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Sample records for natural convection energy

  1. Natural convection: Fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakac, S.; Aung, W.; Viskanta, R.

    Among the topics discussed are: stability solutions for laminar external boundary region flows; natural convection in plane layers and cavities with volumetric energy sources; and turbulence modelling equations. Consideration is also given to: natural convection in enclosures containing tube bundles; natural limiting behaviors in porous media cavity flows; numerical solutions in laminar and turbulent natural convection; and heat transfer in the critical region of binary mixtures. Additional topics discussed include: natural convective cooling of electronic equipment; natural convection suppression in solar collectors; and laser induced buoyancy and forced convection in vertical tubes.

  2. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  3. Investigation of Transient, Turbulent Natural Convection in Vertical Tubes for Thermal Energy Storage in Supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghaei Lakeh, Reza; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Wirz, Richard E.

    2013-11-01

    Heat transfer can be a limiting factor in the operation of thermal energy storage, including sensible heat and latent heat storage systems. Poor heat transfer between the energy storage medium and the container walls impairs the functionality of the thermal storage unit by requiring excessively long times to charge or discharge the system. In this study, the effect of turbulent, unsteady buoyancy-driven flow on heat transfer in vertical storage tubes containing supercritical CO2 as the storage medium is investigated computationally. The heat transfer from a constant-temperature wall to the storage fluid is studied during the charge cycle. The results of this study show that turbulent natural convection dominates the heat transfer mechanism and significantly reduces the required time for charging compared to pure conduction. Changing the L/D ratio of the storage tube has a major impact on the charge time. The charge time shows a decreasing trend with RaL. The non-dimensional model of the problem shows that Nusselt number and non-dimensional mean temperature of the storage fluid in different configurations of the tube is a function Buoyancy-Fourier number defined as of FoL * RaLm* L/D. This study was supported by award No. DE-AR0000140 granted by U.S. Department of Energy under Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) and by award No. 5660021607 granted by Southern California Gas Company.

  4. Natural convection between concentric spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference solution for steady natural convective flow in a concentric spherical annulus with isothermal walls has been obtained. The stream function-vorticity formulation of the equations of motion for the unsteady axisymmetric flow is used; interest lying in the final steady solution. Forward differences are used for the time derivatives and second-order central differences for the space derivatives. The alternating direction implicit method is used for solution of the discretization equations. Local one-dimensional grid adaptation is used to resolve the steep gradients in some regions of the flow at large Rayleigh numbers. The break-up into multi-cellular flow is found at high Rayleigh numbers for air and water, and at significantly low Rayleigh numbers for liquid metals. Excellent agreement with previous experimental and numerical data is obtained.

  5. Studies of heat source driven natural convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Nagle, M. E.; Cassen, P.

    1974-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid with a zero heat flux lower boundary, and an isothermal upper boundary, has been studied. Quantitative information on the time-mean temperature distribution and the fluctuating component of temperature about the mean temperature in steady turbulent convection are obtained from a small thermocouple inserted into the layer through the upper bounding plate. Data are also presented on the development of temperature at several vertical positions when the layer is subject to both a sudden increase and to a sudden decrease in power input. For changes of power input from zero to a value corresponding to a Rayleigh number much greater than the critical linear stability theory value, a slight hysteresis in temperature profiles near the upper boundary is observed between the heat-up and cool-down modes.

  6. A Generalized Convective Inhibition Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailleux, R.

    2002-12-01

    The common view about preconvecting soundings is that they possess both CAPE (Convective Available Potential Energy) and CINE (Convective INhibition Energy), the latter preventing the former to be spontaneously released. The two concepts of CAPE and CINE are ambiguous, however, because they depend upon the parcel used to compute the work of buoyancy forces, as well as upon the thermodynamic transformation (adiabatic, pseudo-adiabatic) assumed in lifting the parcel. To remove the ambiguity intrinsically associated with CAPE, Randall and Wang (1992) introduced the concept of GCAPE (Generalized CAPE), defined as the minimum achievable energy difference between the total nonkinetic energy (NKE) of the column of air considered minus the total NKE of a reference soundings obtained by reorganizing the parcels along the vertical by conserving mass. Because the method focuses on how to achieve a global energy minimum without addressing the issue of whether it is achievable or how to achieve it, the concept of CINE is lost. The present work shows how to remedy to this problem, and how to define a Generalized CINE within the same framework serving to define the GCAPE.

  7. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2017-03-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios ( KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }}); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }}. It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  8. Kinetic energy budgets in areas of convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Synoptic scale budgets of kinetic energy are computed using 3 and 6 h data from three of NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiments (AVE's). Numerous areas of intense convection occurred during the three experiments. Large kinetic energy variability, with periods as short as 6 h, is observed in budgets computed over each entire experiment area and over limited volumes that barely enclose the convection and move with it. Kinetic energy generation and transport processes in the smaller volumes are often a maximum when the enclosed storms are near peak intensity, but the nature of the various energy processes differs between storm cases and seems closely related to the synoptic conditions. A commonly observed energy budget for peak storm intensity indicates that generation of kinetic energy by cross-contour flow is the major energy source while dissipation to subgrid scales is the major sink. Synoptic scale vertical motion transports kinetic energy from lower to upper levels of the atmosphere while low-level horizontal flux convergence and upper-level horizontal divergence also occur. Spatial fields of the energy budget terms show that the storm environment is a major center of energy activity for the entire area.

  9. A Simple Classroom Demonstration of Natural Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Dean R.

    2005-01-01

    This article explains a simple way to demonstrate natural convection, such as from a lit candle, in the classroom using an overhead projector. The demonstration is based on the principle of schlieren imaging, commonly used to visualize variations in density for gas flows.

  10. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  11. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  12. Self-propulsion via natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo; Mercier, Matthieu; Allshouse, Michael; Peacock, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Natural convection of a fluid due to a heated or cooled boundary has been studied within a myriad of different contexts due to the prevalence of the phenomenon in environmental systems such as glaciers, katabatic winds, or magmatic chambers; and in engineered problems like natural ventilation of buildings, or cooling of electronic components. It has, however, hitherto gone unrecognized that boundary-induced natural convection can propel immersed objects. We experimentally investigate the motion of a wedge-shaped object, immersed within a two-layer fluid system, due to a heated surface. The wedge resides at the interface between the two fluid layers of different density, and its concomitant motion provides the first demonstration of the phenomenon of propulsion via boundary-induced natural convection. Established theoretical and numerical models are used to rationalize the propulsion speed by virtue of balancing the propulsion force against the appropriate drag force. We successfully verified the influence of various fluid and heat parameters on the predicted speed. now at IMFT (Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse).

  13. Natural Convection Above A Horizontal Heat Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    surface was a thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) sheet. Used to ensure a smooth flat surface, the sheet also provided a visualization of the temperature...a flat horizontal heated surface surrounded by an unheated area. This can contribute significantly to studies in liquid immersion cooling...Gebhart, B., "The Transition of Plane Plumes," Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, v.18., pp. 513-526, 1975. 13. Gaiser, A.O., "Natural Convection Liquid

  14. Education: DNA replication using microscale natural convection.

    PubMed

    Priye, Aashish; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-12-07

    There is a need for innovative educational experiences that unify and reinforce fundamental principles at the interface between the physical, chemical, and life sciences. These experiences empower and excite students by helping them recognize how interdisciplinary knowledge can be applied to develop new products and technologies that benefit society. Microfluidics offers an incredibly versatile tool to address this need. Here we describe our efforts to create innovative hands-on activities that introduce chemical engineering students to molecular biology by challenging them to harness microscale natural convection phenomena to perform DNA replication via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Experimentally, we have constructed convective PCR stations incorporating a simple design for loading and mounting cylindrical microfluidic reactors between independently controlled thermal plates. A portable motion analysis microscope enables flow patterns inside the convective reactors to be directly visualized using fluorescent bead tracers. We have also developed a hands-on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) exercise based on modeling microscale thermal convection to identify optimal geometries for DNA replication. A cognitive assessment reveals that these activities strongly impact student learning in a positive way.

  15. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open

  16. Laminar natural convection under nonuniform gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J.; Eichhorn, R.; Dhir, V.

    1972-01-01

    Laminar natural convection is analyzed for cases in which gravity varies with the distance from the leading edge of an isothermal plate. The study includes situations in which gravity varies by virtue of the varying slope of a surface. A general integral solution method which includes certain known integral solutions as special cases is developed to account for arbitrary position-dependence of gravity. A series method of solution is also developed for the full equations. Although it is more cumbersome it provides verification of the integral method.

  17. Thermophoresis in natural convection with variable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, S.; Dinesh, K. K.; Pillai, K. L.

    The present paper deals with thermophoresis in natural convection with variable properties for a laminar flow over a cold vertical flat plate. Variation of properties like density, viscosity and thermal conductivity with temperature is included in the formulation of the problem. Selection of components for the property ratio is made by fitting the property values between the desired temperature limits. For a selected fluid, Prandtl number variation with temperature is neglected and the Prandtl number corresponding to film temperature is used for the analysis. Solution is carried out by finite difference method. Variation of wall concentration and wall flux along the length of plate is studied. The effect of thermophoretic coefficient on wall concentration is also studied. Results are presented in the form of graphs. The result is compared with similarity solution by Runge-Kutta method and found to be accurate upto second decimal place.

  18. Fully decoupled monolithic projection method for natural convection problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaomin; Kim, Kyoungyoun; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2017-04-01

    To solve time-dependent natural convection problems, we propose a fully decoupled monolithic projection method. The proposed method applies the Crank-Nicolson scheme in time and the second-order central finite difference in space. To obtain a non-iterative monolithic method from the fully discretized nonlinear system, we first adopt linearizations of the nonlinear convection terms and the general buoyancy term with incurring second-order errors in time. Approximate block lower-upper decompositions, along with an approximate factorization technique, are additionally employed to a global linearly coupled system, which leads to several decoupled subsystems, i.e., a fully decoupled monolithic procedure. We establish global error estimates to verify the second-order temporal accuracy of the proposed method for velocity, pressure, and temperature in terms of a discrete l2-norm. Moreover, according to the energy evolution, the proposed method is proved to be stable if the time step is less than or equal to a constant. In addition, we provide numerical simulations of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection and periodic forced flow. The results demonstrate that the proposed method significantly mitigates the time step limitation, reduces the computational cost because only one Poisson equation is required to be solved, and preserves the second-order temporal accuracy for velocity, pressure, and temperature. Finally, the proposed method reasonably predicts a three-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection for different Rayleigh numbers.

  19. Natural convection in a fluid layer periodically heated from above.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Floryan, J M

    2014-08-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to periodic heating from above has been studied. It is shown that the primary convection leads to the cooling of the bulk of the fluid below the mean temperature of the upper wall. The secondary convection may lead either to longitudinal rolls, transverse rolls, or oblique rolls. The global flow properties (e.g., the average Nusselt number for the primary convection and the critical conditions for the secondary convection) are identical to those of the layer heated from below. However, the flow and temperature patterns exhibit phase shifts in the horizontal directions.

  20. Natural Convection in Enclosed Porous or Fluid Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatdjian, Esteban; Lesage, François; Mota, José Paulo B.

    2014-01-01

    In Saatdjian, E., Lesage, F., and Mota, J.P.B, "Transport Phenomena Projects: A Method to Learn and to Innovate, Natural Convection Between Porous, Horizontal Cylinders," "Chemical Engineering Education," 47(1), 59-64, (2013), the numerical solution of natural convection between two porous, concentric, impermeable cylinders was…

  1. Natural convection around the human head.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R P; Toy, N

    1975-01-01

    1. Factors determining the convective flow patterns around the human head in 'still' conditions are discussed in relation to body posture. 2. The flow patterns have been visualized using a schlieren optical system which reveals that the head has a thicker 'insulating' layer of convecting air in the erect posture than in the supine position. 3. Local convective and radiative heat transfer measurements from the head have been using surface calorimeters. These results are seen to be closely related to the thickness of the convective boundary layer flows. 4. The total convective and radiative heat loss from the head of a subject in the erect and supine position has been evaluated from the local measurements. For the head of the supine subject the heat loss was found to be 30% more than when the subject was standing. Images Plate 1 PMID:1142118

  2. Energy analysis of convectively induced wind perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Buechler, Dennis E.

    1989-01-01

    Budgets of divergent and rotational components of kinetic energy (KD and KR) are examined for four upper level wind speed maxima that develop during the fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV) and the first AVE-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME I). A similar budget analysis is performed for a low-level jet stream during AVE-SESAME I. The energetics of the four upper level speed maxima is found to have several similarities. The dominant source of KD is cross-contour flow by the divergent wind, and KD provides a major source of KR via a conversion process. Conversion from available potential energy provides an additional source of KR in three of the cases. Horizontal maps reveal that the conversions involving KD are maximized in regions poleward of the convection. Low-level jet development during AVE-SESAME I appears to be assisted by convective activity to the west.

  3. Double-diffusive natural convection in a fluid saturated porous cavity with a freely convecting wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nithiarasu, P.; Sundararajan, T.; Seetharamu, K.N.

    1997-12-01

    Double-diffusive natural convection in fluid saturated porous medium has been investigated using a generalized porous medium model. One of the vertical walls of the porous cavity considered is subjected to convective heat and mass transfer conditions. The results show that the flow, heat and mass transfer become sensitive to applied mass transfer coefficient in both the Darcy and non-Darcy flow regimes. It is also observed that the Sherwood number approaches a constant value as the solutal Biot number increases. Double-diffusive natural convection in fluid saturated porous medium is encountered in applications such as food processing, contaminant transport in ground water, and others.

  4. Laser-induced natural convection and thermophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Morse, T. F.; Cipolla, J. W., Jr.

    1985-02-01

    The influence of axial laser volumetric heating and forced convection on the motion of aerosol particles in a vertical tube has been studied using the Boussinesq approximation. For constant wall temperature, an asymptotic case provides simple temperature and velocity profiles that determine the convection and thermophoretic motion of small aerosol particles. Laser heating induces upward buoyant motion near the tube center, and when forced convection is downward, there may be an inflection in the velocity profile. For constant laser heating (a small absorption limit), a velocity profile may be found that will minimize the distance over which particles are deposited on the wall. Such an observation may have some bearing on the manufacture of preforms from which optical fibers are drawn.

  5. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  6. Study of plasma natural convection induced by electron beam in atmosphere [

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yongfeng Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2014-06-15

    Using high-energy electron beams to ionize air is an effective way to produce a large-size plasma in the atmosphere. In particular, with a steady-state high power generator, some unique phenomena can be achieved, including natural convection of the plasma. The characteristics of this convection are studied both experimentally and numerically. The results show that an asymmetrical temperature field develops with magnitudes that vary from 295 K to 389 K at a pressure of 100 Torr. Natural convection is greatly enhanced under 760 Torr. Nevertheless, plasma transport is negligible in this convection flow field and only the plasma core tends to move upward. Parameter analysis is performed to discern influencing factors on this phenomenon. The beam current, reflecting the Rayleigh number Ra effect, correlates with convection intensity, which indicates that energy deposition is the underlying key factor in determining such convections. Finally, natural convection is concluded to be an intrinsic property of the electron beam when focused into dense air, and can be achieved by carefully adjusting equipment operations parameters.

  7. Natural thermal convection in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Mezon, C.; Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J. F.; Antoine, R.; Finizola, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the crust, fractures/faults can provide preferential pathways for fluid flow or act as barriers preventing the flow across these structures. In hydrothermal systems (usually found in fractured rock masses), these discontinuities may play a critical role at various scales, controlling fluid flows and heat transfer. The thermal convection is numerically computed in 3D fluid satured fractured porous media. Fractures are inserted as discrete objects, randomly distributed over a damaged volume, which is a fraction of the total volume. The fluid is assumed to satisfy Darcy's law in the fractures and in the porous medium with exchanges between them. All simulations were made for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) < 150 (hence, the fluid is in thermal equilibrium with the medium), cubic boxes and closed-top conditions. Checks were performed on an unfractured porous medium and the convection cells do start for the theoretical value of Ra, namely 4p². 2D convection was verified up to Ra=800. The influence of parameters such as fracture aperture (or fracture transmissivity), fracture density and fracture length is studied. Moreover, these models are compared to porous media with the same macroscopic permeability. Preliminary results show that the non-uniqueness associated with initial conditions which makes possible either 2D or 3D convection in porous media (Schubert & Straus 1979) is no longer true for fractured porous media (at least for 50

  8. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Nitao, J J; Buscheck, T A; Sun, Y

    2006-07-24

    In this study, we conduct a two dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have a strong impact on in-drift convective flow and transport.

  9. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  10. Natural convection from vertical helical coiled tubes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.E.

    1999-07-01

    Helically coiled tubes are used in many engineering applications, such as heating, refrigerating and HVAC systems. They are used also in steam generator and condenser design in power plants because of their large surface area per unit volume. In spite of their widespread use, there is very little information available in the literature on natural convection from such coils. Two experimental investigation have been reported on steady state laminar and transition natural convection from the outer surface of vertically oriented helical coiled tubes in air. Four coils at constant heat flux boundary condition have been used with coil diameter to tube diameter ratio of 16.45 and 23.94. Six more coils have been used at variable surface temperature boundary condition with coil diameter to tube diameter ratio 19.923, 15.904, and 12.798. Local average heat transfer coefficients are obtained for laminar and transition natural convection. The data are correlated with Rayleigh number using the tube diameter as a characteristic length. It has been found that the Nusselt number decreases as Rayleigh number increases for constant heat flux. Transition to turbulent natural convection regime has obtained at a critical Rayleigh number of about 5,000 and it characterizes by a waveform like relation between Nusselt number and Rayleigh number.

  11. On the convective-absolute nature of river bedform instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesipa, Riccardo; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca; Chomaz, Jean Marc

    2014-12-01

    River dunes and antidunes are induced by the morphological instability of stream-sediment boundary. Such bedforms raise a number of subtle theoretical questions and are crucial for many engineering and environmental problems. Despite their importance, the absolute/convective nature of the instability has never been addressed. The present work fills this gap as we demonstrate, by the cusp map method, that dune instability is convective for all values of the physical control parameters, while the antidune instability exhibits both behaviors. These theoretical predictions explain some previous experimental and numerical observations and are important to correctly plan flume experiments, numerical simulations, paleo-hydraulic reconstructions, and river works.

  12. Drift natural convection and seepage at the Yucca Mountain repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock, from the hot drift center to the cool drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water- induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  13. Numerical investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a cylindrical enclosure due to ultrasonic vibrations.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Maryam; Setareh, Milad; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Hosseini Abardeh, Reza

    2017-04-01

    Application of ultrasonic waves for heat transfer augmentation has been proposed in the last few decades. Due to limited researches on acoustic streaming induced by ultrasonic oscillation, the effect of ultrasonic waves on natural convection heat transfer is the main purpose of this paper. At first, natural convection on up-ward-facing heating surface in a cylindrical enclosure filled with air is investigated numerically by the finite difference method, then the effect of upper surface oscillation on convection heat transfer is considered. The conservation equations in Lagrangian approach and compressible fluid are assumed for the numerical simulation. Results show that acoustic pressure will become steady after some milliseconds also pressure oscillation amplitude and acoustic velocity components will be constant therefore steady state velocity is used for solving energy equation. Results show that Enhancement of heat transfer coefficient can be up to 175% by induced ultrasonic waves. In addition, the effect of different parameters on acoustic streaming and heat transfer has been studied.

  14. Estimating convective energy losses from solar central receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, D L; Kraabel, J S

    1984-04-01

    This report outlines a method for estimating the total convective energy loss from a receiver of a solar central receiver power plant. Two types of receivers are considered in detail: a cylindrical, external-type receiver and a cavity-type receiver. The method is intended to provide the designer with a tool for estimating the total convective energy loss that is based on current knowledge of convective heat transfer from receivers to the environment and that is adaptable to new information as it becomes available. The current knowledge consists of information from two recent large-scale experiments, as well as information already in the literature. Also outlined is a method for estimating the uncertainty in the convective loss estimates. Sample estimations of the total convective energy loss and the uncertainties in those convective energy loss estimates for the external receiver of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Plant (Barstow, California) and the cavity receiver of the International Energy Agency Small Solar Power Systems Project (Almeria, Spain) are included in the appendices.

  15. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  16. Three-dimensional natural convection in a narrow spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Egbers, Christoph

    The convective motions in a shallow fluid layer between two concentric spheres in the presence of a constant axial force field have been studied numerically. The aspect ratio of the fluid layer to inner radius is beta =0.08, the Prandtl number Pra =37.5. A three-dimensional time-dependent numerical code is used to solve the governing equations in primitive variables. Convection in the sphe rical shell has then a highly three-dimensional nature. Characteristic flow patterns with a large number of banana-type cells, oriented in north-south direction and aligned in the azimuthal direction, are formed on the northern hemisphere, which grow gradually into the equatorial region accompanied by the generation of new cells as the Rayleigh number is increased. Various characteristics of these flows as well as their transient evolution are investigated for Rayleigh numbers up to 20 000.

