; Boggs, J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to study the geochemical and biochemical processes which contribute to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in ground water systems, a subsurface residual NAPL hydrocarbon mixture was emplaced in the well characterized and highly instrumented heterogeneous aquifer at the Columbus AFB, MS groundwater test site. 1,147 kg of NAPL composed of decane, naphthalene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, toluene, benzene and 2 Kg of KBr tracer was mixed with 30 m{sup 3} of local aquifer material to create a 16% residual phase and emplaced below the water table on November 23rd, 1995. Natural hydraulic gradients are now dissolving the hydrocarbons and transporting the dissolved hydrocarbon and bromide plume. Background sampling of groundwater and aquifer solids was done prior to source emplacement to characterize the site geochemistry and anaerobic and aerobic microbiology. The aquifer was initially oxygenated with DO levels ranging from 0.5 to 6.9 mg/L and generally < 3.5, NO{sub 3}-N ranged from 0.02--0.3 mg/L. Sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.0 to 8.6 mg/L. Dissolved Fe{sup 2+} ranged up to 5.0 mg/L. Observed natural attenuation rates will be correlated with microbial and geochemical changes in the aquifer. These correlations will provide a basis for understanding and implementing natural attenuation as a remedial action for hydrocarbons.

  1. EFFECT OF BTEX AND ETHANOL ON ANAEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have recently demonstrated that natural anaerobic biotransformation of MTBE to TBA can account for the natural attenuation of MTBE in a plume from a gasoline spill at Parsippany, New Jersey. It is well established in the literature that the presence of the BTEX compounds natu...

  2. Depth-Resolved Quantification of Anaerobic Toluene Degraders and Aquifer Microbial Community Patterns in Distinct Redox Zones of a Tar Oil Contaminant Plume▿

    PubMed Central

    Winderl, Christian; Anneser, Bettina; Griebler, Christian; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Lueders, Tillmann

    2008-01-01

    Microbial degradation is the only sustainable component of natural attenuation in contaminated groundwater environments, yet its controls, especially in anaerobic aquifers, are still poorly understood. Hence, putative spatial correlations between specific populations of key microbial players and the occurrence of respective degradation processes remain to be unraveled. We therefore characterized microbial community distribution across a high-resolution depth profile of a tar oil-impacted aquifer where benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) degradation depends mainly on sulfate reduction. We conducted depth-resolved terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting and quantitative PCR of bacterial 16S rRNA and benzylsuccinate synthase genes (bssA) to quantify the distribution of total microbiota and specific anaerobic toluene degraders. We show that a highly specialized degrader community of microbes related to known deltaproteobacterial iron and sulfate reducers (Geobacter and Desulfocapsa spp.), as well as clostridial fermenters (Sedimentibacter spp.), resides within the biogeochemical gradient zone underneath the highly contaminated plume core. This zone, where BTEX compounds and sulfate—an important electron acceptor—meet, also harbors a surprisingly high abundance of the yet-unidentified anaerobic toluene degraders carrying the previously detected F1-cluster bssA genes (C. Winderl, S. Schaefer, and T. Lueders, Environ. Microbiol. 9:1035-1046, 2007). Our data suggest that this biogeochemical gradient zone is a hot spot of anaerobic toluene degradation. These findings show that the distribution of specific aquifer microbiota and degradation processes in contaminated aquifers are tightly coupled, which may be of value for the assessment and prediction of natural attenuation based on intrinsic aquifer microbiota. PMID:18083871

  3. HANFORD GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, B; THOMPSON, M; WILDE, R.; FORD, B.; GERBER, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    united in its desire to protect the Columbia River and have a voice in Hanford's future. This paper presents the challenges, and then discusses the progress and efforts underway to reduce the risk posed by contaminated groundwater at Hanford. While Hanford groundwater is not a source of drinking water on or off the Site, there are possible near-shore impacts where it flows into the Columbia River. Therefore, this remediation is critical to the overall efforts to clean up the Site, as well as protect a natural resource.

  4. Hanford Groundwater Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Charboneau, B.; Thompson, K. M.; Wilde, R.; Ford, B.; Gerber, M.

    2006-07-01

    united in its desire to protect the Columbia River and have a voice in Hanford's future. This paper presents the challenges, and then discusses the progress and efforts underway to reduce the risk posed by contaminated groundwater at Hanford. While Hanford groundwater is not a source of drinking water on or off the Site, there are possible near-shore impacts where it flows into the Columbia River. Therefore, this remediation is critical to the overall efforts to clean up the Site, as well as protect a natural resource. (authors)

  5. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  6. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-04-18

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop

  7. Global Groundwater related Risk Indicators: quantifying groundwater stress and groundwater table decline (1990-2010) at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faneca Sanchez, Marta; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Kuijper, Marijn; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater is an invisible but indispensable resource for the economic development of many countries. Due to the need for this resource, in many cases it is exploited under severe pressure and the exploitation can become not sustainable. The non-sustainable exploitation of water is a well-known problem on both regional and global scales. However, most currently-available assessments on water stress still mostly focus on surface water and on water balances. In this work, we presented two global maps of groundwater risk indicators: an updated version of the groundwater stress (Gleeson et al., 2011, DOI: 10.1038/nature11295) and an indicator on groundwater table decline for the period 1990-2010. To calculate both indicators, we used the updated PCR-GLOBWB model output at 5 arcmin resolution (about 10 km at the equator), that is extended with an offline coupling to a global groundwater MODFLOW model. PCR-GLOBWB simulates daily river discharge and groundwater recharge, as well as surface water and groundwater abstraction rates. The latter are estimated internally within the model based on the simulation of their availabilities and water demands for irrigation and other sectors. The daily output of PCR-GLOBWB would then be aggregated to the monthly resolution and used to force the MODFLOW groundwater model resolving spatio-temporal groundwater table dynamics, incorporating the simulated groundwater abstraction of PCR-GLOBWB. Using the PCR-GLOBWB and MODFLOW simulation results from the period 1990-2010, we then quantified groundwater stress and assessed the groundwater table decline. Results are presented on four different spatial scales: 5 arcmin pixel, drainage/sub-catchment unit, state level, and major aquifer unit. The maps clearly show where groundwater is under stress, where there is a trend in the drop of the groundwater table, the slope of the drop and the significance of it.

  8. Arsenic remediation by formation of arsenic sulfide minerals in a continuous anaerobic bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E.; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Root, Robert A.; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a highly toxic metalloid that has been identified at high concentrations in groundwater in certain locations around the world. Concurrent microbial reduction of arsenate (AsV) and sulfate (SO42-) can result in the formation of poorly soluble arsenic sulfide minerals (ASM). The objective of this research was to study As biomineralization in a minimal iron environment for the bioremediation of As-contaminated groundwater using simultaneous AsV and SO42- reduction. A continuous-flow anaerobic bioreactor was maintained at slightly acidic pH (6.25-6.50) and fed with AsV and SO42-, utilizing ethanol as an electron donor for over 250 d. A second bioreactor running under the same conditions but lacking SO42- was operated as a control to study the fate of As (without S). The reactor fed with SO42- removed an average 91.2% of the total soluble As at volumetric rates up to 2.9 mg As/(L∙h), while less than 5% removal was observed in the control bioreactor. Soluble S removal occurred with an S to As molar ratio of 1.2, suggesting the formation of a mixture of orpiment- (As2S3) and realgar-like (AsS) solid phases. Solid phase characterization using K-edge X-Ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a mixture of As2S3 and AsS. These results indicate that a bioremediation process relying on the addition of a simple, low-cost electron donor offers potential to promote the removal of As from groundwater with naturally occurring or added sulfate by precipitation of ASM. PMID:26333155

