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Sample records for natural circulation flow

  1. Experimental Observations of Natural Circulation Flow in the NSTF

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, Darius; Kraus, Adam R.; Bucknor, Matthew D.; Hu, Rui; Farmer, Mitchell T.

    2016-09-01

    A 1/2 scale test facility has been constructed at Argonne National Laboratory to study the heat removal performance and natural circulation flow patterns in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Our test facility, the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF), supports the broader goal of developing an inherently safe and fully passive ex-vessel decay heat removal for advanced reactor designs. The project, initiated in 2010 to support the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART), Small Modular Reactor (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) programs, has been conducting experimental operations since early 2014. The following paper provides a summary of some primary design features of the 26-m tall test facility along with a description of the data acquisition suite that guides our experimental practices. Specifics of the distributed fiber optic temperature measurements will be discussed, which introduces an unparalleled level of data density that has never before been implemented in a large scale natural circulation test facility. Results from our test series will then be presented, which provide insight into the thermal hydraulic behavior at steady-state and transient conditions for varying heat flux levels and exhaust chimney configuration states. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-sustained hydrodynamic oscillations in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, K. C.

    1969-01-01

    Results of an experimental and theoretical study of factors affecting self-sustaining hydrodynamic oscillations in boiling-water loops are reported. Data on flow variables, and the effects of geometry, subcooling and pressure on the development of oscillatory behavior in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop are included.

  3. Study of turbulent natural-circulation flow and low-Prandtl-number forced-convection flow. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.S.; Thompson, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    Calculational methods and results are discussed for the coupled energy and momentum equations of turbulent natural circulation flow and low Prandtl number forced convection flow. The objective of this paper is to develop a calculational method for the study of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of coolant flowing in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor channel under natural circulation conditions. The two-equation turbulence model is used to evaluate the turbulent momentum transport property. Because the analogy between momentum transfer and heat transfer does not generally hold for low Prandtl number fluid and natural circulation flow conditions, the turbulent thermal conductivity is calculated independently using equations similar to the two-equation turbulence model. The numerical technique used in the calculation is the finite element method.

  4. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-29

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  5. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  6. Two-phase flow stability structure in a natural circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhiwei

    1995-09-01

    The present study reports a numerical analysis of two-phase flow stability structures in a natural circulation system with two parallel, heated channels. The numerical model is derived, based on the Galerkin moving nodal method. This analysis is related to some design options applicable to integral heating reactors with a slightly-boiling operation mode, and is also of general interest to similar facilities. The options include: (1) Symmetric heating and throttling; (2) Asymmetric heating and symmetric throttling; (3) Asymmetric heating and throttling. The oscillation modes for these variants are discussed. Comparisons with the data from the INET two-phase flow stability experiment have qualitatively validated the present analysis.

  7. Two-phase flow instability and dryout in parallel channels in natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Hughes, E.D.

    1993-06-01

    The unique feature of parallel channel flows is that the pressure drop or driving head for the flow is maintained constant across any given channel by the flow in all the others, or by having a large downcomer or bypass in a natural circulation loop. This boundary condition is common in all heat exchangers, reactor cores and boilers, it is well known that the two-phase flow in parallel channels can exhibit both so-called static and dynamic instability. This leads to the question of the separability of the flow and pressure drop boundary conditions in the study of stability and dryout. For the areas of practical interest, the flow can be considered as incompressible. The dynamic instability is characterized by density (kinematic) or continuity waves, and the static instability by inertial (pressure drop) or manometric escalations. The static has been considered to be the zero-frequency or lowest mode of the dynamic case. We briefly review the status of the existing literature on both parallel channel static and dynamic instability, and the latest developments in theory and experiment. The difference between the two derivations lies in the retention of the time-dependent terms in the conservation equations. The effects and impact of design options are also discussed. Since dryout in parallel systems follows instability, it has been traditional to determine the dryout power for a parallel channel by testing a single channel with a given (inlet) flow boundary condition without particular regard for the pressure drop. Thus all modern dryout correlations are based on constant or fixed flow tests, a so-called hard inlet, and subchannel and multiple bundle effects are corrected for separately. We review the thinking that lead to this approach, and suggest that for all multiple channel and natural circulation systems close attention should be paid to the actual (untested) pressure drop conditions. A conceptual formulation is suggested as a basis for discussion.

  8. Chaotic Phenomena and Analysis of Natural Circulation Flow Instability under Rolling Motion Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. C.; Gao, P. Z.

    2010-03-01

    Experimental study on natural circulation flow instability under rolling motion is carried out and the results show that the complex flow oscillations are formed due to the overlapped effect of the rolling motion (trough instability) and density wave oscillation. The system becomes more instable because of the occurrence of complex flow oscillations. Complex flow oscillations only occur in the case of high subcooling and may be divided into two types: regular and irregular complex flow oscillations. Under the same thermo hydraulic conditions, the marginal stability boundary (MSB) of regular complex oscillations is similar to that of density wave oscillation without rolling motion. And the influences of rolling amplitude and rolling period on its MSB are slight. Chaotic characteristics are found in irregular complex oscillation flow under rolling motion condition. Based on the experimental data and G-P method, correlation dimension and Kolmogorov entropy are gotten with time series analysis. The results show that complex oscillation has fractal dimension and positive Kolmogorov entropy and is typical chaotic time series.

  9. Thermally induced flow oscillation in vertical two-phase natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yong; Ishii, Mamoru

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulation during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed using Freon-113 boiling and condensation loop. In quasi-steady state, the flow became relatively stabilized and certain regular patterns of flow oscillations were detected with ranges of periods in 8-/approximately/35 seconds and 2.5-/approximately/4 minutes. In order to find out the nature of these oscillations, one-dimensional field equations for the single-phase (liquid) and two-phase region were set up, and these field equations were integrated along the loop. The homogeneous flow model was used for the two-phase region. Then the characteristic equation was derived using perturbation method. Thermal non-equilibrium and compressibility of each phase were not considered in the present analysis. The characteristic equation derived can be used to obtain the stability criteria. A simplified approach showed that the short-period oscillation were the manometer oscillation. The longer period oscillations were the density wave oscillation which had the period of oscillations close to the residence time of a fluid around the loop.

  10. The low-power low-pressure flow resonance in a natural circulation cooled boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Stekelenburg, A.J.C.

    1995-09-01

    The last few years the possibility of flow resonances during the start-up phase of natural circulation cooled BWRs has been put forward by several authors. The present paper reports on actual oscillations observed at the Dodewaard reactor, the world`s only operating BWR cooled by natural circulation. In addition, results of a parameter study performed by means of a simple theoretical model are presented. The influence of relevant parameters on the resonance characteristics, being the decay ratio and the resonance frequency, is investigated and explained.

  11. Simulation experiments on two-phase natural circulation in a freon-113 flow visualization loop

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yong; Ishii, Mamoru

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulaton and flow termination during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed using a Freon-113 flow visualization loop. The main focus of the present experiment was placed on the two-phase flow behavior in the hot-leg U-bend typical of B and W LWR systems. The loop was built based on the two-phase flow scaling criteria developed under this program to find out the effect of fluid properties, phase changes and coupling between hydrodynamic and heat transfer phenomena. Significantly different flow behaviors have been observed due to the non-equilibrium phase change phenomena such as the flashing and condensation on the Freon loop in comparison with the previous adiabatic experiment. The phenomena created much more unstable hydrodynamic conditions which lead to cyclic or oscillatory flow behaviors. Also, the void distribution and primary loop flow rate were measured in detail in addition to the important key paramaters, such as the power input, loop friction and the liquid level inside the simulated steam generator.

  12. Experimental investigation on the flow instability behavior of a multi-channel boiling natural circulation loop at low-pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Vikas; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2010-09-15

    Natural circulation as a mode of heat removal is being considered as a prominent passive feature in the innovative nuclear reactor designs, particularly in boiling-water-reactors, due to its simplicity and economy. However, boiling natural circulation system poses many challenges to designer due to occurrence of various kinds of instabilities such as excursive instability, density wave oscillations, flow pattern transition instability, geysering and metastable states in parallel channels. This problem assumes greater significance particularly at low-pressures i.e. during startup, where there is great difference in the properties of two phases. In light of this, a parallel channel loop has been designed and installed that has a geometrical resemblance to the pressure-tube-type boiling-water-reactor, to investigate into the behavior of boiling natural circulation. The loop comprises of four identical parallel channels connected between two common plenums i.e. steam drum and header. The recirculation path is provided by a single downcomer connected between steam drum and header. Experiments have been conducted over a wide range of power and pressures (1-10 bar). Two distinct unstable zones are observed with respect to power i.e. corresponding to low power (Type-I) and high power (Type-II) with a stable zone at intermediate powers. The nature of oscillations in terms of their amplitude and frequency and their evolution for Type-I and Type-II instabilities are studied with respect to the effect of heater power and pressure. This paper discusses the evolution of unstable and stable behavior along with the nature of flow oscillation in the channels and the effect of pressure on it. (author)

  13. Prediction of Severe Accident Counter Current Natural Circulation Flows in the Hot Leg of a Pressurized Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Christopher F.

    2006-07-01

    During certain phases of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the core becomes uncovered and steam carries heat to the steam generators through natural circulation. For PWR's with U-tube steam generators and loop seals filled with water, a counter current flow pattern is established in the hot leg. This flow pattern has been experimentally observed and has been predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Predictions of severe accident behavior are routinely carried out using severe accident system analysis codes such as SCDAP/RELAP5 or MELCOR. These codes, however, were not developed for predicting the three-dimensional natural circulation flow patterns during this phase of a severe accident. CFD, along with a set of experiments at 1/7. scale, have been historically used to establish the flow rates and mixing for the system analysis tools. One important aspect of these predictions is the counter current flow rate in the nearly 30 inch diameter hot leg between the reactor vessel and steam generator. This flow rate is strongly related to the amount of energy that can be transported away from the reactor core. This energy transfer plays a significant role in the prediction of core failures as well as potential failures in other reactor coolant system piping. CFD is used to determine the counter current flow rate during a severe accident. Specific sensitivities are completed for parameters such as surge line flow rates, hydrogen content, as well as vessel and steam generator temperatures. The predictions are carried out for the reactor vessel upper plenum, hot leg, a portion of the surge line, and a steam generator blocked off at the outlet plenum. All predictions utilize the FLUENT V6 CFD code. The volumetric flow in the hot leg is assumed to be proportional to the square root of the product of normalized density difference, gravity, and hydraulic diameter to the 5. power. CFD is used to determine the proportionality constant in the range

  14. Buoyancy Driven Coolant Mixing Studies of Natural Circulation Flows at the ROCOM Test Facility Using ANSYS CFX

    SciTech Connect

    Hohne, Thomas; Kliem, Soren; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2006-07-01

    Coolant mixing in the cold leg, downcomer and the lower plenum of pressurized water reactors is an important phenomenon mitigating the reactivity insertion into the core. Therefore, mixing of the de-borated slugs with the ambient coolant in the reactor pressure vessel was investigated at the four loop 1:5 scaled ROCOM mixing test facility. Thermal hydraulics analyses showed, that weakly borated condensate can accumulate in particular in the pump loop seal of those loops, which do not receive safety injection. After refilling of the primary circuit, natural circulation in the stagnant loops can re-establish simultaneously and the de-borated slugs are shifted towards the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the ROCOM experiments, the length of the flow ramp and the initial density difference between the slugs and the ambient coolant was varied. From the test matrix experiments with 0 resp. 2% density difference between the de-borated slugs and the ambient coolant were used to validate the CFD software ANSYS CFX. To model the effects of turbulence on the mean flow a higher order Reynolds stress turbulence model was employed and a mesh consisting of 6.4 million hybrid elements was utilized. Only the experiments and CFD calculations with modeled density differences show a stratification in the downcomer. Depending on the degree of density differences the less dense slugs flow around the core barrel at the top of the downcomer. At the opposite side the lower borated coolant is entrained by the colder safety injection water and transported to the core. The validation proves that ANSYS CFX is able to simulate appropriately the flow field and mixing effects of coolant with different densities. (authors)

  15. Experimental Investigation of Natural-Circulation Flow Behavior Under Low-Power/Low-Pressure Conditions in the Large-Scale PANDA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Auban, Olivier; Paladino, Domenico; Zboray, Robert

    2004-12-15

    Twenty-five tests have been carried out in the large-scale thermal-hydraulic facility PANDA to investigate natural-circulation and stability behavior under low-pressure/low-power conditions, when void flashing might play an important role. This work, which extends the current experimental database to a large geometric scale, is of interest notably with regard to the start-up procedures in natural-circulation-cooled boiling water reactors. It should help the understanding of the physical phenomena that may cause flow instability in such conditions and can be used for validation of thermal-hydraulics system codes. The tests were performed at a constant power, balanced by a specific condenser heat removal capacity. The test matrix allowed the reactor pressure vessel power and pressure to be varied, as well as other parameters influencing the natural-circulation flow. The power spectra of flow oscillations showed in a few tests a major and unique resonance peak, and decay ratios between 0.5 and 0.9 have been found. The remainder of the tests showed an even more pronounced stable behavior. A classification of the tests is presented according to the circulation modes (from single-phase to two-phase flow) that could be assumed and particularly to the importance and the localization of the flashing phenomenon.

  16. A study on the effect of various design parameters on the natural circulation flow rate of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a study on the effect of various design parameters such as the channel gap width, heat flux distribution, down-comer pipe size and two-phase flow slip ratio on the natural circulation flow rate is performed based on a physical model for a natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of an EU-APR1400, and these effects on the natural circulation flow rate are analyzed and compared with the minimum flow rate required for the safe operation of the system. (authors)

  17. Study on bubbly flow behavior in natural circulation reactor by thermal-hydraulic simulation tests with SF6-Gas and ethanol liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yoshiyuki; Suga, Keishi; Hibi, Koki; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Komeno, Toshihiro; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Serizawa, Akimi; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Arai, Takahiro

    2009-02-01

    An advanced experimental technique has been developed to simulate two-phase flow behavior in a light water reactor (LWR). The technique applies three kinds of methods; (1) use of sulfur-hexafluoride (SF6) gas and ethanol (C2H5OH) liquid at atmospheric temperature and a pressure less than 1.0MPa, where the fluid properties are similar to steam-water ones in the LWR, (2) generation of bubble with a sintering tube, which simulates bubble generation on heated surface in the LWR, (3) measurement of detailed bubble distribution data with a bi-optical probe (BOP), (4) and measurement of liquid velocities with the tracer liquid. This experimental technique provides easy visualization of flows by using a large scale experimental apparatus, which gives three-dimensional flows, and measurement of detailed spatial distributions of two-phase flow. With this technique, we have carried out experiments simulating two-phase flow behavior in a single-channel geometry, a multi-rod-bundle one, and a horizontal-tube-bundle one on a typical natural circulation reactor system. Those experiments have clarified a) a flow regime map in a rod bundle on the transient region between bubbly and churn flow, b) three-dimensional flow behaviour in rod-bundles where inter-subassembly cross-flow occurs, c) bubble-separation behavior with consideration of reactor internal structures. The data have given analysis models for the natural circulation reactor design with good extrapolation.

  18. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  19. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  20. Laser anemometry measurements of natural circulation flow in a scale model PWR reactor system. [Pressurized Water Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadambi, J. R.; Schneider, S. J.; Stewart, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    The natural circulation of a single phase fluid in a scale model of a pressurized water reactor system during a postulated grade core accident is analyzed. The fluids utilized were water and SF6. The design of the reactor model and the similitude requirements are described. Four LDA tests were conducted: water with 28 kW of heat in the simulated core, with and without the participation of simulated steam generators; water with 28 kW of heat in the simulated core, with the participation of simulated steam generators and with cold upflow of 12 lbm/min from the lower plenum; and SF6 with 0.9 kW of heat in the simulated core and without the participation of the simulated steam generators. For the water tests, the velocity of the water in the center of the core increases with vertical height and continues to increase in the upper plenum. For SF6, it is observed that the velocities are an order of magnitude higher than those of water; however, the velocity patterns are similar.

  1. Natural flow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Bauer, Steven X. S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a natural flow wing and a method for constructing the same. The method comprises contouring a three-dimensional upper surface and a three-dimensional lower surface of the natural flow wing independently of one another into a prescribed shape. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that flow and pressure-loading over an upper surface of a wing tend to be conical about an apex of the wing, producing favorable and unfavorable regions of performance based on drag. The method reduces these unfavorable regions by shaping the upper surface such that the maximum thickness near a tip of the natural flow wing moves aft, thereby, contouring the wing to coincide more closely with the conical nature of the flow on the upper surface. Nearly constant compressive loading characterizes the flow field over a lower surface of the conventional wing. Magnitude of these compressive pressures on the lower surface depends on angle of attack and on a streamwise curvature of the lower surface of the wing and not on a cross-sectional spanwise curvature. The method, thereby, shapes the lower surface to create an area as large as possible with negative slopes. Any type of swept wing may be used to obtain the final, shaped geometry of the upper and lower surfaces of the natural flow wing.

  2. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  3. Decay heat removal in HTGRs by Natural Circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tzoref, J.; Saphier, D.

    1990-01-01

    The coolability of a conceptual 1000-MW(thermal) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with complete loss of forced circulation is investigated. Similar design concepts have been proposed by several designers. The important question is whether, for the given geometrical configuration and power density, natural circulation can be developed within a sufficiently short period so that passive cooling devices can be used to remove the decay heat. From the present study, it was concluded that if the reactor remains pressurized during the accident, and if passage near a passive cooling device with a minimum 0.3% nominal heat removal capacity of the reactor nominal decay power can be established, then the maximum fuel temperature will always stay below the 1600{degree}C limit, which is the limit for the beginning of fission product release. The generated decay heat under such conditions is partly removed by the developed natural circulation to the passive heat sink, whereas the rest is absorbed by the system large heat capacity. At the beginning of the accident, most of the decay heat is absorbed by the graphite in the thermal shield structure metal. In the course of the accident, the relative part of the heat dominant. The study was performed by using the DSNP modular simulation language. A dynamic model was developed for the natural circulation flow in the primary loop of a medium-size HTGR during loss of forced circulation.

  4. Performance of Liquid Metals in Natural Circulation Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ceballos, Carlos; Lathouwers, Danny; Verkooijen, Adrian

    2004-07-01

    The inherent safety capability of natural circulation makes reactor design more reliable. Additionally, the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant with natural circulation in the primary cooling circuit is an interesting alternative for nuclear plant designers, due to their lower operational and investment costs obtained by simplifying systems and controls. This paper deals with the feasibility of application of natural circulation in the primary cooling circuit of a liquid metal fast reactor. The methodology employed is a non-dimensional analysis, which describes the relationship between the physical properties and system variables. The performance criterion is bounded by a safety argument, referring to the maximum cladding temperature allowed during operation. The study considers several coolants, which can play a part in reactor cooling systems, such as lead, lead-bismuth and sodium. Bismuth and gallium are included in this analysis, in order to extend the range of properties for reference purposes. The results present a characterization of natural circulation flow in a reactor and compare the cooling capabilities from different liquid metals coolants. (authors)

  5. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  6. Numerical simulation of losses along a natural circulation helium loop

    SciTech Connect

    Knížat, Branislav Urban, František Mlkvik, Marek Ridzoň, František Olšiak, Róbert

    2016-06-30

    A natural circulation helium loop appears to be a perspective passive method of a nuclear reactor cooling. When designing this device, it is important to analyze the mechanism of an internal flow. The flow of helium in the loop is set in motion due to a difference of hydrostatic pressures between cold and hot branch. Steady flow at a requested flow rate occurs when the buoyancy force is adjusted to resistances against the flow. Considering the fact that the buoyancy force is proportional to a difference of temperatures in both branches, it is important to estimate the losses correctly in the process of design. The paper deals with the calculation of losses in branches of the natural circulation helium loop by methods of CFD. The results of calculations are an important basis for the hydraulic design of both exchangers (heater and cooler). The analysis was carried out for the existing model of a helium loop of the height 10 m and nominal heat power 250 kW.

  7. Control of natural circulation loops by electrohydrodynamic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, W.; Testi, D.; Della Vista, D.

    2014-04-01

    The paper analyses the effect of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pumping on the control of natural circulation loops (NCLs). The two major objectives of the investigation are: finding the optimal configuration of an EHD pump and demonstrating that the NCL flow direction can be inverted by exploiting the EHD phenomena. In the initial experimental set-up, we measured the static pressure rise given by an EHD pump made of three consecutive modules of point-ring electrodes for different dielectric fluids and electrode materials. When reversing the polarity of the applied DC voltage, we observed opposite pumping directions, suggesting the presence of two distinct EHD phenomena, inducing motion on opposite directions: ion-drag pumping and conduction pumping. The former was identified as a more efficient process compared to the latter. Based on these preliminary experiments, we built a NCL, operating with the fluid HFE-7100. Two oppositely mounted optimised pumping sections could be alternately activated, to promote clockwise or anticlockwise motion. In the first series of tests, alternately, the pumping sections were triggered prior to the heat input. In any case, the circulation followed the EHD pumping direction. In other tests, the electric field was applied when natural circulation was already present and the flow was reversed by means of opposite EHD pumping, at both polarities. Simply inverting the polarity of the applied voltage, we could alternate ion-drag and conduction pumping; in this way, we easily controlled the direction of motion by means of a single EHD pumping device.

  8. Investigations on the thermal-hydraulics of a natural circulation cooled BWR fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, H.V.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Mudde, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    A scaled natural circulation loop facility has been built after the Dodewaard Boiling Water Reactor, which is the only operating natural circulation cooled BWR in the world. The loop comprises one fuel assembly, a riser with a downcomer and a condenser with a cooling system. Freon-12 is used as a scaling liquid. This paper reports on the first measurements done with this facility. Quantities like the circulation flow, carry-under and the void-fraction have been measured as a function of power, pressure, liquid level, riser length, condensate temperature and friction factors. The behavior of the circulation flow can be understood by considering the driving force. Special attention has been paid to the carry-under, which has been shown to have a very important impact on the dynamics of a natural circulation cooled BWR.

  9. Modeling of a coal-fired natural circulation boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Bhambare, K.S.; Mitra, S.K.; Gaitonde, U.N.

    2007-06-15

    Modeling of a natural circulation boiler for a coal-fired thermal power station is presented here. The boiler system is divided into seven subcomponents, and for each section, models based on conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are formulated. The pressure drop at various sections and the heat transfer coefficients are computed using empirical correlations. Solutions are obtained by using SIMULINK. The model is validated by comparing its steady state and dynamic responses with the actual plant data. Open loop responses of the model to the step changes in the operating parameters, such as pressure, temperature, steam flow, feed water flow, are also analyzed. The present model can be used for the development and design of effective boiler control systems.

  10. Independent review of SCDAP/RELAP5 natural circulation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, G.M.; Gross, R.J.; Martinez, M.J.; Rightley, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    A review and assessment of the uncertainties in the calculated response of reactor coolant system natural circulation using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code were completed. The SCDAP/RELAP5 calculation modeled a station blackout transient in the Surry nuclear power plant and concluded that primary system depressurization from natural circulation induced primary system failure is more likely than previously thought.

  11. Density wave oscillations of a boiling natural circulation loop induced by flashing

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Masahiro; Inada, Fumio; Yasuo, Akira

    1995-09-01

    Experiments are conducted to investigate two-phase flow instabilities in a boiling natural circulation loop with a chimney due to flashing in the chimney at lower pressure. The test facility used in this experiment is designed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR. Stability maps in reference to the heat flux, the inlet subcooling, the system pressure are presented. This instability is suggested to be density wave oscillations due to flashing in the chimney, and the differences from other phenomena such as flow pattern oscillations and geysering phenomena are discussed by investigating the dynamic characteristics, the oscillation period, and the transient flow pattern.

  12. COBRA-WC model and predictions for a fast-reactor natural-circulation transient. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Prather, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code has been used to predict the core-wide coolant and rod temperature distribution in a liquid metal fast reactor during the early part (first 220 seconds) of a natural circulation transient. Approximately one-sixth of the core was modeled including bypass flows and the pressure losses above and below the core region. Detailed temperature and flow distributions were obtained for the two test fuel assemblies. The COBRA-WC model, the approach, and predictions of core-wide transient coolant and rod temperatures during a natural circulation transient are presented in this paper.

  13. Study of natural circulation in a VHTR after a LOFA using different turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Hsin Tung; Yuh-Ming Ferng; Richard W. Johnson; Ching-Chang Chieng

    2013-10-01

    Natural convection currents in the core are anticipated in the event of the failure of the gas circulator in a prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The paths that the helium coolant takes in forming natural circulation loops and the effective heat transport are of interest. The heated flow in the reactor core is turbulent during normal operating conditions and at the beginning of the LOFA with forced convection, but the flow may significantly be slowed down after the event and laminarized with mixed convection. In the present study, the potential occurrence and effective heat transport of natural circulation are demonstrated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations with different turbulence models as well as laminar flow. Validations and recommendation on turbulence model selection are conducted. The study concludes that large loop natural convection is formed due to the enhanced turbulence levels by the buoyancy effect and the turbulent regime near the interface of upper plenum and flow channels increases the flow resistance for channel flows entering upper plenum and thus less heat can be removed from the core than the prediction by laminar flow assumption.

  14. Transient boiling in two-phase helium natural circulation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase helium natural circulation loops are used for cooling large superconducting magnets, as CMS for LHC. During normal operation or in the case of incidents, transients are exerted on the cooling system. Here a cooling system of this type is studied experimentally. Sudden power changes are operated on a vertical-heated-section natural convection loop, simulating a fast increase of heat deposition on magnet cooling pipes. Mass flow rate, heated section wall temperature and pressure drop variations are measured as a function of time, to assess the time behavior concerning the boiling regime according to the values of power injected on the heated section. The boiling curves and critical heat flux (CHF) values have been obtained in steady state. Temperature evolution has been observed in order to explore the operating ranges where heat transfer is deteriorated. Premature film boiling has been observed during transients on the heated section in some power ranges, even at appreciably lower values than the CHF. A way of attenuating these undesired temperature excursions has been identified through the application of high enough initial heating power.

  15. Natural Circulation Patterns in the VHTR Air-Ingress Accident and Related Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hyung Seok Kang

    2010-10-01

    A natural circulation pattern in a Very High Gas-Cooled Reactor during a hypothetical air-ingress accident has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods in order to compare with the previous 1-D flow path model for the air-ingress analyses. The GT-MHR 600 MWt reactor was selected to be the reference design and modeled by a half symmetric 3-D geometry using FLUENT 6.3, a commercial CFD code. The simulation was carried out as steady-state calculations, and the boundary conditions were either assumed or provided from the 1-D GAMMA code results. Totally, 12 different cases have been estimated, and many notable findings and results have been obtained in this study. According to the simulations, the natural circulation pattern in the reactor was quite different from the previous 1-D assumptions. A large re-circulation flow with thermal stratification phenomena was clearly observed in the hot-leg and the lower plenum in the 3-D model. This re-circulation flow provided approximately an order faster air-ingress speed (0.46 m/s in superficial velocity) than previously predicted values by 1-D modeling (0.02~0.03 m/s). It indicates that the 1-D air-ingress modeling may significantly distort the air-ingress scenario and consequences. In addition, the complicated natural circulation pattern is eventually expected to lead to very complex graphite oxidations and corrosion patterns.

  16. Microfluidic flow-dependent optical particle trapping and circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, David; Blakely, Thomas; Gordon, Reuven

    2007-11-01

    Through the planar integration of microfluidics and fiber optics, flow-dependent optical trapping and stable circulation are achieved. Two configurations are demonstrated: Single tapered fiber traps aligned with the up-stream flow direction; and dual fiber cross-flow optical traps with alignment bias relative to the flow direction. In both configurations, particle trapping results from a combination of flow-induced drag force and optical scattering forces. In the tapered fiber traps, the stable particle trapping is achieved through a balance of forward scattering and fluid drag force, with particle position indicating the relative strength each. In the dual fiber traps, two fibers are oriented in the cross-stream direction. Employing a bias in the optical fiber in-plane alignment angle results in a flow dependence for stability and circulation. The result is a microfluidic flow-dependent circulating optical trap which may be employed to indicate flow direction, magnitude, or employed to mix co-laminar streams. A strong dependence on particle size also indicates potential for stream-wise particle sorting by size. Lastly, two extensions of this work are discussed: Microfluidic and optical interactions in multiphase (oil-water-particle) systems; and flow dependencies of optically-trapped linear arrays of particles.

  17. Validation of SSC using the FFTF natural-circulation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Kennett, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the Super System Code (SSC) validation program, the 100% power FFTF natural circulation test has been simulated using SSC. A detailed 19 channel, 2 loop model was used in SSC. Comparisons showed SSC calculations to be in good agreement with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), test data. Simulation of the test was obtained in real time.

  18. Natural Circulation Patterns in the VHTR Air-Ingress Accident and Related Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2012-08-01

    Natural circulation patterns in the VHTR during a hypothetical air-ingress accident have been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods in order to compare results from the previous 1-D model which was developed using GAMMA code for the air-ingress analyses. The GT-MHR 600 MWt reactor was selected to be the reference design and modeled by a half symmetric 3-D geometry using FLUENT 6.3, a commercial CFD code. CFD simulations were carried out as the steady-state calculation, and the boundary conditions were either assumed or provided from the 1-D GAMMA code results. Totally, 12 different cases have been reviewed, and many notable results have been obtained through in this work. According to the simulations, natural circulation patterns in the reactor were quite different from the previous 1-D assumptions. A large re-circulation flow with thermal stratification phenomena was clearly observed in the hot-leg and the lower plenum in the 3-D model. This re-circulation flow provided about an order faster air-ingress speed (0.46 m/s in superficial velocity) than previously predicted by 1-D modeling (0.02~0.03 m/s). It indicates that the 1-D air-ingress modeling may significantly distort the air-ingress scenario and consequences. In addition, complicated natural circulation patterns are eventually expected to result in very complex graphite oxidations and corrosion behaviors.

  19. Evaluation Method for Core Thermohydraulics during Natural Circulation in Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamide, Hideki; Nagasawa, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Miyakoshi, Hiroyuki

    Decay heat removal using natural circulation is one of significant functions for a reactor. As the decay heat removal system, a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system has been selected in current designs of fast reactors. In this system, cold sodium is provided in an upper plenum of reactor vessel and it covers the reactor core outlet. The cold sodium can penetrate into the gap region between the subassemblies. This gap flow is referred as inter-wrapper flow (IWF). A numerical estimation method for such phenomena was developed, which modeled each subassembly as a rectangular duct with gap region and also the upper plenum. This numerical simulation method was verified by a sodium test and also a water test. We applied this method to the natural circulation in a 600 MWe class fast reactor. The temperature in the core strongly depended on IWF, flow redistribution in the core, and inter-subassembly heat transfer.

  20. An analytical and experimental investigation of natural circulation transients in a model pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Massoud, M

    1987-01-01

    Natural Circulation phenomena in a simulated PWR was investigated experimentally and analytically. The experimental investigation included determination of system characteristics as well as system response to the imposed transient under symmetric and asymmetric operations. System characteristics were used to obtain correlation for heat transfer coefficient in heat exchangers, system flow resistance, and system buoyancy heat. Asymmetric transients were imposed to study flow oscillation and possible instability. The analytical investigation encompassed development of mathematical model for single-phase, steady-state and transient natural circulation as well as modification of existing model for two-phase flow analysis of phenomena such as small break LOCA, high pressure coolant injection and pump coast down. The developed mathematical model for single-phase analysis was computer coded to simulate the imposed transients. The computer program, entitled ''Symmetric and Asymmetric Analysis of Single-Phase Flow (SAS),'' were employed to simulate the imposed transients. It closely emulated the system behavior throughout the transient and subsequent steady-state. Modifications for two-phase flow analysis included addition of models for once-through steam generator and electric heater rods. Both programs are faster than real time. Off-line, they can be used for prediction and training applications while on-line they serve for simulation and signal validation. The programs can also be used to determine the sensitivity of natural circulation behavior to variation of inputs such as secondary distribution and power transients.

  1. Monitoring circulating apoptotic cells by in-vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Liu, Guangda; Wu, Bin; Wang, Chen

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapies currently constitute one main venue of cancer treatment. For a large number of adult and elderly patients, however, treatment options are poor. These patients may suffer from disease that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy or may not be candidates for curative therapies because of advanced age or poor medical conditions. To control disease in these patients, new therapies must be developed that are selectively targeted to unique characteristics of tumor cell growth and metastasis. A reliable early evaluation and prediction of response to the chemotherapy is critical to its success. Chemotherapies induce apoptosis in tumor cells and a portion of such apoptotic cancer cells may be present in the circulation. However, the fate of circulating tumor cells is difficult to assess with conventional methods that require blood sampling. We report the in situ measurement of circulating apoptotic cells in live animals using in vivo flow cytometry, a novel method that enables real-time detection and quantification of circulating cells without blood extraction. Apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared from the circulation with a half-life of ~10 minutes. Real-time monitoring of circulating apoptotic cells can be useful for detecting early changes in disease processes, as well as for monitoring response to therapeutic intervention.

  2. Experimental and analytical investigation of two-phase stability in a natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmick, G.R.; Chatoorgoon, V.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are currently studying the feasibility of pool type reactors, for heating commercial buildings. To investigate thermal hydraulic aspects of reactor design, including the stability under extreme conditions, an electrically heated natural circulation loop was designed and constructed. Experimental tests with this loop show that it is stable under all single phase conditions, an expected result. In tests with two phases present in the circuit, different types of behaviour were observed depending on the experimental conditions. These were either stable flow, non-divergent oscillating flow or divergent oscillating flow. All of these type of behaviour were successfully simulated using the newly developed SPORTS stability computer code.

  3. MODELING STRATEGIES TO COMPUTE NATURAL CIRCULATION USING CFD IN A VHTR AFTER A LOFA

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Hsin Tung; Richard W. Johnson; Ching-Chang Chieng; Yuh-Ming Ferng

    2012-11-01

    A prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is being developed under the next generation nuclear plant program (NGNP) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. In the design of the prismatic VHTR, hexagonal shaped graphite blocks are drilled to allow insertion of fuel pins, made of compacted TRISO fuel particles, and coolant channels for the helium coolant. One of the concerns for the reactor design is the effects of a loss of flow accident (LOFA) where the coolant circulators are lost for some reason, causing a loss of forced coolant flow through the core. In such an event, it is desired to know what happens to the (reduced) heat still being generated in the core and if it represents a problem for the fuel compacts, the graphite core or the reactor vessel (RV) walls. One of the mechanisms for the transport of heat out of the core is by the natural circulation of the coolant, which is still present. That is, how much heat may be transported by natural circulation through the core and upwards to the top of the upper plenum? It is beyond current capability for a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to perform a calculation on the whole RV with a sufficiently refined mesh to examine the full potential of natural circulation in the vessel. The present paper reports the investigation of several strategies to model the flow and heat transfer in the RV. It is found that it is necessary to employ representative geometries of the core to estimate the heat transfer. However, by taking advantage of global and local symmetries, a detailed estimate of the strength of the resulting natural circulation and the level of heat transfer to the top of the upper plenum is obtained.

  4. FFTF operating experience with sodium natural circulation: slides included

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T.M.; Additon, S.L.; Beaver, T.R.; Midgett, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been designed for passive, back-up, safety grade decay heat removal utilizing natural circulation of the sodium coolant. This paper discusses the process by which operator preparation for this emergency operating mode has been assured, in paralled with the design verification during the FFTF startup and acceptance testing program. Over the course of the test program, additional insights were gained through the testing program, through on-going plant analyses and through general safety evaluations performed throughout the nuclear industry. These insights led to development of improved operator training material for control of decay heat removal during both forced and natural circulation as well as improvements in the related plant operating procedures.

  5. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne; Williams, David F; Elkassabgi, Yousri M.; Caja, Joseph; Caja, Mario; Jordan, John; Salinas, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  6. Heat transfer to water from a vertical tube bundle under natural-circulation conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszczynski, M.J.; Viskanta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The natural circulation heat transfer data for longitudinal flow of water outside a vertical rod bundle are needed for developing correlations which can be used in best estimate computer codes to model thermal-hydraulic behavior of nuclear reactor cores under accident or shutdown conditions. The heat transfer coefficient between the fuel rod surface and the coolant is the key parameter required to predict the fuel temperature. Because of the absence of the required heat transfer coefficient data base under natural circulation conditions, experiments have been performed in a natural circulation loop. A seven-tube bundle having a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 was used as a test heat exchanger. A circulating flow was established in the loop, because of buoyancy differences between its two vertical legs. Steady-state and transient heat transfer measurements have been made over as wide a range of thermal conditions as possible with the system. Steady state heat transfer data were correlated in terms of relevant dimensionless parameters. Empirical correlations for the average Nusselt number, in terms of Reynolds number, Rayleigh number and the ratio of Grashof to Reynolds number are given.

  7. Circulation shedding in viscous starting flow past a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Monika; Xu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Numerical simulations of viscous flow past a flat plate moving in the direction normal to itself reveal details of the vortical structure of the flow. At early times, most of the vorticity is attached to the plate. This paper introduces a definition of the shed circulation at all times and shows that it indeed represents vorticity that separates and remains separated from the plate. During a large initial time period, the shed circulation satisfies the scaling laws predicted for self-similar inviscid separation. Various contributions to the circulation shedding rate are presented. The results show that during this initial time period, viscous diffusion of vorticity out of the vortex is significant but appears to be independent of the value of the Reynolds number. At later times, the departure of the shed circulation from its large Reynolds number behaviour is significantly affected by diffusive loss of vorticity through the symmetry axis. A timescale is proposed that describes when the viscous loss through the axis becomes relevant. The simulations provide benchmark results to evaluate simpler separation models such as point vortex and vortex sheet models. A comparison with vortex sheet results is included.

  8. Investigation of Natural Circulation Instability and Transients in Passively Safe Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru

    2016-11-30

    The NEUP funded project, NEUP-3496, aims to experimentally investigate two-phase natural circulation flow instability that could occur in Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), especially for natural circulation SMRs. The objective has been achieved by systematically performing tests to study the general natural circulation instability characteristics and the natural circulation behavior under start-up or design basis accident conditions. Experimental data sets highlighting the effect of void reactivity feedback as well as the effect of power ramp-up rate and system pressure have been used to develop a comprehensive stability map. The safety analysis code, RELAP5, has been used to evaluate experimental results and models. Improvements to the constitutive relations for flashing have been made in order to develop a reliable analysis tool. This research has been focusing on two generic SMR designs, i.e. a small modular Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) like design and a small integral Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) like design. A BWR-type natural circulation test facility was firstly built based on the three-level scaling analysis of the Purdue Novel Modular Reactor (NMR) with an electric output of 50 MWe, namely NMR-50, which represents a BWR-type SMR with a significantly reduced reactor pressure vessel (RPV) height. The experimental facility was installed with various equipment to measure thermalhydraulic parameters such as pressure, temperature, mass flow rate and void fraction. Characterization tests were performed before the startup transient tests and quasi-steady tests to determine the loop flow resistance. The control system and data acquisition system were programmed with LabVIEW to realize the realtime control and data storage. The thermal-hydraulic and nuclear coupled startup transients were performed to investigate the flow instabilities at low pressure and low power conditions for NMR-50. Two different power ramps were chosen to study the effect of startup

  9. Natural Laminar Flow Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A supercritical airfoil section was designed with favorable pressure gradients on both the upper and lower surfaces. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The outer wing panels of the F-111 TACT airplane were modified to incorporate partial span test gloves having the natural laminar, flow profile. Instrumentation was installed to provide surface pressure data as well as to determine transition location and boundary layer characteristics. The flight experiment encompassed 19 flights conducted with and without transition fixed at several locations for wing leading edge sweep angles which varied from 10 to 26 at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85 and altitudes of 7620 meters and 9144 meters. Preliminary results indicate that a large portion of the test chord experienced laminar flow.

  10. Circulation shedding in viscous starting flow past a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Monika; Xu, Ling

    2013-11-01

    Numerical simulations of viscous flow past a flat plate moving in direction normal to itself reveal details of the vortical structure of the flow. At early times, most of the vorticity is attached to the plate. We introduce a definition of the shed circulation at all times and show that it indeed represents vorticity that separates and remains separated from the plate. Scaling laws for the shed circulation, and contributions to the shedding rate across various boundary components are presented, as well as their dependence on Reynolds number. The simulations provide benchmark results to evaluate simpler separation models such as point vortex and vortex sheet models. A comparison with vortex sheet results is included.

  11. Salt marsh productivity with natural and altered tidal circulation.

    PubMed

    Zedler, Joy B; Winfield, Ted; Williams, Phil

    1980-01-01

    The effects of altered tidal circulation on southern California salt marshes are investigated by comparing a well-flushed wetland and two modified wetlands which have reduced tidal flow. The Tijuana Estuary had continuous exchange of seawater but relatively low net aerial primary productivity (0.4-1.0 kg m(-2)yr(-1)) of vascular plants. Low productivity (0.6 kg m(-2)yr(-1)) was also found in the Flood Control Channel of the San Diego River, where tidal exchange was restricted to flow through a riprap dike. High productivity (1.2-2.9 kg m(-2)yr(-1)) in Los Penasquitos Lagoon was attributed to the influences of freshwater impounded behind a sand bar which blocked the mouth of the lagoon during much of the study period.It is hypothesized that elimination of tidal flow during the growing season increased primary productivity of vascular plants because freshwater runoff decreased soil salinity and because nutrients were retained within the marsh. However, we predict that sand bar obstruction can decrease productivity if below-average rainfall leads to hypersalinity of closed lagoons. Comprehensive evaluation of the effects of altered tidal circulation requires longterm study and examination of the total ecosystem.

  12. Naturally forced multidecadal variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menary, Matthew; Scaife, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The mechanisms by which natural forcing factors alone could drive simulated multidecadal variability in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) are assessed in an ensemble of climate model simulations. It is shown for a new state-of-the-art general circulation model, HadGEM2-ES, that the most important of these natural forcings, in terms of the multidecadal response of the AMOC, is solar rather than volcanic forcing. AMOC strengthening occurs through a densification of the North Atlantic, driven by anomalous surface freshwater fluxes due to increased evaporation. These are related to persistent North Atlantic atmospheric circulation anomalies, driven by forced changes in the stratosphere, associated with anomalously weak solar irradiance during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Within a period of approximately 100 years the 11-year smoothed ensemble mean AMOC strengthens by 1.5Sv and subsequently weakens by 1.9Sv, representing respectively approximately 3 and 4 standard deviations of the 11-year smoothed control simulation. The solar-induced variability of the AMOC has various relevant climate impacts, such as a northward shift of the intertropical convergence zone, anomalous Amazonian rainfall, and a sustained increase in European temperatures. While this model has only a partial representation of the atmospheric response to solar variability, these results demonstrate the potential for solar variability to have a multidecadal impact on North Atlantic climate.

  13. Natural gas flow through critical nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical method for calculating both the mass flow rate and upstream volume flow rate through critical flow nozzles is determined. Method requires knowledge of the composition of natural gas, and of the upstream pressure and temperature.

  14. Circulation system for flowing uranium hexafluoride cavity reactor experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaminet, J. F.; Kendall, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Research related to determining the feasibility of producing continuous power from fissile fuel in the gaseous state is presented. The development of three laboratory-scale flow systems for handling gaseous UF6 at temperatures up to 500 K, pressure up to approximately 40 atm, and continuous flow rates up to approximately 50g/s is presented. A UF6 handling system fabricated for static critical tests currently being conducted is described. The system was designed to supply UF6 to a double-walled aluminum core canister assembly at temperatures between 300 K and 400 K and pressure up to 4 atm. A second UF6 handling system designed to provide a circulating flow of up to 50g/s of gaseous UF6 in a closed-loop through a double-walled aluminum core canister with controlled temperature and pressure is described. Data from flow tests using UF6 and UF6/He mixtures with this system at flow rates up to approximately 12g/s and pressure up to 4 atm are presented. A third UF6 handling system fabricated to provide a continuous flow of UF6 at flow rates up to 5g/s and at pressures up to 40 atm for use in rf-heated, uranium plasma confinement experiments is described.

  15. Circulation system for flowing uranium hexafluoride cavity reactor experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaminet, J. F.; Kendall, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Research related to determining the feasibility of producing continuous power from fissile fuel in the gaseous state is presented. The development of three laboratory-scale flow systems for handling gaseous UF6 at temperatures up to 500 K, pressure up to approximately 40 atm, and continuous flow rates up to approximately 50g/s is presented. A UF6 handling system fabricated for static critical tests currently being conducted is described. The system was designed to supply UF6 to a double-walled aluminum core canister assembly at temperatures between 300 K and 400 K and pressure up to 4 atm. A second UF6 handling system designed to provide a circulating flow of up to 50g/s of gaseous UF6 in a closed-loop through a double-walled aluminum core canister with controlled temperature and pressure is described. Data from flow tests using UF6 and UF6/He mixtures with this system at flow rates up to approximately 12g/s and pressure up to 4 atm are presented. A third UF6 handling system fabricated to provide a continuous flow of UF6 at flow rates up to 5g/s and at pressures up to 40 atm for use in rf-heated, uranium plasma confinement experiments is described.

  16. Pattern of Circulation of Norovirus GII Strains during Natural Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fobisong, Cajetan; Tah, Ferdinand; Lindh, Magnus; Nkuo-Akenji, Theresia; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is considered a major cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis among people of all ages worldwide, but the natural course of infection is incompletely known. In this study, the pattern of circulation of NoVs was studied among 146 children and 137 adults in a small community in southwestern Cameroon. The participants provided monthly fecal samples during a year. NoV RNA was detected in at least one sample from 82 (29%) of the participants. The partial VP1 region could be sequenced in 36 NoV GII-positive samples. Three different genotypes were identified (GII.1, GII.4, and GII.17), with each genotype circulating within 2 to 3 months and reappearing after a relapse period of 2 to 3 months. Most infections occurred once, and 2 episodes at most within a year were detected. No difference in the frequency of NoV infection between children and adults was recorded. The same genotype was detected for a maximum of 2 consecutive months in 3 children only, suggesting that a less than 30-day duration of viral shedding in natural infection was common. Reinfection within a year with the same genotype was not observed, consistent with short-term homotypic immune protection. The study revealed that NoV strains are circulating with a limited duration of viral shedding both in the individuals and the population as part of their natural infection. The results also provide evidence of cross-protective immunity of limited duration between genotypes of the same genogroup. PMID:25274996

  17. Pattern of circulation of norovirus GII strains during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Ayukekbong, James Ayukepi; Fobisong, Cajetan; Tah, Ferdinand; Lindh, Magnus; Nkuo-Akenji, Theresia; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-12-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is considered a major cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis among people of all ages worldwide, but the natural course of infection is incompletely known. In this study, the pattern of circulation of NoVs was studied among 146 children and 137 adults in a small community in southwestern Cameroon. The participants provided monthly fecal samples during a year. NoV RNA was detected in at least one sample from 82 (29%) of the participants. The partial VP1 region could be sequenced in 36 NoV GII-positive samples. Three different genotypes were identified (GII.1, GII.4, and GII.17), with each genotype circulating within 2 to 3 months and reappearing after a relapse period of 2 to 3 months. Most infections occurred once, and 2 episodes at most within a year were detected. No difference in the frequency of NoV infection between children and adults was recorded. The same genotype was detected for a maximum of 2 consecutive months in 3 children only, suggesting that a less than 30-day duration of viral shedding in natural infection was common. Reinfection within a year with the same genotype was not observed, consistent with short-term homotypic immune protection. The study revealed that NoV strains are circulating with a limited duration of viral shedding both in the individuals and the population as part of their natural infection. The results also provide evidence of cross-protective immunity of limited duration between genotypes of the same genogroup. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. An experimental investigation of single-phase natural circulation behavior in a rectangular loop with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, A.K.; Gartia, M.R.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, the natural circulation behavior in a rectangular loop was investigated experimentally with water and different concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofluids (0.3-2% by wt. and particle size 40-80 nm). It was demonstrated that, not only the flow instabilities are suppressed but also the natural circulation flow rates are enhanced with nanofluids. The enhancement in natural circulation flow rate and suppression of instabilities were found to be dependent on the concentration of nanoparticles in water. (author)

  19. Improved algorithms for circulation-control airfoils in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Frank A.; Strash, Daniel J.; York, Brian J.; Dash, Sanford M.

    1987-01-01

    A zonal model for aerodynamic analysis of two-dimensional transonic circulation control airfoils has been developed. The present approach combines a transonic full potential method for the global flow field and an integral boundary layer method for regions of the airfoil excluding the wall jet with a parabolized Navier-Stokes code for resolving the wall jet region beyond the slot. Existing methods suffer from two deficiencies: the insensitivity of the calculation to small changes in the Coanda surface geometry; and the inability to predict the shock structure of the underexpanded supersonic wall jets. The present wall jet procedure involves a pressure-split approach in the streamwise sense to enable noniterative solution of the coupled continuity and normal momentum equations for increased surface sensitivity and allows for expansion of applications to sonic slot exit conditions. Encouraging results are obtained in comparison with experimental data for two circulation airfoils with subsonic wall jets.

  20. Circulation-preserving plane flows of incompressible viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.-L.

    1983-06-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a systematic use of the method of complex variables in a study of (generally unsteady) plane solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. Circulation-preserving flows are considered in the investigation. However, the employed method can also be applied to more general cases. A circulation-preserving plane solution of the Navier-Stokes equation possesses a biharmonic stream function. The stream function may, therefore, be expressed in terms of two complex analytic functions, taking into account Goursat's representation. Attention is given to differential equations in the complex form, the case of steady vorticity, the case of unsteady vorticity with a spatially constant vorticity gradient, solutions with logarithmic vorticity fields, and a proof of completeness.

  1. Improved algorithms for circulation-control airfoils in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Frank A.; Strash, Daniel J.; York, Brian J.; Dash, Sanford M.

    1987-01-01

    A zonal model for aerodynamic analysis of two-dimensional transonic circulation control airfoils has been developed. The present approach combines a transonic full potential method for the global flow field and an integral boundary layer method for regions of the airfoil excluding the wall jet with a parabolized Navier-Stokes code for resolving the wall jet region beyond the slot. Existing methods suffer from two deficiencies: the insensitivity of the calculation to small changes in the Coanda surface geometry; and the inability to predict the shock structure of the underexpanded supersonic wall jets. The present wall jet procedure involves a pressure-split approach in the streamwise sense to enable noniterative solution of the coupled continuity and normal momentum equations for increased surface sensitivity and allows for expansion of applications to sonic slot exit conditions. Encouraging results are obtained in comparison with experimental data for two circulation airfoils with subsonic wall jets.

  2. Design study of lead bismuth cooled fast reactors and capability of natural circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktamuliani, Sri; Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary study designs SPINNOR (Small Power Reactor, Indonesia, No On-Site Refueling) liquid metal Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors, fuel (U, Pu)N, 150 MWth have been performed. Neutronic calculation uses SRAC which is designed cylindrical core 2D (R-Z) 90 × 135 cm, on the core fuel composed of heterogeneous with percentage difference of PuN 10, 12, 13% and the result of calculation is effective neutron multiplication 1.0488. Power density distribution of the output SRAC is generated for thermal hydraulic calculation using Delphi based on Pascal language that have been developed. The research designed a reactor that is capable of natural circulation at inlet temperature 300 °C with variation of total mass flow rate. Total mass flow rate affect pressure drop and temperature outlet of the reactor core. The greater the total mass flow rate, the smaller the outlet temperature, but increase the pressure drop so that the chimney needed more higher to achieve natural circulation or condition of the system does not require a pump. Optimization of the total mass flow rate produces optimal reactor design on the total mass flow rate of 5000 kg/s with outlet temperature 524,843 °C but require a chimney of 6,69 meters.

  3. Design study of lead bismuth cooled fast reactors and capability of natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oktamuliani, Sri Su’ud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    A preliminary study designs SPINNOR (Small Power Reactor, Indonesia, No On-Site Refueling) liquid metal Pb-Bi cooled fast reactors, fuel (U, Pu)N, 150 MWth have been performed. Neutronic calculation uses SRAC which is designed cylindrical core 2D (R-Z) 90 × 135 cm, on the core fuel composed of heterogeneous with percentage difference of PuN 10, 12, 13% and the result of calculation is effective neutron multiplication 1.0488. Power density distribution of the output SRAC is generated for thermal hydraulic calculation using Delphi based on Pascal language that have been developed. The research designed a reactor that is capable of natural circulation at inlet temperature 300 °C with variation of total mass flow rate. Total mass flow rate affect pressure drop and temperature outlet of the reactor core. The greater the total mass flow rate, the smaller the outlet temperature, but increase the pressure drop so that the chimney needed more higher to achieve natural circulation or condition of the system does not require a pump. Optimization of the total mass flow rate produces optimal reactor design on the total mass flow rate of 5000 kg/s with outlet temperature 524,843 °C but require a chimney of 6,69 meters.

  4. Enhancement of natural circulation type domestic solar hot water system performance by using a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, K. K.; Srinivasan, P. S. S.

    2011-08-01

    Performance improvement of existing 200 litres capacity natural convection type domestic solar hot water system is attempted. A two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a vertical axis windmill having Savonius type rotor is added to the fluid loop. The windmill driven pump circulates the water through the collector. The system with necessary instrumentation is tested over a day. Tests on Natural Circulation System (NCS) mode and Wind Assisted System (WAS) mode are carried out during January, April, July and October, 2009. Test results of a clear day are reported. Daily average efficiency of 25-28 % during NCS mode and 33-37 % during WAS mode are obtained. With higher wind velocities, higher collector flow rates and hence higher efficiencies are obtained. In general, WAS mode provides improvements in efficiency when compared to NCS mode.

  5. Unsteady flow model for circulation-control airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis and a numerical lifting surface method are developed for predicting the unsteady airloads on two-dimensional circulation control airfoils in incompressible flow. The analysis and the computer program are validated by correlating the computed unsteady airloads with test data and also with other theoretical solutions. Additionally, a mathematical model for predicting the bending-torsion flutter of a two-dimensional airfoil (a reference section of a wing or rotor blade) and a computer program using an iterative scheme are developed. The flutter program has a provision for using the CC airfoil airloads program or the Theodorsen hard flap solution to compute the unsteady lift and moment used in the flutter equations. The adopted mathematical model and the iterative scheme are used to perform a flutter analysis of a typical CC rotor blade reference section. The program seems to work well within the basic assumption of the incompressible flow.

  6. Flow cytometric data analysis of circulating progenitor cell stability.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Ernestine A; Mou, Liping; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Waller, Edmund K

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication by Mekonnen et al. demonstrated that among women with non-obstructive coronary artery disease, higher levels of circulating progenitor cells in the blood (CPC), were associated with impaired coronary flow reserve [1]. We performed a quality control assessment of the stability of circulating blood progenitor cells in blood samples stored at 4 °C, to determine the time period during which blood samples can be analyzed and yield consistent data for progenitor cell content. Healthy volunteers (n=6) were recruited and underwent phlebotomy, and blood was stored in EDTA tubes at 4 °C. Flow cytometry was performed to quantitate progenitor cell subsets at 0-4 h, 24 h, and 48 h post phlebotomy. All processed samples were fixed with 1% Paraformaldehyde and 1,000,000 total data events were collected. We found no significant differences in PC data for both CD34+ (P=0.68 for one-way ANOVA) and CD34+/CD133+ (P=0.74 for one-way ANOVA).

  7. Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized-Bed Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Parviz Famouri

    2005-07-01

    In a variety of industrial applications, the use of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) provides various advantages, such as reducing environmental pollution and increasing process efficiency. The application of circulating fluidized bed technology contributes to the improvement of gas-solid contact, reduction of the cross-sectional area with the use of higher superficial velocities, the use of the solids circulation rate as an additional control variable, and superior radial mixing, Grace et al. [1]. In order to improve raw material usage and utility consumption, optimization and control of CFB is very important, and an accurate, real time model is required to describe and quantify the process. Currently there is no accepted way to construct a reliable model for such a complex CFB system using traditional methods, especially at the pilot or industrial scale. Three major obstacles in characterizing the system are: 1) chaotic nature of the system; 2) non-linearity of the system, and 3) number of immeasurable unknowns internal to the system,[2]. Advanced control theories and methods have the ability to characterize the system, and can overcome all three of these obstacles. These methods will be discussed in this report.

  8. Steam condensation and liquid hold-up in steam generator U-tubes during oscillatory natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    De Santi, G.F.; Mayinger, F.

    1990-01-01

    In many accident scenarios, natural circulation is an important heat transport mechanism for long-term cooling of light water reactors. In the event of a small pipe break, with subsequent loss of primary cooling fluid loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or under abnormal operating conditions, early tripping of the main coolant pumps can be actuated. Primary fluid flow will then progress from forced to natural convection. Understanding of the flow regimes and heat-removal mechanisms in the steam generators during the entire transient is of primary importance to safety analysis. Flow oscillations during two-phase natural circulation experiments for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with inverted U-tube steam generators occur at high pressure and at a primary inventory range between two-phase circulation and reflex heat removal. This paper deals with the oscillatory flow behavior that was observed in the LOBI-MOD2 facility during the transition period between two-phase natural circulation and reflex condensation.

  9. Thermalhydraulic calculation for boiling water reactor and its natural circulation component

    SciTech Connect

    Trianti, Nuri Nurjanah,; Su’ud, Zaki; Arif, Idam; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-30

    Thermalhydraulic of reactor core is the thermal study on fluids within the core reactor, i.e. analysis of the thermal energy transfer process produced by fission reaction from fuel to the reactor coolant. This study include of coolant temperature and reactor power density distribution. The purposes of this analysis in the design of nuclear power plant are to calculate the coolant temperature distribution and the chimney height so natural circulation could be occurred. This study was used boiling water reactor (BWR) with cylinder type reactor core. Several reactor core properties such as linear power density, mass flow rate, coolant density and inlet temperature has been took into account to obtain distribution of coolant density, flow rate and pressure drop. The results of calculation are as follows. Thermal hydraulic calculations provide the uniform pressure drop of 1.1 bar for each channels. The optimum mass flow rate to obtain the uniform pressure drop is 217g/s. Furthermore, from the calculation it could be known that outlet temperature is 288°C which is the saturated fluid’s temperature within the system. The optimum chimney height for natural circulation within the system is 14.88 m.