  17. Topological analysis of a mixing flow generated by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Pablo Sebastián; de la Cruz, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We use topological tools to describe the natural convective motion and the Lagrangian trajectories of a flow generated by stepwise, alternating heating and cooling protocol of opposite vertical walls of a cubic container. The working fluid considered is Newtonian and the system is in presence of the acceleration of gravity but the nonlinear terms are neglected, i.e., we study the piece-wise steady and linear problem. For this convective mixing flow, we identify invariant surfaces formed by the Lagrangian orbits of massless tracers that are topologically equivalent to spherical shells and period-1 lines with elliptic and hyperbolic segments that are located on symmetry planes. We describe the previous features as functions of the Rayleigh number in the range 3 × 104 ≤ Ra ≤ 5 × 105. We show that this system shares properties with other systems with non-toroidal invariant surfaces.

  18. Natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Larson, T.K.; Christenson, W.A.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    The generic situation considered is natural convection between a single heated, vertical cylinder and a surrounding array of cooler vertical cylinders in a triangular pattern. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6 by adjusting the electrical power. The Rayleigh number, based on test section diameter and air properties evaluated at cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 4.6 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer data could be approximated as Nu{sub D} (T{sub ts}/T{sub ct}){sup 0.14} = 0.156 Ra{sub D}{sup 1/3} in the apparent turbulent region for Ra{sub L} > 1.2 x 10{sup 11.}

  19. Natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; O`Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Larson, T.K.; Christenson, W.A.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-09-01

    The generic situation considered is natural convection between a single heated, vertical cylinder and a surrounding array of cooler vertical cylinders in a triangular pattern. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6 by adjusting the electrical power. The Rayleigh number, based on test section diameter and air properties evaluated at cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 4.6 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer data could be approximated as Nu{sub D} (T{sub ts}/T{sub ct}){sup 0.14} = 0.156 Ra{sub D}{sup 1/3} in the apparent turbulent region for Ra{sub L} > 1.2 x 10{sup 11.}

  20. Instabilities of Natural Convection in a Periodically Heated Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. Z.; Floryan, Jerzy M.

    2013-11-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to a spatially periodic heating along the lower wall has been investigated. The heating produces sinusoidal temperature variations characterized by the wave number α and the Rayleigh number Rap. The primary response has the form of stationary rolls with axis orthogonal to the heating wave vector. For large α convection is limited to a thin layer adjacent to the lower wall with a uniform conduction above it. Linear stability was used to determine conditions leading to a secondary convection. Two mechanisms of instability have been identified. For α = 0(1), the parametric resonance dominates and leads to the pattern of instability that is locked-in with the pattern of the heating according to the relation δcr = α /2, where δcr denotes the component of the critical disturbance wave vector parallel to the heating wave vector. The second mechanism, Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) mechanism, dominates for large α. Competition between these mechanisms gives rise to non-commensurable states and appearance of soliton lattices, to the formation of distorted transverse rolls, and to the appearance of the wave vector component in the direction perpendicular to the forcing direction.

  1. Tropical Cyclone Signatures in Atmospheric Convective Available Potential Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studholme, Joshua; Gulev, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Tropical cyclones play an important role in the climate system providing transports of energy and water vapor, forcing the ocean, and also affecting mid-latitude circulation phenomena. Tropical cyclone tracks experience strong interannual variability and in addition, longer term trend-like changes in all ocean basins. Analysis of recent historical data reveal a poleward shift in the locations of tropical cyclone tracks in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (Kossin et al. 2014, Nature, 509, 349-352). The physical consequences of these alterations are largely unconstrained. For example, the increasing encroachment of tropical cyclone activity into the extra-tropical environment presents a novel and still poorly understood paradigm for tropical-extratropical interactions. In this respect, the role that the atmospheric convective available potential energy (CAPE) plays in the dynamics of tropical cyclones is highly interesting. The two characteristic global-scale spatial patterns in CAPE are identified using EOF analysis. The first pattern shows an abundance of CAPE in the centre of the Pacific and corresponds to the El Nino Southern Oscillation. The second one is capturing positive CAPE anomalies in the oceanic tropics and negative anomalies over equatorial Africa. Associated with these buoyancy patterns, alterations in tropical cyclone activity occur in all basins forming both zonal and meridional patterns. Atmospheric buoyancy is the trigger for deep convection, and subsequently cyclone genesis. This is the mechanism of impact upon location at the start of cyclone tracks. It is found to have less impact upon where cyclones subsequently move, whether or not they undergo extratropical transition and when and where they experience lysis. It is shown that CAPE plays a critical role in the general circulation in the tropics which in turn is the larger steering context for embedded systems within the Walker and Hadley cells. So this lack of `latter life' impact

  2. Bursting near transition in non-Boussinesq natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisman, Catherine; Barkley, Dwight; Le Quere, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    Natural convection of air in a differentially heated cavity with large temperature gradients can be described by the low Mach approximation equations obtained by Paolucci allowing for filtering of sound waves with the fluid viscosity a nonlinear function of temperature. Numerical simulations exhibit intriguing time-dependent solutions. The transition to time-dependence appears to be subcritical. In the vicinity of transition, an intermittent solution is observed, with periodic bursts separating quasi-steady states. These phenomena can be understood in terms of a slow passage through a Hopf bifurcation; model equations based on slow passage qualitatively explain the numerical observations.

  3. The efficiency of convective energy transport in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Mixing length theory (MLT) utilizes adiabatic expansion (as well as radiative transport) to diminish the energy content of rising convective elements. Thus in MLT, the rising elements lose their energy to the environment most efficiently and consequently transport heat with the least efficiency. On the other hand Malkus proposed that convection would maximize the efficiency of energy transport. A new stellar envelope code is developed to first examine this other extreme, wherein rising turbulent elements transport heat with the greatest possible efficiency. This other extreme model differs from MLT by providing a small reduction in the upper convection zone temperatures but greatly diminished turbulent velocities below the top few hundred kilometers. Using the findings of deep atmospheric models with the Navier-Stokes equation allows the calculation of an intermediate solar envelope model. Consideration is given to solar observations, including recent helioseismology, to examine the position of the solar envelope compared with the envelope models.

  4. Particle filter based on thermophoretic deposition from natural convection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sasse, A.G.B.M.; Nazaroff, W.W. ); Gadgil, A.J. )

    1994-04-01

    We present an analysis of particle migration in a natural convection flow between parallel plates and within the annulus of concentric tubes. The flow channel is vertically oriented with one surface maintained at a higher temperature than the other. Particle migration is dominated by advection in the vertical direction and thermophoresis in the horizontal direction. From scale analysis it is demonstrated that particles are completely removed from air flowing through the channel if its length exceeds L[sub c] = (b[sup 4]g/24K[nu][sup 2]), where b is the width of the channel, g is the acceleration of gravity, K is a thermophoretic coefficient of order 0.5, and [nu] is the kinematic viscosity of air. Precise predictions of particle removal efficiency as a function of system parameters are obtained by numerical solution of the governing equations. Based on the model results, it appears feasible to develop a practical filter for removing smoke particles from a smoldering cigarette in an ashtray by using natural convection in combination with thermophoresis. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Natural convection heat transfer along vertical rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental investigations have been reported on steady state natural convection from the outer surface of vertical rectangular and square ducts in air. Seven ducts have been used; three of them have a rectangular cross section and the rest have square cross section. The ducts are heated using internal constant heat flux heating elements. The temperatures along the vertical surface and the peripheral directions of the duct wall are measured. Axial (perimeter averaged) heat transfer coefficients along the side of each duct are obtained for laminar and transition to turbulent regimes of natural convection heat transfer. Axial (perimeter averaged) Nusselt numbers are evaluated and correlated using the modified Rayleigh numbers for laminar and transition regime using the vertical axial distance as a characteristic length. Critical values of the modified Rayleigh numbers are obtained for transition to turbulent. Furthermore, total overall averaged Nusselt numbers are correlated with the modified Rayleigh numbers and the area ratio for the laminar regimes. The local axial (perimeter averaged) heat transfer coefficients are observed to decrease in the laminar region and increase in the transition region. Laminar regimes are obtained at the lower half of the ducts and its chance to appear decreases as the heat flux increases.

  6. Effect of enclosure shape on natural convection velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical analysis was performed to compare natural convection velocities in two dimensional enclosures of various shape. The following shapes were investigated: circle, square, horizontal and upright 2 x 1 aspect ratio rectangles, horizontal and upright half circles, diamond. In all cases, the length scale in the various dimensionless parameters, such as Rayleigh number, is defined as the diameter of the equal area circle. Natural convection velocities were calculated for Rayleigh numbers of 1000 and 5000 with the temperature difference taken to be across (1) the maximum horizontal dimension, (2) the median horizontal line (line through centroid) and (3) the horizontal distance such that the temperature gradient is the same for shapes of equal area. For the class of shapes including the square, upright half circle and upright rectangle, the computed velocities were found to agree very closely with that of the equal area circle when the temperature difference is taken to be across the maximum horizontal dimension (condition (a)). The velocities for the horizontal rectangle and half circle were found to be approximately one half that of the equal area circle for the same condition. Better overall agreement among all shapes was obtained by setting the temperature difference across a distance such that the temperature gradients were equal for shapes of equal area.

  7. Radiation effects on bifurcation and dual solutions in transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kang; Yi, Hong-Liang Tan, He-Ping

    2014-05-15

    Transitions and bifurcations of transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus with radiatively participating medium are numerically investigated using the coupled lattice Boltzmann and direct collocation meshless (LB-DCM) method. As a hybrid approach based on a common multi-scale Boltzmann-type model, the LB-DCM scheme is easy to implement and has an excellent flexibility in dealing with the irregular geometries. Separate particle distribution functions in the LBM are used to calculate the density field, the velocity field and the thermal field. In the radiatively participating medium, the contribution of thermal radiation to natural convection must be taken into account, and it is considered as a radiative term in the energy equation that is solved by the meshless method with moving least-squares (MLS) approximation. The occurrence of various instabilities and bifurcative phenomena is analyzed for different Rayleigh number Ra and Prandtl number Pr with and without radiation. Then, bifurcation diagrams and dual solutions are presented for relevant radiative parameters, such as convection-radiation parameter Rc and optical thickness τ. Numerical results show that the presence of volumetric radiation changes the static temperature gradient of the fluid, and generally results in an increase in the flow critical value. Besides, the existence and development of dual solutions of transient convection in the presence of radiation are greatly affected by radiative parameters. Finally, the advantage of LB-DCM combination is discussed, and the potential benefits of applying the LB-DCM method to multi-field coupling problems are demonstrated.

  8. Numerical investigation of transient flow-mode transition of laminar natural convection in an inclined enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, P.Y.; Soong, C.Y.; Sheu, T.S.

    1997-02-07

    The present work is concerned with a numerical investigation of transient laminar natural convection and the associated flow-mode transition in a two-dimensional rectangular enclosure. Navier-Stokes/Boussinesq equations for fluid flow and energy balance are solved by using the SIMPLE-C algorithm. Air of Pr = 0.71 in a differentially heated enclose of length-to-height aspect ratio As = 4 and at Ra = 5,000 is chosen as the flow model to examine the influences of the inclination. Calculations of time accuracy are performed to investigate the transient procedure of the flow-mode transition with increasing or decreasing inclination. The present results reveal that, at some critical situations, natural convection in inclined enclosures is very sensitive to the change in tilt angle, and the associated heat transfer rates are closely related to the correspondent cellular flow patterns.

  9. Special session: computational predictability of natural convection flows in enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M A; Gresho, P M; Sutton, S B

    2000-08-14

    Modern thermal design practices often rely on a ''predictive'' simulation capability--although predictability is rarely quantified and often difficult to confidently achieve in practice. The computational predictability of natural convection in enclosures is a significant issue for many industrial thermal design problems. One example of this is the design for mitigation of optical distortion due to buoyancy-driven flow in large-scale laser systems. In many instances the sensitivity of buoyancy-driven enclosure flows can be linked to the presence of multiple bifurcation points that yield laminar thermal convective processes that transition from steady to various modes of unsteady flow. This behavior is brought to light by a problem as ''simple'' as a differentially-heated tall rectangular cavity (8:1 height/width aspect ratio) filled with a Boussinesq fluid with Pr = 0.71--which defines, at least partially, the focus of this special session. For our purposes, the differentially-heated cavity provides a virtual fluid dynamics laboratory.

  10. Numerical study of the laminar natural convection flow around an array of two horizontal isothermal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Chouikh, R.; Guizani, A.; Maalej, M.; Belghith, A.

    1999-04-01

    The amount of work accomplished in the area of natural convection heat transfer in interacting flow fields around an array of cylinders has increased in the last years. There is a growing demand for a better understanding of this phenomenon in areas like heat exchangers, electronic devices, solar heating and storing technology among others. Here, natural convection heat transfer from an array of heated cylinders has received attention in recent years. However, most of the previous investigations has been experimental and has been restricted to the influence of geometrical parameters on the overall heat transfer. The present work is devoted to the numerical study of laminar natural convection flow from an array of two horizontal isothermal cylinders. This work, that enters within the framework of general study dealing with an array of several cylinders, states the problem in Cartesian coordinates system, involves the use of a control-volume method and solves the full vorticity transport equation together with the stream function and energy equations. The modifications of the average Nusselt number evolution compared with the single cylinder are explained in terms of velocity and temperature fields of the flow around the cylinders. Results are obtained for variety of combinations of spacing and numbers of Rayleigh.

  11. Natural Convection and Boiling for Cooling SRP Reactors During Loss of Circulation Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-06-26

    This study investigated natural convection and boiling as a means of cooling SRP reactors in the event of a loss of circulation accident. These studies show that single phase natural convection cooling of SRP reactors in shutdown conditions with the present piping geometry is probably not feasible.

  12. Assessment of MELCOR condensation models with the presence of noncondensable gas in natural convection flow regime

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Dhongik S; Jo, HangJin; Corradini, Michael L

    2017-04-01

    Condensation of steam vapor is an important mode of energy removal from the reactor containment. The presence of noncondensable gas complicates the process and makes it difficult to model. MELCOR, one of the more widely used system codes for containment analyses, uses the heat and mass transfer analogy to model condensation heat transfer. To investigate previously reported nodalization-dependence in natural convection flow regime, MELCOR condensation model as well as other models are studied. The nodalization-dependence issue is resolved by using physical length from the actual geometry rather than node size of each control volume as the characteristic length scale formore » MELCOR containment analyses. At the transition to turbulent natural convection regime, the McAdams correlation for convective heat transfer produces a better prediction compared to the original MELCOR model. The McAdams correlation is implemented in MELCOR and the prediction is validated against a set of experiments on a scaled AP600 containment. The MELCOR with our implemented model produces improved predictions. For steam molar fractions in the gas mixture greater than about 0.58, the predictions are within the uncertainty margin of the measurements. The simulation results still underestimate the heat transfer from the gas-steam mixture, implying that conservative predictions are provided.« less

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of natural convection in a vertical porous slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, B. M.; Kumar, Jai; Shivakumara, I. S.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of the conduction regime of natural convection in an electrically conducting fluid saturated porous vertical slab is investigated in the presence of a uniform external transverse magnetic field. The flow in the porous medium is described by modified Brinkman-extended Darcy equation with fluid viscosity different from effective viscosity. The boundaries of the vertical porous slab are assumed to be rigid-isothermal and electrically non-conducting. The resulting stability equations are solved numerically using Galerkin method. The critical Grashof number Gc, the critical wave number αc and the critical wave speed cc are computed for a wide range of porous parameter σp, the ratio of effective viscosity to the fluid viscosity Λ, the Prandtl number Pr and the Hartmann number M. Based on these parameters, the stability characteristics of the system are discussed in detail. The presence of advective inertia is to instill instability on the flow in a porous medium and found that the magnetic field, porous parameter and ratio of viscosities have a stabilizing effect on both stationary and oscillatory wave instabilities. Besides, the value of Pr at which transition occurs from stationary to oscillatory mode of instability decreases with increasing M ,σp and Λ .

  14. Natural convection heat transfer analysis of ATR fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Langerman, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Natural convection air cooling of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel assemblies is analyzed to determine the level of decay heat that can be removed without exceeding the melting temperature of the fuel. The study was conducted to assist in the level 2 PRA analysis of a hypothetical ATR water canal draining accident. The heat transfer process is characterized by a very low Rayleigh number (Ra {approx} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a high temperature ratio. Since neither data nor analytical models were available for Ra < 0.1, an analytical approach is presented based upon the integral boundary layer equations. All assumptions and simplifications are presented and assessed and two models are developed from similar foundations. In one model, the well-known Boussinesq approximations are employed, the results from which are used to assess the modeling philosophy through comparison to existing data and published analytical results. In the other model, the Boussinesq approximations are not used, thus making the model more general and applicable to the ATR analysis.

  15. Transient natural convection of cold water in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi

    2016-05-01

    The two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM) is applied to analyse the transient natural convection of cold water in a vertical channel. The cold water gives rise to a density variation with temperature that may not be linearized. The vertical channel is composed of doubly infinite parallel plates, one of which has a constant prescribed temperature and the other of which is insulated. Considering the temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of the water, approximate analytical (series) solutions for the temperature and flow velocity are derived. The transformed functions included in the solutions are obtained through a simple recursive procedure. Numerical computation is performed for the entire range of water temperature conditions around the temperature at the density extremum point, i.e. 4°C. Numerical results illustrate the effects of the temperature-dependent properties on the transient temperature and flow velocity profiles, volumetric flow rate, and skin friction. The DTM is a powerful tool for solving nonlinear transient problems as well as steady problems.

  16. Experimental analysis of natural convection within a thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.

    1993-09-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a thermosyphon designed to passively cool cylindrical heat sources are experimentally studied. The analysis is based on recognizing the physics of the flow within different regions of the thermosyphon to develop empirical heat transfer correlations. The basic system consists of three concentric cylinders, with an outer channel between the outer two cylinders, and an inner channel between the inner two cylinders. Tests were conducted. with two different process material container diameters, representing the inner cylinder, and several different power levels. The experimentally determined local and average Nu numbers for the inner channel are in good agreement with previous work for natural convection between vertical parallel plates, one uniformly heated and the other thermally insulated. The implication is that the heat transfer off of each surface is independent of the adjacent surface for sufficiently high Ra numbers. The heat transfer is independent because of limited interaction between the boundary layers at sufficiently high Ra numbers. As a result of the limited interaction, the maximum temperature within the system remained constant, or decreased slightly when the radii of the inner cylinders increased for the same amount of heat removal.

  17. Natural convection in a horizontal cylinder with axial rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Odalys; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol; Alonso, Arantxa

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of thermal convection in a laterally heated horizontal cylinder rotating about its axis. A cylinder of aspect ratio Γ =H /2 R =2 containing a small Prandtl number fluid (σ =0.01 ) representative of molten metals and molten semiconductors at high temperature is considered. We focus on a slow rotation regime (Ω <8 ), where the effects of rotation and buoyancy forces are comparable. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations with the Boussinesq approximation are solved numerically to calculate the basic states, analyze their linear stability, and compute several secondary flows originated from the instabilities. Due to the confined cylindrical geometry—the presence of lateral walls and lids—all the flows are completely three dimensional, even the basic steady states. Results characterizing the basic states as the rotation rate increases are presented. As it occurred in the nonrotating case for higher values of the Prandtl number, two curves of steady states with the same symmetric character coexist for moderate values of the Rayleigh number. In the range of Ω considered, rotation has a stabilizing effect only for very small values. As the value of the rotation rate approaches Ω =3.5 and Ω =4.5 , the scenario of bifurcations becomes more complex due to the existence in both cases of very close bifurcations of codimension 2, which in the latter case involve both curves of symmetric solutions.

  18. Universality of energy spectrum in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Kunlun; Hoeller, Judith; Brown, Eric

    2016-11-01

    We present study of energy spectrum in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection, in both cylindrical and cubic containers, tilting and non-tilting conditions, and with Rayleigh number ranging from 0 . 5 ×109 to 1 ×1010 . For these different conditions of geometry, tilt, and Rayleigh number, the temperature spectra measured on the system side walls are significantly different from each other. Even for the same condition, the spectrum varies depending on whether the sensors locate in the path of large-scale circulations. However, quite interestingly, once the signals of large-scale circulations are subtracted from the raw temperature, all spectra display a universal shape, regardless of system geometry, tilt, Rayleigh number, and location of sensors. It suggests that one could model the large-scale circulations and small-scale fluctuations separately in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection.