  9. Arsenic remediation by formation of arsenic sulfide minerals in a continuous anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Root, Robert A; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is a highly toxic metalloid that has been identified at high concentrations in groundwater in certain locations around the world. Concurrent microbial reduction of arsenate (As(V) ) and sulfate (SO4 (2-) ) can result in the formation of poorly soluble arsenic sulfide minerals (ASM). The objective of this research was to study As biomineralization in a minimal iron environment for the bioremediation of As-contaminated groundwater using simultaneous As(V) and SO4 (2-) reduction. A continuous-flow anaerobic bioreactor was maintained at slightly acidic pH (6.25-6.50) and fed with As(V) and SO4 (2-) , utilizing ethanol as an electron donor for over 250 d. A second bioreactor running under the same conditions but lacking SO4 (2-) was operated as a control to study the fate of As (without S). The reactor fed with SO4 (2-) removed an average 91.2% of the total soluble As at volumetric rates up to 2.9 mg As/(L · h), while less than 5% removal was observed in the control bioreactor. Soluble S removal occurred with an S to As molar ratio of 1.2, suggesting the formation of a mixture of orpiment- (As2 S3 ) and realgar-like (AsS) solid phases. Solid phase characterization using K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a mixture of As2 S3 and AsS. These results indicate that a bioremediation process relying on the addition of a simple, low-cost electron donor offers potential to promote the removal of As from groundwater with naturally occurring or added SO4 (2-) by precipitation of ASM. PMID:26333155

  10. Arsenic remediation by formation of arsenic sulfide minerals in a continuous anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Root, Robert A; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is a highly toxic metalloid that has been identified at high concentrations in groundwater in certain locations around the world. Concurrent microbial reduction of arsenate (As(V) ) and sulfate (SO4 (2-) ) can result in the formation of poorly soluble arsenic sulfide minerals (ASM). The objective of this research was to study As biomineralization in a minimal iron environment for the bioremediation of As-contaminated groundwater using simultaneous As(V) and SO4 (2-) reduction. A continuous-flow anaerobic bioreactor was maintained at slightly acidic pH (6.25-6.50) and fed with As(V) and SO4 (2-) , utilizing ethanol as an electron donor for over 250 d. A second bioreactor running under the same conditions but lacking SO4 (2-) was operated as a control to study the fate of As (without S). The reactor fed with SO4 (2-) removed an average 91.2% of the total soluble As at volumetric rates up to 2.9 mg As/(L · h), while less than 5% removal was observed in the control bioreactor. Soluble S removal occurred with an S to As molar ratio of 1.2, suggesting the formation of a mixture of orpiment- (As2 S3 ) and realgar-like (AsS) solid phases. Solid phase characterization using K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a mixture of As2 S3 and AsS. These results indicate that a bioremediation process relying on the addition of a simple, low-cost electron donor offers potential to promote the removal of As from groundwater with naturally occurring or added SO4 (2-) by precipitation of ASM.

  11. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel.

  12. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical dynamics throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Nossa, Carlos W; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-09-01

    The capacity of groundwater ecosystem to recover from contamination by organic chemicals is a vital concern for environmental scientists. A pilot-scale aquifer system was used to investigate the long-term dynamics of contaminants, groundwater geochemistry, and microbial community structure (by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR) throughout the 5-year life cycle of a surrogate ethanol blend fuel plume (10% ethanol + 50 mg/L benzene + 50 mg/L toluene). Two-year continuous ethanol-blended release significantly changed the groundwater geochemistry (resulted in anaerobic, low pH, and organotrophic conditions) and increased bacterial and archaeal populations by 82- and 314-fold respectively. Various anaerobic heterotrophs (fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and hydrocarbon degraders) were enriched. Two years after the release was shut off, all contaminants and their degradation byproducts disappeared and groundwater geochemistry completely restored to the pre-release states (aerobic, neutral pH, and oligotrophic). Bacterial and archaeal populations declined by 18- and 45-fold respectively (relative to the time of shut off). Microbial community structure reverted towards the pre-release states and alpha diversity indices rebounded, suggesting the resilience of microbial community to ethanol blend releases. We also found shifts from O2-sensitive methanogens (e.g., Methanobacterium) to methanogens that are not so sensitive to O2 (e.g., Methanosarcina and Methanocella), which is likely to contribute to the persistence of methanogens and methane generation following the source removal. Overall, the rapid disappearance of contaminants and their metabolites, rebound of geochemical footprints, and resilience of microbial community unequivocally document the natural capacity of groundwater ecosystem to attenuate and recover from a large volume of catastrophic spill of ethanol-based biofuel. PMID:25996759

  13. Groundwater hydrology instructional system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ronald G.

    Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, is preparing for its third cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology, beginning January 15, 1986. The first cycle finished with an impressive completion ratio for registered participants, and the second cycle has currently been underway since July. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the Soil Conservation Service (of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. Since its evolution into IRIS, an 80% participant completion rate has been recorded for the first cycle, which is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by correspondence courses. This excellent rate of success is the result of 2 years of refinement and demonstrates the progressive nature of the program. IRIS has met the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  14. Remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater by a permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch (Biowall).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Wilson, John T; Shen, Hai; Henry, Bruce M; Kampbell, Donald H

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base in Oklahoma, USA to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in groundwater emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 meters deep, and 0.5 meters wide. The barrier is also called a Biowall because one of the mechanisms for removal of TCE is anaerobic biodegradation. This study aimed at evaluating the performance of the pilot-scale Biowall after its installation. Data from over four years' monitoring indicated that the Biowall greatly changed geochemistry in the study area and stimulated TCE removal. The concentration of TCE in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall was greatly reduced as compared to that in ground water upgradient of the Biowall, while the concentration of cis-DCE in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall was much higher than that observed upgradient of the Biowall. Over time, the concentration of vinyl chloride in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall increased. Dehalococcoides DNA was detected within and downgradient of the Biowall, corresponding to the observation that vinyl chloride was produced at these locations. Results from a tracer study indicated that the regional groundwater flow pattern ultimately determined the flow direction in the area around the Biowall. The natural groundwater velocity was estimated at an average of 0.060 +/- 0.015 m/d.

  15. A strategy for aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation under anaerobic conditions and the impacts of ethanol: A microcosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu Dao; Barker, James F.; Gui, Lai

    2008-02-01

    Increased use of ethanol-blended gasoline (gasohol) and its potential release into the subsurface have spurred interest in studying the biodegradation of and interactions between ethanol and gasoline components such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers (BTEX) in groundwater plumes. The preferred substrate status and the high biological oxygen demand (BOD) posed by ethanol and its biodegradation products suggests that anaerobic electron acceptors (EAs) will be required to support in situ bioremediation of BTEX. To develop a strategy for aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation and to understand the impacts of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation under strictly anaerobic conditions, a microcosm experiment was conducted using pristine aquifer sand and groundwater obtained from Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada. The initial electron accepter pool included nitrate, sulfate and/or ferric iron. The microcosms typically contained 400 g of sediment, 600˜800 ml of groundwater, and with differing EAs added, and were run under anaerobic conditions. Ethanol was added to some at concentrations of 500 and 5000 mg/L. Trends for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons for the Borden aquifer material were first developed in the absence of ethanol, The results showed that indigenous microorganisms could degrade all aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX and trimethylbenzene isomers-TMB) under nitrate- and ferric iron-combined conditions, but not under sulfate-reducing conditions. Toluene, ethylbenzene and m/p-xylene were biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. However, the persistence of benzene indicated that enhancing denitrification alone was insufficient. Both benzene and o-xylene biodegraded significantly under iron-reducing conditions, but only after denitrification had removed other aromatics. For the trimethylbenzene isomers, 1,3,5-TMB biodegradation was found under denitrifying and then iron-reducing conditions. Biodegradation of 1,2,3-TMB or 1,2,4-TMB was slower under iron

  16. U1/U2 crib groundwater biological treatment demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Koegler, S.S.; Brouns, T.M.; Heath, W.O.