  10. Circulation times of cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. Hepatocellular carcinoma may metastasize to lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor: the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines, high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells, which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly, the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison, <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  11. Results of two-phase natural circulation in hot-leg U-bend simulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Lee, S.Y.; Abou El-Seoud, S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulation and flow termination during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed using two different thermal-hydraulic loops. The main focus of the experiment was the two-phase flow behavior in the hot-leg U-bend typical of BandW LWR systems. The first group of experiments was carried out in the nitrogen gas-water adiabatic simulation loop and the second in the Freon 113 boiling and condensation loop. Both of the loops have been designed as a flow visualization facility and built according to the two-phase flow scaling criteria developed under this program. The nitrogen gas-water system has been used to isolate key hydrodynamic phenomena such as the phase distribution, relative velocity between phases, two-phase flow regimes and flow termination mechanisms, whereas the Freon loop has been used to study the effect of fluid properties, phase changes and coupling between hydrodynamic and heat transfer phenomena. Significantly different behaviors have been observed due to the non-equilibrium phase change phenomena such as the flashing and condensation in the Freon loop. The phenomena created much more unstable hydrodynamic conditions which lead to cyclic or oscillatory flow behaviors.

  12. Investigation of natural circulation instability and transients in passively safe novel modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shanbin

    The Purdue Novel Modular Reactor (NMR) is a new type small modular reactor (SMR) that belongs to the design of boiling water reactor (BWR). Specifically, the NMR is one third the height and area of a conventional BWR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with an electric output of 50 MWe. The fuel cycle length of the NMR-50 is extended up to 10 years due to optimized neutronics design. The NMR-50 is designed with double passive engineering safety system. However, natural circulation BWRs (NCBWR) could experience certain operational difficulties due to flow instabilities that occur at low pressure and low power conditions. Static instabilities (i.e. flow excursion (Ledinegg) instability and flow pattern transition instability) and dynamic instabilities (i.e. density wave instability and flashing/condensation instability) pose a significant challenge in two-phase natural circulation systems. In order to experimentally study the natural circulation flow instability, a proper scaling methodology is needed to build a reduced-size test facility. The scaling analysis of the NMR uses a three-level scaling method, which was developed and applied for the design of the Purdue Multi-dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). Scaling criteria is derived from dimensionless field equations and constitutive equations. The scaling process is validated by the RELAP5 analysis for both steady state and startup transients. A new well-scaled natural circulation test facility is designed and constructed based on the scaling analysis of the NMR-50. The experimental facility is installed with different equipment to measure various thermal-hydraulic parameters such as pressure, temperature, mass flow rate and void fraction. Characterization tests are performed before the startup transient tests and quasi-steady tests to determine the loop flow resistance. The controlling system and data acquisition system are programmed with LabVIEW to realize the real-time control and data storage. The thermal

  13. Measurement of anterior and posterior circulation flow contributions to cerebral blood flow. An ultrasound-derived volumetric flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Boyajian, R A; Schwend, R B; Wolfe, M M; Bickerton, R E; Otis, S M

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasound-derived volumetric flow analysis may be useful in answering questions of basic physiological interest in the cerebrovascular circulation. Using this technique, the authors have sought to describe quantitatively the complete concurrent flow relations among all four arteries supplying the brain. The aim of this study of normal subjects was to determine the relative flow contributions of the anterior (internal carotid arteries) and posterior (vertebral arteries) cerebral circulation. Comparisons between the observed and theoretically expected anterior and posterior flow distribution would provide an opportunity to assess traditional rheological conceptions in vivo. Pulsed color Doppler ultrasonography was used to measure mean flow rates in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries in 21 normal adults. The anterior circulation (internal carotid arteries bilaterally) carried 82% of the brain's blood supply and comprised 67% of the total vascular cross-sectional area. These values demonstrate precise concordance between observations in vivo and the theoretically derived (Hagen-Poiseuille) expected flow distribution. These cerebrovascular findings support the traditional conception of macroscopic blood flow. Further studies using ultrasound-derived volumetric analysis of the brain's arterial flow relations may illuminate the vascular pathophysiology underlying aging, cerebral ischemia, and dementias.

  14. Pulsational characteristics of the natural-circulation loop of a large-scale model of a light-boiling boiling-water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Babykin, A.S.; Balunov, B.F.; Chernykh, N.G.; Smirnov, E.L.; Tisheninova, V.I.; Zhiuitskaya, T.S.

    1985-10-01

    The results of an experimental study of a natural-circulation (NC) loop, whose geometrical and hydraulic characteristics are presented are described. The range of state parameters encompassed in the experiments is also indicated. The authors used a large-scale model of a low-boiling-water reactor, with natural heights and reduced stages of separate elements of the NC loop. The study confirmed that under the conditions the pulsations in the flow rate of the coolant occurs only in the transitional zone from natural circulation of the singlephase medium to natural circulation of the two-phase coolant.

  15. In Vivo Flow Cytometry of Circulating Tumor-Associated Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Kore, Rajshekhar A.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) demonstrated the potential as prognostic markers of metastatic development. However, the incurable metastasis can already be developed at the time of initial diagnosis with the existing CTC assays. Alternatively, tumor-associated particles (CTPs) including exosomes can be a more valuable prognostic marker because they can be released from the primary tumor long before CTCs and in larger amount. However, little progress has been made in high sensitivity detection of CTPs, especially in vivo. We show here that in vivo integrated photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence flow cytometry (PAFFC) platform can provide the detection of melanoma and breast-cancer-associated single CTPs with endogenously expressed melanin and genetically engineered proteins or exogenous dyes as PA and fluorescent contrast agents. The two-beam, time-of-light PAFFC can measure the sizes of CTCs and CTPs and identify bulk and rolling CTCs and CTC clusters, with no influence on blood flow instability. This technique revealed a higher concentration of CTPs than CTCs at an early cancer stage. Because a single tumor cell can release many CTPs and in vivo PAFFC can examine the whole blood volume, PAFFC diagnostic platform has the potential to dramatically improve (up to 105-fold) the sensitivity of cancer diagnosis. PMID:27965916

  16. The existence and stability of steady circulations in a conditionally symmetrically unstable basic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Qin

    1987-01-01

    The existence of steady, nonlinear circulations in a flow susceptible to conditionally symmetric instability is studied, treating the latent heating as an energy source which is implicitly related to the motion field. The viscous nonlinear circulations of symmetrical instability are briefly discussed, and an existence theorem for steady, nonlinear symmetric circulations with bounded rates of latent heat release is given. The uniqueness and stability of these circulations are discussed, and some physical interpretations are given.

  17. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  18. Thermohydraulic model experiments on the transition from forced to natural circulation for pool-type fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D. )

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, thermohydraulic studies on the transition from forced to natural convection are carried out using the 1:20 scale RAMONA three-dimensional reactor model with water as the simulant fluid. In the investigations, a scram from 40% load operation of a fast reactor is simulated. The core mass flows and the core as well as the hot plenum temperatures are measured as a function of time for various core power levels, coastdown curves of the primary- and secondary-side pumps, and for various delay times for the start of the immersion coolers after a scram. These parameters influence the onset of the natural circulation in the reactor tank. The main result is that the longer the intermediate heat exchanger coolability is ensured and the later the immersion coolers start to operate, the higher is the natural-circulation flow and, hence, the lower are the core temperatures.

  19. CFD analyses of natural circulation in the air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.; Pointer, W. D.

    2013-07-01

    The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) is currently being built at Argonne National Laboratory, to evaluate the feasibility of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). CFD simulations have been applied to evaluate the NSTF and NGNP RCCS designs. However, previous simulations found that convergence was very difficult to achieve in simulating the complex natural circulation. To resolve the convergence issue and increase the confidence of the CFD simulation results, additional CFD simulations were conducted using a more detailed mesh and a different solution scheme. It is found that, with the use of coupled flow and coupled energy models, the convergence can be greatly improved. Furthermore, the effects of convection in the cavity and the effects of the uncertainty in solid surface emissivity are also investigated. (authors)

  20. Experimental study of physiological advantages of assist circulation using oscillated blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Nitta, S; Yambe, T; Naganuma, S; Hashimoto, H; Fukuju, T; Tabayashi, K

    1995-07-01

    To estimate the effect of oscillated blood flow on hemodynamics in an awake condition, left ventricular assist circulation using oscillated blood flow was performed on 3 adult goats as chronic animal examination. A vibrating flow pump (VFP) was used for generating high-frequency oscillated flow. The blood flow rate of assisted circulation was approximately 1.0 L/min, and the driving frequency of VFP was 25 Hz. Systemic vascular resistance and arterial impedance were calculated in this study. Systemic vascular resistance during assist circulation was decreased compared with that without assistance. Oscillated blood flow may be effective in decreasing vascular resistance. Moreover, it was suggested from the study of arterial impedance that motive characteristics of the vascular wall against changing blood pressure may keep their normal reaction. Therefore, oscillated blood flow may be used for left ventricular assist circulation as concluded from the study of the characteristics of blood vessels.

  1. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  2. Dimensional analysis of natural debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gordon; Ouyang, Chaojun

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows occur when masses of poorly sorted sediment, agitated and saturated with water, surge down slopes in response to gravitational attraction. They are of great concern because they often cause catastrophic disasters due to the long run-out distance and large impact forc-es. Different from rock avalanches and sediment-laden water floods, both solid and fluid phases affected by multiple parameters can influence the motion of debris flows and govern their rheological properties. A dimensional analysis for a systematic study of the governing parameters is presented in this manuscript. Multiple dimensionless numbers with clear physical meanings are critically reviewed. Field data on natural debris flows are available here based on the fifty years' observation and measurement in the Jiangjia Gully, which is located in the Dongchuan City, Yunnan Province of China. The applications of field data with the dimensional analysis for studying natural debris flows are demonstrated. Specific values of dimensionless numbers (e.g., modified Savage Number, Reynolds number, Friction number) for classifying flowing regimes of natural debris flows on the large scales are obtained. Compared to previous physical model tests conducted mostly on small scales, this study shows that the contact friction between particles dominates in natural debris flows. In addition, the solid inertial stress due to particle collisions and the pore fluid viscous shear stress play key roles in governing the dynamic properties of debris flows and the total normal stress acting on the slope surfaces. The channel width as a confinement to the flows can affect the solids discharge per unit width significantly. Furthermore, a dimensionless number related to pore fluid pressure dissipation is found for distinguishing surge flows and continuous flows in field satisfactorily. It indicates that for surge debris flows, the high pore fluid pressures generated in granular body dissipate quite slowly and may

  3. Dengue serotype circulation in natural populations of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Taissa Pereira; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonsalvez; da Silva, Keli Antunes Barbosa; de Castro, Márcia Gonçalves; de Brito, Anielly Ferreira; Maspero, Renato Cesar; de Alcântra, Rosilene; Dos Santos, Flávia Barreto; Honorio, Nildimar A; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo

    2017-07-23

    Ae. aegypti is the main vector of dengue (DENV), Zika (ZIKV), and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. The transmission dynamics of these arboviruses, especially the arboviral circulation in the mosquito population during low and high transmission seasons in endemic areas are still poorly understood. We conducted an entomological survey to determine dengue infection rates in Ae. aegypti and Aedes albopictus. These collections were performed in 2012-2013 during a Rio de Janeiro epidemic, just before the introduction and spread of ZIKV and CHIKV in the city. MosquiTrap(©) and BG-Sentinel traps were installed in three fixed and seven itinerant neighborhoods each month over ten months. Mosquitoes were in supernatants pools tested and individually confirmed for DENV infection using RT-PCR. A total of 3053 Aedes mosquitos were captured and Ae. aegypti was much more frequent (92.9%) than Ae. albopictus (6.8%). Ae. aegypti females accounted for 71.8% of captured mosquitoes by MosquitTrap(©) and were the only species found naturally infected with DENV (infection rate=0.81%). Only one Ae. aegypti male, collected by BG-sentinel, was also tested positive for DENV. The peak of DENV-positive mosquitoes coincided the season of the highest incidence of human cases. The most common serotypes detected in mosquitoes were DENV-3 (24%) and DENV-1 (24%), followed by DENV-4 (20%), DENV-2 (8%) and DENV-1 plus DENV4 (4%), while 95% of laboratory-confirmed human infections in the period were due to DENV-4. These contrasting results suggest silent maintenance of DENV serotypes during the epidemics, reinforcing the importance of entomological and viral surveillance in endemic areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. On the stability of natural circulation loops with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskin, Troy C.

    The stability of a simple, closed-loop, water-cooled natural circulation system was characterized over a range of single phase and two-phase states. The motivation for this investigation is a Next Generation Nuclear Plant safety cooling system called the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). One of the proposed designs for the RCCS is a closed-circuit of network piping using water as a working fluid. One of the safety considerations for such a system is the stability of the system at steady-state under a large number of unknown states. This work provides a derivation of the commonly used one-dimensional conservation laws used in thermohydraulic system modeling and a novel discretization scheme that allows for exact integration of the computational domain for accurate calculation of eigenvalues of a linearized system. The steady-state solution of the discretized equations is then performed using a fully nonlinear Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov Method for a number of temperatures, pressures, and heat loads both in single and two-phase conditions. All of the single and two-phase state exhibit linear stability to small perturbations in values. The linear stability is also found to increase with increasing heat load due to the greater inertia of the system damping out small perturbation effectively and with increasing pressure due to the greater stiffness of the fluid. Nonlinear stability was also examined for a point power insertion of varying intensity from two steady-states. The loop exhibited stability for all power insertions from both steady-states, returning to the initial steady value shortly after the pulse.

  5. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  6. Identifying natural flow regimes using fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Tsai, Wen-Ping; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Hung-kwai; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryModern water resources management has adopted natural flow regimes as reasonable targets for river restoration and conservation. The characterization of a natural flow regime begins with the development of hydrologic statistics from flow records. However, little guidance exists for defining the period of record needed for regime determination. In Taiwan, the Taiwan Eco-hydrological Indicator System (TEIS), a group of hydrologic statistics selected for fisheries relevance, is being used to evaluate ecological flows. The TEIS consists of a group of hydrologic statistics selected to characterize the relationships between flow and the life history of indigenous species. Using the TEIS and biosurvey data for Taiwan, this paper identifies the length of hydrologic record sufficient for natural flow regime characterization. To define the ecological hydrology of fish communities, this study connected hydrologic statistics to fish communities by using methods to define antecedent conditions that influence existing community composition. A moving average method was applied to TEIS statistics to reflect the effects of antecedent flow condition and a point-biserial correlation method was used to relate fisheries collections with TEIS statistics. The resulting fish species-TEIS (FISH-TEIS) hydrologic statistics matrix takes full advantage of historical flows and fisheries data. The analysis indicates that, in the watersheds analyzed, averaging TEIS statistics for the present year and 3 years prior to the sampling date, termed MA(4), is sufficient to develop a natural flow regime. This result suggests that flow regimes based on hydrologic statistics for the period of record can be replaced by regimes developed for sampled fish communities.

  7. Numerical study on the Welander oscillatory natural circulation problem using high-order numerical methods

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-11-16

    In this study, the classical Welander’s oscillatory natural circulation problem is investigated using high-order numerical methods. As originally studied by Welander, the fluid motion in a differentially heated fluid loop can exhibit stable, weakly instable, and strongly instable modes. A theoretical stability map has also been originally derived from the stability analysis. Numerical results obtained in this paper show very good agreement with Welander’s theoretical derivations. For stable cases, numerical results from both the high-order and low-order numerical methods agree well with the non-dimensional flow rate analytically derived. The high-order numerical methods give much less numerical errors compared to themore » low-order methods. For stability analysis, the high-order numerical methods could perfectly predict the stability map, while the low-order numerical methods failed to do so. For all theoretically unstable cases, the low-order methods predicted them to be stable. The result obtained in this paper is a strong evidence to show the benefits of using high-order numerical methods over the low-order ones, when they are applied to simulate natural circulation phenomenon that has already gain increasing interests in many future nuclear reactor designs.« less

  8. Numerical study on the Welander oscillatory natural circulation problem using high-order numerical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Kim, Seung Jun

    2016-11-16

    In this study, the classical Welander’s oscillatory natural circulation problem is investigated using high-order numerical methods. As originally studied by Welander, the fluid motion in a differentially heated fluid loop can exhibit stable, weakly instable, and strongly instable modes. A theoretical stability map has also been originally derived from the stability analysis. Numerical results obtained in this paper show very good agreement with Welander’s theoretical derivations. For stable cases, numerical results from both the high-order and low-order numerical methods agree well with the non-dimensional flow rate analytically derived. The high-order numerical methods give much less numerical errors compared to the low-order methods. For stability analysis, the high-order numerical methods could perfectly predict the stability map, while the low-order numerical methods failed to do so. For all theoretically unstable cases, the low-order methods predicted them to be stable. The result obtained in this paper is a strong evidence to show the benefits of using high-order numerical methods over the low-order ones, when they are applied to simulate natural circulation phenomenon that has already gain increasing interests in many future nuclear reactor designs.

  9. Characterization of Circulating Natural Killer Cells in Neotropical Primates

    PubMed Central

    Carville, Angela; Evans, Tristan I.; Reeves, R. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive use of nonhuman primates as models for infectious diseases and reproductive biology, imprecise phenotypic and functional definitions exist for natural killer (NK) cells. This deficit is particularly significant in the burgeoning use of small, less expensive New World primate species. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we identified peripheral blood NK cells as CD3-negative and expressing a cluster of cell surface molecules characteristic of NK cells (i.e., NKG2A, NKp46, NKp30) in three New World primate species – common marmosets, cotton-top tamarins, and squirrel monkeys. We then assessed subset distribution using the classical NK markers, CD56 and CD16. In all species, similar to Old World primates, only a minor subset of NK cells was CD56+, and the dominant subset was CD56–CD16+. Interestingly, CD56+ NK cells were primarily cytokine-secreting cells, whereas CD56–CD16+ NK cells expressed significantly greater levels of intracellular perforin, suggesting these cells might have greater potential for cytotoxicity. New World primate species, like Old World primates, also had a minor CD56–CD16– NK cell subset that has no obvious counterpart in humans. Herein we present phenotypic profiles of New World primate NK cell subpopulations that are generally analogous to those found in humans. This conservation among species should support the further use of these species for biomedical research. PMID:24244365

  10. Vortex flow in nature and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugt, H. J.

    The occurrence and characteristics of vortices in flows are explored comprehensively, including historical observations and representations dated several millenia BC. Attention is given to the development of the scientific concept of vortices, and the basic concepts and kinematics of vortices are reviewed, as are the properties of simple vortices. The genesis and behavior of vorticity is traced through separation, instability, and turbulence. Fluid flow in a rotating system is explored, as are stratification in the ocean and atmosphere, circulations in the atmosphere, ocean, and earth, and the features of single vortices in the atmosphere and oceans. Hurrican formations are investigated, together with extraterrestrial vortices in planetary atmospheres, stars, and galaxies. A plethora of photographs and illustrations is presented, including drawings by Leonardo da Vinci.

  11. Natural Circulation Level Optimization and the Effect during ULOF Accident in the SPINNOR Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Kurniasih, Neny; Yulianti, Yanti

    2010-12-23

    Natural circulation level optimization and the effect during loss of flow accident in the 250 MWt MOX fuelled small Pb-Bi Cooled non-refueling nuclear reactors (SPINNOR) have been performed. The simulation was performed using FI-ITB safety code which has been developed in ITB. The simulation begins with steady state calculation of neutron flux, power distribution and temperature distribution across the core, hot pool and cool pool, and also steam generator. When the accident is started due to the loss of pumping power the power distribution and the temperature distribution of core, hot pool and cool pool, and steam generator change. Then the feedback reactivity calculation is conducted, followed by kinetic calculation. The process is repeated until the optimum power distribution is achieved. The results show that the SPINNOR reactor has inherent safety capability against this accident.

  12. Modeling of thermohydraulic transients in a boiling helium natural circulation loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.

    2016-12-01

    Boiling helium natural circulation loops are a cooling option for superconducting magnets. Previous studies on the field have provided a thorough understanding of their steady state behavior in all boiling regimes. Recent experimental research has lead to the understanding of their transient behavior. In particular, it highlights the impact of the thermohydraulic evolution of the circuit on the onset of transient boiling crisis, which represents a limitation of the cooling system. Hence, the need of modeling this aspect of these systems. In this work we present modeling options of two-phase helium loops departing from the homogeneous equilibrium two-phase flow model. Reasonable additional assumptions are introduced to obtain a simplified model and the effect of these assumptions is evaluated by comparison with the solution of the non-simplified equations system. These methods are compared to experimental data to analyze their success and limitations.

  13. Moisture and wave-mean flow interactions in the general circulation of Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ray

    Baroclinic eddies play an important role in shaping the midlatitude climate and its variability. They are the dominant means by which heat, momentum, and water vapor are transported in the atmosphere, but their turbulent nature makes it challenging to grasp their aggregate effect on the mean circulation. Wave-mean flow diagnostics provide an effective means for understanding the interactions between eddies and the mean circulation. These diagnostics are derived by dynamically motivated averaging of the equations of motion, which exposes the total explicit eddy effect on the mean circulation tendency. Most of the classic formulations of these diagnostics have been limited by the fact that they do not account for the eddy flux of water vapor, which can drive circulation through latent heat released from condensation. In the first part of this thesis, a moist isentropic generalization of the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux diagnostic is developed. Moist isentropes are often not invertible with height, which prevents the standard techniques used to derive the dry diagnostic from being applied in the moist case. This issue is resolved by using a conditional-averaging approach to define a weak coordinate transformation. The primitive equations, EP flux, and EP theorem are derived in generality for non- invertible coordinates, without assumptions of quasi-geostrophy or small wave-amplitude. It is shown that, in the reanalysis climatology, the moist EP flux is twice as strong as the dry EP flux and has a greater equatorward extent. Physically, the increase in momentum exchange is tied to an enhancement of the form drag associated with the horizontal structure of midlatitude eddies, where the poleward flow of moist air is located in regions of strong eastward pressure gradients. The second part of this thesis studies the effect of latent heating on the mean flow adjustment in idealized baroclinic life cycles. The life cycles are simulated in an idealized moist general circulation

  14. Flow chemistry syntheses of natural products.

    PubMed

    Pastre, Julio C; Browne, Duncan L; Ley, Steven V

    2013-12-07

    The development and application of continuous flow chemistry methods for synthesis is a rapidly growing area of research. In particular, natural products provide demanding challenges to this developing technology. This review highlights successes in the area with an emphasis on new opportunities and technological advances.

  15. Natural laminar flow application to transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratzer, Louis B.

    1990-01-01

    A major goal of NASA during the last 15 years has been the development of laminar flow technology for aircraft drag reduction. Of equal importance is achieving a state of readiness that will allow the successful application of this technology by industry to large, long-range aircraft. Recent progress in achieving extensive laminar flow with limited suction on the Boeing 757 has raised the prospects from practical application of the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) concept to subsonic aircraft. Also, better understanding of phenomena affecting laminar flow stability and response to disturbances has encouraged consideration of natural laminar flow (NLF), obtained without suction or active mechanical means, for application to transport aircraft larger than previously thought feasible. These ideas have inspired the current NASA/ASEE project with goals as follows: explore the feasibility of extensive NLF for aircraft at high Reynolds number under realistic flight conditions; determine the potential applications of NLF technology and the conditions under which they may be achieved; and identify existing aircraft that could be adapted to carry out flight experiments to validate NLF technology application. To achieve these objectives, understanding of the physical limits to natural laminar flow and possible ways to extend these limits was sought. The primary factors involved are unit Reynolds number, Mach number, wing sweep, thickness, and lift coefficients as well as surface pressure gradients and curvature. Based on previous and ongoing studies using laminar boundary layer stability theory, the interplay of the above factors and the corresponding transition limits were postulated.

  16. Self-evaporation Phenomena of Water Accompanied by a Circulation Water Flow in a Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuo; Ogushi, Hidemasa

    In the self-evaporation process of hot water in a vertical steam accumulator, the mean temperature of hot water in the vessel is higher than the saturation temperature corresponding to the operation pressure. This temperature deviation generates a capacity loss of a thermal storage system, and should be reduced by optimal designs of internal baffles. In this study, hot water circulation, that is naturally and permanently induced by self evaporation, is analytically studied on an assumption and a simplification as follows. (1) single straight tube is used as the internal baffle, (2) steam and hot water in the two phase flow are in the thermal equilibrium condition. Analysis results show that the solution obtained agree well with visual test results. By using this analysis method, temperature deviations in hot water layer were estimated for various accumulators having wide range of operation conditions, volume and aspect ratio of the vessel.

  17. Thermalhydraulic aspects of decay heat removal by natural circulation in fast reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.M.; Hetsroni, G.; Banerjee, S.

    1990-01-01

    Natural convection in enclosures have been studied numerically to provide insight into the scaling laws existing for removal of decay heat in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFR). Specifically, 3-D simulations have been carried out for natural circulation in a cylinder with small aspect ratio (of the order of 0.5). These results have been compared to the results of an experiment conducted by UCSB, in collaboration with GE, to provide benchmark data for code validation. Parametric studies have been conducted to establish the validity of a 3-D Finite difference code that uses body-fitted grids for simulations of complex geometries. Further, numerical simulations have been carried out to demonstrate the importance of 3-D computer codes as tools in the design and scale-up of prototype LMFRs. It has been shown that the geometry of the passive safety systems is key to safe operation of LMFRs under shutdown conditions. The key phenomena that occur in such situations have bee studied and the available experimental studies have been identified. The future direction for modeling of natural convection recirculating flows in confined enclosures has been proposed. 31 refs.

  18. Thermalhydraulic aspects of decay heat removal by natural circulation in fast reactor systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.M.; Hetsroni, G.; Banerjee, S.

    1990-12-31

    Natural convection in enclosures have been studied numerically to provide insight into the scaling laws existing for removal of decay heat in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFR). Specifically, 3-D simulations have been carried out for natural circulation in a cylinder with small aspect ratio (of the order of 0.5). These results have been compared to the results of an experiment conducted by UCSB, in collaboration with GE, to provide benchmark data for code validation. Parametric studies have been conducted to establish the validity of a 3-D Finite difference code that uses body-fitted grids for simulations of complex geometries. Further, numerical simulations have been carried out to demonstrate the importance of 3-D computer codes as tools in the design and scale-up of prototype LMFRs. It has been shown that the geometry of the passive safety systems is key to safe operation of LMFRs under shutdown conditions. The key phenomena that occur in such situations have bee studied and the available experimental studies have been identified. The future direction for modeling of natural convection recirculating flows in confined enclosures has been proposed. 31 refs.

  19. Stability analysis of a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiyue

    This dissertation is aimed at nuclear-coupled thermal hydraulics stability analysis of a natural circulation lead cooled fast reactor design. The stability concerns arise from the fact that natural circulation operation makes the system susceptible to flow instabilities similar to those observed in boiling water reactors. In order to capture the regional effects, modal expansion method which incorporates higher azimuthal modes is used to model the neutronics part of the system. A reduced order model is used in this work for the thermal-hydraulics. Consistent with the number of heat exchangers (HXs), the reactor core is divided into four equal quadrants. Each quadrant has its corresponding external segments such as riser, plenum, pipes and HX forming an equivalent 1-D closed loop. The local pressure loss along the loop is represented by a lumped friction factor. The heat transfer process in the HX is represented by a model for the coolant temperature at the core inlet that depends on the coolant temperature at the core outlet and the coolant velocity. Additionally, time lag effects are incorporated into this HX model due to the finite coolant speed. A conventional model is used for the fuel pin heat conduction to couple the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. The feedback mechanisms include Doppler, axial/radial thermal expansion and coolant density effects. These effects are represented by a linear variation of the macroscopic cross sections with the fuel temperature. The weighted residual method is used to convert the governing PDEs to ODEs. Retaining the first and second modes, leads to six ODEs for neutronics, and five ODEs for the thermal-hydraulics in each quadrant. Three models are developed. These are: 1) natural circulation model with a closed coolant flow path but without coupled neutronics, 2) forced circulation model with constant external pressure drop across the heated channels but without coupled neutronics, 3) coupled system including neutronics with

  20. Estimating flow heterogeneity in natural fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckenby, Robert J.; Sanderson, David J.; Lonergan, Lidia

    2005-10-01

    Examples of small to medium scale fault systems have been mapped in Jurassic sedimentary rocks in north Somerset, England. These examples include contractional and dilational strike-slip oversteps as well as normal faults. These maps form the basis of calculations performed to investigate heterogeneity in natural fracture systems with the aim of predicting fluid flow localisation in different fault styles. As there is no way to measure fracture aperture directly, we use vein thickness to represent an integrated flow path or 'palaeo-aperture' from which we derive a representation of the flow distribution. Three different methods are used to estimate flow heterogeneity based on: (1) fracture density (the ratio of fracture length to area), (2) fracture aperture (fracture porosity) and (3) hydraulic conductance (fracture permeability normalised to the pressure gradient and fluid properties). Our results show that fracture density and hydraulic conductance are poorly correlated and that fracture density does not fully represent the natural heterogeneity of fracture systems. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductance indicate stronger degrees of flow localisation. Different types of structures also seem to display characteristic and predictable patterns of heterogeneity. Normal fault systems show the highest magnitude of localisation along the faults rather than in the relay ramps, while contractional and dilational strike-slip systems show very strong localisation in the faults and oversteps, respectively. In all cases the amount of damage in the oversteps can modify such patterns of heterogeneity.

  1. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  2. The natural flow wing-design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1992-01-01

    A wing-design study was conducted on a 65 degree swept leading-edge delta wing in which the wing geometry was modified to take advantage of the naturally occurring flow that forms over a slender wing in a supersonic flow field. Three-dimensional nonlinear analysis methods were used in the study which was divided into three parts: preliminary design, initial design, and final design. In the preliminary design, the wing planform, the design conditions, and the near-conical wing-design concept were derived, and a baseline standard wing (conventional airfoil distribution) and a baseline near-conical wing were chosen. During the initial analysis, a full-potential flow solver was employed to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline standard delta wing and to investigate modifications to the airfoil thickness, leading-edge radius, airfoil maximum-thickness position, and wing upper to lower surface asymmetry on the baseline near-conical wing. The final design employed an Euler solver to analyze the best wing configurations found in the initial design and to extend the study of wing asymmetry to develop a more refined wing. Benefits resulting from each modification are discussed, and a final 'natural flow' wing geometry was designed that provides an improvement in aerodynamic performance compared with that of a baseline conventional uncambered wing, linear-theory cambered wing, and near-conical wing.

  3. [Research of potassium flow and circulation based on substance flow analysis].

    PubMed

    Bai, Hua; Zeng, Si-Yu; Dong, Xin; Chen, Ji-Ning

    2013-06-01

    Mass of potassium is consumed in the process of crop production, which is the dominating section of potassium flow and circulation in China. However, the degree of self-sufficiency is relatively low due to the deficient domestic resource of potassium. This study analyzed the key links of potassium issues in crop production and consumptive use in 2009 based on substance flow analysis. The results indicated that the farmland nutrient balance of input/output couldn't make even, with a heavy deficit of 50.4 kg x hm(-2) at the national level. Meanwhile, about 2.31 million ton of potash fertilizer was washed away into the hydrologic cycle, which accounts for 40.97% of chemical fertilizer applied in the whole year. Domestic wastewater in urban and rural areas was identified as another primary source for the transformation of potassium from terrestrial ecosystem to water environment system, annually contributing 671 and 547 thousand tons, which takes up 19.00% and 15.50%, respectively. And the amount of potassium in effluent of wastewater treatment plants was 505 thousand tons per year, accounting for 75.25% of the total emission in urban areas.

  4. Dynamics of zonal-mean flow assimilation and implications for winter circulation anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    DeWeaver, E.; Nigam, S.

    1997-07-01

    Seasonally averaged 200-mb circulations for recent winters (1987/88 and 1988/89) that represent opposite phases of El Nino and a zonal-mean zonal flow index cycle are diagnosed using data assimilated by the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) and operational analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The comparison is undertaken to determine whether there are significant differences in the 200-mb vorticity dynamics implied by the mean meridional circulations in the two datasets and whether these differences can be related to the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) method used in the GEOS assimilation. The two datasets show a high degree of similarity in their depictions of the large-scale rotational flow, but there are substantial differences in the associated divergent circulations. For the zonal-mean flow, the zonal winds are substantially the same, but the meridional wind in the Tropics and subtropics is considerably weaker in the GEOS assimilation than its counterparts in both the ECMWF data and the GEOS analyses used to produce the assimilation. The authors examine the assimilation of the Hadley circulation using a zonally symmetric f-plane model. For this model, the IAU method easily assimilates the rotational flow but fails to assimilate the divergent circulation. This deficiency of the IAU method may explain the weakness of the Hadley cell in the GEOS assimilation. For this simple model, an alternative assimilation method, based on constraints imposed by the analyzed potential vorticity and mean meridional circulation fields, is proposed that simultaneously assimilates both rotational and divergent flow components. Barotropic modeling suggests that an accurate representation of mean meridional flow anomalies can be important for the diagnosis of both zonal-mean and eddy rotational flow perturbations, particularly during extreme phases of the zonal-mean zonal flow fluctuation. 22 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  6. Compact counter-flow cooling system with subcooled gravity-fed circulating liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Sasaki, A.; Watanabe, H.; Kawahara, T.; Hamabe, M.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2010-11-01

    A liquid nitrogen (LN2) is usually used to keep the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable low temperature. A pump is utilized to circulate LN2 inside the cryopipes. In order to minimize heat leakage, a thermal siphon circulation scheme can be realized instead. Here, we discuss the effectiveness of thermal siphon with counter-flow circulation loop composed of cryogen flow channel and inner cable channel. The main feature of the system is the existence of essential parasitic heat exchange between upwards and downwards flows. Feasibility of the proposed scheme for cable up to 500 m in length has been investigated numerically. Calculated profiles of temperature and pressure show small differences of T and p in the inner and the outer flows at the same elevation, which allows not worrying about mechanical stability of the cable. In the case under consideration the thermal insulating properties of a conventional electrical insulating material (polypropylene laminated paper, PPLP) appear to be sufficient. Two interesting effects were disclosed due to analysis of subcooling of LN2. In case of highly inclined siphon subcooling causes significant increase of temperature maximum that can breakup of superconductivity. In case of slightly inclined siphon high heat flux from outer flow to inner flow causes condensation of nitrogen gas in outer channel. It leads to circulation loss. Results of numerical analyses indicate that counter-flow thermosiphon cooling system is a promising way to increase performance of short-length power transmission (PT) lines, but conventional subcooling technique should be applied carefully.

  7. Analytical study of lateral-circulation-induced exchange flow in tidally dominated well-mixed estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Wang, Aijun; Jia, Jianju

    2017-05-01

    In straight estuary channels, differential advection and the Coriolis force are the major driving mechanisms for lateral circulation. An analytical model was developed to explore the roles of the two mechanisms in the dynamics of tidally dominated well-mixed estuaries. The model provided a nondimensional parameter, Keh, a type of Kelvin number (considered as horizontal Kelvin number) to elucidate the relative importance of the two mechanisms. Differential advection is effective under small Keh, while the Coriolis force is effective under larger Keh. The critical value of Keh has an order of magnitude of 0.1 in well-mixed estuaries. Lateral circulations generate residual currents through the lateral advection term in the along-estuary momentum equation. When differential advection is effective, the lateral-advection-induced flow has a laterally sheared structure with the landward flow in the channel and seaward flows over shoals. When the Coriolis force is effective, it has a laterally sheared structure with the landward flow in the left part of the cross-section and the seaward flow in the right (facing ocean). When the two mechanisms are equally important, it has an asymmetric laterally sheared structure with a stronger seaward flow over the right shoal. Those lateral structures indicate that the lateral-circulation-induced flow generally reinforces the estuarine gravitational circulation.

  8. Production circulator fabrication and testing for core flow test loop. Final report, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The performance testing of two production helium circulators utilizing gas film lubrication is described. These two centrifugal-type circulators plus an identical circulator prototype will be arranged in series to provide the helium flow requirements for the Core Flow Test Loop which is part of the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program (GCFR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report presents the results of the Phase III performance and supplemental tests, which were carried out by MTI during the period of December 18, 1980 through March 19, 1981. Specific test procedures are outlined and described, as are individual tests for measuring the performance of the circulators. Test data and run descriptions are presented.

  9. In Vivo Photoswitchable Flow Cytometry for Direct Tracking of Single Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (PSFPs) that change their color in response to light have led to breakthroughs in studying static cells. However, using PSFPs to study cells in dynamic conditions is challenging. Here we introduce a method for in vivo ultrafast photoswitching of PSFPs that provides labeling and tracking of single circulating cells. Using in vivo multicolor flow cytometry, this method demonstrated the capability for studying recirculation, migration, and distribution of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) during metastasis progression. In tumor-bearing mice, it enabled monitoring of real-time dynamics of CTCs released from primary tumor, identifying dormant cells, and imaging of CTCs colonizing a primary tumor (self-seeding) or existing metastasis (reseeding). Integration of genetically encoded PSFPs, fast photoswitching, flow cytometry, and imaging makes in vivo single cell analysis in the circulation feasible to provide insights into the behavior of CTCs and potentially immune-related and bacterial cells in circulation. PMID:24816228

  10. Novel in vivo flow cytometry platform for early prognosis of metastatic activity of circulating tumor cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Jacqueline; Cai, Chenzhoung; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 8 million people lose their lives due to cancer each year. Metastatic disease is responsible for 90% of those cancer-related deaths. Only viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that can survive in the blood circulation can create secondary tumors. Thus, real-time enumeration of CTCs and assessment of their viability in vivo has great biological significance. However, little progress has been made in this field. Conventional flow cytometry is the current technique being used for the assessment of cell viability, but there are many limitations to this technique: 1) cell properties may be altered during the extraction and processing method; 2) collection of cells from blood prevents the long-term study of individual cells in their natural biological environment; and 3) there are time-consuming preparation procedures. Whether it be for the assessment of antitumor drugs, where induction of apoptosis or necrosis is the preferred event, or the identification of nanoparticle-induced toxicity during nanotherapeutic treatment, it is clear that new approaches for assessment of the viability circulating blood cells and CTCs are urgently needed. We have developed a novel high speed, multicolor in vivo flow cytometry (FC) platform that integrates photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence FC (PAFFC) and demonstrate its ability to enumerate rare circulating normal and abnormal (e.g. tumor) cells and assess their viability (e.g. apoptotic and necrotic) in a mouse model.

  11. Preliminary simulated tidal flow and circulation patterns in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of channel dredging and island construction on tidal flow and circulation in Hillsborough Bay, Fla., due to the Tampa Harbor Deepening Project is being investigated using a two-dimensional, finite-difference numerical model. Preliminary model results are presented as a series of maps showing tidal flood, tidal ebb, and circulation patterns in the bay for predredging and postdredging conditions. Complex circulation patterns occur near the bay mouth in an area where there is (1) a change in thalweg alinement of the bay, (2) an intersection of three major ship channels, and (3) submergent and emergent dredged material located adjacent to each of the channels. (USGS)

  12. Options for Cryogenic Load Cooling with Forced Flow Helium Circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni, Roberto Than

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic pumps designed to circulate super-critical helium are commonly deemed necessary in many super-conducting magnet and other cooling applications. Acknowledging that these pumps are often located at the coldest temperature levels, their use introduces risks associated with the reliability of additional rotating machinery and an additional load on the refrigeration system. However, as it has been successfully demonstrated, this objective can be accomplished without using these pumps by the refrigeration system, resulting in lower system input power and improved reliability to the overall cryogenic system operations. In this paper we examine some trade-offs between using these pumps vs. using the refrigeration system directly with examples of processes that have used these concepts successfully and eliminated using such pumps

  13. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 2: Friction pressure drop lessening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. Two heated sections with different internal diameter (10 and 6 mm) were tested. The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were registered. The post-CHF regime was studied watching simultaneously the evolution of boiling crisis onset along the test section and the evolution of pressure drop and mass flow rate. A significant lessening of friction was observed simultaneous to the development of the post-CHF regime, accompanied by a mass flow rate increase, which lets suppose that the vapor film in the film boiling regime acts as a lubricant. A model was created based on this idea and on heat transfer considerations. The predictions by this model are satisfactory for the low quality post-CHF regime.

  14. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth Cooled Natural Circulated Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Takaaki Sakai; Yasuhiro Enuma; Takashi Iwasaki; Kazuhiro Ohyama

    2002-07-01

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth cooled natural circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 100 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled natural circulation reactor designed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. PRACS (Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System) is prepared for the JNC's concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 sec after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 Centigrade, because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporary reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system and the out let temperature decreases successfully. (authors)

  15. System Analysis for Decay Heat Removal in Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Natural-Circulation Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2004-03-15

    Decay heat removal analyses for lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactors are described in this paper. A combined multidimensional plant dynamics code (MSG-COPD) has been developed to conduct the system analysis for the natural-circulation reactors. For the preliminary study, transient analysis has been performed for a 300-MW(thermal) lead-bismuth-cooled reactor designed by Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, decay heat removal characteristics of a 400-MW(electric) lead-bismuth-cooled natural-circulation reactor designed by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been evaluated by using MSG-COPD. The primary reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) is prepared for the JNC concept to get sufficient heat removal capacity. During 2000 s after the transient, the outlet temperature shows increasing tendency up to the maximum temperature of 430 deg. C because the buoyancy force in a primary circulation path is temporarily reduced. However, the natural circulation is recovered by the PRACS system, and the outlet temperature decreases successfully.

  16. Altered Flow Changes Thrombin Generation Rate of Circulating Platelets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Bond, Kyle; Rouf, Farzana; Rubenstein, David A

    2015-12-01

    Shear stress affects platelet participation in coagulation. Many numerical models have been developed to describe coagulation kinetics. However, most of those models used rate constants determined under static conditions. Little is known about the effects of flow on coagulation rate constants. In the present study, platelets were exposed to constant or pulsatile shear stress/rate, with or without prothrombin, factor Xa, and factor Va. Thrombin generation was measured using a modified prothrombinase assay, and the overall thrombin generation rate was solved using typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Platelet surface P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) expression was measured using flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that the concentration of factor Va had a dominant effect on thrombin generation rate under flow. In comparison, the expression of PS was less sensitive to altered flow. The lumped overall rate constant for prothrombin conversion to thrombin was significantly affected by the shear forces that were applied to the coagulation complex. Constant shear stress/rate induced faster thrombin generation compared to pulsatile shear stress/rate, but elevated shear stress/rate did not necessarily enhance thrombin generation. Therefore, the overall thrombin generation rate is dynamic and must be described as a function of shear stress/rate, shear exposure time and the immediate availability of coagulation proteins.

  17. An experimental investigation of circulation control flow fields using holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments are presented which were conducted on flow fields produced by a circulation control airfoil utilizing the Coanda effect at the trailing edge. The application of holographic interferometry to obtain both visualization and quantitative data on the flow field about a circulation control airfoil at transonic flow speed is covered. A brief description of the flow model and measurement techniques is given. The data reduction procedure, results, and interpretation are presented. The results have provided a good deal of information on the character of the flow field, particularly in the neighborhood of the trailing edge. As to the airfoil design, it is apparent that improved performance can be achieved if jet detachment is delayed. Another design improvement would involve the development of an optimum trailing-edge shape for the expected operating Mach and Reynolds number ranges.

  18. Deficiencies of Circulating Mucosal-associated Invariant T Cells and Natural Killer T Cells in Patients with Multiple Trauma.

    PubMed

    Jo, Young Goun; Choi, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jung Chul; Cho, Young Nan; Kang, Jeong Hwa; Jin, Hye Mi; Kee, Seung Jung; Park, Yong Wook

    2017-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells are known to play important roles in autoimmunity, infectious diseases and cancers. However, little is known about the roles of these invariant T cells in multiple trauma. The purposes of this study were to examine MAIT and NKT cell levels in patients with multiple trauma and to investigate potential relationships between these cell levels and clinical parameters. The study cohort was composed of 14 patients with multiple trauma and 22 non-injured healthy controls (HCs). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell levels in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. The severity of injury was categorised according to the scoring systems, such as Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell numbers were significantly lower in multiple trauma patients than in HCs. Linear regression analysis showed that circulating MAIT cell numbers were significantly correlated with age, APACHE II, SAPS II, ISS category, hemoglobin, and platelet count. NKT cell numbers in the peripheral blood were found to be significantly correlated with APACHE II, SAPS II, and ISS category. This study shows numerical deficiencies of circulating MAIT cells and NKT cells in multiple trauma. In addition, these invariant T cell deficiencies were found to be associated with disease severity. These findings provide important information for predicting the prognosis of multiple trauma. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  19. On Stability of Natural-circulation-cooled Boiling Water Reactors during Start-up (Experimental Results)

    SciTech Connect

    Manera, A.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.

    2002-07-01

    The characteristics of flashing-induced instabilities, which are of importance during the start-up phase of natural-circulation Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), are studied. Experiments at typical start-up conditions (low power and low pressure) are carried out on a steam/water natural circulation loop. The mechanism of flashing-induced instability is analyzed in detail and it is found that non-equilibrium between phases and enthalpy transport plays an important role in the instability process. Pressure and steam volume in the steam dome are found to have a stabilizing effect. The main characteristics of the instabilities have been analyzed. (authors)

  20. Experiments in a single-phase natural circulation mini-loop

    SciTech Connect

    Misale, M.; Garibaldi, P.; Passos, J.C.; de Bitencourt, G. Ghisi

    2007-08-15

    This study reports an experimental investigation related to a rectangular single-phase natural circulation mini-loop, which consists of two horizontal copper tubes (heat transfer sections) and two vertical tubes (legs) made of copper, connected by means of four glass 90 bends. The loop inner diameter is 4 mm. The lower heating section consists of an electrical heating wire made of nicromel on the outside of the copper tube; the upper cooling system consists of a coaxial cylindrical heat exchanger with a water-glycol mixture, set at controlled temperature and flowing through the annulus. The loop has an imposed heat flux in the lower heating section and an imposed temperature in the cooler. The mini-loop was placed onto a table which can assume different inclinations. The parameters investigated during the experiments were: power transferred to the fluid and inclination of the loop. The preliminary results show a stable behaviour with a steady temperature difference across the heat sinks. It has been confirmed that the fluid velocity is very small (order of millimetres per second). (author)

  1. Contributions of Respiration and Heartbeat to the Pulmonary Blood Flow in the Fontan Circulation.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takashi; Itatani, Keiichi; Takanashi, Manabu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Ando, Hisashi; Kimura, Sumito; Nakahata, Yayoi; Oka, Norihiko; Miyaji, Kagami; Ishii, Masahiro

    2016-11-01

    In the Fontan circulation, driving forces with respiration, heartbeat, and lower limb muscle pump are relevant. However, the mechanics of these forces has not been proven, and their effects on the Fontan circulation remain unclear. We performed catheter examinations and measured pressure and flow velocity simultaneously in the bilateral pulmonary arteries of 12 Fontan patients 1 year after the operation. The pulmonary pressure and flow velocity data were decomposed into respiratory and heartbeat components by discrete Fourier analysis. We then calculated respiratory and cardiac wave intensity (WI) based on the respiratory and heartbeat components of pressure and flow velocity data. Respiratory WI formed 2 negative peaks, a backward expansion wave during the inspiratory phase, and then a backward compression wave during the expiratory phase. In 2 phrenic nerve palsy cases and 1 case of a patient on a respirator, respiratory WI showed disturbed patterns and a negative pattern, respectively. Cardiac WI showed 2 or 4 negative peaks, the time phase of which matched that of the atrial contractions. WI analysis elucidated that inspiration acts as a sucking driving force and increases the pulmonary blood flow in the Fontan circulation. Respiratory complications compromise efficiency in the Fontan circulation. It was also revealed that the pulmonary blood flow was mutually dammed up and sucked in by increases and decreases in atrial pressure. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  3. Numerical calculations of two dimensional, unsteady transonic flows with circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. M.; Warming, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of obtaining two-dimensional, unsteady transonic aerodynamic data by numerically integrating the Euler equations is investigated. An explicit, third-order-accurate, noncentered, finite-difference scheme is used to compute unsteady flows about airfoils. Solutions for lifting and nonlifting airfoils are presented and compared with subsonic linear theory. The applicability and efficiency of the numerical indicial function method are outlined. Numerically computed subsonic and transonic oscillatory aerodynamic coefficients are presented and compared with those obtained from subsonic linear theory and transonic wind-tunnel data.

  4. Study on the flow characteristics and the wastewater treatment performance in modified internal circulation reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiade; Xu, Weijun; Yan, Jingjia; Yu, Jianming

    2014-12-01

    A modified internal circulation (MIC) reactor with an external circulation system was proposed and the performance of treating dyeing wastewater using both MIC and typical IC reactor were compared. Utilization of the external circulation system in the MIC reactor could dramatically improve the mixing intensity of the biomass with the wastewater and resulted in better performance. The COD removal efficiency, biogas production, volatile fatty acids and effluent color were approximately 87%, 98 L d−1, 180 mg L−1 and 100 times, respectively, in the MIC reactor with a hydraulic retention time of 5 h and organic loading rate of 15 kg COD m−3 d−1. The hydrodynamics of the MIC reactor under different flows rate of external circulation were also analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. The optimal flow rate of external circulation was 12 L min−1, which resulted in a corresponding up-flow velocity of 40 m h−1. The consistency of the result between experiment and simulation validated the scientificity of CFD technique applied to numerical simulation of the MIC reactor.

  5. Flow Characterization in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alajmi, A.; Gharbi, R.

    2008-12-01

    Most hydrocarbon reservoirs are fractured in nature with various degrees of fracture intensities. With the current oil prices and growing demand for oil, a great interest is built in the petroleum industry to characterize partially fractured reservoirs and to develop an increased understanding of the physics of fluid flow in these types of reservoirs. This is due to the fact that fractured reservoirs have different performance behavior and high potential for oil recovery than conventional reservoirs. Therefore, prediction and understanding of fluid displacement in these reservoirs is very much critical in the decision on the applicability of oil recovery methods. Using a finite difference numerical simulator, this study investigated the effect of reservoir fracture intensities on the displacement behavior. Several heterogeneous permeable media, each with different probability of fracture intensity, were generated stochastically. The fracture intensity covers reservoirs with no fracture (zero fracture intensity) to fully fractured reservoirs (fracture intensity of 1). In order to better describe and model fractured reservoirs, a dual porosity-dual permeability model was built. Extensive simulations of water displacing oil were then performed in each of the generated fractured models for different well configurations. The objective was to determine the functional relationships between the displacement performance, fracture intensities, and well configurations. The study has resulted in significant new insights into the flow characterization in naturally fractured reservoirs. Results show that the reservoir fracture intensity has considerable effects on the efficiency of fluid displacement in naturally fractured reservoirs. A critical value of reservoir fracture intensity appears to sort favorable from unfavorable displacement, causing the displacement to be either fracture-dominated or matrix-dominated. The conditions under which fluid displacement may yield better

  6. Natural circulation analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor refueling process 11

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, R.F.; Dasardhi, S.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Yoder, G.L.

    1995-09-01

    During the refueling process of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR), the spent fuel elements must be moved from the primary coolant loop (containing D{sub 2}O), through a heavy water pool, and finally into a light water spent fuel storage area. The present refueling scheme utilizes remote refueling equipment to move the spent fuel elements through a D{sub 2}O filled stack and tunnel into a temporary storage canal. A transfer lock is used to move the spent fuel elements from the D{sub 2}O-filled interim storage canal to a light water pool. Each spent fuel element must be cooled during this process, using either natural circulation or forced convection. This paper presents a summary of the numerical techniques used to analyze natural circulation cooling of the ANSR fuel elements as well as selected results of the calculations. Details of the analysis indicate that coolant velocities below 10 cm/s exist in the coolant channels under single phase natural circulation conditions. Also, boiling does not occur within the channels if power levels are below a few hundred kW when the core transitions to natural circulation conditions.

  7. Design and measured performance of a solar chimney for natural circulation solar energy dryers

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, O.V.; Norton, B.

    1996-02-01

    An experimental solar chimney consisted of a cylindrical polyethylene-clad vertical chamber supported by steel framework and draped internally with a selectively absorbing surface. The performance of the chimney which was monitored extensively is reported. Issues related to the design and construction of solar chimneys for natural circulation solar energy dryers are discussed.

  8. Radar observations of mesoscale circulations induced by a small lake under varying synoptic-scale flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asefi-Najafabady, Salvi; Knupp, Kevin; Mecikalski, John R.; Welch, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines Doppler radar observations of springtime lake breeze (LB) circulations produced by a small reservoir (mean width of ˜2 km), Wheeler Lake, on the Tennessee River in northern Alabama. The analysis allows for the formation of a general understanding of the flow structures as a composite of many LB circulation events. It is found that LB circulation, once formed, is robust and persistent over a range of background or synoptic-scale wind flows despite the small size of Wheeler Lake and the relatively small differences between land and lake temperature (often a few degrees Celsius) that drive the LB circulation. The formation, location, strength, and inland penetration of the Wheeler Lake breeze are highly sensitive to the background wind speed and direction with respect to the lakeshore, resulting in complex spatial and temporal variations in the LB characteristics. The LB front is most prominent as a radar fine line when the ambient flow is offshore (opposing the LB background wind) and perpendicular to the orientation (120°-300°) of the lake. For wind speeds <4-5 m s-1, a radar-detectable thin line delineating the LB front appears primarily on the upwind side of the lake, either to the north or south, while synoptic-scale winds stronger than ˜5 m s-1 tend to destroy the breeze front entirely. If the background wind is parallel to lake orientation and the wind is ≤4 m s-1, the LB circulations often develop on both sides of the lake. The radar fine line often appears patchy and broad for low-wind conditions near 2 m s-1. Overall, the findings of this study show that small lakes can generate persistent local circulations that follow similar patterns of behavior and respond to the synoptic flow as large lakes or sea breezes.

  9. DETECTION OF EQUATORWARD MERIDIONAL FLOW AND EVIDENCE OF DOUBLE-CELL MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION INSIDE THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Junwei; Bogart, R. S.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Hartlep, Thomas; Duvall, T. L. Jr.

    2013-09-10

    Meridional flow in the solar interior plays an important role in redistributing angular momentum and transporting magnetic flux inside the Sun. Although it has long been recognized that the meridional flow is predominantly poleward at the Sun's surface and in its shallow interior, the location of the equatorward return flow and the meridional flow profile in the deeper interior remain unclear. Using the first 2 yr of continuous helioseismology observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, we analyze travel times of acoustic waves that propagate through different depths of the solar interior carrying information about the solar interior dynamics. After removing a systematic center-to-limb effect in the helioseismic measurements and performing inversions for flow speed, we find that the poleward meridional flow of a speed of 15 m s{sup -1} extends in depth from the photosphere to about 0.91 R{sub Sun }. An equatorward flow of a speed of 10 m s{sup -1} is found between 0.82 and 0.91 R{sub Sun} in the middle of the convection zone. Our analysis also shows evidence of that the meridional flow turns poleward again below 0.82 R{sub Sun }, indicating an existence of a second meridional circulation cell below the shallower one. This double-cell meridional circulation profile with an equatorward flow shallower than previously thought suggests a rethinking of how magnetic field is generated and redistributed inside the Sun.

  10. Progress in natural laminar flow research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    For decades, since the earliest attempts to obtain natural laminar flow (NLF) on airplanes, three classical objections to its practicality have been held in the aeronautical community. These objectives concerned first, the capability to manufacture practical airframe surfaces smooth enough for NLF; second, the apparent inherent instability and sensitivity of NLF; and third, the accumulation of contamination such as insect debris in flight. This paper explains recent progress in our understanding of the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on modern airframe surfaces. This discussion explains why previous attempts to use NLF failed and what has changed regarding the three classical objections to NLF practicality. Future NASA research plans are described concerning exploring the limits of NLF usefulness, production tolerances, operational considerations, transition behavior and measurement methods, and NLF design applications.

  11. An investigation of the physical factors controlling the sense of secondary flow circulation within submarine meanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, S. E.; Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Sumner, E.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R.

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by the symposium held at the 2011 AGU on "Submarine Channel Systems: Flow Dynamics and Sedimentary Deposits", we have undertaken a holistic investigation into the factors affecting secondary flow circulation within submarine meander bends. In both subaerial and submarine meander bends, fluid flow travels in a helical spiral, as centrifugal and hydrostatic forces balance the turbulent shear stress within the flow. Understanding the sense of the secondary flow circulation is important because the near bed orientation of the fluid flow vector strongly affects sediment transport and meander bend morphodynamic evolution, the patterns of surface grain size sorting and, ultimately it controls the character of the sedimentary deposits produced. The study we present here uses a simplified analytical model, considering the fundamental interconnectedness of the principle physical forces driving the rotational flow within submarine meanders. This holistic radial flow model, which incorporates centrifugal and Coriolis forces, the radial pressure gradient and the baroclinicity of the flow, is formulated using existing empirical models. The analytical model is validated using experimental data and used to highlight the influence of the principal physical forces acting on the flow. Previous analytical studies have considered a temporally constant, two-dimensional, rotationally invariant, framework that leads to vanishing material flux conditions when applied to flows within bounded channels. However, with reference to experimental studies, we show that a three-dimensional flow framework, with non-zero material fluxes, is required to capture the rotational structure of flow within submarine meanders. Given this three-dimensional model, we present phase-space diagrams indicating the variation of the generic vertical structure of rotational flow within submarine meanders are presented. These phase-space analyses allow a system wide discussion of secondary flow structure

  12. A centrifugal pump driven tidal flow extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system tested with neonatal mock circulation.