  19. Stratification and energy fluxes in the anelastic convection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejda, Pavel; Reshetnyak, Maxim

    2013-04-01

    Convection in the planetary cores is usually connected with the geostrophic state. At the onset of convection, the ratio of horizontal scale to the scale along the axis of rotation is proportional to the cube root of the Ekman number, which characterises the ratio of the viscous forces to the Coriolis force. The Ekman number is extremely small in the liquid cores, which is a source of strong anisotropy. Even if further increase of the heat sources leads to decrease of anisotropy, the final state is still highly anisotropic. The influence of the rapid rotation on the structure of the flows in the physical space is also manifested by a substantial change of the spectral properties of the turbulence in the core (Reshetnyak and Hejda, 2008; Hejda and Reshetnyak, 2009). If for the non-rotating flow the kinetic energy in the wave space propagates from the large scales to the small dissipative scales (the so-called direct Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade), then in presence of rotation the turbulence degenerates to the quasi two-dimensional state and the inverse cascade of the kinetic energy is observed. Having in mind that Cartesian and spherical geometries exhibit similar results and reproduce the inverse cascades of the kinetic energy (Reshetnyak and Hejda, 2012), there is an open question how this cascade contributes to the more general energy balance, which includes the heat flux equation. As the heat energy definition in the Boussinesq model is quite questionable, we consider the anelastic model, where the heat fluxes can be compared with the kinetic energy fluxes in the adequate way. Here we consider the spherical geometry model in the shell that limits our study to the cascades in the azimuthal wave-number. As the self-consistent anelastic model includes new term, the adiabatic cooling, which produces "stratification" in the outer part of the core, we consider its influence on convection in the physical and wave spaces. We show that even small cooling can change the

  20. Experimental study of natural convective heat transfer in a vertical hexagonal sub channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandian, Nathanael P.; Umar, Efrizon; Hardianto, Toto; Febriyanto, Catur

    2012-06-01

    The development of new practices in nuclear reactor safety aspects and optimization of recent nuclear reactors, including the APWR and the PHWR reactors, needs a knowledge on natural convective heat transfer within sub-channels formed among several nuclear fuel rods or heat exchanger tubes. Unfortunately, the currently available empirical correlation equations for such heat transfer modes are limited and researches on convective heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders (especially within the natural convection modes) are scarcely done. Although boundary layers around the heat exchanger cylinders or fuel rods may be dominated by their entry regions, most of available convection correlation equations are for fully developed boundary layers. Recently, an experimental study on natural convective heat transfer in a subchannel formed by several heated parallel cylinders that arranged in a hexagonal configuration has been being done. The study seeks for a new convection correlation for the natural convective heat transfer in the sub-channel formed among the hexagonal vertical cylinders. A new convective heat transfer correlation equation has been obtained from the study and compared to several similar equations in literatures.

  1. Experimental study of natural convective heat transfer in a vertical hexagonal sub channel

    SciTech Connect

    Tandian, Nathanael P.; Umar, Efrizon; Hardianto, Toto; Febriyanto, Catur

    2012-06-06

    The development of new practices in nuclear reactor safety aspects and optimization of recent nuclear reactors, including the APWR and the PHWR reactors, needs a knowledge on natural convective heat transfer within sub-channels formed among several nuclear fuel rods or heat exchanger tubes. Unfortunately, the currently available empirical correlation equations for such heat transfer modes are limited and researches on convective heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders (especially within the natural convection modes) are scarcely done. Although boundary layers around the heat exchanger cylinders or fuel rods may be dominated by their entry regions, most of available convection correlation equations are for fully developed boundary layers. Recently, an experimental study on natural convective heat transfer in a subchannel formed by several heated parallel cylinders that arranged in a hexagonal configuration has been being done. The study seeks for a new convection correlation for the natural convective heat transfer in the sub-channel formed among the hexagonal vertical cylinders. A new convective heat transfer correlation equation has been obtained from the study and compared to several similar equations in literatures.

  2. Multicellular natural convection of a low Prandlt number fluid between horizontal concentric cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Joosik Yoo; Jun Young Choi; Moonuhn Kim . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional natural convection of a fluid of low Prandtl number (Pr = 0.02) in an annulus between two concentric horizontal cylinders is numerically investigated in a wide range of gap widths. For low Grashof numbers, a steady unicellular convection is obtained. Above a transition Grashof number that depends on the gap width, a steady bicellular flow occurs. With further increase of the Grashof number, steady or time-periodic multicellular convection occurs, and finally, complex unsteady convective flow appears. A plot is presented that predicts the type of flow patterns for various combination of gap widths and Grashof numbers.

  3. Numerical study of natural convection in fully open tilted cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, M.M.; Al-Najem, N.M.; El-Refaee, M.M.; Noor, A.A.

    1999-09-01

    A numerical simulation of two-dimensional laminar natural convection in a fully open tilted square cavity with an isothermally heated back wall is conducted. The remaining two walls of the cavity are adiabatic. Steady-state solutions are presented for Grashof numbers between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 5} and for tilt angles ranging from {minus}60{degree} to 90{degree} (where 90{degree} represents a cavity with the opening facing down). The fluid properties are assumed to be constant except for the density variation with temperature that gives rise to the buoyancy forces, which is treated by the Boussinesq approximation. The fluid concerned is air with Prandtl number fixed at 0.71. The governing equations are expressed in a normalized primitive variables formulation. Numerical predictions of the velocity and temperature fields are obtained using the finite-volume-based power law (SIMPLER: Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations Revised) algorithm. For a vertical open cavity ({alpha} = 0{degree}), the algorithm generated results that were in good agreement with those previously published. Flow patterns and isotherms are shown in order to give a better understanding of the heat transfer and flow mechanisms inside the cavity. Effects of the controlling parameters-Grashof number and tilt angle-on the heat transfer (average Nusselt number) are presented and analyzed. The results also revealed that the open-cavity Nusselt number approaches the flat-plate solution when either Grashof number or tilt angle increases. In addition, a correlation of the Nusselt number in terms of the Grashof number and tilt angle is developed and presented; a comparison is made with available data from other literature.

  4. Experimental and numerical study on unsteady natural convection heat transfer in helically coiled tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, E.; Hossainpour, S.; Bahiraee, F.

    2014-06-01

    Both of experimental and numerical investigations were performed to understand unsteady natural convection from outer surface of helical coils. Four helical coils with two different curvature ratios were used. Each coil was mounted in the shell both vertically and horizontally. The cold water was entered the coil and the hot water in the shell was cooling by unsteady natural convection. A CFD code was developed to simulate natural convection heat transfer. Equations of tube and shell are solved simultaneously. Statistical analyses have been done on data points of temperature and natural convection Nusselt number. It was revealed that shell-side fluid temperature and the Nusselt number of the outer surface of coils are functions of in-tube fluid mass flow rate, specific heat of fluids and geometrical parameters including length, inner diameter of the tube and the volume of the shell, and time.

  5. Natural convection during a phase change of sodium acetate trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Yasunori; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    A latent heat storage system has higher storage capacity than a sensible heat storage system. Sodium acetate trihydrate has large latent heat at the temperature, 58°C, suitable for a hot-water supply system. The present study focused on convection in a phase change process to understand the heat transfer from the phase change material (PCM). The convection occurred only in certain conditions of supercooling temperature and PCM concentration. A spicular crystal grew quickly and the thermal convection couldn't be detected at large supercooling temperature with high concentration of PCM. In the range of 5 ~ 13°C of supercooling temperature, the buoyancy driven convection due to the latent heat of PCM was measured using the PIV. It was also observed that a part of CH3COONa-3H2O solution was sucked into the growing spicular crystals to supply CH3COONa at the condition with small concentration and at 5 ~ 13°C of supercooling temperature.

  6. The effects of natural, forced and thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic convection during the solidification of thin sample alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, A.; Shevchenko, N.; Roshchupinka, O.; Eckert, S.; Pericleous, K.

    2015-06-01

    Using a fully coupled transient 3-dimensional numerical model, the effects of convection on the microstructural evolution of a thin sample of Ga-In25%wt. was predicted. The effects of natural convection, forced convection and thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamics were investigated numerically. A comparison of the numerical results is made to experimental results for natural convection and forced convection. In the case of natural convection, density variations within the liquid cause plumes of solute to be ejected into the bulk. When forced convection is applied observed effects include the suppression of solute plumes, preferential secondary arm growth and an increase in primary arm spacing. These effects were observed both numerically and experimentally. By applying an external magnetic field inter-dendritic flow is generated by thermoelectrically induced Lorentz forces, while bulk flow experiences an electromagnetic damping force. The former causes preferential secondary growth, while the latter slows the formation of solute plumes. This work highlights that the application of external forces can be a valuable tool for tailoring the microstructure and ultimately the macroscopic material properties.

  7. Classical convective energy transport in large gradient regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F.L.

    1996-12-31

    Large gradients in density and temperature occur near the edge in H-mode plasmas and in the core of tokamak plasmas with negative central shear. Transport in these regions may be comparable to neoclassical. Standard neoclassical theory does not apply when the gradient lengths are comparable to an ion orbit excursion, or banana width. A basic question for neoclassical transport in large gradient regions is: do ion-ion collisions drive particle transport? Near the plasma edge in H-mode, where ion orbit loss requires that the ion energy transport be convective, neoclassical particle transport due to ion-ion collisions may play an important role. In negative central shear plasmas, where transport is inferred to be near neoclassical, it is important to have accurate predictions for the neoclassical rate of energy and particle transport. A simple 2-D slab model has been used, with a momentum-conserving collision operator, to show that ion-ion collisions do drive particle transport. When the gradients are large, the {open_quotes}field particle{close_quotes} contribution to the particle flux is non-local, and does not cancel the {open_quotes}test particle{close_quotes} contribution, which is local. Solutions of the kinetic equation are found which show that the steepness of the density profile, for increasing particle flux, is limited by orbit averaging. The gradient length is limited by the thermal gyroradius, and the convective energy flux is independent of ion temperature. This will allow an ion thermal runaway to occur, if there are no other ion energy loss mechanisms.

  8. Distribution of convective energy at upper level in South Korea and the possibility of artificial showery rain caused by activated CAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Byun, Hi-Ryong

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports a theoretical study on the possibility of inducing artificial showery rain using the convective available potential energy, which is naturally stored in the troposphere. We calculated the environmental parameters (frequency of climatic values, extreme value of stability index, etc.) in the upper troposphere using rawinsonde data from six main stations in Korea from 2001 to 2008 and examined the temporal spatial convective energy according to region. Our results showed that convective available potential energy, which can induce artificial rainfall, existed in the troposphere mainly in summer and were low in other seasons. Its value was found to be highest during late afternoon and in inland regions. We examined the vertical structure of the atmosphere using moisture convergence and vertical velocity (omega) and found that precipitation occurred under strong real latent instability conditions with high convective available potential energy (>3,000 J/kg) in summer and was characterized by moisture convergence at 1,000-400 hPa, moisture divergence at 400-300 hPa, and continuous ascending air current at 1,000-300 hPa (-ω), on average. However, precipitation still did not occur in more than half the cases with high convective available potential energy because, according to the analysis, convective rainfall is affected to a greater extent by the value of convective inhibition than by convective available potential energy. It was also verified that in spite of zero convective inhibition, if the updrafts at a lower level were not sufficient to generate high convective available potential energy at a level higher than the level of free convection, convective rainfall would not occur under real latent instability. Therefore, we suggest it might be possible during the summer to secure the water resources in regions without precipitation by inducing ascending air current artificially under unstable atmospheric conditions to induce showery rain.

  9. Radiation effect on natural convection over a vertical cylinder embedded in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1999-02-01

    Study of buoyancy-induced convection flow and heat transfer in a fluid-saturated porous medium has recently attracted considerable interest because of a number of important energy-related engineering and geophysical applications such as thermal insulation of buildings, geothermal engineering, enhanced recovery of petroleum resources, filtration processes, ground water pollution and sensible heat storage beds. In this paper numerical solutions are presented for the effect of radiation on natural convection about an isothermal vertical cylinder embedded in a saturated porous medium. These partial differential equations are transformed into the nonsimilar boundary layer equations which are solved by an implicit finite-difference method (Keller box method). Numerical results for the dimensionless temperature profiles and the local Nusselt number are presented for the transverse curvature parameter {xi}, conduction-radiation parameter R{sub d} and surface temperature excess ratio H. In general, the local Nusselt number increases as the transverse curvature parameter {xi} increases. Furthermore, decreasing the conduction-radiation parameter R{sub d} and increasing surface temperature excess ratio H augments the local heat transfer rate.

  10. Numerical simulation of magnetic nanofluid natural convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    Free convection of magnetic nanofluid in a porous curved cavity is investigated. Influence of external magnetic source is taken into account. Innovative numerical approach, namely CVFEM, is applied. Impacts of Darcy number (Da), Rayleigh (Ra), Hartmann (Ha) numbers and volume fraction of Fe3O4 (ϕ) on hydrothermal characteristics are examined. Results indicate that heat transfer augmentation augments with rise of Ha and reduces with rise of Da , Ra . Lorentz forces make the nanofluid motion to decrease and enhance the thermal boundary layer thickness. Temperature gradient enhances with increase of Da , Ra , ϕ, but it reduces with rise of Ha.

  11. 3-D Velocity Measurement of Natural Convection Using Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoki, Masatoshi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Okada, Toshifumi; Kimura, Ichiro

    This paper describes quantitative three-dimensional measurement method for flow field of a rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical cell heated below and cooled above. A correlation method for two-dimensional measurement was well advanced to a spatio-temporal correlation method. Erroneous vectors, often appeared in the correlation method, was successfully removed using Hopfield neural network. As a result, calculated 3-D velocity vector distribution well corresponded to the observed temperature distribution. Consequently, the simultaneous three-dimensional measurement system for temperature and flow field was developed.

  12. Natural-convection heat transfer of a spherical lighting fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Takamasa; Fujii, Tetsu

    1994-09-01

    The surface temperatures of the inner lamp and the outer globe of a spherical lighting fixture, the surfaces of which are painted black, were measured. From the results, the average convective heat-transfer coefficients between the inner lamp and the outer globe and on the outer surface of the globe were obtained. These data are correlated with the aid of existing equations for two concentric spheres and the outer surface of a single sphere. The relationships between the maximum and mean temperatures on the lamp and the globe were also obtained. By the use of these equations, a method for the optimal thermal design of spherical lighting fixtures is proposed.

  13. Transient natural convection heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient combined heat and mass transfer across a rectangular cavity is performed by a numerical method based on the SIMPLE algorithm. The physical parameters are selected to represent a range of possible crystal growth in solutions. Numerical results are compared with available experimental data to confirm the accuracy of the results. Good qualitative agreements are obtained for the average mass transfer rate across the cavity. Also, qualitative agreements are observed for the global development of thermal and solute fields. It is found that the thermal and solute fields become highly oscillatory when the thermal and solute Grashof numbers are large. Oscillations are probably caused by a number of different instability mechanisms. By reducing the gravity some of these instabilities were made to disappear at the lower Grashof numbers. Transient temperature and solute distribution near the crystal growing surface are highly non-uniform at the higher Grashof numbers. These non-uniformities are less severe in the reduced gravity environments but still exist. The effects of convection on the rate of average mass transfer are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of conduction in the range of Grashof numbers studied. Dependency of mass transfer rate on the Grashof number indicates that the convection effects many not be negligible even in the microgravity environments for the range of parameters investigated.

  14. Natural convection heat transfer in vertical triangular subchannel in Zirconia-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandian, N. P.; Alkharboushi, A. A. K.; Kamajaya, K.

    2015-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer in vertical triangular sub-channel has important role in cooling mechanism of the APWR and the PHWR nuclear reactors. Unfortunately, natural convection correlation equations for such geometry are scarcely available. Recent studies showed that ZrO2-water nanofluid has a good prospect to be used in the nuclear reactor technology due to its low neutron absorption cross section. Although several papers have reported transport properties of ZrO2-water nanofluids, practically there is no correlation equation for predicting natural convection heat transfer in a vertical triangular sub-channel in ZrO2-water nanofluid. Therefore, a study for finding such heat transfer correlation equation has been done by utilizing Computational Fluid Dynamics software and reported in this paper. In the study, natural convection heat transfer in a vertical triangular sub-channel has been simulated at several values of heat transfer flux within 9.1 to 30.9 kW/m2 range and ZrO2 concentrations of 0 (pure water), 0.27, and 3 volume-% of ZrO2. The study shows that the ZrO2 concentration has no significant influence to the natural convection heat transfer at those concentration levels. The obtained theoretical heat transfer correlation equations were verified through experiment, and they showed very similar results. The correlation equations are reported in this paper.

  15. Effect of natural convection in a horizontally oriented cylinder on NMR imaging of the distribution of diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorič, Aleš; Stepišnik, Janez

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes the influence of natural convection on NMR measurement of a self-diffusion constant of fluid in the earth's magnetic field. To get an estimation of the effect, the Lorenz model of natural convection in a horizontally oriented cylinder, heated from below, is derived. Since the Lorenz model of natural convection is derived for the free boundary condition, its validity is of a limited value for the natural no-slip boundary condition. We point out that even a slight temperature gradient can cause significant misinterpretation of measurements. The chaotic nature of convection enhances the apparent self-diffusion constant of the liquid.

  16. Development and validation of a new LBM-MRT hybrid model with enthalpy formulation for melting with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda Fuentes, Johann; Kuznik, Frédéric; Johannes, Kévyn; Virgone, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new model to simulate melting with natural convection of a phase change material. For the phase change problem, the enthalpy formulation is used. Energy equation is solved by a finite difference method, whereas the fluid flow is solved by the multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann method. The model is first verified and validated using the data from the literature. Then, the model is applied to a tall brick filled with a fatty acid eutectic mixture and the results are presented. The main results are (1) the spatial convergence rate is of second order, (2) the new model is validated against data from the literature and (3) the natural convection plays an important role in the melting process of the fatty acid mixture considered in our work.

  17. Enhancement of Natural Convection by Carbon Nanotube Films Covered Microchannel-Surface for Passive Electronic Cooling Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang; Jiang, Shaohui; Yao, Wei; Liu, Changhong

    2016-11-16

    Owing to the outstanding properties of thermal conduction, lightweight, and chemical durability, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have revealed promising applications in thermal management materials. Meanwhile, the increasingly popular portable electronics and the rapid development of space technology need lighter weight, smaller size, and more effective thermal management devices. Here, a novel kind of heat dissipation devices based on the superaligned CNT films and underlying microchannels is proposed, and the heat dissipation properties are measured at the natural condition. Distinctive from previous studies, by combining the advantages of microchannels and CNTs, such a novel heat dissipation device enables superior natural convection heat transfer properties. Our findings prove that the novel CNT-based devices could show an 86.6% larger total natural heat dissipation properties than bare copper plate. Further calculations of the radiation and natural convection heat transfer properties demonstrate that the excellent passive cooling properties of these CNT-based devices are primarily caused by the reinforcement of the natural convection heat transfer properties. Furthermore, the heat dissipation mechanisms are briefly discussed, and we propose that the very high heat transfer coefficients and the porous structures of superaligned CNT films play critical roles in reinforcing the natural convection. The novel CNT-based heat dissipation devices also have advantages of energy-saving, free-noise, and without additional accessories. So we believe that the CNT-based heat dissipation devices would replace the traditional metal-finned heat dissipation devices and have promising applications in electronic devices, such as photovoltaic devices, portable electronic devices, and electronic displays.

  18. Natural Neutrino Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwich, Ilya

    2010-06-23

    1 construct a general description for neutrino dark energy models, that do not require exotic particles or strange couplings. With the help of the above, this class of models is reduced to a single function with several constraints. It is shown that these models lead to some concrete predictions that can be verified (or disproved) within the next decade, using results from PLANK, EUCLID and JDEM.

  19. Protoneutron star cooling with convection: the effect of the symmetry energy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L F; Shen, G; Cirigliano, V; Pons, J A; Reddy, S; Woosley, S E

    2012-02-10

    We model neutrino emission from a newly born neutron star subsequent to a supernova explosion to study its sensitivity to the equation of state, neutrino opacities, and convective instabilities at high baryon density. We find the time period and spatial extent over which convection operates is sensitive to the behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy at and above nuclear density. When convection ends within the protoneutron star, there is a break in the predicted neutrino emission that may be clearly observable.

  20. Effect of Prandtl number and computational schemes on the oscillatory natural convection in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Toshio; Ozoe, Hiroyuki

    1996-08-23

    Numerical calculations were carried out for natural convection of low-Prandtl-number fluid. These calculations include the inertial terms that were approximated by six kinds of schemes, i.e., upwind scheme, hybrid scheme, second-order central difference method, Kawamura-Kuwahara scheme, Utopia scheme, and fourth-order central difference method. The average Nusselt number depended significantly on the schemes. The occurrence of oscillatory flow also depended on the schemes for inertial terms. Higher order up-winding approximations for inertial terms appear to be required to calculate natural convection of low-Prandtl-number fluids like liquid metal, even if the Rayleigh number is not large enough.