    1989-11-01

    The primary objective of the biological treatment project is to develop and demonstrate a process for Hanford groundwater remediation. Biodenitrification using facultative anaerobic microorganisms is a promising technology for the simultaneous removal of nitrates and organics from contaminated aqueous streams. During FY 1988, a consortium of Hanford groundwater microorganisms was shown to degrade both nitrates and carbon tetrachloride (CC1{sub 4}). A pilot-scale treatment system was designed and constructed based on the results of laboratory-and-bench-scale testing. This report summarizes the results of biological groundwater treatment studies performed during FY 1989 at the pilot-scale. These tests were conducted using a simulated Hanford groundwater with a continuous stirred-tank bioreactor, and a fluidized-bed bioreactor that was added to the pilot-scale treatment system in FY 1989. The pilot-scale system demonstrated continuous degradation of nitrates and CC1{sub 4} in a simulated groundwater. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Bacterial community dynamics during biostimulation and bioaugmentation experiments aiming at chlorobenzene degradation in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wenderoth, D F; Rosenbrock, P; Abraham, W R; Pieper, D H; Höfle, M G

    2003-08-01

    A set of microcosm experiments was performed to assess different bioremediation strategies, i.e., biostimulation and bioaugmentation, for groundwater contaminated with chlorobenzenes. The biodegradative potential was stimulated either by the supply of electron acceptors (air, (NO3-), to increase the activity of the indigenous bacterial community, or by the addition of aerobic chlorobenzene-degrading bacteria (Pseudomonas putida GJ31, Pseudomonas aeruginosa RHO1, Pseudomonas putida F1deltaCC). Experiments were performed with natural groundwater of the aquifer of Bitterfeld, which had been contaminated with 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB), and chlorobenzene (CB). The microcosms consisted of airtight glass bottles with 800 mL of natural groundwater and were incubated under in situ temperature (13 degrees C). Behavior of the introduced strains within the indigenous bacterial community was monitored by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with species-specific oligonucleotides. Dynamics of the indigenous community and the introduced strains within the microcosms were followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of 16S rDNA amplicons obtained from total DNA of the microbial community. An indigenous biodegradation potential under aerobic as well as anaerobic denitrifying conditions was observed accompanied by fast and specific changes in the natural bacterial community composition. Augmentation with P. aeruginosa RHO1 did not enhance bio-degradation. In contrast, both P. putida GJ31 as well as P. putida F1deltaCC were capable of growing in groundwater, even in the presence of the natural microbial community, and thereby stimulating chlorobenzene depletion. P. putida GJ31 disappeared when the xenobiotics were depleted and P. putida F1deltaCC persisted even in the absence of CB. Detailed statistical analyses revealed that community dynamics of the groundwater microbiota were highly reproducible but specific to the

  18. Reconstruction of groundwater depletion using a global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Rens; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; Wada, Yoshi; Bierkens, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater forms an integral part of the global hydrological cycle and is the world's largest accessible source of fresh water to satisfy human water needs. It buffers variable recharge rates over time, thereby effectively sustaining river flows in times of drought as well as evaporation in areas with shallow water tables. Moreover, although lateral groundwater flows are often slow, they cross topographic and administrative boundaries at appreciable rates. Despite the importance of groundwater, most global scale hydrological models do not consider surface water-groundwater interactions or include a lateral groundwater flow component. The main reason of this omission is the lack of consistent global-scale hydrogeological information needed to arrive at a more realistic representation of the groundwater system, i.e. including information on aquifer depths and the presence of confining layers. The latter holds vital information on the accessibility and quality of the global groundwater resource. In this study we developed a high resolution (5 arc-minutes) global scale transient groundwater model comprising confined and unconfined aquifers. This model is based on MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) and coupled with the land-surface model PCR GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011) via recharge and surface water levels. Aquifers properties were based on newly derived estimates of aquifer depths (de Graaf et al., 2014b) and thickness of confining layers from an integration of lithological and topographical information. They were further parameterized using available global datasets on lithology (Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2011) and permeability (Gleeson et al., 2014). In a sensitivity analysis the model was run with various hydrogeological parameter settings, under natural recharge only. Scenarios of past groundwater abstractions and corresponding recharge (Wada et al., 2012, de Graaf et al. 2014a) were evaluated. The resulting estimates of groundwater depletion are lower than

  19. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  20. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  1. Assessing the role of climate and resource management on groundwater dependent ecosystem changes in arid environments with the landsat archive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs) rely on the presence of subsurface or surficial expressions of groundwater. These systems are receiving more attention as temperature increases, droughts are more extreme, and where groundwater development captures natural discharge for anthropogenic use. Phre...

  2. [Construction of groundwater contamination prevention mapping system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; He, Jiang-Tao; Lu, Yan; Liu, Li-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Liang

    2012-09-01

    Groundwater contamination prevention mapping is an important component of groundwater contamination geological survey and assessment work, which could provide the basis for making and implementing groundwater contamination prevention planning. A groundwater contamination prevention mapping system was constructed in view of the synthetic consideration on nature perspective derived from groundwater contamination sources and aquifer itself, social-economic perspective, policy perspective derived from outside. During the system construction process, analytic hierarchy process and relevant overlaying principles were used to couple groundwater contamination risk assessment, groundwater value as well as wellhead protection area zoning. Data processing and visualization of mapping results were achieved in the GIS environment. The research on groundwater contamination prevention mapping in Beijing Plain indicated that the final groundwater prevention map was in accordance with the actual conditions and well reflected the priorities of groundwater prevention, which could play a guidance role in designing and implementing further practical prevention and supervision measures. Besides, because of the dynamical properties of the system components, it was suggested to analyze the update frequency of the mapping.

  3. Monitoring groundwater drought with GRACE data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; Getirana, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater drought is a distinct class of drought, not a sub-class of meteorological, agricultural and hydrological drought and has profound impacts on natural environments and societies. Due to a deficiency of in situ measurements, we developed a groundwater drought indicator using groundwater change estimates derived by assimilating GRACE derived terrestrial water storage (TWS) anomalies into the NASA Catchment land surface model. Data assimilation enables spatial and temporal downscaling of coarse GRACE TWS observations (monthly and ~150,000 km2 effective spatial resolution) and extrapolation to near-real time. In this talk, we will present our latest progress on using GRACE satellite data for groundwater drought monitoring in the U.S. and globally. Characteristics of this groundwater drought indicator will be discussed, including its relationship with other types of drought and how they are influenced by model physics and climate conditions. Results are evaluated using in situ groundwater observations.

  4. Key policy choices in groundwater quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Batie, S.S.; Diebel, P.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental policy choice of who has the right to do what to whom is a pivotal issue of governance. Over the last few decades, the answer to that question has become more restrictive to those who own and use natural resources as inputs into production processes. Increasingly, the beneficiaries of new policy initiatives are those who desire higher protection of groundwater quality. With respect to groundwater management, policy design increasingly reflects such diverse interests as agriculturists, industrialists, homeowners, local government officials and state officials. Policy design is becoming complex, in part because of this diversity and in part because scientific uncertainty hampers informed policy design. No umbrella federal legislation exists for managing groundwater resources. EPA's role has been mainly an advisory one on groundwater issues. The difficulties and responsibilities of protecting groundwater thus remain with the states. For the near future, it is the states that will address key policy choices with respect to groundwater quality management issues.

  5. Wyoming groundwater-quality monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boughton, Gregory K.

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of human activities have the potential to contaminate groundwater. In addition, naturally occurring constituents can limit the suitability of groundwater for some uses. The State of Wyoming has established rules and programs to evaluate and protect groundwater quality based on identified uses. The Wyoming Groundwater-Quality Monitoring Network (WGQMN) is a cooperative program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) and was implemented in 2009 to evaluate the water-quality characteristics of the State's groundwater. Representatives from USGS, WDEQ, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Wyoming Water Development Office, and Wyoming State Engineer's Office formed a steering committee, which meets periodically to evaluate progress and consider modifications to strengthen program objectives. The purpose of this fact sheet is to describe the WGQMN design and objectives, field procedures, and water-quality analyses. USGS groundwater activities in the Greater Green River Basin also are described.