    PubMed

    Trittenwein, G; Kölbl, R; Trittenwein, H; Golej, J; Burda, G; Hermon, M; Pollak, A

    1999-06-01

    In 1993, Chevalier published his experiences with tidal flow venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) featuring a single lumen cannula, non-occlusive roller pump, and alternating clamps. Using a neonatal mock circulation (NMC), which enables different hemodynamic states for neonatal ECMO research, the tested hypothesis was that it is possible to create a centrifugal pump driven tidal flow neonatal venovenous ECMO system. Additionally, the resulting hemodynamic effects in a condition of circulatory impairment were investigated. The ECMO circuit tested was assembled using a pediatric centrifugal pump head, a distensible reservoir, and a rotary clamp separating drainage from the injection phase. Using the NMC, end tidal volumes, mock circulation flow, and arterial and venous pressures were measured at different pump speeds after the drainage and injection phases. Effective venovenous ECMO flow (evvEF) was calculated. Mock circulation baseline values (ECMO clamped) were compared to values during tidal flow ECMO. At 3,000 rpm, a centrifugal pump speed of 75 ml/kg/min evvEF was reached, and it increased with higher pump speeds. At this point, the end tidal mock circulation flow (representing cardiac output) after drainage differed significantly from that during the injection phase (p < 0.01) but not from the baseline value. The end tidal arterial and venous pressures after the drainage phase were found to be significantly decreased compared to the baselines (p < 0.01). In conclusion, a centrifugal pump driven tidal flow venovenous ECMO system can be created enabling sufficient tidal volumes. Tested in the described NMC simulating posthypoxic circulatory impairment, significant hemodynamic effects could be demonstrated. Animal experiments for confirmation are necessary.

  13. History of natural flows--Kansas River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leeson, Elwood R.

    1958-01-01

    confluence of the Smoky Hill and Republican Rivers, From that point the river flows eastward about 175 miles to Kansas City where it empties into the Missouri River. The basic history of its natural flow can be depicted in general by the records from three gaging stations. The one at Bonner Springs, about 21 miles upstream from the mouth, may be considered as representing the total outflow from the basin; the one at Ogden, about 8 miles downstream from the confluence of the Smoky Hill and Republican Rivers, may be considered as representing the combined contribution of those streams to the Kansas River flow; and the one at Topeka, being only about 16 river miles nearer to Ogden than to Bonner Springs, may be considered as representing flows at the mid-point along the river.

  14. Liquid circulation in a stirred system with an axial flow impeller and a cylindrical draft tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Ivan; Vlček, Petr; Jirout, Tomáš

    2017-07-01

    This study deals with a CFD simulation of the turbulent flow of a homogeneous liquid in a cylindrical stirred system with a pitched-blade impeller and a cylindrical draft tube. Design of investigated pilot plant equipment corresponds to the shape of agitated crystallizer with a draft tube - additional cooling heat exchanger. The results of the computation are expressed by means of the circulation pattern of a stirred liquid and the main flow characteristics of the system - the flow rate numbers and the impeller power number.

  15. Evaluation of natural circulation cooldown tests performed at Diablo Canyon, San Onofre, and Palo Verde nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.H.; Perkins, K.R.; Cavlina, N.

    1988-01-01

    The natural circulation cooldown tests performed at Diablo Canyon, San Onofre, and Palo Verde nuclear power plants were evaluated for the compliance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission design requirements. BNL concluded that these tests combined with the supporting analyses demonstrated the natural circulation, boron mixing, and cooldown capability of these plants.

  16. Evaluation of blood flow distribution asymmetry and vascular geometry in patients with Fontan circulation using 4-D flow MRI.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Kelly; Schnell, Susanne; Barker, Alex J; Garcia, Julio; Lorenz, Ramona; Rose, Michael; Chowdhary, Varun; Carr, James; Robinson, Joshua D; Rigsby, Cynthia K; Markl, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetrical caval to pulmonary blood flow is suspected to cause complications in patients with Fontan circulation. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of 4-D flow MRI for characterizing the relationship between 3-D blood flow distribution and vascular geometry. We hypothesized that both flow distribution and geometry can be calculated with low interobserver variability and will detect a direct relationship between flow distribution and Fontan geometry. Four-dimensional flow MRI was acquired in 10 Fontan patients (age: 16 ± 4 years [mean ± standard deviation], range: 9-21 years). The Fontan connection was isolated by 3-D segmentation to evaluate flow distribution from the inferior vena cava (IVC) and superior vena cava (SVC) to the left and right pulmonary arteries (LPA, RPA) and to characterize geometry (cross-sectional area, caval offset, vessel angle). Flow distribution results indicated SVC flow tended toward the RPA while IVC flow was more evenly distributed (SVC to RPA: 78% ± 28 [9-100], IVC to LPA: 54% ± 28 [4-98]). There was a significant relationship between pulmonary artery cross-sectional area and flow distribution (IVC to RPA: R(2)=0.50, P=0.02; SVC to LPA: R(2)=0.81, P=0.0004). Good agreement was found between observers and for flow distribution when compared to net flow values. Four-dimensional flow MRI was able to detect relationships between flow distribution and vessel geometry. Future studies are warranted to investigate the potential of patient specific hemodynamic analysis to improve diagnostic capability.

  17. Abnormal arterial flows by a distributed model of the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M; Westerhof, Berend E; Faber, Dirk J; Ramsay, Margaret M; Westerhof, Nico; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2006-11-01

    Modeling the propagation of blood pressure and flow along the fetoplacental arterial tree may improve interpretation of abnormal flow velocity waveforms in fetuses. The current models, however, either do not include a wide range of gestational ages or do not account for variation in anatomical, vascular, or rheological parameters. We developed a mathematical model of the pulsating fetoumbilical arterial circulation using Womersley's oscillatory flow theory and viscoelastic arterial wall properties. Arterial flow waves are calculated at different arterial locations from which the pulsatility index (PI) can be determined. We varied blood viscosity, placental and brain resistances, placental compliance, heart rate, stiffness of the arterial wall, and length of the umbilical arteries. The PI increases in the umbilical artery and decreases in the cerebral arteries, as a result of increasing placental resistance or decreasing brain resistance. Both changes in resistance decrease the flow through the placenta. An increased arterial stiffness increases the PIs in the entire fetoplacental circulation. Blood viscosity and peripheral bed compliance have limited influence on the flow profiles. Bradycardia and tachycardia increase and decrease the PI in all arteries, respectively. Umbilical arterial length has limited influence on the PI but affects the mean arterial pressure at the placental cord insertion. The model may improve the interpretation of arterial flow pulsations and thus may advance both the understanding of pathophysiological processes and clinical management.

  18. A study of natural circulation in the evaporator of a horizontal-tube heat recovery steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Pleshanov, K. A.; Sterkhov, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    Results obtained from investigations of stable natural circulation in an intricate circulation circuit with a horizontal layout of the tubes of evaporating surface having a negative useful head are presented. The possibility of making a shift from using multiple forced circulation organized by means of a circulation pump to natural circulation in vertical heat recovery steam generator is estimated. Criteria for characterizing the performance reliability and efficiency of a horizontal evaporator with negative useful head are proposed. The influence of various design solutions on circulation robustness is considered. With due regard of the optimal parameters, the most efficient and least costly methods are proposed for achieving more stable circulation in a vertical heat recovery steam generator when a shift is made from multiple forced to natural circulation. A procedure for calculating the circulation parameters and an algorithm for checking evaporator performance reliability are developed, and recommendations for the design of heat recovery steam generator, nonheated parts of natural circulation circuit, and evaporating surface are suggested.

  19. An Active Flow Circulation Controlled Flap Concept for General Aviation Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Viken, Sally A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2002-01-01

    A recent focus on revolutionary aerodynamic concepts has highlighted the technology needs of general aviation and personal aircraft. New and stringent restrictions on these types of aircraft have placed high demands on aerodynamic performance, noise, and environmental issues. Improved high lift performance of these aircraft can lead to slower takeoff and landing speeds that can be related to reduced noise and crash survivability issues. Circulation Control technologies have been around for 65 years, yet have been avoided due to trade offs of mass flow, pitching moment, perceived noise etc. The need to improve the circulation control technology for general aviation and personal air-vehicle applications is the focus of this paper. This report will describe the development of a 2-D General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) wing concept that utilizes a pulsed pneumatic flap.

  20. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  1. Simulation of tidal flow and circulation patterns in the Loxahatchee River Estuary, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Goodwin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional, vertically averaged, computer simulation model of the Loxahatchee River estuary show that under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, water circulation is dominated by freshwater inflow rather than by tidal influence. The model can simulate tidal flow and circulation in the Loxahatchee River estuary under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, but is limited, however, to low-flow and well mixed conditions. Computed patterns of residual water transport show a consistent seaward flow from the northwest fork through the central embayment and out Jupiter Inlet to the Atlantic Ocean. A large residual seaward flow was computed from the North Intracoastal Waterway to the inlet channel. Although the tide produces large flood and ebb flows in the estuary, tide-induced residual transport rates are low in comparison with freshwater-induced residual transport. Model investigations of partly mixed or stratified conditions in the estuary need to await development of systems capable of simulating three-dimensional flow patterns. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Mock circulatory system of the Fontan circulation to study respiration effects on venous flow behavior.

    PubMed

    Vukicevic, Marija; Chiulli, John A; Conover, Timothy; Pennati, Giancarlo; Hsia, Tain Yen; Figliola, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    We describe an in vitro model of the Fontan circulation with respiration to study subdiaphragmatic venous flow behavior. The venous and arterial connections of a total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) test section were coupled with a physical lumped parameter (LP) model of the circulation. Intrathoracic and subdiaphragmatic pressure changes associated with normal breathing were applied. This system was tuned for two patients (5 years, 0.67 m2; 10 years, 1.2 m2) to physiological values. System function was verified by comparison to the analytical model on which it was based and by consistency with published clinical measurements. Overall, subdiaphragmatic venous flow was influenced by respiration. Flow within the arteries and veins increased during inspiration but decreased during expiration, with retrograde flow in the inferior venous territories. System pressures and flows showed close agreement with the analytical LP model (p < 0.05). The ratio of the flow rates occurring during inspiration to expiration were within the clinical range of values reported elsewhere. The approach used to set up and control the model was effective and provided reasonable comparisons with clinical data.

  3. Nearfield Flow Topology of a Rounded Wingtip Subject to Circulation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edstrand, Adam; Cattafesta, Louis

    2014-11-01

    Trailing vortices are an adverse byproduct of lift causing induced drag, accounting for 40% of the total drag on aircraft, and impose a wake hazard on trailing aircraft (Spalart 1998). The metric used to quantify the wake hazard is the average maximum swirl velocity measured in a velocity snapshot. Circulation control uses tangential blowing along a rounded surface, causing the flow to wrap around the surface. This control methodology is extended to a NACA 0012 wingtip by blowing tangentially over a rounded wingtip to control the circulation of the trailing vortex. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements are acquired along the chord and downstream of the wingtip to characterize the effects of circulation control on vortex formation and evolution. Compared to the baseline case, the vortex core develops along the upper surface of the airfoil further upstream. This upstream development causes more rapid spatial growth of the vortex, resulting with a larger, less intense vortex than the baseline case. However, the circulation, five chords downstream of the leading edge, increases rather than decreases. This increase implies that favorable control of the circulation does not occur. However, there is a 30% reduction in the wake hazard metric due to the increased vortex size. ONR Grant N00014010824 and NSF PIRE Grant OISE-0968313.

  4. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  5. Computer program for natural gas flow through nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Subroutines, FORTRAN 4 type, were developed for calculating isentropic natural gas mass flow rate through nozzle. Thermodynamic functions covering compressibility, entropy, enthalpy, and specific heat are included.

  6. On a sparse pressure-flow rate condensation of rigid circulation models.

    PubMed

    Schiavazzi, D E; Hsia, T Y; Marsden, A L

    2016-07-26

    Cardiovascular simulation has shown potential value in clinical decision-making, providing a framework to assess changes in hemodynamics produced by physiological and surgical alterations. State-of-the-art predictions are provided by deterministic multiscale numerical approaches coupling 3D finite element Navier Stokes simulations to lumped parameter circulation models governed by ODEs. Development of next-generation stochastic multiscale models whose parameters can be learned from available clinical data under uncertainty constitutes a research challenge made more difficult by the high computational cost typically associated with the solution of these models. We present a methodology for constructing reduced representations that condense the behavior of 3D anatomical models using outlet pressure-flow polynomial surrogates, based on multiscale model solutions spanning several heart cycles. Relevance vector machine regression is compared with maximum likelihood estimation, showing that sparse pressure/flow rate approximations offer superior performance in producing working surrogate models to be included in lumped circulation networks. Sensitivities of outlets flow rates are also quantified through a Sobol׳ decomposition of their total variance encoded in the orthogonal polynomial expansion. Finally, we show that augmented lumped parameter models including the proposed surrogates accurately reproduce the response of multiscale models they were derived from. In particular, results are presented for models of the coronary circulation with closed loop boundary conditions and the abdominal aorta with open loop boundary conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. On a sparse pressure-flow rate condensation of rigid circulation models

    PubMed Central

    Schiavazzi, D. E.; Hsia, T. Y.; Marsden, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular simulation has shown potential value in clinical decision-making, providing a framework to assess changes in hemodynamics produced by physiological and surgical alterations. State-of-the-art predictions are provided by deterministic multiscale numerical approaches coupling 3D finite element Navier Stokes simulations to lumped parameter circulation models governed by ODEs. Development of next-generation stochastic multiscale models whose parameters can be learned from available clinical data under uncertainty constitutes a research challenge made more difficult by the high computational cost typically associated with the solution of these models. We present a methodology for constructing reduced representations that condense the behavior of 3D anatomical models using outlet pressure-flow polynomial surrogates, based on multiscale model solutions spanning several heart cycles. Relevance vector machine regression is compared with maximum likelihood estimation, showing that sparse pressure/flow rate approximations offer superior performance in producing working surrogate models to be included in lumped circulation networks. Sensitivities of outlets flow rates are also quantified through a Sobol’ decomposition of their total variance encoded in the orthogonal polynomial expansion. Finally, we show that augmented lumped parameter models including the proposed surrogates accurately reproduce the response of multiscale models they were derived from. In particular, results are presented for models of the coronary circulation with closed loop boundary conditions and the abdominal aorta with open loop boundary conditions. PMID:26671219

  8. Vertical circulation flows for vadose and groundwater zone in situ (bio-)remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, J.

    1995-12-31

    Vertical circulation flows have been established under in situ remediation techniques. Their hydraulic flow field permits physical and biological remediation of the saturated, as well as the unsaturated subsoil. A special advantage is that these techniques can be combined with any appropriate in-well or on-site technique. Even addition of nutrients and/or electron acceptors for stimulating biological degradation processes are possible. This paper discusses the different remediation techniques and the numerical results associated with the influence of hydrogeologic conditions on the system`s radius of influence and time behavior. Attention is focused on BTEX, PCE, and TCE.

  9. Prognostic residual mean flow in an ocean general circulation model and its relation to prognostic Eulerian mean flow

    DOE PAGES

    Saenz, Juan A.; Chen, Qingshan; Ringler, Todd

    2015-05-19

    Recent work has shown that taking the thickness-weighted average (TWA) of the Boussinesq equations in buoyancy coordinates results in exact equations governing the prognostic residual mean flow where eddy–mean flow interactions appear in the horizontal momentum equations as the divergence of the Eliassen–Palm flux tensor (EPFT). It has been proposed that, given the mathematical tractability of the TWA equations, the physical interpretation of the EPFT, and its relation to potential vorticity fluxes, the TWA is an appropriate framework for modeling ocean circulation with parameterized eddies. The authors test the feasibility of this proposition and investigate the connections between the TWAmore » framework and the conventional framework used in models, where Eulerian mean flow prognostic variables are solved for. Using the TWA framework as a starting point, this study explores the well-known connections between vertical transfer of horizontal momentum by eddy form drag and eddy overturning by the bolus velocity, used by Greatbatch and Lamb and Gent and McWilliams to parameterize eddies. After implementing the TWA framework in an ocean general circulation model, we verify our analysis by comparing the flows in an idealized Southern Ocean configuration simulated using the TWA and conventional frameworks with the same mesoscale eddy parameterization.« less

  10. Prognostic residual mean flow in an ocean general circulation model and its relation to prognostic Eulerian mean flow

    SciTech Connect

    Saenz, Juan A.; Chen, Qingshan; Ringler, Todd

    2015-05-19

    Recent work has shown that taking the thickness-weighted average (TWA) of the Boussinesq equations in buoyancy coordinates results in exact equations governing the prognostic residual mean flow where eddy–mean flow interactions appear in the horizontal momentum equations as the divergence of the Eliassen–Palm flux tensor (EPFT). It has been proposed that, given the mathematical tractability of the TWA equations, the physical interpretation of the EPFT, and its relation to potential vorticity fluxes, the TWA is an appropriate framework for modeling ocean circulation with parameterized eddies. The authors test the feasibility of this proposition and investigate the connections between the TWA framework and the conventional framework used in models, where Eulerian mean flow prognostic variables are solved for. Using the TWA framework as a starting point, this study explores the well-known connections between vertical transfer of horizontal momentum by eddy form drag and eddy overturning by the bolus velocity, used by Greatbatch and Lamb and Gent and McWilliams to parameterize eddies. After implementing the TWA framework in an ocean general circulation model, we verify our analysis by comparing the flows in an idealized Southern Ocean configuration simulated using the TWA and conventional frameworks with the same mesoscale eddy parameterization.

  11. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  12. Research on Flow Non-Uniformity in Main Circulation Loop of a CFB Boiler with Multiple Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Yang, H. R.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Wu, Y. X.; Yue, G. X.; Wang, Y. Z.

    Maldistribution of gas-solid tow-phase flow field in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) can cause a series of problems, such as thermal deviation, wear of water walls, etc. In this study, a cold model CFB facility, which was scaled down from a commercial 300MWe CFB boiler with three cyclones placed in an array, was built up and a series of experiments were conducted the flow non-uniformity. The results showed that in CFB boiler with multiple cyclones, the distribution of bed material in the circulation loops is different and uncertain. The gas-solid two-phase flow in the furnace is unbiased, even the circulating rates in the circulation loops are different. The circulating rate in the middle loop is larger than that in the side loops. The difference is less than 10%.

  13. Macrolide antibiotics removal using a circulating TiO2-coated paper photoreactor: parametric study and hydrodynamic flow characterization.

    PubMed

    Ounnar, Amel; Bouzaza, Abdelkrim; Favier, Lidia; Bentahar, Fatiha

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigates the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of biorecalcitrant macrolide antibiotics in a circulating tubular photoreactor. As target pollutants, spiramycin (SPM) and tylosin (TYL) were considered in this study. The photoreactor leads to the use of an immobilized titanium dioxide on non-woven paper under artificial UV-lamp irradiation. Maximum removal efficiency was achieved at the optimum conditions of natural pH, low pollutant concentration and a 0.35 L min(-1) flow rate. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model was used to fit experimental results and the model constants were determined. Moreover, the total organic carbon analysis reveals that SPM and TYL mineralization is not complete. In addition, the study of the residence time distribution allowed us to investigate the flow regime of the reactor. Electrical energy consumption for photocatalytic degradation of macrolides using circulating TiO2-coated paper photoreactor was lower compared with some reported photoreactors used for the elimination of pharmaceutic compounds. A repetitive reuse of the immobilized catalyst was also studied in order to check its photoactivity performance.

  14. Natural circulation loop using liquid nitrogen for cryo-detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yeon Suk

    2014-01-29

    The natural circulation loop is designed for the cryogenic insert in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Sensitivity is the key parameter of a FTICR mass spectrometer and the cryo-cooling of the pre-amplifier can reduce the thermal noise level and thereby improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The pre-amplifier consisted of non-magnetic materials is thermally connected to the cooling loop which is passing through the flange maintaining ultra-high vacuum in the ion cell. The liquid nitrogen passes through inside of the loop to cool the pre-amplifier indirectly. At the end, a cryocooler is located to re-condense nitrogen vapor generated due to the heat from the pre-amplifier. The circulating fluid removes heat from the pre-amplifier and transports it to the cryocooler or heat sink. In this paper the natural circulation loop for cryogenic pre-amplifier is introduced for improving the sensitivity of cryo-detector. In addition, the initial cool-down of the system by a cryocooler is presented and the temperature of the radiation shield is discussed with respect to the thickness of shield and the thermal radiation load.

  15. Natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100, 550 kWe power system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-06-01

    This research investigated the decay heat removal from the SP-100 reactor core of a 550-kWe power system for a lunar outpost by natural circulation of lithium coolant. A transient model that simulates the decay heat removal loop (DHRL) of the power system was developed and used to assess the system's decay heat removal capability. The effects of the surface area of the decay heat rejection radiator, the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger (DHE) flow duct, the elevation of the DHE, and the diameter of the rise and down pipes in the DHRL on the decay heat removal capability were examined. Also, to determine the applicability of test results at earth gravity to actual system performance on the lunar surface, the effect of the gravity constant (1 g and 1/6 g) on the thermal behavior of the system after shutdown was investigated.

  16. Natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100, 550 kWe power system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    This research investigated the decay heat removal from the SP-100 reactor core of a 550-kWe power system for a lunar outpost by natural circulation of lithium coolant. A transient model that simulates the decay heat removal loop (DHRL) of the power system was developed and used to assess the system's decay heat removal capability. The effects of the surface area of the decay heat rejection radiator, the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger (DHE) flow duct, the elevation of the DHE, and the diameter of the rise and down pipes in the DHRL on the decay heat removal capability were examined. Also, to determine the applicability of test results at earth gravity to actual system performance on the lunar surface, the effect of the gravity constant (1 g and 1/6 g) on the thermal behavior of the system after shutdown was investigated.

  17. Studying the role of macrophages in circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaojun; Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a very complicated multi-step process and accounts for the low survival rate of the cancerous patients. To metastasize, the malignant cells must detach from the primary tumor and migrate to secondary sites in the body through either blood or lymph circulation. Macrophages appear to be directly involved in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of macrophages in affecting cancer metastasis has not been fully elucidated. Here, we have utilized an emerging technique, namely in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) to study the depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells in mice and how depletion of macrophages by the liposome-encapsulated clodronate affects the depletion kinetics. Our results show different depletion kinetics of PC-3 cells between macrophage-deficient group and the control group. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in macrophage-deficient group decreases in a slower manner compared to the control mice group. The differences in depletion kinetics indicate that the absence of macrophages facilitates the stay of prostate cancer cells in circulation. We speculate that macrophages might be able to arrest, phagocytose and digest PC-3 cells. Therefore, the phagocytosis may mainly contribute to the depletion kinetic differences. The developed methods here would be useful to study the relationship between macrophages and tumor metastasis in small animal cancer model.

  18. Tomographic Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometry for Enumeration of Rare Circulating Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric William

    2011-12-01

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations is important in many areas of preclinical and clinical biomedical research including the study of metastasized cancers, T-Lymphotocyes and hematopoietic stem cells. Normally this is done either by extraction and analysis of small blood samples or more recently using microscopy-based in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry. In this thesis, a new technological approach to this problem is described using detection of diffuse fluorescent light from relatively large blood vessels in vivo. The 'tomographic diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer' (TDFFC) uses modulated lasers to illuminate a mouse limb and an array of optical fibers coupled to a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube array operating in photon counting mode to detect weak fluorescence signals from cells. It is first demonstrated that the TDFFC instrument is capable of detecting fluorescent microspheres and Vybrant-DiD labeled cells with excellent accuracy in an optical flow phantom with similar size, optical properties, linear flow rates and autofluorescence as a mouse limb. Preliminary data demonstrating that the TDFFC is capable of detecting circulating cells in nude mice in vivo is also shown. Finally, a number of methods for performing coarse tomographic localization of fluorescent cells within the cross-section of a mouse limb using TDFFC data sets are described, and the feasibility of this approach is demonstrated using in vitro data sets. In principle, this device would allow interrogation of the whole blood volume of a mouse in minutes, with several orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement compared with current approaches.

  19. Simulations of Flow Circulations and Atrazine Concentrations in a Midwest U.S. Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xianggui; Gu, Roy R.; Guo, Chuling; Wang, Kui; Li, Shijie

    Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the spring for pre-emergent weed control in the corn cropping area in the Midwestern United States. A frequent high level of herbicide concentrations in reservoirs is a great concern for public health and aquatic ecosystems. In this study, a two-dimensional hydrodynamics and toxic contaminant transport model was applied to Saylorville Reservoir, Iowa, USA. The model simulates physical, chemical, and biological processes and predicts unsteady vertical and longitudinal distributions of a toxic chemical. Model results were validated by measured temperatures and atrazine concentrations. Simulated flow velocities, water temperatures, and chemical concentrations demonstrated that the spatial variation of atrazine concentrations was largely affected by seasonal flow circulation patterns in the reservoir. In particular, the simulated fate and transport of atrazine showed the effect of flow circulation on spatial distribution of atrazine during summer months as the river flow formed an underflow within the reservoir and resulted in greater concentrations near the surface of the reservoir. Atrazine concentrations in the reservoir peaked around the end of May and early June. A thorough understanding of the fate and transport of atrazine in the reservoir can assist in developing operation and pollution prevention strategies with respect to timing, amount, and depth of withdrawal. The responses of atrazine transport to various boundary conditions provide useful information in assessing environmental impact of alternative upstream watershed management practices on the quality of reservoir water.

  20. Continuous Flow Deformability-Based Separation of Circulating Tumor Cells Using Microfluidic Ratchets.

    PubMed

    Park, Emily S; Jin, Chao; Guo, Quan; Ang, Richard R; Duffy, Simon P; Matthews, Kerryn; Azad, Arun; Abdi, Hamidreza; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Bazov, Jenny; Chi, Kim N; Black, Peter C; Ma, Hongshen

    2016-04-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer tremendous potential for the detection and characterization of cancer. A key challenge for their isolation and subsequent analysis is the extreme rarity of these cells in circulation. Here, a novel label-free method is described to enrich viable CTCs directly from whole blood based on their distinct deformability relative to hematological cells. This mechanism leverages the deformation of single cells through tapered micrometer scale constrictions using oscillatory flow in order to generate a ratcheting effect that produces distinct flow paths for CTCs, leukocytes, and erythrocytes. A label-free separation of circulating tumor cells from whole blood is demonstrated, where target cells can be separated from background cells based on deformability despite their nearly identical size. In doping experiments, this microfluidic device is able to capture >90% of cancer cells from unprocessed whole blood to achieve 10(4) -fold enrichment of target cells relative to leukocytes. In patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, where CTCs are not significantly larger than leukocytes, CTCs can be captured based on deformability at 25× greater yield than with the conventional CellSearch system. Finally, the CTCs separated using this approach are collected in suspension and are available for downstream molecular characterization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Natural laminar flow airfoil analysis and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of an airfoil for a large commercial transport cruising at Mach 0.8 and the use of advanced computer techniques to perform the analysis are described. Incorporation of the airfoil into a natural laminar flow transport configuration is addressed and a comparison of fuel requirements and operating costs between the natural laminar flow transport and an equivalent turbulent flow transport is addressed.

  2. Observation of Oil Flow Characteristics in Rolling Piston Rotary Compressor for Reducing Oil Circulation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. j.; Noh, K. Y.; Min, B. C.; Yang, J. S.; Choi, G. M.; Kim, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    The oil circulation rate (OCR) of the rolling piston rotary compressor is a significant factor which affects the performance of refrigeration system. The increase of oil discharge causes decreasing of the heat transfer efficiency in the heat exchanger, pressure drop and lack of oil in lubricate part in compressor. In this study, the internal flow of compressor was visualized to figure out the oil droplet flow characteristics. The experiments and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted in various frequency of compressor to observe the effect of operation frequency on oil droplet flow characteristics for reducing OCR. In situ, measurement of oil droplet diameter and velocity were conducted by using high speed image visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The flow paths were dominated by copper wire parts driving the motor which was inserted in compressor. In order to verify the reliability of CFD simulation, the tendency of oil flow characteristics in each flow path and the compressor operating conditions were applied in CFD simulation. For reducing OCR, the structure such as vane, disk and ring is installed in the compressor to restrict the main flow path of oil particle. The effect of additional structure for reducing OCR was evaluated using CFD simulation and the results were discussed in detail.

  3. The dynamics of a rigid body in potential flow with circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vankerschaver, J.; Kanso, E.; Marsden, J. E.

    2010-10-01

    We consider the motion of a two-dimensional body of arbitrary shape in a planar irrotational, incompressible fluid with a given amount of circulation around the body. We derive the equations of motion for this system by performing symplectic reduction with respect to the group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms and obtain the relevant Poisson structures after a further Poisson reduction with respect to the group of translations and rotations. In this way, we recover the equations of motion given for this system by Chaplygin and Lamb, and we give a geometric interpretation for the Kutta-Zhukowski force as a curvature-related effect. In addition, we show that the motion of a rigid body with circulation can be understood as a geodesic flow on a central extension of the special Euclidian group SE(2), and we relate the cocycle in the description of this central extension to a certain curvature tensor.

  4. Evidence for the circulation of antimicrobial-resistant strains and genes in nature and especially between humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, M

    2012-04-01

    The concern over antibiotic-resistant bacteria producing human infections that are difficult to treat has led to a proliferation of studies in recent years investigating resistance in livestock, food products, the environment and people, as well as in the mechanisms of transfer of the genetic elements of resistance between bacteria, and the routes, or risk pathways, by which the spread of resistance might occur. The possibility of transfer of resistant genetic elements between bacteria in mixed populations adds many additional and complex potential routes of spread. There is now considerable evidence that transfer of antimicrobial resistance from food-producing animals to humans directly via the food chain is a likely route of spread. The application of animal wastes to farmland and subsequent leaching into watercourses has also been shown to lead to many potential, but less well-documented, pathways for spread. Often, however, where contamination of water sources, processed foods, and other environmental sites is concerned, specific routes of circulation are unclear and may well involve human sources of contamination. Examination of water sources in particular may be difficult due to dilution and their natural flow. Also, as meat is comparatively easy to examine, and is frequently suspected of being a source of spread, there is some bias in favour of studying this vehicle. Such complexities mean that, with the evidence currently available, it is not possible to prioritise the importance of potential risk pathways and circulation routes.

  5. Changes in equatorial zonal circulations and precipitation in the context of the global warming and natural modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong-Hee; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2017-07-01

    The strengthening and westward shift of Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) is observed during the recent decades. However, the relative roles of global warming and natural variability on the change in PWC unclearly remain. By conducting numerical atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments using the spatial SST patterns in the global warming and natural modes which are obtained by the multi-variate EOF analysis from three variables including precipitation, sea surface temperature (SST), and divergent zonal wind, we indicated that the westward shift and strengthening of PWC are caused by the global warming SST pattern in the global warming mode and the negative Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation-like SST pattern in the natural mode. The SST distribution of the Pacific Ocean (PO) has more influence on the changes in equatorial zonal circulations and tropical precipitation than that of the Indian Ocean (IO) and Atlantic Ocean (AO). The change in precipitation is also related to the equatorial zonal circulations variation through the upward and downward motions of the circulations. The IO and AO SST anomalies in the global warming mode can affect on the changes in equatorial zonal circulations, but the influence of PO SST disturbs the changes in Indian Walker Circulation and Atlantic Walker Circulation which are affected by the anomalous SST over the IO and AO. The zonal shift of PWC is found to be highly associated with a zonal gradient of SST over the PO through the idealized numerical AGCM experiments and predictions of CMIP5 models.

  6. Research of natural circulation in the experimental helium loop of STU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    František, Urban; František, RidzoÅ; Branislav, Knížat; Róbert, Olšiak; Jozef, Bereznai; Peter, Mlynár

    2017-09-01

    On the STU experimental helium loop, natural circulation of the helium by residual thermal power of the reactor up to 220 kW, temperature of the helium from l50°C to 520°C and helium pressure up to 7,0 MPa is investigated. Selected measurements are analysed. Measurements realized on experimental device with different operational states of the STU helium loop can be used for cooling loops design corrections and validation of the computational algorithms of the passive heat removal from ALLEGRO nuclear reactor.

  7. EFFECTS OF INITIAL FLOW ON CLOSE-IN PLANET ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thrastarson, Heidar Th.; Cho, James Y-K. E-mail: J.Cho@qmul.ac.u

    2010-06-10

    We use a general circulation model to study the three-dimensional (3D) flow and temperature distributions of atmospheres on tidally synchronized extrasolar planets. In this work, we focus on the sensitivity of the evolution to the initial flow state, which has not received much attention in 3D modeling studies. We find that different initial states lead to markedly different distributions-even under the application of strong forcing (large day-night temperature difference with a short 'thermal drag time') that may be representative of close-in planets. This is in contrast with the results or assumptions of many published studies. In general, coherent jets and vortices (and their associated temperature distributions) characterize the flow, and they evolve differently in time, depending on the initial condition. If the coherent structures reach a quasi-stationary state, their spatial locations still vary. The result underlines the fact that circulation models are currently unsuitable for making quantitative predictions (e.g., location and size of a 'hot spot') without better constrained, and well-posed, initial conditions.

  8. Continuous enrichment of circulating tumor cells using a microfluidic lateral flow filtration chip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Hyun, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung-Il; Kang, Ji-Yoon; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2015-01-16

    The isolation and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) is of great importance in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Highly sensitive detection of CTCs can be very difficult because they are extremely rare (i.e., 1-5 CTCs per 10(9) erythrocytes) in blood. Recently, various devices have been developed that exploit biochemical (affinity-based) and physical (size or density) methods. Antibody-based isolation has its own limitations, as the expression level of the epitopes for an antibody varies due to the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Harsh conditions associated with physical methods can cause the deformation and damage of CTCs during the isolation process. Here, we propose a microfluidic lateral flow filtration (μ-LaFF) chip in which lateral flow was combined with vertical flow into the filter to capture the CTCs gently. The CTCs experienced weak shear flow owing to the lateral flow and traveled alongside the filter channel until finally being captured. The vertical flow in the filter held the captured cells tightly and served as an exit for uncaptured hematological cells (white and red blood cells). From our μ-LaFF chip we obtained a high capture efficiency (95%) and purity (99%), minimizing any damage to the CTCs. Our μ-LaFF technology is expected to be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of various cancers.

  9. Numerical simulation of blood flow and pressure drop in the pulmonary arterial and venous circulation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M Umar; Vaughan, Gareth D A; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin; Peskin, Charles S; Olufsen, Mette S; Hill, N A

    2014-10-01

    A novel multiscale mathematical and computational model of the pulmonary circulation is presented and used to analyse both arterial and venous pressure and flow. This work is a major advance over previous studies by Olufsen et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 28:1281-1299, 2012) which only considered the arterial circulation. For the first three generations of vessels within the pulmonary circulation, geometry is specified from patient-specific measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood flow and pressure in the larger arteries and veins are predicted using a nonlinear, cross-sectional-area-averaged system of equations for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube. Inflow into the main pulmonary artery is obtained from MRI measurements, while pressure entering the left atrium from the main pulmonary vein is kept constant at the normal mean value of 2 mmHg. Each terminal vessel in the network of 'large' arteries is connected to its corresponding terminal vein via a network of vessels representing the vascular bed of smaller arteries and veins. We develop and implement an algorithm to calculate the admittance of each vascular bed, using bifurcating structured trees and recursion. The structured-tree models take into account the geometry and material properties of the 'smaller' arteries and veins of radii ≥ 50 μm. We study the effects on flow and pressure associated with three classes of pulmonary hypertension expressed via stiffening of larger and smaller vessels, and vascular rarefaction. The results of simulating these pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment for circulatory diseases within the lung.

  10. Numerical simulation of blood flow and pressure drop in the pulmonary arterial and venous circulation

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, M. Umar; Vaughan, Gareth D.A.; Sainsbury, Christopher; Johnson, Martin; Peskin, Charles S.; Olufsen, Mette S.; Hill, N.A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiscale mathematical and computational model of the pulmonary circulation is presented and used to analyse both arterial and venous pressure and flow. This work is a major advance over previous studies by Olufsen and coworkers (Ottesen et al., 2003; Olufsen et al., 2012) which only considered the arterial circulation. For the first three generations of vessels within the pulmonary circulation, geometry is specified from patient-specific measurements obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood flow and pressure in the larger arteries and veins are predicted using a nonlinear, cross-sectional-area-averaged system of equations for a Newtonian fluid in an elastic tube. Inflow into the main pulmonary artery is obtained from MRI measurements, while pressure entering the left atrium from the main pulmonary vein is kept constant at the normal mean value of 2 mmHg. Each terminal vessel in the network of ‘large’ arteries is connected to its corresponding terminal vein via a network of vessels representing the vascular bed of smaller arteries and veins. We develop and implement an algorithm to calculate the admittance of each vascular bed, using bifurcating structured trees and recursion. The structured-tree models take into account the geometry and material properties of the ‘smaller’ arteries and veins of radii ≥ 50µm. We study the effects on flow and pressure associated with three classes of pulmonary hypertension expressed via stiffening of larger and smaller vessels, and vascular rarefaction. The results of simulating these pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment of circulatory diseases within the lung. PMID:24610385

  11. Investigations on natural circulation in reactor models and shutdown heat removal systems for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Weinberg, D.; Marten, K. ); Ieda, Yoshiaki )

    1989-11-01

    For sodium-cooled pool-type reactors, studies have been undertaken to remove the decay heat by natural convection alone, as in the case of failure of all power supplies. For this purpose, four immersion coolers (ICs), two each installed at a 180-deg circumferential position with respect to the others, are arranged within the reactor tank. They are connected with natural-drift air coolers through independent intermediate circuits. The primary sodium in the tank as well as the secondary sodium in the intermediate loop circulate by natural convection. The general functioning of this passive shutdown decay heat removal (DHR) system is demonstrated in 1:20 and 1:5 scale test models using water as a simulant fluid for sodium. The model design is based on the thermohydraulics similarity criteria. In the RAMONA three-dimensional 1:20 scale model, experiments were carried out to clarify the steady-state in-vessel thermohydraulics for different parameter combinations (core power, radial power distribution across the core, DHR by 2 or 4 ICs in operation, above-core structure geometry and position, different IC designs). For all mentioned parameters, temperatures and their fluctuations were measured and used to indicate isotherms and lines of identical temperature fluctuations. The flow patterns were observed visually. The experiments were recalculated by an updated version of the single-phase three-dimensional thermohydraulics code COMMIX.

  12. Flow Regime Study in a High Density Circulating Fluidized Bed Riser with an Abrupt Exit

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Shadle, L.J.; Yue, P.C.; Monazam, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regime study was conducted in a 0.3 m diameter, 15.5 m height circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser with an abrupt exit at the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. Local particle velocities were measured at various radial positions and riser heights using an optical fiber probe. On-line measurement of solid circulating rate was continuously recorded by the Spiral. Glass beads of mean diameter 61 μm and particle density of 2,500 kg/m3 were used as bed material. The CFB riser was operated at various superficial gas velocities ranging from 3 to 7.6 m/s and solid mass flux from 20 to 550 kg/m2-s. At a constant riser gas velocity, transition from fast fluidization to dense suspension upflow (DSU) regime started at the bottom of the riser with increasing solid flux. Except at comparatively low riser gas velocity and solid flux, the apparent solid holdup at the top exit region was higher than the middle section of the riser. The solid fraction at this top region could be much higher than 7% under high riser gas velocity and solid mass flux. The local particle velocity showed downward flow near the wall at the top of the riser due to its abrupt exit. This abrupt geometry reflected the solids and, therefore, caused solid particles traveling downward along the wall. However, at location below, but near, the top of the riser the local particle velocities were observed flowing upward at the wall. Therefore, DSU was identified in the upper region of the riser with an abrupt exit while the fully developed region, lower in the riser, was still exhibiting core-annular flow structure. Our data were compared with the flow regime boundaries proposed by Kim et al. [1] for distinguishing the dilute pneumatic transport, fast fluidization, and DSU.

  13. Diurnal Variations of Circulating Extracellular Vesicles Measured by Nano Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Camacho, Virginia; Felton, Edward J.; Khoory, Joseph; Kreimer, Simion; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Mantel, Pierre-Yves; Jones, Jennifer; Akuthota, Praveen; Das, Saumya; Ghiran, Ionita

    2016-01-01

    The identification of extracellular vesicles (EVs) as intercellular conveyors of biological information has recently emerged as a novel paradigm in signaling, leading to the exploitation of EVs and their contents as biomarkers of various diseases. However, whether there are diurnal variations in the size, number, and tissue of origin of blood EVs is currently not known, and could have significant implications when using EVs as biomarkers for disease progression. Currently available technologies for the measurement of EV size and number are either time consuming, require specialized equipment, or lack sufficient accuracy across a range of EV sizes. Flow cytometry represents an attractive alternative to these methods; however, traditional flow cytometers are only capable of measuring particles down to 500 nm, which is significantly larger than the average and median sizes of plasma EVs. Utilizing a Beckman Coulter MoFlo XDP flow cytometer with NanoView module, we employed nanoscale flow cytometry (termed nanoFCM) to examine the relative number and scatter distribution of plasma EVs at three different time points during the day in 6 healthy adults. Analysis of liposomes and plasma EVs proved that nanoFCM is capable of detecting biologically-relevant vesicles down to 100 nm in size. With this high resolution configuration, we observed variations in the relative size (FSC/SSC distributions) and concentration (proportions) of EVs in healthy adult plasma across the course of a day, suggesting that there are diurnal variations in the number and size distribution of circulating EV populations. The use of nanoFCM provides a valuable tool for the study of EVs in both health and disease; however, additional refinement of nanoscale flow cytometric methods is needed for use of these instruments for quantitative particle counting and sizing. Furthermore, larger scale studies are necessary to more clearly define the diurnal variations in circulating EVs, and thus further inform

  14. Real-time photoacoustic flow cytography and photothermolysis of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Wang, Lidai; Shi, Junhui; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ruiying; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for as many as 90% of cancer-related deaths, and the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma, has a high propensity for metastasis. Since hematogenous spread of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is cancer's main route of metastasis, detecting and destroying CTCs can impede metastasis and improve patients' prognoses. Extensive studies employing exogenous agents to detect tumor-specific biomarkers and guide therapeutics to CTCs have achieved promising results, but biosafety remains a critical concern. Taking another approach, physical detection and destruction of CTCs is a safer way to evaluate and reduce metastasis risks. Melanoma cells strongly express melanosomes, providing a striking absorption contrast with the blood background in the red to near-infrared spectrum. Exploiting this intrinsic optical absorption contrast of circulating melanoma cells, we coupled dual-wavelength photoacoustic flow cytography with a nanosecond-pulsed laser killing mechanism that specifically targets melanoma CTCs. We have successfully achieved in vivo label-free imaging of rare single CTCs and CTC clusters in mice. Further, the photoacoustic signal from a CTC immediately hardware-triggers a lethal pinpoint laser irradiation that lyses it on the spot in a thermally confined manner. Our technology can facilitate early inhibition of metastasis by clearing circulating tumor cells from vasculature.

  15. Role of macrophages in circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Wei, Xunbin

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages appear to be directly involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, the role of macrophages in influencing tumor metastasis has not been fully understood. Here, we have used an emerging technique, namely in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) to study the depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells in mice and how depletion of macrophages by the liposome-encapsulated clodronate affects the depletion kinetics. Our results show different depletion kinetics of PC-3 prostate cancer cells between macrophage-deficient group and the control group. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in macrophage-deficient group decreases in a slower manner compared to the control mice group. The differences in depletion kinetics indicate that the absence of macrophages might facilitate the stay of prostate tumor cells in circulation. We speculate that macrophages might be able to arrest, phagocytose and digest PC-3 cancer cells. Therefore, the phagocytosis may mainly contribute to the differences in depletion kinetics. The developed methods here would be useful to study the relationship between macrophages and cancer metastasis in small animal tumor model.

  16. Pressure distributions and oil-flow patterns for a swept circulation-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Wood, Norman J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure distributions and photographs of oil flow patterns are presented for a circulation control wing. The model was an aspect ratio four semispan wing mounted on the side wall of the NASA Ames Transonic Wind Tunnel. The airfoil was a 20 percent thick ellipse, modified with circular leading and trailing edges of 4 percent radius, and had a 25.4 cm constant chord. This configuration does not represent a specific wing design, but is generic. A full span, tangetial, rearward blowing, circulation control slot was incorporated ahead of the trailing edge on the upper surface. The wing was tested at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.75 at sweep angle of 0 to 45 deg with internal to external pressure ratios of 1.0 to 3.0. Lift and pitching momemt coefficients were obtained from measured pressure distributions at five span stations. When the conventional corrections resulting from sweep angle are applied to the lift and moment of circulation control sections, no additional corrections are necessary to account for changes in blowing efficiency. This is demonstrated for an aft sweep angle of 45 deg. An empirical technique for estimating the downwash distribution of a swept wing was validated.

  17. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing changes caused by dredge and fill in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1991-01-01

    Hillsborough Bay, Florida, underwent extensive physical changes between 1880 and 1972 because of the construction of islands, channels, and shoreline fills. These changes resulted in a progressive reduction in the quantity of tidal water that enters and leaves the bay. Dredging and filling also changed the magnitude and direction of tidal flow in most of the bay. A two-dimensional, finite-difference hydrodynamic model was used to simulate flood, ebb, and residual water transport for physical conditions in Hillsborough Bay and the northeastern part of Middle Tampa Bay during 1880, 1972, and 1985. The calibrated and verified model was used to evaluate cumulative water-transport changes resulting from construction in the study area between 1880 and 1972. The model also was used to evaluate water-transport changes as a result of a major Federal dredging project completed in 1985. The model indicates that transport changes resulting from the Federal dredging project are much less areally extensive than the corresponding transport changes resulting from construction between 1880 and 1972. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in flood and ebb water transport were computed to occur over only about 8 square miles of the 65-square-mile study area between 1972 and 1985. Model results indicate that construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over about 23 square miles. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in residual water transport were computed to occur over only 17 square miles between 1972 and 1985. Between 1880 and 1972, changes of similar magnitude were computed to occur over an area of 45 square miles. Model results also reveal historical tide-induced circulation patterns. The patterns consist of a series of about 8 interconnected circulatory features in 1880 and as many as 15 in 1985. Dredging- and construction-caused changes in number, size, position, shape, and intensity of the circulatory features increase tide

  18. Improved Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometer Prototype for High Sensitivity Detection of Rare Circulating Cells In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestana, Noah Benjamin

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations is important in many areas of pre-clinical and clinical biomedical research, for example, in the study of cancer metastasis or the immune response following tissue and organ transplants. Normally this is done "ex-vivo" by drawing and purifying a small volume of blood and then analyzing it with flow cytometry, hemocytometry or microfludic devices, but the sensitivity of these techniques are poor and the process of handling samples has been shown to affect cell viability and behavior. More recently "in vivo flow cytometry" (IVFC) techniques have been developed where fluorescently-labeled cells flowing in a small blood vessel in the ear or retina are analyzed, but the sensitivity is generally poor due to the small sampling volume. To address this, our group recently developed a method known as "Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometry" (DFFC) that allows detection and counting of rare circulating cells with diffuse photons, offering extremely high single cell counting sensitivity. In this thesis, an improved DFFC prototype was designed and validated. The chief improvements were three-fold, i) improved optical collection efficiency, ii) improved detection electronics, and iii) development of a method to mitigate motion artifacts during in vivo measurements. In combination, these improvements yielded an overall instrument detection sensitivity better than 1 cell/mL in vivo, which is the most sensitive IVFC system reported to date. Second, development and validation of a low-cost microfluidic device reader for analysis of ocular fluids is described. We demonstrate that this device has equivalent or better sensitivity and accuracy compared a fluorescence microscope, but at an order-of-magnitude reduced cost with simplified operation. Future improvements to both instruments are also discussed.

  19. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing changes caused by dredge and fill in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1987-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida, underwent extensive physical changes between 1880 and 1972 because of construction of causeways, islands, channels, and shoreline fills. These changes resulted in a progressive reduction in the quantity of tidal water that enters and leaves the bay. Dredging and filling also changed the magnitude and direction of tidal flows in large parts of the bay. A two-dimensional, finite-difference, hydrodynamic model was used to simulate flood, ebb, and residual transport of both water and a dissolved constituent for the physical conditions that existed in Tampa Bay during 1880 and 1972 and for the conditions that are likely to exist in 1985. The calibrated and verified model was used to hindcast water- and constituent-transport changes caused by construction in the bay between 1880 and 1972. The model was used also to forecast changes that can be expected to occur as a result of a major Federal dredging project scheduled for completion in 1985. The model forecasted transport changes caused by the Federal dredging project to be much less areally extensive than the corresponding transport changes caused by construction in Tampa Bay between 1880 and 1972. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in flood and ebb transport were computed to occur over only 8 or 9 square miles of the bay's 390-square-mile surface area between 1972 and 1985. The model computed that construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over 58 square miles of the bay. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in residual transport were computed to occur over 58 square miles of the bay between 1972 and 1985. According to the model simulation, construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over 167 square miles. Computations reveal historical tide-induced circulation patterns. The patterns consist of a series of about 20 interconnected circulatory features that range in diameter from 1 to 6 miles. Dredging- and construction

  20. Variable-density saturated flow with modified Darcy's law: The salt lake problem and circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooding, Robin A.

    2007-02-01

    For unsteady variable-density seepage flow, alternative solutions are obtained by taking, respectively, the curl and the divergence of a linear form of Darcy's law, and solving each problem directly, using compatible boundary conditions. This gives a vector potential formulation depending upon the horizontal density gradient, and a pressure formulation depending upon the vertical density gradient, resulting in two complementary solutions. Two velocity fields are obtained by taking the curl of the vector potential solution, and by solving Darcy's law using the gradient of the pressure solution, and corresponding vector potentials are obtained, fairly symmetrically, from these velocities. The novelty is that a linear combination of the two solutions can be made by simple addition or subtraction, with independent scalar coefficients, having broader scope than each of the alternative solutions alone. A two-dimensional model, based on convective plumes in a Hele-Shaw experiment with a macroscopic Rayleigh number of 3975, is treated as a benchmark salt lake problem, having a uniform evaporation layer with 1% noise along one-third part of the upper boundary, with appropriate saline recharge. The coefficients are optimized for maximum circulation. This determines the ratio of the pressure-based solution to the vector potential-based solution, modifying the Rayleigh number downward to an effective value of 3455. Numerical streamlines reveal secondary flow typical of Henry circulation, measured by a peak stream function equal to the circulation flux. From finger geometry, there is better agreement between the numerically calculated plumes and the experimental plumes than has been achieved previously.

  1. Large-eddy simulations of flow around a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2008-11-01

    Circulation control, proposed in NASA's Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) concept, has the potential to increase air-traffic throughput and reduce the noise footprint. Circulation control obtains a substantial increase in lift coefficient by using a wall-jet that blows tangentially on a rounded (Coanda) surface deflected at the trailing edge. The flow has proven to be difficult to reliably predict using Reynolds-averaged models. We undertake large-eddy simulations to better understand underlying mechanisms and create a database for modelers. Simulations are patterned after Novak et al.'s (1987) experiment, which, despite its faults, is the best documented to date. A Reynolds number of 10̂6 and two cases with low and high blowing are considered using Stanford's unstructured solver CDP. The upper surface begins with laminar to turbulent transition following a region of weak shear stress. Then strong favorable pressure gradient as the jet slot is approached leads to a raised log-law. There exists a region over the Coanda surface where the mean flow development collapses very well in wall-jet similarity coordinates, indicating that a portion of the near-wall region maintains classical wall-jet characteristics. At the present time, the lower surface has delayed transition due to lack of tripping in the simulations and considerable discrepancies with the experiments for second-order statistics.

  2. In vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots using negative phototothermal and photoacoustic contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Keyrouz, Salah G.; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional photothermal (PT) and photoacousic (PA) imaging, spectroscopy, and cytometry are preferentially based on positive PT/PA effects, when signals are above background. Here, we introduce PT/PA technique based on detection of negative signals below background. Among various new applications, we propose label-free in vivo flow cytometry of circulating clots. No method has been developed for the early detection of clots of different compositions as a source of severe thromboembolisms including ischemia at strokes and myocardial dysfunction at heart attack. When a low-absorbing, platelet-rich clot passes a laser-irradiated vessel volume, a transient decrease in local absorption results in an ultrasharp negative PA hole in blood background. Using this phenomenon alone or in combination with positive contrasts, we demonstrated identification of white, red and mixed clots on a mouse model of myocardial infarction and human blood. The concentration and size of clots were measured with threshold down to few clots in the entire circulation with size as low as 20 µm. This multiparameter diagnostic platform using portable personal high-speed flow cytometer with negative dynamic contrast mode has potential to real-time defining risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and for prognosis and prevention of stroke or use clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy. Possibility for label-free detection of platelets, leukocytes, tumor cells or targeting them by negative PA probes (e.g., nonabsorbing beads or bubbles) is also highlighted. PMID:21976458

  3. Studying depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  4. Depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells studied by in vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangda; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  5. Posterior circulation cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome after high flow external carotid artery to middle cerebral artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Quach, Eric T; Gonzalez, Andres A; Shilian, Parastou; Russin, Jonathan J

    2015-09-01

    We present the first report, to our knowledge, in which revascularization of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) with a high flow extracranial-intracranial procedure resulted in symptomatic hyperemia of the posterior circulation. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) is a poorly understood phenomenon that is classically seen in the distribution of a revascularized artery. A 37-year-old woman presented with a 3 month history of cognitive and speech difficulties, persistent headaches, weakness, numbness, and paresthesia which was worse in the right extremities and face. She was found to have bilateral watershed infarcts worse in the left cerebral hemisphere, severe bilateral stenosis of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery, and a small left superior hypophyseal aneurysm. The patient underwent left cerebral hemisphere revascularization with a high flow external carotid artery to MCA bypass with aneurysm trapping. During skin closure, significant changes were seen in her bilateral upper extremity motor-evoked potentials. The patient's postoperative exam was noted for an intermittent inability to follow commands, bilateral upper extremity weakness, vertical nystagmus, and alogia that all dramatically improved with strict blood pressure control. Postoperative perfusion imaging revealed posterior circulation hyperemia. This patient highlights the potential for hyperemic complications outside the revascularized arterial territory. Strict blood pressure control is recommended in order to prevent and manage hyperemia-associated symptoms. Improving our understanding of CHS may assist in identifying at risk patients and at risk arterial territories in order to optimize CHS prevention and management strategies.

  6. Efficient encoding of natural optic flow.

    PubMed

    Calow, Dirk; Lappe, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Statistically efficient processing schemes focus the resources of a signal processing system on the range of statistically probable signals. Relying on the statistical properties of retinal motion signals during ego-motion we propose a nonlinear processing scheme for retinal flow. It maximizes the mutual information between the visual input and its neural representation, and distributes the processing load uniformly over the neural resources. We derive predictions for the receptive fields of motion sensitive neurons in the velocity space. The properties of the receptive fields are tightly connected to their position in the visual field, and to their preferred retinal velocity. The velocity tuning properties show characteristics of properties of neurons in the motion processing pathway of the primate brain.

  7. A study of eddy-mean flow interactions using Eliassen-Palm diagnostics: FGGE SOP-1 data and the NASA GLAS general circulation model compared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, M. P.; Edmon, H. J., Jr.; Holton, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Latitude-height cross sections of the Eliassen-Palm (ep) flux, its divergence, the residual mean meridional circulation as well as conventional eddy and mean flow fields are computed using both observational and general circulation model data.

  8. Seafloor subsidence, heat flow and water circulation within the Australian-Antarctic Discordance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    One of the last seagoing expeditions of Jean Francheteau was the Antaus Cruise of R/V Marion Dufresne, to measure heat flow within the Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD), an anomalously deep segment of the Southeast Indian Ridge within 120°E and 128°E. We collected 23 new data points along a 14-Ma old isochron, that were analyzed together with 19 existing measurements from the 20- to 24-Ma old crust. Most sites of measurements exhibit low heat flux (from 2 to 50 mW/m2) with near-linear temperature- depth profiles except at a few sites, where recent bottom water temperature change may have caused nonlinearity toward the sediment surface. Because the igneous basement is expected to outcrop a short distance away from any measurement site, horizontally channelized water circulation within the uppermost crust is the primary process for the widespread low heat flow values. The process may be further influenced by vertical fluid flow along numerous fault zones that crisscross the AAD seafloor. Our analysis suggests that, due to the presence of patchy sediment cover and conveniently spaced faulting (across-strike and parallel to the spreading center), seawater circulation through faults continues off-axis within the AAD and cools the crust by lateral flow of water within the upper, highly permeable crustal layer, but possibly also by lateral conductive cooling of the less permeable, lower crustal layer. Hence, we hypothesize that the two crustal layers constitute a water dominated or "wet" domain, overlying a "dry" domain that encompasses the lower crust and possibly part of the mantle. The temperature at the top of the "dry" domain being greater than zero, the temperature difference that controls the thermal contraction of the sub-crustal lithosphere is less than it would be in absence of seawater circulation. This process could explain part of the low subsidence rates documented within the AAD, as well as the abruptness of the variation in subsidence rate across

  9. On the Pathways of the Return Flow of the Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jochum, Markus

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the tropical Atlantic ocean is used to investigate the upper layer pathways of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) in the tropical Atlantic. The main focus of this thesis is on those parts of the tropical circulation that are thought to be important for the MOC return flow, but whose dynamics have not been understood yet. It is shown how the particular structure of the tropical gyre and the MOO act to inhibit the flow of North Atlantic water into the equatorial thermocline. As a result, the upper layers of the tropical Atlantic are mainly fed by water from the South Atlantic. The processes that carry the South Atlantic water across the tropical Atlantic into the North Atlantic as part of the MOO are described here, and three processes that were hitherto not understood are explained as follows: The North Brazil Current rings are created as the result of the reflection of Rossby waves at the South American coast. These Rossby waves are generated by the barotropically unstable North Equatorial Countercurrent. The deep structure of the rings can be explained by merger of the wave's anticyclones with the deeper intermediate eddies that are generated as the intermediate western boundary current crosses the equator. The bands of strong zonal velocity in intermediate depths along the equator have hitherto been explained as intermediate currents. Here, an alternative interpretation of the observations is offered: The Eulerian mean flow along the equator is negligible and the observations are the signature of strong seasonal Rossby waves. The previous interpretation of the observations can then be explained as aliasing of the tropical wave field. The Tsuchyia Jets are driven by the Eliassen-Palm flux of the tropical instability waves. The equatorial current system with its strong shears is unstable and generates tropical instability waves.