  1. Transient performance and temperature field of a natural convection air dehumidifier loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazilati, Mohammad Ali; Sedaghat, Ahmad; Alemrajabi, Ali-Akbar

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, transient performance of the previously introduced natural convection heat and mass transfer loop is investigated for an air dehumidifier system. The performance of the loop is studied in different conditions of heat source/heat sink temperature and different startup desiccant concentrations. Unlike conventional loops, it is observed that natural convection of the fluid originates from the heat sink towards the heat source. The proper operation of the cycle is highly dependent on the heat sink/heat source temperatures. To reduce the time constant of the system, a proper desiccant concentration should be adopted for charge of the loop.

  2. Transient testing of the FFTF for decay-heat removal by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, T R; Johnson, H G; Stover, R L

    1982-06-01

    This paper reports on the series of transient tests performed in the FFTF as a major part of the pre-operations testing program. The structure of the transient test program was designed to verify the capability of the FFTF to safely remove decay heat by natural convection. The series culminated in a scram from full power to complete natural convection in the plant, simulating a loss of all electrical power. Test results and acceptance criteria related to the verification of safe decay heat removal are presented.

  3. Natural Convection Cooling of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Hill, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    After fueling and prior to launch, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) will be stored for a period of time then moved to the launch pad for integration with the space probe and mounting on the launch vehicle. During this time, which could be as long as 3 years, the ASRG will operate continuously with heat rejected from the housing and fins. Typically, the generator will be cooled by forced convection using fans. During some of the ground operations, maintaining forced convection may add significant complexity, so allowing natural convection may simplify operations. A test was conducted on the ASRG Engineering Unit (EU) to quantify temperatures and operating parameters with natural convection only and determine if the EU could be safely operated in such an environment. The results show that with natural convection cooling the ASRG EU Stirling convertor pressure vessel temperatures and other parameters had significant margins while the EU was operated for several days in this configuration. Additionally, an update is provided on ASRG EU testing at NASA Glenn Research Center, where the ASRG EU has operated for over 16,000 hr and underwent extensive testing.

  4. Comparisons of RELAP5-3D Analyses to Experimental Data from the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bucknor, Matthew; Hu, Rui; Lisowski, Darius; Kraus, Adam

    2016-04-17

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is an important passive safety system being incorporated into the overall safety strategy for high temperature advanced reactor concepts such as the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) reflects a 1/2-scale model of the primary features of one conceptual air-cooled RCCS design. The project conducts ex-vessel, passive heat removal experiments in support of Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program, while also generating data for code validation purposes. While experiments are being conducted at the NSTF to evaluate the feasibility of the passive RCCS, parallel modeling and simulation efforts are ongoing to support the design, fabrication, and operation of these natural convection systems. Both system-level and high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed to gain a complete understanding of the complex flow and heat transfer phenomena in natural convection systems. This paper provides a summary of the RELAP5-3D NSTF model development efforts and provides comparisons between simulation results and experimental data from the NSTF. Overall, the simulation results compared favorably to the experimental data, however, further analyses need to be conducted to investigate any identified differences.

  5. Natural Gas Energy Educational Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    Prepared by energy experts and educators to introduce middle school and high school students to natural gas and its role in our society, this kit is designed to be incorporated into existing science and social studies curricula. The materials and activities focus on the origin, discovery, production, delivery, and use of natural gas. The role of…

  6. The Fractional Step Method Applied to Simulations of Natural Convective Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Saxon, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes research done to apply the Fractional Step Method to finite-element simulations of natural convective flows in pure liquids, permeable media, and in a directionally solidified metal alloy casting. The Fractional Step Method has been applied commonly to high Reynold's number flow simulations, but is less common for low Reynold's number flows, such as natural convection in liquids and in permeable media. The Fractional Step Method offers increased speed and reduced memory requirements by allowing non-coupled solution of the pressure and the velocity components. The Fractional Step Method has particular benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, since other methods presently employed are not very efficient. Previously, the most suitable method for predicting flows in a directionally solidified binary alloy was the penalty method. The penalty method requires direct matrix solvers, due to the penalty term. The Fractional Step Method allows iterative solution of the finite element stiffness matrices, thereby allowing more efficient solution of the matrices. The Fractional Step Method also lends itself to parallel processing, since the velocity component stiffness matrices can be built and solved independently of each other. The finite-element simulations of a directionally solidified casting are used to predict macrosegregation in directionally solidified castings. In particular, the finite-element simulations predict the existence of 'channels' within the processing mushy zone and subsequently 'freckles' within the fully processed solid, which are known to result from macrosegregation, or what is often referred to as thermo-solutal convection. These freckles cause material property non-uniformities in directionally solidified castings; therefore many of these castings are scrapped. The phenomenon of natural convection in an alloy under-going directional solidification, or thermo-solutal convection, will be explained. The

  7. Forced-to-natural convection transition tests in parallel simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, A.E. ); Montgomery, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Out of Reactor Safety (THORS) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had as its objective the testing of simulated, electrically heated liquid metal reactor (LMR) fuel assemblies in an engineering-scale, sodium loop. Between 1971 and 1985, the THORS Program operated 11 simulated fuel bundles in conditions covering a wide range of normal and off-normal conditions. The last test series in the Program, THORS-SHRS Assembly 1, employed two parallel, 19-pin, full-length, simulated fuel assemblies of a design consistent with the large LMR (Large Scale Prototype Breeder -- LSPB) under development at that time. These bundles were installed in the THORS Facility, allowing single- and parallel-bundle testing in thermal-hydraulic conditions up to and including sodium boiling and dryout. As the name SHRS (Shutdown Heat Removal System) implies, a major objective of the program was testing under conditions expected during low-power reactor operation, including low-flow forced convection, natural convection, and forced-to-natural convection transition at various powers. The THORS-SHRS Assembly 1 experimental program was divided up into four phases. Phase 1 included preliminary and shakedown tests, including the collection of baseline steady-state thermal-hydraulic data. Phase 2 comprised natural convection testing. Forced convection testing was conducted in Phase 3. The final phase of testing included forced-to-natural convection transition tests. Phases 1, 2, and 3 have been discussed in previous papers. The fourth phase is described in this paper. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Numerical simulation heat transfer by natural convection in liquid metal with a sinusoidal temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Abdelkrim; Elmir, Mohamed; Bouanini, Mohamed; Belkacem, Abdellah; Draoui, Belkacem

    2016-03-01

    This study focuses on the numerical simulation of heat transfer by natural convection in a rectangular enclosure, filled with a liquid metal (low Prandtl number) partially heated from below with a sinusoidal temperature. The value of the study lies in its involvement in the crystal growth for the manufacture of semiconductors and electronics cooling. Indeed, the occurrence of convection during crystal growth can lead to in homogeneities that lead to striations and defects that affect the quality of the crystals obtained by the Bridgman techniques or Chochrawlski. Temperature of the oscillations, due to the instabilities of the convective flow in the liquid metal, also induces non-uniform cooling in the solidification front. Convection is then studied in order to reduce it. A modelling of the problem in two dimensions was conducted using Comsol computer code that is based on the finite element method, by varying the configuration of the control parameters, namely, the Rayleigh number, the nature of fluid (Prandtl number) and amplitude of temperature on heat transfer rate (Nusselt number) on convective structures that appear.

  9. Carbon-nanotube nanofluid thermophysical properties and heat transfer by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Inagaki, T.; Yamauchi, N.

    2014-11-01

    We measured the thermophysical properties of suspensions of carbon nanotubes in water as a type of nanofluid, and experimentally investigated their heat transfer characteristics in a horizontal, closed rectangular vessel. Using a previously constructed system for high- reliability measurement, we quantitatively determined their thermophysical properties and the temperature dependence of these properties. We also investigated the as yet unexplained mechanism of heat transport in carbon-nanotube nanofluids and their flow properties from a thermal perspective. The results indicated that these nanofluids are non-Newtonian fluids, whose high viscosity impedes convection and leads to a low heat transfer coefficient under natural convection, despite their high thermal conductivity.

  10. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  11. An improved model for natural convection heat loss from modified cavity receiver of solar dish concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.S.; Sendhil Kumar, N.

    2009-10-15

    A 2-D model has been proposed to investigate the approximate estimation of the natural convection heat loss from modified cavity receiver of without insulation (WOI) and with insulation (WI) at the bottom of the aperture plane in our previous article. In this paper, a 3-D numerical model is presented to investigate the accurate estimation of natural convection heat loss from modified cavity receiver (WOI) of fuzzy focal solar dish concentrator. A comparison of 2-D and 3-D natural convection heat loss from a modified cavity receiver is carried out. A parametric study is carried out to develop separate Nusselt number correlations for 2-D and 3-D geometries of modified cavity receiver for estimation of convective heat loss from the receiver. The results show that the 2-D and 3-D are comparable only at higher angle of inclinations (60 {<=} {beta} {<=} 90 ) of the receiver. The present 3-D numerical model is compared with other well known cavity receiver models. The 3-D model can be used for accurate estimation of heat losses from solar dish collector, when compared with other well known models. (author)

  12. Enhanced Natural Convection in a Metal Layer Cooled by Boiling Water

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jae-Seon; Suh, Kune Y.; Chung, Chang-Hyun; Park, Rae-Joon; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2004-12-15

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics and the solidification of the molten metal pool concurrently with forced convective boiling of the overlying coolant to simulate a severe accident in a nuclear power plant. The relationship between the Nusselt number (Nu) and the Rayleigh number (Ra) in the molten metal pool region is determined and compared with the correlations in the literature and experimental data with subcooled water. Given the same Ra condition, the present experimental results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with coolant boiling are found to be higher than those predicted by the existing correlations or measured from the experiment with subcooled boiling. To quantify the observed effect of the external cooling on the natural convection heat transfer rate from the molten pool, it is proposed to include an additional dimensionless group characterizing the temperature gradients in the molten pool and in the external coolant region. Starting from the Globe and Dropkin correlation, engineering correlations are developed for the enhancement of heat transfer in the molten metal pool when cooled by an overlying coolant. The new correlations for predicting natural convection heat transfer are applicable to low-Prandtl-number (Pr) materials that are heated from below and solidified by the external coolant above. Results from this study may be used to modify the current model in severe accident analysis codes.

  13. The effect of external heat transfer on thermal explosion in a spherical vessel with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A N

    2015-07-14

    When any exothermic reaction proceeds in an unstirred vessel, natural convection may develop. This flow can significantly alter the heat transfer from the reacting fluid to the environment and hence alter the balance between heat generation and heat loss, which determines whether or not the system will explode. Previous studies of the effects of natural convection on thermal explosion have considered reactors where the temperature of the wall of the reactor is held constant. This implies that there is infinitely fast heat transfer between the wall of the vessel and the surrounding environment. In reality, there will be heat transfer resistances associated with conduction through the wall of the reactor and from the wall to the environment. The existence of these additional heat transfer resistances may alter the rate of heat transfer from the hot region of the reactor to the environment and hence the stability of the reaction. This work presents an initial numerical study of thermal explosion in a spherical reactor under the influence of natural convection and external heat transfer, which neglects the effects of consumption of reactant. Simulations were performed to examine the changing behaviour of the system as the intensity of convection and the importance of external heat transfer were varied. It was shown that the temporal development of the maximum temperature in the reactor was qualitatively similar as the Rayleigh and Biot numbers were varied. Importantly, the maximum temperature in a stable system was shown to vary with Biot number. This has important consequences for the definitions used for thermal explosion in systems with significant reactant consumption. Additionally, regions of parameter space where explosions occurred were identified. It was shown that reducing the Biot number increases the likelihood of explosion and reduces the stabilising effect of natural convection. Finally, the results of the simulations were shown to compare favourably with

  14. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  15. Prevention Methods of Natural Convection in Inclined Pipes - An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebach, Robin; Haberstroh, Christoph

    It is widely known in cryogenics that interconnecting pipework between warm and cold temperature level contribute to the heat intake of a cryogenic storage tank, especially under critical inclination. With the help of a recently published correlation the additional heat intake by possibly upcoming convection can be estimated. However, for practical application the knowledge of additional heat leaks is only one thing that matters. Rather interesting are methods for an effective prevention of natural convection even under critical inclinations. Within this paper we discuss several approaches which presumably have potential to reduce convective heat transfer. With the help of theoretical analysis and experiments in our test cryostat we evaluated the impact of all approaches with remarkable results. Further, a comparison was carried out with literature hints for the prevention of natural convection in pipes. As the main result of our study we could clearly distinguish the most effective prevention methods and even more interesting is the almost useless ones which have been anticipated as effective in literature.

  16. On the transition to chaos of natural convection between two infinite differentially heated vertical plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhenlan; Podvin, Berengere; Sergent, Anne; Xin, Shihe; Le Quere, Patrick; Tuckerman, Laurette

    2013-11-01

    Natural convection of air between two infinite vertical differentially heated plates is studied analytically in two dimensions (2D) and numerically in two and three dimensions (3D), for Rayleigh numbers Ra up to three times the critical value Rac . The first instability is a supercritical circle pitchfork bifurcation leading to steady 2D corotating rolls. A Ginzburg-Landau equation is derived analytically for the flow around this first bifurcation and compared with results from direct numerical simulation (DNS). In 2D, DNS shows that the rolls become unstable via a Hopf bifurcation. As Ra is further increased, the flow becomes quasi-periodic, then temporally chaotic for a limited range of Rayleigh numbers, beyond which the flow returns to a steady state through a spatial modulation instability. In 3D, the rolls instead undergo another pitchfork bifurcation to 3D structures, which consist of transverse rolls connected by counter-rotating vorticity braids. The flow then becomes time-dependent through a Hopf bifurcation, as exchanges of energy occur between the rolls and the braids. Chaotic behavior subsequently occurs through two competing mechanisms: a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations leading to intermittency or else a spatial pattern modulation. Some of the computations were carried out at CNRS-IDRIS Project DARI0326.

  17. Transition to chaos of natural convection between two infinite differentially heated vertical plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhenlan; Sergent, Anne; Podvin, Berengere; Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick; Tuckerman, Laurette S.

    2013-08-01

    Natural convection of air between two infinite vertical differentially heated plates is studied analytically in two dimensions (2D) and numerically in two and three dimensions (3D) for Rayleigh numbers Ra up to 3 times the critical value Rac=5708. The first instability is a supercritical circle pitchfork bifurcation leading to steady 2D corotating rolls. A Ginzburg-Landau equation is derived analytically for the flow around this first bifurcation and compared with results from direct numerical simulation (DNS). In two dimensions, DNS shows that the rolls become unstable via a Hopf bifurcation. As Ra is further increased, the flow becomes quasiperiodic, and then temporally chaotic for a limited range of Rayleigh numbers, beyond which the flow returns to a steady state through a spatial modulation instability. In three dimensions, the rolls instead undergo another pitchfork bifurcation to 3D structures, which consist of transverse rolls connected by counter-rotating vorticity braids. The flow then becomes time dependent through a Hopf bifurcation, as exchanges of energy occur between the rolls and the braids. Chaotic behavior subsequently occurs through two competing mechanisms: a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations leading to intermittency or a spatial pattern modulation reminiscent of the Eckhaus instability.

  18. Turbulent Natural Convection in a Square Cavity with a Circular Cylinder

    DOE PAGES

    Aithal, S. M.

    2016-07-19

    In this paper, numerical simulations of high Rayleigh number flows (108-1010) were conducted to investigate the turbulent fluid flow and thermal characteristics of natural convection induced by a centrally placed hot cylinder in a cold square enclosure. The effect of the aspect ratio (radius of the cylinder to the side of the cavity) was investigated for three values (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) for each Rayleigh number. Effects of turbulence induced by the high Rayleigh number (>107) were computed by using the unsteady k-ω model. A spectral-element method with high polynomial order (high resolution) was used to solve the system ofmore » unsteady time-averaged equations of continuity, momentum, and energy, along with the turbulence equations. Detailed comparison with other numerical work is presented. Contours of velocity, temperature, and turbulence quantities are presented for various high Rayleigh numbers. Also presented is the influence of the Rayleigh number on the local Nusselt number on the centrally placed hot cylinder and the cold enclosure walls. Time-marching results show that the steady-state solutions can be obtained even for high Rayleigh numbers considered in this study. The results also show that the average and peak Nusselt numbers roughly double for each order of magnitude increase of the Rayleigh number for all radii considered. Finally, a correlation for the average Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number and aspect ratio is also presented.« less

  19. Turbulent Natural Convection in a Square Cavity with a Circular Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Aithal, S. M.

    2016-07-19

    In this paper, numerical simulations of high Rayleigh number flows (108-1010) were conducted to investigate the turbulent fluid flow and thermal characteristics of natural convection induced by a centrally placed hot cylinder in a cold square enclosure. The effect of the aspect ratio (radius of the cylinder to the side of the cavity) was investigated for three values (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) for each Rayleigh number. Effects of turbulence induced by the high Rayleigh number (>107) were computed by using the unsteady k-ω model. A spectral-element method with high polynomial order (high resolution) was used to solve the system of unsteady time-averaged equations of continuity, momentum, and energy, along with the turbulence equations. Detailed comparison with other numerical work is presented. Contours of velocity, temperature, and turbulence quantities are presented for various high Rayleigh numbers. Also presented is the influence of the Rayleigh number on the local Nusselt number on the centrally placed hot cylinder and the cold enclosure walls. Time-marching results show that the steady-state solutions can be obtained even for high Rayleigh numbers considered in this study. The results also show that the average and peak Nusselt numbers roughly double for each order of magnitude increase of the Rayleigh number for all radii considered. Finally, a correlation for the average Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number and aspect ratio is also presented.

  20. Numerical study of natural convection within a wavy enclosure using meshfree approach: effect of corner heating.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonam; Bhargava, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of natural convection within a wavy enclosure heated via corner heating. The considered enclosure is a square enclosure with left wavy side wall. The vertical wavy wall of the enclosure and both of the corner heaters are maintained at constant temperature, T c and T h , respectively, with T h > T c while the remaining horizontal, bottom, top and side walls are insulated. A penalty element-free Galerkin approach with reduced gauss integration scheme for penalty terms is used to solve momentum and energy equations over the complex domain with wide range of parameters, namely, Rayleigh number (Ra), Prandtl number (Pr), and range of heaters in the x- and y-direction. Numerical results are represented in terms of isotherms, streamlines, and Nusselt number. It is observed that the rate of heat transfer depends to a great extent on the Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, length of the corner heaters and the shape of the heat transfer surface. The consistent performance of the adopted numerical procedure is verified by comparison of the results obtained through the present meshless technique with those existing in the literature.

  1. Transition to chaos of natural convection between two infinite differentially heated vertical plates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenlan; Sergent, Anne; Podvin, Berengere; Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick; Tuckerman, Laurette S

    2013-08-01

    Natural convection of air between two infinite vertical differentially heated plates is studied analytically in two dimensions (2D) and numerically in two and three dimensions (3D) for Rayleigh numbers Ra up to 3 times the critical value Ra(c)=5708. The first instability is a supercritical circle pitchfork bifurcation leading to steady 2D corotating rolls. A Ginzburg-Landau equation is derived analytically for the flow around this first bifurcation and compared with results from direct numerical simulation (DNS). In two dimensions, DNS shows that the rolls become unstable via a Hopf bifurcation. As Ra is further increased, the flow becomes quasiperiodic, and then temporally chaotic for a limited range of Rayleigh numbers, beyond which the flow returns to a steady state through a spatial modulation instability. In three dimensions, the rolls instead undergo another pitchfork bifurcation to 3D structures, which consist of transverse rolls connected by counter-rotating vorticity braids. The flow then becomes time dependent through a Hopf bifurcation, as exchanges of energy occur between the rolls and the braids. Chaotic behavior subsequently occurs through two competing mechanisms: a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations leading to intermittency or a spatial pattern modulation reminiscent of the Eckhaus instability.

  2. Numerical Study of Natural Convection within a Wavy Enclosure Using Meshfree Approach: Effect of Corner Heating

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonam; Bhargava, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of natural convection within a wavy enclosure heated via corner heating. The considered enclosure is a square enclosure with left wavy side wall. The vertical wavy wall of the enclosure and both of the corner heaters are maintained at constant temperature, Tc and Th, respectively, with Th > Tc while the remaining horizontal, bottom, top and side walls are insulated. A penalty element-free Galerkin approach with reduced gauss integration scheme for penalty terms is used to solve momentum and energy equations over the complex domain with wide range of parameters, namely, Rayleigh number (Ra), Prandtl number (Pr), and range of heaters in the x- and y-direction. Numerical results are represented in terms of isotherms, streamlines, and Nusselt number. It is observed that the rate of heat transfer depends to a great extent on the Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, length of the corner heaters and the shape of the heat transfer surface. The consistent performance of the adopted numerical procedure is verified by comparison of the results obtained through the present meshless technique with those existing in the literature. PMID:24672383

  3. Natural convection in a vertical plane channel: DNS results for high Grashof numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiš, P.; Herwig, H.