  6. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  7. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2006-04-05

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also

  8. Water, Water Everywhere but is it Safe to Drink? Some Detrimental Health Effects Associated with Consumption of Groundwater Enriched in Naturally-Occurring Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuge, R.

    2007-05-01

    Drinking water represents a major pathway of trace elements into the human body. As such, groundwaters, the chemistry of which reflect water/rock interaction, can be a source of trace elements which will have a marked health effect on humans consuming them. Health problems associated with the consumption of groundwater enriched in various elements and compounds have been recorded for many years. For example, high-arsenic groundwaters used for public water supply were first associated with harmful health effects as early as 1917 in Córdoba Province in Argentina, where the local population suffered from skin disorders. Subsequently, in the 1960s consumption of high-arsenic groundwaters was identified as a factor in the aetiology of "black foot disease", an endemic vascular disease, in Taiwan. However, it is problems associated with the very high-arsenic groundwaters of the highly populous Ganges delta area of Bangladesh and West Bengal that has more recently highlighted the health problem of consuming high-arsenic waters. The most obvious problems of excess arsenic consumption through drinking water are arsenical skin lesions, the severity of which being generally correlated with arsenic content of the water. A high incidence of cancers of the skin, bladder and other organs has been recorded in the high-arsenic drinking water areas of the world. A high incidence of vascular disease, found in the arsenic-rich area of Taiwan, has also been shown to occur in Bangladesh. In addition, it has been suggested that high arsenic in drinking water results in increased incidence of diabetes mellitus. Fluorine is another element long recognised as having a major effect on the well-being of humans. Consumption of high-fluorine waters were first identified as having a detrimental effect on teeth in the 1920s and 30s. It was subsequently shown that where fluorine is present in drinking waters at concentrations of around 0.5 to 1 mg/L it can have beneficial effects on humans

  9. Assessing the impact of VOC-contaminated groundwater on surface water at the city scale.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Paul A; Rivett, Michael O

    2007-04-01

    This study is believed to be one of the first to assess the impact of urban VOC-(volatile organic compound) contaminated groundwater on river-water quality at the city scale. A network of riverbed piezometers was used to study the 7.4-km urbanised reach of the River Tame that flows across the groundwater-effluent unconfined Triassic sandstone aquifer underlying the city of Birmingham (UK). Aquifer groundwater contained significant chlorinated VOC contamination due to the city's industrial heritage. Chlorinated VOC-contaminated baseflow was widespread along the reach with trichloroethene (TCE) dominant. VOC concentrations in riverbed piezometers were in the range 0.1-100 microg/l with typical regulatory limits occasionally exceeded by an order of magnitude. Although anaerobic biodegradation products such as cis-dichloroethene were widespread, they were unlikely to have formed in the generally aerobic riverbed. The lack of anaerobic conditions was ascribed to insufficient accumulation of low-permeability, organic-carbon rich riverbed sediments in this medium-high energy river. Assumptions a priori that natural attenuation of chlorinated VOCs will occur via reductive dechlorination in urban riverbeds are likely in error, particularly where deposits of medium-high permeability exist transmitting much of the baseflow. Surface-water quality impacts were nevertheless still low with in-river TCE increasing by just 2 microg/l over the 7.4-km reach. Agreement of baseflow contaminant flux estimates based on five flow-concentration product methods was achieved to within an order of magnitude with 22-200 kg/yr of TCE estimated to discharge to the 7.4-km reach (equivalent to 0.8-7.5 mg/d/m2 of riverbed). Such uncertainty was not regarded as unreasonable when the large measurement scale and geological and chemical heterogeneities are considered. Improved flux estimation methods and greater monitoring densities are nevertheless warranted. Considering Birmingham's long industrial

  10. Anaerobic Degradation of Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and o-Xylene in Sediment-Free Iron-Reducing Enrichment Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Michael K.; Haderlein, Stefan B.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2005-01-01

    Monoaromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) are widespread contaminants in groundwater. We examined the anaerobic degradation of BTEX compounds with amorphous ferric oxide as electron acceptor. Successful enrichment cultures were obtained for all BTEX substrates both in the presence and absence of AQDS (9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid). The electron balances showed a complete anaerobic oxidation of the aromatic compounds to CO2. This is the first report on the anaerobic degradation of o-xylene and ethylbenzene in sediment-free iron-reducing enrichment cultures. PMID:15933041

  11. Human interactions with ground-water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    Ground-Water could be considered as an immense reservoir, from which only a certain amount of water can be withdrawn without affecting the quantity and quality of water. This amount is determined by the characteristics of the environment in which ground-water occurs and by the interactions of ground-water with precipitation, surface water, and people. It should be recognized that quantity and quality of ground-water are intimately related and should be considered accordingly. Quantity refers to usable water and water is usable for any specific purpose only so long as its quality has not deteriorated beyond acceptable limits. Thus an overall quantitative and qualitative management of ground water is inevitable, and its should also involve the uses of ground-water reservoirs for purposes other than water supply. The main objective of ground-water management is to ensure that ground-water resources will be available in appropriate time and in appropriate quantity and quality to meet the most important demands of our society. Traditional, and obvious uses of ground-water are the extraction of water for water supplies (domestic, municipal, agricultural, and industrial) and the natural discharge feeding lakes and maintaining base flow of streams. Not so obvious are the uses of ground-water reservoirs, the very framework within which ground-water occurs and moves, and in which other fluids or materials can be stored. In the last two decades, ground-water reservoirs have been intensively considered for many other purposes than water supplies. Diversified and very often conflicting uses need to be evaluated and dealt with in the most efficient way in order to determine the importance of each possible use, and to assign priorities of these uses. With rising competition for the use of ground-water reservoirs, we will also need to increase the potential for effective planning of ground-water development and protection. Man's development and use of ground-water necessarily

  12. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  13. Anaerobic propane oxidation in marine hydrocarbon seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quistad, Steven D.; Valentine, David L.

    2011-04-01

    Propane (C 3H 8) is an abundant hydrocarbon in subsurface reservoirs with significance to atmospheric chemistry and to marine biogeochemistry. The anaerobic oxidation of propane coupled to sulfate reduction may prevent sub-seafloor accumulations of propane from entering the ocean and atmosphere. Anaerobic oxidation of propane has recently been demonstrated in cultures of novel sulfate-reducing bacteria, but has not been directly demonstrated or quantified in nature. In this work we describe a method involving incubation with 13C-propane to quantify rates of anaerobic oxidation of propane in anoxic sediment, and we conclusively demonstrate the oxidation of propane under sulfidic conditions in fresh sediments of a marine hydrocarbon seep. Observed rates of anaerobic oxidation of propane adhere to first-order kinetic behavior, enabling the modification of this method for whole core rate determinations. Whole core rates in nine cores from two hydrocarbon seeps measured 0.04-2100 nmoles C 3H 8 cm -3 day -1 by this method. The seep persistently supplied with more propane displayed substantially higher rates of anaerobic oxidation of propane, by 1-2 orders of magnitude when averaged over the top 10-cm, suggesting the development of the microbial community is strongly modulated by the availability of propane. This work is the first to estimate rates for anaerobic oxidation of propane in any environment, and demonstrates the potential importance of the process as a filter for preventing propane from entering the ocean and atmosphere.