  10. On the Pathways of the Return Flow of the Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jochum, Markus

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the tropical Atlantic ocean is used to investigate the upper layer pathways of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) in the tropical Atlantic. The main focus of this thesis is on those parts of the tropical circulation that are thought to be important for the MOC return flow, but whose dynamics have not been understood yet. It is shown how the particular structure of the tropical gyre and the MOO act to inhibit the flow of North Atlantic water into the equatorial thermocline. As a result, the upper layers of the tropical Atlantic are mainly fed by water from the South Atlantic. The processes that carry the South Atlantic water across the tropical Atlantic into the North Atlantic as part of the MOO are described here, and three processes that were hitherto not understood are explained as follows: The North Brazil Current rings are created as the result of the reflection of Rossby waves at the South American coast. These Rossby waves are generated by the barotropically unstable North Equatorial Countercurrent. The deep structure of the rings can be explained by merger of the wave's anticyclones with the deeper intermediate eddies that are generated as the intermediate western boundary current crosses the equator. The bands of strong zonal velocity in intermediate depths along the equator have hitherto been explained as intermediate currents. Here, an alternative interpretation of the observations is offered: The Eulerian mean flow along the equator is negligible and the observations are the signature of strong seasonal Rossby waves. The previous interpretation of the observations can then be explained as aliasing of the tropical wave field. The Tsuchyia Jets are driven by the Eliassen-Palm flux of the tropical instability waves. The equatorial current system with its strong shears is unstable and generates tropical instability waves.

  11. F-111 TACT natural laminar flow glove flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Steers, L. L.; Trujillo, B.

    1981-01-01

    Improvements in cruise efficiency on the order of 15 to 40% are obtained by increasing the extent of laminar flow over lifting surfaces. Two methods of achieving laminar flow are being considered, natural laminar flow and laminar flow control. Natural laminar flow (NLF) relies primarily on airfoil shape while laminar flow control involves boundary layer suction or blowing with mechanical devices. The extent of natural laminar flow that could be achieved with consistency in a real flight environment at chord Reynolds numbers in the range of 30 x 10(6) power was evaluated. Nineteen flights were conducted on the F-111 TACT airplane having a NLF airfoil glove section. The section consists of a supercritical airfoil providing favorable pressure gradients over extensive portions of the upper and lower surfaces of the wing. Boundary layer measurements were obtained over a range of wing leading edge sweep angles at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85. Data were obtained for natural transition and for a range of forced transition locations over the test airfoil.

  12. Circulation of images and graphic practices in Renaissance natural history: the example of Conrad Gessner.

    PubMed

    Egmond, Florike; Kusukawa, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Conrad Gessner's Historia animalium is a compilation of information from a variety of sources: friends, correspondents, books, broadsides, drawings, as well as his own experience. The recent discovery of a cache of drawings at Amsterdam originally belonging to Gessner has added a new dimension for research into the role of images in Gessner's study of nature. In this paper, we examine the drawings that were the basis of the images in the volume of fishes. We uncovered several cases where there were multiple copies of the same drawing of a fish (rather than multiple drawings of the samefish), which problematizes the notion of unique "original" copies and their copies. While we still know very little about the actual mechanism of, or people involved in, commissioning or generating copies of drawings, their very existence suggests that the images functioned as an important medium in the circulation of knowledge in the early modern period.

  13. Heat and Mass Transfer in Nucleate Boiling Regime of HE I in a Natural Circulation Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkheira, L.; Souhar, M.; Baudouy, B.

    2006-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the experimental study of He I natural circulation loop under nucleate boiling conditions, which simulates the cooling system of the 4 Tesla superconducting solenoid CMS under construction at CERN for the LHC. The test section consists of an electrically heated copper tube of 0.010 m ID and 0.95 m long. Uniform heat fluxes in the range of 0-2000 W/m2 were employed. All data were generated near atmospheric pressure. Reported are results of the boiling curves and the effect of heat flux on the heat transfer coefficient under boiling. An attempt is carried out to predict the boiling incipience and to correlate the heat transfer coefficient based on the combining effect of forced convection and nucleate boiling by a power-type asymptotic model.

  14. Helium I heat transfer in a small natural circulation loop with self-sustaining recondensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Four, Aurélien; Baudouy, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer of helium I in a natural circulation loop is experimentally studied around atmospheric pressure. The test section of the loop has an inner diameter of 4 mm and a height of 23 cm and can be uniformly heated by wire heater. On top of the loop, a condenser is mounted and thermally connected to the second-stage of a 1.5 W at 4.2 K GM cryocooler. Helium can be recondensed in the condenser, where the pressure is regulated around the atmospheric pressure. While the dissipated heat flux is increased from 0 to 1 W, one encounters the different heat transfer regimes as single phase liquid convection, two phase nucleate boiling and single phase vapor convection. The wall superheat varies up to 11 K in the single phase vapor convection regime. The wall temperature measurement allows obtaining the boiling curve and determining the heat transfer coefficient.

  15. Development of the FHR advanced natural circulation analysis code and application to FHR safety analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Z.; Zweibaum, N.; Shao, M.; ...

    2016-04-19

    The University of California, Berkeley (UCB) is performing thermal hydraulics safety analysis to develop the technical basis for design and licensing of fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactors (FHRs). FHR designs investigated by UCB use natural circulation for emergency, passive decay heat removal when normal decay heat removal systems fail. The FHR advanced natural circulation analysis (FANCY) code has been developed for assessment of passive decay heat removal capability and safety analysis of these innovative system designs. The FANCY code uses a one-dimensional, semi-implicit scheme to solve for pressure-linked mass, momentum and energy conservation equations. Graph theory is used to automatically generate amore » staggered mesh for complicated pipe network systems. Heat structure models have been implemented for three types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann and Robin boundary conditions). Heat structures can be composed of several layers of different materials, and are used for simulation of heat structure temperature distribution and heat transfer rate. Control models are used to simulate sequences of events or trips of safety systems. A proportional-integral controller is also used to automatically make thermal hydraulic systems reach desired steady state conditions. A point kinetics model is used to model reactor kinetics behavior with temperature reactivity feedback. The underlying large sparse linear systems in these models are efficiently solved by using direct and iterative solvers provided by the SuperLU code on high performance machines. Input interfaces are designed to increase the flexibility of simulation for complicated thermal hydraulic systems. In conclusion, this paper mainly focuses on the methodology used to develop the FANCY code, and safety analysis of the Mark 1 pebble-bed FHR under development at UCB is performed.« less

  16. Development of the FHR advanced natural circulation analysis code and application to FHR safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z.; Zweibaum, N.; Shao, M.; Huddar, L. R.; Peterson, P. F.; Qiu, S.

    2016-04-19

    The University of California, Berkeley (UCB) is performing thermal hydraulics safety analysis to develop the technical basis for design and licensing of fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactors (FHRs). FHR designs investigated by UCB use natural circulation for emergency, passive decay heat removal when normal decay heat removal systems fail. The FHR advanced natural circulation analysis (FANCY) code has been developed for assessment of passive decay heat removal capability and safety analysis of these innovative system designs. The FANCY code uses a one-dimensional, semi-implicit scheme to solve for pressure-linked mass, momentum and energy conservation equations. Graph theory is used to automatically generate a staggered mesh for complicated pipe network systems. Heat structure models have been implemented for three types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann and Robin boundary conditions). Heat structures can be composed of several layers of different materials, and are used for simulation of heat structure temperature distribution and heat transfer rate. Control models are used to simulate sequences of events or trips of safety systems. A proportional-integral controller is also used to automatically make thermal hydraulic systems reach desired steady state conditions. A point kinetics model is used to model reactor kinetics behavior with temperature reactivity feedback. The underlying large sparse linear systems in these models are efficiently solved by using direct and iterative solvers provided by the SuperLU code on high performance machines. Input interfaces are designed to increase the flexibility of simulation for complicated thermal hydraulic systems. In conclusion, this paper mainly focuses on the methodology used to develop the FANCY code, and safety analysis of the Mark 1 pebble-bed FHR under development at UCB is performed.

  17. Simulation of tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing of the Charlotte Harbor Estuarine System, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional circulation and constituent- transport model, SIMSYS2D, was used to simulate tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics in Charlotte Harbor. The model was calibrated and verified against field observations of stage,discharge, and velocity. Standard errors averaged about 3 percent of the range in stage at the tide stations and between 3 and 10 percent of the range in discharge measured in the inlets for the calibration period. Following calibration and verification, the model was applied to three different conditions. The first condition represented the existing physical configuration and typical freshwater inflow. The second condition represented reduced fresh water inflow, and the third represented an alteration of Sanibel Causeway. All three conditions were evaluated through Lagrangian particle tracks and simulated dye injections. Residual circulation patterns were similar for typical and reduced freshwater inflow, but reduced freshwater inflow increased the residence time in the upper harbor by a factor of two or more. Removal of Sanibel Causeway did not significantly affect residual flows in upper and lower Charlotte Harbor, Matlacha Pass, Gasparilla Sound, or the Gulf of Mexico. Analysis of Lagrangian particle tracks indicated changes in residence times in San Carlos Bay as a result of removing Sanibel Causeway, but the changes were not consistent for all particles. The residence time of 8 particles in San Carlos Bay decreased with removal of the causeway, 1 was unchanged, and the residence time of 3 particles increased. Simulated flushing characteristics of the estuarine system were affected more by reduced freshwater inflow than for typical freshwater inflow. After 30 days of simulation of reduced freshwater inflow, 42 percent of the dye injected into the upper harbor remained in the upper harbor, compared to 28 percent for typical freshwater inflow. The upper harbor has a relatively long flushing time because it is not directly

  18. Measurement of circulating cell-derived microparticles by flow cytometry: sources of variability within the assay.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Lisa; Kohler, Malcolm; Harrison, Paul; Sargent, Ian; Dragovic, Rebecca; Schaap, Marianne; Nieuwland, Rienk; Brooks, Susan A; Ferry, Berne

    2011-04-01

    Circulating cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been implicated in several disease processes and elevated levels are found in many pathological conditions. The detection and accurate measurement of MPs, although attracting widespread interest, is hampered by a lack of standardisation. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable flow cytometric assay to measure distinct subtypes of MPs in disease and to identify any significant causes of variability in MP quantification. Circulating MPs within plasma were identified by their phenotype (platelet, endothelial, leukocyte and annexin-V positivity (AnnV+). The influence of key variables (i.e. time between venepuncture and centrifugation, washing steps, the number of centrifugation steps, freezing/long-term storage and temperature of thawing) on MP measurement were investigated. Increasing time between venepuncture and centrifugation leads to increased MP levels. Washing samples results in decreased AnnV+MPs (P=0.002) and platelet-derived MPs (PMPs) (P=0.002). Double centrifugation of MPs prior to freezing decreases numbers of AnnV+MPs (P=0.0004) and PMPs (P=0.0004). A single freeze thaw cycle of samples led to an increase in AnnV+MPs (P=0.0020) and PMPs (P=0.0039). Long-term storage of MP samples at -80° resulted in decreased MP levels. This study found that minor protocol changes significantly affected MP levels. This is one of the first studies attempting to standardise a method for obtaining and measuring circulating MPs. Standardisation will be essential for successful development of MP technologies, allowing direct comparison of results between studies and leading to a greater understanding of MPs in disease. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat Flow and Hydrothermal Circulation of the Lucky Strike Segment, Mid Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Escartin, J.; Lucazeau, F.; Cannat, M.; Gouze, P.; von Herzen, R. P.; Adam, C.; Le Bars, M.; Monoury, E.; Vidal, V.

    2003-12-01

    In June 2003, expedition Luckyflux aboard the R/V Poseidon conducted a heat flow survey of a zone centred on the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid Atlantic ridge south of the Azores between ˜35° N and 39° N. Using a 5 m-long lance with 7 outrigger thermal probes, about 150 successful thermal gradient measurements were obtained, 140 of these with in-situ thermal conductivity. Measurements were made at ˜1 mile intervals along several profiles, where adequately sedimented sites were identified using 6-channel and 3.5 kHz seismic data from the previous Sudazores'98 cruise. We conducted heat flow measurements in two areas: a near axis region within the V-shaped ridge of overthickened crust that emanated from the Azores hotspot between ˜14 and 4 Ma, and an off-axis region East of the V-shaped ridge. The off-axis region is characterized by an homogeneous sediment cover, 300-400 m thick, and crustal ages varying between ˜6 and >10 Ma. Long wavelength (tens of km) low heat flow anomalies can be identified but the mean of 160 mWm-2 is comparable to the conductive heat flow expected for a crust of that age. Along two 80-km profiles perpendicular to the ridge, we observed coherent but different patterns. On the first profile, low heat flow values of 20-50 mWm-2 are observed at the base of the V-shaped ridge. These values are 100 mWm-2 below the profile average, showing that hydrothermal circulations can also affect oceanic crust beneath a thick and relatively impermeable sediment cover. On the other profile, heat flow generally decreases from west to east. On both profiles, higher than average values of heat flow are also present, associated on one of them with a nearly outcropping basement elevation. These contrasting overall heat flow patterns in similar geological context indicate that the likely pattern of hydrothermal circulations is mainly 3D, and not driven only by the presence of basement outcrops. In the near-axis region, where the tectonic structure is more

  20. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the Pulmonary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Rios, Lourdes; Smith, Triston; Schroeder, Theodore; Mueller, Jeffrey; Murali, Srinivas; Lasorda, David; Zikos, Anthony; Spotti, Jennifer; Reilly, John J.; Finol, Ender A.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the pulmonary vasculature has the potential to reveal continuum metrics associated with the hemodynamic stress acting on the vascular endothelium. It is widely accepted that the endothelium responds to flow-induced stress by releasing vasoactive substances that can dilate and constrict blood vessels locally. The objectives of this study are to examine the extent of patient specificity required to obtain a significant association of CFD output metrics and clinical measures in models of the pulmonary arterial circulation, and to evaluate the potential correlation of wall shear stress (WSS) with established metrics indicative of right ventricular (RV) afterload in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Right heart catheterization (RHC) hemodynamic data and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively acquired for 10 PH patients and processed to simulate blood flow in the pulmonary arteries. While conducting CFD modeling of the reconstructed patient-specific vasculatures, we experimented with three different outflow boundary conditions to investigate the potential for using computationally derived spatially averaged wall shear Stress (SAWSS) as a metric of RV afterload. SAWSS was correlated with both pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (R2 = 0.77, P < 0.05) and arterial compliance (C) (R2 = 0.63, P < 0.05), but the extent of the correlation was affected by the degree of patient specificity incorporated in the fluid flow boundary conditions. We found that decreasing the distal PVR alters the flow distribution and changes the local velocity profile in the distal vessels, thereby increasing the local WSS. Nevertheless, implementing generic outflow boundary conditions still resulted in statistically significant SAWSS correlations with respect to both metrics of RV afterload, suggesting that the CFD model could be executed without the need for complex outflow boundary conditions that require invasively obtained

  1. Hydrodechlorination of TCE in a circulated electrolytic column at high flow rate

    PubMed Central

    Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Rajic, Ljiljana; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by cathodic H2 produced from water electrolysis has been tested. For a field in-well application, the flow rate is generally high. In this study, the performance of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE using cathodic H2 is evaluated under high flow rate (1 L min−1) in a circulated column system, as expected to occur in practice. An iron anode supports reduction conditions and it is used to enhance TCE hydrodechlorination. However, the precipitation occurs and high flow rate was evaluated to minimize its advers effects on the process (electrode coverage, clogging, etc.). Under the conditions of 1 L min−1 flow, 500 mA current, and 5 mg L−1 initial TCE concentration, removal efficacy using iron anodes (96%) is significantly higher than by mixed metal oxide (MMO) anodes (66%). Two types of cathodes (MMO and copper foam) in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under various currents (250, 125, and 62 mA) were used to evaluate the effect of cathode materials on TCE removal efficacy. The similar removal efficiencies were achieved for both cathodes, but more precipitation generated with copper foam cathode (based on the experiments done by authors). In addition to the well-known parameters such as current density, electrode materials, and initial TCE concentration, the high velocities of groundwater flow can have important implications, practically in relation to the flush out of precipitates. For potential field application, a cost-effective and sustainable in situ electrochemical process using a solar panel as power supply is being evaluated. PMID:26344148

  2. Hydrodechlorination of TCE in a circulated electrolytic column at high flow rate.

    PubMed

    Fallahpour, Noushin; Yuan, Songhu; Rajic, Ljiljana; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2016-02-01

    Palladium-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) by cathodic H2 produced from water electrolysis has been tested. For a field in-well application, the flow rate is generally high. In this study, the performance of Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of TCE using cathodic H2 is evaluated under high flow rate (1 L min(-1)) in a circulated column system, as expected to occur in practice. An iron anode supports reduction conditions and it is used to enhance TCE hydrodechlorination. However, the precipitation occurs and high flow rate was evaluated to minimize its adverse effects on the process (electrode coverage, clogging, etc.). Under the conditions of 1 L min(-1) flow, 500 mA current, and 5 mg L(-1) initial TCE concentration, removal efficacy using iron anodes (96%) is significantly higher than by mixed metal oxide (MMO) anodes (66%). Two types of cathodes (MMO and copper foam) in the presence of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under various currents (250, 125, and 62 mA) were used to evaluate the effect of cathode materials on TCE removal efficacy. The similar removal efficiencies were achieved for both cathodes, but more precipitation generated with copper foam cathode (based on the experiments done by authors). In addition to the well-known parameters such as current density, electrode materials, and initial TCE concentration, the high velocities of groundwater flow can have important implications, practically in relation to the flush out of precipitates. For potential field application, a cost-effective and sustainable in situ electrochemical process using a solar panel as power supply is being evaluated.

  3. Patient-specific computational modeling of blood flow in the pulmonary arterial circulation.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Rios, Lourdes; Smith, Triston; Schroeder, Theodore; Mueller, Jeffrey; Murali, Srinivas; Lasorda, David; Zikos, Anthony; Spotti, Jennifer; Reilly, John J; Finol, Ender A

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the pulmonary vasculature has the potential to reveal continuum metrics associated with the hemodynamic stress acting on the vascular endothelium. It is widely accepted that the endothelium responds to flow-induced stress by releasing vasoactive substances that can dilate and constrict blood vessels locally. The objectives of this study are to examine the extent of patient specificity required to obtain a significant association of CFD output metrics and clinical measures in models of the pulmonary arterial circulation, and to evaluate the potential correlation of wall shear stress (WSS) with established metrics indicative of right ventricular (RV) afterload in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Right Heart Catheterization (RHC) hemodynamic data and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively acquired for 10 PH patients and processed to simulate blood flow in the pulmonary arteries. While conducting CFD modeling of the reconstructed patient-specific vasculatures, we experimented with three different outflow boundary conditions to investigate the potential for using computationally derived spatially averaged wall shear stress (SAWSS) as a metric of RV afterload. SAWSS was correlated with both pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (R(2)=0.77, P<0.05) and arterial compliance (C) (R(2)=0.63, P<0.05), but the extent of the correlation was affected by the degree of patient specificity incorporated in the fluid flow boundary conditions. We found that decreasing the distal PVR alters the flow distribution and changes the local velocity profile in the distal vessels, thereby increasing the local WSS. Nevertheless, implementing generic outflow boundary conditions still resulted in statistically significant SAWSS correlations with respect to both metrics of RV afterload, suggesting that the CFD model could be executed without the need for complex outflow boundary conditions that require invasively obtained

  4. NMR with a continuously circulating flow of laser-polarized {sup 129}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Seydoux, R.; Pines, A.; Haake, M.; Reimer, J.A. |

    1999-06-03

    In this paper the authors describe the construction of an apparatus for optical pumping of {sup 129}Xe in a circulating gas system connected to a probe for static high-field NMR. The optimal working conditions for the optical pumping under flow are explored, yielding a continuous gas flow with a steady-state spin-polarization of about 2%. It is shown that on various types of high surface area materials a steady-state of adsorbed laser-polarized xenon can be reached with polarizations of about 0.3%. NMR spectroscopy of this layer is greatly facilitated due to the renewable magnetization under the continuous-flow conditions allowing unprecedented fast detection of two-dimensional NMR experiments with laser-polarized Xe. The steady-state spin-polarization of adsorbed {sup 129}Xe gives rise to cross-relaxation to surface nuclei such as {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si. A direct spin-polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) to heteronuclei is observed with an enhancement factor of about 20--30. A method is presented for simple modulation of the spin-polarization direction in the fringe field of the high-field magnet; this is exploited to obtain difference SPINOE spectra to highlight only the surface nuclei. Furthermore, a transfer via cross-polarization (CP) from adsorbed XE to surface protons is demonstrated to select surface groups with reduced mobility compared to SPINOE detection.

  5. Numerical steady flow solutions of the lower leg venous circulation: effects of external compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullana, J.-M.; Flaud, P.

    2007-06-01

    We present a numerical model used to compute steady flow solutions of the venous circulation of the leg. The network topology is based on clinical data and the flow is assumed to be steady, incompressible, and one-dimensional. We develop a non Newtonian approach to a one-dimensional flow because the blood viscosity depends on the velocity profile, and we demonstrate theoretically the pertinence of a phenomenological law of equivalent viscosity. Clinical experiments observe hemodynamical variables (i.e. venous pressure, venous area, blood velocity) only at the accessible places. In contrast the numerical model results are not limited to particular locations but can be evaluated on every point of the network. It provides important help to the definition of a clinical protocol. The model was designed to quantify a compression level of elastic compression stockings and to plan clinical studies. We validate the numerical approach using a published clinical trial, where the diameter of superficial and deep veins were measured at different compression pressures. We show also that the viscosity variations in a bed-rest position as a consequence of the application of a European Class II compression stockings. These variations could prevent the hyper-coagulability and the stasis of the blood.

  6. Flow of a circulating tumor cell and red blood cells in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the behavior of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood stream is of fundamental importance for understanding metastasis. Here, we investigate the flow mode and velocity of CTCs interacting with red blood cells (RBCs) in various sized microvessels. The flow of leukocytes in microvessels has been described previously; a leukocyte forms a train with RBCs in small microvessels and exhibits margination in large microvessels. Important differences in the physical properties of leukocytes and CTCs result from size. The dimensions of leukocytes are similar to those of RBCs, but CTCs are significantly larger. We investigate numerically the size effects on the flow mode and the cell velocity, and we identify similarities and differences between leukocytes and CTCs. We find that a transition from train formation to margination occurs when (R -a ) /tR≈1 , where R is the vessel radius, a is the cell radius, and tR is the thickness of RBCs, but that the motion of RBCs differs from the case of leukocytes. Our results also show that the velocities of CTCs and leukocytes are larger than the average blood velocity, but only CTCs move faster than RBCs for microvessels of R /a ≈1.5 -2.0 . These findings are expected to be useful not only for understanding metastasis, but also for developing microfluidic devices.

  7. Study on the flow in the pipelines of the support system of circulating fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Yang, J.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhuang, X. H.

    2013-12-01

    In the support system of Circulating Fluidized Bed (Below referred to as CFB) of thermal power plant, the pipelines of primary wind are used for transporting the cold air to the boiler, which is important in controlling and combustion effect. The pipeline design will greatly affect the energy loss of the system, and accordingly affect the thermal power plant economic benefits and production environment. Three-dimensional numerical simulation is carried out for the pipeline internal flow field of a thermal power plant in this paper. Firstly three turbulence models were compared and the results showed that the SST k-ω model converged better and the energy losses predicted were closer to the experimental results. The influence of the pipeline design form on the flow characteristics are analysed, then the optimization designs of the pipeline are proposed according to the energy loss distribution of the flow field, in order to reduce energy loss and improve the efficiency of tunnel. The optimization plan turned out to be efficacious; about 36% of the pressure loss is reduced.

  8. Studying circulation times of liver cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Li, Y.; Fan, Z.; Guo, J.; Tan, X.; Wei, X.

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may metastasize to lung kidney and many other organs. The survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  9. The formation of alteration rims in basaltic lava flows upon hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, Bruno; Driesner, Thomas; Kosakowski, Georg; Kulik, Dmitrii

    2016-04-01

    We investigated fossil hydrothermal systems in the North of the Reykjavik peninsula (Iceland), in order to better understand water-rock interactions occurring during hydrothermal fluid circulation. The observation of a lava flow formation showed that the basalt is practically not altered, except in zones of a few cm thickness around the largest fractures (i.e. alteration rims). XRD analysis and observations of polished thin sections by optical microscope evidenced a severe alteration of the protolith in the alteration rim. Secondary minerals mostly consist in pyrite, calcite and chlorite, indicating a temperature of 250°C during the hydrothermal event. The presence of pyrite and calcite in the alteration rim and their absence in the rest of the rock suggest that the fluid contained significant amount of volcanic gasses H2S and CO2 and probably followed an ascending path. Most of the calcite is located in fractures that have been formed after the precipitation of the other secondary minerals. This observation, coupled with fluid inclusions analysis, indicates a second hydrothermal event that happened at lower temperature and pressure. We reproduced those observations by using a geochemical reactive transport model (OpenGeoSys-GEM code). The purpose was to decipher how diffusion and mineral reaction kinetics (protolith dissolution and secondary minerals precipitation) influence the alteration, and to establish the time duration of the hydrothermal circulation.

  10. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  11. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  12. An investigation of natural circulation decay heat removal from an SP-100 reactor system for a lunar outpost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Xue, Huimin

    1992-01-01

    A transient thermal-hydraulic model of the decay heat removal from a 550 kWe SP-100 power system for a lunar outpost has been developed and used to assess the coolability of the system by natural circulation after reactor shutdown. Results show that natural circulation of lithium coolant is sufficient to ensure coolability of the reactor core after shutdown. Further improvement of the decay heat removal capability of the system could be achieved by increasing the dimensions of the decay heat exchanger duct. A radiator area of 10-15 m2 would be sufficient to maintain the reactor core safely coolable by natural circulation after shutdown. Increasing the area of the decay heat rejection radiator or the diameter of the heat pipes in the guard vessel wall insignificantly affects the decay heat removal capability of the system.

  13. Estimating Natural Flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Kadir, T.; Chung, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta under predevelopment vegetative conditions, if and when reconstructed, can serve as a useful guide to establish minimum stream flows, restoration targets, and a basis for assessing impacts of global warming in the Bay-Delta System. Daily simulations of natural Delta flows for the period 1922-2009 were obtained using precipitation-snowmelt-runoff models for the upper watersheds that are tributaries to the California's Central Valley, and then routing the water through the Central Valley floor area using a modified version of the California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) for water years 1922 through 2009. Daily stream inflows from all major upper watersheds were simulated using 23 Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) models. Historical precipitation and reference evapotranspiration data were extracted from the SIMETAW2 with the 4km gridded meteorological data. The Historical natural and riparian vegetation distributions were compiled from several pre-1900 historical vegetation maps of the Central Valley. Wetlands were dynamically simulated using interconnected lakes. Flows overtopping natural levees were simulated using flow rating curves. New estimates of potential evapotranspiration from different vegetative classes under natural conditions were also used. Sensitivity simulations demonstrate that evapotranspiration estimates, native vegetation distribution, surface-groundwater interaction parameters, extinction depth for groundwater uptake, and other physical processes play a key role in the magnitude and timing of upstream flows arriving at the Delta. Findings contradict a common misconception that the magnitude of inflows to the Delta under natural vegetative conditions is greater than those under the historical agricultural and urban land use development. The developed models also enable to study the impacts of global warming by modifying meteorological and

  14. Experimental Study on Thermal-Hydraulics During Start-Up in the Natural Circulation Boiling Water Reactor Concept: Effects of System Pressure and Increasing Heat Flux on the Geysering and Density Wave Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadid Subki, M.; Masanori Aritomi; Noriyuki Watanabe; Chaiwat Muncharoen

    2002-07-01

    The feasibility study in thermal-hydraulics for the future light water reactor concept is carried out. One of the essential studies is the two-phase flow instability during start-up in the natural circulation boiling water reactor (BWR) concept. It is anticipated that the occurrence of the two-phase flow instabilities during start-up significantly affects the feasibility concept, since it would cause the complexity in raising and maneuvering the power output. The purpose of the current study is to experimentally investigate the driving mechanism of the geysering and density wave oscillation in the natural circulation loop, induced by a range of system operating pressure and increasing heat flux in vertical parallel channels. The pressure range of atmospheric up to about 4 bars, and the input heat flux range of 0 up to 577 kW/m{sup 2} are applied in these experiments. An experimental apparatus of twin boiling upflow channels to simulate natural circulation flow loop has been designed, constructed and operated. The natural circulation in the loop occurs due to the density difference between two-phase region in the channels and the single-phase liquid in the downcomer. The objective of the study is to propose a rational start-up procedure in which the geysering and density wave oscillation can be prevented during startup, according to its system pressure and heat flux. Previous studies have clarified that three (3) kinds of thermo-hydraulics instabilities may occur during start-up in the natural circulation BWR depending on its procedure and reactor configuration, which are (1) geysering induced by condensation, (2) natural circulation induced by hydrostatic head fluctuation in steam separator, and (3) density wave oscillation. (authors)

  15. Coupled ice-flow/ocean circulation modeling in the Amundsen Sea Embayment using ISSM and MITgcm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, E. Y.; Menemenlis, D.; Schodlok, M.

    2014-12-01

    the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is thought to be prone to marine instability in which prolonged grounding line retreat could occur due to inland downwards sloping bedrocks. However, this instability is difficult to model in part due to the absence of good parameterizations for melt-rates under ice-shelves, in particular near or at the grounding-line, where a complex interplay between butressing, melt-rate, water-pressure and internal stresses in the ice develops. In order to simulate such melt rates accurately, ice-sheet models need to be fully coupled to ocean models, in order to capture the feedback mechanisms between heat-flux at the ice/ocean interface and cavity shape driven by grounding-line retreat.Here, we show an example of such a coupling between the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) and the MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm). The goal is to run sensitivity studies of the evolution of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica. We quantify the impact of feedbacks between both systems by running short transients (20-100 years) of the coupled ice-sheet flow/ocean circulation model. We vary inputs such as far-field temperature of the Circumpolar Deep-Water, surface temperature of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, and far-field surface ice-flow velocity. Preliminary insights into the variability of the system are presented, as well as quantified impacts of variations in model inputs.This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory undera contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere Science Program.

  16. On subsonic compressible flows by a method of correspondence II : application of methods to studies of flow with circulation about a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    GELBART ABE; Bartnoff, Shepard

    1947-01-01

    A general method for studying the flow of a compressible fluid around a closed body was discussed in Part I of this report. Here, application is made to the specific case in which the linearized equation of state is used. For a given incompressible flow around a specific profile, a corresponding compressible flow is found. The flow at infinity remains unchanged. Detailed studies are made of the flow with circulation around a unit circle, and velocity distributions are found for a wide range of Mach number and angle of attack. Comparisons are made with other methods.

  17. Effect of Increased Blood Flow on Pulmonary Circulation Before and During High Altitude Acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Matthias Peter; Müller, Andrea; Flück, Daniela; Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Keiser, Stefanie; Auinger, Katja; Lundby, Carsten; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Matthias Peter Hilty, Andrea Mueller, Daniela Flück, Christoph Siebenmann, Peter Rasmussen, Stefanie Keiser, Katja Auinger, Carsten Lundby, and Marco Maggiorini. Effect of increased blood flow on the pulmonary circulation before and during high altitude acclimatization. High Alt Med Biol. 17:305-314, 2016.-Introduction and Methods: Acute exposure to high altitude increases pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The evolution of Ppa and PVR with continuous hypoxic exposure remains, however, elusive. To test the hypothesis that altitude exposure leads to a persistent elevation in Ppa and PVR throughout acclimatization in seven healthy male subjects, echocardiography was performed at sea level (SL; 488 m) weekly during a 4-week sojourn at 3454 m (HA1-HA4) and upon return (SL2). Pulmonary artery catheterization and bilateral thigh cuff release maneuver were performed at SL and HA3 to study the properties of pulmonary circulation after 3 weeks of acclimatization. Pulmonary artery catheter determined that systolic Ppa (mean ± SEM) was increased from 20 ± 1 at SL to 27 ± 2 mmHg at HA3 (p < 0.01). Echocardiography assessed that systolic Ppa remained equally increased throughout acclimatization (26 ± 2, 25 ± 2, 25 ± 2, and 24 ± 2 mmHg at HA1-HA4; p = 0.93) and returned to baseline upon return (17 ± 2, 18 ± 1 mmHg at SL, SL2; p = 0.3). The same was shown for PVR. Right heart function remained unaffected. Thigh cuff release maneuvers at SL and HA3 resulted in similar increase in cardiac output (2.5 ± 0.5 and 2.2 ± 0.4 L/min; p = 0.61) without affecting mean Ppa. Prolonged altitude exposure leads to a persistent increase in Ppa and PVR without affecting right heart function and is fully reversible within 1 week after return to SL. The thigh cuff release maneuver-induced increase in cardiac output suggests a preserved ability of pulmonary circulation to cope with

  18. Interleukin (IL)-18 Binding Protein Deficiency Disrupts Natural Killer Cell Maturation and Diminishes Circulating IL-18.

    PubMed

    Harms, Robert Z; Creer, Austin J; Lorenzo-Arteaga, Kristina M; Ostlund, Katie R; Sarvetnick, Nora E

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin (IL)-18 is a crucial amplifier of natural killer (NK) cell function. IL-18 signaling is regulated by the inhibitory effects of IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). Using mice deficient in IL-18BP (IL-18BPKO), we investigated the impact of mismanaged IL-18 signaling on NK cells. We found an overall reduced abundance of splenic NK cells in the absence of IL-18BP. Closer examination of NK cell subsets in spleen and bone marrow using CD27 and CD11b expression revealed that immature NK cells were increased in abundance, while the mature population of NK cells was reduced. Also, NK cells were polarized to greater production of TNF-α, while dedicated IFN-γ producers were reduced. A novel subset of IL-18 receptor α(-) NK cells contributed to the expansion of immature NK cells in IL-18BPKO mice. Splenocytes cultured with IL-18 resulted in alterations similar to those observed in IL-18BP deficiency. NK cell changes were associated with significantly reduced levels of circulating plasma IL-18. However, IL-18BPKO mice exhibited normal weight gain and responded to LPS challenge with a >10-fold increase in IFN-γ compared to wild type. Finally, we identified that the source of splenic IL-18BP was among dendritic cells/macrophage localized to the T cell-rich regions of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that IL-18BP is required for normal NK cell abundance and function and also contributes to maintaining steady-state levels of circulating IL-18. Thus, IL-18BP appears to have functions suggestive of a carrier protein, not just an inhibitor.

  19. Interleukin (IL)-18 Binding Protein Deficiency Disrupts Natural Killer Cell Maturation and Diminishes Circulating IL-18

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Robert Z.; Creer, Austin J.; Lorenzo-Arteaga, Kristina M.; Ostlund, Katie R.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin (IL)-18 is a crucial amplifier of natural killer (NK) cell function. IL-18 signaling is regulated by the inhibitory effects of IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). Using mice deficient in IL-18BP (IL-18BPKO), we investigated the impact of mismanaged IL-18 signaling on NK cells. We found an overall reduced abundance of splenic NK cells in the absence of IL-18BP. Closer examination of NK cell subsets in spleen and bone marrow using CD27 and CD11b expression revealed that immature NK cells were increased in abundance, while the mature population of NK cells was reduced. Also, NK cells were polarized to greater production of TNF-α, while dedicated IFN-γ producers were reduced. A novel subset of IL-18 receptor α− NK cells contributed to the expansion of immature NK cells in IL-18BPKO mice. Splenocytes cultured with IL-18 resulted in alterations similar to those observed in IL-18BP deficiency. NK cell changes were associated with significantly reduced levels of circulating plasma IL-18. However, IL-18BPKO mice exhibited normal weight gain and responded to LPS challenge with a >10-fold increase in IFN-γ compared to wild type. Finally, we identified that the source of splenic IL-18BP was among dendritic cells/macrophage localized to the T cell-rich regions of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that IL-18BP is required for normal NK cell abundance and function and also contributes to maintaining steady-state levels of circulating IL-18. Thus, IL-18BP appears to have functions suggestive of a carrier protein, not just an inhibitor. PMID:28900426

  20. Mechanical circulatory support of a univentricular Fontan circulation with a continuous axial-flow pump in a piglet model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xufeng; Sanchez, Pablo G; Liu, Yang; Li, Tieluo; Watkins, A Claire; Wu, Zhongjun J; Griffith, Bartley P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significant contribution of the Fontan procedure to the therapy of complex congenital heart diseases, many patients progress to failure of their Fontan circulation. The use of ventricular assist devices to provide circulatory support to these patients remains challenging. In the current study, a continuous axial-flow pump was used to support a univentricular Fontan circulation. A modified Fontan circulation (atrio-pulmonary connection) was constructed in six Yorkshire piglets (8-14 kg). A Dacron conduit (12 mm) with two branches was constructed to serve as a complete atrio-pulmonary connection without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. The Impella pump was inserted into the conduit through an additional Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft in five animals. Hemodynamic data were collected for 6 hours under the supported Fontan circulation. The control animal died after initiating the Fontan circulation independent of resuscitation. Four pump supported animals remained hemodynamically stable for 6 hours with pump speeds between 18,000 rpm and 22,000 rpm (P1-P3). Oxygen saturation was maintained between 95% and 100%. Normal organ perfusion was illustrated by blood gas analysis and biochemical assays. A continuous axial-flow pump can be used for temporal circulatory support to the failing Fontan circulation as "bridge" to heart transplantation or recovery.

  1. Estimating the Natural Flow Regime of the Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, T.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The Rio Grande is the fifth longest river in North America and is a critical water supply for millions of people in the U. S. and Mexico. It is essential that both governements understand the magnitude of transformation to the river's flow regime as the countries engage in bi-national discussion about restoring parts of the river's native ecosystem. Previous studies have focused on estimating changes in the statistical properties of floods, but no studies have estimated the magnitude of reduction of the total annual flow nor changes to the annual hydrograph. Significant reductions in flow on the Rio Grande date to the onset of increased irrigation development in the mid-1800s, and human disturbances precede gaging records. Since the late 1800s, the total annual stream flow has been reduced by 98%, and the snowmelt flood has been virtually eliminated. We used a systems analysis approach to analyze available mean daily discharge data throughout the watershed to estimate the natural unregulated flow regime of the northern branch of the Rio Grande upstream from the Rio Conchos. We specifically estimated what would have been the natural hydrograph of the northern branch if there were no diversions of water for irrigation or municipal water supply in each year between 1958 and 2008, based on evaluation of 34 gaging station records. In each year, we reconstructed hydrographs for successive pairs of gages using estimated unaltered flows as upstream inputs, routed flow as if existing impoundments did not exist, and we made corrections for irrigation diversions; we also evaluated historical flood records. We show that the total natural annual flow for the northern branch was more than 50 times greater than the actual measured flow for this 50-year period. The magnitude of the existing diversions has eliminated the ecological cues in which the native ecosystem evolved. This reduction of flow has shifted the river into fine sediment surplus and initiated widespread channel

  2. Absence of circulating natural killer (NK) cells in a child with erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis lacking NK cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, H.; Komiyama, A.; Aoyama, K.; Miyagawa, Y.; Akabane, T.

    1988-06-01

    A 5-year-old girl who was diagnosed as having erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis died at age 9 years. Peripheral lymphocytes from the patient persistently lacked natural killer (NK) cell activity during the 4-year observation period: the percent lysis values as measured by a 4-hr /sup 51/Cr release assay at a 40:1 effector:target ratio were below 1.0% against K562 and Molt-4 cells as compared with the normal lymphocyte value (mean +/- SD) of 46.2% +/- 5.8% and 43.9% +/- 6.7%, respectively. The patient's lymphocytes never developed NK cell activity by their incubation with target cells for longer time periods or by their stimulation with interferon-alpha, interleukin-2, or polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid. Single cell-in-agarose assay showed the absence of target-binding cells (TBCs): TBC numbers were below 0.3% as compared with the normal lymphocyte value of 8.1% +/- 1.3% (mean +/- SD). Flow cytometry showed a marked decrease in Leu-7+ cells (1.7%) and the absence of Leu-11+ cells (0.4%) in the peripheral blood. These results first demonstrate a case of erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in which there is the lack of NK cell activity due to the absence of circulating NK cells.

  3. Natural Laminar Flow Design for Wings with Moderate Sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the aerodynamic design of wings with natural laminar flow is under development at the NASA Langley Research Center. The approach involves the addition of new flow constraints to an existing knowledge-based design module for use with advanced flow solvers. The uniqueness of the new approach lies in the tailoring of target pressure distributions to achieve laminar flow on transonic wings with leading-edge sweeps and Reynolds numbers typical of current transports. The method is demonstrated on the Common Research Model configuration at critical N-factor levels representative of both flight and high-Reynolds number wind tunnel turbulence levels. The design results for the flight conditions matched the target extent of laminar flow very well. The design at wind tunnel conditions raised some design issues that prompted further improvements in the method, but overall has given promising results.

  4. Going with the flow: the role of ocean circulation in global marine ecosystems under a changing climate.

    PubMed

    van Gennip, Simon J; Popova, Ekaterina E; Yool, Andrew; Pecl, Gretta T; Hobday, Alistair J; Sorte, Cascade J B

    2017-07-01

    Ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced productivity are widely considered to be the major stressors to ocean ecosystems induced by emissions of CO2 . However, an overlooked stressor is the change in ocean circulation in response to climate change. Strong changes in the intensity and position of the western boundary currents have already been observed, and the consequences of such changes for ecosystems are beginning to emerge. In this study, we address climatically induced changes in ocean circulation on a global scale but relevant to propagule dispersal for species inhabiting global shelf ecosystems, using a high-resolution global ocean model run under the IPCC RCP 8.5 scenario. The ¼ degree model resolution allows improved regional realism of the ocean circulation beyond that of available CMIP5-class models. We use a Lagrangian approach forced by modelled ocean circulation to simulate the circulation pathways that disperse planktonic life stages. Based on trajectory backtracking, we identify present-day coastal retention, dominant flow and dispersal range for coastal regions at the global scale. Projecting into the future, we identify areas of the strongest projected circulation change and present regional examples with the most significant modifications in their dominant pathways. Climatically induced changes in ocean circulation should be considered as an additional stressor of marine ecosystems in a similar way to ocean warming or acidification. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Calculation of the Phenix end-of-life test in natural circulation with the CATHARE code

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, L.; Cocheme, F.

    2012-07-01

    The Inst. of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support to French public authorities. As such, IRSN is in charge of safety assessment of operating and under construction reactors, as well as future projects. In this framework, one current objective of IRSN is to evaluate the ability and accuracy of numerical tools to foresee consequences of accidents. One of the advantages pointed up for fast reactors cooled by heavy liquid metal is the possibility of decay heat removal based on natural convection. The promotion of this passive cooling mode in future safety demonstrations will involve the use of adapted and validated numerical codes. After the final shutdown of the Phenix sodium cooled fast reactor in 2009, a set of tests covering different areas was conducted for code validation, including a natural circulation test in the primary circuit. Experimental data were issued by CEA to organize a benchmark exercise in the frame of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP), with the objective to assess the system-codes capability in simulating the thermal-hydraulics behavior of sodium cooled fast reactors in such accidental conditions. IRSN participated to this benchmark with the CATHARE code. This code, co-developed by CEA, EDF, AREVA and IRSN and widely used for PWR safety studies, was recently extended for sodium applications. This paper presents the CATHARE modeling of the Phenix primary circuit and the results obtained. A relatively good agreement was found with available measurements considering the experimental uncertainties. This work stressed the local aspects of phenomena occurring during the natural convection establishment and the limits of a 0D/1D approach. (authors)

  6. Impact of waves on the circulation flow in the Iguasu gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogovalov, S.; Kislov, V.; Tronin, I.

    2017-01-01

    2D axisymmetric transient flow induced by a pulsed braking force in the Iguasu gas centrifuge (GC) is simulated numerically. The simulation is performed for two cases: transient and stationary. The braking forces averaged over the period of rotation are equal to each other in both cases. The transient case is compared with the stationary case where the flow is excited by the stationary braking force.Two models of the gas cenrifuge is simulated. There are two cameras in the first model and three cameras in the second one. In the transient case for the two cameras model pulsations almost doubles the axial circulation flux in the working camera. In the transient case for the three cameras model the gas flux through the gap in the bottom baffle exceeds on 15 % the same flux in the stationary case for the same gas content and temperature at the walls of the rotor. We argue that the waves can reduce the gas content in the GC on the same 15 %.

  7. Mean circulation and high-frequency flow amplification in the Sable Gully

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenan, Blair J. W.; Petrie, Brian D.; Cardoso, Diana A.

    2014-06-01

    The Sable Gully, a broad, shelf break submarine canyon approximately 40 km east of Sable Island on the eastern Scotian Shelf, separates Banquereau and Sable Island Banks. Unique among canyons on the eastern Canadian continental shelf because of its depth, steep slopes and extension far onto the shelf, its ecological significance and increasing human pressures led to its designation in 2004 under Canada's Oceans Act as the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the Atlantic Region. To improve the state of knowledge of the Gully MPA, a multi-disciplinary field program was carried out in 2006-07; the physical oceanographic component consisted of the deployment (April 2006) and recovery (August 2007) of four current meter moorings and CTD surveys. Analysis of this 16-month mooring deployment demonstrates that the mean circulation above the canyon rim (~200 m) is characterized by a southwestward flow that appears unaffected by the canyon topography. There is also some indication of the existence of an eddy at rim depth. Below 500 m, the circulation is dominated by an upcanyon flow (of order 0.02 m s-1) at the mooring array (halfway between the canyon head and mouth). The mean, 200 m-bottom transport towards the head of the Gully was estimated as 35,500 m3 s-1, implying an upwelling velocity of 1.7×10-4 m s-1 (14 m d-1) over the area. Results also show bottom-intensified tidal flows and non-linear constituents due to the interaction of K1, O1, M2 and S2 components along the thalweg of the canyon; the strong overtides and compound tides observed in the Gully make it unique among canyons. Further analyses provide evidence of enhanced mixing in the Gully (Kv~180×10-4 m2 s-1), which is approximately 20 times that observed on the adjoining Scotian Shelf. Total variance of the currents in the Gully is about 2.5 times greater than that observed on the nearby continental slope with an equivalent water depth.

  8. Rockford Public Library's Circulation Services: A Work Flow Analysis and Spacial Analysis Study with Recommendations and Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Elizabeth; Grant, Wallace

    The purpose of this project was to perform an analysis of the Rockford Public Library (Illinois) circulation services department and provide recommendations leading to customer service improvement, better space utilization, and improved departmental work flow. Based on an analysis of input from individual interviews with staff, review of…

  9. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), existing assays still have low sensitivity (1–10 CTC/mL) due to the small volume of blood samples (5–10 mL). Consequently, they can miss up to 103–104 CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 102–103 times) by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults). We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC’s capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5–4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL) and throughput (up to 10 mL/min) than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-resolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits. PMID:24335964

  10. Flow cytometric detection of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein on feline circulating leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Paltrinieri, S; Marchini, I; Gelain, M E

    2012-08-01

    To assess whether alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) can be detected on the membrane of feline circulating leucocytes. The presence of AGP on circulating leucocytes was investigated in both clinically healthy cats and cats with different diseases. A group of feline coronavirus (FCoV)-positive cats, comprising cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) and cats not affected by FIP but seropositive for FCoV, were included in this study because the serum concentration of AGP increases during FCoV infection. Flow cytometry (using an anti-feline AGP antibody), serum protein electrophoresis, routine haematology and measurement of the serum AGP concentration were performed using blood samples from 32 healthy cats (19 FCoV-seropositive), 13 cats with FIP and 12 with other diseases (6 FCoV-seropositive). The proportion of cats with AGP-positive leucocytes in the different groups (e.g. controls vs sick; FIP vs other diseases, etc.) or in cats with different intensities of inflammatory response was compared using a Chi-square test. AGP-positive leucocytes were found in 23% of cats. Compared with controls, the proportion of patients with positive granulocytes and monocytes was higher among sick cats (especially cats with diseases other than FIP) and cats with high serum AGP concentration, but not in cats with leucocytosis or that were FCoV-seropositive. AGP-positive leucocytes can be found in feline blood, especially during inflammation. Conversely, no association between AGP-positive leucocytes and FIP was found. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this finding and its diagnostic role in cats with inflammation. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  11. Natural constructal emergence of vascular design with turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, E.; Lorente, S.; Bejan, A.

    2010-06-01

    Here, we show that vascular design emerges naturally when a volume is bathed by a single stream in turbulent flow. The stream enters the volume, spreads itself to bathe the volume, and then reconstitutes itself as a single stream before it exits the volume. We show that in the pursuit of a smaller global flow resistance and larger volumes, the flow architecture changes stepwise from a stack of identical elements bathed in parallel flow (like a deck of cards) to progressively more complex structures configured as trees matched canopy to canopy. The transition from one architecture to the next occurs at a precise volume size, which is identified. Each transition marks a decrease in the rate at which the global flow resistance increases with the volume size. This decrease accelerates as the volume size increases. The emergence of such vasculatures for turbulent flow is compared with the corresponding phenomenon when the flow is laminar. To predict this design generation phenomenon is essential to being able to scale up the designs of complex flow structures, from small scale models to life size models. The constructal law is a bridge between the principles of physics and biology.

  12. Thermohydraulic model experiments and calculations on the transition from forced to natural circulation for pool-type fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D.; Kamide, H.

    1990-01-01

    After a reactor scram, the decay heat removal (DHR) is of decisive importance for the safety of the plant. A fully passive DHR system based on natural circulation alone is independent of any power source. The DHE system consists of immersion coolers (ICs) installed in the hot plenum and connected to air coolers, each via intermediate circuits. During the postscram phase, the decay heat is to be removed by natural circulation from the core into the hot plenum and via the ICs and intermediate loops to the air coolers. The function of this DHR system is investigated and demonstrated in model tests with a geometry similar to the reactor, though on a different scale RAMONA is such a three-dimensional model set up on a 1:20 scale. It is operated with water. The steady-state tests for natural-circulation DHR operations have been conducted over a wide range of operational and geometric parameters. To study the transition from nominal to DHR conditions, experiments were defined to investigate the onset of natural circulation in the postscram phase (transient tests). The experiments were analyzed using the one-dimensional LEDHER code. LEDHER is a network analysis code for the long-term DHR of a fast reactor developed at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in Japan. The results of the experiments and conclusions are summarized.

  13. Characterising natural bedform morphology and its influence on flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Paarlberg, Andries J.; Winter, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Bedforms such as dunes and ripples are ubiquitous in rivers and coastal seas, and commonly described as triangular shapes from which height and length are calculated to estimate hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic parameters. Natural bedforms, however, present a far more complicated morphology; the difference between natural bedform shape and the often assumed triangular shape is usually neglected, and how this may affect the flow is unknown. This study investigates the shapes of natural bedforms and how they influence flow and shear stress, based on four datasets extracted from earlier studies on two rivers (the Rio Paraná in Argentina, and the Lower Rhine in The Netherlands). The most commonly occurring morphological elements are a sinusoidal stoss side made of one segment and a lee side made of two segments, a gently sloping upper lee side and a relatively steep (6 to 21°) slip face. A non-hydrostatic numerical model, set up using Delft3D, served to simulate the flow over fixed bedforms with various morphologies derived from the identified morphological elements. Both shear stress and turbulence increase with increasing slip face angle and are only marginally affected by the dimensions and positions of the upper and lower lee side. The average slip face angle determined from the bed profiles is 14°, over which there is no permanent flow separation. Shear stress and turbulence above natural bedforms are higher than above a flat bed but much lower than over the often assumed 30° lee side angle.

  14. Design of fuselage shapes for natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, S. S.; Vandam, C. P.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent technological advances in airplane construction techniques and materials allow for the production of aerodynamic surfaces without significant waviness and roughness, permitting long runs of natural laminar flow (NLF). The present research effort seeks to refine and validate computational design tools for use in the design of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric natural-laminar-flow bodies. The principal task of the investigation involves fuselage body shaping using a computational design procedure. Analytical methods were refined and exploratory calculations conducted to predict laminar boundary-layer on selected body shapes. Using a low-order surface-singularity aerodynamic analysis program, pressure distribution, boundary-layer development, transition location and drag coefficient have been obtained for a number of body shapes including a representative business-aircraft fuselage. Extensive runs of laminar flow were predicted in regions of favorable pressure gradient on smooth body surfaces. A computational design procedure was developed to obtain a body shape with minimum drag having large extent of NLF.

  15. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  16. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  17. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  18. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  19. [Impact of effect of natural disasters on the circulation of causative agents of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vaserin, Iu I; Khromenkova, E P; Dimidova, L L; Tverdokhlebova, T I; Nagornyĭ, S A; Prokopova, L V; Dumbadze, O S; Murashov, N E; Butaev, T M; Agirov, A Kh; Osmolovskiĭ, S V; Papatsenko, L B; Soldatova, M V

    2005-01-01

    The southern region is marked by a high incidence of parasitic diseases and a significant contamination of environmental objects with the eggs and cysts of their pathogens. Background examinations revealed the greatest soil contamination with helminthic eggs in the Temryuksky District of the Krasnodar Territory and in the towns of Vladikavkaz and Digora of the Republic of North Ossetia (Alania). The least contamination was found in Rostov-on-Don and the towns of the south-western area of the Krasnodar Territory. The eggs of Toxocara and astamination. There is an increase in the proportion of soil positive tests from 26.6 to 50.0, with the high (up to 82.0-100.0%) viability of eggs and a rise in the intensive index of their content per kg of soil (from 2.7 to 4.7-11.0). Toxocara eggs were mainly detected. The established high proportion of seropositive persons (10.7-18.0%) among the local population is an additional verification of the wide circulation of Toxocara eggs in nature. By the helminthic egg contamination index, the soils of localities of the south of Russia are qualified as those of moderate epidemic hazard. The floods accompanied by the increased helminthological contamination of the upper soil layer may lead to a higher human risk for contamination with helminthic diseases.

  20. Preliminary numerical studies of an experimental facility for heat removal in natural circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Caramello, M.; Falcone, N.; Bersano, A.; Panella, B.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years particular attention has been dedicated to passive safety systems for heat removal in nuclear power plants. Passive safety systems can achieve a high level of safety, as they carry out their mission relying solely on physical principles like natural circulation, without any need of operators or energy sources. To qualify these systems and components experimental activities are necessary to study and to understand the governing physical phenomena. The present paper shows the design of an experimental facility to be installed in the laboratories of the Energy Department of Politecnico di Torino. The facility is inspired by the decay heat removal system for ALFRED reactor and comprehends a heated bayonet tube and a heat sink for the heat removal (a heat exchanger inside a pool). The thermal power is in the order of 1 kW. A RELAP5-3D model of the facility has been developed and sensitivity analyses were performed to highlight the geometry of the heat exchanger, the final heat sink, and the mass of water inside the loop. The results of this phase serve to understand the physical limits of the facility, to demonstrate a preliminary feasibility and to optimize the geometry for the desired operating conditions.

  1. A Mass Circulation View of the Low Frequency Nature of the Stratospheric Northern Annular Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Cai, M.

    2016-12-01

    We consider three indices to measure polar stratospheric mass and stratospheric meridional mass circulation variability: anomalies of (i) total mass in the polar stratospheric cap (60-90°N, above the isentropic surface 400 K, PSM), (ii) total adiabatic mass transport across 60°N into the polar stratosphere cap (AMT), (iii) and total diabatic mass transport across 400 K into the polar stratosphere (DMT). It is confirmed that the negative stratospheric Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and normalized PSM indices have a nearly indistinguishable temporal evolution and both indices have the same red-noise-like spectrum with the de-correlation timescale of 4 weeks. In this sense, these two indices are synonymous with each other. This enables us to examine the low-frequency nature of the PSM (or NAM) index in the framework of the mass conservation, namely, dPSM/dt=AMT+DMT . Results indicate that the DMT index tends to be negatively correlated with the PSM index and also has a red-noise-like spectrum with the de-correlation timescale of 3-4 weeks. The AMT index, however, has a large positive correlation with the tendency of the PSM rather than the PSM itself. The temporal variability of the AMT has otherwise white-noise-like spectrum except with a pronounced peak at the 2-week timescale. Therefore, the conservation equation of the PSM behaves like a linear stochastic differential equation with the DMT serving as the thermal damping term and the AMT as the high-frequency white noise source term. It follows that the low-frequency nature of the stratospheric NAM (or PSM) index can be viewed as the red-noise response to a white noise in a fluctuation-dissipation system.

  2. Rethinking the process of detrainment: jets in obstructed natural flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossa, Michele; de Serio, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the mixing and diffusion of turbulent jets released in porous obstructions is still lacking in literature. This issue is undoubtedly of interest because it is not strictly limited to vegetated flows, but also includes outflows which come from different sources and which spread among oyster or wind farms, as well as aerial pesticide treatments sprayed onto orchards. The aim of the present research is to analyze this process from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, by examining the entrainment coefficient, it is deduced that the presence of a canopy prevents a momentum jet from having an entrainment process, but rather promotes its detrainment. In nature, detrainment is usually associated with buoyancy-driven flows, such as plumes or density currents flowing in a stratified environment. The present study proves that detrainment occurs also when a momentum-driven jet is issued in a not-stratified obstructed current, such as a vegetated flow.

  3. Rethinking the process of detrainment: jets in obstructed natural flows

    PubMed Central

    Mossa, Michele; De Serio, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the mixing and diffusion of turbulent jets released in porous obstructions is still lacking in literature. This issue is undoubtedly of interest because it is not strictly limited to vegetated flows, but also includes outflows which come from different sources and which spread among oyster or wind farms, as well as aerial pesticide treatments sprayed onto orchards. The aim of the present research is to analyze this process from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, by examining the entrainment coefficient, it is deduced that the presence of a canopy prevents a momentum jet from having an entrainment process, but rather promotes its detrainment. In nature, detrainment is usually associated with buoyancy-driven flows, such as plumes or density currents flowing in a stratified environment. The present study proves that detrainment occurs also when a momentum-driven jet is issued in a not-stratified obstructed current, such as a vegetated flow. PMID:27974835

  4. Rethinking the process of detrainment: jets in obstructed natural flows.

    PubMed

    Mossa, Michele; De Serio, Francesca

    2016-12-15

    A thorough understanding of the mixing and diffusion of turbulent jets released in porous obstructions is still lacking in literature. This issue is undoubtedly of interest because it is not strictly limited to vegetated flows, but also includes outflows which come from different sources and which spread among oyster or wind farms, as well as aerial pesticide treatments sprayed onto orchards. The aim of the present research is to analyze this process from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, by examining the entrainment coefficient, it is deduced that the presence of a canopy prevents a momentum jet from having an entrainment process, but rather promotes its detrainment. In nature, detrainment is usually associated with buoyancy-driven flows, such as plumes or density currents flowing in a stratified environment. The present study proves that detrainment occurs also when a momentum-driven jet is issued in a not-stratified obstructed current, such as a vegetated flow.