    2014-07-01

    The turbulent natural convection of a gas ( Pr = 0.71) between two vertical infinite walls at different but constant temperatures is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation for a wide range of Grashof numbers (6.0 × 106 > Gr > 1.0 × 103). The maximum Grashof number is almost one order of magnitude higher than those of computations reported in the literature so far. Results for the turbulent transport equations are presented and compared to previous studies with special attention to the study of Verteegh and Nieuwstadt (Int J Heat Fluid Flow 19:135-149, 1998). All turbulence statistics are available on the TUHH homepage (http://www.tu-harburg.de/tt/dnsdatabase/dbindex.en.html). Accuracy considerations are based on the time averaged balance equations for kinetic and thermal energy. With the second law of thermodynamics Nusselt numbers can be determined by evaluating time averaged wall temperature gradients as well as by a volumetric time averaged integration. Comparing the results of both approaches leads to a direct measure of the physical consistency.

  4. Thermal instability and energy relations in the convective envelopes of slowly rotating stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavorskaya, I. M.

    1974-01-01

    The nonstationary convection that arises due to thermal instability in the envelopes of lower Main Sequence stars (and the sun in particular) is investigated. The convection that arises in the envelopes as a result of thermal instability is of nonstationary turbulent nature. It is shown that construction of a consistent model of the zones of turbulent convection in the stars requires the use of the complete heat flux equation with consideration of the terms that appear because of turbulence. Expressions for these additional terms in terms of averaged characteristics of the motion and eddy viscosity coefficients are derived on the basis of the Prandtl-Wasiutinsky theory.

  5. Effect of natural convection on the current-voltage characteristic of a DC discharge in neon at intermediate pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarov, A. V.; Sakharova, N. A.; Vinnichenko, N. A.

    2011-12-15

    The parameters of the positive column of a glow discharge in neon are calculated with allowance for the induced hydrodynamic motion. It is shown that natural convection in the pressure range of {approx}0.1 atm significantly affects the profiles of the parameters of the positive column and its current-voltage characteristic. The convection arising at large deposited energies improves heat removal, due to which the temperature in the central region of the discharge becomes lower than that calculated from the heat conduction equation. As a result, the current-voltage characteristic is shifted. With allowance for convection, the current-voltage characteristic changes at currents much lower than the critical current at which a transition into the constricted state is observed. This change is uniquely related to the Rayleigh number in the discharge. Thus, a simplified analysis of thermal conduction and diffusion, even with detailed account of kinetic processes occurring in the positive column, does not allow one to accurately calculate the current-voltage characteristic and other discharge parameters at intermediate gas pressures.

  6. Clausius-Clapeyron Scaling of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) in Cloud-Resolving Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, J.; Romps, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work by Singh and O'Gorman has produced a theory for convective available potential energy (CAPE) in radiative-convective equilibrium. In this model, the atmosphere deviates from a moist adiabat—and, therefore, has positive CAPE—because entrainment causes evaporative cooling in cloud updrafts, thereby steepening their lapse rate. This has led to the proposal that CAPE increases with global warming because the strength of evaporative cooling scales according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. However, CAPE could also change due to changes in cloud buoyancy and changes in the entrainment rate, both of which could vary with global warming. To test the relative importance of changes in CAPE due to CC scaling of evaporative cooling, changes in cloud buoyancy, and changes in the entrainment rate, we subject a cloud-resolving model to a suite of natural (and unnatural) forcings. We find that CAPE changes are primarily driven by changes in the strength of evaporative cooling; the effect of changes in the entrainment rate and cloud buoyancy are comparatively small. This builds support for CC scaling of CAPE.

  7. Effect of natural convection heat transfer during polymer optical fiber drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Hayden Matane

    The quality of polymer optical fiber is dependent on the diametral uniformity of the fiber and the applied drawing force. In this study, the force required to draw a polymer preform into optical fiber is predicted and measured as it is heated in an enclosed cylindrical furnace. The draw force is a function of the highly temperature dependent polymer viscosity. Therefore accurate prediction of the drawing force requires a detailed investigation of the heat transfer within the furnace. In this investigation, the full axi-symmetric conjugate problem (including both natural convection and thermal radiation) was solved. In addition, the location of the polymer/air interface was solved for as part of the problem and was not prescribed beforehand. Numerical results compared well with the experimentally measured draw tension and neck-down profiles for several preform diameters, draw speeds, and furnace temperatures. The experimental investigation also found that as the buoyant potential of the air within the furnace was increased the natural convection transitioned from time-invariant to oscillatory, and finally, to chaotic flow. The time-varying heating caused by the oscillatory and chaotic regimes alters the rheology of the elongating polymer preform, causing detrimental variations in the fiber diameter. When subjected to oscillatory and chaotic natural convection the standard deviation of the fiber diameter variations was up to 2.5 to 10 times greater, respectively, than that measured under time-invariant heating conditions. Experimental visualization of the unsteady natural convection flow indicates that the instability occurs at the interface between two counter-rotating cells. Numerical simulations of natural convection within a tall non-isothermal axi-symmetric annular cavity with an aspect ratio of 10 and a radius ratio of 0.6 predicted unsteady phenomena. At low Rayleigh numbers a steady bi-cellular flow was predicted. As the Rayleigh number was increased the

  8. Convective kinetic energy equation under the mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi

    2015-03-01

    The present paper originally derives the convective kinetic energy equation under mass-flux subgrid-scale parameterization in a formal manner based on the segmentally-constant approximation (SCA). Though this equation is long since presented by Arakawa and Schubert (1974), a formal derivation is not known in the literature. The derivation of this formulation is of increasing interests in recent years due to the fact that it can explain basic aspects of the convective dynamics such as discharge-recharge and transition from shallow to deep convection. The derivation is presented in two manners: (i) for the case that only the vertical component of the velocity is considered and (ii) the case that both the horizontal and vertical components are considered. The equation reduces to the same form as originally presented by Arakwa and Schubert in both cases, but with the energy dissipation term defined differently. In both cases, nevertheless, the energy "dissipation" (loss) term consists of the three principal contributions: (i) entrainment-detrainment, (ii) outflow from top of convection, and (iii) pressure effects. Additionally, inflow from the bottom of convection contributing to a growth of convection is also formally counted as a part of the dissipation term. The eddy dissipation is also included for a completeness. The order-of-magnitude analysis shows that the convective kinetic energy "dissipation" is dominated by the pressure effects, and it may be approximately described by Rayleigh damping with a constant time scale of the order of 102-103 s. The conclusion is also supported by a supplementary analysis of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation. The Appendix discusses how the loss term ("dissipation") of the convective kinetic energy is qualitatively different from the conventional eddy-dissipation process found in turbulent flows.

  9. Prediction of natural convection in nonrectangular enclosures using orthogonal curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Doormaal, J. P.; Raithby, G. D.; Strong, A. B.

    1981-03-01

    A method for generating a two-dimensional orthogonal grid within a polygonal geometry is discussed in order to predict natural convection in nonrectangular enclosures. The equations of motion are written for orthogonal curvilinear coordinates, using stream function and vorticity as dependent variables. An iterative technique is used to solve simultaneously for both dependent variables along lines in order to obtain the solution of the finite-difference equations, and seems to overcome the stability problems often encountered with stream function and vorticity variables. These techniques are applied to the problem of laminar two-dimensional natural convection in an air layer bounded above by an isothermal flat plate and below by a higher-temperature vee-corrugated isothermal surface. The dependence of heat transfer on Rayleigh number, aspect ratio and inclination angle is taken into consideration. This problem is an extension of the rectangular cavity problem, and is of practical interest for solar collector design

  10. Unstable phenomena of low speed compressible natural convection with open boundaries by multi-GPU implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Hsiang; Fu, Wu-Shung; Tsubokura, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Unstable phenomena of low speed compressible natural convection are investigated numerically. Geometry contains parallel square plates or single heated plate with open boundaries is taken into consideration. Numerical methods of the Roe scheme, preconditioning and dual time stepping matching the DP-LUR method are used for low speed compressible flow. The absorbing boundary condition and modified LODI method is adopted to solve open boundary problems. High performance parallel computation is achieved by multi-GPU implementation with CUDA platform. The effects of natural convection by isothermal plates facing upwards in air is then carried out by the methods mentioned above Unstable behaviors appeared upon certain Rayleigh number with characteristic length respect to the width of plates or height between plates.

  11. The CAV program for numerical evaluation of laminar natural convection heat transfer in vertical rectangular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Milos H.; Nowak, Edwin S.

    1993-12-01

    To analyze the laminar natural convection heat transfer and fluid flow distribution in vertical rectangular cavities with or without inner partitions, the personal computer finite difference program entitled CAV is used. The CAV program was tested successfully for slender cavities with aspect ratios as high as R = H/ L = 90 and for the Grashof numbers, based on the cavity height, up to GrH = 3 x10 9. To make the CAV program useful for a number of applications, various types of boundary conditions can also be imposed on the program calculations. Presented are program applications dealing with the 2-D numerical analysis of natural convection heat transfer in very slender window cavities with and without small inner partitions and recommendations are made for window design.

  12. Potential of enhancing a natural convection loop with a thermomagnetically pumped ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aursand, Eskil; Gjennestad, Magnus Aa.; Lervåg, Karl Yngve; Lund, Halvor

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of using a thermomagnetically pumped ferrofluid to enhance the performance of a natural convection cooling loop is investigated. First, a simplified analytical estimate for the thermomagnetic pumping action is derived, and then design rules for optimal solenoid and ferrofluid are presented. The design rules are used to set up a medium-scale (1 m, 10-1000 W) case study, which is modeled using a previously published and validated model (Aursand et al. [1]). The results show that the thermomagnetic driving force is significant compared to the natural convection driving force, and may in some cases greatly surpass it. The results also indicate that cooling performance can be increased by factors up to 4 and 2 in the single-phase and two-phase regimes, respectively, even when taking into the account the added heat from the solenoid. The performance increases can alternatively be used to obtain a reduction in heat-sink size by up to 75%.

  13. Calculation of Post-Closure Natural Convection Heat and Mass Transfer in Yucca Mountain Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    S. Webb; M. Itamura

    2004-03-16

    Natural convection heat and mass transfer under post-closure conditions has been calculated for Yucca Mountain drifts using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Calculations have been performed for 300, 1000, 3000, and 10,000 years after repository closure. Effective dispersion coefficients that can be used to calculate mass transfer in the drift have been evaluated as a function of time and boundary temperature tilt.

  14. A new approach to the stability analysis of transient natural convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Nils

    2016-11-01

    Onset of natural convection due to transient diffusion in porous media has attracted considerable attention for its applications to CO2 sequestration. Stability analyses typically investigate onset of convection using an initial value problem approach in which a perturbation is introduced to the concentration field at an initial time t =tp . This leads to debate concerning physically appropriate perturbations, the critical time tc for linear instability, and to the counter-intuitive notion of an optimal initial time tp that maximizes perturbation growth. We propose a new approach in which transient diffusion is continuously perturbed by small variations in the porosity. With this approach, instability occurs immediately (tc = 0) without violating any physical constraints, such that the concepts of initial time tp and critical time tc have less relevance. We argue that the onset time for nonlinear convection is a more physically relevant parameter, and show that it can be predicted using a simple asymptotic expansion. Using the expansion, we consider porosity perturbations that vary sinusoidally in the horizontal and vertical directions, and show there are optimal combinations of wavelengths that minimize the onset time of nonlinear convection.

  15. Effects of slotted structures on the nonlinear characteristics of natural convection in a cylinder with an internal concentric slotted annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chunyun; Yang, Mo; Zhang, Yuwen; Li, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Natural convection in a cylinder with an internally slotted annulus was solved by SIMPLE algorithm, and the effects of different slotted structures on nonlinear characteristics of natural convection were investigated. The results show that the equivalent thermal conductivity Keq increases with Rayleigh number, and reaches the maximum in the vertical orientation. Nonlinear results were obtained by simulating the fluid flow at different conditions. With increasing Rayleigh number, heat transfer is intensified and the state of heat transfer changes from the steady to unsteady. We investigated different slotted structures effects on natural convection, and analyze the corresponding nonlinear characteristics.

  16. Effects of natural convection on thermal explosion in a closed vessel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Yueh; Campbell, Alasdair N; Cardoso, Silvana S S; Hayhurst, Allan N

    2008-09-28

    A new way of ascertaining whether or not a reacting mixture will explode uses just three timescales: that for chemical reaction to heat up the fluid containing the reactants and products, the timescale for heat conduction out of the reactor, and the timescale for natural convection in the fluid. This approach is developed for an nth order chemical reaction, A --> B occurring exothermically in a spherical, batch reactor without significant consumption of A. The three timescales are expressed in terms of the physical and chemical parameters of the system. Numerical simulations are performed for laminar natural convection occurring; also, a theoretical relation is developed for turbulent flow. These theoretical and numerical results agree well with previous experimental measurements for the decomposition of azomethane in the gas phase. The new theory developed here is compared with Frank-Kamenetskii's classical criterion for explosion. This new treatment has the advantage of separating the two effects inhibiting explosion, viz. heat removal by thermal conduction and by natural convection. Also, the approach is easily generalised to more complex reactions and flow systems.

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Surface Conditions on Natural Convection-Driven Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, S. M.; Saylor, J. R.

    2009-11-01

    Presented are the results from an experimental investigation of the effects of surface conditions at an air/water interface on transport phenomena within the context of natural convection-driven evaporation. Experiments were conducted using tanks of heated water under several different surface conditions: 1) contamination with an oleyl alcohol monolayer, 2) contamination with a stearic acid monolayer, and 3) ``clean'' or surfactant-free. These surface conditions create the following hydrodynamic boundary conditions: 1) constant elasticity, 2) no-slip, and 3) shear-free. The effect of these boundary conditions on evaporation and air-side natural convection heat transfer is presented via the power law relationships between the Sherwood and Rayleigh numbers (for evaporation) and the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers (for natural convection heat transfer). Additionally, infrared imagery of the water surface was collected during these experiments, yielding qualitative information on the effect of these boundary conditions on the flow near the interface. Few studies exist in which the effects of surface conditions on interfacial heat and mass transfer are investigated, making this work particularly relevant.

  18. Emergency cooling down of fast-neutron reactors by natural convection (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, A. V.; Sorokin, A. P.; Kuzina, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    Various methods for emergency cooling down of fast-neutron reactors by natural convection are discussed. The effectiveness of using natural convection for these purposes is demonstrated. The operating principles of different passive decay heat removal systems intended for cooling down a reactor are explained. Experimental investigations carried out in Russia for substantiating the removal of heat in cooling down fast-neutron reactors are described. These investigations include experimental works on studying thermal hydraulics in small-scale simulation facilities containing the characteristic components of a reactor (reactor core elements, above-core structure, immersed and intermediate heat exchangers, pumps, etc.). It is pointed out that a system that uses leaks of coolant between fuel assemblies holds promise for fast-neutron reactor cooldown purposes. Foreign investigations on this problem area are considered with making special emphasis on the RAMONA and NEPTUN water models. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using natural convection as the main method for passively removing heat in cooling down fast-neutron reactors, which is confirmed experimentally both in Russia and abroad.

  19. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  20. Parametric numerical investigaion of natural convection in a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, A.E.; Chudanov, V.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vabishchevich, P.N.

    1995-09-01

    Unsteady natural convection of a heat-generating fluid with phase transitions in the enclosures of a square section with isothermal rigid walls is investigated numerically for a wide range of dimensionless parameters. The quasisteady state solutions of conjugate heat and mass transfer problem are compared with available experimental results. Correlation relations for heat flux distributions at the domain boundaries depending on Rayleigh and Ostrogradskii numbers are obtained. It is shown that generally heat transfer is governed both by natural circulation and crust formation phenomena. Results of this paper may be used for analysis of experiments with prototypic core materials.

  1. Numerical study of natural convection characteristics of nanofluids in an enclosure using multiphase model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Jun; Wang, Ping-Yang; Liu, Zhen-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The natural convective heat transfer and flow characteristics of nanofluids in an enclosure are numerically simulated using the multiphase-flow model and single phase model respectively. The simulated results are compared with the experimental results from the published papers to investigate the applicability of these models for nanofluids from a macro standpoint. The effects of Rayleigh number, Grashof number and volume concentration of nanoparticles on the heat transfer and flow characteristics are investigated and discussed. Comparisons of the horizontal and vertical central dimensionless velocity profiles between nanofluid and water for various Grashof numbers are studied. In addition, both streamline contours and isotherms lines for different volume concentrations of nanofluids are analyzed as well. The study results show that a great deviation exists between the simulated result of the single phase model and the experimental data on the relation of Nusselt number and Rayleigh number, which indicates that the single phase model cannot reflect the heat transfer characteristic of nanofluid. While the simulated results using the multiphase-flow model show a good agreement with the experimental data of nanofluid, which means that the multiphase-flow model is more suitable for the numerical study of nanofluid. For the natural convection, the present study holds the point that using Grashof numbers as the benchmark would be more appropriate to describe the heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid. Moreover, the simulated results demonstrate that adding nanoparticles into the base fluid can enhance both the motion of fluid and convection in the enclosure significantly.

  2. Solar drying of whole mint plant under natural and forced convection.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Y I; Aly, M H; Nassar, A F; Mohamed, E A

    2015-03-01

    Two identical prototype solar dryers (direct and indirect) having the same dimensions were used to dry whole mint. Both prototypes were operated under natural and forced convection modes. In the case of the later one the ambient air was entered the dryer with the velocity of 4.2 m s(-1). The effect of flow mode and the type of solar dryers on the drying kinetics of whole mint were investigated. Ten empirical models were used to fit the drying curves; nine of them represented well the solar drying behavior of mint. The results indicated that drying of mint under different operating conditions occurred in the falling rate period, where no constant rate period of drying was observed. Also, the obtained data revealed that the drying rate of mint under forced convection was higher than that of mint under natural convection, especially during first hours of drying (first day). The values of the effective diffusivity coefficient for the mint drying ranged between 1.2 × 10(-11) and 1.33 × 10(-11) m(2) s(-1).

  3. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  4. The effect of perturbations of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Twigg, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied for a number of cases. Such perturbations primarily effect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope (at depth of approx. 1000 km below the photosphere). Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius is always very small compared to the change in luminosity. This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred from historical observations of solar eclipses. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope.

  5. Natural convective heat transfer within nanofluid-filled hemispherical horizontal enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, O.; Baïri, A.

    2016-10-01

    This survey deals with some steady-state natural convection taking place in a hemispherical enclosure filled with nanofluid consisting of water based metallic nanoparticles, with volumetric fraction ranging between 0% (pure water) and 20%. The hot active wall of the cavity is its horizontal disk subjected to a wide range of constant heat fluxes. The 3D numerical approach is done by means of the finite volume method based on a mixture model. Temperature and velocity distributions are presented for some typical cases and the heat transfer is quantified by means of the Nusselt number versus Rayleigh number. A comparison done between the results with the water and the nanofluid clearly confirms enhancement of the convective heat transfer with the nanoparticles.

  6. MHD natural convection in an inclined square porous cavity with a heat conducting solid block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraj, C.; Sheremet, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper deals with natural convection in an inclined porous cavity with a heat conducting solid body placed at its center under the influence of the applied magnetic field of different orientations. The left and right vertical walls of the cavity are maintained at different temperatures Th and Tc, respectively, while the horizontal walls are adiabatic. The governing coupled partial differential equations were solved using a finite volume method on a uniformly staggered grid system. The effects of the inclination angles of the magnetic field and cavity and the Hartmann number on the flow and thermal fields are investigated in detail. Numerical results are presented in terms of isotherms, streamlines and average Nusselt numbers. In general, the results indicate that the inclusion of the magnetic field reduces the convective heat transfer rate in the cavity. It is also found that an increase in the angle of the applied magnetic field produces a non-linear variation in the average Nusselt numbers.

  7. Model for natural convective flow of visco-elastic nanofluid past an isothermal vertical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, M.; Mushtaq, Ammar

    2015-09-01

    The present article addresses the classical problem of the natural convection flow past a vertical plate by considering visco-elastic nanofluid. The mathematical model is constructed by following the constitutive equations of the upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid. The novel aspects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are taken into account. The recently proposed condition of passively controlled wall nanoparticle volume fraction is used. The shooting approach combined with the fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration procedure is utilized for computing the numerical solutions. The results are in agreement with the available studies in limiting sense. Our results indicate that the velocity profile is parabolic and it decreases with an increment in the visco-elastic parameter.