  14. Evaluation of the fate and transport of chlorinated ethenes in a complex groundwater system discharging to a stream in Wonju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Sun; Kaown, Dugin; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2015-11-01

    Chlorinated ethenes such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are common and persistent groundwater contaminants. If contaminated groundwater discharges to a stream, then stream water pollution near the contamination site also becomes a problem. In this respect, the fate and transport of chlorinated ethenes around a stream in an industrial complex were evaluated using the concentration of each component, and hydrogeochemical, microbial, and compound-specific carbon isotope data. Temporal and spatial monitoring reveal that a TCE plume originating from main and local source zones continues to be discharged to a stream. Groundwater geochemical data indicate that aerobic conditions prevail in the upgradient area of the studied aquifer, whereas conditions become anaerobic in the downgradient. The TCE molar fraction is high at the main and local source zones, ranging from 87.4 to 99.2% of the total volatile organic compounds (VOCs). An increasing trend in the molar fraction of cis-1, 2-Dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) was observed in the downgradient zone of the study area. The enriched δ13C values of TCE and depleted values of cis-DCE in the stream zone, compared to those of the source zone, also suggest biodegradation of VOCs. Microbial community structures in monitoring wells adjacent to the stream zone in the downgradient area were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing to identify the microorganisms responsible for biodegradation. This was attributed to the high relative abundance of dechlorinating bacteria in monitoring wells under anaerobic conditions farthest from the stream in the downgradient area. The multilateral approaches adopted in this study, combining hydrogeochemical and biomolecular methods with compound-specific analyses, indicate that contaminants around the stream were naturally attenuated by active anaerobic biotransformation processes.

  15. Evaluation of the fate and transport of chlorinated ethenes in a complex groundwater system discharging to a stream in Wonju, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Sun; Kaown, Dugin; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2015-11-01

    Chlorinated ethenes such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are common and persistent groundwater contaminants. If contaminated groundwater discharges to a stream, then stream water pollution near the contamination site also becomes a problem. In this respect, the fate and transport of chlorinated ethenes around a stream in an industrial complex were evaluated using the concentration of each component, and hydrogeochemical, microbial, and compound-specific carbon isotope data. Temporal and spatial monitoring reveal that a TCE plume originating from main and local source zones continues to be discharged to a stream. Groundwater geochemical data indicate that aerobic conditions prevail in the upgradient area of the studied aquifer, whereas conditions become anaerobic in the downgradient. The TCE molar fraction is high at the main and local source zones, ranging from 87.4 to 99.2% of the total volatile organic compounds (VOCs). An increasing trend in the molar fraction of cis-1, 2-Dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) was observed in the downgradient zone of the study area. The enriched δ(13)C values of TCE and depleted values of cis-DCE in the stream zone, compared to those of the source zone, also suggest biodegradation of VOCs. Microbial community structures in monitoring wells adjacent to the stream zone in the downgradient area were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing to identify the microorganisms responsible for biodegradation. This was attributed to the high relative abundance of dechlorinating bacteria in monitoring wells under anaerobic conditions farthest from the stream in the downgradient area. The multilateral approaches adopted in this study, combining hydrogeochemical and biomolecular methods with compound-specific analyses, indicate that contaminants around the stream were naturally attenuated by active anaerobic biotransformation processes.

  16. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E. M.; Sutanudjaja, E. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is the world's largest accessible source of fresh water. It plays a vital role in satisfying needs for drinking water, agriculture and industrial activities. During times of drought groundwater sustains baseflow to rivers and wetlands, thereby supporting ecosystems. Most global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, mainly due to lack of geohydrological data at the global scale. For the simulation of lateral flow and groundwater head dynamics a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system is needed, especially for GHMs that run at finer resolution. In this study we present a global scale groundwater model (run at 6' as dynamic steady state) using MODFLOW to construct an equilibrium water table at its natural state as the result of long-term climatic forcing. The aquifer schematization and properties were based on available global datasets of lithology and transmissivities combined with estimated aquifer thickness of an upper unconfined aquifer. The model is forced with outputs from the land-surface model PCR-GLOBWB, specifically with net recharge and surface water levels. A sensitivity analysis, in which the model was run with various parameter settings, showed variation in saturated conductivity causes most of the groundwater level variations. Simulated groundwater heads were validated against reported piezometer observations. The validation showed that groundwater depths are reasonably well simulated for many regions of the world, especially for sediment basins (R2 = 0.95). The simulated regional scale groundwater patterns and flowpaths confirm the relevance of taking lateral groundwater flow into account in GHMs. Flowpaths show inter-basin groundwater flow that can be a significant part of a basins water budget and helps to sustain river baseflow, explicitly during times of droughts. Also important aquifer systems are recharged by inter-basin groundwater flows that positively affect water

  17. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources.

  18. Quantifying RDX biodegradation in groundwater using delta15N isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Adar, Eilon; Ronen, Zeev; Lowag, Harald; Stichler, Willibald; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2010-01-15

    Isotope analysis was used to examine the extent of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) biodegradation in groundwater along a ca. 1.35-km contamination plume. Biodegradation was proposed as a natural attenuating remediation method for the contaminated aquifer. By isotope analysis of RDX, the extent of biodegradation was found to reach up to 99.5% of the initial mass at a distance of 1.15-1.35km down gradient from the contamination sources. A range of first-order biodegradation rates was calculated based on the degradation extents, with average half-life values ranging between 4.4 and 12.8years for RDX biodegradation in the upper 15m of the aquifer, assuming purely aerobic biodegradation, and between 10.9 and 31.2years, assuming purely anaerobic biodegradation. Based on the geochemical data, an aerobic biodegradation pathway was suggested as the dominant attenuation process at the site. The calculated biodegradation rate was correlated with depth, showing decreasing degradation rates in deeper groundwater layers. Exceptionally low first-order kinetic constants were found in a borehole penetrating the bottom of the aquifer, with half life ranging between 85.0 to 161.5years, assuming purely aerobic biodegradation, and between 207.5 and 394.3years, assuming purely anaerobic biodegradation. The study showed that stable isotope fractionation analysis is a suitable tool to detect biodegradation of RDX in the environment. Our findings clearly indicated that RDX is naturally biodegraded in the contaminated aquifer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported use of RDX isotope analysis to quantify its biodegradation in contaminated aquifers.

  19. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Ethylene Glycol within Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyob, K. M.; Mouser, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is a commonly used organic additive in hydraulic fracturing fluids used for shale gas recovery. Under aerobic conditions, this compound readily biodegrades to acetate and CO2 or is oxidized through the glycerate pathway. In the absence of oxygen, organisms within genera Desulfovibrio, Acetobacterium, and others can transform EG to acetaldehyde, a flammable and suspected carcinogenic compound. Acetaldehyde can then be enzymatically degraded to ethanol or acetate and CO2. However, little is known on how EG degrades in the presence of other organic additives, particularly under anaerobic conditions representative of deep groundwater aquifers. To better understand the fate and attenuation of glycols within hydraulic fracturing fluids we are assessing their biodegradation potential and pathways in batch anaerobic microcosm treatments. Crushed Berea sandstone was inoculated with groundwater and incubated with either EG or a synthetic fracturing fluid (SFF) containing EG formulations. We tracked changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), EG, and its transformation products over several months. Approximately 41% of bulk DOC in SFF is degraded within 21 days, with 58% DOC still remaining after 63 days. By comparison, this same SFF degrades by 70% within 25 days when inoculated with sediment-groundwater microbial communities, suggesting that bulk DOC degradation occurs at a slower rate and to a lesser extent with bedrock. Aerobic biodegradation of EG occurs rapidly (3-7 days); however anaerobic degradation of EG is much slower, requiring several weeks for substantial DOC loss to be observed. Ongoing experiments are tracking the degradation pathways of EG alone and in the presence of SFF, with preliminary data showing incomplete glycol transformation within the complex hydraulic fracturing fluid mixture. This research will help to elucidate rates, processes, and pathways for EG biodegradation and identify key microbial taxa involved in its degradation.