  5. The natural flow regime of Hawaíi streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Y. P.; Strauch, A. M.; Clilverd, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater is a critical, but limited natural resource on tropical islands; sustaining agriculture, industry, hydropower, urban development, and domestic water supply. The hydrology of Hawaíi islands is largely influenced by the health of mountain forests, which capture and absorb rain and fog drip, recharging aquifers and sustaining stream flow. Forests in Hawaíi are being degraded through the replacement of native vegetation with introduced species or conversion to another land use. Streams in the tropics frequently experience flash flooding due to extreme rainfall-runoff events and low flows due to seasonal drought. These patterns drive habitat availability for freshwater fauna, as well as sediment and nutrient export to near-shore ecosystems. Flow regimes can be used to characterize the frequency and magnitude of extreme high and low flows and are influenced by watershed climate, geology, land cover and soil composition. We examined the effect of climate extremes on stream flow from Hawaiian forests using historical flow data to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns in surface water resources. By defining flow regimes from forests we can improve our understanding of climate extremes on water resource availability across tropical island landscapes.

  6. Role of circulating nitrite and S-nitrosohemoglobin in the regulation of regional blood flow in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Shelhamer, James H.; Schechter, Alan N.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; Panza, Julio A.; Ognibene, Frederick P.; Cannon, Richard O.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the relative contributions of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) vs. intravascular nitrogen oxide species in the regulation of human blood flow, we simultaneously measured forearm blood flow and arterial and venous levels of plasma nitrite, LMW-SNOs and HMW-SNOs, and red cell S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb). Measurements were made at rest and during regional inhibition of NO synthesis, followed by forearm exercise. Surprisingly, we found significant circulating arterial-venous plasma nitrite gradients, providing a novel delivery source for intravascular NO. Further supporting the notion that circulating nitrite is bioactive, the consumption of nitrite increased significantly with exercise during the inhibition of regional endothelial synthesis of NO. The role of circulating S-nitrosothiols and SNO-Hb in the regulation of basal vascular tone is less certain. We found that low-molecular-weight S-nitrosothiols were undetectable and S-nitroso-albumin levels were two logs lower than previously reported. In fact, S-nitroso-albumin primarily formed in the venous circulation, even during NO synthase inhibition. Whereas SNO-Hb was measurable in the human circulation (brachial artery levels of 170 nM in whole blood), arterial-venous gradients were not significant, and delivery of NO from SNO-Hb was minimal. In conclusion, we present data that suggest (i) circulating nitrite is bioactive and provides a delivery gradient of intravascular NO, (ii) S-nitroso-albumin does not deliver NO from the lungs to the tissue but forms in the peripheral circulation, and (iii) SNO-Hb and S-nitrosothiols play a minimal role in the regulation of basal vascular tone, even during exercise stress. PMID:11027349

  7. Role of circulating nitrite and S-nitrosohemoglobin in the regulation of regional blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Gladwin, M T; Shelhamer, J H; Schechter, A N; Pease-Fye, M E; Waclawiw, M A; Panza, J A; Ognibene, F P; Cannon, R O

    2000-10-10

    To determine the relative contributions of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) vs. intravascular nitrogen oxide species in the regulation of human blood flow, we simultaneously measured forearm blood flow and arterial and venous levels of plasma nitrite, LMW-SNOs and HMW-SNOs, and red cell S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb). Measurements were made at rest and during regional inhibition of NO synthesis, followed by forearm exercise. Surprisingly, we found significant circulating arterial-venous plasma nitrite gradients, providing a novel delivery source for intravascular NO. Further supporting the notion that circulating nitrite is bioactive, the consumption of nitrite increased significantly with exercise during the inhibition of regional endothelial synthesis of NO. The role of circulating S-nitrosothiols and SNO-Hb in the regulation of basal vascular tone is less certain. We found that low-molecular-weight S-nitrosothiols were undetectable and S-nitroso-albumin levels were two logs lower than previously reported. In fact, S-nitroso-albumin primarily formed in the venous circulation, even during NO synthase inhibition. Whereas SNO-Hb was measurable in the human circulation (brachial artery levels of 170 nM in whole blood), arterial-venous gradients were not significant, and delivery of NO from SNO-Hb was minimal. In conclusion, we present data that suggest (i) circulating nitrite is bioactive and provides a delivery gradient of intravascular NO, (ii) S-nitroso-albumin does not deliver NO from the lungs to the tissue but forms in the peripheral circulation, and (iii) SNO-Hb and S-nitrosothiols play a minimal role in the regulation of basal vascular tone, even during exercise stress.

  8. In vivo label-free photoacoustic flow cytography and on-the-spot laser killing of single circulating melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Wang, Lidai; Shi, Junhui; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ruiying; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-12-01

    Metastasis causes as many as 90% of cancer-related deaths, especially for the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma. Since hematogenous dissemination of circulating tumor cells is the major route of metastasis, detection and destruction of circulating tumor cells are vital for impeding metastasis and improving patient prognosis. Exploiting the exquisite intrinsic optical absorption contrast of circulating melanoma cells, we developed dual-wavelength photoacoustic flow cytography coupled with a nanosecond-pulsed melanoma-specific laser therapy mechanism. We have successfully achieved in vivo label-free imaging of rare single circulating melanoma cells in both arteries and veins of mice. Further, the photoacoustic signal from a circulating melanoma cell immediately hardware-triggers a lethal pinpoint laser irradiation to kill it on the spot in a thermally confined manner without causing collateral damage. A pseudo-therapy study including both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated the performance and the potential clinical value of our method, which can facilitate early treatment of metastasis by clearing circulating tumor cells from vasculature.

  9. In vivo label-free photoacoustic flow cytography and on-the-spot laser killing of single circulating melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Yun; Wang, Lidai; Shi, Junhui; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ruiying; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis causes as many as 90% of cancer-related deaths, especially for the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma. Since hematogenous dissemination of circulating tumor cells is the major route of metastasis, detection and destruction of circulating tumor cells are vital for impeding metastasis and improving patient prognosis. Exploiting the exquisite intrinsic optical absorption contrast of circulating melanoma cells, we developed dual-wavelength photoacoustic flow cytography coupled with a nanosecond-pulsed melanoma-specific laser therapy mechanism. We have successfully achieved in vivo label-free imaging of rare single circulating melanoma cells in both arteries and veins of mice. Further, the photoacoustic signal from a circulating melanoma cell immediately hardware-triggers a lethal pinpoint laser irradiation to kill it on the spot in a thermally confined manner without causing collateral damage. A pseudo-therapy study including both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated the performance and the potential clinical value of our method, which can facilitate early treatment of metastasis by clearing circulating tumor cells from vasculature. PMID:28000788

  10. Critical rate of electrolyte circulation for preventing zinc dendrite formation in a zinc-bromine redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyeon Sun; Park, Jong Ho; Ra, Ho Won; Jin, Chang-Soo; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    In a zinc-bromine redox flow battery, a nonaqueous and dense polybromide phase formed because of bromide oxidation in the positive electrolyte during charging. This formation led to complicated two-phase flow on the electrode surface. The polybromide and aqueous phases led to different kinetics of the Br/Br- redox reaction; poor mixing of the two phases caused uneven redox kinetics on the electrode surface. As the Br/Br- redox reaction was coupled with the zinc deposition reaction, the uneven redox reaction on the positive electrode was accompanied by nonuniform zinc deposition and zinc dendrite formation, which degraded battery stability. A single-flow cell was operated at varying electrolyte circulation rates and current densities. Zinc dendrite formation was observed after cell disassembly following charge-discharge testing. In addition, the flow behavior in the positive compartment was observed by using a transparent version of the cell. At low rate of electrolyte circulation, the polybromide phase clearly separated from the aqueous phase and accumulated at the bottom of the flow frame. In the corresponding area on the negative electrode, a large amount of zinc dendrites was observed after charge-discharge testing. Therefore, a minimum circulation rate should be considered to avoid poor mixing of the positive electrolyte.

  11. Climatology and natural variability of the global hydrologic cycle in the GLA atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Mehta, V. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    Time average climatology and low-frequency variabilities of the global hydrologic cycle (GHC) in the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) were investigated in the present work. A 730-day experiment was conducted with the GLA GCM forced by insolation, sea surface temperature, and ice-snow undergoing climatological annual cycles. Ifluences of interactive soil moisture on time average climatology and natural variability of the GHC were also investigated by conducting 365-day experiments with and without interactive soil moisture. Insolation, sea surface temperature, and ice-snow were fixed at their July levels in the latter two experiments. Results show that the model's time average hydrologic cycle variables for July in all three experiments agree reasonably well with observations. Except in the case of precipitable water, the zonal average climates of the annual cycle experiment and the two perpetual July experiments are alike, i.e., their differences are within limits of the natural variability of the model's climate. Statistics of various components of the GHC, i.e., water vapor, evaporation, and precipitation, are significantly affected by the presence of interactive soil moisture. A long-term trend is found in the principal empirical modes of variability of ground wetness, evaporation, and sensible heat. Dominant modes of variability of these quantities over land are physically consistent with one another and with land surface energy balance requirements. The dominant mode of precipitation variability is found to be closely related to organized convection over the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The precipitation variability has timescales in the range of 2 to 3 months and can be identified with the stationary component of the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The precipitation mode is not sensitive to the presence of interactive soil moisture but is closely linked to both the rotational and divergent components of atmospheric

  12. Climatology and natural variability of the global hydrologic cycle in the GLA atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Mehta, V. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    Time average climatology and low-frequency variabilities of the global hydrologic cycle (GHC) in the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) were investigated in the present work. A 730-day experiment was conducted with the GLA GCM forced by insolation, sea surface temperature, and ice-snow undergoing climatological annual cycles. Ifluences of interactive soil moisture on time average climatology and natural variability of the GHC were also investigated by conducting 365-day experiments with and without interactive soil moisture. Insolation, sea surface temperature, and ice-snow were fixed at their July levels in the latter two experiments. Results show that the model's time average hydrologic cycle variables for July in all three experiments agree reasonably well with observations. Except in the case of precipitable water, the zonal average climates of the annual cycle experiment and the two perpetual July experiments are alike, i.e., their differences are within limits of the natural variability of the model's climate. Statistics of various components of the GHC, i.e., water vapor, evaporation, and precipitation, are significantly affected by the presence of interactive soil moisture. A long-term trend is found in the principal empirical modes of variability of ground wetness, evaporation, and sensible heat. Dominant modes of variability of these quantities over land are physically consistent with one another and with land surface energy balance requirements. The dominant mode of precipitation variability is found to be closely related to organized convection over the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The precipitation variability has timescales in the range of 2 to 3 months and can be identified with the stationary component of the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The precipitation mode is not sensitive to the presence of interactive soil moisture but is closely linked to both the rotational and divergent components of atmospheric

  13. Coordinated scheduling of electricity and natural gas infrastructures with a transient model for natural gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cong; Shahidehpour, Mohammad; Wang, Jianhui

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on transient characteristics of natural gas flow in the coordinated scheduling of security-constrained electricity and natural gas infrastructures. The paper takes into account the slow transient process in the natural gas transmission systems. Considering their transient characteristics, natural gas transmission systems are modeled as a set of partial differential equations (PDEs) and algebraic equations. An implicit finite difference method is applied to approximate PDEs by difference equations. The coordinated scheduling of electricity and natural gas systems is described as a bi-level programming formulation from the independent system operator's viewpoint. The objective of the upper-level problem is to minimize the operating cost of electric power systems while the natural gas scheduling optimization problem is nested within the lower-level problem. Numerical examples are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed solution and to compare the solutions for steady-state and transient models of natural gas transmission systems.

  14. Coordinated scheduling of electricity and natural gas infrastructures with a transient model for natural gas flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Shahidehpour, Mohammad; Wang, Jianhui

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on transient characteristics of natural gas flow in the coordinated scheduling of security-constrained electricity and natural gas infrastructures. The paper takes into account the slow transient process in the natural gas transmission systems. Considering their transient characteristics, natural gas transmission systems are modeled as a set of partial differential equations (PDEs) and algebraic equations. An implicit finite difference method is applied to approximate PDEs by difference equations. The coordinated scheduling of electricity and natural gas systems is described as a bi-level programming formulation from the independent system operator's viewpoint. The objective of the upper-level problem is to minimize the operating cost of electric power systems while the natural gas scheduling optimization problem is nested within the lower-level problem. Numerical examples are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed solution and to compare the solutions for steady-state and transient models of natural gas transmission systems.

  15. Circulating tumor cells: clinically relevant molecular access based on a novel CTC flow cell.

    PubMed

    Winer-Jones, Jessamine P; Vahidi, Behrad; Arquilevich, Norma; Fang, Cong; Ferguson, Samuel; Harkins, Darren; Hill, Cory; Klem, Erich; Pagano, Paul C; Peasley, Chrissy; Romero, Juan; Shartle, Robert; Vasko, Robert C; Strauss, William M; Dempsey, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error) and a precision (CV<25%) down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens the way for clinically relevant genetic profiling of CTCs.

  16. Circulating Tumor Cells: Clinically Relevant Molecular Access Based on a Novel CTC Flow Cell

    PubMed Central

    Winer-Jones, Jessamine P.; Vahidi, Behrad; Arquilevich, Norma; Fang, Cong; Ferguson, Samuel; Harkins, Darren; Hill, Cory; Klem, Erich; Pagano, Paul C.; Peasley, Chrissy; Romero, Juan; Shartle, Robert; Vasko, Robert C.; Strauss, William M.; Dempsey, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. Methodology/Principal Findings Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error) and a precision (CV<25%) down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. Conclusions/Significance The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens the way for

  17. Wall jet analysis for circulation control aerodynamics. Part 2: Zonal modeling concepts for wall jet/potential flow coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Frank A.; Dash, Sanford M.

    1987-01-01

    Work currently in progress to update an existing transonic circulation control airfoil analysis method is described. Existing methods suffer from two dificiencies: the inability to predict the shock structure of the underexpanded supersonic jets; and the insensitivity of the calculation to small changes in the Coanda surface geometry. A method developed for the analysis of jet exhaust plumes in supersonic flow is being modified for the case of the underexpanded wall jet. In the subsonic case, the same wall jet model was modified to include the calculation of the normal pressure gradient. This model is currently being coupled with the transonic circulation control airfoil analysis.

  18. Circulating tumor cell detection in hepatocellular carcinoma based on karyoplasmic ratios using imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zixin; Guo, Weixing; Zhang, Dandan; Pang, Yanan; Shi, Jie; Wan, Siqin; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Shuqun

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) originate from tumor tissues and are associated with cancer prognosis. However, existing technologies for CTC detection are limited owing to a lack of specific or accurate biomarkers. Here, we developed a new method for CTC detection based on the karyoplasmic ratio, without biomarkers. Consecutive patients with liver cancer or non-cancer liver diseases were recruited. CTCs in blood samples were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry based on the karyoplasmic ratio as well as EpCAM and CD45. Microvascular invasion (MVI), tumor recurrence, and survival were recorded for all patients. A total of 56.2 ± 23.8/100,000 cells with high karyoplasmic ratios (HKR cells) were detected in cancer patients, which was higher than the number of HKR cells in the non-cancer group (7.6 ± 2.2/100,000). There was also a difference in HKR cells between liver cancer patients with and without MVI. Based on a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the threshold was 21.8 HKR cells per 100,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the area under the curve was higher than those of traditional methods (e.g., CD45 and EpCAM staining). These results indicate that the new CTC detection method was more sensitive and reliable than existing methods. Accordingly, it may improve clinical CTC detection. PMID:28009002

  19. Modelling of compositional flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhangxin; Douglas, J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    A double porosity model of multidimensional, multicomponent, three-phase flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is derived first on the basis of physical intuition and then by the mathematical theory of homogenization. A fully compositional model is considered when there are N chemical components, each of which may exist in any or all of the three phases: gas, oil, and water. The equations of the interaction between matrix and fracture systems are obtained from the mass, momentum, and energy balance laws and the entropy condition, and a mechanical potential tensor is introduced to describe the matrix boundary condition. Various types of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs are treated as particular cases of the present techniques.

  20. A Signature of Persistent Natural Thermohaline Circulation Cycles in Observed Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J.; Allan, R.; Folland, C.; Vellinga, M.; Mann, M.

    2005-12-01

    An ensemble of simulations of 20th Century climate using the HadCM3 coupled climate model forced with estimates of natural and anthropogenic forcings is compared with instrumental temperature data sets. The results show that while external climate forcing can account for most of 20th century climate change, there are also significant multidecadal climate fluctuations that are not produced by forcings. A major part of this variability corresponds to the `Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation' (AMO), which has been identified in observations, and represents coherent fluctuations in temperature throughout most of the Northern Hemisphere. Using a 1400 year calculation with HadCM3 without external forcings, we show the model produces a quasi-periodic internal mode with a pattern, amplitude and characteristic time scale similar to that of the observed AMO. Further, the model implies the AMO is a genuine long-lived quasi-cyclical climate phenomenon related to large-scale oceanic heat transport variations associated with changes in the strength of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of about 2 Sv (10%). In the simulation, stronger cross-equatorial temperature gradients are associated with the anomalous northward ocean heat transport during a warm AMO phase. This causes a northward displacement of the mean ITCZ, leading to more rainfall and the development of anomalously fresh water in the tropical North Atlantic. These sustained anomalies slowly propagate to the subpolar North Atlantic in about 5 decades, where they act to slow the THC. The results also confirm observed links between the AMO and multidecadal variability in north-east Brazil and Sahel precipitation, and Atlantic hurricane formation. In addition, the simulated link between temperature and the THC allows an estimate of possible past changes in THC strength. Our results imply that the THC has undergone distinct strong and weak phases in the 20th century and has strengthened over recent decades. We also produce a

  1. Evaluation of circulating levels and renal clearance of natural amino acids in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Pivonello, R; Melis, D; Alfieri, R; Filippella, M; Spagnuolo, G; Salvatore, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2002-02-01

    Although the hypercortisolism-induced impairment of protein homeostasis is object of several studies, a detailed evaluation of the complete amino acid profile of patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) has never been performed. The aim of the current open transversal controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary concentrations as well as renal clearance of the complete series of natural amino acids and their relationship with glucose tolerance in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Twenty patients with CD (10 active and 10 cured) and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls entered the study. Measurement of serum and urinary levels of the complete series of natural amino acids was performed in all patients analyzed by cationic exchange high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) after 2 weeks of a standardized protein intake regimen. The renal clearance (renal excretion rate) of each amino acid was calculated on the basis of the serum and urinary concentrations of creatinine and the specific amino acid. Fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose and insulin response to standard glucose load, insulinogenic and homeostasis model insulin resistance (Homa-R) indexes were also evaluated and correlated to the circulating levels and renal clearances of each amino acid. Significantly higher serum (p<0.01) and urinary (p<0.05) levels of alanine and cystine, lower serum and higher urinary levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.05) and higher renal excretion rates of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.01) were found in patients with active CD than in patients cured from the disease and in controls. No difference was found between cured patients and controls. Creatinine clearance was similar in active and cured patients and in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol levels were significantly correlated to urinary cystine levels (r=0.85; p<0.01) and renal excretion rate of leucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05), isoleucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05) and valine (r=-0

  2. Modeling of information flows in natural gas storage facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbari, Leyla; Bahar, Arifah; Aziz, Zainal Abdul

    2013-09-01

    The paper considers the natural-gas storage valuation based on the information-based pricing framework of Brody-Hughston-Macrina (BHM). As opposed to many studies which the associated filtration is considered pre-specified, this work tries to construct the filtration in terms of the information provided to the market. The value of the storage is given by the sum of the discounted expectations of the cash flows under risk-neutral measure, conditional to the constructed filtration with the Brownian bridge noise term. In order to model the flow of information about the cash flows, we assume the existence of a fixed pricing kernel with liquid, homogenous and incomplete market without arbitrage.

  3. Indomethacin Inhibits Circulating PGE2 and Reverses Postexercise Suppression of Natural Killer Cell Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    after the oral administration of a placebo, the PG inhibitor indomethacin (75 mg/day for 5 days), or naltrexone (reported elsewhere). Circulating...which blocks PGE2 biosynthe- sis via inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity (57). Maxi- mal suppression of PG production occurs with doses between 50...and 150 mg (1). In addition to the indepen- dent effects of PGE2 on NKCA, low circulating levels of PGE2 can synergize with endogenous glucocorticoids

  4. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (Compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Part 3 of the Symposium proceedings contains papers addressing advanced airfoil development, flight research experiments, and supersonic transition/laminar flow control research. Specific topics include the design and testing of natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils, NLF wing gloves, and NLF nacelles; laminar boundary-layer stability over fuselage forebodies; the design of low noise supersonic/hypersonic wind tunnels; and boundary layer instability mechanisms on swept leading edges at supersonic speeds.

  5. Synergy of photoacoustic and fluorescence flow cytometry of circulating cells with negative and positive contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sawant, Rupa; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    In vivo photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence flow cytometry were previously applied separately using pulsed and continuous wave lasers respectively, and positive contrast detection mode only. This paper introduces a real-time integration of both techniques with positive and negative contrast modes using only pulsed lasers. Various applications of this new tool are summarized, including detection of liposomes loaded with Alexa-660 dye, red blood cells labeled with Indocyanine Green, B16F10 melanoma cells co-expressing melanin and green fluorescent protein (GFP), C8161-GFP melanoma cells targeted by magnetic nanoparticles, MTLn3 adenocarcinoma cells expressing novel near-infrared iRFP protein, and quantum dot-carbon nanotube conjugates. Negative contrast flow cytometry provided label-free detection of low absorbing or weakly fluorescent cells in blood absorption and autofluorescence background, respectively. The use of pulsed laser for time-resolved discrimination of objects with long fluorescence lifetime (e.g., quantum dots) from shorter autofluorescence background (e.g., blood plasma) is also highlighted in this paper. The supplementary nature of PA and fluorescence detection increased the versatility of the integrated method for simultaneous detection of probes and cells having various absorbing and fluorescent properties, and provided verification of PA data using a more established fluorescence based technique. The principles of integrated photoacoustic and fluorescence flow cytometry using positive contrast for detection of strongly absorbing and fluorescent cells and negative contrast for detection of weakly absorbing and fluorescent cells in blood absorption and autofluorescence background, respectively. PMID:22903924

  6. Development of the Circulation Control Flow Scheme Used in the NTF Semi-Span FAST-MAC Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Chan, David T.; Allan, Brian G.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Melton, Latunia P.; Anders, Scott G.; Carter, Melissa B.; Capone, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    The application of a circulation control system for high Reynolds numbers was experimentally validated with the Fundamental Aerodynamic Subsonic Transonic Modular Active Control semi-span model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. This model utilized four independent flow paths to modify the lift and thrust performance of a representative advanced transport type of wing. The design of the internal flow paths highlights the challenges associated with high Reynolds number testing in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel. Weight flow boundaries for the air delivery system were identified at mildly cryogenic conditions ranging from 0.1 to 10 lbm/sec. Results from the test verified system performance and identified solutions associated with the weight-flow metering system that are linked to internal perforated plates used to achieve flow uniformity at the jet exit.

  7. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-06-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm2), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis.

  8. Hybrid on-axis plus ridge-perpendicular circulation reconciles hydrothermal flow observations at fast spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, J.; Theissen-Krah, S.; Rupke, L.; Morgan, J.; Iyer, K. H.; Petersen, S.; Devey, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present crustal-scale 3D numerical calculations of hydrothermal fluid flow at fast spreading ridges. The model domain covers 5 km along-axis, 20 km across-axis and extends down to Moho depth. We observe that a complex hydrothermal system develops that extends over the entire crustal thickness and forms a series of on-axis vent fields with an average along-ridge spacing of 500-1000m. This hydrothermal system comprises two distinct flow components: (1) An on-axis circulation above the melt lens with recharging flow surrounding the hot up-flow zones. (2) A ridge-perpendicular circulation with recharge areas located kilometers away from the ridge. Here fluids penetrate the crust down to Moho depth and travel at temperatures of 400-600°C towards the ridge where they merge with the on-axis circulation in a reaction zone above the axial melt lens. Fluids released at the seafloor are a mixture of both components, with an average ratio between proximately- and distally-sourced fluids of about 2:1. This hybrid hydrothermal system reconciles previously incompatible observations that support either on-axis or ridge-perpendicular circulation patterns. The potential co-existence of two interacting hydrothermal circulations at fast spreading ridges is of importance for the interpretation of chemical signatures at hydrothermal vents and the quantification of the mass and energy exchange between ocean and solid earth: (1) A vertically and laterally extended ridge-perpendicular circulation will expose a much larger volume of oceanic crust to high-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Especially the lower crust would also be exposed to significant hydrothermal fluid flow and thus geochemical mining. (2) Fluids that migrate ridge-perpendicular and undergo phase separation at depth are likely to separate gravitationally from the denser and highly saline brine phase. Only the vapor-like phase may migrate up-slope towards the top of the melt lens, where these fluids would provide a

  9. Numerical Modeling of Reactive Multiphase Flow for FCC and Hot Gas Desulfurization Circulating Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Aubrey L.

    2005-07-01

    This work was carried out to understand the behavior of the solid and gas phases in a CFB riser. Only the riser is modeled as a straight pipe. A model with linear algebraic approximation to solids viscosity of the form, {musubs} = 5.34{epsisubs}, ({espisubs} is the solids volume fraction) with an appropriate boundary condition at the wall obtained by approximate momentum balance solution at the wall to acount for the solids recirculation is tested against experimental results. The work done was to predict the flow patterns in the CFB risers from available experimental data, including data from a 7.5-cm-ID CFB riser at the Illinois Institute of Technology and data from a 20.0-cm-ID CFB riser at the Particulate Solid Research, Inc., facility. This research aims at modeling the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas using zinc oxide as the sorbent in a circulating fluidized bed and in the process indentifying the parameters that affect the performance of the sulfidation reactor. Two different gas-solid reaction models, the unreacted shrinking core (USC) and the grain model were applied to take into account chemical reaction resistances. Also two different approaches were used to affect the hydrodynamics of the process streams. The first model takes into account the effect of micro-scale particle clustering by adjusting the gas-particle drag law and the second one assumes a turbulent core with pseudo-steady state boundary condition at the wall. A comparison is made with experimental results.

  10. Enumeration, characterization, and collection of intact circulating tumor cells by cross contamination-free flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masashi; Takeda, Kazuo

    2011-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are an important biomarker for several solid cancers. Most of the commercially available systems for enumeration of CTC are based on immunomagnetic enrichment of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM/CD326)-expressing CTC before microscopic cell imaging or reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The aim of this study was to establish a practical method for enumeration of CTC using a novel flow cytometer that has a disposable microfluidic chip, which is designed to realize absolute cross contamination-free measurements and to collect the analyzed cell sample. Although the process of enumeration and labeling of CTC was optimized for this device, the simplified protocol described here could be applied to other flow cytometers. Cultured cancer cells spiked into normal blood were enriched using MACS® EpCAM-MicroBeads following cell labeling with an allophycocyanin (APC)-conjugated EpCAM mAb, instead of by intracellular staining of cytokeratins (CK). The EpCAM double-positive selection/labeling method allows enumeration of intact CTC, maintenance of cellular integrity, and the concomitant performance of a CTC viability test. The combination of the fine-tuned CTC enrichment process and the cytometric multicolor analysis resulted in a linear relationship between the output cell count and the input cell number from zero to hundreds of cells. In particular, a satisfactory signal/noise ratio was obtained by gate-exclusion of leukocyte signals using an anti-CD45 mAb. The entire process had little influence on the viability of the spiked lung cancer cell PC-9. Measured PC-9 and breast cancer MCF-7 cells bearing EpCAM-MicroBeads, APC-conjugated EpCAM mAb, and the DNA staining dye SYTO9 grew normally, demonstrating the potential usefulness of the collected samples for further studies. This intact CTC enumeration and analysis procedure (iCeap) would be of great benefit to clinicians by providing them with rapid stratification of antitumor therapy, and

  11. Simulation of natural flows in major river basins in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Alexandria M.; García, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Water Resources (OWR) in the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) is charged with the assessment of the State’s water resources. This study developed a watershed model for the major river basins that are within Alabama or that cross Alabama’s borders, which serves as a planning tool for water-resource decisionmakers. The watershed model chosen to assess the natural amount of available water was the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). Models were configured and calibrated for the following four river basins: Mobile, Gulf of Mexico, Middle Tennessee, and Chattahoochee. These models required calibrating unregulated U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gaging stations to estimate natural flows, with emphases on low-flow calibration. The target calibration criteria required the errors be within the range of: (1) ±10 percent for total-streamflow volume, (2) ±10 percent for low-flow volume, (3) ±15 percent for high-flow volume, (4) ±30 percent for summer volume, and (5) above 0.5 for the correlation coefficient (R2). Seventy-one of the 90 calibration stations in the watershed models for the four major river basins within Alabama met the target calibration criteria. Variability in the model performance can be attributed to limitations in correctly representing certain hydrologic conditions that are characterized by some of the ecoregions in Alabama. Ecoregions consisting of predominantly clayey soils and (or) low topographic relief yield less successful calibration results, whereas ecoregions consisting of loamy and sandy soils and (or) high topographic relief yield more successful calibration results. Results indicate that the model does well in hilly regions with sandy soils because of rapid surface runoff and more direct interaction with subsurface flow.

  12. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 1: Critical heat flux, boiling crisis onset and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. The same loop was used in two experiments with different heated section internal diameter (10 and 6 mm). The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were recorded. The values of critical heat flux (CHF) were found at different positions of the test section, and the post-CHF regime was studied. The predictions of CHF by existing correlations were good in the downstream portion of the section, however CHF anomalies have been observed near the entrance, in the low quality region. In resonance with this, the re-wetting of the surface has distinct hysteresis behavior in each of the two CHF regions. Furthermore, hydraulics effects of crisis, namely on friction, were studied (Part 2). This research is the starting point to future works addressing transients conducing to boiling crisis in helium natural circulation loops.

  13. Subtle exchange model of flow depended on the blood cell shape to enhance the micro-circulation in capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Iatneng

    2012-02-01

    In general the exchange of gases or other material in capillary system is conceptualized by the diffusion effect. But in this model, we investigate a micro-flow pattern by simulation and computation on a micro-exchange model in which the blood cell is a considered factor, especially on its shape. It shows that the cell benefits the circulation while it is moving in the capillary. In the study, the flow detail near the cell surface is mathematically analyzed, such that the Navier-Stokes equations are applied and the viscous factor is also briefly considered. For having a driven force to the motion of micro-circulation, a breathing mode is suggested to approximately compute on the flow rate in the blood capillary during the transfer of cell. The rate is also used to estimate the enhancement to the circulation in additional to the outcome of diffusion. Moreover in the research, the shape change of capillary wall under pressure influence is another element in the beginning calculation for the effect in the assistance to cell motion.

  14. The characterization of a non-Newtonian blood analog in natural- and shear-layer-induced transitional flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Walker, Andrew M; Rival, David E

    2014-01-01

    Although a blood analog of aqueous glycerol and xanthan gum was found to replicate the viscoelastic behavior of blood, measurements were restricted to laminar flow. To expand the characterization of a non-Newtonian blood analog of aqueous glycerol and xanthan gum to transitional Reynolds numbers to quantify its behavior as a function of both natural and shear-layer-induced mechanisms. A Newtonian analog and a shear-thinning aqueous glycerol, xanthan gum solution were circulated through an in vitro flow loop replicating both a straight and obstructed artery where transition was initiated through natural and shear-layer-induced mechanisms respectively. Steady and pulsatile pressure drop measurements for both fluids were acquired across a range of Reynolds numbers up to 7600 and Womersley numbers of 4 and 6. In steady and pulsatile straight flow, the non-Newtonian analog presented with reduced pressure drops and prolonged laminar flow to Reynolds numbers of 3200 and 3800 respectively. Upon blockage inclusion, non-Newtonian minor losses were comparable to Newtonian in steady flow and greater in pulsatile flow suggesting an elongation of downstream non-Newtonian recirculation. Although non-Newtonian total system pressure drops in both straight and obstructed flows were lower, the ratio of pressure drop difference between the two fluids decreased through shear-layer-induced transition. These findings not only demonstrated the suitability of using a xanthan gum analog to model blood flow in transitional regimes, but also presented the respective differences in analog behavior as a function of transition mechanism.

  15. Characterization of fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.D.

    1981-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a four month study of the characteristics of multiphase flow in naturally fractured porous media. An assessment and evaluation of the literature was carried out and a comprehensive list of references compiled on the subject. Mathematical models presented in the various references cited were evaluated along with the stated assumptions or those inherent in the equations. Particular attention was focused upon identifying unique approaches which would lead to the formulation of a general mathematical model of multiphase/multi-component flow in fractured porous media. A model is presented which may be used to more accurately predict the movement of multi-phase fluids through such type formations. Equations of motion are derived for a multiphase/multicomponent fluid which is flowing through a double porosity, double permeability medium consisting of isotropic primary rock matrix blocks and an anisotropic fracture matrix system. The fractures are assumed to have a general statistical distribution in space and orientation. A general distribution function, called the fracture matrix function is introduced to represent the statistical nature of the fractures.

  16. Particle filter based on thermophoretic deposition from natural convection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sasse, A.G.B.M.; Nazaroff, W.W. ); Gadgil, A.J. )

    1994-04-01

    We present an analysis of particle migration in a natural convection flow between parallel plates and within the annulus of concentric tubes. The flow channel is vertically oriented with one surface maintained at a higher temperature than the other. Particle migration is dominated by advection in the vertical direction and thermophoresis in the horizontal direction. From scale analysis it is demonstrated that particles are completely removed from air flowing through the channel if its length exceeds L[sub c] = (b[sup 4]g/24K[nu][sup 2]), where b is the width of the channel, g is the acceleration of gravity, K is a thermophoretic coefficient of order 0.5, and [nu] is the kinematic viscosity of air. Precise predictions of particle removal efficiency as a function of system parameters are obtained by numerical solution of the governing equations. Based on the model results, it appears feasible to develop a practical filter for removing smoke particles from a smoldering cigarette in an ashtray by using natural convection in combination with thermophoresis. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Role of terminal and anastomotic circulation in the patency of arteries jailed by flow-diverting stents: animal flow model evaluation and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Iosif, Christina; Berg, Philipp; Ponsonnard, Sebastien; Carles, Pierre; Saleme, Suzana; Pedrolo-Silveira, Eduardo; Mendes, Georges; Waihrich, Eduardo; Trolliard, Gilles; Couquet, Claude-Yves; Yardin, Catherine; Mounayer, Charbel

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors describe herein the creation of an animal model capable of producing quantifiable data regarding blood flow rate and velocity modifications in terminal and anastomotic types of cerebrofacial circulation. They also present the preliminary results of a translational study aimed at investigating the role of terminal and anastomotic types of circulation in arterial branches jailed by flow-diverting stents as factors contributing to arterial patency or occlusion. METHODS Two Large White swine were used to validate a terminal-type arterial model at the level of the right ascending pharyngeal artery (APhA), created exclusively by endovascular means. Subsequently 4 Large White swine, allocated to 2 groups corresponding to the presence (Group B) or absence (Group A) of terminal-type flow modification, underwent placement of flow-diverting stents. Blood flow rates and velocities were quantified using a dedicated time-resolved 3D phase-contrast MRA sequence before and after stenting. Three months after stent placement, the stented arteries were evaluated with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Patent (circulating) ostia quantification was performed on the SEM images. RESULTS Terminal-type flow modification was feasible; an increase of 75.8% in mean blood velocities was observed in the right APhAs. The mean blood flow rate for Group A was 0.31 ± 0.19 ml/sec (95% CI -1.39 to 2.01) before stenting and 0.21 ± 0.07 ml/sec (95% CI -0.45 to 0.87) after stenting. The mean blood flow rate for Group B was 0.87 ± 0.32 ml/sec (95% CI -1.98 to 3.73) before stenting and 0.76 ± 0.13 ml/sec (95% CI -0.41 to 1.93) after stenting. Mean flow rates after stenting showed a statistically significant difference between Groups A and B (Welch test). Mean and maximal blood velocities were reduced in Group A cases and did not decrease in Group B cases. Control DSA and SEM findings showed near occlusion of the jailed APhAs in both

  18. Fluid Flow along Venous Adventitia in Rabbits: Is It a Potential Drainage System Complementary to Vascular Circulations?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-yi; Chen, Min; Yang, Jie-fu; Yang, Chong-qing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Fang; Tong, Jia-bin; Lv, You; Suonan, Caidan

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous research and other studies with radiotracers showed evidence of a centripetal drainage pathway, separate from blood or lymphatic vessels, that can be visualized when a small amount of low molecular weight tracer is injected subcutaneously into a given region on skin of humans. In order to further characterize this interesting biological phenomenon, animal experiments are designed to elucidate histological and physiologic characteristics of these visualized pathways. Methods Multiple tracers are injected subcutaneously into an acupuncture point of KI3 to visualize centripetal pathways by magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescein photography in 85 healthy rabbits. The pathways are compared with venography and indirect lymphangiography. Fluid flow through the pathways is observed by methods of altering their hydrated state, hydrolyzing by different collagenases, and histology is elucidated by optical, fluorescein and electron microscopy. Results Histological and magnetic imaging examinations of these visualized pathways show they consist of perivenous loose connective tissues. As evidenced by examinations of tracers’ uptake, they appear to function as a draining pathway for free interstitial fluid. Fluorescein sodium from KI3 is found in the pathways of hind limbs and segments of the small intestines, partial pulmonary veins and results in pericardial effusion, suggesting systematical involvement of this perivenous pathway. The hydraulic conductivity of these pathways can be compromised by the collapse of their fiber-rich beds hydrolyzed by either of collagenase type I, III, IV or V. Conclusions The identification of pathways comprising perivenous loose connective tissues with a high hydraulic conductivity draining interstitial fluid in hind limbs of a mammal suggests a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations. These findings may provide new insights into a systematically distributed collagenous connective tissue with

  19. Fluid flow along venous adventitia in rabbits: is it a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations?

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-yi; Chen, Min; Yang, Jie-fu; Yang, Chong-qing; Xu, Liang; Wang, Fang; Tong, Jia-bin; Lv, You; Suonan, Caidan

    2012-01-01

    Our previous research and other studies with radiotracers showed evidence of a centripetal drainage pathway, separate from blood or lymphatic vessels, that can be visualized when a small amount of low molecular weight tracer is injected subcutaneously into a given region on skin of humans. In order to further characterize this interesting biological phenomenon, animal experiments are designed to elucidate histological and physiologic characteristics of these visualized pathways. Multiple tracers are injected subcutaneously into an acupuncture point of KI3 to visualize centripetal pathways by magnetic resonance imaging or fluorescein photography in 85 healthy rabbits. The pathways are compared with venography and indirect lymphangiography. Fluid flow through the pathways is observed by methods of altering their hydrated state, hydrolyzing by different collagenases, and histology is elucidated by optical, fluorescein and electron microscopy. Histological and magnetic imaging examinations of these visualized pathways show they consist of perivenous loose connective tissues. As evidenced by examinations of tracers' uptake, they appear to function as a draining pathway for free interstitial fluid. Fluorescein sodium from KI3 is found in the pathways of hind limbs and segments of the small intestines, partial pulmonary veins and results in pericardial effusion, suggesting systematical involvement of this perivenous pathway. The hydraulic conductivity of these pathways can be compromised by the collapse of their fiber-rich beds hydrolyzed by either of collagenase type I, III, IV or V. The identification of pathways comprising perivenous loose connective tissues with a high hydraulic conductivity draining interstitial fluid in hind limbs of a mammal suggests a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations. These findings may provide new insights into a systematically distributed collagenous connective tissue with a circulatory function and their

  20. Evaluation of tubular poly(trimethylene carbonate) tissue engineering scaffolds in a circulating pulsatile flow system.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Wennink, Jos W H; Poot, Andre A; Vermes, Istvan; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2011-02-01

    Tubular scaffolds (internal diameter approximately 3 mm and wall thickness approximately 0.8 mm) with a porosity of approximately 83% and an average pore size of 116 µm were prepared from flexible poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) polymer by dip-coating and particulate leaching methods. PTMC is a flexible and biocompatible polymer that crosslinks upon irradiation; porous network structures were obtained by irradiating the specimens in vacuum at 25 kGy before leaching soluble salt particles. To assess the suitability of these scaffolds in dynamic cell culturing for cardiovascular tissue engineering, the scaffolds were coated with a thin (0.1 to 0.2 mm) non-porous PTMC layer and its performance was evaluated in a closed pulsatile flow system (PFS). For this, the PFS was operated at physiological conditions at liquid flows of 1.56 ml/s with pressures varying from 80-120 mmHg at a frequency of 70 pulsations per minute. The mechanical properties of these coated porous PTMC scaffolds were not significantly different than non-coated scaffolds. Typical tensile strengths in the radial direction were 0.15 MPa, initial stiffness values were close to 1.4 MPa. Their creep resistance in cyclic deformation experiments was excellent. In the pulsatile flow setup, the distention rates of these flexible and elastic scaffolds were approximately 0.10% per mmHg, which is comparable to that of a porcine carotid artery (0.11% per mmHg). The compliance and stiffness index values were close to those of natural arteries.?In long-term deformation studies, where the scaffolds were subjected to physiological pulsatile pressures for one week, the morphology and mechanical properties of the PTMC scaffolds did not change. This suggests their suitability for application in a dynamic cell culture bioreactor.

  1. Natural Length Scales Shape Liquid Phase Continuity in Unsaturated Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Lehmann, P. G.; Or, D.

    2015-12-01

    Unsaturated flows supporting soil evaporation and internal drainage play an important role in various hydrologic and climatic processes manifested at a wide range of scales. We study inherent natural length scales that govern these flow processes and constrain the spatial range of their representation by continuum models. These inherent length scales reflect interactions between intrinsic porous medium properties that affect liquid phase continuity, and the interplay among forces that drive and resist unsaturated flow. We have defined an intrinsic length scale for hydraulic continuity based on pore size distribution that controls soil evaporation dynamics (i.e., stage 1 to stage 2 transition). This simple metric may be used to delineate upper bounds for regional evaporative losses or the depth of soil-atmosphere interactions (in the absence of plants). A similar length scale governs the dynamics of internal redistribution towards attainment of field capacity, again through its effect on hydraulic continuity in the draining porous medium. The study provides a framework for guiding numerical and mathematical models for capillary flows across different scales considering the necessary conditions for coexistence of stationarity (REV), hydraulic continuity and intrinsic capillary gradients.

  2. Topological analysis of a mixing flow generated by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Pablo Sebastián; de la Cruz, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We use topological tools to describe the natural convective motion and the Lagrangian trajectories of a flow generated by stepwise, alternating heating and cooling protocol of opposite vertical walls of a cubic container. The working fluid considered is Newtonian and the system is in presence of the acceleration of gravity but the nonlinear terms are neglected, i.e., we study the piece-wise steady and linear problem. For this convective mixing flow, we identify invariant surfaces formed by the Lagrangian orbits of massless tracers that are topologically equivalent to spherical shells and period-1 lines with elliptic and hyperbolic segments that are located on symmetry planes. We describe the previous features as functions of the Rayleigh number in the range 3 × 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 5 × 105. We show that this system shares properties with other systems with non-toroidal invariant surfaces.

  3. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell.

    PubMed

    Arp, Trevor B; Barlas, Yafis; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2016-12-14

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light energy harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light-harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we compare the theoretical minimum energy fluctuations in nanoscale quantum heat engine photocells that incorporate one or two photon-absorbing channels and show that fluctuations are naturally suppressed in the two-channel photocell. This intrinsic suppression acts as a passive regulation mechanism that enables the efficient conversion of varying incident solar power into a steady output for absorption over a broad range of the solar spectrum on Earth. Remarkably, absorption in the green portion of the spectrum provides no inherent regulatory benefit, indicating that green light should be rejected in a photocell whose primary role is the regulation of energy flow.

  4. High-flaps for natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Harry L.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the NACA and NASA low-drag airfoil research is presented with particular emphasis given to the development of mechanical high-lift flap systems and their application to general aviation aircraft. These flap systems include split, plain, single-slotted, and double-slotted trailing-edge flaps plus slat and Krueger leading-edge devices. The recently developed continuous variable-camber high-lift mechanism is also described. The state-of-the-art of theoretical methods for the design and analysis of multi-component airfoils in two-dimensional subsonic flow is discussed, and a detailed description of the Langley MCARF (Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis Program) computer code is presented. The results of a recent effort to design a single- and double-slotted flap system for the NASA high speed natural laminar flow (HSNLF) (1)-0213 airfoil using the MCARF code are presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the code.

  5. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (Compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, NASA, industry, and universities have worked together to conduct important research focused at developing laminar flow technology that could reduce fuel consumption for general aviation, commuter, and transport aircraft by as much as 40 to 50 percent. The symposium was planned in view of the recent accomplishments within the areas of laminar flow control and natural laminar flow, and the potential benefits of laminar flow technology to the civil and military aircraft communities in the United States. Included were technical sessions on advanced theory and design tool development; wind tunnel and flight research; transition measurement and detection techniques; low and high Reynolds number research; and subsonic and supersonic research.

  6. Natural Vertical Flow in the Los Azufres, Mexico, Geothermal Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, E.R.; Arellano, V.M.; Ortiz-Ramirez, J.

    1986-01-21

    This work focuses on estimating the mass (M) and energy (E) flow rates, the permeability k, and the relative permeability functions R{sub L} and R{sub V} associated with the natural vertical flow in the reservoir. To estimate M and E we used the standard 1-D vertical equations for two-phase flow, complemented with boundary conditions at the boiling and dew interfaces. These boundary conditions were derived in an earlier stage of this study that established an approximate 1-D vertical model of the reservoir. The estimated values of M and E were then used together with the previously established liquid saturation vertical profile of the reservoir, and the differential equation expressing the pressure gradient, to fit, by trial and error, the observed natural pressure profile. The accuracy of the fit depends on the assumed value for the vertical permeability and on the chosen forms for the relative permeability functions. They estimated M {approx} 6.9 x 10{sup -8} kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and E {approx} 0.2 W m{sup -2}. These results lie well within the ample ranges of mass and energy flowrates per unit area found in geothermal fields worldwide. The estimated values of M and E support the previous inference that there is an extensive caprock in the reservoir. The best fit to the natural pressure gradient implies a vertical permeability of about 0.08 mD, residual water- and steam-saturations of about 0.04 and 0.00 respectively, and ''fracture relative permeabilities'' (i.e., R{sub L} + R{sub V} = 1). This work addresses a major obstacle for a successful analysis of the Los Azufres geothermal reservoir, which is characterized by an extensive two-phase region: the former unavailability of reasonably reliable relative permeability functions. Furthermore, the present characterization of the vertical natural flow provides important constraints for both lumped- and distributed-parameter models of the reservoir. Finally, this work gives information on reservoir properties that

  7. Differentiation of chronic total occlusion and subtotal occlusion of the femoropopliteal artery-role of retrograde flow sign and collateral circulation on CT angiography images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujun; Su, Yanfei; Chen, Haisong

    2017-08-01

    To study the value of a retrograde flow sign and the collateral circulation on CT angiography (CTA) for the differential diagnosis of chronic total occlusion from subtotal occlusion of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA). 50 patients with obstruction of the FPA underwent CTA and digital subtraction angiography examinations of the lower limbs. The frequency of a retrograde flow sign and collateral circulation on CTA in chronic total and subtotal occlusion was noted and analyzed, with the results of digital subtraction angiography as a standard to judge total or subtotal occlusion. The decreasing CT value from the distal to proximal direction on CTA suggests the existence of retrograde flow. There were significant differences in the occurrence rates of a retrograde flow sign on CTA in the chronic total and subtotal obstruction groups (X(2) = 13.1, p < 0.05), as well as a collateral circulation sign (X(2) = 13.5, p < 0.05). Employing both the retrograde flow sign and the collateral circulation sign to diagnose chronic total obstruction of the FPA had a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 89.8%. The retrograde flow sign combined with a collateral circulation sign is of great clinical value for differentiation of chronic total stenosis from severe stenosis (subtotal occlusion) of the FPA. Advances in knowledge: A retrograde flow sign combined with a collateral circulation sign is of great clinical value to differentiate between chronic total stenosis and severe stenosis (subtotal occlusion) of the FPA.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of various immunomodulators: independence from normal levels of circulating monocytes and natural killer cells. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Morahan, P.S.; Dempsey, W.L.; Volkman, A.; Connor, J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of /sup 89/Sr treatment on the natural host resistance of CD-1 mice and the enhancement of resistance by immunomodulators to infection with Listeria monocytogenes or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) were determined. In the CD-1 mouse, single-dose treatment with /sup 89/Sr caused a profound decrease in the number of circulating monocytes (Mo), lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) within 1 week. There was also marked functional impairment of the Mo inflammatory response, as well as markedly decreased spontaneous and activatable cytoxicity by splenic natural killer (NK) cells. Despite this profound cellular suppression, there was no significant change in natural resistance of CD-1 mice to L. monocytogenes of HSV-2 infection. Furthermore, prophylactic treatment of mice with the biologic immunomodulator Corynebacterium parvum or the synthetic immunomodulators maleic anhydride-divinyl ether or avridine in liposomes resulted in comparable enhancement of resistance in /sup 89/Sr-treated and normal mice. These data indicate that natural and immunomodulator-enhanced resistance of CD-1 mice to microbail infections do not depend on normal levels of Mo, PMN, or NK cells. The resistance enhancement may rely on activated tissue macrophages. In contrast to the early changes in circulating leukocytes, the residenet peritoneal cell populations were not markedly altered until after day 30. There then was a distinct decline in lymphocytes and a gradual decline in activated tissue macrophages.

  9. Building a Practical Natural Laminar Flow Design Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary natural laminar flow (NLF) design method that has been developed and applied to supersonic and transonic wings with moderate-to-high leading-edge sweeps at flight Reynolds numbers is further extended and evaluated in this paper. The modular design approach uses a knowledge-based design module linked with different flow solvers and boundary layer stability analysis methods to provide a multifidelity capability for NLF analysis and design. An assessment of the effects of different options for stability analysis is included using pressures and geometry from an NLF wing designed for the Common Research Model (CRM). Several extensions to the design module are described, including multiple new approaches to design for controlling attachment line contamination and transition. Finally, a modification to the NLF design algorithm that allows independent control of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) and cross flow (CF) modes is proposed. A preliminary evaluation of the TS-only option applied to the design of an NLF nacelle for the CRM is performed that includes the use of a low-fidelity stability analysis directly in the design module.

  10. Special session: computational predictability of natural convection flows in enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M A; Gresho, P M; Sutton, S B

    2000-08-14

    Modern thermal design practices often rely on a ''predictive'' simulation capability--although predictability is rarely quantified and often difficult to confidently achieve in practice. The computational predictability of natural convection in enclosures is a significant issue for many industrial thermal design problems. One example of this is the design for mitigation of optical distortion due to buoyancy-driven flow in large-scale laser systems. In many instances the sensitivity of buoyancy-driven enclosure flows can be linked to the presence of multiple bifurcation points that yield laminar thermal convective processes that transition from steady to various modes of unsteady flow. This behavior is brought to light by a problem as ''simple'' as a differentially-heated tall rectangular cavity (8:1 height/width aspect ratio) filled with a Boussinesq fluid with Pr = 0.71--which defines, at least partially, the focus of this special session. For our purposes, the differentially-heated cavity provides a virtual fluid dynamics laboratory.

  11. Assessment of flow distribution in the mouse fetal circulation at late gestation by high-frequency Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Qing; Cahill, Lindsay S; Wong, Michael D; Seed, Mike; Macgowan, Christopher K; Sled, John G

    2014-08-15

    This study used high-frequency ultrasound to evaluate the flow distribution in the mouse fetal circulation at late gestation. We studied 12 fetuses (embryonic day 17.5) from 12 pregnant CD1 mice with 40 MHz ultrasound to assess the flow in 11 vessels based on Doppler measurements of blood velocity and M-mode measurements of diameter. Specifically, the intrahepatic umbilical vein (UVIH), ductus venosus (DV), foramen ovale (FO), ascending aorta (AA), main pulmonary artery (MPA), ductus arteriosus (DA), descending thoracic aorta (DTA), common carotid artery (CCA), inferior vena cava (IVC), and right and left superior vena cavae (RSVC, LSVC) were examined, and anatomically confirmed by micro-CT. The mouse fetal circulatory system was found to be similar to that of the humans in terms of the major circuit and three shunts, but characterized by bilateral superior vena cavae and a single umbilical artery. The combined cardiac output (CCO) was 1.22 ± 0.05 ml/min, with the left ventricle (flow in AA) contributing 47.8 ± 2.3% and the right ventricle (flow in MPA) 52.2 ± 2.3%. Relative to the CCO, the flow percentages were 13.6 ± 1.0% for the UVIH, 10.4 ± 1.1% for the DV, 35.6 ± 2.4% for the DA, 41.9 ± 2.6% for the DTA, 3.8 ± 0.3% for the CCA, 29.5 ± 2.2% for the IVC, 12.7 ± 1.0% for the RSVC, and 9.9 ± 0.9% for the LSVC. The calculated flow percentage was 16.6 ± 3.4% for the pulmonary circulation and 31.2 ± 5.3% for the FO. In conclusion, the flow in mouse fetal circulation can be comprehensively evaluated with ultrasound. The baseline data of the flow distribution in normal mouse fetus serve as the reference range for future studies. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Mike; Banks, Dan; Garzon, Andres; Matisheck, Jason

    2014-01-01

    IR thermography was used to characterize the transition front on a S-NLF test article at chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million Changes in transition due to Mach number, Reynolds number, and surface roughness were investigated - Regions of laminar flow in excess of 80% chord at chord Reynolds numbers greater than 14 million IR thermography clearly showed the transition front and other flow features such as shock waves impinging upon the surface A series of parallel oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, were found to cause premature transition at higher Reynolds numbers. NASA has a current goal to eliminate barriers to the development of practical supersonic transport aircraft Drag reduction through the use of supersonic natural laminar flow (S-NLF) is currently being explored as a means of increasing aerodynamic efficiency - Tradeoffs work best for business jet class at M<2 Conventional high-speed designs minimize inviscid drag at the expense of viscous drag - Existence of strong spanwise pressure gradient leads to crossflow (CF) while adverse chordwise pressure gradients amplifies and Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instabilities Aerion Corporation has patented a S-NLF wing design (US Patent No. 5322242) - Low sweep to control CF - dp/dx < 0 on both wing surfaces to stabilize TS - Thin wing with sharp leading edge to minimize wave drag increase due to reduction in sweep NASA and Aerion have partnered to study S-NLF since 1999 Series of S-NLF experiments flown on the NASA F-15B research test bed airplane Infrared (IR) thermography used to characterize transition - Non-intrusive, global, good spatial resolution - Captures significant flow features well

  13. Initial Acute Animal Experiment Using a New Miniature Axial Flow Pump in Series With the Natural Heart.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Yano, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hidekazu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    We have advocated an axial flow blood pump called "valvo pump" that is implanted at the aortic valve position, and we have developed axial flow blood pumps to realize the concept of the valvo pump. The latest model of the axial flow blood pump mainly consists of a stator, a directly driven impeller, and a hydrodynamic bearing. The axial flow blood pump has a diameter of 33 mm and length of 74 mm, and the length of anatomical occupation is 33 mm. The axial flow blood pump is anastomosed to the aorta with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cuffs worn on the inflow and outflow ports. Dp-Q curves of the axial flow blood pump are flatter than those of ordinary axial flow pumps, and pump outflow of 5 L/min was obtained against a pressure difference of 50 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 9000 rpm in vitro. The axial flow blood pump was installed in a goat by anastomosing with the thoracic descending aorta using PTFE cuffs, and it was rotated at a rotational speed of 8000 rpm. Unlike in case of the ventricular assistance in parallel with the natural heart, pulsatilities of aortic pressure and aortic flow were preserved even when the pump was on, and mean aortic flow was increased by 1.5 L/min with increase in mean aortic pressure of 30 mm Hg. In conclusion, circulatory assistance in series with the natural heart using the axial flow blood pump was able to improve hemodynamic pulsatility, and it would contribute to improvement of end-organ circulation. . Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. THE LIQUID NITROGEN SYSTEM FOR CHAMBER A; A CHANGE FROM ORIGINAL FORCED FLOW DESIGN TO A NATURAL FLOW (THERMO SIPHON) SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, J.; Montz, M.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Knudsen, P.; Creel, J.; Arenius, D.; Garcia, S.

    2010-04-09

    NASA at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston is presently working toward modifying the original forced flow liquid nitrogen cooling system for the thermal shield in the space simulation chamber-A in Building 32 to work as a natural flow (thermo siphon) system. Chamber A is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 35.66 m (117 ft) high. The LN{sub 2} shroud environment within the chamber is approximately 17.4 m (57 ft) in diameter and 28 m (92 ft) high. The new thermo siphon system will improve the reliability, stability of the system. Also it will reduce the operating temperature and the liquid nitrogen use to operate the system. This paper will present the requirements for the various operating modes. System level thermodynamic comparisons of the existing system to the various options studied and the final option selected will be outlined. A thermal and hydraulic analysis to validate the selected option for the conversion of the current forced flow to natural flow design will be discussed. The proposed modifications to existing system to convert to natural circulation (thermo siphon) system and the design features to help improve the operations, and maintenance of the system will be presented.