  8. Studies of heat source driven natural convection. Ph.D. Thesis. Technical Report, Jul. 1974 - Aug. 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Emara, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid was measured for Rayleigh numbers from 1890 to 2.17 x 10 to the 12th power. The fluid layer is bounded below by a rigid zero-heat-flux surface and above by a rigid constant-temperature surface. Joule heating by an alternating current passing horizontally through the layer provides the uniform volumetric energy source. The overall steady-state heat transfer coefficient at the upper surface was determined by measuring the temperature difference across the layer and power input to the fluid. The correlation between the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for the data of the present study and the data of the Kulacki study is given.

  9. Natural Convection Cooling of a Three by Three Array of Leadless Chip Carrier Packages in a Dielectric Liquid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-24

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California AD-A282 298 UUU1UII1HUL .2 <~o STA~To THESIS NATURAL CONVECTION COOLING OF A THREE BY THREE ARRAY OF...LEADLESS CHIP CARRIER PACKAGES IN A DIELECTRIC LIQUID by Joseph Matthew Bradley March 1994 Thesis Advisor: Yogendra Joshi Approved for public release...1994. Engineer’s Thesis 5. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATURAL CONVECTION COOLING OF A FUNDING NUMBERS THREE-BY-THREE ARRAY OF LEADLESS CHIP CARRIER PACKAGES IN A

  10. Studies of heat-source driven natural convection: A numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emara, A. A.; Kulacki, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal convection driven by uniform volumetric energy sources was studied in a horizontal fluid layer bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal surface and from below by a rigid, zero heat-flux surface. The side walls of the fluid domain were assumed to be rigid and perfectly insulating. The computations were formally restricted to two-dimensional laminar convection but were carried out for a range of Rayleigh numbers which spans the regimes of laminar and turbulent flow. The results of the computations consists of streamline and isotherm patterns, horizontally averaged temperature distributions, and horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers at the upper surface. Flow and temperature fields do not exhibit a steady state, but horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers reach limiting, quasi-steady values for all Rayleigh numbers considered. Correlations of the Nusselt number in terms of the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers were determined.

  11. Magnetic energy dissipation and mean magnetic field generation in planar convection-driven dynamos.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, A

    2014-07-01

    A numerical study of dynamos in rotating convecting plane layers is presented which focuses on magnetic energies and dissipation rates and the generation of mean fields (where the mean is taken over horizontal planes). The scaling of the magnetic energy with the flux Rayleigh number is different from the scaling proposed in spherical shells, whereas the same dependence of the magnetic dissipation length on the magnetic Reynolds number is found for the two geometries. Dynamos both with and without mean field exist in rapidly rotating convecting plane layers.

  12. Local patches of turbulent boundary layer behaviour in classical-state vertical natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chong Shen; Ooi, Andrew; Lohse, Detlef; Chung, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence of local patches in vertical natural convection that are reminiscent of Prandtl-von Kármán turbulent boundary layers, for Rayleigh numbers 105-109 and Prandtl number 0.709. These local patches exist in the classical state, where boundary layers exhibit a laminar-like Prandtl-Blasius-Polhausen scaling at the global level, and are distinguished by regions dominated by high shear and low buoyancy flux. Within these patches, the locally averaged mean temperature profiles appear to obey a log-law with the universal constants of Yaglom (1979). We find that the local Nusselt number versus Rayleigh number scaling relation agrees with the logarithmically corrected power-law scaling predicted in the ultimate state of thermal convection, with an exponent consistent with Rayleigh-Bénard convection and Taylor-Couette flows. The local patches grow in size with increasing Rayleigh number, suggesting that the transition from the classical state to the ultimate state is characterised by increasingly larger patches of the turbulent boundary layers.

  13. The effect of natural and forced melt convection on dendritic solidification in Ga-In alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, N.; Roshchupkina, O.; Sokolova, O.; Eckert, S.

    2015-05-01

    The directional solidification of Ga-25 wt%In alloys within a Hele-Shaw cell was visualized by means of X-ray radioscopy. The experimental investigations are especially focused on the impact of melt convection on the dendritic growth. Natural convection occurs during a bottom up solidification because lighter solute is rejected at the solid-liquid interface leading to an unstable density stratification. Forced convection was produced by a rotating wheel with two parallel disks containing at their inner sides a set of permanent NdFeB magnets with alternating polarization. The direction of forced melt flow is almost horizontal at the solidification front whereas local flow velocities in the range between 0.1 and 1.0 mm/s were achieved by controlling the rotation speed of the magnetic wheel. Melt flow induces various effects on the grain morphology primarily caused by the convective transport of solute. Our observations show a facilitation of the growth of primary trunks or lateral branches, suppression of side branching, dendrite remelting and fragmentation. The manifestation of all phenomena depends on the dendrite orientation, local direction and intensity of the flow. The forced flow eliminates the solutal plumes and damps the local fluctuations of solute concentration. It provokes a preferential growth of the secondary arms at the upstream side of the primary dendrite arms, whereas the high solute concentration at the downstream side of the dendrites can inhibit the formation of secondary branches completely. Moreover, the flow changes the inclination angle of the dendrites and the angle between primary trunks and secondary arms.

  14. Natural convection in binary gases due to horizontal thermal and solutal gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of augmenting and opposing thermal and solutal buoyancy forces on natural convection of binary gases due to horizontal temperature and concentration gradients is examined through comparison of smoke flow visualization and measured temperature and concentration distributions with numerical predictions. The observed flow at the cold wall was unsteady for opposing body forces. The same basic flow structure was observed, but the unsteady flow intensifies as the opposing solutal buoyancy force increases as compared to the thermal buoyancy force. Comparison of predicted and measured temperatures and concentrations is fair overall, but the steady-state analytical model fails to predict the unsteady flow and heat and mass transport for opposing body forces.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic flow of water/ethylene glycol based nanofluids with natural convection through a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeshan, A.; Ellahi, R.; Hassan, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the natural convection boundary layer flow along with inverted cone, magnetic and heat generation on water and ethylene glycol based nanofluids is considered by means of variable wall temperature. Porous medium is also taken into account. The physical problem is first modeled and then the governing equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations under the assumptions of the Boussinesq approximation. Analytical solutions of nonlinear coupled equations are obtained by the homotopy analysis method. Correlation of skin friction and heat transfer rate corresponding to active parameters is also presented. Obtained results are illustrated by graphs and tables in order to see the effects of physical parameters.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Turbulent Natural Convection in Differentially Heated Square Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelter, Sonja; Lindner, Gert; Wendt, Gudrun; Model, Regine

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the numerical simulation of turbulent natural convection in cavities heated from the side. Three cases are considered: an air-filled square cavity of size 0.75 m, a water-filled cavity of the same size, and a 20 times larger water-filled cavity. The Rayleigh numbers of these applications reach from 1.46ṡ109 to 2.77ṡ1015. For the air-filled cavity, the results are validated by comparison with experimental data from Tian & Karayiannis [1]. In addition, the investigations have the practical background to provide support for improving temperature measurements of liquids in large storage tanks.

  17. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.; Cheng, X.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  18. Drying characteristic of barley under natural convection in a mixed-mode type solar grain dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Basunia, M.A.; Abe, T.

    1999-07-01

    Thin-layer solar drying characteristics of barley were determined at average natural air flow temperature ranging from 43.4 to 51.7 C and for relative humidities ranging from 16.5% to 37.5%. A mixed-mode type natural convection solar dryer was used for this experiment. The data of sample weight, and dry and wet bulb temperatures of the drying air were recorded continuously throughout the drying period for each test. The drying data were then fitted to the Page model. The model gave a good fit for the moisture content with an average standard error of 0.305% dry basis. The parameter N in Page's equation was assumed as a product-dependent constant which made it easy to compare the effects of independent variables on the natural convection solar drying rate without causing considerable error in predicting the drying rate for barley. A linear relationship was found between the parameter K, temperature T, and relative humidity R{sub H}.

  19. Thermal analysis of a fully wet porous radial fin with natural convection and radiation using the spectral collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, F.; Darvishi, M. T.; Gorla, R. S.. R.; Gireesha, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    Heat transfer with natural convection and radiation effect on a fully wet porous radial fin is considered. The radial velocity of the buoyancy driven flow at any radial location is obtained by applying Darcy's law. The obtained non-dimensionalized ordinary differential equation involving three highly nonlinear terms is solved numerically with the spectral collocation method. In this approach, the dimensionless temperature is approximated by Chebyshev polynomials and discretized by Chebyshev-Gausse-Lobatto collocation points. A particular algorithm is used to reduce the nonlinearity of the conservation of energy equation. The present analysis characterizes the effect of ambient temperature in different ways and it provides a better picture regarding the effect of ambient temperature on the thermal performance of the fin. The profiles for temperature distributions and dimensionless base heat flow are obtained for different parameters which influence the heat transfer rate.

  20. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Liquid Metal Pool With Bottom Heating and Top Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Hwang, Jin S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). A relationship is determined between the Nusselt number Nu and the Rayleigh number Ra in the liquid metal rectangular pool. Results are compared with correlations and experimental data in the literature. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with top subcooling are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or experiments. The current test results are utilized to develop natural convection heat transfer correlations applicable to low Prandtl number Pr fluids that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used in designing BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment at remote sites cycled with MOBIS (Modular Optimized Brayton Integral System) for electricity generation, tied with NAVIS (Naval Application Vessel Integral System) for ship propulsion, joined with THAIS (Thermochemical Hydrogen Acquisition Integral System) for hydrogen production, and coupled with DORIS (Desalination Optimized Reactor Integral System) for seawater desalination. Tests are performed with Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool whose lower surface is heated and upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The test section is 20 cm long, 11.3 cm high and 15 cm wide. The simulant has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. The constant temperature and heat flux condition was realized for the bottom heating once the steady state had been met. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature

  1. Natural Convection Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid Metal Cooled by Subcooled Water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Il S.; Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics with subcooled coolant to create engineering database for basic applications in a lead alloy cooled reactor. Tests are performed in the ALTOS (Applied Liquid-metal Thermal Operation Study) apparatus as part of MITHOS (Metal Integrated Thermo Hydrodynamic Operation System). The relationship between the Nusselt number (Nu) and the Rayleigh number (Ra) in the liquid metal is determined and compared with the correlations in the literature and experimental results. Given the similar Ra condition, the present test results for Nu of the liquid metal pool with subcooled coolant are found to be similar to those predicted by the existing correlations or measured from previous experiments. The current experimental results are utilized to develop new engineering solutions. The new experimental correlations for predicting the natural convection heat transfer are applicable to low Prandtl number (Pr) materials that are heated from below and cooled by the external coolant above. Results from this study are slated to be used to design BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System), a small lead cooled modular fast reactor for deployment in remote sites. Tests are performed with air, water and Wood's metal (Pb-Bi-Sn-Cd) filling a rectangular pool while the lower surface is heated and the upper surface cooled by forced convection of water. The inner dimensions of the test section are 20 cm in length, 11.3 cm in height, and 15 cm in width. Wood's metal has a melting temperature of 78 deg. C. Constant temperature and heat flux condition is adopted for the bottom heating. The test parameters include the heated bottom surface temperature of the liquid metal pool, the input power to the bottom surface of the section, and the coolant temperature. (authors)

  2. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Mayor, T S; Couto, S; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s(-1)) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 10(2)-3 × 10(5)). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow

  3. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, T. S.; Couto, S.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s-1) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 102-3 × 105). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow patterns and

  4. Coronal heating of M dwarfs: The flare-energy distribution of fully convective stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Poppenhaeger, K.; Goulding, A. D.; Bulbul, E.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic flaring is an important mechanism for the coronal heating of the Sun and solar-like stars. The driver for these flares is a magnetic dynamo anchored at the boundary layer between the convective zone and the radiative core. Fully convective M dwarfs have been observed to produce powerful flares as well, but they lack a radiative core and must possess a different dynamo mechanism. How their flaring behavior differs from the solar case is not fully understood yet. We have analyzed X-ray flares of 22 M dwarfs, including both fully and partially convective ones, using archival XMM-Newton data. We extracted flares from the individual X-ray light curves and determined the amount of energy released by each flare in the observed X-ray band. We constructed flare-energy distributions of the targets to investigate the degree to which flares heat stellar coronae. We fitted the slopes of the flare-energy distributions for individual targets and for groups of targets bundled by spectral type. Depending on the value of the slope, the total energy released by flares, as extrapolated from the flare-energy distributions, could be sufficient to heat the entire corona. We find that the slopes of the flare-energy distributions are very similar to that of the Sun, for both partially and fully convective M dwarfs. The dynamo process at work in the fully convective stars of our sample needs to have a flare production efficiency which is very close to the solar case. Further observations will cover ultracool targets near the brown dwarfs boundary to test for which masses this solar analogy is valid. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. Study on natural convection capability of liquid gallium for passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Kim, J. H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    The safety issues of the SFRs are important due to the fact that it uses sodium as a nuclear coolant, reacting vigorously with water and air. For that reason, there are efforts to seek for alternative candidates of liquid metal coolants having excellent heat transfer property and to adopt improved safety features to the SFR concepts. This study considers gallium as alternative liquid metal coolant applicable to safety features in terms of chemical activity issue of the sodium and aims to experimentally investigate the natural convection capability of gallium as a feasibility study for the development of gallium-based passive safety features in SFRs. In this paper, the design and construction of the liquid gallium natural convection loop were carried out. The experimental results of heat transfer coefficient of liquid gallium resulting in heat removal {approx}2.53 kW were compared with existing correlations and they were much lower than the correlations. To comparison of the experimental data with computer code analysis, gallium property code was developed for employing MARS-LMR (Korea version of RELAP) based on liquid gallium as working fluid. (authors)

  6. Performance of extended surface from a cryocooler for subcooling liquid nitrogen by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yeon Suk; Chang, Ho-Myung; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2006-05-01

    Natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen under a horizontal flat plate is measured by experiment. This study is motivated mainly by our recent development of cryocooling systems for HTS power devices without any forced circulation of liquid nitrogen. Since the cold surface of a GM cryocooler is very limited, the cooling plate immersed in subcooled liquid nitrogen is thermally anchored to the cryocooler located at the top in order to serve as an extended surface. A vertical plate generating uniform heat flux is placed at a given distance under the cooling plate so that subcooled liquid may generate cellular flow by natural convection. The temperature distributions on the plates and liquid are measured during the cool-down and in steady state, from which the heat transfer coefficients are calculated and compared with the existing correlations for a horizontal surface with uniform temperature. A fair agreement is observed between two data sets, when the heat flux is small or the plate temperatures are relatively uniform in horizontal direction. Some discrepancy at higher heat flux is explained by the cellular flow pattern and the fin efficiency of the extended surface, resulting in the non-uniformity of the horizontal plate.

  7. A new look at natural convection from isothermal vertical parallel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.H.; Chung, B.T.F.

    1996-12-31

    Natural convection between isothermal plates is solved numerically by applying the full Navier-Stokes equations. The elliptic formulation allows separating the effect of the Rayleigh number, Ra, and the aspect ratio, L/B. Calculations are made on a wide range of the Rayleigh number and the aspect ratio, and the Nusselt number is provided as a function of both Ra and B/L. The conventional correlations in the literature presenting the Nusselt number in terms of a single parameter, RaB/L, have been found inaccurate. At a small value of RaB/L, multiple values of Nusselt number are obtained for different combinations of Ra and B/L. Previous results are found to be the special cases of the present study. A minimum Rayleigh number is also obtained above which a fully-developed flow is possible. To simulate the natural convective flow, the ambient pressure is given at the exit while the pressure at the entrance is related to the ambient pressure by the Bernoulli equation. Velocities at the entrance and exit are also solved from the Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. Natural convection in a vertical rectangular enclosure with localized heating and cooling zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, I.; Matsumoto, R.; Senoo, A.

    Experimental and numerical studies of natural convection in a single phase, closed thermosyphon were carried out using a vertical, rectangular enclosure model. Only one vertical plate plays the role of heat transfer surface having 100mm height and 100mm width, and others act as the adiabatic wall made of transparent plexi-glass. The heat transfer surface is separated into three horizontal zones with an equal height; top 1/3 and bottom 1/3 of the surface are cooling and heating zones, respectively and intermediate section is an adiabatic zone. Water is used as the working fluid. Variable parameters are distance D between the heat transfer surface and an adiabatic plate opposite to the heat transfer plate, and temperature difference ΔT between heating and cooling zones. By changing both D and ΔT, three regimes of the natural convection flow; quasi-two-dimensional steady, three-dimensional steady and unsteady flows are observed by means of thermo-sensitive liquid crystal powder and numerically simulated very well by solving a set of governing equations.

  9. Convective available potential energy in the environment of oceanic and continental clouds: Correction and comments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Christopher; Zipser, Edward J.; Lemone, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    In 1980, Zipser and LeMone estimated the convective available potential energy (CAPE) for the Thunderstorm Project cumulonimbus environment to be about 3000 J per kg. By assuming the most adiabat reported by Byers and Braham (1949) to be that of an undilute parcel rather than a reference moist adiabat, a significant error was introduced. On the basis of recent calculations made under similar conditions in Oklahoma and Florida, CAPE is now estimated to be considerably lower. These lower CAPE estimates shed doubt on the suggestion that differences in CAPE account for differences in the vertical velocities in convective updrafts over land and over the ocean.

  10. Kinetic energy budgets in areas of intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Berecek, E. M.; Ebel, D. M.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A kinetic energy budget analysis of the AVE-SESAME 1 period which coincided with the deadly Red River Valley tornado outbreak is presented. Horizontal flux convergence was found to be the major kinetic energy source to the region, while cross contour destruction was the major sink. Kinetic energy transformations were dominated by processes related to strong jet intrusion into the severe storm area. A kinetic energy budget of the AVE 6 period also is presented. The effects of inherent rawinsonde data errors on widely used basic kinematic parameters, including velocity divergence, vorticity advection, and kinematic vertical motion are described. In addition, an error analysis was performed in terms of the kinetic energy budget equation. Results obtained from downward integration of the continuity equation to obtain kinematic values of vertical motion are described. This alternate procedure shows promising results in severe storm situations.

  11. A new concept to harvest thermal energy using pyroeletric effect and Rayleigh-Benard convections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra El fatnani, Fatima; Guyomar, Daniel; Belhora, Fouad; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahia; Hajjaji, Abdelowahed

    2016-08-01

    Thermal energy is one of the ambient energy sources surely exploitable but it has not drawn as much interest as mechanical energy. Our work aims to use thermal energy and to show that it is an important source for producing electrical energy using the pyroelectric effect. More precisely, we present in this paper a new concept to harvest thermal energy using the pyroelectric effect and Rayleigh-Benard convections. In fact, the convections will be created inside an oil bath, which can keep the pyroelectric element under temperature fluctuations (heating and cooling), making it possible to generate voltage by the pyroelectric effect. Our experimental findings show that with this original concept, based on Rayleigh-Benard convections, we harvested 0.28mW; this value was also improved by using the SSHI technique, which allows us to increase it up to 0.55mW. This obtained value of power is a heavy amount, which will certainly be useful in an extensive range of applications, including sensors and infrared detection. These results shed light on the thermoelectric energy conversion by PZT ceramic buzzer having the pyroelectric property, using a constant heat source.

  12. Natural and mixed convection in the cylindrical pool of TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Tiselj, I.; Matkovič, M.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature fields within the pool of the JSI TRIGA MARK II nuclear research reactor were measured to collect data for validation of the thermal hydraulics computational model of the reactor tank. In this context temperature of the coolant was measured simultaneously at sixty different positions within the pool during steady state operation and two transients. The obtained data revealed local peculiarities of the cooling water dynamics inside the pool and were used to estimate the coolant bulk velocity above the reactor core. Mixed natural and forced convection in the pool were simulated with a Computational Fluid Dynamics code. A relatively simple CFD model based on Unsteady RANS turbulence model was found to be sufficient for accurate prediction of the temperature fields in the pool during the reactor operation. Our results show that the simple geometry of the TRIGA pool reactor makes it a suitable candidate for a simple natural circulation benchmark in cylindrical geometry.

  13. Performance characteristics of a thermal energy storage module - A transient PCM/forced convection conjugate analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a thermal energy storage module is simulated numerically. The change of phase of the phase-change material (PCM) and the transient forced convective heat transfer for the transfer fluid with low Prandtl numbers are solved simultaneously as a conjugate problem. A parametric study and a system optimization are conducted. The numerical results show that module geometry is crucial to the design of a space-based thermal energy storage system.