  20. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  1. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  2. Reconnaissance of ground-water quality in the Papio-Missouri river natural resources district, Eastern Nebraska, July through September 1992. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraeten, I.M.; Ellis, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to describe the water quality of the principal aquifers in the study area. Wells representative of the geology and land use in the study area were selected for water-quality sampling. Variations in constituent concentration among aquifers are discussed. The report describes the spatial distributions of dissolved nitrite plus-nitrate as nitrogen and triazine and other acetanilide herbicides and evaluates the effects of cropland application of nitrogen and herbicides on the ground-water quality within the study area. The report also summarizes the concentrations of dissolved major and trace constituents including radionuclide activity and concentration.

  3. In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from solution in groundwater down gradient from permeable reactive barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Clay E.; Morrison, Stanley J.

    2001-07-03

    This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

  4. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  5. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  6. Biomarkers of Microbial Metabolism for Monitoring in-situ Anaerobic PAH Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L.; Phelps, C.; Battistelli, J.

    2002-12-01

    Monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic compounds found in petroleum and its products are subject to biodegradation in the absence of oxygen. These anaerobic pathways reveal novel mechanism of microbial transformation through a series of metabolites and intermediates which are unique to the anaerobic degradation process. The presence of these compounds in-situ, then conceptually can serve as indicators that anaerobic degradation is taking place. We have laboratory studies and field samples which support this concept for BTX and PAH compounds. Environments in which these anaerobic degradation processes have been observed include freshwater and estuarine sediments, groundwater from impacted aquifers at a former manufactured gas plant and gasoline station, and a creosote-contaminated aquifer. Analytical protocols were developed to detect nanomolar concentrations from soil slurries and groundwater samples and microcosm studies verified their formation from field samples and use as biomarkers of activity. Recent studies on the mechanisms of anaerobic naphthalene and methylnaphthalene metabolism have identified several unusual compounds that can serve as biomarkers for monitoring in situ PAH biodegradation. For naphthalene these include 2-naphthoic acid (2-NA), tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid (TH-2-NA), hexahydro-2-naphthoic acid (HH-2-NA) and methylnaphthoic acid (MNA) generated by sulfate-reducing bacteria degrading naphthalene or methylnaphthalene. Groundwater samples were analyzed from wells distributed throughout an anaerobic, creosote-contaminated aquifer and also from a leaking underground storage site. Samples were extracted, derivatized and analyzed by GC/MS. The concentration of 2-NA at each monitoring well was quantified and correlated to the zones of naphthalene contamination. Taken together with measurements of the aquifer's physical characteristics, these biomarker data can be used to describe the extent of naphthalene biodegradation at these site.

  7. Natural attenuation of chlorinated organics in a shallow sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Rosane C M; Nobre, Manoel M M

    2004-07-01

    This work presents the second phase of a groundwater remediation program for the migration control of a 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) contaminated plume which includes natural attenuation at a distance downgradient from the source area. The conceived system for the plume migration control, implemented just after a major accidental release of 1,2-DCA in the soil, included a 300 m long physical barrier (cement-bentonite diaphragm wall) and 12 extraction wells. Results of field investigations have provided evidence that 1,2-DCA was naturally biodegrading into vinyl chloride as well as ethene under the natural anaerobic-reducing conditions at the site. In that case, source control measures were implemented to accelerate the overall remediation process. Although the results are favorable, the natural degradation of the 1,2-DCA does not guarantee acceptable levels of concentrations. Therefore, a pilot test to evaluate the enhancement of these processes is being carried out through the use of a biosparging system. This test is being implemented near the source to achieve sequential aerobic-anaerobic treatment zones.

  8. California Groundwater Units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Tyler D.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The California Groundwater Units dataset classifies and delineates areas within the State of California into one of three groundwater-based polygon units: (1) those areas previously defined as alluvial groundwater basins or subbasins, (2) highland areas that are adjacent to and topographically upgradient of groundwater basins, and (3) highland areas not associated with a groundwater basin, only a hydrogeologic province. In total, 938 Groundwater Units are represented. The Groundwater Units dataset relates existing groundwater basins with their newly delineated highland areas which can be used in subsequent hydrologic studies. The methods used to delineate groundwater-basin-associated highland areas are similar to those used to delineate a contributing area (such as for a lake or water body); the difference is that highland areas are constrained to the immediately surrounding upslope (upstream) area. Upslope basins have their own delineated highland. A geoprocessing tool was created to facilitate delineation of highland areas for groundwater basins and subbasins and is available for download.

  9. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  10. Diversity, Metabolic Properties and Arsenic Mobilization Potential of Indigenous Bacteria in Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K.; Gupta, Ashok K.; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC) and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2)] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.). Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations suggest that

  11. Diversity, metabolic properties and arsenic mobilization potential of indigenous bacteria in arsenic contaminated groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC) and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2)] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.). Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations suggest that

  12. Diversity, metabolic properties and arsenic mobilization potential of indigenous bacteria in arsenic contaminated groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC) and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2)] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.). Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations suggest that

  13. Arsenic release from shallow aquifers of the Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia: evidence from bacterial community in aquifer sediments and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Guo, Huaming; Hao, Chunbo

    2014-12-01

    Indigenous microbes play crucial roles in arsenic mobilization in high arsenic groundwater systems. Databases concerning the presence and the activity of microbial communities are very useful in evaluating the potential of microbe-mediated arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers hosting high arsenic groundwater. This study characterized microbial communities in groundwaters at different depths with different arsenic concentrations by DGGE and one sediment by 16S rRNA gene clone library, and evaluated arsenic mobilization in microcosm batches with the presence of indigenous bacteria. DGGE fingerprints revealed that the community structure changed substantially with depth at the same location. It indicated that a relatively higher bacterial diversity was present in the groundwater sample with lower arsenic concentration. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated that the sediment bacteria mainly belonged to Pseudomonas, Dietzia and Rhodococcus, which have been widely found in aquifer systems. Additionally, NO3(-)-reducing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. was the largest group, followed by Fe(III)-reducing, SO4(2-)-reducing and As(V)-reducing bacteria in the sediment sample. These anaerobic bacteria used the specific oxyanions as electron acceptor and played a significant role in reductive dissolution of Fe oxide minerals, reduction of As(V), and release of arsenic from sediments into groundwater. Microcosm experiments, using intact aquifer sediments, showed that arsenic release and Fe(III) reduction were microbially mediated in the presence of indigenous bacteria. High arsenic concentration was also observed in the batch without amendment of organic carbon, demonstrating that the natural organic matter in sediments was the potential electron donor for microbially mediated arsenic release from these aquifer sediments.

  14. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  15. Natural uranium and strontium isotope tracers of water sources and surface water-groundwater interactions in arid wetlands - Pahranagat Valley, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paces, James B.; Wurster, Frederic C.

    2014-09-01

    Near-surface physical and chemical process can strongly affect dissolved-ion concentrations and stable-isotope compositions of water in wetland settings, especially under arid climate conditions. In contrast, heavy radiogenic isotopes of strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and uranium (234U/238U) remain largely unaffected and can be used to help identify unique signatures from different sources and quantify end-member mixing that would otherwise be difficult to determine. The utility of combined Sr and U isotopes are demonstrated in this study of wetland habitats on the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, which depend on supply from large-volume springs north of the Refuge, and from small-volume springs and seeps within the Refuge. Water budgets from these sources have not been quantified previously. Evaporation, transpiration, seasonally variable surface flow, and water management practices complicate the use of conventional methods for determining source contributions and mixing relations. In contrast, 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U remain unfractionated under these conditions, and compositions at a given site remain constant. Differences in Sr- and U-isotopic signatures between individual sites can be related by simple two- or three-component mixing models. Results indicate that surface flow constituting the Refuge's irrigation source consists of a 65:25:10 mixture of water from two distinct regionally sourced carbonate-aquifer springs, and groundwater from locally sourced volcanic aquifers. Within the Refuge, contributions from the irrigation source and local groundwater are readily determined and depend on proximity to those sources as well as water management practices.