  15. The Essential Role of Circulating Thyroglobulin in Maintaining Dominance of Natural Regulatory T Cell Function to Prevent Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y M; Brown, N K; Morris, G P; Flynn, J C

    2015-09-01

    Several key findings from the late 1960s to mid-1970s regarding thyroid hormone metabolism and circulating thyroglobulin composition converged with studies pertaining to the role of T lymphocytes in autoimmune thyroiditis. These studies cemented the foundation for subsequent investigations into the existence and antigenic specificity of thymus-derived natural regulatory T cells (nTregs). These nTregs prevented the development of autoimmune thyroiditis, despite the ever-present genetic predisposition, autoantigen (thyroglobulin), and thyroglobulin-reactive T cells. Guided by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis as a fixed set-point regulator in thyroid hormone metabolism, we used a murine model and compared at key junctures the capacity of circulating thyroglobulin level (raised by thyroid-stimulating hormone or exogenous thyroglobulin administration) to strengthen self-tolerance and resist autoimmune thyroiditis. The findings clearly demonstrated an essential role for raised circulating thyroglobulin levels in maintaining the dominance of nTreg function and inhibiting thyroid autoimmunity. Subsequent identification of thyroglobulin-specific nTregs as CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) in the early 2000s enabled the examination of probable mechanisms of nTreg function. We observed that whenever nTreg function was perturbed by immunotherapeutic measures, opportunistic autoimmune disorders invariably surfaced. This review highlights the step-wise progression of applying insights from endocrinologic and immunologic studies to advance our understanding of the clonal balance between natural regulatory and autoreactive T cells. Moreover, we focus on how tilting the balance in favor of maintaining peripheral tolerance could be achieved. Thus, murine autoimmune thyroiditis has served as a unique model capable of closely simulating natural physiologic conditions.

  16. Pressure Regulator With Internal Ejector Circulation Pump, Flow and Pressure Measurement Porting, and Fuel Cell System Integration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    An advanced reactant pressure regulator with an internal ejector reactant circulation pump has been developed to support NASA's future fuel cell power systems needs. These needs include reliable and safe operation in variable-gravity environments, and for exploration activities with both manned and un manned vehicles. This product was developed for use in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) power plant reactant circulation systems, but the design could also be applied to other fuel cell system types, (e.g., solid-oxide or alkaline) or for other gas pressure regulation and circulation needs. The regulator design includes porting for measurement of flow and pressure at key points in the system, and also includes several fuel cell system integration options. NASA has recognized ejectors as a viable alternative to mechanical pumps for use in spacecraft fuel cell power systems. The ejector motive force is provided by a variable, high-pressure supply gas that travels through the ejector s jet nozzle, whereby the pressure energy of the fluid stream is converted to kinetic energy in the gas jet. The ejector can produce circulation-to-consumption-flow ratios that are relatively high (2-3 times), and this phenomenon can potentially (with proper consideration of the remainder of the fuel cell system s design) be used to provide completely for reactant pre-humidification and product water removal in a fuel cell system. Specifically, a custom pressure regulator has been developed that includes: (1) an ejector reactant circulation pump (with interchangeable jet nozzles and mixer sections, gas-tight sliding and static seals in required locations, and internal fluid porting for pressure-sensing at the regulator's control elements) and (2) internal fluid porting to allow for flow rate and system pressure measurements. The fluid porting also allows for inclusion of purge, relief, and vacuum-breaker check valves on the regulator assembly. In addition, this regulator could also

  17. Fine-scale heat flow, shallow heat sources, and decoupled circulation systems at two sea-floor hydrothermal sites, Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.S.; Fisher, A.T.; Langseth, M.; Jin, W.; Iturrino, G.; Davis, E.

    1998-12-01

    Fine-scale heat-flow patterns at two areas of active venting in Middle Valley, a sedimented rift on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge, provide thermal evidence of shallow hydrothermal reservoirs beneath the vent fields. The extreme variability of heat flow is explained by conductive heating immediately adjacent to vents and shallow circulation within sediments above the reservoir. This secondary circulation is hydrologically separated from the deeper system feeding the vents by a shallow conductive lid within the sediments. A similar separation of shallow and deep circulation may also occur at sediment-free ridge-crest hydrothermal environments.

  18. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for Natural Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, Ramy

    To ensure the long-term sustainability of aviation, serious effort is underway to mitigate the escalating economic, environmental, and social concerns of the industry. Significant improvement to the energy efficiency of air transportation is required through the research and development of advanced and unconventional airframe and engine technologies. In the quest to reduce airframe drag, this thesis is concerned with the development and demonstration of an effective design tool for improving the aerodynamic efficiency of subsonic and transonic airfoils. The objective is to advance the state-of-the-art in high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization by incorporating and exploiting the phenomenon of laminar-turbulent transition in an efficient manner. A framework for the design and optimization of Natural Laminar Flow (NLF) airfoils is developed and demonstrated with transition prediction capable of accounting for the effects of Reynolds number, freestream turbulence intensity, Mach number, and pressure gradients. First, a two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver has been extended to incorporate an iterative laminar-turbulent transition prediction methodology. The natural transition locations due to Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities are predicted using the simplified eN envelope method of Drela and Giles or, alternatively, the compressible form of the Arnal-Habiballah-Delcourt criterion. The boundary-layer properties are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes flow solution, and the transition to turbulent flow is modeled using an intermittency function in conjunction with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The RANS solver is subsequently employed in a gradient-based sequential quadratic programming shape optimization framework. The laminar-turbulent transition criteria are tightly coupled into the objective and gradient evaluations. The gradients are obtained using a new augmented discrete-adjoint formulation for non-local transition

  19. Dynamic leaching and fractionation of trace elements from environmental solids exploiting a novel circulating-flow platform.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Nakano, Koji; Sasaki, Masaya; Shinozaki, Haruka; Suzuki, Shiho; Okawara, Chitose; Miró, Manuel; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic flow-through microcolumn extraction system based on extractant re-circulation is herein proposed as a novel analytical approach for simplification of bioaccessibility tests of trace elements in sediments. On-line metal leaching is undertaken in the format of all injection (AI) analysis, which is a sequel of flow injection analysis, but involving extraction under steady-state conditions. The minimum circulation times and flow rates required to determine the maximum bioaccessible pools of target metals (viz., Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) from lake and river sediment samples were estimated using Tessier's sequential extraction scheme and an acid single extraction test. The on-line AIA method was successfully validated by mass balance studies of CRM and real sediment samples. Tessier's test in on-line AI format demonstrated to be carried out by one third of extraction time (6h against more than 17 h by the conventional method), with better analytical precision (<9.2% against >15% by the conventional method) and significant decrease in blank readouts as compared with the manual batch counterpart.

  20. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER FLOW PATTERNS AROUND A DUAL-SCREENED GROUNDWATER CIRCULATION WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dual-screened groundwater circulation wells (GCWs) can be used to remove contaminant mass and to mix reagents in situ. GCWs are so named because they force water in a circular pattern between injection and extraction screens. The radial extent, flux and direction of the effective...

  1. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER FLOW PATTERNS AROUND A DUAL-SCREENED GROUNDWATER CIRCULATION WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dual-screened groundwater circulation wells (GCWs) can be used to remove contaminant mass and to mix reagents in situ. GCWs are so named because they force water in a circular pattern between injection and extraction screens. The radial extent, flux and direction of the effective...

  2. Circulating natural killer and gammadelta T cells decrease soon after infection of rhesus macaques with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Juan D; Cairo, Cristiana; Djavani, Mahmoud; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Ruckwardt, Tracy; Bryant, Joseph; Pauza, C David; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2009-07-01

    Rhesus macaques infected with the WE strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV-WE) serve as a model for human infection with Lassa fever virus. To identify the earliest events of acute infection, rhesus macaques were monitored immediately after lethal infection for changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Changes in CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD20 subsets did not vary outside the normal fluctuations of these blood cell populations; however, natural killer (NK) and gammadelta T cells increased slightly on day 1 and then decreased significantly after two days. The NK subsets responsible for the decrease were primarily CD3-CD8+ or CD3-CD16+ and not the NKT (primarily CD3+CD56+) subset. Macaques infected with a non-virulent arenavirus, LCMV-Armstrong, showed a similar drop in circulating NK and gammadelta T cells, indicating that this is not a pathogenic event. V(3)9 T cells, representing the majority of circulating gammadelta T cells in rhesus macaques, displayed significant apoptosis when incubated with LCMV in cell culture; however, the low amount of cell death for virus-co-cultured NK cells was insufficient to account for the observed disappearance of this subset. Our observations in primates are similar to those seen in LCMV-infected mice, where decreased circulating NK cells were attributed to margination and cell death. Thus, the disappearance of these cells during acute hemorrhagic fever in rhesus macaques may be a cytokine-induced lymphopenia common to many virus infections.

  3. In Vitro Validation of Endovascular Doppler-derived Flow Rates in Models of the Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    McGah, P M; Nerva, J D; Morton, R P; Barbour, M C; Levitt, M R; Mourad, P D; Kim, L J; Aliseda, A

    2015-01-01

    This study presents validation of endovascular Doppler velocimetry-based volumetric flow rate measurements conducted in a pulsatile flow loop simulating conditions in both the internal carotid and basilar artery. In vitro models of cerebral vessels, each containing an aneurysm, were fabricated from patient anatomies extracted from 3D rotational angiography. Flow velocity measurements were collected with three different experimental techniques: an endovascular Doppler wire, Particle Image Velocimetry, and a time-resolved ultrasonic flow meter. Womersley’s theory of pulsatile flow in a cylindrical vessel was used to compute time-resolved volumetric flow rates from the endovascular Doppler velocity. The volumetric flow rates computed from the Doppler measurements were compared to those from the Particle Image Velocimetry profile measurements, and the direct measurements from the ultrasonic flow meter. The study establishes confidence intervals for any systematic or random errors associated with the wire-derived flow rates as benchmarked to the other two modalities. There is an approximately 10% random error in the Doppler-derived peak and time-averaged flow rates. There is a measurable uniform bias, about 15% too low, in the time-averaged Doppler-derived flow rates. There is also a small proportional bias in the peak systolic Doppler-derived flow rates. Potential sources of error are also discussed. PMID:26450643

  4. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  5. Preliminary report of 48-hours Atosiban administration in spontaneous preterm labor - Doppler blood flow assessment of placental and fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, Mariusz; Wilczynski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The aims were to investigate whether there are any changes in placental and fetal circulation during Atosiban tocolysis within the first 48 hours of therapy. Detailed Doppler evaluation of placental and fetal circulation was performed prior to Atosiban administration and thereafter at 24 and 48 hours. Maternal heart rate and the pulsatility index (PI) in both uterine arteries (R-UtA, L-UtA) were assessed. Fetal heart rate (FHR), the resistance (RI) and pulsatility index (PI) of umbilical (UA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) were measured. Additionally cerebroplacental ratio was calculated. E-wave/A-wave ratio (E/A) for atrioventricular valves, the myocardial performance index (MPI) and shortening fraction (SF) for both ventricles were calculated for both ventricles independently. To determine changes over time in all study variables analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements followed by Tukey-Kramer's post hoc test was used. The effects of additional clinical covariates were checked. Maternal heart rate and blood flow in (R-UtA/L-UtA) were not altered significantly during Atosiban administration. No significant changes in FHR as well as Doppler parameters (RI, PI, PSV) in UA and MCA were recorded after 24/48 hours of tocolytic treatment. The mean values of cerebroplacental ratio (CPR) remained unaltered during treatment. Detailed evaluation of fetal cardiac function parameters (E/A, SF, MPI) calculated independently for both ventricles, revealed no significant changes over the time. To our best knowledge this study has been first evaluation of placental and fetal circulation with assessment of cardiac hemodynamic function during 48-hours administration of Atosiban. This kind of tocolysis treatment seems not to alter uterine nor fetal arterial blood flow pattern seriously. Hemodynamic cardiac activity in fetuses has remained unaffected. We cannot conclude definitely that there are absolutely no changes in the fetal hemodynamic condition due to Atosiban

  6. Heat Flow on the Incoming Plate Offshore Nicoya, Costa Rica margin: Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation and the Thermal State of the Subducting Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Harris, R. N.; Stein, C.; Wang, K.; Hutnak, M.; Cherkaoui, A.; Pfender, M.; Cleary, R.; Silver, E.; Wheat, C. G.; Bodzin, R.; Underwood, M.; Moser, C.; Kelly, R.; Friedmann, P.; Stewart, Y.; Jones, K.

    2001-12-01

    The TicoFlux I expedition was intended to determine the nature of hydrothermal activity and its influence on subduction processes offshore of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica margin, on 20-25 Ma lithosphere. Prior coverage in this region was sparse, but suggested that heat flow from crust created at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) as generally lower (by 50-70%) than expected for seafloor of 20-25 Ma. In contrast, heat flow through similarly-aged seafloor created at the Cocos-Nazca Ridge was at or greater than values predicted by standard lithospheric cooling models. One goal of our expedition was to confirm this overall pattern through collection of modern data at higher resolution along a series of transects coinciding with newly-acquired seismic profiles. A second goal was to determine the cause for the difference in heat flow, through evaluation of the lateral scale of the transition between higher and lower values. If the difference in heat flow is caused by variations in heat input at the base of the plate, the transition should be broad and gradual, with a wavelength that scales with plate thickness. If the difference in seafloor heat flow results from advective mining of heat from EPR-generated lithosphere, the transition should be abrupt, with a wavelength that scales with the depth of hydrothermal cooling. We crossed the transition in three places and in each case, the change from normal to anomalously-low heat flow values occurred over a distance of just a few kilometers, consistent with a shallow, fluid flow explanation. In addition, the survey identified an area of anomalously high heat flow (640 mW/m2) immediately above a deep, low-angle reflection that may be a crust-penetrating fault. High heat flow in this area may result from fluid circulation along the fault, carrying heat from depth. The heat flow survey also demonstrated that a low-heat flow area identified during an earlier survey, and drilled during ODP Leg 170, is surrounded on three sides by

  7. Helium in deep circulating groundwater in the Great Hungarian Plain: Flow dynamics and crustal and mantle helium fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, M.; Sonntag, C.; Deák, J.; Schlosser, P.

    1992-05-01

    Observed helium concentrations in deep circulating groundwater of the sedimentary basin of the Great Hungarian Plain (GHP), Hungary, cover a range of three orders of magnitude (≈4 ·10 -8 to 4 · 10 -5 ccSTP g-1). 3He /4He ratios and noble gas concentrations are used to separate helium components originating from the atmosphere, tritium decay, crustal production, and mantle degassing. The characteristic distribution of measured helium concentrations and isotope ratios can be reproduced qualitatively by a simple two-dimensional advection/diffusion model. Other simple models isolating parts of the regional flow domain (recharge, discharge, and horizontal flow) are discussed and applied to derive quantitative information on helium fluxes due to degassing of the Earth's crust /mantle and on the dynamics of groundwater flow. The estimated helium flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is lower than values derived from other deep groundwater circulation systems, probably because the relatively young upper few thousand meters of the sedimentary basin (Tertiary to Quaternary age) shield the flux from the deeper crust. The high mantle helium flux of up to 4.2 · 10 8 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is probably related to the Miocene volcanism or to continuing intrusion accompanying extension. By fitting calculated helium depth profiles to measured data in the discharge area, vertical flow velocities of the order of 1.5 mm y -1 are estimated. Assuming that a flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is representative for the entire basin, the turnover time of the regional groundwater flow system is estimated to be about 10 6 y.

  8. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  9. Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion combined with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest on cerebral circulation: comparison between pulsatile and nonpulsatile blood flows.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Masao

    2007-04-01

    In aortic arch surgeries, antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) combined with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) has been recently widely used in institutions as one of the most reliable methods for cerebral protection. However, some studies reported a 3.7-9.3% incidence of postoperative cerebral complications. To perform antegrade SCP more safely, we sought to examine the impact of pulsatile flow perfusion during DHCA on cerebral tissue metabolism, focusing on physiological effects of pulsatile flow perfusion. Sixteen pigs were divided into 2 groups. In each group, antegrade SCP combined with DHCA was conducted. During circulatory arrest, for SCP, a pulsatile flow (group P) and a nonpulsatile flow (group N) were used. We compared results between group P and group N. Jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjO(2)) and cerebral tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtO(2)) were measured at baseline, and continuously throughout the extracorporeal circulation. Hematocrit (Ht), and concentrations of S-100 protein and CK-BB in blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured at baseline (before the beginning of extracorporeal circulation), following SCP, and after rewarming. Following rewarming, each brain under perfused fixation was removed, and histopathological examinations were conducted using Kluver-Barrera and Tunnel staining methods, electron micrograph. SjO(2) was found to be within normal ranges until after SCP, but decreased with rewarming in both groups. In Group N, changes in SjO(2) were significant, with a decrease to < or =50%. In Group N, concentrations of S-100 protein and CK-BB in CSF after SCP and after rewarming were significantly higher than those in Group P. The time needed for rewarming to 36 degrees C in Group P was shorter than that in Group N. Our results suggest that the pulsatile flow circulation method shows cerebral protection effects with increasing blood flow in small cerebral tissues. In addition, it is effective for improving the

  10. Numerical modeling of natural and ventilated cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qiao

    Cavitation is a phenomenon that frequently occurs in fluid-handling machinery, ranging from all types of pumps, turbines, and propellers to various piping systems and hydraulic structures. Cavitation research has been pursued for over a century and an enormous quantity of literature on cavitation has been generated. Cavitation modeling is challenging and is still in the development stage due to its inherent complexity of the physics involved. There are basically three objectives in this thesis work. First, an existing virtual single-phase natural cavitation model is used to extensively explore the unsteadiness of sheet/cloud cavitation on two hydrofoils (NACA 0015 and CAV2003). Five discrete vortex shedding mechanisms are identified in this research. Second, this existing virtual single-phase natural cavitation model is further modified to take into account the effect of incondensable gas that comes out of solution due to the cavitation evaporation process. This was motivated by the observation that the computed mean velocity distribution in the wake of a cavitating hydrofoil, without the effect of incondensable gas, agrees well with experimental data close to the trailing edge but deviates systematically further downstream. This revision shows a significant improvement on the computed mean velocity distribution in the wake compared to that without the incondensable gas effect and the results are in agreement with those from experiments. These are two new findings that are absent in literature. Third, a two-phase, fully compressible flow model based on Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for ventilated cavitating flows is developed and is successfully implemented in the simulation of an axisymmetric underwater body.

  11. Natural laminar flow experiments on modern airplane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Obara, C. J.; Yip, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    Flight and wind-tunnel natural laminar flow experiments have been conducted on various lifting and nonlifting surfaces of several airplanes at unit Reynolds numbers between 0.63 x 10 to the 6th power/ft and 3.08 x 10 to the 6th power/ft, at Mach numbers from 0.1 to 0.7, and at lifting surface leading-edge sweep angles from 0 deg to 63 deg. The airplanes tested were selected to provide relatively stiff skin conditions, free from significant roughness and waviness, on smooth modern production-type airframes. The observed transition locations typically occurred downstream of the measured or calculated pressure peak locations for the test conditions involved. No discernible effects on transition due to surface waviness were observed on any of the surfaces tested. None of the measured heights of surface waviness exceeded the empirically predicted allowable surface waviness. Experimental results consistent with spanwise contamination criteria were observed. Large changes in flight-measured performance and stability and control resulted from loss of laminar flow by forced transition. Rain effects on the laminar boundary layer caused stick-fixed nose-down pitch-trim changes in two of the airplanes tested. No effect on transition was observed for flight through low-altitude liquid-phase clouds. These observations indicate the importance of fixed-transition tests as a standard flight testing procedure for modern smooth airframes.

  12. Biomechanical model of the coronary blood flow and its relation to certain aspects of auxiliary circulation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, V. A.

    1981-11-01

    Whereas under experimental conditions it is possible to investigate the responses of the self-regulatory mechanisms of the coronary circulation either with a constant load on the myocardium and variable conditions of perfusion of the coronary system [17] or vice-versa [18], in the case of balloon pulsation both these factors act togetherandin animal experiments cannot be distinguished. At the same time, their separate evaluation is important in studying the hemodynamic efficiency of the counterpulsation method. The proposed model of the biomechanics of the coronary circulation is sensitive to changes in the conditions of perfusion of the myocardium and at the same time maintains a constant value of the coronary resistance irrespective of the energy consumption of the heart. Accordingly, by comparing the results of modeling and the experimental data it is possible to estimate the contribution of the self-regulatory mechanisms of the coronary blood flow to the change in the transport functions of the coronary circulation associated with intraaortic balloon pulsation. Thus, the proposed model can be used as a tool for investigating the blood supply to the normal heart and for the partial evaluation of the hemodynamic efficiency of the intraaortic counterpulsation method.

  13. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  14. Natural variability of the climate as predicted by a simple ocean model with parameterized thermohaline circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.G.; Li, S.

    1995-12-31

    Variability of the Earth`s climate can take place on many time scales as a result of internal features. This natural variability is important to humans since it affects such important human enterprises as agriculture, floods, droughts, etc. The authors investigate natural variability within a simple ocean model.

  15. Circulation rate of change: A vortex approach for understanding accelerated inhomogeneous flows through intermediate times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Peng, Gaozhu; Zabusky, Norman J.

    2006-09-01

    We present a new simple diagnostic formula, Eq. (4) in this paper, involving a pressure difference, for determining the rate-of-change of total circulation, Γ˙D (within a domain M =1.3), single-mode, inviscid environment with an initially finite-width interfacial transition layer (ITL), and various postshock Atwood numbers, 0.2≤A*≤0.75. We show that for intermediate times (up to t /tM<8.0), Γ˙D/(Γshock/tM), has several consistent behaviors and scaling laws depending on A*. Here Γshock, is the circulation deposited by the initial shock on the region of finite density gradient and tM is the time at which the single mode interfacial midcontour becomes multivalued.

  16. A Radial Flow Microfluidic Device for Ultra-high-throughput Affinity-based Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murlidhar, Vasudha; Zeinali, Mina; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Wicha, Max S.; Simeone, Diane M.; Ramnath, Nithya; Reddy, Rishindra M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to play an important role in metastasis, a process responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. But their rarity in the bloodstream makes microfluidic isolation complex and time-consuming. Additionally the low processing speeds can be a hindrance to obtaining higher yields of CTCs, limiting their potential use as biomarkers for early diagnosis. Here we report a high throughput microfluidic technology, the OncoBean Chip, employing radial flow that introduces a varying shear profile across the device enabling efficient cell capture by affinity at high flow rates. The recovery from whole blood was validated with cancer cell lines H1650 and MCF7, achieving a mean efficiency >80% at a throughput of 10 mL hr−1 in contrast to a flow rate of 1 mL hr−1 standardly reported with other microfluidic devices. Cells were recovered with a viability rate of 93% at these high speeds, increasing the ability to use captured CTCs for downstream analysis. Broad clinical application was demonstrated using comparable flow rates from blood specimens obtained from breast, pancreatic and lung cancer patients. Comparable CTC numbers were recovered in all the samples at the two flow rates demonstrating the ability of the technology to perform at high-throughputs. PMID:25074448

  17. A radial flow microfluidic device for ultra-high-throughput affinity-based isolation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Murlidhar, Vasudha; Zeinali, Mina; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Wicha, Max S; Simeone, Diane M; Ramnath, Nithya; Reddy, Rishindra M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2014-12-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to play an important role in metastasis, a process responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. But their rarity in the bloodstream makes microfluidic isolation complex and time-consuming. Additionally the low processing speeds can be a hindrance to obtaining higher yields of CTCs, limiting their potential use as biomarkers for early diagnosis. Here, a high throughput microfluidic technology, the OncoBean Chip, is reported. It employs radial flow that introduces a varying shear profile across the device, enabling efficient cell capture by affinity at high flow rates. The recovery from whole blood is validated with cancer cell lines H1650 and MCF7, achieving a mean efficiency >80% at a throughput of 10 mL h(-1) in contrast to a flow rate of 1 mL h(-1) standardly reported with other microfluidic devices. Cells are recovered with a viability rate of 93% at these high speeds, increasing the ability to use captured CTCs for downstream analysis. Broad clinical application is demonstrated using comparable flow rates from blood specimens obtained from breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer patients. Comparable CTC numbers are recovered in all the samples at the two flow rates, demonstrating the ability of the technology to perform at high throughputs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Application of digital holographic interferometry to pressure measurements of symmetric, supercritical and circulation-control airfoils in transonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Francisco J.

    1987-01-01

    Six airfoil interferograms were evaluated using a semiautomatic image-processor system which digitizes, segments, and extracts the fringe coordinates along a polygonal line. The resulting fringe order function was converted into density and pressure distributions and a comparison was made with pressure transducer data at the same wind tunnel test conditions. Three airfoil shapes were used in the evaluation to test the capabilities of the image processor with a variety of flows. Symmetric, supercritical, and circulation-control airfoil interferograms provided fringe patterns with shocks, separated flows, and high-pressure regions for evaluation. Regions along the polygon line with very clear fringe patterns yielded results within 1% of transducer measurements, while poorer quality regions, particularly near the leading and trailing edges, yielded results that were not as good.

  19. Comparison of flow modification induced by plasma and fluidic jet actuators dedicated to circulation control around wind turbine airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, A.; Braud, C.; Baleriola, S.; Loyer, S.; Devinant, P.; Aubrun, S.

    2016-09-01

    In order to reduce the aerodynamic load fluctuations on wind turbine blades by innovative control solutions, strategies of active circulation control acting at the blade airfoil trailing edge are studied, allowing lift increase and decrease. This study presents a comparison of results obtained by performing surface plasma and continuous fluidic jet actuation on a blade airfoil designed with a rounded trailing edge. In the present study, both actuator types are located at the trailing edge. Plasma actuators act uniformly in the spanwise direction, whereas fluidic jets blow through small squared holes distributed along the span, and therefore, provide a three-dimensional action on the flow. Load and velocity field measurements were performed to assess the effectiveness of both actuators and to highlight the flow mechanisms induced by both actuation methods for lift-up configurations. Results are presented for a chord Reynolds number of 2. 105 and for a lift coefficient increase of 0.06.

  20. Computation of blood flow through collateral circulation of the superficial femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R R; Vinke, E J; Poelmann, F B; Rohof, D; Holewijn, S; Slump, C H; Reijnen, Mmpj

    2016-04-01

    Obliteration of collaterals during (endo)vascular treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease is considered detrimental. We use a model to calculate maximum collateral bed flow of the superficial femoral artery in order to provide insight in their hemodynamic relevance. A computational model was developed using digital subtraction angiographies in combination with Poiseuille's equation and Ohm's law. Lesions were divided into short and long (<15 cm and ≥15 cm, respectively) and into stenosis and occlusions. Data are presented in relation to the calculated maximum healthy superficial femoral artery flow. Stenotic lesions are longer than occlusive lesions (P < 0.05) and occlusions had more and larger collaterals (P < 0.05). In all four study groups the collateral flow significantly increased the total flow (P < 0.05). The maximum collateral system flow in the stenosis and occlusion groups was 5.1% and 20.8% of healthy superficial femoral artery flow, respectively (P < 0.05), and there were no significant differences between short and long lesions (11.2% and 6.7% of healthy superficial femoral artery flow, respectively). The maximum collateral system flow of the superficial femoral artery is only a fraction, with a maximum of one fifth, of healthy superficial femoral artery flow. Effects of collateral vessel occlusion during (endo)vascular treatment may therefore be without detrimental consequences. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. [Circulating lipids in prolonged postoperative parenteral feeding: their changes depending on the nature of energy intake].

    PubMed

    Manelli, J C; Lallemand, J; Kiégel, P; Siccardi, F; Bimar, J

    1977-01-01

    Repeated estimations of circulating total lipids and various fractions were made during the postoperative period in patients receiving parenteral nutrition for more than ten days. The patients were paired in relation to the underlying pathology and divided into two group : the first receiving energy supplements in the form of carbohydrates alone, whilst the second received part of this supply in the form of lipid emulsions (Trive 1000). Total lipids and various plasma fractions, with the exception of free fatty acids, increased progressively during the postoperative period, regardless of the inital values and independently of the lipid content of the nutrition fluids given. There was no significant difference between those patients who received lipid emulsions and those who did not. Free fatty acids remained at levels slightly greater than normal in the group which did not receive lipids. They were significantly higher in the group given lipid emulsions, though it was not possible to precisely define their orgin.

  2. Scale-Dependence of Natural Variability of Flow Regimes in a Forested Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, S. E.; Creed, I. F.

    2005-12-01

    The natural flow paradigm states that rivers should be managed to preserve their natural flow regimes. Maintaining natural variability in the flow regime is critical for conserving the structure and function of riverine ecosystems. This research seeks to determine relations between natural variability in the flow regime and basin scale. A distributed hydrologic model was used to characterize the natural flow regime of basins from first to fifth order within tributaries of the Batchawana River in the Algoma Highlands of central Ontario using the Range of Variability Approach (RVA). A thirty-year simulated flow record was used to calculate natural variability in the flow regime, defined as the S80 ((90th percentile - 10th percentile) / median). A scale-dependence in the S80 of these flows, and particularly low-flow parameters, was observed. Basins less than a threshold between ca. 400 and 600 ha had a large range in S80, while basins greater than 600 ha had a smaller range that converged towards a constant with increasing area. This represents the potential for a representative elementary area (REA) to exist with regard to interannual variability of some flow parameters. Below the REA, the mean of the ln (/To tan B) distribution was significantly related to the S80 mean summer flow and 90-day minimum flow (p<0.001). This research demonstrates the scale-dependence of natural variability of flows, important for establishing reference conditions against which impacts of disturbance on flows throughout a drainage basin may be measured.

  3. Flat-head positioning increases cerebral blood flow in anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke. A cluster randomized phase IIb trial.

    PubMed

    Olavarría, Verónica V; Lavados, Pablo M; Muñoz-Venturelli, Paula; González, Francisca; Gaete, Javier; Martins, Sheila; Arima, Hisatomi; Anderson, Craig S; Brunser, Alejandro M

    2017-01-01

    Background Whether lying-flat improves blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke is unknown. Our aim was to investigate if lying-flat "changes" cerebral blood flow velocities assessed by transcranial Doppler in acute ischemic stroke patients. Methods In a multicenter cluster clinical trial, we randomly assigned patients within 12 h from onset of a neurological deficit due to cerebral ischemia of the anterior circulation to lying-flat or upright head positioning. The primary outcome was a change of 8 cm/s or more in mean cerebral blood flow velocities on transcranial Doppler to the middle cerebral artery at 1 and 24 h post-randomization, adjusted for imbalance in baseline variables. Secondary outcomes included serious adverse events and physical functioning at 90 days. Results Ninety-four of 304 patients screened were recruited. The primary outcome occurred in 11 (26%) of 43 patients in the lying-flat group and in 6 (12%) of 51 in the upright group at 1 h (adjusted odds ratio, 3.81; 95% CI, 1.07 to 13.54), and in 23 (53%) and 18 (36%) patients in these respective groups at 24 h (adjusted odds ratio, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.08 to 8.53). There were no between-group differences in serious adverse events, including pneumonia, heart failure or mortality, nor in functional outcome at 3 months (adjusted common odds ratio, 1.38; 95% CI 0.64 to 3.00). Conclusion The lying-flat head position was associated with a significant increase in cerebral blood flow velocities at one and 24 h within the ipsilateral hemisphere of anterior circulation acute ischemic stroke, without serious safety concerns. Clinical trial registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT01706094.

  4. Removal of Nutrients from Septic Effluent with Re-circulated Hybrid Tidal Flow Constructed Wetland

    Treesearch

    Lihua Cui; Jigkun Feng; Ying Ouyang; Peiwen. Deng

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid tidal flow constructed wetland (CW) with recirculation is an improved biological and engineering technique for removal of excess nutrients and certain pollutants from wastewater. This study investigated the removal efficiency of total phosphorus (TP), ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N), and total nitrogen (TN) from septic tank effluent with the hybrid tidal flow CW system...

  5. Flow Visualization of Forced and Natural Convection in Internal Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Hugh M. Mcllroy,Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Keith G. Condie; Glenn McCreery; Randy Clarsean; Robert S. Brodkey; Yann G. Guezennec

    2002-01-31

    The report descries innovative flow visualization techniques, fluid mechanics measurements and computational models of flows in a spent nuclear fuel canister. The flow visualization methods used a fluid that reacted with a metal plate to show how a local reaction affects the surrounding flow. A matched index of refraction facility was used to take mean flow and turbulence measurements within a generic spent nuclear fuel canister. Computational models were also made of the flow in the canister. It was determined that the flow field in the canister was very complex, and modifications may need to be made to ensure that the spent fuel elements are completely passivated.

  6. Expanding the Natural Laminar Flow Boundary for Supersonic Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    A computational design and analysis methodology is being developed to design a vehicle that can support significant regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) at supersonic flight conditions. The methodology is built in the CDISC design module to be used in this paper with the flow solvers Cart3D and USM3D, and the transition prediction modules BLSTA3D and LASTRAC. The NLF design technique prescribes a target pressure distribution for an existing geometry based on relationships between modal instability wave growth and pressure gradients. The modal instability wave growths (both on- and off-axes crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting) are balanced to produce a pressure distribution that will have a theoretical maximum NLF region for a given streamwise wing station. An example application is presented showing the methodology on a generic supersonic transport wingbody configuration. The configuration has been successfully redesigned to support significant regions of NLF (approximately 40% of the wing upper surface by surface area). Computational analysis predicts NLF with transition Reynolds numbers (ReT) as high as 36 million with 72 degrees of leading-edge sweep (?LE), significantly expanding the current boundary of ReT - ?LE combinations for NLF. This NLF geometry provides a total drag savings of 4.3 counts compared to the baseline wing-body configuration (approximately 5% of total drag). Off-design evaluations at near-cruise and low-speed, high-lift conditions are discussed, as well as attachment line contamination/transition concerns. This computational NLF design effort is a part of an ongoing cooperative agreement between NASA and JAXA researchers.

  7. Field_flow Fractionation For The Characterisation of Natural Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Kammer, F.; Saal, C.; Baborowski, M.

    The investigation of colloid contribution to transport processes requires a detailed analysis of the actually and potentially mobile colloidal phases present in a certain system of interest. In general all important parameters can not be determined with a single method. Field Flow Fractionation (FFF) is considered as a powerful technique regarding the analysis of colloid molecular weight or size-distributions. FFF can be labelled as a hydrodynamic chromatography that provides a fractionation of an usu- ally aqueous colloid dispersion due to the selective retention of particles/colloids in a ribbon shaped channel. The retention ratios of particles are depending on particle volume, density or diffusion coefficient, depending on the type of channel and method used. In contrast to methods like size exclusion chromatography, the absence of a sta- tionary phase enables FFF to cover a particle size range of theoretically five orders of magnitude (0.001 to 100 µm) and provides the analysis even of fragile aggregates. FFF equipped with modern detection systems like on-line (or quasi-on-line) static or dynamic light scattering detectors provide an internal verification of the fractionation itself and methods to retrieve the particles mean shape factor from the combination of different fractionation/detection methods are in development. Moreover, regarding the light scattering techniques, FFF provides close to monodisperse sample slices, enabling the scattering techniques to work at optimal conditions even with broad dis- tributed samples. ICP-detectors provide main and trace element distributions over par- ticle size. The presentation will give a critical overview of the application of advanced FFF methods on natural colloidal samples, covering Flow-FFF, Sedimentation-FFF and hyphenated methods using static and dynamic light scattering, UV-VIS and fluo- rescence detection as well as ICP-MS couplings.

  8. Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics of Kings Bay, Citrus County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammett, K.M.; Goodwin, C.R.; Sanders, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Kings Bay is an estuary on the gulf coast of peninsular Florida with a surface area of less than one square mile. It is a unique estuarine system with no significant inflowing rivers or streams. As much as 99 percent of the freshwater entering the bay originates from multiple spring vents at the bottom of the estuary. The circulation and flushing characteristics of Kings Bay were evaluated by applying SIMSYS2D, a two-dimensional numerical model. Field data were used to calibrate and verify the model. Lagrangian particle simulations were used to determine the circulation characteristics for three hydrologic conditions: low inflow, typical inflow, and low inflow with reduced friction from aquatic vegetation. Spring discharge transported the particles from Kings Bay through Crystal River and out of the model domain. Tidal effects added an oscillatory component to the particle paths. The mean particle residence time was 59 hours for low inflow with reduced friction; therefore, particle residence time is affected more by spring discharge than by bottom friction. Circulation patterns were virtually identical for the three simulated hydroloigc conditions. Simulated particles introduced in the southern part of Kings Bay traveled along the eastern side of Buzzard Island before entering Crystal River and existing the model domain. The flushing characteristics of Kings Bay for the three hydrodynamic conditions were determined by simulating the injection of conservative dye constituents. The average concentration of dye initially injected in Kings Bay decreased asymptotically because of spring discharge, and the tide caused some oscillation in the average dye concentration. Ninety-five percent of the injected dye exited Kings Bay and Crystal River with 94 hours for low inflow, 71 hours for typical inflow, and 94 hours for low inflow with reduced bottom friction. Simulation results indicate that all of the open waters of Kings Bay are flushed by the spring discharge. Reduced

  9. Applicability of flow laws to naturally deformed polyphase rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée; Stünitz, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Small scale shear zones formed in the Gran Paradiso metagranodiorite under lower amphibolite facies conditions (~550°C/0.8 GPa LeGoff & Ballevre, 1990; Brouwer et al.,2002). Based on detailed microstructural work the deformation mechanisms of the different rheological phases have been identified. Polycrystalline quartz aggregates deform by dislocation creep (gbm recrystallization), whereas the polymineralic matrix deforms by diffusion creep (Kilian et al., 2011). Iso - stress conditions (Sachs-average) are assumed based on a constant recrystallized quartz grain size and the formation of shear-parallel layers. Deformed quartz aggregates show higher rotation angle / lower aspect ratio relations, little coalescence, and only minor pinch and swell structures, which altogether suggest that quartz represents the more viscous phase in a somewhat lower viscous matrix. At high strain quartz is completely recrystallized and forms parallel layers with the matrix and does not boudinage. Experimental flow laws for quartz and feldspar from the literature as well as the theoretically derived flow law for Coble creep with the appropriate parameters can reproduce the observed relation between quartz aggregates and matrix suggesting a strain rate ratio below 2 orders of magnitude. A comparison of data from different granitic rocks deformed between 450° to ~ 600°C suggests that a combination of a quartz creep law and a Coble creep law can be used for extrapolation at medium grade, natural conditions. These results provide an indication for the range of reasonable flow law parameters and viscosity ratios which are useful for modeling purposes. References: Kilian, R., Heilbronner, R., Stünitz, H. Quartz grain size reduction in a granitoid rock and the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep. JSG 33,1265-1284,2011. LeGoff, E., Ballevre, M. Geothermobarometry in albite-garnet orthogneisses - a case-study from the Gran-Paradiso Nappe (Western Alps). Lithos, 25,261-280,1990. F

  10. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was performed before and at 1, 2, and 3 hours after ECC commencement. To eliminate bias induced by hematocrit and plasma, all blood samples were adjusted to a hematocrit of 45% using baseline plasma. Blood viscoelasticity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, arterial blood gas analysis, central venous O2 saturation, and lactate were measured. Results The blood viscosity and aggregation index decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC and then remained low during ECC in both groups, but blood elasticity did not change during ECC. Blood viscosity, blood elasticity, plasma viscosity, and the aggregation index were not significantly different in the groups at any time. Hematocrit decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC in both groups due to dilution by the priming solution used. Conclusion After ECC, blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation were not different in the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups in the adult dog model. Furthermore, pulsatile flow did not have a more harmful effect on blood viscoelasticity or RBC aggregation than nonpulsatile flow. PMID:27298790

  11. Effects of DTIC, DM-COOK and ICRF-159 on the number of circulating Lewis lung carcinoma cells detected by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, T; Sava, G; Cherubino, R; Bottiroli, G; Mazzini, G

    1984-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells can be detected by means of flow cytometry in the blood of mice bearing i.m. Lewis lung carcinoma. This technique can be applied in the case of aneuploid tumors and does not require either concentration of nucleated cells or other processing of the blood samples. It offers the advantages of simplicity and speed and allows quantitative measurement of the number of circulating tumor cells. It can be applied to the study of the effects of drug treatment on the number of circulating tumor cells, for those drugs which do not cause alterations in the nuclear DNA content of normal diploid blood cells. The number of circulating tumor cells determined by flow cytometry is markedly reduced by treatment with ICRF-159, by dimethyltriazene DM-COOK, and also by its clinically used analog, DTIC.

  12. Feasibility of a miniature centrifugal rotary blood pump for low-flow circulation in children and infants.

    PubMed

    Takatani, Setsuo; Hoshi, Hideo; Tajima, Kennichi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Makoto; Asama, Junichio; Shimshi, Tadahiko; Yoshikawa, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a seal-less, tiny centrifugal rotary blood pump was designed for low-flow circulatory support in children and infants. The design was targeted to yield a compact and priming volume of 5 ml with a flow rate of 0.5-4 l/min against a head pressure of 40-100 mm Hg. To meet the design requirements, the first prototype had an impeller diameter of 30 mm with six straight vanes. The impeller was supported with a needle-type hydrodynamic bearing and was driven with a six-pole radial magnetic driver. The external pump dimensions included a pump head height of 20 mm, diameter of 49 mm, and priming volume of 5 ml. The weight was 150 g, including the motor driver. In the mock circulatory loop, using fresh porcine blood, the pump yielded a flow of 0.5-4.0 l/min against a head pressure of 40-100 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 1800-4000 rpm using 1/4" inflow and outflow conduits. The maximum flow and head pressure of 5.25 l/min and 244 mm Hg, respectively, were obtained at a rotational speed of 4400 rpm. The maximum electrical-to-hydraulic efficiency occurred at a flow rate of 1.5-3.5 l/min and at a rotational speed of 2000-4400 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis, which was evaluated using fresh porcine blood, was 0.0076 g/100 l with the impeller in the down-mode and a bearing clearance of 0.1 mm. Further refinement in the bearing and magnetic coupler are required to improve the hemolytic performance of the pump. The durability of the needle-type hydrodynamic bearing and antithrombotic performance of the pump will be performed before clinical applications. The tiny centrifugal blood pump meets the flow requirements necessary to support the circulation of pediatric patients.

  13. Urban infrastructure and natural resource flows: evidence from Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Katherine

    2013-09-01

    The current economic development trajectory is fundamentally unsustainable. However, decoupling economic growth from excessive natural resource consumption can be adopted as a means to deviate from this current trajectory. Decoupling enables economic growth and human development through non-material growth, without the environmental and social casualties of the incumbent model. Cities are the current and future context for socio development as well as a significant part of the cause and solution to sustainability challenges. Cities account for the majority of production and consumption activities leading to environmental degradation, and they are also the primary location for economic, institutional, and human capital. Innovative responses to global challenges generally emerge during the interaction between these kinds of capital. This paper presents the case of three of Cape Town's resource flows namely; electricity, water and solid waste, as mediated by networked urban infrastructure, to demonstrate the possibility of urban scale decoupling. Conclusions indicate that while decoupling can occur at the city scale, it is unlikely to be sufficient for the realization of sustainable urban development. Purposive interventions are therefore critical for successful, sustainable urban transitions.

  14. An investigation of radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth, Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando, Samaniego V.; Jesus, Rivera R.; Fernando Rodriguez

    1991-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where longitudinal dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared to those previously presented in literature by Moench and Ogata, Tang et al., Chen et al., and Hsieh et al. The solution is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., for short times) was carried out. The influence of various dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was investigated. A discussion of results obtained through the Crump and Stehfest algorithm is presented, concluding that the Crump method provides more reliable tracer concentrations.

  15. The global distribution of natural tritium in precipitation simulated with an Atmospheric General Circulation Model and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauquoin, A.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Risi, C.; Fourré, É.; Stenni, B.; Landais, A.

    2015-10-01

    The description of the hydrological cycle in Atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs) can be validated using water isotopes as tracers. Many GCMs now simulate the movement of the stable isotopes of water, but here we present the first GCM simulations modelling the content of natural tritium in water. These simulations were obtained using a version of the LMDZ General Circulation Model enhanced by water isotopes diagnostics, LMDZ-iso. To avoid tritium generated by nuclear bomb testing, the simulations have been evaluated against a compilation of published tritium datasets dating from before 1950, or measured recently. LMDZ-iso correctly captures the observed tritium enrichment in precipitation as oceanic air moves inland (the so-called continental effect) and the observed north-south variations due to the latitudinal dependency of the cosmogenic tritium production rate. The seasonal variability, linked to the stratospheric intrusions of air masses with higher tritium content into the troposphere, is correctly reproduced for Antarctica with a maximum in winter. LMDZ-iso reproduces the spring maximum of tritium over Europe, but underestimates it and produces a peak in winter that is not apparent in the data. This implementation of tritium in a GCM promises to provide a better constraint on: (1) the intrusions and transport of air masses from the stratosphere, and (2) the dynamics of the modelled water cycle. The method complements the existing approach of using stable water isotopes.

  16. Paleofluid-flow circulation within a Triassic rift basin: Evidence from oil inclusions and thermal histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tseng, H.-Y.; Burruss, R.C.; Onstott, T.C.; Omar, G.

    1999-01-01

    The migration of subsurface fluid flow within continental rift basins has been increasingly recognized to significantly affect the thermal history of sediments and petroleum formation. To gain insight into these paleofluid flow effects, the thermal history of the Taylorsville basin in Virginia was reconstructed from fluid-inclusion studies, apatite fission-track data, and vitrinite reflectance data. Models of thermal history indicate that the basin was buried to the thermal maximum at 200 Ma; a cooling event followed during which the eastern side of the basin cooled earlier and faster than the western side, suggesting that there was a differential uplift and topographically driven fluid flow. This hypothesis is supported by analyses of secondary oil and aqueous inclusions trapped in calcite and quartz veins during the uplift stage. Gas chromatograms of inclusion oils exhibit variable but extensive depletion of light molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The relative abundance of n-alkanes, petrographic observations, and the geological data indicate that the alteration process on these inclusion oils was probably neither phase separation nor biodegradation, but water washing. Water:oil ratios necessary to produce the observed alteration are much greater than 10000:1. These exceedingly high ratios are consistent with the migration of inclusion oils along with fluid flow during the early stages of basin evolution. The results provide significant evidence about the role of a subsurface flow system in modifying the temperature structure of the basin and the composition of petroleum generated within the basin.

  17. The simulation of start-up of natural circulation boiler based on the Astrom-Bell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Zhao, Zhenning; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xianran

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation on the dynamic analysis of steam and water system of the natural circulation boiler SHL35.2.5/AI with the software MATLAB/SIMULINK. Based on the four-order Astrom-Bell model, a model applicable the specific boiler was established, casting light on the changes in parameters of designed, cold start and varying load condition. And a curve of cold start is obtained, which can be taken as reference for practical operation. In addition, in the condition of varying load, our model captured the phenomenon of false water level, and according analysis is made. Our study introduces a feasible method of simulation on the dynamic analysis of steam and water system on other boilers as well.

  18. Changes in skin blood flow during the menstrual cycle: the influence of the menstrual cycle on the peripheral circulation in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bartelink, M L; Wollersheim, H; Theeuwes, A; van Duren, D; Thien, T

    1990-05-01

    1. It is known that females have a lower skin perfusion than males. In women there are also differences in blood flow at different reproductive stages of their lives. As an initial investigation of the possible contribution of sex hormones to these differences, we studied skin and forearm blood flow during the natural changes in hormone levels which occur during the menstrual cycle. 2. Thirty-one healthy female volunteers were studied. The effect of a standardized finger cooling test (immersion of a gloved hand in a 16 degrees C water bath) on finger skin temperature and on laser Doppler flux in the finger, and forearm blood flow (strain gauge venous occlusion plethysmography) was assessed at four different times during one cycle: during menstruation, 1 day before ovulation, 2 days after ovulation and at the mid-luteal phase. Test days were determined by daily measurements of basal body temperature and were confirmed afterwards by determinations of serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, 17 beta-oestradiol and progesterone. 3. Peripheral skin circulation varied significantly within one menstrual cycle. The extremes were a mean finger skin temperature of 25.9 +/- 3.0 degrees C in the luteal phase compared with 28.4 +/- 3.7 degrees C in the pre-ovulatory phase (P = 0.002). The respective values for the mean laser Doppler flux were 18.4 +/- 10.9 compared with 29.2 +/- 16.4 arbitrary units (P = 0.003). 4. Baseline forearm muscle blood flow also varied significantly (P = 0.04) within one menstrual cycle, with low values in the menstrual phase compared with the other phases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Development of a Couette-Taylor flow device with active minimization of secondary circulation.

    PubMed

    Schartman, E; Ji, H; Burin, M J

    2009-02-01

    A novel Taylor-Couette experiment has been developed to produce rotating shear flows for the study of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities which are believed to drive angular momentum transport in astrophysical accretion disks. High speed, concentric, corotating cylinders generate the flow where the height of the cylinders is twice the radial gap width. Ekman pumping is controlled and minimized by splitting the vertical boundaries into pairs of nested, differentially rotating rings. The end rings and cylinders comprise four independently driven rotating components which provide flexibility in developing flow profiles. The working fluids of the experiment are water, a water-glycerol mix, or a liquid gallium alloy. The mechanical complexity of the apparatus and large dynamic pressures generated by high speed operation with the gallium alloy presented unique challenges. The mechanical implementation of the experiment and some representative results obtained with laser Doppler velocimetry in water are discussed.

  20. Low Circulating Natural Killer Cell Counts are Associated With Severe Disease in Patients With Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ebbo, Mikael; Gérard, Laurence; Carpentier, Sabrina; Vély, Frédéric; Cypowyj, Sophie; Farnarier, Catherine; Vince, Nicolas; Malphettes, Marion; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Vivier, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells have been shown to exert antiviral and antitumoural activities. Nevertheless most available data are derived from mouse models and functions of these cells in human remain unclear. To evaluate the impact of low circulating NK cell counts and to provide some clues to the role of NK cells in natural conditions, we studied a large cohort of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) included in a multicenter cohort of patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia. Patients were classified into three groups on the basis of their NK cell counts: severe and mild NK cell lymphopenia (< 50 and 50–99 × 106/L respectively), and normal NK cell counts (> 100 × 106/L). Clinical events were analyzed and compared between these three groups of patients. During study period, 457 CVID patients were included: 99 (21.7%) with severe NK cell lymphopenia, 118 (25.8%) with mild NK cell lymphopenia and 240 (52.5%) with normal NK cell counts. Non-infectious complications (57% vs. 36% and 35%), and, particularly, granulomatous complications (25.3% vs. 13.6% and 8.8%), were more frequent in patients with severe NK cell lymphopenia than in other groups. Invasive infections (68.7% vs. 60.2% and 48.8%), including bacteraemia (22.2% vs. 5.9% and 8.3%) and infectious pneumonia (63.6% vs. 59.3% and 44.2%), were also more frequent in this population. However, no difference was observed for viral infections and neoplasms. Low circulating NK cell counts are associated with more severe phenotypes of CVID, which may indicate a protective role of these immune cells against severe bacterial infections and other complications and non-redundant immune functions when the adaptive immune response is not optimal. PMID:27211564

  1. Tracer flow model for naturally fractured geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Jetzabeth; Rivera, Jesus; Rodriquez, Fernando

    1988-01-01

    The model proposed has been developed to study the flow of tracers through naturally fractured geothermal reservoirs. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where diffusion and convection take place and a stagnant or immobile region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Solutions to the basic equations in the Laplace space were derived for tracer injection and were numerically inverted using the Stehfest algorithm. Even though numerical dispersion is present in these solutions, starting at moderate dimensionless time values, a definite trend was found as to infer the behavior of the system under different flow conditions. For practical purposes, it was found that he size of the matrix blocks does not seem to affect the tracer concentration reponse and the solution became equivalent to that previously presented by Tang et al. Under these conditions, the behavior of the system can be described by two dimensionless parameters: the Peclet number for the fractures, P{sub e{sup 1}}, and a parameter {alpha} ({alpha} = {xi}{sqrt}P{sub e{sup 2}}), where {xi} is {xi} = {phi}{sub e} D{sub e}/v(w-{delta}) and P{sub e{sup 2}} is the Peclet number for the matrix. Tracer response for spike injection was also derived in this work. A limiting analytical solution was found for the case of {alpha} approaching zero and a given P{sub e{sup 1}}, which corresponds to the case of a homogeneous system. It is shown that this limiting solution is valid for {alpha} < 10{sup -2}. For the case of continuous injection this solution reduces to that previously presented by Coats and Smith. For the spike solution it was found that the breakthrough time for maximum tracer concentration is directly related to the dimensionless group ({sqrt}(9 + (X{sub D}){sup 2}(P{sub e{sup 1}}){sup 2}) -3)/P{sub e{sup 1}}. Therefore it is possible to obtain the value of P{sub e{sup 1}} or X{sub D}. A set of graphs of dimensionless concentration in the fracture vs

  2. The hydrodynamic and ultrasound-induced forces on microbubbles under high Reynolds number flow representative of the human systemic circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are micron-sized bubbles that are used in conjunction with ultrasound (US) in medical applications such as thrombolysis and targeted intravenous drug delivery. Previous work has shown that the Bjerknes force, due to the phase difference between the incoming US pressure wave and the bubble volume oscillations, can be used to manipulate the trajectories of microbubbles. Our work explores the behavior of microbubbles in medium sized blood vessels under both uniform and pulsatile flows at a range of physiologically relevant Reynolds and Womersley numbers. High speed images were taken of the microbubbles in an in-vitro flow loop that replicates physiological flow conditions. During the imaging, the microbubbles were insonified at different diagnostic ultrasound settings (varying center frequency, PRF, etc.). An in-house Lagrangian particle tracking code was then used to determine the trajectories of the microbubbles and, thus, a dynamic model for the microbubbles including the Bjerknes forces acting on them, as well as drag, lift, and added mass. Preliminary work has also explored the behavior of the microbubbles in a patient-specific model of a carotid artery bifurcation to demonstrate the feasibility of preferential steering of microbubbles towards the intracranial circulation with US.

  3. EBR-II in-vessel natural circulation experiments on hot and cold pool stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, W.A.; Feldman, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II is located in a cylindrical pool of liquid sodium which is part of the cold-leg of the primary flow circuit. A vertical string of 32 thermocouples spans the 8 m tank height, at each of two diametrically opposed locations in the primary tank. Local temperatures were measured with these 64 thermocouples during dynamic tests. The instantaneous spacial temperature distribution obtained from a string of thermocouples can be viewed on a personal computer. The animation which results from displaying successive spacial distributions provide a very effective way to quickly obtain physical insights. The design of the two strings of thermocouples, the software used to create the animation, measured data from three different types of tests--two unprotected reactor transients, and one with the reactor at decay power levels and the reactor cover lifted, are discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Directional dispersal between mid-ocean ridges: deep-ocean circulation and gene flow in Ridgeia piscesae.

    PubMed

    Young, C R; Fujio, S; Vrijenhoek, R C

    2008-04-01

    This study examined relationships between bathymetrically induced deep-ocean currents and the dispersal of the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae along the northeast Pacific ridge system. A robust diagnostic model of deep-ocean circulation in this region predicted strong southeasterly currents following contours of the Blanco Transform Fault, a 450-km lateral offset that separates the Gorda and Juan de Fuca ridge systems. Such currents should facilitate the southward dispersal of R. piscesae larvae. Immigration rates for populations north and south of the Blanco Transform Fault were estimated from molecular population genetic data. Mitochondrial DNA evidence revealed population subdivision across the Blanco Transform Fault, and a strong directional bias in gene flow that was consistent with predictions of the circulation model. The distribution of mitochondrial diversity between the northern and southern populations of R. piscesae suggests that the Gorda Ridge tubeworms have maintained larger effective population sizes than the northern populations, a pattern that also exists in co-occurring limpets. Together, these data suggest that the northern vent fields may experience a higher frequency of habitat turnover and consequently more rapid losses of genetic diversity.

  5. Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Reyes

    2005-02-14

    In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

  6. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood.

  7. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Sengupta, Shramik; Viator, John A.

    2011-03-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are inadequately sensitive. Patients must wait until secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and flow through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring cancer. Our group utilizes the photoacoustic effect to detect metastatic melanoma cells, which contain the pigmented granule melanin. As a rapid laser pulse irradiates melanoma, the melanin undergoes thermo-elastic expansion and ultimately creates a photoacoustic wave. Thus, melanoma patient's blood samples can be enriched, leaving the melanoma in a white blood cell (WBC) suspension. Irradiated melanoma cells produce photoacoustic waves, which are detected with a piezoelectric transducer, while the optically transparent WBCs create no signals. Here we report an isolation scheme utilizing two-phase flow to separate detected melanoma from the suspension. By introducing two immiscible fluids through a t-junction into one flow path, the analytes are compartmentalized. Therefore, the slug in which the melanoma cell is located can be identified and extracted from the system. Two-phase immiscible flow is a label free technique, and could be used for other types of pathological analytes.

  8. Effect of Riser Geometry Structure on Local Flow Pattern in a Rectangular Circulating Fluidized Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chen; Wang, Qinhui; Luo, Zhongyang; Zhang, Ximei; Cheng, Leming; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    By using a high-speed video camera and particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, the local flow properties of the solid-gas two phases flow were studied in a plexiglass rectangular CFB cold model with the a riser of 1.5×0.864×4.9m3. Measurements were carried out with transparent spherical glass bead between 0.1-0.425mm as bed materials and cold air as flow medium. The experimental results showed that the secondary air has an important influence on the particle velocity distribution. Because of the secondary air penetrating effect, the particle lateral movement was acute. In the dilute region, the outlet and the comer effect induced the defluxion of the particles movement and the core-annular distribution was broken. The closer to the outlet, the stronger the lateral velocity is. The obstruct of hanging screen reduced the furnace outlet effects between the hanging screen and the front wall, where the particle movement in the area was controlled by the gas flow and the constrain of the wall. High particle concentration areas were formed in the junction between the screen and the front wall and in the comer between the wall and the front wall.

  9. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood. PMID:22734751

  10. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle D; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; Mosley, Jeffrey D; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastatic melanoma cells in blood.

  11. Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Oosterkamp, Willem Jan; Marquino, Wayne

    1999-01-05

    A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereat access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed.

  12. Chimney for enhancing flow of coolant water in natural circulation boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Marquino, W.

    1999-01-05

    A chimney which can be reconfigured or removed during refueling to allow vertical removal of the fuel assemblies is disclosed. The chimney is designed to be collapsed or dismantled. Collapse or dismantlement of the chimney reduces the volume required for chimney storage during the refueling operation. Alternatively, the chimney has movable parts which allow reconfiguration of its structure. In a first configuration suitable for normal reactor operation, the chimney is radially constricted such that the chimney obstructs vertical removal of the fuel assemblies. In a second configuration suitable for refueling or maintenance of the fuel core, the parts of the chimney which obstruct access to the fuel assemblies are moved radially outward to positions whereas access to the fuel assemblies is not obstructed. 11 figs.