  14. A convective-like energy-stable open boundary condition for simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new energy-stable open boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, for simulating incompressible flows with outflow/open boundaries. This open boundary condition ensures the energy stability of the system, even when strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow boundary. Under certain situations it can be reduced to a form that can be analogized to the usual convective boundary condition. One prominent feature of this boundary condition is that it provides a control over the velocity on the outflow/open boundary. This is not available with the other energy-stable open boundary conditions from previous works. Our numerical algorithm treats the proposed open boundary condition based on a rotational velocity-correction type strategy. It gives rise to a Robin-type condition for the discrete pressure and a Robin-type condition for the discrete velocity on the outflow/open boundary, respectively at the pressure and the velocity sub-steps. We present extensive numerical experiments on a canonical wake flow and a jet flow in open domain to test the effectiveness and performance of the method developed herein. Simulation results are compared with the experimental data as well as with other previous simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the current method. Long-time simulations are performed for a range of Reynolds numbers, at which strong vortices and backflows occur at the outflow/open boundaries. The results show that our method is effective in overcoming the backflow instability, and that it allows for the vortices to discharge from the domain in a fairly natural fashion even at high Reynolds numbers.

  15. Turbulent heat transfer with combined forced and natural convection along a vertical flat plate. Effect of Prandtl number

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, T. ); Kitamura, K. )

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent heat transfer of combined forced and natural convection along a vertical flat plate was investigated experimentally both with aiding and opposing flows of air. Local heat-transfer coefficients were measured in the vertical direction. The results show that the local Nusselt numbers for aiding flow become smaller than those for the forced and the natural convection, while the Nusselt numbers for the opposing flow are increased significantly. These results are compared with the previous results for water. It has been found that the nondimensional parameter Z(= Gr{sub x}*/Nu{sub x}Re{sub x}){sup 2.7}Pr{sup 0.6} can predict the behavior of heat transfer both for air and water. Furthermore, the natural, forced, and combined convection regions can be classified in terms of the above parameter.

  16. Magnetic control of natural convection in the horizontal Bridgman configuration using a spectral method: transversal plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaziz, Inès; Ben Salah, Nizar; Kaddeche, Slim

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigates the electromagnetic braking of buoyancy convective flows occurring in differentially heated cavities, filled with low Prandtl, dilute, incompressible and electrically conducting alloys, and subjected to a constant horizontal temperature gradient. In practice, such flows known as 'Hadley circulation' are relevant in material processing technologies, such as the horizontal Bridgman configuration. A collocation spectral numerical method is developed to solve the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, modelling the flow phenomena occurring in such configurations, using a vorticity-stream function formulation. The two components of the velocity are deduced from the stream function and the temperature distribution is obtained through the resolution of the energy conservation equation. The results in terms of velocity and temperature distributions for a given Grashof number are obtained for various Hartmann numbers and show that as the Hartmann number increases, the electromagnetic braking of the flow is observed. Moreover, the results illustrate the changes affecting the flow structure which becomes quasi-parallel in the core region of the cavity for sufficiently high values of Ha and the onset of the Hartmann and parallel layers along the boundaries. Also, with increasing Ha, the isotherms are less affected by the convective flow and become parallel to the vertical walls indicating that heat transfer is mainly achieved by conduction.

  17. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O'Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  18. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O`Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-09-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  19. Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer results and operating data from a natural-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Freche, John C

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer data and operating data were obtained with a natural-convection water-cooled turbine over range of turbine speeds and inlet-gas temperatures. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for natural-convection heat transfer. The turbine data were displaced from a theoretical equation for natural convection heat transfer in the turbulent region and from natural-convection data obtained with vertical cylinders and plates; possible disruption of natural convection circulation within the blade coolant passages was thus indicated. Comparison of non dimensional temperature-ratio parameters for the blade leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge indicated that the blade cooling effectiveness is greatest at the midchord and least at the trailing edge.

  20. General expression for laminar forced and natural convection heat transfer from isothermal flat plates for all Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yovanovich, M. M.

    1993-07-01

    It is presently shown that the correlation equations for forced and natural convection-involving bloundary-layer flows, over isothermal flat plates, collapse into a simple expression directly relating the dimensionless wall-temperature excess to a novel Prandtl number function. This function is demonstrated to be applicable for the full, zero-to-infinity Prandtl number range. This formulation allows forced and natural convection heat-transfer results to appear on the same graph, as dimensionless temperature excess vs Prandtl number functions.

  1. On the effect of natural convection on the thermal-microstructural evolution in gray cast-iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celentano, Diego J.; Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Schulz, Bernd J.

    2006-04-01

    A coupled analysis involving natural convection, thermal balance, and microstructural evolution that take place in the solidification process of a hypoeutectic gray cast iron is presented in this work. The microstructural formulation used in this study includes classical models of primary-austenite and eutectic (gray and white) transformations. The influence of both natural convection and heat-transfer conditions on the thermal-microstructural response is particularly assessed in a simple cylindrical casting system. The evolutions of temperature and different microstructural variables are compared and validated with available experimental measurements.

  2. CFD characterization of natural convection in a two-cell enclosure with a ``door``

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Baker, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    Natural convection in a two-cell enclosure with a door has been investigated comparing the results of a CFD simulation to experimental data available in the literature. The continuity constraint method (CCM), implemented via a finite element weak statement, was employed to solve the unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a buoyant, incompressible laminar flow. The CFD results predicted essentially all experimentally observed features of the flow field, including the vertical plume in the cold zone, boundary-layer, flows along the heated and cooled walls, and the hot zone`s horizontal jet. Vertical temperature stratification predictions were in agreement with the experimental data in the cold zone; however, the measured hot-zone stratification was not well predicted by the CFD simulation. An assessment of factors affecting the CFD results and comparisons to experimental data conclude this paper.

  3. Unsteady natural convection flow of nanofluids past a semi-infinite isothermal vertical plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippa, Sowmya; Narahari, Marneni; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2016-11-01

    Numerical analysis is performed to investigate the unsteady natural convection flow of a nanofluid past a semi-infinite isothermal vertical plate. Five different types of water based nanofluids are considered in this investigation where Silver (Ag), Copper (Cu), Copper Oxide (CuO), Alumina (Al2O3) and Titanium Oxide (TiO2) are the nanoparticles. The governing non-dimensional partial differential equations are solved by employing an implicit finite-difference method of Crank-Nicolson type. Numerical results are computed for different values of pertinent parameters. The results for nanofluid temperature, velocity, local Skin friction and Nusselt number, average Skin friction and Nusselt number are discussed through graphs. The present numerical results for local Nusselt number have been compared with the well-established pure fluid correlation results for the limiting case and the comparison shows that the results are in excellent agreement.

  4. Natural convection in binary gases driven by combined horizontal thermal and vertical solutal gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of natural convection is presented to examine the influence of a horizontal temperature gradient and a concentration gradient occurring from the bottom to the cold wall in a cavity. As the solutal buoyancy force changes from augmenting to opposing the thermal buoyancy force, the fluid motion switches from unicellular to multicellular flow (fluid motion is up the cold wall and down the hot wall for the bottom counterrotating flow cell). Qualitatively, the agreement between predicted streamlines and smoke flow patterns is generally good. In contrast, agreement between measured and predicted temperature and concentration distributions ranges from fair to poor. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to experimental error. However, there remains considerable discrepancy between data and predictions due to the idealizations of the mathematical model, which examines only first-order physical effects. An unsteady flow, variable thermophysical properties, conjugate effects, species interdiffusion, and radiation were not accounted for in the model.

  5. Numerical and experimental study of transient natural convection in an inclined wall cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, J.; Avila, F.

    1995-09-01

    Transient natural convection in an open cavity with one inclined wall is analyzed both numerically and experimentally. The fluid and the cavity are in thermal equilibrium at the onset of the experiment. The inclined wall is heated in such a way that the wall temperature increases uniformly according to an hyperbolic tangent function. The transport equations are solved using a 2-D transient model with a non-orthogonal body fitted coordinate system and an exponential grid distribution for better spatial resolution near the inclined wall. Measurements of velocity and temperature are performed at some key points of the boundary layer and intrusion layer. The fluid motion and heat transfer are analyzed from the time at which heat is applied though the inclined wall to the time at which its effect is detected at the opposite sidewall. The main patterns of the fluid flow and heat transfer are well predicted as comparisons against experimental results indicate.

  6. From cat's eyes to disjoint multicellular natural convection flow in tall tilted cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás, Alfredo; Báez, Elsa; Bermúdez, Blanca

    2011-07-01

    Numerical results of two-dimensional natural convection problems, in air-filled tall cavities, are reported to study the change of the cat's eyes flow as some parameters vary, the aspect ratio A and the angle of inclination ϕ of the cavity, with the Rayleigh number Ra mostly fixed; explicitly, the range of the variation is given by 12⩽A⩽20 and 0°⩽ϕ⩽270°; about Ra=1.1×10. A novelty contribution of this work is the transition from the cat's eyes changes, as A varies, to a disjoint multicellular flow, as ϕ varies. These flows may be modeled by the unsteady Boussinesq approximation in stream function and vorticity variables which is solved with a fixed point iterative process applied to the nonlinear elliptic system that results after time discretization. The validation of the results relies on mesh size and time-step independence studies.

  7. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  8. Solution to Shape Identification of Unsteady Natural Convection Fields to Control Temperature Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katamine, Eiji; Imai, Shinya; Mathmatical design Team; Computational mechanics Team

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical solution to shape identification of unsteady natural convection fields to control temperature to a prescribed distribution. The square error integral between the actual temperature distributions and the prescribed temperature distributions on the prescribed sub-boundaries during the specified period of time is used as the objective functional. Shape gradient of the shape identification problem is derived theoretically using the Lagrange multiplier method, adjoint variable method, and the formulae of the material derivative. Reshaping is carried out by the traction method proposed as an approach to solving shape optimization problems. Numerical analyses program for the shape identification is developed based on FreeFem++, and the validity of proposed method is confirmed by results of 2D numerical analyses.

  9. Effects of a random porosity model on double diffusive natural convection in a porous medium enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.S.; Ke, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    A double diffusive natural convection in a rectangular enclosure filled with porous medium is investigated numerically. The distribution of porosity is based upon the random porosity model. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model is used and the factors of heat flux, mean porosity and standard deviation are taken into consideration. The SIMPLEC method with iterative processes is adopted to solve the governing equations. The effects of the random porosity model on the distributions of local Nusselt number are remarkable and the variations of the local Nusselt number become disordered. The contribution of latent heat transfer to the total heat transfer of the high Rayleigh number is larger than that of the low Rayleigh number and the variations of the latent heat transfer are not in order.

  10. Two- and three-dimensional natural and mixed convection simulation using modular zonal models

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, E.; Nataf, J.M.; Winkelmann, F.

    1996-07-01

    We demonstrate the use of the zonal model approach, which is a simplified method for calculating natural and mixed convection in rooms. Zonal models use a coarse grid and use balance equations, state equations, hydrostatic pressure drop equations and power law equations of the form {ital m} = {ital C}{Delta}{sup {ital n}}. The advantage of the zonal approach and its modular implementation are discussed. The zonal model resolution of nonlinear equation systems is demonstrated for three cases: a 2-D room, a 3-D room and a pair of 3-D rooms separated by a partition with an opening. A sensitivity analysis with respect to physical parameters and grid coarseness is presented. Results are compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and experimental data.

  11. Multi-objective optimization of electronics heat sinks cooled by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampio, K.; Karvinen, R.

    2016-09-01

    Fins and fin arrays with constant temperature at the fin base have known solutions for natural convection. However, in practical applications, no simple solution exists for maximum temperature of heat sink with many heat dissipating components located at the base plate. A calculation model is introduced here to solve this practical problem without time consuming CFD modelling of fluid flow and heat transfer. Solutions with the new model are compared with some simple analytical and CFD solutions to prove that the results are accurate enough for practical applications. Seminal here is that results are obtained many orders of magnitude faster than with CFD. This much shorter calculation time scale makes the model well suited for multi-objective optimization in, e.g., simultaneous minimization of heat sink maximum temperature, size, and mass. An optimization case is presented in which heat sink mass and size are significantly reduced over those of the original reference heat sink.

  12. Sensible Heat Flux from the Earth's Surface under Natural Convective Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Junsei; Ishida, Sachinobu

    1997-02-01

    A value for the exchange speed of sensible heat CHU under natural convective conditions was determined by both indoor and field experiments. Regardless of the type of experiment, the relationships for the CHU were obtained as CHU = b(TS T)1/3. For a wet surface, Tv should be substituted for (TS T). Here, TS is the ground surface temperature, T the air temperature, and Tv the virtual temperature difference. In addition, b is a coefficient having a value of 0.0011 m s1 K1/3 for a smooth surface and 0.0038 m s1 K1/3 over a rough surface. From the field observation data, it was concluded that under strongly unstable conditions (1 > > 477) the best pair of stability profile functions was proposed.

  13. Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal cylinders in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Takeuchi, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer on two horizontal 7.6 mm diameter test cylinders assembled with the ratio of the distance between each cylinder axis to the cylinder diameter, S/D, of 2 in liquid sodium was studied experimentally and theoretically. The heat transfer coefficients on the cylinder surface due to the same heat inputs ranging from 1.0 X 10{sup 7} to 1.0 x 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 3} were obtained experimentally for various setting angeles, {gamma}, between vertical direction and the plane including both of these cylinder axis over the range of zero to 90{degrees}. Theoretical equations for laminar natural convection heat transfer from the two horizontal cylinders were numerically solved for the same conditions as the experimental ones considering the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties concerned. The average Nusselt numbers, Nu, values on the Nu versus modified Rayleigh number, R{sub f}, graph. The experimental values of Nu for the upper cylinder are about 20% lower than those for the lower cylinder at {gamma} = 0{degrees} for the range of R{sub f} tested here. The value of Nu for the upper cylinder becomes higher and approaches that for the lower cylinder with the increase in {gamma} over range of 0 to 90{degrees}. The values of Nu for the lower cylinder at each {gamma} are almost in agreement with those for a single cylinder. The theoretical values of Nu on two cylinders except those for R{sub f}<4 at {gamma} = 0{degrees} are in agreement with the experimental data at each {gamma} with the deviations less than 15%. Correlations for Nu on the upper and lower cylinders were obtained as functions of S/D and {gamma} based n the theoretical solutions for the S/D ranged over 1.5 to 4.0.

  14. Convection in molten pool created by a concentrated energy flux on a solid metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Dikshit, B.; Zende, G. R.; Bhatia, M. S.; Suri, B. M.

    2009-08-15

    During surface evaporation of metals by use of a concentrated energy flux such as electron beam or lasers, a liquid metal pool having a very high temperature gradient is formed around the hot zone created by the beam. Due to temperature dependence of surface tension, density, and depression of the evaporating surface caused by back pressure of the emitted vapor in this molten pool, a strong convective current sets in the molten pool. A proposition is made that this convection may pass through three different stages during increase in the electron beam power depending upon dominance of the various driving forces. To confirm this, convective heat transfer is quantified in terms of dimensionless Nusselt number and its evolution with power is studied in an experiment using aluminum, copper, and zirconium as targets. These experimentally determined values are also compared to the theoretical values predicted by earlier researchers to test the validity of their assumptions and to know about the type of flow in the melt pool. Thus, conclusion about the physical characteristics of flow in the molten pool of metals could be drawn by considering the roles of surface tension and curvature of the evaporating surface on the evolution of convective heat transfer.

  15. Energy Conversion in Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Iain; Li, Gonghu; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Modern civilization is dependent upon fossil fuels, a nonrenewable energy source originally provided by the storage of solar energy. Fossil fuel dependence has severe consequences including energy security issues and greenhouse gas emissions. The consequences of fossil fuel dependence could be avoided by fuel-producing artificial systems that mimic natural photosynthesis, directly converting solar energy to fuel. This review describes the three key components of solar energy conversion in photosynthesis: light harvesting, charge separation, and catalysis. These processes are compared in natural and artificial systems. Such a comparison can assist in understanding the general principles of photosynthesis and in developing working devices including photoelectrochemical cells for solar energy conversion. PMID:20534342

  16. Experimental verification of natural convective heat transfer phenomenon from isothermal cuboids

    SciTech Connect

    Radziemska, Ewa; Lewandowski, Witold M.

    2008-02-15

    The paper presents results of experimental investigations of the convective heat transfer from isothermal cuboid with relatively big dimensions (i.e. 1.5 m x 1 m x 0.5 m). The aim of this research was to obtain results, which could be comparable to those obtained for the relatively small cuboid, presented in our previous paper [E. Radziemska, W. Lewandowski, Natural convective heat transfer from isothermal cuboids, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 46 (2003) 2169-2178]. The analytical solution was performed, taking into account complete boundary layer length and the manner of its propagation around the isothermal cuboid. As the characteristic linear dimension L in Nusselt-Rayleigh theoretical and experimental correlations, we proposed the ratio of six volumes to the cuboids surface area, which allowed performing the experimental results independently from the orientation of the block. The experiment was then carried out for three possible positions of the tested cuboid with dimensions 0.2 m x 0.1 m x 0.045 m. In present the investigations the Rayleigh numbers based on the proposed characteristic length ranged from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9}, due to the cuboids size. The Nusselt number, describing the intensity of convective heat transfer from the cuboid, was expressed by Nu = X . Ra{sup 1/5} +Y . Ra{sup 1/4}, where X and Y are coefficients dependent on the cuboids dimensions. For the range of provided experiment the theoretical Nusselt-Rayleigh relation can be presented in the form: Nu{sub L}=0.452.Ra{sub L}{sup 1/5}+0.516.Ra{sub L}{sup 1/4}that is adequate to Nu{sub L}=0.743.Ra{sub L}{sup 1/4}. A better correlation is obtained for the experimental results: Nu{sub L}=0.90.Ra{sub L}{sup 1/4} has a 10% deviation to the value previously obtained, for the cuboid with small dimensions, results (Nu{sub L}=0.818.Ra{sub L}{sup 1/4}). (author)

  17. Transient natural convection and conduction heat transfers on hot box of a coke drum in Pre-heating stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, A. S.; Ambarita, H.; Kawai, H.; Daimaruya, M.

    2017-01-01

    In an oil refinery unit, coke drum is subjected cyclic thermal stress and mechanical loads due to cyclic heating and cooling loads. Thus, the useful life of a coke drum is much shorter than other equipment. One of the most severe locations due to thermal stress is shell to skirt junction. Here, a hot box is proposed. In this study effectiveness of a hot box will be analyzed numerically. The addition of hot box (triangular cavity) was expected to generate natural convection, which will enhance heat transfer. As for the result show that heat flux conduction and natural convection have the same trend. The peak of conduction heat flux is 122 W/m2 and for natural convection is 12 W/m2. In the heating stage of coke drum cycle it found that the natural convection only provide approximately 10 % of heat transfer compare to conduction heat transfer. In this study it was proved that in the heating stage, the addition of triangular enclosure is less effective to enhance the heat transfer than previously thought.

  18. Transport Phenomena Projects: Natural Convection between Porous, Concentric Cylinders--A Method to Learn and to Innovate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saatadjian, Esteban; Lesage, Francois; Mota, Jose Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    A project that involves the numerical simulation of transport phenomena is an excellent method to teach this subject to senior/graduate chemical engineering students. The subject presented here has been used in our senior/graduate course, it concerns the study of natural convection heat transfer between two concentric, horizontal, saturated porous…

  19. Numerical simulation of natural convection in a square enclosure filled with nanofluid using the two-phase Lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cong; He, Yurong; Yan, Shengnan; Tian, Fenglin; Hu, Yanwei

    2013-02-04

    Considering interaction forces (gravity and buoyancy force, drag force, interaction potential force, and Brownian force) between nanoparticles and a base fluid, a two-phase Lattice Boltzmann model for natural convection of nanofluid is developed in this work. It is applied to investigate the natural convection in a square enclosure (the left wall is kept at a high constant temperature (TH), and the top wall is kept at a low constant temperature (TC)) filled with Al2O3/H2O nanofluid. This model is validated by comparing numerical results with published results, and a satisfactory agreement is shown between them. The effects of different nanoparticle fractions and Rayleigh numbers on natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid are investigated. It is found that the average Nusselt number of the enclosure increases with increasing nanoparticle volume fraction and increases more rapidly at a high Rayleigh number. Also, the effects of forces on nanoparticle volume fraction distribution in the square enclosure are studied in this paper. It is found that the driving force of the temperature difference has the biggest effect on nanoparticle volume fraction distribution. In addition, the effects of interaction forces on flow and heat transfer are investigated. It is found that Brownian force, interaction potential force, and gravity-buoyancy force have positive effects on the enhancement of natural convective heat transfer, while drag force has a negative effect.