  16. Natural uranium and strontium isotope tracers of water sources and surface water-groundwater interactions in arid wetlands: Pahranagat Valley, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Wurster, Frederic C.

    2014-01-01

    Near-surface physical and chemical process can strongly affect dissolved-ion concentrations and stable isotope compositions of water in wetland settings, especially under arid climate conditions. In contrast, heavy radiogenic isotopes of strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and uranium (234U/238U) remain largely unaffected and can be used to help identify unique signatures from different sources and quantify end-member mixing that would otherwise be difficult to determine. The utility of combined Sr and U isotopes are demonstrated in this study of wetland habitats on the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, which depend on supply from large-volume springs north of the Refuge, and from small-volume springs and seeps within the Refuge. Water budgets from these sources have not been quantified previously. Evaporation, transpiration, seasonally variable surface flow, and water management practices complicate the use of conventional methods for determining source contributions and mixing relations. In contrast, 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U remain unfractionated under these conditions, and compositions at a given site remain constant. Differences in Sr- and U-isotopic signatures between individual sites can be related by simple two- or three-component mixing models. Results indicate that surface flow constituting the Refuge’s irrigation source consists of a 65:25:10 mixture of water from two distinct regionally sourced carbonate aquifer springs, and groundwater from locally sourced volcanic aquifers. Within the Refuge, contributions from the irrigation source and local groundwater are readily determined and depend on proximity to those sources as well as water management practices.

  17. Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Agriculture has had direct and indirect effects on the rates and compositions of groundwater recharge and aquifer biogeochemistry. Direct effects include dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizers and associated materials and hydrologic alterations related to irrigation and drainage. Some indirect effects include changes in water-rock reactions in soils and aquifers caused by increased concentrations of dissolved oxidants, protons, and major ions. Agrilcultural activities have directly or indirectly affected the concentrations of a large number of inorganic chemicals in groundwater, for example NO3-, N2, Cl, SO42-, H+, P, C, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra, and As, as well a wide variety of pesticides and other organic compounds. For reactive contaminants like NO3-, a combination of chemical, isotopic, and environmental-tracer analytical approaches might be required to resolve changing inputs from subsequent alterations as causes of concentration gradients in groundwater. Groundwater records derived from multi-component hydrostratigraphic data can be used to quantify recharge rates and residence times of water and dissolved contaminants, document past variations in recharging contaminant loads, and identify natural contaminant-remediation processes. These data indicate that many of the world's surficial aquifers contain transient records of changing agricultural contamination from the last half of the 20th century. The transient agricultural groundwater signal has important implications for long-term trends and spatial heterogeneity in discharge.

  18. Review: groundwater in Alaska (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Kikuchi, C.P.; Koch, J.C.; Lilly, M.R.; Leake, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in the US state of Alaska is critical to both humans and ecosystems. Interactions among physiography, ecology, geology, and current and past climate have largely determined the location and properties of aquifers as well as the timing and magnitude of fluxes to, from, and within the groundwater system. The climate ranges from maritime in the southern portion of the state to continental in the Interior, and arctic on the North Slope. During the Quaternary period, topography and rock type have combined with glacial and periglacial processes to develop the unconsolidated alluvial aquifers of Alaska and have resulted in highly heterogeneous hydrofacies. In addition, the long persistence of frozen ground, whether seasonal or permanent, greatly affects the distribution of aquifer recharge and discharge. Because of high runoff, a high proportion of groundwater use, and highly variable permeability controlled in part by permafrost and seasonally frozen ground, understanding groundwater/surface-water interactions and the effects of climate change is critical for understanding groundwater availability and the movement of natural and anthropogenic contaminants.

  19. Groundwater recharge and agricultural contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhlke, John-Karl

    2002-02-01

    Agriculture has had direct and indirect effects on the rates and compositions of groundwater recharge and aquifer biogeochemistry. Direct effects include dissolution and transport of excess quantities of fertilizers and associated materials and hydrologic alterations related to irrigation and drainage. Some indirect effects include changes in water-rock reactions in soils and aquifers caused by increased concentrations of dissolved oxidants, protons, and major ions. Agricultural activities have directly or indirectly affected the concentrations of a large number of inorganic chemicals in groundwater, for example NO3 -, N2, Cl, SO4 2-, H+, P, C, K, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra, and As, as well as a wide variety of pesticides and other organic compounds. For reactive contaminants like NO3 -, a combination of chemical, isotopic, and environmental-tracer analytical approaches might be required to resolve changing inputs from subsequent alterations as causes of concentration gradients in groundwater. Groundwater records derived from multi-component hydrostratigraphic data can be used to quantify recharge rates and residence times of water and dissolved contaminants, document past variations in recharging contaminant loads, and identify natural contaminant-remediation processes. These data indicate that many of the world's surficial aquifers contain transient records of changing agricultural contamination from the last half of the 20th century. The transient agricultural groundwater signal has important implications for long-term trends and spatial heterogeneity in discharge.

  20. Influence of the addition of sulphate and ferric ions in a methanogenic anaerobic packed-bed reactor treating gasoline-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, B S; Chinalia, F A; Sarti, A; Silva, A J; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2006-01-01

    Benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) are relatively soluble aromatic compounds of gasoline. Gasoline storage tank leakages generally lead to an extensive contamination of groundwater. In the natural environment for instance, these compounds might be biodegraded under a variety of reducing potentials. The objective of this work was to examine the influence of the addition of sulphate and Fe(OH)3 in a methanogenic horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized-biomass reactor treating gasoline-contaminated water. Three different conditions were evaluated: methanogenic, sulphidogenic and sulphidogenic with the addition of ferric ions. Methanogenic condition showed the higher BTX degradation rates and the addition of sulphate negatively affected BTX removal rates with the production of H2S. However, the addition of ferric ions resulted in the precipitation of sulphur, improving BTX degradation by the consortium. Metanosphaera sp., Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosaeta concilii were identified in the consortium by means of 16S and directly related to the addition of ferric ions.

  1. Investigations of natural groundwater hazards at the proposed Yucca Mountain high level nuclear waste repository. Part A: Geology at Yucca Mountain. Part B: Modeling of hydro-tectonic phenomena relevant to Yucca Mountain. Annual report - Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J.S.; Schluter, C.M.; Livingston, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    This document is an annual report describing investigations of natural groundwater hazards at the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository.This document describes research studies of the origin of near surface calcite/silica deposits at Yucca Mountain. The origin of these deposits is controversial and the authors have extended and strengthened the basis of their arguments for epigenetic, metasomatic alteration of the tuffs at Yucca Mountain. This report includes stratigraphic, mineralogical, and geochronological information along with geochemical data to support the conclusions described by Livingston and Szymanski, and others. As part of their first annual report, they take this opportunity to clarify the technical basis of their concerns and summarize the critical geological field evidence and related information. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Spatial variations of groundwater background concentrations in coastal aquifers, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yunjung; Lee, Soojae

    2014-05-01

    In coastal aquifers the mixing between fresh terrestrial water and seawater occurs, which influences groundwater quality. Due to mixing elevated chloride concentrations are often observed in coastal aquifers. In coastal areas terrestrial water-seawater mixing can be caused by anthropogenic activities or natural factors such as tides and sea level changes. Therefore, it is difficult or even impossible to characterize groundwater background concentrations in coastal aquifers. Although it is usual to exclude coastal aquifer when characterizing background concentrations, it is essential to accurately characterize naturally-affected groundwater quality in coastal areas because groundwater is a major water resource for potable, irrigation, domestic uses. So in this work we define groundwater background concentrations as naturally occurring ambient concentrations with excluding groundwater abstraction. Based on this definition, we evaluate groundwater background concentrations in various geologic formations and analyze characteristics of groundwater quality in coastal aquifers by utilizing Groundwater Quality Monitoring System (GQMS) data. The results show that high concentrations of chloride are observed in some coastal areas but not always. Tidal effects and topographical characteristics are thought to be as factors affecting such spatial variations. In some coastal areas high concentrations of chloride are observed with high nitrate concentrations. This means that agricultural practices can attribute to anthropogenic background, leading to elevated concentrations of nitrate. These results provide some essential information for groundwater resources management in coastal areas. Further data collection and analysis is required for evaluating the effect of tide and sea level changes on groundwater quality.