  13. On the North Atlantic circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, W.J. Jr.; McCartney, M.S. )

    1993-02-01

    A summary for North Atlantic circulation is proposed to replace the circulation scheme hypothesized by Worthington in 1976. Divergences from the previous model are in thermohaline circulation, cross-equatorical transport and Florida Current sources, flow in the eastern Atlantic, circulation in the Newfoundland Basin, slope water currents, and flow pattern near the Bahamas. The circulation patterns presented here are consistent with the majority of of published accounts of flow components. 77 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Do general circulation models underestimate the natural variability in the artic climate?

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, D.S.; Bitz, C.M.; Moritz, R.E.

    1997-08-01

    The authors examine the natural variability of the arctic climate system simulated by two very different models: the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) global climate model, and an area-averaged model of the arctic atmosphere-sea ice-upper-ocean system called the polar cap climate model, the PCCM. A 1000-yr integration of the PCCM is performed in which the model is driven by a prescribed, stochastic atmospheric energy flux convergence (D), which has spectral characteristics that are identical to the spectra of the observed D. The standard deviation of the yearly mean sea ice thickness from this model is 0.85 m; the mean sea ice thickness is 3.1 m. In contrast, the standard deviation of the yearly averaged sea ice thickness in the GFDL climate model is found to be about 6% of the climatological mean thickness and only 24% of that simulated by the PCCM. A series of experiments is presented to determine the cause of these disparate results. First, after changing the treatment of sea ice and snow albedo in the (standard) PCCM model to be identical thermodynamically to that in the GFDL model, the PCCM is driven with D from the GFDL control integration to demonstrate that the PCCM model produces an arctic climate similar to that of the GFDL model. Integrations of the PCCM are then examined in which the different prescriptions of the sea ice treatment (GFDL vs standard PCCM) and D (GFDL vs observed) are permutated. The authors present calculations that indicate the variability in the sea ice thickness is extremely sensitive to the spectrum of the atmospheric energy flux convergence. A conservative best estimate for the amplitude of the natural variability in the arctic sea ice volume is presented.The results suggest that most of the global climate models that have been used to evaluate climate change may also have artificially quiescent variability in the Arctic. 24 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Natural flow regimes of the Ozark-Ouachita Interior Highlands region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leasure, D. R.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Longing, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    Natural flow regimes represent the hydrologic conditions to which native aquatic organisms are best adapted. We completed a regional river classification and quantitative descriptions of each natural flow regime for the Ozark–Ouachita Interior Highlands region of Arkansas, Missouri and Oklahoma. On the basis of daily flow records from 64 reference streams, seven natural flow regimes were identified with mixture model cluster analysis: Groundwater Stable, Groundwater, Groundwater Flashy, Perennial Runoff, Runoff Flashy, Intermittent Runoff and Intermittent Flashy. Sets of flow metrics were selected that best quantified nine ecologically important components of these natural flow regimes. An uncertainty analysis was performed to avoid selecting metrics strongly affected by measurement uncertainty that can result from short periods of record. Measurement uncertainties (bias, precision and accuracy) were assessed for 170 commonly used flow metrics. The ranges of variability expected for select flow metrics under natural conditions were quantified for each flow regime to provide a reference for future assessments of hydrologic alteration. A random forest model was used to predict the natural flow regimes of all stream segments in the study area based on climate and catchment characteristics, and a map was produced. The geographic distribution of flow regimes suggested distinct ecohydrological regions that may be useful for conservation planning. This project provides a hydrologic foundation for future examination of flow–ecology relationships in the region. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Development of a Couette-Taylor flow device with active minimization of secondary circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ethan Schartman

    2009-01-27

    A novel Taylor-Couette experiment has been developed to produce rotating shear ows for the study of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities which are believed to drive angular momentum transport in astrophysical accretion disks. High speed, concentric, corotating cylinders generate the flow where the height of the cylinders is twice the radial gap width. Ekman pumping is controlled and minimized by splitting the vertical boundaries into pairs of nested, differentially rotating rings. The end rings and cylinders comprise four independently driven rotating components which provide exibility in developing flow profiles. The working fluids of the experiment are water, a water-glycerol mix, or a liquid gallium alloy. The mechanical complexity of the apparatus and large dynamic pressures generated by high speed operation with the gallium alloy presented unique challenges. The mechanical implementation of the experiment and some representative results obtained with Laser Doppler Velocimetry in water are discussed.

  17. HIV Type 1 Integrase Natural Polymorphisms in Viral Variants Circulating in FSU Countries.

    PubMed

    Lapovok, Ilya; Laga, Vita; Kazennova, Elena; Bobkova, Marina

    2017-08-15

    Natural variability of integrase (IN) across HIV-1 variants may influence the emergence of resistant viruses. The most apparent explanation of these fact is the IN polymorphism and the associated differences in codon usage, which, in turn, influence the probability and the terms of DRMs acquisition. Possible mechanisms by which polymorphisms affect DRMs emergence remain disputed and should still be clarified because these substitutions may be associated with a reduced activity of some INSTIs and may impact on ART regimen choice depending of HIV-1 subtype. The aim of this work was to assess the prevalence of naturally occurring polymorphisms within the HIV-1 integrase gene, which might influence the susceptibility to INSTIs, among the patients from Russia and former USSR countries, according to HIV-1 subtypes. A study involved 506 HIV-1 IN sequences of INSTI-naive patients from Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Belarus, and Georgia. Among them, 194 sequences were newly obtained in this study and 312 were downloaded from Los-Alamos database. The proviral DNA was sequenced using an in-house PCR protocol designed on the basis of a well-conserved integrase region in order to detect all HIV-1 variants. The phylogenetic analyses based on IN population sequencing found subtype A6 being the most prevalent (259) (51.2%) in the collection studied, followed by subtype G (36) (7.1%), AG-recombinants (148) (29.3%), subtype B (50) (9.9%), and CRF03_AB (5) (1,0%). The major INSTI resistance-associated mutations (DRMs) were found only in two A6 samples. The prevalence of minor/accessory substitutions depended on HIV-1 variants, while the most notable findings were L74I in subtype A6 (93.1%) and E157Q in subtype B (44.0%). Most of minor DRMs and polymorphic substitutions were concentrated in the central catalytic domain of the IN molecule. Both the DDE triad and HHCC zinc binding motifs were fully conserved. The results of the study suggest a very low

  18. Nature of the source of vortex sound flowing around a cylindrical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, L. A.; Semenov, A. G.

    2014-11-01

    This paper is devoted to refining the nature of a vortex sound source and validly estimating the parameters of the region of source origination in a wake behind a cylindrical profile depending on the incoming flow velocity and profile diameter. Based on experimental measurements of the rms values of pressure pulsations on the surface and in the wake behind the profile and hydrodynamic laws for 2D fluid flows, the position of the origin of the vortex street in the wake and the size of the region where the street is still irregular are estimated. In this region, the street dimensions and pressure pulsation amplitudes change with distance from the profile. It is found that the maximum of the pressure pulsation in the wake approaches the profile surface in the range of Reynolds numbers (4.7 × 103-1.5 × 104); the amplitude of pressure pulsations on the profile and vortex sound intensity also increase. Based on the relationship between the source's position and size and the width of the vortex street, as well as taking into account the decay of vortex circulation in the street with increasing distance to the profile, it is shown that the distance from the source to the surface of the profile should not exceed two gages. It is shown that an obstacle in the wake in the region of its irregularity causes a decrease in pressure pulsations on the profile and attenuation of emitted sound. Sound emission ceases completely when the obstacle comes in direct contact with the region of origination of the vortex street. Theoretical estimates satisfactorily agree with the measurement results.

  19. Observation of airplane flow fields by natural condensation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1988-01-01

    In-flight condensation patterns can illustrate a variety of airplane flow fields, such as attached and separated flows, vortex flows, and expansion and shock waves. These patterns are a unique source of flow visualization that has not been utilized previously. Condensation patterns at full-scale Reynolds number can provide useful information for researchers experimenting in subscale tunnels. It is also shown that computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field provide an inexpensive way to analyze the qualitative features of the condensation pattern, although a more complete theoretical modeling is necessary to obtain details of the condensation process. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that relative humidity is more sensitive to changes in local static temperature than to changes in pressure.

  20. Sensitivity of Circulation in the Skagit River Estuary to Sea Level Rise and Future Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Long, Wen; Sackmann, Brandon; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Hamlet, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Future climate simulations based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario (A1B) have shown that the Skagit River flow will be affected, which may lead to modification of the estuarine hydrodynamics. There is considerable uncertainty, however, about the extent and magnitude of resulting change, given accompanying sea level rise and site-specific complexities with multiple interconnected basins. To help quantify the future hydrodynamic response, we developed a three dimensional model of the Skagit River estuary using the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was set up with localized high-resolution grids in Skagit and Padilla Bay sub-basins within the intermediate-scale FVCOM based model of the Salish Sea (greater Puget Sound and Georgia Basin). Future changes to salinity and annual transport through the basin were examined. The results confirmed the existence of a residual estuarine flow that enters Skagit Bay from Saratoga Passage to the south and exits through Deception Pass. Freshwater from the Skagit River is transported out in the surface layers primarily through Deception Pass and Saratoga Passage, and only a small fraction (≈4%) is transported to Padilla Bay. The moderate future perturbations of A1B emissions, corresponding river flow, and sea level rise of 0.48 m examined here result only in small incremental changes to salinity structure and inter-basin freshwater distribution and transport. An increase in salinity of ~1 ppt in the near-shore environment and a salinity intrusion of approximately 3 km further upstream is predicted in Skagit River, well downstream of the drinking water intakes.

  1. Island-trapped Waves, Internal Waves, and Island Circulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    model of the depth-integrated flow for the world ocean allowing for island circulations . Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn., 45:89–112, 1989. J. MacKinnon...Mountain waves in the deep ocean . Nature, 501:321–322, 2013. M. Nikurashin and R. Ferrari. Overturning circulation driven by breaking internal waves...Island-trapped waves, internal waves, and island circulation T. M. Shaun Johnston Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California

  2. Increased Drake Passage through-flow triggered abrupt re-invigoration of Atlantic Overturning Circulation during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; McCave, I. N. N.; McClymont, E.; Kender, S.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Matano, R. P.; Hodell, D. A.; Peck, V. L.

    2016-12-01

    The position of Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) fronts in the Drake Passage is important for the supply of low-density intermediate water into the Atlantic, and is thus key to the stability of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). We examined changes in the position of ACC fronts by reconstructing flow speed and temperature in the Drake Passage over the last 25,000 years. A dramatic convergence of flow speeds and temperatures at the entrance and exit of Drake Passage 14,700 years ago indicates a significant southward shift of the sub-Antarctic Front from a position north of Drake Passage. The timing of this southward shift coincides with an abrupt re-invigoration of AMOC at the onset of the Bølling-Allerød. We argue that 14,700 years ago, a southward shift in the position of the ACC fronts relative to Drake Passage enabled low-density intermediate water to enter the Atlantic; this accentuated the meridional density gradient in the Atlantic causing an abrupt re-invigoration of AMOC.

  3. Risk assessment of debris flow hazards in natural slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junghae; Chae, Byung-gon; Liu, Kofei; Wu, Yinghsin

    2016-04-01

    The study area is located at north-east part of South Korea. Referring to the map of landslide sus-ceptibility (KIGAM, 2009) from Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM for short), there are large areas of potential landslide in high probability on slope land of mountain near the study area. Besides, recently some severe landslide-induced debris flow hazards occurred in this area. So this site is convinced to be prone to debris flow haz-ards. In order to mitigate the influence of hazards, the assessment of potential debris flow hazards is very important and essential. In this assessment, we use Debris-2D, debris flow numerical program, to assess the potential debris flow hazards. The worst scenario is considered for simulation. The input mass sources are determined using landslide susceptibility map. The water input is referred to the daily accumulative rainfall in the past debris flow event in study area. The only one input material property, i.e. yield stress, is obtained using calibration test. The simulation results show that the study area has po-tential to be impacted by debris flow. Therefore, based on simulation results, to mitigate debris flow hazards, we can propose countermeasures, including building check dams, constructing a protection wall in study area, and installing instruments for active monitoring of debris flow hazards. Acknowledgements:This research was supported by the Public Welfare & Safety Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2012M3A2A1050983)

  4. Plasma flow and carbon production and circulation with the ergodic divertor of Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, Y.; Gunn, J.; Pégourié, B.; Guirlet, R.; DeMichelis, C.; Giannella, R.; Ghendrih, P.; Hogan, J.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Azéroual, A.; Escarguel, A.; Gauthier, E.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of carbon production and transport from the ergodic divertor (ED) target plates to the plasma core in the Tore Supra tokamak. Adapted experimental and numerical modelling techniques have been used to describe each of the main phenomena in play. Edge electron density and temperature are measured with Langmuir probes. The C II, C III and Hα emission is measured with optical fibres and cameras. The background plasma flow is calculated consistently with the observed recycling pattern by the neutral transport code EDCOLL for the two magnetic connection schemes of interest (short or long connection lengths). 3D Monte-Carlo modelling of carbon near the neutralizer plate (BBQ code) shows that the transport of carbon ions is governed by the friction force in addition to the electric field. Finally, a simplified 3D test particle model is used to estimate the core penetration fraction of carbon. A high value is found for the carbon screening efficiency (fraction of particles that does not penetrate in the plasma core), in the range 95-97% depending on the edge plasma conditions. This value, combined with the calculated carbon influxes, yields the first quantitative estimate of the carbon core contamination during ED operation. The paper shows that the screening of carbon and core contamination are mainly dependent on the carbon source (partially controlled with the ED) and the plasma flow distribution in the laminar region (magnetic topology and particle drifts).

  5. Elderly bioheat modeling: changes in physiology, thermoregulation, and blood flow circulation.

    PubMed

    Rida, Mohamad; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-11-01

    A bioheat model for the elderly was developed focusing on blood flow circulatory changes that influence their thermal response in warm and cold environments to predict skin and core temperatures for different segments of the body especially the fingers. The young adult model of Karaki et al. (Int J Therm Sci 67:41-51, 2013) was modified by incorporation of the physiological thermoregulatory and vasomotor changes based on literature observations of physiological changes in the elderly compared to young adults such as lower metabolism and vasoconstriction diminished ability, skin blood flow and its minimum and maximum values, the sweating values, skin fat thickness, as well as the change in threshold parameter related to core or skin temperatures which triggers thermoregulatory action for sweating, maximum dilatation, and maximum constriction. The developed model was validated with published experimental data for elderly exposure to transient and steady hot and cold environments. Predicted finger skin temperature, mean skin temperature, and core temperature were in agreement with published experimental data at a maximum error less than 0.5 °C in the mean skin temperature. The elderly bioheat model showed an increase in finger skin temperature and a decrease in core temperature in cold exposure while it showed a decrease in finger skin temperature and an increase in core temperature in hot exposure.

  6. The Oscillating Component of the Internal Jugular Vein Flow: The Overlooked Element of Cerebral Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Sisini, Francesco; Toro, Eleuterio; Gambaccini, Mauro; Zamboni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The jugular venous pulse (JVP) provides valuable information about cardiac haemodynamics and filling pressures and is an indirect estimate of the central venous pressure (CVP). Recently it has been proven that JVP can be obtained by measuring the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the IJV on each sonogram of an ultrasound B-mode sonogram sequence. It has also been proven that during its pulsation the IJV is distended and hence that the pressure gradient drives the IJV haemodynamics. If this is true, then it will imply the following: (i) the blood velocity in the IJV is a periodic function of the time with period equal to the cardiac period and (ii) the instantaneous blood velocity is given by a time function that can be derived from a flow-dynamics theory that uses the instantaneous pressure gradient as a parameter. The aim of the present study is to confirm the hypothesis that JVP regulates the IJV blood flow and that pressure waves are transmitted from the heart toward the brain through the IJV wall. PMID:26783380

  7. Going With the Flow: Evidence for Changes in Circulation in Seneca Lake, NY During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, M. L.; Curtin, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    carbonate concentrations are highest, between 30-35%. The combination of relatively finer grain sizes and low P'values of sediment deposited during the late Hypsithermal and part of the Neoglacial suggests there was more extensive reworking by currents or organisms, eliminating any preferred depositional alignment of grains as a function of lake currents or low current influence during this time. Overall, variations in median grain size, MS, and P' indicate varying current strengths are responsible for deposition of sediment and reflect changes in lake circulation in response to changes in air temperatures and the position of the jet stream.

  8. Patterns in the sky: Natural visualization of aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the current publication is to present the collection of flight photographs to illustrate the types of flow patterns that were visualized and to present qualitative correlations with computational and wind tunnel results. Initially in section 2, the condensation process is discussed, including a review of relative humidity, vapor pressure, and factors which determine the presence of visible condensate. Next, outputs from computer code calculations are postprocessed by using water-vapor relationships to determine if computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field correlate with the qualitative features of the in-flight condensation patterns. The photographs are then presented in section 3 by flow type and subsequently in section 4 by aircraft type to demonstrate the variety of condensed flow fields that was visualized for a wide range of aircraft and flight maneuvers.

  9. Brain damage in dogs immediately following pulsatile and non-pulsatile blood flows in extracorporeal circulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J. M.; Wright, G.; Sims, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The brains of dogs subjected to total cardiac bypass were examined for early signs of ischaemic nerve cell changes. Diffuse nerve cell changes were found immediately following two- and three-hour non-pulsatile perfusions but not following pulsatile perfusions of the same durations. The nerve cell changes found in the brains were acute cell swelling and early ischaemic cell change. Acute cell swelling was found only in the cerebellar Purkinje cells. Ischaemic cell change was found in several regions of the brain but the cerebral cortex and cerebellar Purkinje cells were most frequently affected. Diffuse nerve cell changes are attributed to non-pulsatile blood flow but some complicating factors are recognized. Focal lesions found in three brains may have been due to embolism by blood cell aggregates and/or gas microbubbles. Images PMID:5039442

  10. Circulation on the Northwestern Iberian Margin: Vertical structure and seasonality of the alongshore flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles-Machado, Ana; Peliz, Álvaro; McWilliams, James C.; Couvelard, Xavier; Ambar, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    We describe the seasonal cycle of the alongshore flows on the Northwestern Iberian Margin and explain what are the important mechanisms forcing the system. We used a 20-year model simulation at 2.3 km horizontal resolution, with realistic atmospheric forcing and covering the whole Western Iberian Margin. The model results are compared with satellite data, with data measured at two moored buoys and with a compilation of current meter data available for the study region. We show that currents over the slope are divided in three different cores: the Iberian Poleward Current (IPC) occupying the top 350 m, a deeper core at Mediterranean Water levels (∼600-1200 m) and in between the two, an equatorward core centered just beneath the IPC core, the Upper Slope Countercurrent (USCC). The IPC is present almost yearlong, including in summer months, when it is close to the shelf-break and topped by the equatorward upwelling jet. After September, the IPC intensifies and its core surfaces. Heat and salinity budgets on the shelf and slope are dominated by advection, confirming the important role of the IPC in driving the temperature and salinity seasonal cycles. Analysis of the seasonal cycle of the barotropic vorticity equation on the slope, shows that the main forcing mechanism of northward flows is the "Joint Effect of Baroclinicity and Relief" (JEBAR), whose contribution is higher in summer than in winter. In December and January, when the IPC is stronger and surface intensified, the main contribution is from southerly winds. The cross-shore analysis of these terms shows that JEBAR decreases substantially at the core of the IPC because, as advection terms become important, the northward density flux diminishes the local meridional density gradients, resulting in the decrease of JEBAR in the months of strong IPC.

  11. Short-term exercise training improves flow-mediated dilation and circulating angiogenic cell number in older sedentary adults.

    PubMed

    Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Corrigan, Kelsey J; Guth, Lisa M; Altom, Christine N; Spangenburg, Espen E; Prior, Steven J; Hagberg, James M

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk increases with age due, in part, to impaired endothelial function and decreased circulating angiogenic cell (CAC) number and function. We sought to determine if 10 days of aerobic exercise training improves endothelial function, CAC number, and intracellular redox balance in older sedentary adults. Eleven healthy subjects (4 men, 7 women), 61 ± 2 years of age participated in 60 min of aerobic exercise at 70% maximal oxygen consumption for 10 consecutive days while maintaining body weight. Before and after training, endothelial function was measured as flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery and fasting blood was drawn to enumerate 3 CAC subtypes. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in CD34+ CACs were measured using fluorescent probes and reinforced via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Flow-mediated dilation improved significantly following training (10% ± 1.3% before vs. 16% ± 1.4% after training; P < 0.05). Likewise, CD34+/KDR+ number increased 104% and KDR+ number increased 151% (P < 0.05 for both), although CD34+ number was not significantly altered (P > 0.05). Intracellular NO and ROS levels in CD34+ CACs were not different after training (P > 0.05 for both). Messenger RNA expression of SOD1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and NADPH oxidase 2 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 in CD34+ CACs was not significantly altered with training (P > 0.05). In conclusion, 10 consecutive days of aerobic exercise increased flow-mediated dilation and CAC number in older, previously sedentary adults, but did not affect intracellular redox balance in CD34+ CACs. Overall, these data indicate that even short-term aerobic exercise training can have a significant impact on cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  12. Flow cytometric analysis of circulating endothelial cells and endothelial progenitors for clinical purposes in oncology: A critical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    DANOVA, MARCO; COMOLLI, GIUDITTA; MANZONI, MARIANGELA; TORCHIO, MARTINA; MAZZINI, GIULIANO

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors are characterized by uncontrolled cell growth and metastatic spread, with a pivotal importance of the phenomenon of angiogenesis. For this reason, research has focused on the development of agents targeting the vascular component of the tumor microenvironment and regulating the angiogenic switch. As a result, the therapeutic inhibition of angiogenesis has become an important component of anticancer treatment, however, its utility is partly limited by the lack of an established methodology to assess its efficacy in vivo. Circulating endothelial cells (CECs), which are rare in healthy subjects and significantly increased in different tumor types, represent a promising tool for monitoring the tumor clinical outcome and the treatment response. A cell population circulating into the blood also able to form endothelial colonies in vitro and to promote vasculogenesis is represented by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The number of both of these cell types is extremely low and they cannot be identified using a single marker, therefore, in absence of a definite consensus on their phenotype, require discrimination using combinations of antigens. Multiparameter flow cytometry (FCM) is ideal for rapid processing of high numbers of cells per second and is commonly utilized to quantify CECs and EPCs, however, remains technically challenging since there is as yet no standardized protocol for the identification and enumeration of these rare events. Methodology in studies on CECs and/or EPCs as clinical biomarkers in oncology is heterogeneous and data have been obtained from different studies leading to conflicting conclusions. The present review presented a critical review of the issues that limit the comparability of results of the most significant studies employing FCM for CEC and/or EPC detection in patients with cancer. PMID:27284422

  13. Detection of circulating microparticles by flow cytometry: influence of centrifugation, filtration of buffer, and freezing

    PubMed Central

    Dey-Hazra, Emily; Hertel, Barbara; Kirsch, Torsten; Woywodt, Alexander; Lovric, Svjetlana; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion; Erdbruegger, Uta

    2010-01-01

    The clinical importance of microparticles resulting from vesiculation of platelets and other blood cells is increasingly recognized, although no standardized method exists for their measurement. Only a few studies have examined the analytical and preanalytical steps and variables affecting microparticle detection. We focused our analysis on microparticle detection by flow cytometry. The goal of our study was to analyze the effects of different centrifugation protocols looking at different durations of high and low centrifugation speeds. We also analyzed the effect of filtration of buffer and long-term freezing on microparticle quantification, as well as the role of Annexin V in the detection of microparticles. Absolute and platelet-derived microparticles were 10- to 15-fold higher using initial lower centrifugation speeds at 1500 × g compared with protocols using centrifugation speeds at 5000 × g (P < 0.01). A clear separation between true events and background noise was only achieved using higher centrifugation speeds. Filtration of buffer with a 0.2 μm filter reduced a significant amount of background noise. Storing samples for microparticle detection at −80°C decreased microparticle levels at days 28, 42, and 56 (P < 0.05 for all comparisons with fresh samples). We believe that staining with Annexin V is necessary to distinguish true events from cell debris or precipitates. Buffers should be filtered and fresh samples should be analyzed, or storage periods will have to be standardized. Higher centrifugation speeds should be used to minimize contamination by smaller size platelets. PMID:21191433

  14. Transient analysis of subcritical/supercritical carbon dioxide based natural circulation loop with end heat exchangers: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Ramgopal, Maddali; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2017-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) based natural circulation loops (NCLs) has gained attention due to its compactness with higher heat transfer rate. In the present study, experimental investigations have been carried out to capture the transient behaviour of a CO2 based NCL operating under subcritical as well as supercritical conditions. Water is used as the external fluid in cold and hot heat exchangers. Results are obtained for various inlet temperatures (323-353 K) of water in the hot heat exchanger and a fixed inlet temperature (305 K) of cooling water in the cold heat exchanger. Effect of loop operating pressure (50-90 bar) on system performance is also investigated. Effect of loop tilt in two different planes (XY and YZ) is also studied in terms of transient as well as steady state behaviour of the loop. Results show that the time required to attain steady state decreases as operating pressure of the loop increases. It is also observed that the change in temperature of loop fluid (CO2) across hot or cold heat exchanger decreases as operating pressure increases.

  15. Transient analysis of subcritical/supercritical carbon dioxide based natural circulation loop with end heat exchangers: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Ramgopal, Maddali; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) based natural circulation loops (NCLs) has gained attention due to its compactness with higher heat transfer rate. In the present study, experimental investigations have been carried out to capture the transient behaviour of a CO2 based NCL operating under subcritical as well as supercritical conditions. Water is used as the external fluid in cold and hot heat exchangers. Results are obtained for various inlet temperatures (323-353 K) of water in the hot heat exchanger and a fixed inlet temperature (305 K) of cooling water in the cold heat exchanger. Effect of loop operating pressure (50-90 bar) on system performance is also investigated. Effect of loop tilt in two different planes (XY and YZ) is also studied in terms of transient as well as steady state behaviour of the loop. Results show that the time required to attain steady state decreases as operating pressure of the loop increases. It is also observed that the change in temperature of loop fluid (CO2) across hot or cold heat exchanger decreases as operating pressure increases.

  16. Transmission-blocking activity of tafenoquine (WR-238605) and artelinic acid against naturally circulating strains of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ponsa, Narong; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Eikarat, Nantana; Coleman, Russell E

    2003-11-01

    The sporontocidal activity of tafenoquine (WR-238605) and artelinic acid was determined against naturally circulating isolates of Plasmodium vivax in western Thailand. Primaquine was used as a negative control and a dihydroacridine-dione (WR-250547) was used as a positive control. Laboratory-reared Anopheles dirus mosquitoes were infected with P. vivax by allowing mosquitoes to feed on blood (placed in an artificial-membrane feeding apparatus) collected from gametocytemic volunteers reporting to local malaria clinics in Tak province, Thailand. Four days post-infection, mosquitoes were refed on uninfected mice treated 90 minutes earlier with a given drug. Drug activity was determined by assessing oocyst and sporozoite development. Neither primaquine nor artelinic acid affected oocyst or sporozoite development at a dose of 100 mg of base drug/kg of mouse body weight. In contrast, tafenoquine and WR-250547 affected sporogonic development at doses as low as 25.0 and 0.39 mg/kg, respectively. The potential role of these compounds in the prevention of malaria transmission is discussed, as are alternative strategies for the use of transmission-blocking antimalarial drugs.

  17. Evolution of a natural debris flow: In situ measurements of flow dynamics, video imagery, and terrestrial laser scanning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.; Staley, D.M.; Wasklewicz, T.A.; Tucker, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    Many theoretical and laboratory studies have been undertaken to understand debris-flow processes and their associated hazards. However, complete and quantitative data sets from natural debris flows needed for confirmation of these results are limited. We used a novel combination of in situ measurements of debris-flow dynamics, video imagery, and pre- and postflow 2-cm-resolution digital terrain models to study a natural debris-flow event. Our field data constrain the initial and final reach morphology and key flow dynamics. The observed event consisted of multiple surges, each with clear variation of flow properties along the length of the surge. Steep, highly resistant, surge fronts of coarse-grained material without measurable pore-fluid pressure were pushed along by relatively fine-grained and water-rich tails that had a wide range of pore-fluid pressures (some two times greater than hydrostatic). Surges with larger nonequilibrium pore-fluid pressures had longer travel distances. A wide range of travel distances from different surges of similar size indicates that dynamic flow properties are of equal or greater importance than channel properties in determining where a particular surge will stop. Progressive vertical accretion of multiple surges generated the total thickness of mapped debris-flow deposits; nevertheless, deposits had massive, vertically unstratified sedimentological textures. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  18. Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale

    DOE PAGES

    Buchanan, Brian P.; Auerbach, Daniel A.; McManamay, Ryan A.; ...

    2017-01-04

    Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologic alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used these empirical flow-ecology relationships to evaluate alternative surface water withdrawals and environmental flow rules. Reduced high-flow magnitude, dampened rates of change, and increased low-flow magnitudes were apparent regionally, but changes in many of the flow metrics likely to be sensitive to withdrawals also showed substantial regional variation. Fish community measures were significantly relatedmore » to flow alteration, including declines in species richness with diminished annual runoff, winter low-flow, and summer median-flow. In addition, the relative abundance of intolerant taxa decreased with reduced winter high-flow and increased flow constancy, while fluvial specialist species decreased with reduced winter and annual flows. Stream size strongly mediated both the impact of withdrawal scenarios and the protection afforded by environmental flow standards. Under the most intense withdrawal scenario, 75% of reference headwaters and creeks (drainage areas <99 km2) experienced at least 78% reduction in summer flow, whereas little change was predicted for larger rivers. Moreover, the least intense withdrawal scenario still reduced summer flows by at least 21% for 50% of headwaters and creeks. The observed 90th quantile flow-ecology relationships indicate that such alteration could reduce species richness by 23% or more. Seasonally varying environmental flow standards and high fixed minimum flows protected the most streams from hydrologic alteration, but common minimum flow standards left numerous locations vulnerable to substantial flow alteration. This study clarifies how additional water demands in the region

  19. Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Brian P; Auerbach, Daniel A; McManamay, Ryan A; Taylor, Jason M; Flecker, Alexander S; Archibald, Josephine A; Fuka, Daniel R; Walter, M Todd

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologic alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used these empirical flow-ecology relationships to evaluate alternative surface water withdrawals and environmental flow rules. Reduced high-flow magnitude, dampened rates of change, and increased low-flow magnitudes were apparent regionally, but changes in many of the flow metrics likely to be sensitive to withdrawals also showed substantial regional variation. Fish community measures were significantly related to flow alteration, including declines in species richness with diminished annual runoff, winter low-flow, and summer median-flow. In addition, the relative abundance of intolerant taxa decreased with reduced winter high-flow and increased flow constancy, while fluvial specialist species decreased with reduced winter and annual flows. Stream size strongly mediated both the impact of withdrawal scenarios and the protection afforded by environmental flow standards. Under the most intense withdrawal scenario, 75% of reference headwaters and creeks (drainage areas <99 km(2) ) experienced at least 78% reduction in summer flow, whereas little change was predicted for larger rivers. Moreover, the least intense withdrawal scenario still reduced summer flows by at least 21% for 50% of headwaters and creeks. The observed 90th quantile flow-ecology relationships indicate that such alteration could reduce species richness by 23% or more. Seasonally varying environmental flow standards and high fixed minimum flows protected the most streams from hydrologic alteration, but common minimum flow standards left numerous locations vulnerable to substantial flow alteration. This study clarifies how additional water demands in the region may

  20. Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow and experimental program for resilient leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, B. H.

    1979-01-01

    The potential of natural laminar flow for significant drag reduction and improved efficiency for aircraft is assessed. Past experience with natural laminar flow as reported in published and unpublished data and personal observations of various researchers is summarized. Aspects discussed include surface contour, waviness, and smoothness requirements; noise and vibration effects on boundary layer transition, boundary layer stability criteria; flight experience with natural laminar flow and suction stabilized boundary layers; and propeller slipstream, rain, frost, ice and insect contamination effects on boundary layer transition. The resilient leading edge appears to be a very promising method to prevent leading edge insect contamination.

  1. Flow and habitat effects on juvenile fish abundance in natural and altered flow regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Bowen, Z.H.; Bovee, K.D.; Irwin, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    Conserving biological resources native to large river systems increasingly depends on how flow-regulated segments of these rivers are managed. Improving management will require a better understanding of linkages between river biota and temporal variability of flow and instream habitat. However, few studies have quantified responses of native fish populations to multiyear (>2 yr) patterns of hydrologic or habitat variability in flow-regulated systems. To provide these data, we quantified young-of-year (YOY) fish abundance during four years in relation to hydrologic and habitat variability in two segments of the Tallapoosa River in the southeastern United States. One segment had an unregulated flow regime, whereas the other was flow-regulated by a peak-load generating hydropower dam. We sampled fishes annually and explored how continuously recorded flow data and physical habitat simulation models (PHABSIM) for spring (April-June) and summer (July-August) preceding each sample explained fish abundances. Patterns of YOY abundance in relation to habitat availability (median area) and habitat persistence (longest period with habitat area continuously above the long-term median area) differed between unregulated and flow-regulated sites. At the unregulated site, YOY abundances were most frequently correlated with availability of shallow-slow habitat in summer (10 species) and persistence of shallow-slow and shallow-fast habitat in spring (nine species). Additionally, abundances were negatively correlated with 1-h maximum flow in summer (five species). At the flow-regulated site, YOY abundances were more frequently correlated with persistence of shallow-water habitats (four species in spring; six species in summer) than with habitat availability or magnitude of flow extremes. The associations of YOY with habitat persistence at the flow-regulated site corresponded to the effects of flow regulation on habitat patterns. Flow regulation reduced median flows during spring and

  2. Scale-dependence of natural variability of flow regimes in a forested landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, S. E.; Creed, I. F.; Tague, C. L.; Beall, F. D.; Buttle, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The ecological integrity of riverine ecosystems is dependent upon the natural flow regime of the river system. Maintaining natural variability in the flow regime is critical for conserving the structure and function of riverine ecosystems. This research seeks to determine relations between natural variability in the flow regime and basin scale. A distributed hydrologic model was used to characterize the natural flow regime of basins from first to fifth order within tributaries of the Batchawana River in the Algoma Highlands of central Ontario using the range of variability approach (RVA). A 30-year simulated flow record was used to calculate natural variability in the flow regime, defined by the S80 [(90th percentile - 10th percentile)/median]. Flow variability under wetter conditions was similar across all basins, regardless of scale. Conversely, flow variability under drier conditions was scale-dependent, with smaller basins (<600 ha) showing a large range in variability and larger basins (>600 ha) showing a smaller range in variability that converged toward a constant with increasing area. The effect of basin area on flow variability suggested the existence of a representative elementary area (REA). Within the REA, morphometric sources of natural variability were determined through multivariate regression analyses. A combination of indices describing the near-stream riparian area within a basin, median basin residence time, and basin curvature was significantly related to flow variability under drier conditions. These findings present a potential management template for establishing reference conditions against which impacts of disturbance on flows throughout a regional drainage basin may be measured.

  3. Upscaling Multiphase Fluid Flow in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthai, S.; Maghami-Nick, H.; Belayneh, M.; Geiger, S.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbon recovery from fractured porous reservoirs is difficult to predict as it depends on the focusing of the flow and the local balance of viscous, gravitational, and capillary forces. Hecto-metre scale sub-volumes of fractured oil reservoirs contain thousands of fractures with highly variable flow properties, dimensions and orientations. This complexity precludes direct geometric incorporation into field scale multiphase flow models. Macroscopic laws of their integral effects on multiphase flow are required. These can be investigated by DFM (discrete fracture and matrix) numerical simulations based on discrete fracture models representing fractured reservoir analogues. Here we present DFM results indicating that hecto-metre-scale relative permeability, the time to water breakthrough, and the subsequent water cut primarily depend on the fracture-to-rock matrix flux ratio, qf/qm, quantifying the proportion of the cross-sectional flux that occurs through the fractures. Relative permeability during imbibition runs is best approximated by a rate-dependent new model taking into account capillary fracture-matrix transfer. The up-scaled fractional flow function fo(sw) derived from this new kri formulation is convex with a near-infinity slope at the residual water saturation. This implies that the hector-metre scale spatially averaged Buckley-Leverett equation for fractured porous media does not contain a shock, but a long leading edge in the averaged profile of the invading phase. This dispersive behaviour marks the progressively widening saturation front and an early water breakthrough observed in the discrete fracture reservoir analogues. Since fracture porosity φf is usually only a fraction of a percent, a cross-over from krw < kro to krw/kro ≈ qf/qm occurs after the first few percent of recovery, and because qf/qm ranges between 10-1,000, sweep efficiency ignoring the positive influence of counter-current imbibition is extremely low. The accuracy of reservoir

  4. Numerical Temperature And Fluid-Flow Modelling For The Topographic Effects On Hydrothermal Circulation; A case study in Lucy Strike Vent Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erçetin, Engin; Düşünür Doǧan, Doǧa

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study is to present a numerical temperature and fluid-flow modelling for the topographic effects on hydrothermal circulation. Bathymetry can create a major disturbance on fluid flow pattern. ANSYS Fluent Computational fluid dynamics software is used for simulations. Coupled fluid flow and temperature quations are solved using a 2-Dimensional control volume finite difference approach. Darcy's law is assumed to hold, the fluid is considered to be anormal Boussinesq incompressible fluid neglecting inertial effects. Several topographic models were simulated and both temperature and fluid flow calculations obtained for this study. The preliminary simulations examine the effect of a ingle bathymetric high on a single plume and the secondary study of simulations investigates the effect of multiple bathymetric highs on multiple plume. The simulations were also performed for the slow spreading Lucky Strike segment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), one of the best studied regions along the MAR, where a 3.4 km deep magma chamber extending 6 km along-axis is found at its center. The Lucky Strike segment displays a transitional morphology between that of the FAMOUS - North FAMOUS segments, which are characterized by well-developed axial valleys typical of slow-spreading segments, and that of the Menez Gwen segment, characterized by an axial high at the segment center. Lucky Strike Segment hosts a central volcano and active vent field located at the segment center and thus constitutes an excellent case study to simulate the effects of bathymetry on fluid flow. Results demonstrate that bathymetric relief has an important influence on hydrothermal flow. Subsurface pressure alterations can be formed by bathymetric highs, for this reason, bathymetric relief ought to be considered while simulating hydrothermal circulation systems. Results of this study suggest the dominant effect of bathymetric highs on fluid flow pattern and Darcy velocities will be presented

  5. Vertebral Artery Diameter and Flow: Nature or Nurture.

    PubMed

    Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Fejer, Bence; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Littvay, Levente; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Cirelli, Carlo; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Sacconi, Beatrice; Fagnani, Corrado; Medda, Emanuela; Farina, Filippo; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Horvath, Tamas; Pucci, Giacomo; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Baracchini, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    In contrast with the carotid arteries, the vertebral arteries (VAs) show considerable variation in length, caliber, and vessel course. This study investigated whether the variation in diameter and flow characteristics of the VAs might be inherited. A total of 172 Italian twins from Padua, Perugia, and Terni (54 monozygotic, 32 dizygotic) recruited from the Italian Twin Registry underwent B-mode and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound assessment of their VAs. VA diameters, peak systolic velocity (PSV) and end diastolic velocity (EDV) were assessed at the level of a horizontal V2 segment. Univariate quantitative genetic modeling was performed. Fourteen percent of the sample had VA hypoplasia. Within pair correlation in monozygotic twins was higher than in dizygotics (.552 vs. .229) for VA diameter. Age- and sex-adjusted genetic effect, under the most parsimonious model, accounted for 54.7% (95% CI: 42.2-69.1%) of the variance of VA diameter, and unshared environmental effect for 45.3% (95% CI: 30.9-57.8%). No heritability was found for the PSV of VA, but shared (34.1%; 95% CI: 16.7-53.7%) and unshared (65.9%; 95% CI: 45.9-83.1%) environmental factors determined the variance. EDV of VA is moderately genetically influenced (42.4%; 95% CI: 16.1-64.9%) and also determined by the unshared environment (57.6%; 95% CI: 34.7-83.7%). The diameter of the VAs is moderately genetically determined. Different factors influence the PSV and EDV of VAs, which may highlight the complex hemodynamic background of VA flow and help to understand the vertebral flow anomalies found by ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  6. Hydrological classification of natural flow regimes to support environmental flow assessments in intensively regulated Mediterranean rivers, Segura River Basin (Spain).

    PubMed

    Belmar, Oscar; Velasco, Josefa; Martinez-Capel, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    Hydrological classification constitutes the first step of a new holistic framework for developing regional environmental flow criteria: the "Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA)". The aim of this study was to develop a classification for 390 stream sections of the Segura River Basin based on 73 hydrological indices that characterize their natural flow regimes. The hydrological indices were calculated with 25 years of natural monthly flows (1980/81-2005/06) derived from a rainfall-runoff model developed by the Spanish Ministry of Environment and Public Works. These indices included, at a monthly or annual basis, measures of duration of droughts and central tendency and dispersion of flow magnitude (average, low and high flow conditions). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated high redundancy among most hydrological indices, as well as two gradients: flow magnitude for mainstream rivers and temporal variability for tributary streams. A classification with eight flow-regime classes was chosen as the most easily interpretable in the Segura River Basin, which was supported by ANOSIM analyses. These classes can be simplified in 4 broader groups, with different seasonal discharge pattern: large rivers, perennial stable streams, perennial seasonal streams and intermittent and ephemeral streams. They showed a high degree of spatial cohesion, following a gradient associated with climatic aridity from NW to SE, and were well defined in terms of the fundamental variables in Mediterranean streams: magnitude and temporal variability of flows. Therefore, this classification is a fundamental tool to support water management and planning in the Segura River Basin. Future research will allow us to study the flow alteration-ecological response relationship for each river type, and set the basis to design scientifically credible environmental flows following the ELOHA framework.

  7. Circadian rhythm in circulating CD16-positive natural killer (NK) cells in macaque monkeys, implication of plasma cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Terao, Keiji; Suzuki, Juri; Ohkura, Satoshi

    2002-10-01

    The daily change in both percentage and absolute number of circulating major lymphocyte subset was determined with young Japanese monkeys and rhesus monkeys. The blood sample was collected at four hour-intervals beginning at 16:00 for 24 hours under the condition of applying tethering system by which blood samples could be collected without restraint. During the dark period (from 20:00 to 08:00), the number of peripheral lymphocytes increased and that of granulocytes decreased, resulting in no significant change in the number of total peripheral white blood cells. The absolute number of CD4+ T, CD8+ T, and CD20+ B cells showed the significant daily change similar to that in number of peripheral lymphocytes, indicating no proportional change in these subsets. The typical proportional change was observed in CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells and the percentage of CD16+ cells decreased during dark period (from 20:00 to 04:00) and increased in the morning (from 08:00 to 12:00). The NK activity determined by killing K562 target cells showed the same changing pattern as that of percentage in CD16+ NK cells. The changing pattern of both percentage and activity of NK cells was consistent with that of plasma cortisol levels. In addition, the intravenous injection of 300 g/kg of cortisol induced increase in plasma cortisol levels and decrease in percentage of CD16+ NK cells during the first 60 min after cortisol injection. These results strongly suggest that the levels of peripheral functional CD16+ NK cells might be directly regulated by plasma cortisol level in macaque monkeys.

  8. Laminar boundary layer in conditions of natural transition to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyakov, N. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental study of regularities of a natural transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent layer at low subsonic air flow velocities are presented, analyzed and compared with theory and model experiments.

  9. On the nature of magnetic turbulence in rotating, shearing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justin; Lesur, Geoffroy; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2016-03-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to k-2, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence k-3/2. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states - their intensity v0 and their outer scale λ0 satisfy the balance condition v0/λ0 ˜ dΩ/dln r, where dΩ/dln r is the local orbital shearing rate of the flow. Finally, we find no sustained dynamo action in the Pm = 1 zero net-flux case for Reynolds numbers as high as 45 000, casting doubts on the existence of an MRI dynamo in the Pm ≤ 1 regime.

  10. Estimation of natural historical flows for the Manitowish River near Manitowish Waters, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juckem, Paul F.; Reneau, Paul C.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is charged with oversight of dam operations throughout Wisconsin and is considering modifications to the operating orders for the Rest Lake Dam in Vilas County, Wisconsin. State law requires that the operation orders be tied to natural low flows at the dam. Because the presence of the dam confounds measurement of natural flows, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, installed streamflow-gaging stations and developed two statistical methods to improve estimates of natural flows at the Rest Lake Dam. Two independent methods were used to estimate daily natural flow for the Manitowish River approximately 1 mile downstream of the Rest Lake Dam. The first method was an adjusted drainage-area ratio method, which used a regression analysis that related measured water yield (flow divided by watershed area) from short-term (2009–11) gaging stations upstream of the Manitowish Chain of Lakes to the water yield from two nearby long-term gaging stations in order to extend the flow record (1991–2011). In this approach, the computed flows into the Chain of Lakes at the upstream gaging stations were multiplied by a coefficient to account for the monthly hydrologic contributions (precipitation, evaporation, groundwater, and runoff) associated with the additional watershed area between the upstream gaging stations and the dam at the outlet of the Chain of Lakes (Rest Lake Dam). The second method used to estimate daily natural flow at the Rest Lake Dam was a water-budget approach, which used lake stage and dam outflow data provided by the dam operator. A water-budget model was constructed and then calibrated with an automated parameter-estimation program by matching simulated flow-duration statistics with measured flow-duration statistics at the upstream gaging stations. After calibration of the water-budget model, the model was used to compute natural flow at the dam from 1973 to

  11. Use of Pore water Rn and Ra Profiles to Evaluate the Nature of Flow through Permeable Coastal Sands in Huntington Beach, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, D. E.; Colbert, S. L.; Talsky, H.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD), as commonly defined, can represent (1) water recharged above sea level, or (2) water that is circulated locally through permeable sediments by pressure gradients generated by flow over rough topography, by wave activity, and by physical pumping of irrigating macrofauna. Under some circumstances, rapid increases in water column density over time could also drive episodes of pore fluid circulation. Budgets for radium isotopes in the water column have been used to evaluate SGD in a number of recent studies, and used to calculate fluxes of nutrients due to SGD. However, because the scale distances for nutrients may differ from those of the Ra isotopes, it is important to constrain whether SGD calculated from near-shore water column Ra budgets represents local circulation of overlying water through sediments, or regional flow driven by recharge above sea level. This also can define whether nutrient fluxes are driven by re-mineralization of biogenic material formed in the overlying water, or by transport from adjacent land areas. We have measured profiles of Rn-222 and Ra isotopes (223,224, 228) in pore waters of permeable sediments offshore from Huntington Beach on multiple occasions, working at the shoreline and at water depths of 5 to 15 m. By also determining the rate at which these isotopes emanate from solid phases and the adsorption constant for Ra on solid phases, we can evaluate the nature of SGD circulation in this system. Results indicate that nearly all of the SGD is due to local recirculation of overlying water, with macrofaunal irrigation probably driving most of the flow. Ra-228 profiles, coupled with water column budgets, can be used to put constraints on regional vertical flow.

  12. Research in Natural Laminar Flow and Laminar-Flow Control, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, Jerry N. (Compiler); Sabo, Frances E. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Part 2 of the Symposium proceedings includes papers addressing various topics in basic wind tunnel research/techniques and computational transitional research. Specific topics include: advanced measurement techniques; laminar flow control; Tollmien-Schlichting wave characteristics; boundary layer transition; flow visualization; wind tunnel tests; flight tests; boundary layer equations; swept wings; and skin friction.

  13. Modifying effects of phenotypic plasticity on interactions among natural selection, adaptation and gene flow.

    PubMed

    Crispo, E

    2008-11-01

    Divergent natural selection, adaptive divergence and gene flow may interact in a number of ways. Recent studies have focused on the balance between selection and gene flow in natural populations, and empirical work has shown that gene flow can constrain adaptive divergence, and that divergent selection can constrain gene flow. A caveat is that phenotypic diversification may be under the direct influence of environmental factors (i.e. it may be due to phenotypic plasticity), in addition to partial genetic influence. In this case, phenotypic divergence may occur between populations despite high gene flow that imposes a constraint on genetic divergence. Plasticity may dampen the effects of natural selection by allowing individuals to rapidly adapt phenotypically to new conditions, thus slowing adaptive genetic divergence. On the other hand, plasticity may promote future adaptive divergence by allowing populations to persist in novel environments. Plasticity may promote gene flow between selective regimes by allowing dispersers to adapt to alternate conditions, or high gene flow may result in the selection for increased plasticity. Here I expand frameworks for understanding relationships among selection, adaptation and gene flow to include the effects of phenotypic plasticity in natural populations, and highlight its importance in evolutionary diversification.

  14. The Nature, Meaning, and Measure of Teacher Flow in Elementary Schools: A Test of Rival Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Karen Stansberry; Hoy, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This inquiry is the first comprehensive, empirical analysis of the nature and measurement of flow in elementary teachers. The clearest sign of flow is the merging of action and awareness, that is, the degree to which an activity becomes spontaneous and automatic and individuals lose conscious awareness of themselves as they perform a task…

  15. The Nature, Meaning, and Measure of Teacher Flow in Elementary Schools: A Test of Rival Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Karen Stansberry; Hoy, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This inquiry is the first comprehensive, empirical analysis of the nature and measurement of flow in elementary teachers. The clearest sign of flow is the merging of action and awareness, that is, the degree to which an activity becomes spontaneous and automatic and individuals lose conscious awareness of themselves as they perform a task…

  16. Natural laminar flow and airplane stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Cornelis P.

    1986-01-01

    Location and mode of transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer flow have a dominant effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil section. The influences of these parameters on the sectional lift and drag characteristics of three airfoils are examined. Both analytical and experimental results demonstrate that when the boundary layer transitions near the leading edge as a result of surface roughness, extensive trailing-edge separation of the turbulent boundary layer may occur. If the airfoil has a relatively sharp leading-edge, leading-edge stall due to laminar separation can occur after the leading-edge suction peak is formed. These two-dimensional results are used to examine the effects of boundary layer transition behavior on airplane longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control.

  17. The nature of flow distortions caused by rotor blade wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1976-01-01

    The distortion caused by wakes of rotor blades is one of the least understood phenomena in turbomachinery. An attempt is made to predict the decay characteristics of the defect in axial and tangential velocity components, and the decay of the maximum radial velocity inside the rotor wake using the momentum integral analysis. The predictions agree well with the experimental data taken at the exit of an axial flow fan operating at zero incidence. The measurements are carried out with a three sensor hot wire probe. The wake width is found to grow linearly with distance downstream and the defect in tangential velocity inside the rotor wake decays fastest of the three components. An empirical expression is also provided for the axial velocity profile of a rotor wake.

  18. In vivo multispectral photoacoustic and photothermal flow cytometry with multicolor dyes: a potential for real-time assessment of circulation, dye-cell interaction, and blood volume.

    PubMed

    Proskurnin, Mikhail A; Zhidkova, Tatyana V; Volkov, Dmitry S; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Mock, Donald; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    Recently, photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) has been developed for in vivo detection of circulating tumor cells and bacteria targeted by nanoparticles. Here, we propose multispectral PAFC with multiple dyes having distinctive absorption spectra as multicolor PA contrast agents. As a first step of our proof-of-concept, we characterized high-speed PAFC capability to monitor the clearance of three dyes (Indocyanine Green [ICG], Methylene Blue [MB], and Trypan Blue [TB]) in an animal model in vivo and in real time. We observed strong dynamic PA signal fluctuations, which can be associated with interactions of dyes with circulating blood cells and plasma proteins. PAFC demonstrated enumeration of circulating red and white blood cells labeled with ICG and MB, respectively, and detection of rare dead cells uptaking TB directly in bloodstream. The possibility for accurate measurements of various dye concentrations including Crystal Violet and Brilliant Green were verified in vitro using complementary to PAFC photothermal (PT) technique and spectrophotometry under batch and flow conditions. We further analyze the potential of integrated PAFC/PT spectroscopy with multiple dyes for rapid and accurate measurements of circulating blood volume without a priori information on hemoglobin content, which is impossible with existing optical techniques. This is important in many medical conditions including surgery and trauma with extensive blood loss, rapid fluid administration, and transfusion of red blood cells. The potential for developing a robust clinical PAFC prototype that is safe for human, and its applications for studying the liver function are further highlighted.

  19. In vivo multispectral photoacoustic and photothermal flow cytometry with multicolor dyes: a potential for real-time assessment of circulation, dye-cell interaction, and blood volume

    PubMed Central

    Proskurnin, Mikhail A.; Zhidkova, Tatyana V.; Volkov, Dmitry S.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Mock, Donald; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) has been developed for in vivo detection of circulating tumor cells and bacteria targeted by nanoparticles. Here, we propose multispectral PAFC with multiple dyes having distinctive absorption spectra as multicolor PA contrast agents. As a first step of our proof-of-concept, we characterized high-speed PAFC capability to monitor the clearance of three dyes (ICG, MB, and TB) in an animal model in vivo and in real time. We observed strong dynamic PA signal fluctuations, which can be associated with interactions of dyes with circulating blood cells and plasma proteins. PAFC demonstrated enumeration of circulating red and white blood cells labeled with ICG and MB, respectively, and detection of rare dead cells uptaking TB directly in bloodstream. The possibility for accurate measurements of various dye concentrations including CV and BG were verified in vitro using complementary to PAFC photothermal (PT) technique and spectrophotometry under batch and flow conditions. We further analyze the potential of integrated PAFC/PT spectroscopy with multiple dyes for rapid and accurate measurements of circulating blood volume without a priori information on hemoglobin content, which is impossible with existing optical techniques. This is important in many medical conditions including surgery and trauma with extensive blood loss, rapid fluid administration, transfusion of red blood cells. The potential for developing a robust clinical PAFC prototype that is, safe for human, and its applications for studying the liver function are further highlighted. PMID:21905207

  20. On the threshold of flow in a tight natural rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Main, I. G.; Clint, O. C.; Li, L.

    2012-02-01

    The behaviour of hydraulically ‘tight’ barrier rocks is a key determinant of the long-term integrity of potential underground storage sites for the waste products from low-carbon emission energy production technologies (including nuclear waste and CO2 captured from fossil fuels). Here we isolate the relationship between crack-induced permeability and porosity using an initially crack-free natural crystalline material. We vary secondary porosity from an initial value of zero, and demonstrate that the bulk permeability K varies with total connected porosity Φ above the percolation threshold Φc as K = K0(Φ - Φc)n, where n = 3.8 ± 0.4, i.e., similar to results obtained for higher porosity rocks, indicating universality of this scaling law. Close to the percolation threshold a modest change in total porosity from 1% to 5% or so results in a massive change in permeability of 7 orders of magnitude or more. The results are consistent with a continuum percolation model that reflects the microstructure of the pore/induced microcrack network in the natural material.

  1. Primary arrest of circulating platelets on collagen involves phosphorylation of Syk, cortactin and focal adhesion kinase: studies under flow conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Arderiu, Gemma; Díaz-Ricart, Maribel; Buckley, Byron; Escolar, Ginés; Ordinas, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    After a vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the subendothelium following a sequence of events: arrest of single platelets on the surface, progression to platelet spreading and final aggregation. Primary arrest of circulating platelets on subendothelial components occurs through platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib and collagen receptors; then platelets spread and aggregate through a GPIIb-IIIa-dependent mechanism. A series of strategies were applied to analyse the tyrosine-phosphorylation mechanisms occurring at the different stages of platelet adhesion on subendothelial components under flow conditions, with special attention to primary arrest. To evaluate spread platelets, samples were exposed to acetylsalicylic acid, which blocks aggregate formation. To study single platelets in contact, a monoclonal antibody specific for GPIIb-IIIa was used to prevent platelet spreading and further aggregation. This experimental situation was also investigated using blood from two patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (i.e. lacking GPIIb-IIIa). Results demonstrated that blockade of both spreading and aggregation results in significant changes in the tyrosine-phosphorylation patterns. Arrest of single platelets on collagen-rich surfaces resulted in phosphorylation of p125, identified as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), the 80/85 kDa doublet (cortactin), and p72, identified as Syk. Arrest of single platelets on von Willebrand factor as adhesive substrate showed that interaction through GPIb induces Syk phosphorylation, but not that of cortactin and FAK. Our data indicate that the initial arrest of platelets on subendothelial components involves Syk phosphorylation, which seems to be GPIb-dependent, and this is followed by activation and phosphorylation of cortactin and FAK. These processes seem to occur before GPIIb-IIIa becomes activated. PMID:11988077

  2. Evaluation of asymmetries of blood flow rate and of circulation time by intravenous radionuclide cerebral angiography in patients with ischemic completed stroke.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, A; Primavera, A; Gasparetto, B

    1984-12-01

    155 patients with ischemic completed stroke of varying severity and outcome have been evaluated by radionuclide cerebral angiography with analysis of regional time-activity curves. Two parameters have been evaluated: area under the upslope of the curve (Aup) reflecting regional blood flow rate and moment of the whole curve reflecting tracer circulation time (rABCT) Combination of these two methods ensured increased detection of perfusion asymmetries.

  3. Evidences of the circulation of natural philosophical knowledge about Brazil in a 1763 manuscript by António Nunes Ribeiro Sanches.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Gisele C

    2017-01-01

    António Nunes Ribeiro Sanches was a Portuguese physician and the author of several works about education and science in Portugal and its Empire. Many of these texts circulated and were made public through letters written by him and sent to other intellectuals. This article sheds light on an unpublished manuscript written by Sanches in 1763, in which he argued for the recognition of Brazilian natural resources and their exploitation for trade and medicine.

  4. Natural flow and water consumption in the Milk River basin, Montana and Alberta, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the differences between natural and nonnatural Milk River streamflow, to delineate and quantify the types and effects of water consumption on streamflow, and to refine the current computation procedure into one which computes and apportions natural flow. Water consumption consists principally of irrigated agriculture, municipal use, and evapotranspiration. Mean daily water consumption by irrigation ranged from 10 cu ft/sec to 26 cu ft/sec in the Canada part and from 6 cu ft/sec to 41 cu ft/sec in the US part. Two Canadian municipalities consume about 320 acre-ft and one US municipality consumes about 20 acre-ft yearly. Evaporation from the water surface comprises 80% 0 90% of the flow reduction in the Milk River attributed to total evapotranspiration. The current water-budget approach for computing natural flow of the Milk River where it reenters the US was refined into an interim procedure which includes allowances for man-induced consumption and a method for apportioning computed natural flow between the US and Canada. The refined procedure is considered interim because further study of flow routing, tributary inflow, and man-induced consumption is needed before a more accurate procedure for computing natural flow can be developed. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Hemolymph circulation in insect flight appendages: physiology of the wing heart and circulatory flow in the wings of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Ravi Theja V; Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-12-15

    The wings of insects are composed of membranes supported by interconnected veins. Within these veins are epithelial cells, nerves and tracheae, and their maintenance requires the flow of hemolymph. For this purpose, insects employ accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) that circulate hemolymph throughout the wings. Here, we used correlative approaches to determine the functional mechanics of hemolymph circulation in the wings of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Examination of sectioned tissues and intravital videos showed that the wing heart is located underneath the scutellum and is separate from the dorsal vessel. It is composed of a single pulsatile diaphragm (indicating that it is unpaired) that contracts at 3 Hz and circulates hemolymph throughout both wings. The wing heart contracts significantly faster than the dorsal vessel, and there is no correlation between the contractions of these two pulsatile organs. The wing heart functions by aspirating hemolymph out of the posterior wing veins, which forces hemolymph into the wings via anterior veins. By tracking the movement of fluorescent microspheres, we show that the flow diameter of the wing circulatory circuit is less than 1 µm, and we present a spatial map detailing the flow of hemolymph across all the wing veins, including the costa, sub-costa, ambient costa, radius, media, cubitus anterior, anal vein and crossveins. We also quantified the movement of hemolymph within the radius and within the ambient costa, and show that hemolymph velocity and maximum acceleration are higher when hemolymph is exiting the wing.

  6. Dual-scale hydrothermal circulation inferred from detailed heat flow measurements in the Suiyo Seamount Hydrothermal System, Izu-Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomado, M.; Kinoshita, M.

    2002-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity within the caldera of Suiyo Seamount was investigated in detail using manned or remotely-operated submersibles, and by deep-tow imagery and seismic surveys. Hydrothermal regime in the Suiyo-seamount is characterized by a geochemically uniform fluid, shallow reservoir depth, very permeable seafloor, and venting without creating big chimneys. Detailed heat flow surveys were carried out through four research cruises conducted in 2001-2002. Geothermal probes, called SAHF (Stand-Alone Heat Flow) meter, are 1m in length, and five thermistors are installed at 11-12 cm intervals. Heat flow is highest (> 10 W/m2) within the active area. These values were obtained close to black smokers, thus are affected by the venting or very shallow reservoirs. To the east, heat flow is uniform around 4 W/m2. Since there were no indications of discharge, this area is dominated by thermal conduction, and its heat source would be a hydrothermal reservoir capped by some impermeable layer. To the west, we detected very low heat flow values of less than 0.3 W/m2, only several tens of meters away from the active area. A similar heat flow anomaly was detected in the TAG hyudrothermal mound of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Becker et al., 1996). We penetrated at 1-2 m away from two isolated active sulfide mounds. At both sites subbottom temperatures were about 40 degC at 10-20 cm depth, then they decreased to about 20 degC at 30-40cm. The temperature reversals suggest a meter-scale hydrothermal circulation, where a hot fluid discharges as a branch flow from the main vent to the mound. An impermeable structure of the mound and a permeable sediment surrounding the mound would make this very local circulation possible. We suggest a dual scale hydrothermal circulation system, one with several meters scale, and the other with few tens of meters scale. The former would be driven by a suction created by discrete venting of high temperature fluid, and the latter is a regional

  7. Numerical investigation of transient flow-mode transition of laminar natural convection in an inclined enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, P.Y.; Soong, C.Y.; Sheu, T.S.

    1997-02-07

    The present work is concerned with a numerical investigation of transient laminar natural convection and the associated flow-mode transition in a two-dimensional rectangular enclosure. Navier-Stokes/Boussinesq equations for fluid flow and energy balance are solved by using the SIMPLE-C algorithm. Air of Pr = 0.71 in a differentially heated enclose of length-to-height aspect ratio As = 4 and at Ra = 5,000 is chosen as the flow model to examine the influences of the inclination. Calculations of time accuracy are performed to investigate the transient procedure of the flow-mode transition with increasing or decreasing inclination. The present results reveal that, at some critical situations, natural convection in inclined enclosures is very sensitive to the change in tilt angle, and the associated heat transfer rates are closely related to the correspondent cellular flow patterns.

  8. Numerical simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in naturally fractured geothermal reservoir using DFN method with matrix flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehun; Lee, Kyungbook; Lee, Hyunsuk; Lee, Wonsuk

    2017-04-01

    Natural fractures have an effect on the fluid flow and heat transfer in the naturally fractured geothermal reservoir. However, most of the previous works in this area assumed that reservoir systems are continuum model whether it is single continuum or dual continuum. Moreover, some people have studied without continuum model but, it was just pipeline model or didn't calculate heat and fluid flow from matrix. In this paper, we developed a generalized discrete fracture network (DFN) geothermal reservoir simulator consiering fluid flow and heat transfer from matrix. In the model, 2D flow is possible within a rectangular fracture, which is important in thick naturally fractured reservoirs. Also, it can calculate heat conduction between matrix and fracture and matrix can increase temperature of injected water. The DFN model developed in this study was validated for two synthetic fracture systems using a commercial thermal model, TETRAD. Comparison results showed an excellent matching between both models. However, this model is conducted at simple fracture network. Therefore, developed model will be conducted a test in realistic fracture network.

  9. Restoring native fish assemblages to a regulated California stream using the natural flow regime concept.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, Joseph D; Moyle, Peter B; Crain, Patrick K

    2012-07-01

    We examined the response of fishes to establishment of a new flow regime in lower Putah Creek, a regulated stream in California, U.S.A. The new flow regime was designed to mimic the seasonal timing of natural increases and decreases in stream flow. We monitored fish assemblages annually at six sample sites distributed over approximately 30 km of stream for eight years before and nine years after the new flow regime was implemented. Our purpose was to determine whether more natural stream flow patterns would reestablish native fishes and reduce the abundances of alien (nonnative) fishes. At the onset of our study, native fishes were constrained to habitat immediately (<1 km) below the diversion dam, and alien species were numerically dominant at all downstream sample sites. Following implementation of the new flow regime, native fishes regained dominance across more than 20 km of lower Putah Creek. We propose that the expansion of native fishes was facilitated by creation of favorable spawning and rearing conditions (e.g., elevated springtime flows), cooler water temperatures, maintenance of lotic (flowing) conditions over the length of the creek, and displacement of alien species by naturally occurring high-discharge events. Importantly, restoration of native fishes was achieved by manipulating stream flows at biologically important times of the year and only required a small increase in the total volume of water delivered downstream (i.e., water that was not diverted for other uses) during most water years. Our results validate that natural flow regimes can be used to effectively manipulate and manage fish assemblages in regulated rivers.

  10. Increased circulating microRNAs miR-342-3p and miR-21-5p in natural sheep prion disease.

    PubMed

    Sanz Rubio, David; López-Pérez, Óscar; de Andrés Pablo, Álvaro; Bolea, Rosa; Osta, Rosario; Badiola, Juan J; Zaragoza, Pilar; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Toivonen, Janne M

    2017-02-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), or prion disease, of sheep and goats. As no simple diagnostic tests are yet available to detect TSEs in vivo, easily accessible biomarkers could facilitate the eradication of scrapie agents from the food chain. To this end, we analysed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR a selected set of candidate microRNAs (miRNAs) from circulating blood plasma of naturally infected, classical scrapie sheep that demonstrated clear scrapie symptoms and pathology. Significant scrapie-associated increase was repeatedly found for miR-342-3p and miR-21-5p. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of circulating miRNA alterations in any animal suffering from TSE. Genome-wide expression studies are warranted to investigate the true depth of miRNA alterations in naturally occurring TSEs, especially in presymptomatic animals, as the presented study demonstrates the potential feasibility of miRNAs as circulating TSE biomarkers.

  11. Numerical simulation of a natural gradient tracer experiment for the natural attenuation study: flow and physical transport.

    PubMed

    Julian, H E; Boggs, J M; Zheng, C; Feehley, C E

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented for numerical simulations of ground water flow and physical transport associated with a natural gradient tracer experiment conducted within a heterogeneous alluvial aquifer of the Natural Attenuation Study (NATS) site near Columbus, Mississippi. A principal goal of NATS is to evaluate biogeochemical models that predict the rate and extent of natural biodegradation under field conditions. This paper describes the initial phase in the model evaluation process, i.e., calibration of flow and physical transport models that simulate conservative bromide tracer plume evolution during NATS. An initial large-scale flow model (LSM) is developed encompassing the experimental site and surrounding region. This model is subsequently scaled down in telescopic fashion to an intermediate-scale ground water flow model (ISM) covering the tracer-monitoring network, followed by a small-scale transport model (SSM) focused on the small region of hydrocarbon plume migration observed during NATS. The LSM uses inferred depositional features of the site in conjunction with hydraulic conductivity (K) data from aquifer tests and borehole flowmeter tests to establish large-scale K and flow field trends in and around the experimental site. The subsequent ISM incorporates specified flux boundary conditions and large-scale K trends obtained from the calibrated LSM, while preserving small-scale K structure based on some 4000 flowmeter data for solute transport modeling. The configuration of the ISM-predicted potentiometric surface approximates that of the observed surface within a root mean squared error of 0.15 m. The SSM is based on the dual-domain mass-transfer approach. Despite the well-recognized difficulties in modeling solute transport in extremely heterogeneous media as found at the NATS site, the dual-domain model adequately reproduced the observed bromide concentration distributions. Differences in observed and predicted bromide concentration distributions are

  12. Design of a naturalized flow regime—An example from the Lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Galat, David L.

    2008-01-01

     group of river managers, stakeholders, and scientists met during summer 2005 to design a more naturalized flow regime for the Lower Missouri River (LMOR). The objective was to comply with requirements under the U.S. Endangered Species Act to support reproduction and survival of threatened and endangered species, with emphasis on the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus), while minimizing negative effects to existing social and economic benefits of prevailing river management. Specific hydrograph requirements for pallid sturgeon reproduction are unknown, hence much of the design process was based on features of the natural flow regime. Environmental flow components (EFCs) extracted from the reference natural flow regime were used to design and assess performance of alternative flow regimes.The design process incorporated a primary stage in which conceptual hydrographs were developed and assessed for their general ecological and social-economic performance. The second stage accounted for hydroclimatic variation by coding the conceptual hydrographs into reservoir release rules, adding constraints for downstream flooding and low-storage precludes, and running the rules through 100 years of hydroclimatic simulation. The output flow regimes were then evaluated for presumed ecological benefits based on how closely they resembled EFCs in the reference natural flow regime. Flow regimes also were assessed for social-economic cost indicators, including days of flooding of low-lying agricultural land, days over flood stage, and storage levels in system reservoirs.Our experience with flow-regime design on the LMOR underscored the lack of confidence the stakeholders place in the value of the natural flow regime as a measure of ecosystem benefit in the absence of fundamental scientific documentation. Stakeholders desired proof of ecological benefits commensurate with the certainty of economic losses. We also gained insight into the processes of integrating science

  13. Evaluation of low flow characteristics of the Vermont Yankee plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ganther, S.; LeFrancoi, M.; Bergeron, P.

    1997-12-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) core flow instrumentation inaccuracies under low-flow conditions have been the subject of both reactor vendor and regulatory communications in response to incidents of the reported core flow being less than the flow corresponding to the natural-circulation line on the power flow map. During single recirculation loop operation, low-flow conditions exist in the idle recirculation loop, and these flow inaccuracies can affect the usefulness of the reported core flow. Accurate core flow indications are needed above 25% power to administer fuel thermal limits and comply with restrictions associated with the potential for thermal-hydraulic instability. While the natural-circulation line on the power flow map is recognized to be a nominal estimate of the flow expected at and near natural-circulation conditions, the boundaries of the stability regions are associated with conditions assumed in safety analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with general design criteria 10 and 12.

  14. Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Marashdeh, Qussai

    2013-02-01

    A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi

  15. Operator splitting method for simulation of dynamic flows in natural gas pipeline networks

    DOE PAGES

    Dyachenko, Sergey A.; Zlotnik, Anatoly; Korotkevich, Alexander O.; ...

    2017-09-19

    Here, we develop an operator splitting method to simulate flows of isothermal compressible natural gas over transmission pipelines. The method solves a system of nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs) of hydrodynamic type for mass flow and pressure on a metric graph, where turbulent losses of momentum are modeled by phenomenological Darcy-Weisbach friction. Mass flow balance is maintained through the boundary conditions at the network nodes, where natural gas is injected or withdrawn from the system. Gas flow through the network is controlled by compressors boosting pressure at the inlet of the adjoint pipe. Our operator splitting numerical scheme ismore » unconditionally stable and it is second order accurate in space and time. The scheme is explicit, and it is formulated to work with general networks with loops. We test the scheme over range of regimes and network configurations, also comparing its performance with performance of two other state of the art implicit schemes.« less

  16. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be

  17. Median and Low-Flow Characteristics for Streams under Natural and Diverted Conditions, Northeast Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Flow-duration statistics under natural (undiverted) and diverted flow conditions were estimated for gaged and ungaged sites on 21 streams in northeast Maui, Hawaii. The estimates were made using the optimal combination of continuous-record gaging-station data, low-flow measurements, and values determined from regression equations developed as part of this study. Estimated 50- and 95-percent flow duration statistics for streams are presented and the analyses done to develop and evaluate the methods used in estimating the statistics are described. Estimated streamflow statistics are presented for sites where various amounts of streamflow data are available as well as for locations where no data are available. Daily mean flows were used to determine flow-duration statistics for continuous-record stream-gaging stations in the study area following U.S. Geological Survey established standard methods. Duration discharges of 50- and 95-percent were determined from total flow and base flow for each continuous-record station. The index-station method was used to adjust all of the streamflow records to a common, long-term period. The gaging station on West Wailuaiki Stream (16518000) was chosen as the index station because of its record length (1914-2003) and favorable geographic location. Adjustments based on the index-station method resulted in decreases to the 50-percent duration total flow, 50-percent duration base flow, 95-percent duration total flow, and 95-percent duration base flow computed on the basis of short-term records that averaged 7, 3, 4, and 1 percent, respectively. For the drainage basin of each continuous-record gaged site and selected ungaged sites, morphometric, geologic, soil, and rainfall characteristics were quantified using Geographic Information System techniques. Regression equations relating the non-diverted streamflow statistics to basin characteristics of the gaged basins were developed using ordinary-least-squares regression analyses. Rainfall

  18. Synthesis of Natural and Unnatural Cyclooligomeric Depsipeptides Enabled by Flow Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lücke, Daniel; Dalton, Toryn; Ley, Steven V; Wilson, Zoe E

    2016-03-14

    Flow chemistry has been successfully integrated into the synthesis of a series of cyclooligomeric depsipeptides of three different ring sizes including the natural products beauvericin (1 a), bassianolide (2 b) and enniatin C (1 b). A reliable flow chemistry protocol was established for the coupling and macrocyclisation to form challenging N-methylated amides. This flexible approach has allowed the rapid synthesis of both natural and unnatural depsipeptides in high yields, enabling further exploration of their promising biological activity. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Groundwater flow system in the valley of Toluca, Mexico: an assay of natural radionuclide specific activities.

    PubMed

    Segovia, N; Tamez, E; Peña, P; Carrillo, J; Acosta, E; Armienta, M A; Iturbe, J L

    1999-03-01

    Natural radionuclides and physicochemical parameters have been evaluated in groundwater samples from boreholes belonging to the drinking water supply system of the Toluca City, Mexico. The results obtained for radon and radium, together with the physicochemical parameters of the studied samples, indicate a fast and efficient recharge pattern. The presence of a local and a regional groundwater flows was also observed. The local flow belongs to shallower water, recognized by its low radon content and dissolved ions, as compared with the regional, deeper groundwater flow with a longer residence time.

  20. Design and Experimental Results for a Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil for General Aviation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    A natural-laminar-flow airfoil for general aviation applications, the NLF(1)-0416, was designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The basic objective of combining the high maximum lift of the NASA low-speed airfoils with the low cruise drag of the NACA 6-series airfoils was achieved. The safety requirement that the maximum lift coefficient not be significantly affected with transition fixed near the leading edge was also met. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show excellent agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils, both laminar flow and turbulent flow, confirm the achievement of the basic objective.

  1. Nature of Transport across Sheared Zonal Flows in Electrostatic Ion-Temperature-Gradient Gyrokinetic Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Leboeuf, J.-N.; Decyk, V. K.; Carreras, B. A.

    2008-11-14

    It is shown that the usual picture for the suppression of turbulent transport across a stable sheared flow based on a reduction of diffusive transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, collisionless ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found that the nature of the transport is altered fundamentally, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Additionally, whenever the flows are self-consistently driven by turbulence, the transport gains an additional non-Gaussian character. These results suggest that a description of transport across sheared flows using effective diffusivities is oversimplified.

  2. Secondary flow and its stability for natural convection in tall vertical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Chait, A.

    1986-01-01

    The multicellular flow in a tall vertical rectangular and annular enclosure was studied by solving the Boussinesq equations with time-splitting pseudospectral methods. Comparison between two time-splitting algorithms is presented, and results show that the method that introduces a time-splitting error in the calculation is unacceptable for simulations of time-dependent large Prandtl number flows. The steady flow of air and the time-periodic flow of oil were investigated, and descriptions of these flows based on physical and spectral approaches are presented. The dependency of the flow on the axial wave length was established and it was found that the maximum heat transfer appears to coincide with the natural axial wave length. Three-dimensional linear stability of the multicellular flow of air in a cartesian slot was also investigated. The domain of stable two-dimensional cellular motions was found to be constrained by the Eckhaus instability and by two types of monotone instabilities. These limit the two-dimensional multicellular flow to Grashof numbers below about 8550. For this reason the flow of air in a sufficiently tall vertical cavity is likely to be three-dimensional in many practical cases.

  3. Red ginseng extract improves coronary flow reserve and increases absolute numbers of various circulating angiogenic cells in patients with first ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chul Min; Hong, Soon Jun; Choi, Seung Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jae Sang; Lim, Do-Sun

    2011-02-01

    The effects of red ginseng extract on circulating angiogenic cell mobilization and improvement of microvascular integrity were evaluated in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients during 8-month follow-up. AMI patients (n = 50) were randomly assigned to the red ginseng group (3 g/day, n = 25) or the placebo group (n = 25) after coronary stenting. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was measured at baseline and at 8 months with an intracoronary Doppler wire. Serial changes in the absolute numbers of circulating angiogenic cells such as CD34(+) , CXCR4(+) , CD117(+) , CD133(+) and C-met(+) were measured at baseline, 1 day, 5 days and at 8 months. CFR were similar between the two groups at baseline, and CFR was significantly higher in the red ginseng group than in the placebo group (2.80 ± 0.91 and 2.56 ± 0.77, p < 0.05, respectively) after 8 months of red ginseng administration. The absolute numbers of circulating CD34(+) , CXCR4(+) and CD117(+) cells were significantly higher in the red ginseng group at 1 and 5 days after stenting. Significant positive correlations were found between the numbers of circulating angiogenic cells at day 1 and the changes from baseline in CFR for CD34(+) , CXCR4(+) , CD117(+) and C-met(+) cells. Red ginseng extract increased CD34(+) , CXCR4(+) and CD117(+) circulating angiogenic cell mobilization and decreased inflammation in AMI patients, thereby improving CFR during the 8-month follow-up. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Final results of bilateral comparison between NIST and PTB for flows of high pressure natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickan, B.; Toebben, H.; Johnson, A.; Kegel, T.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 NIST developed a US national flow standard to provide traceability for flow meters used for custody transfer of pipeline quality natural gas. NIST disseminates the SI unit of flow by calibrating a customer flow meter against a parallel array of turbine meter working standards, which in turn are traceable to a pressure-volume-temperature-time (PVTt) primary standard. The calibration flow range extends from 0.125 actual m3/s to 9 actual m3/s with an expanded uncertainty as low as 0.22% at high flows, and increasing to almost 0.40% at the lowest flows. Details regarding the traceability chain and uncertainty analysis are documented in prior publications. The current manuscript verifies NIST's calibration uncertainty via a bilateral comparison with the German National Metrology Institute PTB. The results of the bilateral are linked to the 2006 key comparison results between three EURAMET national metrology institutes (i.e., PTB, VSL and LNE). Linkage is accomplished in spite of using a different transfer standard in the bilateral versus the key comparison. A mathematical proof is included that demonstrates that the relative difference between a laboratory's measured flow and the key comparison reference value is independent of the transfer package for most flow measurement applications. The bilateral results demonstrate that NIST's natural gas flow measurements are within their specified uncertainties and are equivalent to those of the EURAMET National Metrology Institutes. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. Estimating peak-flow frequency statistics for selected gaged and ungaged sites in naturally flowing streams and rivers in Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2016-06-27

    -central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=46.4 percent; pseudo-R2>92 percent) and region 5 in central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=30.3 percent; pseudo-R2>95 percent). Regression model fit was poor for region 7 in southern Idaho (average standard error of prediction=103 percent; pseudo-R2<78 percent) compared to other regions because few streamgages in region 7 met the criteria for inclusion in the study, and the region’s semi-arid climate and associated variability in precipitation patterns causes substantial variability in peak flows.A drainage area ratio-adjustment method, using ratio exponents estimated using generalized least-squares regression, was presented as an alternative to the regional regression equations if peak-flow estimates are desired at an ungaged site that is close to a streamgage selected for inclusion in this study. The alternative drainage area ratio-adjustment method is appropriate for use when the drainage area ratio between the ungaged and gaged sites is between 0.5 and 1.5.The updated regional peak-flow regression equations had lower total error (standard error of prediction) than all regression equations presented in a 1982 study and in four of six regions presented in 2002 and 2003 studies in Idaho. A more extensive streamgage screening process used in the current study resulted in fewer streamgages used in the current study than in the 1982, 2002, and 2003 studies. Fewer streamgages used and the selection of different explanatory variables were likely causes of increased error in some regions compared to previous studies, but overall, regional peak‑flow regression model fit was generally improved for Idaho. The revised statistical procedures and increased streamgage screening applied in the current study most likely resulted in a more accurate representation of natural peak-flow conditions.The updated, regional peak-flow regression equations will be integrated in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program to allow

  6. Improved Modeling of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs by Quantitatively Handling Flow Convergence into the Wellbore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadelman, M.; Crandall, D.; Sams, W. N.; Bromhal, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Complex fractured networks in the subsurface control the flow of fluids in many applications, and accurately modeling their interaction with wells is critical to understanding their behavior. For tight sand and shale formations, fluid flow is primarily restricted to fractures within each rock layer. NFFLOW was designed by the Department of Energy to model gas well production from naturally fractured reservoirs. NFFLOW is a discrete fracture simulator, with every fracture and rock matrix in the domain handled individually. One-dimensional models are used calculate the flow through connected fractures and flow from the surrounding rocks into fractures. Flow into wellbores are determined from the combined flux from connecting fractures and adjacent rock matrices. One-dimensional fluid flow equations are used because they are extremely fast to solve and represent a reasonable approximation of the physical behavior of fluids in most of the reservoir. However, near the wellbore those models become inaccurate due to gas flow convergence, which is a multidimensional situation. We present a method to correct the one-dimensional models, using data from two-dimensional fluid flow models, while maintaining the original simulator speed. By applying corrections from the two-dimensional model, the one-dimensional models can better account for gas flow convergence into the wellbore as well as the location of the wellbore within the rock strata. Corrections were successful in scaling the one-dimensional flow rates to match the two dimensional values over a wide range of parameters for both fracture flow and porous media flow into the wellbore. This is shown to increase the accuracy of history matching to production data for a wide range of wells, allowing for better modeling and prediction of future productivity. With an accurate history match established, NFFLOW can then be used to investigate issues such as the ability of the formation to sequester carbon dioxide or the effects

  7. Estimates of Bottom Flows and Bottom Boundary Layer Dissipation of the Oceanic General Circulation from Global High-Resolution Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-27

    Penduff et , • , ». r HI J m 1 mno m • , -„„,, . . * . , general circulation [e.g., Munk and Wunsch, 1998...model variables and all grid points in the vertical and horizontal directions, because of the unfeasibly large stor- age and analysis computers that

  8. An evaluation of Dynamic TOPMODEL in natural and human-impacted catchments for low flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim; Lane, Rosanna; Musuuza, Jude; Woods, Ross; Wagener, Thorsten; Howden, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Models of catchment hydrology are essential tools for drought risk management, often providing input to water resource system models, aiding our understanding of low flow processes within catchments and providing low flow simulations and predictions. However, simulating low flows is challenging as hydrological systems often demonstrate threshold effects in connectivity, non-linear groundwater contributions and a greater influence of anthropogenic modifications such as surface and ground water abstractions during low flow periods. These processes are typically not well represented in commonly used hydrological models due to knowledge, data and model limitations. Hence, a better understanding of the natural and human processes that occur during low flows, how these are represented within models and how they could be improved is required to be able to provide robust and reliable predictions of future drought events. The aim of this study is to assess the skill of dynamic TOPMODEL during low flows for both natural and human-impacted catchments. Dynamic TOPMODEL was chosen for this study as it is able to explicitly characterise connectivity and fluxes across landscapes using hydrological response units (HRU's) while still maintaining flexibility in how spatially complex the model is configured and what specific functions (i.e. abstractions or groundwater stores) are represented. We apply dynamic TOPMODEL across the River Thames catchment using daily time series of observed rainfall and potential evapotranspiration data for the period 1999 - 2014, covering two major droughts in the Thames catchment. Significantly, to assess the impact of abstractions on low flows across the Thames catchment, we incorporate functions to characterise over 3,500 monthly surface water and ground water abstractions covering the simulation period into dynamic TOPMODEL. We evaluate dynamic TOPMODEL at over 90 gauging stations across the Thames catchment against multiple signatures of catchment

  9. Unified fractional differential approach for transient interporosity flow in naturally fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babak, Petro; Azaiez, Jalel

    2014-12-01

    A unified approach to modeling flows of slightly compressible fluids through naturally fractured media is presented. The unified fractional differential model is derived by combining the flow at micro scale for matrix blocks and macro scale for fractures, using the transient interporosity flow behavior at the interface between matrix blocks and fractures. The derived model is able to unify existing transient interporosity flow models formulated for different shapes of matrix blocks in any medium dimensions. The model is formulated in the form of a fractional order partial differential equation that involves Caputo derivative of order 1/2 with respect to time. Explicit solutions for the unified model are derived for different axisymmetrical spatial domains using Hankel or Hankel-Weber finite or infinite transforms. Comparisons between the predictions of the unified model and those obtained from existing transient interporosity flow models for matrix blocks in the form of slabs, spheres and cylinders are presented. It is shown that the unified fractional derivative model leads to solutions that are very close to those of transient interporosity flow models for fracture-dominant and transitional fracture-to-matrix dominant flow regimes. An analysis of the results of the unified model reveals that the pressure varies linearly with the logarithm of time for different flow regimes, with half slope for the transitional fracture-to-matrix dominant flow regime vs. the fracture and matrix dominant flow regimes. In addition, a new re-scaling that involves the characteristic length in the form of matrix block volume to surface area ratio is derived for the transient interporosity flow models for matrix blocks of different shapes. It is shown that the re-scaled transient interporosity flow models are governed by two dimensionless parameters Θ and Λ compared to only one dimensionless parameter Θ for the unified model. It is shown that the solutions of the transient

  10. Time-varying Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Caused by N2 Condensation Flows on a Simulated Triton Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C.; Chanover, N.; Murphy, J. R.; Zalucha, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Triton and Pluto are two members of a possible class of bodies with an N2 frost covered surface in vapor-pressure equilibrium with a predominately N2 atmosphere. Modeling the dynamics of such an atmosphere is useful for several reasons. First, winds on Triton were inferred from images of surface streaks and active plumes visible at the time of the Voyager 2 flyby in August 1989. Dynamic atmospheric simulations can reveal the seasonal conditions under which such winds would arise and therefore how long before the Voyager 2 encounter the ground streaks may have been deposited. Second, atmospheric conditions on Pluto at the time of the New Horizons flyby are expected to be similar to those on Triton. Therefore, a dynamical model of a cold, thin N2 atmosphere can be used to predict wind speed and direction on Pluto during the New Horizons encounter with the Pluto/Charon system in July 2015. We used a modified version of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model, version 2.0, to model an N2 atmosphere in contact with N2 surface frosts. We altered the Ames GCM to simulate conditions found on Triton. These alterations included changing the size, rotation rate, orbital inclination, surface gravity, and distance to the Sun of the parent body to model the proper time-varying insolation. We defined the gas properties for an N2 atmosphere, including values for latent heat, specific heat, and the vapor pressure-temperature relationship for N2 frosts. Our simulations assumed an N2 atmosphere with an initial average surface pressure of 18 microbars and we chose N2 frost albedo and emissivity values that resulted in a stable surface pressure over time. We incorporated a 190-meter deep ten-layer water-ice subsurface layer covered with a 20-centimeter global layer of N2 frost. Our simulations did not include atmospheric radiative heat transfer, but did include conduction, convection, and surface-boundary layer heating. We ran simulations of 100 Triton days at 10 points along

  11. Effect of inlet and outlet flow conditions on natural gas parameters in supersonic separation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang; Wang, Shuli; Feng, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions.

  12. Uncertainty Quantification for atmospheric flows: natural terrain and urban area applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sánchez, Clara; Gorlé, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Modeling Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows is an important concern for a wide range of applications, including the assessment of air quality and wind energy resources. The complexity of these ABL flows, whether in urban areas or over natural terrain, still poses a challenge for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. In the present research, the effect of uncertainties in the inflow boundary conditions on the prediction of the flow patterns is investigated, considering two test cases for which field measurements are available: the Askervein Hill experiment (natural terrain) and the Joint Urban 2003 campaign (urban environment). The uncertainty in the inflow boundary conditions is represented by three uncertain parameters, and a non-intrusive polynomial chaos method is used to propagate these uncertainties to the quantities of interest, namely the prediction of the velocity at the locations of the different measurement stations. The results highlight some differences between ABL flows over natural terrain and those in an urban environment, in particular regarding the influence of the different uncertain parameters on the prediction of the velocity field. The implications for evaluating the effect of inflow uncertainties in these different types of ABL flows will be discussed.

  13. Effect of Inlet and Outlet Flow Conditions on Natural Gas Parameters in Supersonic Separation Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Wen, Chuang; Wang, Shuli; Feng, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic separator has been introduced to remove water vapour from natural gas. The mechanisms of the upstream and downstream influences are not well understood for various flow conditions from the wellhead and the back pipelines. We used a computational model to investigate the effect of the inlet and outlet flow conditions on the supersonic separation process. We found that the shock wave was sensitive to the inlet or back pressure compared to the inlet temperature. The shock position shifted forward with a higher inlet or back pressure. It indicated that an increasing inlet pressure declined the pressure recovery capacity. Furthermore, the shock wave moved out of the diffuser when the ratio of the back pressure to the inlet one was greater than 0.75, in which the state of the low pressure and temperature was destroyed, resulting in the re-evaporation of the condensed liquids. Natural gas would be the subsonic flows in the whole supersonic separator, if the mass flow rate was less than the design value, and it could not reach the low pressure and temperature for the condensation and separation of the water vapor. These results suggested a guidance mechanism for natural gas supersonic separation in various flow conditions. PMID:25338207

  14. Assessment of the natural flow regime in a Mediterranean river impacted from irrigated agriculture.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Panagopoulos, Yiannis; Psomas, Alexandros; Mimikou, Maria

    2016-12-15

    Over the last few decades, the natural flow regime of most rivers has been significantly altered influencing the ecological integrity and functioning of river ecosystems. Especially in the Mediterranean region, irrigated agriculture is considered one of the most important drivers of hydro-morphological modifications in river systems. In this study we employ the Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) methodology for the Pinios River and its tributaries, located in a Mediterranean catchment in central Greece, with the purpose to assess the natural flow regime under a simulated no-agriculture scenario and compare with the current situation. The work is based on the use of the SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) model for the simulation of long time series of daily stream flows, which were analyzed under the actual conditions (baseline), and the hypothetical scenario. The key characteristics of the flow regime projected under each model run were assessed through the implementation of the IHA methodology that utilizes a number of indicators to characterize the intra- and inter-annual variability in the hydrologic conditions. The results of this study revealed that without agricultural activities in the catchment, annual and monthly flows would increase, with significant alterations in the flow characteristics of the winter months, and much smaller in summer. However, the analysis showed that the frequency of droughts and low flow summer events would be smaller. The article provides a comprehensive and easy-to-implement methodology that can facilitate the impact assessment of agricultural human activities on river flow variability under the typical Mediterranean conditions, allowing experimentation on setting river flow thresholds required for a good ecological status within the context of the European Water Framework Directive.

  15. Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate the threat of water withdrawals associated with unconventional natural gas development to aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we assessed current patterns of hydrologic alteration in the Marcellus Shale region by comparing observed...

  16. Design of a Slotted, Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil for Business-Jet Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A 14-percent-thick, slotted, natural-laminar-flow airfoil, the S204, for light business-jet applications has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The drag-divergence Mach number is predicted to be greater than 0.70.

  17. Synthesis of monthly natural flows for selected sites in the Musselshell River basin, Montana, base period 1929-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vining, K.C.; Johnson, D.R.; Parrett, Charles

    1996-01-01

    Synthesized monthly natural streamflows were required at 13 sites for use in a streamflow- accounting model to evaluate the effects of various water-allocation schemes on water availability in the Musselshell River Basin in central Montana. Records of monthly streamflow at 14 streamflow-gaging stations were used to synthesize monthly natural flows at tributaries and the 13 synthesis sites. A streamflow-record extension program was used to extend flow records at the 14 gaged sites to a common base period, 1929-89. To synthesize monthly natural flows at 10 sites on the Musselshell River mainstem, synthesized monthly natural flows at all signi- ficant tributary streams were required. Results from a previous study were used to synthesize tributary natural flows. Monthly natural flows at each mainstem site downstream from the first site were synthesized by successively adding monthly natural flows from intervening tributaries to the next upstream mainstem site. Special methods using extended-record flows from gaged tributaries were used to synthesize monthly natural flows at three tributary sites. Synthesized mean annual natural flows were found to be greater than mean annual extended-record flows at three selected comparison sites on the Musselshell River. The differences between mean natural and extended-record flows (depletions) at Harlowton and Musselshell were considered to be reasonable given the amount of irrigated acreage upstream from the two sites. The differences at Mosby, the site farthest downstream, was less than at Musselshell, the next upstream site, indicating that the methods of synthesis had error. The synthesis error generally was attributed to the larger natural variability of tributary flows in the lower portion of the Musselshell River Basin.

  18. Circulation patterns related to debris-flow triggering in the Zermatt valley in current and future climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Floor; Goyette, Stéphane; Rahman, Kazi; Stoffel, Markus

    2016-11-01

    The principal objective of this study was to investigate the types of large-scale meteorological situations that are conducive to the precipitation and temperature conditions most likely to trigger debris flows in the Zermatt valley, Switzerland, under current and future climates. A two-dimensional Bayesian probability calculation was applied to take account of uncertainties in debris-flow triggering. Precipitation quantities exceeding the 95th percentile of daily precipitation amounts were found to have a significantly higher probability to coincide with observed debris flows. A different relationship exists for extreme temperatures, however. Southerly air flows, weak horizontal pressure gradients over Europe, and westerly flows are mostly associated with observed debris flows and 95th precipitation percentile exceedances. These principal flow directions are well represented in the regional climate model (RCM) HIRHAM control simulations for events exceeding the 95th precipitation percentile and the 30th temperature percentile. Under the IPCC A2 emission scenario, westerly and southerly flows are mostly responsible for these precipitation and temperature conditions under the hypothesis of slow adaptation to climate change (HS1/HC1). Under the hypothesis of rapid adaptation to climate change (HS1/HS1), southerly flows and weak horizontal pressure gradients are likely to gain in importance. In both scenarios for the future, southeasterly flows are among the principal flow directions responsible for the joint exceedance of the 95th precipitation percentile and the 30th temperature percentile, while these were absent in observations and the control simulation.

  19. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  20. Two-dimensional distribution of microbial activity and flow patterns within naturally fractured chalk.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shai; Ronen, Zeev; Adar, Eilon; Yakirevich, Alexander; Nativ, Ronit

    2005-10-01

    The two-dimensional distribution of flow patterns and their dynamic change due to microbial activity were investigated in naturally fractured chalk cores. Long-term biodegradation experiments were conducted in two cores ( approximately 20 cm diameter, 31 and 44 cm long), intersected by a natural fracture. 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP) was used as a model contaminant and as the sole carbon source for aerobic microbial activity. The transmissivity of the fractures was continuously reduced due to biomass accumulation in the fracture concurrent with TBP biodegradation. From multi-tracer experiments conducted prior to and following the microbial activity, it was found that biomass accumulation causes redistribution of the preferential flow channels. Zones of slow flow near the fracture inlet were clogged, thus further diverting the flow through zones of fast flow, which were also partially clogged. Quantitative evaluation of biodegradation and bacterial counts supported the results of the multi-tracer tests, indicating that most of the bacterial activity occurs close to the inlet. The changing flow patterns, which control the nutrient supply, resulted in variations in the concentrations of the chemical constituents (TBP, bromide and oxygen), used as indicators of biodegradation.

  1. Reduced-order modellin for high-pressure transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaie, Baba G.; Khan, Ilyas; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh; Alqahtani, Aisha M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the transient flow of hydrogen compressed-natural gas (HCNG) mixture which is also referred to as hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a pipeline is numerically computed using the reduced-order modelling technique. The study on transient conditions is important because the pipeline flows are normally in the unsteady state due to the sudden opening and closure of control valves, but most of the existing studies only analyse the flow in the steady-state conditions. The mathematical model consists in a set of non-linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. The objective of this paper is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of the HCNG transient flow parameters using the Reduced-Order Modelling (ROM). The ROM technique has been successfully used in single-gas and aerodynamic flow problems, the gas mixture has not been done using the ROM. The study is based on the velocity change created by the operation of the valves upstream and downstream the pipeline. Results on the flow characteristics, namely the pressure, density, celerity and mass flux are based on variations of the mixing ratio and valve reaction and actuation time; the ROM computational time cost advantage are also presented.

  2. Flow resistance of flexible and stiff vegetation: a flume study with natural plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, Juha

    2002-12-01

    Flow resistance of natural grasses, sedges and willows was studied in a laboratory flume. The objective was to investigate, how type, density and placement of vegetation, flow depth and velocity influence friction losses. The plants were studied in various combinations under nonsubmerged and submerged conditions in a total of 350 test runs. The results show large variations in the friction factor, f, with depth of flow, velocity, Reynolds number, and vegetative density. The friction factor was dependent mostly on (1) the relative roughness in the case of grasses; (2) the flow velocity in the case of willows and sedges/grasses combined; and (3) the flow depth in the case of leafless willows on bare bottom soil. Leaves on willows seemed to double or even triple the friction factor compared to the leafless case despite the fact that the bottom was growing sedges in both cases. For the leafless willows, f appeared to increase with depth almost linearly and independently of velocity. Unexpectedly, different spacing of the same number of leafless willows with grasses did not have any significant effect on f. Based on the experimental work, a better understanding of flow resistance due to different combinations of natural stiff and flexible vegetation under nonsubmerged and submerged conditions was gained.

  3. Natural flow regimes, nonnative fishes, and native fish persistence in arid-land river systems.

    PubMed

    Propst, David L; Gido, Keith B; Stefferud, Jerome A

    2008-07-01

    Escalating demands for water have led to substantial modifications of river systems in arid regions, which coupled with the widespread invasion of nonnative organisms, have increased the vulnerability of native aquatic species to extirpation. Whereas a number of studies have evaluated the role of modified flow regimes and nonnative species on native aquatic assemblages, few have been conducted where the compounding effects of modified flow regimes and established nonnatives do not confound interpretations, particularly at spatial and temporal scales that are relevant to conservation of species at a range-wide level. By evaluating a 19-year data set across six sites in the relatively unaltered upper Gila River basin, New Mexico, USA, we tested how natural flow regimes and presence of nonnative species affected long-term stability of native fish assemblages. Overall, we found that native fish density was greatest during a wet period at the beginning of our study and declined during a dry period near the end of the study. Nonnative fishes, particularly predators, generally responded in opposite directions to these climatic cycles. Our data suggested that chronic presence of nonnative fishes, coupled with naturally low flows reduced abundance of individual species and compromised persistence of native fish assemblages. We also found that a natural flow regime alone was unlikely to ensure persistence of native fish assemblages. Rather, active management that maintains natural flow regimes while concurrently suppressing or excluding nonnative fishes from remaining native fish strongholds is critical to conservation of native fish assemblages in a system, such as the upper Gila River drainage, with comparatively little anthropogenic modification.

  4. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  5. A Synoptic View of the Ventilation and Circulation of Antarctic Bottom Water from Chlorofluorocarbons and Natural Tracers.

    PubMed

    Purkey, Sarah G; Smethie, William M; Gebbie, Geoffrey; Gordon, Arnold L; Sonnerup, Rolf E; Warner, Mark J; Bullister, John L

    2017-09-06

    Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is the coldest, densest, most prolific water mass in the global ocean. AABW forms at several distinct regions along the Antarctic coast and feeds into the bottom limb of the meridional overturning circulation, filling most of the global deep ocean. AABW has warmed, freshened, and declined in volume around the globe in recent decades, which has implications for the global heat and sea level rise budgets. Over the past three decades, the use of tracers, especially time-varying tracers such as chlorofluorocarbons, has been essential to our understanding of the formation, circulation, and variability of AABW. Here, we review three decades of temperature, salinity, and tracer data and analysis that have led to our current knowledge of AABW and how the southern component of deep-ocean ventilation is changing with time. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  6. Coronary collateral circulation: its relevance.

    PubMed

    Karrowni, Wassef; El Accaoui, Ramzi N; Chatterjee, Kanu

    2013-11-15

    The interest in coronary collateral circulation (CCC) as "natural bypasses" is growing, especially in patients in whom the extent of coronary atherosclerosis is too severe to allow for conventional revascularization. The anatomic foundation of CCC has been recognized for long time. Recently, reliable methods have become available for the assessment of the adequacy of collateral flow. However, the debate regarding the importance of CCC in the different clinical settings continues. In this article, we present the recent progress in the understanding of anatomy and physiology of the CCC and focus on the studies addressing their functional significance in acute, subacute, and chronic coronary artery disease. In addition, we provide a focused update on the essential role of collateral circulation in the management of coronary chronic total occlusions.

  7. The Meridional Secondary Circulation of 3D Vortices in Rotating, Stratified, Shear and its Role in Astrophysical Flows: from a Newly Pale Great Red Spot to Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, P. S.; Hassanzadeh, P.

    2012-12-01

    The interest in understanding the physics of 3D, compact baroclinic vortices in rotating, stratified shear is growing. This is partly due to the fact that vortices in protoplanetary disks attract dust and may be key in planetesimal formation. The interest is also fueled by the unanswered questions about vortices of Jupiter and Saturn and the recent changes of the Jovian vortices. Examples are the appearance of the Red Oval BA in 2005, and the very recent color-change of the Great Red Spot to pale orange, which was observed in July 2012. While the dynamics of 3D baroclinic vortices in rotating stratified flows, even without shear, is poorly understood, the presence of horizontal shear strongly influences their dynamics and further complicates the problem. Studying the physics of planetary vortices and their interaction with the environment requires high-resolution 3D simulations. Ignoring the vertical direction, neglecting the vertical motion (as has been done in almost all published numerical simulations of Jovian vortices because most studies have assumed vertical hydrostatic equilibrium), or the lack of enough resolution eliminates or changes important physical processes such as the secondary circulation. This secondary, ageostrophic flow within the vortices is essential in dust accumulation and agglomeration in vortices in protoplanetary disks. The secondary circulation has been shown to be important in determining the color and cloud patterns in Jovian vortices. For example, the recent color change of the Great Red Spot can be explained by changes in its secondary circulation. It has also been suggested that the persistent rings around the Jovian anticyclones are produces by this secondary circulation. We show that the lifetimes of Jovian vortices depend upon their ability to merge with and absorb smaller vortices and also on the secondary circulations within vortices. The main dissipation mechanism for most astrophysical vortices is thermal radiation rather

  8. Nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment using different anox-circulation flow rates and ethanol as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, H; Laitinen, S; Pradhan, S; Pessi, M; Heinonen-Tanski, H

    2010-05-01

    We studied the optimization of nitrogen reduction from municipal wastewater in a laboratory-scale modified Ludzack-Ettinger activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The unit consisted of primary denitrification, secondary nitrification, a sludge clarifier and a post-denitrification unit. The process simulates the Kuopio WWTP, which provided the influent utilized. We describe the effect of varying anox-circulation schemes on the nitrogen removal efficiency. We further compare the denitrification efficiencies of ethanol and methanol applied in the post-denitrification unit, and compare the properties and costs of these chemicals as carbon sources. Maximum efficiency of total nitrogen removal (70.8%) was obtained with 256% anox-circulation. The process was, however, not very sensitive, as a wide range of 150-400% of anox-circulations gave good results for nitrogen reduction. The unit achieved high BOD, and COD reductions of wastewater also when nitrogen reduction was moderate. The addition of 40 mg/L/day of ethanol to the post-denitrification tank meant that the nitrate-levels of effluent could be controlled to below 10 mg/L of nitrate nitrogen. Methanol and ethanol were equally effective for denitrification. The use of ethanol instead of methanol could reduce treatment costs by 30% to 0.02 E/m3 of treated wastewater according to 2008 market prices.

  9. LES of High-Reynolds-Number Coanda Flow Separating from a Rounded Trailing Edge of a Circulation Control Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichino, Takafumi; Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Large Eddy Simulation of a high reynolds number Coanda flow that is separated from a round trailing edge of a ciruclation control airfoil. The objectives of the study are: (1) To investigate detailed physics (flow structures and statistics) of the fully turbulent Coanda jet applied to a CC airfoil, by using LES (2) To compare LES and RANS results to figure out how to improve the performance of existing RANS models for this type of flow.

  10. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  11. The relative influence of natural selection and geography on gene flow in guppies.

    PubMed

    Crispo, Erika; Bentzen, Paul; Reznick, David N; Kinnison, Michael T; Hendry, Andrew P

    2006-01-01

    Two general processes may influence gene flow among populations. One involves divergent selection, wherein the maladaptation of immigrants and hybrids impedes gene flow between ecological environments (i.e. ecological speciation). The other involves geographic features that limit dispersal. We determined the relative influence of these two processes in natural populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). If selection is important, gene flow should be reduced between different selective environments. If geography is important, gene flow should be impeded by geographic distance and physical barriers. We examined how genetic divergence, long-term gene flow, and contemporary dispersal within a watershed were influenced by waterfalls, geographic distance, predation, and habitat features. We found that waterfalls and geographic distance increased genetic divergence and reduced dispersal and long-term gene flow. Differences in predation or habitat features did not influence genetic divergence or gene flow. In contrast, differences in predation did appear to reduce contemporary dispersal. We suggest that the standard predictions of ecological speciation may be heavily nuanced by the mating behaviour and life history strategies of guppies.

  12. ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

    2004-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  13. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2005-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  14. Mimicking Natural Laminar to Turbulent Flow Transition: A Systematic CFD Study Using PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2005-01-01

    For applied aerodynamic computations using a general purpose Navier-Stokes code, the common practice of treating laminar to turbulent flow transition over a non-slip surface is somewhat arbitrary by either treating the entire flow as turbulent or forcing the flow to undergo transition at given trip locations in the computational domain. In this study, the possibility of using the PAB3D code, standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and the Girimaji explicit algebraic stresses model to mimic natural laminar to turbulent flow transition was explored. The sensitivity of flow transition with respect to two limiters in the standard k-epsilon turbulence model was examined using a flat plate and a 6:1 aspect ratio prolate spheroid for our computations. For the flat plate, a systematic dependence of transition Reynolds number on background turbulence intensity was found. For the prolate spheroid, the transition patterns in the three-dimensional boundary layer at different flow conditions were sensitive to the free stream turbulence viscosity limit, the reference Reynolds number and the angle of attack, but not to background turbulence intensity below a certain threshold value. The computed results showed encouraging agreements with the experimental measurements at the corresponding geometry and flow conditions.

  15. Drivers of circulation in a fringing coral reef embayment: A wave-flow coupled numerical modeling study of Hanalei Bay, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeke, Ron K.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Ridd, Peter V.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled wave-circulation numerical model of Hanalei Bay, Hawaii, was constructed to investigate controls on nearshore hydrodynamics and overall circulation of a bathymetrically-complex coral reef embayment that is exposed to large waves and river floods several times per annum. The model was calibrated using in situ data representative of the two conditions that dominate the region's wave climate: one associated with local trade winds and associated trade-wind waves, and the other with distant-source episodic large swells. The model results were improved by including spatially-varying hydrodynamic bed roughness and making the semi-empirical wave-breaking parameter dependent on incident wave steepness and reef slope. During trade-wind conditions, circulation was primarily wind-driven and volume flux-based flushing times of the bay were on the order of 35 h. Under the episodic swell conditions, circulation were dominated by wave-driven flows and flushing times decreased to as little as 2 h. The vigorous hydrodynamics that occur during the upper 10% most energetic swell conditions indicate that only a few (0-10) events each year are likely capable of exporting significant volumes of sediment from the bay. Like many fringing reef areas backed by steep-sided watersheds on tropical and sub-tropical high islands worldwide, Hanalei Bay receives high episodic fluvial sediment load during a similarly low number of flood events. These similarly episodic but decoupled processes of sediment delivery and removal identified here suggest that the water quality and sedimentary environment of Hanalei Bay and similar linked watershed-reef systems are sensitive to changes in annual storm frequency and intensity.

  16. [Interstitial microdialysis study of changes in metabolism and blood flow in skeletal muscles during cardiac surgery with normothermic and hypothermic extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Mand'ák, J; Zivný, P; Lonský, V; Palicka, V; Kakrdová, D; Marsíková, M; Kunes, P; Kubícek, J

    2003-09-01

    Hypoperfusion of peripheral tissues and splanchnic organs during cardiac surgery in extracorporeal circulation may lead to the origin of serious complications. The aim of the study was to monitor metabolism and blood pressure in interstital peripheral tissue, skeletal muscle, during the operation on the patient with extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in an early post-operation period by means of microdialysis. The interstitial microdialysis is a minimally invasive method for the biochemical monitoring of metabolic changes and blood pressure in extracellular space of tissue. The substances in interstitium pass across a semipermeable membrane of the inserted microdialysis probe and may be analyzed. Microdialysis in this study was performed by means of two microdialysis probes CMA (CMA Microdialysis AB, Sweden) inserted into the deltoid muscle of the surgically treated patient. The probes were perfused by the Ringer solution at the rate of 0.3 ml/hour. The dialysates were sampled in the following intervals: beginning of the operation, beginning of ECC, end of ECC, end of the operation, two hours during the post-operation period. Standard biochemical methods were to evaluate, in the dialysates, glucose, urea, glycerol and lactate. The blood flow in the interstitium was monitored by means of dynamic microdialysis of gentamycine as a marker. Microdialysis was performed in 40 patients with ischemic heart disease, operated on in the extracorporeal circulation. In 20 patients the ECC was performed in normothermia (NT), while in the other 20 patients it was made in hypothermia (HT). In both groups, NT versus HT, a similar dynamism of interstitial concentration of the observed substances in relation to the operation phase and in early post-operation period. Low initial concentrations were gradually increasing during the extracorporeal circulation and increased further after the end of extracorporeal circulation and also in the subsequent phase of the operation. The

  17. Overall results of and lessons learned from the IAEA CRP on sodium natural circulation test performed during the Phenix end-of-life experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, S.; Toti, A.; Tenchine, D.; Pialla, D.

    2012-07-01

    In 2007, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the Phenix End-of-Life Experiments'. The overall purpose of the CRP, performed within the framework of the IAEA programme in support of innovative fast reactor technology development and deployment, is to improve the Member States' analytical capabilities in the various fields of research and design of sodium-cooled fast reactors through data and codes verification and validation. In particular the CRP, taking advantage of the End-of-Life set of experiments performed before the final shut-down of the French prototype fast breeder power reactor Phenix, aims at improving fast reactor simulation methods and design capabilities in the field of temperature and power distribution evaluation, as well as of the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The paper presents the overall results of the CRP, including blind calculations and post-test and sensitivity analyses carried out by the CRP participants, as well as lessons learned and recommendations for further future implementations to resolve open issues. (authors)

  18. An inverse problem solution to the flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth Ramirez S.; Fernando Samaniego V.; Fernando Rodriguez; Jesus Rivera R.

    1994-01-20

    This paper presents a solution for the inverse problem to the flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. The models considered include linear flow in vertical fractures, radial flow in horizontal fractures, and cubic block matrix-fracture geometry. The Rosenbrock method for nonlinear regression used in this study, allowed the estimation of up to six parameters for the cubic block matrix fracture geometry. The nonlinear regression for the three cases was carefully tested against syntetical tracer concentration responses affected by random noise, with the objective of simulating as close as possible step injection field data. Results were obtained within 95 percent confidence limits. The sensitivity of the inverse problem solution on the main parameters that describe this flow problem was investigated. The main features of the nonlinear regression program used in this study are also discussed. The procedure of this study can be applied to interpret tracer tests in naturally fractured reservoirs, allowing the estimation of fracture and matrix parameters of practical interest (longitudinal fracture dispersivity alpha, matrix porosity phi2, fracture half-width w, matrix block size d, matrix diffusion coefficient D2 and the adsorption constant kd). The methodology of this work offers a practical alternative for tracer flow tests interpretation to other techniques.

  19. Atmospheric circulation patterns, cloud-to-ground lightning, and locally intense convective rainfall associated with debris flow initiation in the Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, S. Jeffrey; Schultz, Michael D.; Berti, Metteo; Gregoretti, Carlo; Simoni, Alessandro; Mote, Thomas L.; Saylor, Anthony M.

    2016-02-01

    The Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy experience debris flows with great frequency during the summer months. An ample supply of unconsolidated material on steep slopes and a summer season climate regime characterized by recurrent thunderstorms combine to produce an abundance of these destructive hydro-geologic events. In the past, debris flow events have been studied primarily in the context of their geologic and geomorphic characteristics. The atmospheric contribution to these mass-wasting events has been limited to recording rainfall and developing intensity thresholds for debris mobilization. This study aims to expand the examination of atmospheric processes that preceded both locally intense convective rainfall (LICR) and debris flows in the Dolomite region. 500 hPa pressure level plots of geopotential heights were constructed for a period of 3 days prior to debris flow events to gain insight into the synoptic-scale processes which provide an environment conducive to LICR in the Dolomites. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash data recorded at the meso-scale were incorporated to assess the convective environment proximal to debris flow source regions. Twelve events were analyzed and from this analysis three common synoptic-scale circulation patterns were identified. Evaluation of CG flashes at smaller spatial and temporal scales illustrated that convective processes vary in their production of CF flashes (total number) and the spatial distribution of flashes can also be quite different between events over longer periods. During the 60 min interval immediately preceding debris flow a majority of cases exhibited spatial and temporal colocation of LICR and CG flashes. Also a number of CG flash parameters were found to be significantly correlated to rainfall intensity prior to debris flow initiation.

  20. Atmospheric circulation patterns, cloud-to-ground lightning, and locally intense convective rainfall associated with debris flow initiation in the Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, S. J.; Schultz, M. D.; Berti, M.; Gregoretti, C.; Simoni, A.; Mote, T. L.; Saylor, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Dolomite Alps of northeastern Italy experience debris flows with great frequency during the summer months. An ample supply of unconsolidated material on steep slopes and a summer season climate regime characterized by recurrent thunderstorms combine to produce an abundance of these destructive hydrogeologic events. In the past debris flow events have been studied primarily in the context of their geologic and geomorphic characteristics. The atmospheric contribution to these mass wasting events has been limited to recording rainfall and developing intensity thresholds for debris mobilization. This study aims to expand the examination of atmospheric processes that preceded both locally intense convective rainfall (LICR) and debris flows in the Dolomite region. 500 hPa pressure level plots of geopotential heights were constructed for a period of three days prior to debris flow events to gain insight into the synoptic scale processes which provide an environment conducive to LICR in the Dolomites. Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash data recorded at the meso-scale were incorporated to assess the convective environment proximal to debris flow source regions. Twelve events were analyzed and from this analysis three common synoptic scale circulation patterns were identified. Evaluation of CG flashes at smaller spatial and temporal scales illustrated that convective processes vary in their production of CG flashes (total number) and the spatial distribution of flashes can also be quite different between events over longer periods. During the 60 min interval immediately preceding debris flow a majority of cases exhibited spatial and temporal collocation of LICR and CG flashes. Also a number of CG flash parameters were found to be significantly correlated to rainfall intensity prior to debris flow initiation.

  1. The seasonal variation of the upper layers of the South China Sea (SCS) circulation and the Indonesian through flow (ITF): An ocean model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Danya; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola

    2013-09-01

    The upper layer, wind-driven circulation of the South China Sea (SCS), its through-flow (SCSTF) and the Indonesian through flow (ITF) are simulated using a high resolution model, FVCOM (finite volume coastal ocean model) in a regional domain comprising the Maritime Continent. The regional model is embedded in the MIT global ocean general circulation model (ogcm) which provides surface forcing and boundary conditions of all the oceanographic variables at the lateral open boundaries in the Pacific and Indian oceans. A five decade long simulation is available from the MITgcm and we choose to investigate and compare the climatologies of two decades, 1960-1969 and 1990-1999. The seasonal variability of the wind-driven circulation produced by the monsoon system is realistically simulated. In the SCS th