  3. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  4. Groundwater pollution by nitrates from livestock wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, V.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Utilization of wastes from livestock complexes for irrigation involves the danger of groundwater pollution by nitrates. In order to prevent and minimize pollution, it is necessary to apply geological-hydrogeological evidence and concepts to the situation of wastewater irrigation for the purposes of studying natural groundwater protectiveness and predicting changes in groundwater quality as a result of infiltrating wastes. The procedure of protectiveness evaluation and quality prediction is described. With groundwater pollution by nitrate nitrogen, the concentration of ammonium nitrogen noticeably increases. One of the reasons for this change is the process of denitrification due to changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions in a layer. At representative field sites, it is necessary to collect systematic stationary observations of the concentrations of nitrogenous compounds in groundwater and changes in redox conditions and temperature.

  5. Groundwater age for identification of baseline groundwater quality and impacts of land-use intensification - The National Groundwater Monitoring Programme of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Daughney, Christopher J.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryWe identified natural baseline groundwater quality and impacts caused by land use intensification by relating groundwater chemistry with water age. Tritium, the most direct tracer for groundwater dating, including the time of water passage through the unsaturated zone, was overwhelmed over the recent decades by contamination from bomb-tritium from nuclear weapons testing in the early 1960s. In the Southern Hemisphere, this situation has changed now with the fading of the bomb-tritium, and tritium has become a tool for accurate groundwater dating. Tritium dating will become efficient also in the Northern Hemisphere over the next decade. Plotting hydrochemistry and field parameters versus groundwater age allowed us to identify those parameters that have increasing concentrations with age and are therefore from geological sources. These indicators for natural groundwater evolution are: Na, HCO3, SiO2, F, PO4, the redox-sensitive elements and compounds Fe, Mn, NH4, CH4, and pH and conductivity. In young groundwater that was recharged after the intensification of agriculture, nitrate, sulphate, CFC-11 and CFC-12, and pesticides are the most representative indicators for the impact of land-use intensification on groundwater quality, with 66% of the sites showing such an impact. Elevated concentrations of nitrate in oxic groundwater allowed us to reconstruct the timing and magnitude of the impact of land-use intensification on groundwater which in New Zealand occurred in two stages. Old pristine groundwater reflects the natural baseline quality. A transition to slightly elevated concentration due to low-intensity land-use was observed in groundwater recharged since around 1880. A sharp increase in nitrate and other agrochemicals due to high-intensity agriculture was observed in groundwater recharged since 1955. The threshold concentrations that distinguish natural baseline quality water from low-intensity land-use water, and low-intensity from high intensity land

  6. Arsenic release from shallow aquifers of the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia: Evidence from bacterial community in aquifer sediments and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Guo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Indigenous microbes play crucial roles in arsenic mobilization in high arsenic groundwater systems. Databases concerning the presence and the activity of microbial communities are very useful in evaluating the potential of microbe-mediated arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers hosting high arsenic groundwater. This study characterized microbial communities in groundwaters at different depths with different arsenic concentrations by DGGE and one sediment by 16S rDNA gene clone library, and evaluated arsenic mobilization in microcosm batches with the presence of indigenous bacteria. DGGE fingerprints revealed that the community structure changed substantially with depth at the same location. It indicated that a relatively higher bacterial diversity was present in the groundwater sample with lower arsenic concentration. The clone library of sediment sample 2009M1 and DGGE profiles of microbial community structures of groundwater samples indicated NO3-, Fe(III) and SO42- reducing bacteria are abundant in the As-affected aquifer, which are facultative or anaerobic chemoautotrophic bacteria. Pseudomonas that was rich in both high arsenic groundwater and sediment included a great number of denitrifying bacterium strains that may contribute to the low concentration of nitrate in the groundwater. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria belonging to different species, such as Aquabacterium sp., Thauera sp., Georgfuchsia sp., Methyloversatilis sp., Clostridium sp., were widely found in the community. The genus Desulfosporosinus observed in the sediment sample of 2009M1 was believed to be sulfate reducer. These results offered direct evidences that anaerobic reducing bacteria play a role in the formation of toxic, mobile As(III) in the groundwater of the Hetao basin, especially Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. Incubation of sediments without the addition of organic carbon source showed a significant release of arsenic (predominantly as As(III)). By contrast, sterile incubations and incubations

  7. Groundwater regulation and integrated planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quevauviller, Philippe; Batelaan, Okke; Hunt, Randall J.

    2016-01-01

    The complex nature of groundwater and the diversity of uses and environmental interactions call for emerging groundwater problems to be addressed through integrated management and planning approaches. Planning requires different levels of integration dealing with: the hydrologic cycle (the physical process) including the temporal dimension; river basins and aquifers (spatial integration); socioeconomic considerations at regional, national and international levels; and scientific knowledge. The great natural variation in groundwater conditions obviously affects planning needs and options as well as perceptions from highly localised to regionally-based approaches. The scale at which planning is done therefore needs to be carefully evaluated against available policy choices and options in each particular setting. A solid planning approach is based on River Basin Management Planning (RBMP), which covers: (1) objectives that management planning are designed to address; (2) the way various types of measures fit into the overall management planning; and (3) the criteria against which the success or failure of specific strategies or interventions can be evaluated (e.g. compliance with environmental quality standards). A management planning framework is to be conceived as a “living” or iterated document that can be updated, refined and if necessary changed as information and experience are gained. This chapter discusses these aspects, providing an insight into European Union (EU), United States and Australia groundwater planning practices.

  8. Aerobic and anaerobic PCB biodegradation in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    Studies have identified two distinct biological processes capable of biotransforming polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): aerobic oxidative processes and anaerobic reductive processes. It is now known that these two complementary activities are occurring naturally in the environment. Anaerobic PCB dechlorination, responsible for the conversion of highly chlorinated PCBs to lightly chlorinated ortho-enriched congeners, has been documented extensively in the Hudson River and has been observed at many other sites throughout the world. The products from this anaerobic process are readily degradable by a wide range of aerobic bacteria, and it has now been shown that this process is occurring in surficial sediments in the Hudson River. The widespread anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs that has been observed in many river and marine sediments results in reduction of both the potential risk from and potential exposure to PCBs. The reductions in potential risk include reduced dioxin like toxicity and reduced carcinogenicity. The reduced PCB exposure realized upon dechlorination is manifested by reduced bioaccumulation in the food chain and by the increased anaerobic degradability of these products. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. A high resolution global scale groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Van Beek, L. P.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays a vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and also supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, the large natural groundwater storage provides a buffer against water shortage and sustains flows to rivers and wetlands, supporting ecosystem habitats and biodiversity. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models (GHMs) do not include a groundwater flow component, although it is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle. Thus, a realistic physical representation of the groundwater system that allows for the simulation of groundwater head dynamics and lateral flows is essential for GHMs that increasingly run at finer resolution. In this study we present a transient global groundwater model with a resolution of 5 arc-minutes (approximately 10 km at the equator) using MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988). Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological maps and datasets (Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moosdorf, 2013) combined with information about e.g. aquifer thickness and presence of less permeable, impermeable, and semi-impermeable layers. For the parameterization, we relied entirely on available global datasets and did not calibrate the model so that it can equally be expanded to data poor environments. We forced the groundwater model with the output from the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated simulated groundwater heads with observations, from North America and Australia, resulting in a coefficient of determination of 0.8 and 0.7 respectively. This