  20. Whole Mantle Thermo-Chemical Convection Models With Realistic Mineral Physics Naturally Develop Chemical Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Nakagawa, T.; Deschamps, F.; Connolly, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Starting with [Christensen and Yuen, 1985 JGR], many isochemical convection models have demonstrated the existence of "intermittent" or "partial" layering enforced by the ringwoodite to perovskite+magnesiowustite phase transition over a certain range of Clapeyron slope values, which has often been cited as a possible mechanism for reconciling conflicting evidences for whole-mantle and layered convection. Current mineral physics constraints indicate, however, that the likely value of the Clapeyron slope is too low to enforce this mode, although studies have shown that a viscosity increase at 660 km depth might account for much of the observed variation in slab dynamics without appealing to a phase transition. When chemical variations are additionally taken into account, the dynamical effect of phase transitions can again become important. Firstly the additive effect of the '660' phase transition and chemical buoyancy can combine to keep denser than average material in the lower mantle and less dense than average material in the upper mantle, the so-called filter effect first identified by Weinstein [1992 EPSL]. Secondly, the pyroxene-garnet components transform to perovskite at a higher pressure than olivine components, giving positive buoyancy to MORB and negative buoyancy to harzburgite in the depth range 660-720 km, which has been shown to cause local chemical stratification around 660 km depth. Thirdly, MORB is likely denser than average mantle in the deep mantle, and some fraction of it settles into a layer above the CMB. These effects are here demonstrated and quantified in 3-D spherical convection calculations in which the mineralogy is calculated self-consistently as a function of temperature, pressure and composition (expressed as the ratios of 5 oxides) using free energy minimization. Compositional variations arise self-consistently from melting. These build on the earlier studies of Xie and Tackley [2004 PEPI, JGR], Nakagawa and Tackley [2005 Gcubed; 2006

  1. The Emergence of Solar Supergranulation as a Natural Consequence of Rotationally Constrained Interior Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate how rotationally constrained, deep convection might give rise to supergranulation, the largest distinct spatial scale of convection observed in the solar photosphere. While supergranulation is only weakly influenced by rotation, larger spatial scales of convection sample the deep convection zone and are presumably rotationally influenced. We present numerical results from a series of nonlinear, 3D simulations of rotating convection and examine the velocity power distribution realized under a range of Rossby numbers. When rotation is present, the convective power distribution possesses a pronounced peak, at characteristic wavenumber {{\\ell }}{peak}, whose value increases as the Rossby number is decreased. This distribution of power contrasts with that realized in non-rotating convection, where power increases monotonically from high to low wavenumbers. We find that spatial scales smaller than {{\\ell }}{peak} behave in analogy to non-rotating convection. Spatial scales larger than {{\\ell }}{peak} are rotationally constrained and possess substantially reduced power relative to the non-rotating system. We argue that the supergranular scale emerges due to a suppression of power on spatial scales larger than {\\ell }≈ 100 owing to the presence of deep, rotationally constrained convection. Supergranulation thus represents the largest non-rotationally constrained mode of solar convection. We conclude that the characteristic spatial scale of supergranulation bounds that of the deep convective motions from above, making supergranulation an indirect measure of the deep-seated dynamics at work in the solar dynamo. Using the spatial scale of supergranulation in conjunction with our numerical results, we estimate an upper bound of 10 m s-1 for the Sun’s bulk rms convective velocity.

  2. Thermocapillary convection around gas bubbles: an important natural effect for the enhancement of heat transfer in liquids under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Betz, J; Straub, J

    2002-10-01

    In the presence of a temperature gradient at a liquid-gas or liquid-liquid interface, thermocapillary or Marangoni convection develops. This convection is a special type of natural convection that was not paid much attention in heat transfer for a long time, although it is strong enough to drive liquids against the direction of buoyancy on Earth. In a microgravity environment, however, it is the remaining mode of natural convection and supports heat and mass transfer. During boiling in microgravity it was observed at subcooled liquid conditions. Therefore, the question arises about its contribution to heat transfer without phase change. Thermocapillary convection was quantitatively studied at single gas bubbles in various liquids, both experimentally and numerically. A two-dimensional mathematical model described in this article was developed. The coupled mechanism of heat transfer and fluid flow in pure liquids around a single gas bubble was simulated with a control-volume FE-method. The simulation was accompanied and compared with experiments on Earth. The numerical results are in good accordance with the experiments performed on Earth at various Marangoni numbers using various alcohols of varying chain length and Prandtl numbers. As well as calculations on Earth, the numerical method also allows simulations at stationary spherical gas bubbles in a microgravity environment. The results demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is a natural heat transfer mechanism that can partially replace the buoyancy in a microgravity environment, if extreme precautions are taken concerning the purity of the liquids, because impurities accumulate predominantly at the interface. Under Earth conditions, an enhancement of the heat transfer in a liquid volume is even found in the case where thermocapillary flow is counteracted by buoyancy. In particular, the obstructing influence of surface active substances could be observed during the experiments on Earth in water and also in

  3. Numerical study of natural convection in a horizontal cylinder filled with water-based alumina nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyin; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Natural heat convection of water-based alumina (Al2O3/water) nanofluids (with volume fraction 1% and 4%) in a horizontal cylinder is numerically investigated. The whole three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedure is performed in a completely open-source way. Blender, enGrid, OpenFOAM and ParaView are employed for geometry creation, mesh generation, case simulation and post process, respectively. Original solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleFoam' is selected for the present study, and a temperature-dependent solver 'buoyantBoussinesqSimpleTDFoam' is developed to ensure the simulation is more realistic. The two solvers are used for same cases and compared to corresponding experimental results. The flow regime in these cases is laminar (Reynolds number is 150) and the Rayleigh number range is 0.7 × 10(7) ~ 5 × 10(7). By comparison, the average natural Nusselt numbers of water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are found to increase with the Rayleigh number. At the same Rayleigh number, the Nusselt number is found to decrease with nanofluid volume fraction. The temperature-dependent solver is found better for water and 1% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases, while the original solver is better for 4% Al2O3/water nanofluid cases. Furthermore, due to strong three-dimensional flow features in the horizontal cylinder, three-dimensional CFD simulation is recommended instead of two-dimensional simplifications.

  4. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  5. Evaluation of Two Different k-e-vv-f Turbulence Models for Natural Convection in a Rectangular Cavity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-14

    algebraic flux model (AFM hereafter) together with the low-Reynolds number turbulence model and applied it to the prediction of various natural...fvvk −−− ε model developed by Durbin [1] in the present study. Durbin [1] developed a fvvk −−−ε model around the elliptic relaxation method for... algebraic flux model for the natural convection problem. The relative performances between the original model and the modified model are investigated 2

  6. Effects of finiteness on the thermo-fluid-dynamics of natural convection above horizontal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2016-06-01

    A rigorous and systematic computational and theoretical study, the first of its kind, for the laminar natural convective flow above rectangular horizontal surfaces of various aspect ratios ϕ (from 1 to ∞) is presented. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations (for ϕ → ∞) and three-dimensional CFD simulations (for 1 ≤ ϕ < ∞) are performed to establish and elucidate the role of finiteness of the horizontal planform on the thermo-fluid-dynamics of natural convection. Great care is taken here to ensure grid independence and domain independence of the presented solutions. The results of the CFD simulations are compared with experimental data and similarity theory to understand how the existing simplified results fit, in the appropriate limiting cases, with the complex three-dimensional solutions revealed here. The present computational study establishes the region of a high-aspect-ratio planform over which the results of the similarity theory are approximately valid, the extent of this region depending on the Grashof number. There is, however, a region near the edge of the plate and another region near the centre of the plate (where a plume forms) in which the similarity theory results do not apply. The sizes of these non-compliance zones decrease as the Grashof number is increased. The present study also shows that the similarity velocity profile is not strictly obtained at any location over the plate because of the entrainment effect of the central plume. The 3-D CFD simulations of the present paper are coordinated to clearly reveal the separate and combined effects of three important aspects of finiteness: the presence of leading edges, the presence of planform centre, and the presence of physical corners in the planform. It is realised that the finiteness due to the presence of physical corners in the planform arises only for a finite value of ϕ in the case of 3-D CFD simulations (and not in 2-D CFD simulations or similarity theory

  7. Experimental Study for the Determination of the Turbulence Onset in Natural Convection on Inclined Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Grande, Isabel; Rodriguez Sevillano, Angel; Meseguer, Jos

    In June, 8th, 2009 the balloon-borne solar telescope SUNRISE was launched from the Swedish Space Corporation balloon facility Esrange. A telescope with a mirror of 1 m in diameter ob-served the Sun during six days until the mission was terminated in Canada. The design process of SUNRISE and of any optical telescope requires the analysis of the effect of surrounding air on the quality of images. The turbulence encountered in the local telescope environment de-grades its optical performance. This phenomenon called `seeing' consists of optical aberrations produced by density non-homogeneities in the air along the optical path. The refraction index of air changes due to thermal non-uniformities so that the wavefront incident on the mirror is randomly distorted, and therefore, images are altered. When telescope mirrors are heated, as it happens in solar telescopes, and therefore they are at a temperature different from the environment's, natural convection occurs. It is then crucial to know whether the flow in front of the mirror is laminar or turbulent. After reviewing the literature, it was found that the scattering of results about the onset of the transition gives only rough orders of magnitude of the values of the critical Grashof numbers. Aiming to obtain more information about it, the problem of determination of the turbulence onset in natural convection on heated inclined plates in air environment was experimentally revisited. The transition has been determined from hot wire velocity measurements. The onset of turbulence has been considered to take place where velocity perturbations start to grow. Experiments have shown that the onset depends not only on the Grashof number, but also on other parameters as the temperature difference between the heated plate and the surrounding air. A correlation between dimensionless Grashof and Reynolds numbers has been obtained, fitting extraordinarily well the experimental data. The results are obtained in terms of non

  8. Analysis of the heavy oil production technology effectiveness using natural thermal convection with heat agent recirculation method in reservoirs with varying initial water saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osnos, V. B.; Kuneevsky, V. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Saifullin, E. R.; Gainetdinov, A. V.; Vankov, Yu V.; Larionova, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The method of natural thermal convection with heat agent recirculation (NTC HAR) in oil reservoirs is described. The analysis of the effectiveness of this method for oil reservoir heating with the values of water saturation from 0 to 0.5 units is conducted. As the test element Ashalchinskoye oil field is taken. CMG STARS software was used for calculations. Dynamics of cumulative production, recovery factor and specific energy consumption per 1 m3 of crude oil produced in the application of the heat exchanger with heat agent in cases of different initial water saturation are defined and presented as graphs.

  9. Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong

  10. CFD Calculation of Internal Natural Convection in the Annulus between Horizontal Concentric Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    N.D. Francis, Jr; M.T. Itamura; S.W. Webb; D.L. James

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this heat transfer and fluid flow study is to assess the ability of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to reproduce the experimental results, numerical simulation results, and heat transfer correlation equations developed in the literature for natural convection heat transfer within the annulus of horizontal concentric cylinders. In the literature, a variety of heat transfer expressions have been developed to compute average equivalent thermal conductivities. However, the expressions have been primarily developed for very small inner and outer cylinder radii and gap-widths. In this comparative study, interest is primarily focused on large gap widths (on the order of half meter or greater) and large radius ratios. From the steady-state CFD analysis it is found that the concentric cylinder models for the larger geometries compare favorably to the results of the Kuehn and Goldstein correlations in the Rayleigh number range of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 8} (a range that encompasses the laminar to turbulent transition). For Rayleigh numbers greater than 10{sup 8}, both numerical simulations and experimental data (from the literature) are consistent and result in slightly lower equivalent thermal conductivities than those obtained from the Kuehn and Goldstein correlations.

  11. Characterization of Fuego for laminar and turbulent natural convection heat transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr.

    2005-08-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is conducted for internal natural convection heat transfer using the low Mach number code Fuego. The flow conditions under investigation are primarily laminar, transitional, or low-intensity level turbulent flows. In the case of turbulent boundary layers at low-level turbulence or transitional Reynolds numbers, the use of standard wall functions no longer applies, in general, for wall-bounded flows. One must integrate all the way to the wall in order to account for gradients in the dependent variables in the viscous sublayer. Fuego provides two turbulence models in which resolution of the near-wall region is appropriate. These models are the v2-f turbulence model and a Launder-Sharma, low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Two standard geometries are considered: the annulus formed between horizontal concentric cylinders and a square enclosure. Each geometry emphasizes wall shear flow and complexities associated with turbulent or near turbulent boundary layers in contact with a motionless core fluid. Overall, the Fuego simulations for both laminar and turbulent flows compared well to measured data, for both geometries under investigation, and to a widely accepted commercial CFD code (FLUENT).

  12. Experimental research on heat transfer of natural convection in vertical rectangular channels with large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qing; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Ye, Zhonghao

    2010-01-15

    This work presents the experimental research on the steady laminar natural convection heat transfer of air in three vertical thin rectangular channels with different gap clearance. The much higher ratio of width to gap clearance (60-24) and the ratio of length to gap clearance (800-320) make the rectangular channels similar with the coolant flow passage in plate type fuel reactors. The vertical rectangular channels were composed of two stainless steal plates and were heated by electrical heating rods. The wall temperatures were detected with the K-type thermocouples which were inserted into the blind holes drilled in the steal plates. Also the air temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the channel were detected. The wall heat fluxes added to the air flow were calculated by the Fourier heat conduction law. The heat transfer characteristics were analyzed, and the average Nusselt numbers in all the three channels could be well correlated with the Rayleigh number or the modified Rayleigh number in a uniform correlation. Furthermore, the maximum wall temperatures were investigated, which is a key parameter for the fuel's integrity during some accidents. It was found that even the wall heat flux was up to 1500 W/m{sup 2}, the maximum wall temperature was lower than 350 C. All this work is valuable for the plate type reactor's design and safety analysis. (author)

  13. Unsteady three-dimensional natural convection in an inclined air slot with a hexagonal honeycomb core

    SciTech Connect

    Asako, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamanaka, T.

    1995-08-01

    Unsteady three-dimensional natural convection heat transfer in an inclined air slot with a hexagonal honeycomb enclosure is investigated numerically. The numerical methodology is based on an algebraic coordinate transformation technique that maps the hexagonal cross section onto a rectangle. The transformed governing equations are solved with a control volume discretization scheme using a fully implicit method with time. The computations are performed for inclination angles in the range of 60 to 80 deg for Ra = 10{sup 4}, and in the range of 45 to 80 deg for Ra = 10{sup 5}, for Prandtl number of 0.7, and for a fixed aspect ratio of H/L = 5. A conductive thermal boundary condition for the honeycomb side walls is considered. Both periodic and nonperiodic oscillating solutions are obtained depending on the inclination angle and Rayleigh number. The complex flow patterns are presented in form of particle trajectory maps and are compared with the flow visualization results using microcapsulated liquid crystals. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Natural convection heat transfer from a horizontal wavy surface in a porous enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.; Kumar, B.V.R.; Singh, P.

    1997-02-07

    The effect of surface undulations on the natural convection heat transfer from an isothermal surface in a Darcian fluid-saturated porous enclosure has been numerically analyzed using the finite element method on a graded nonuniform mesh system. The flow-driving Rayleigh number Ra together with the geometrical parameters of wave amplitude a, wave phase {phi}, and the number of waves N considered in the horizontal dimension of the cavity are found to influence the flow and heat transfer process in the enclosure. For Ra around 50 and above, the phenomenon of flow separation and reattachment is noticed on the walls of the enclosure. A periodic shift in the reattachment point from the bottom wall to the adjacent walls in the clockwise direction, leading to the manifestation of cycles of unicellular and bicellular clockwise and counterclockwise flows, is observed, with the phase varying between 0{degree} and 350{degree}. The counterflow in the secondary circulation zone is intensified with the increase in the value of Ra. The counterflow on the wavy wall hinders the heat transfer into the system. An increase in either wave amplitude or the number of waves considered per unit length decreases the global heat flux into the system. Only marginal changes in global heat flux are noticed with increasing Ra. On the whole, the comparison of global heat flux results in the wavy wall case with those of the horizontal flat wall case shows that, in a porous enclosure, the wavy wall reduces the heat transfer into the system.

  15. An experimental study of high Rayleigh number natural convection in a horizontal annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, C.E.; Kohli, A.; Ball, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments have been performed to obtain detailed measurements of the flow field and mean temperature distribution in a differentially heated horizontal annulus for air (Pr = 0.703) for 1.0 {times} 10{sup 6} < Ra{sub L} < 1.0 {times} 10{sup 8}. A two-component laser Doppler velocimeter is used to acquire time-resolved radial and azimuthal velocity measurements in the annulus, which are used to obtain power spectral density (PSD) estimates of the velocity fluctuations in the buoyant plume arising above the heated inner cylinder. The PSD provides information on the dynamical behavior of the flow within the plume and the turbulence scales produced by the buoyant flow. Probability density functions (PDF) are also determined from the velocity measurements, providing additional information about the instabilities associated with the plume. Flow visualization is also used to reveal information about the development of oscillatory flow regimes and the onset of turbulence as Ra{sub L} increases. In addition, axially averaged temperature distributions in the plume region are obtained by holographic interferometry. These measurements provide quantitative information regarding the thermal field in the plume region, including the extent of the plume and its effect on the flow. The results are consistent with the results of previous studies and give further insight into the onset and development of turbulence in natural convection flows.

  16. Natural convection in a differentially heated square enclosure with a solid polygon.

    PubMed

    Roslan, R; Saleh, H; Hashim, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3 ≤ N ≤ ∞, the horizontal position, 0.25 ≤ X 0 ≤ 0.75, the polygon size, 0 ≤ A ≤ π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1 ≤ K r ≤ 10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 10(3) ≤ Ra ≤ 10(6). The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Studies of Transient Natural Convection with Density Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Satoru; Ishiguro, Tatsuji; Kuwahara, Kunio

    1996-11-01

    In beer manufacturing process, we cool beer in storage tank down from 8 to -1 ^circC. The understanding of cooling process is very important for designing a fermentation tank. In this paper, flow and temperature distribution in a rectangular enclosure was studied. The unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were integrated by using the multi-directional third-order upwind finite difference method(MUFDM). A parabolic density-temperature relationship was assumed in water which has the maximum density at 3.98 ^circC. Cooling down from 8 to 0 ^circC of water in 10 cm cubical enclosure (Ra=10^7) was numerically done by keeping a vertical side wall at 0 ^circC. Vortex was caused by density inversion of water which was cooled bellow 4 ^circC, and it rose near the cold wall and reached water surface after 33 min from the start of cooling. Finally, cooling proceeded from upper surface. At the aim of verifing the accuracy of the numerical result, temperature distribution under the same condition was experimentally visualized using temperature sensitive liquid crystal. The results will be presented by using video movie. Comparison between the computation and the experiment showed that the present direct simulation based on the MUFDM was powerful tool for the understanding of the natural convection with density inversion and the application of cooling phenomenon to the design of beer storage tanks.

  18. Experimental study of the steady natural convection in a horizontal annulus with irregular boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The natural convective heat transfer across an annulus with irregular boundaries was studied using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The annulus was formed by an inner hexagonal cylinder and an outer concentric circular cylinder. This configuration models, in two dimensions, a liquid metal fast breeder reactor spent fuel subassembly inside a shipping container. During the test, the annulus was filled with a single gas, either neon, air, argon, krypton, or xenon, at a pressure of about 0.5 MPa. From temperature measurements, both local and mean Nusselt numbers (Nu/sub ..delta../) at the surface of the inner cylinder were evaluated, with the mean Rayleigh number (anti Ra/sub ..delta../) varying from 4.54 x 10/sup 4/ to 0.915 x 10/sup 6/ (..delta.. is the local gas width). The data correlation for the mean Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers is given by anti Nu/sub ..delta../ = 0.183 anti Ra/sub ..delta..//sup 0/ /sup 310/.

  19. Natural convection heat transfer of nanofluids along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The unsteady natural convection heat transfer of nanofluid along a vertical plate embedded in porous medium is investigated. The Darcy-Forchheimer model is used to formulate the problem. Thermal conductivity and viscosity models based on a wide range of experimental data of nanofluids and incorporating the velocity-slip effect of the nanoparticle with respect to the base fluid, i.e., Brownian diffusion is used. The effective thermal conductivity of nanofluid in porous media is calculated using copper powder as porous media. The nonlinear governing equations are solved using an unconditionally stable implicit finite difference scheme. In this study, six different types of nanofluids have been compared with respect to the heat transfer enhancement, and the effects of particle concentration, particle size, temperature of the plate, and porosity of the medium on the heat transfer enhancement and skin friction coefficient have been studied in detail. It is found that heat transfer rate increases with the increase in particle concentration up to an optimal level, but on the further increase in particle concentration, the heat transfer rate decreases. For a particular value of particle concentration, small-sized particles enhance the heat transfer rates. On the other hand, skin friction coefficients always increase with the increase in particle concentration and decrease in nanoparticle size. PMID:23391481

  20. Numerical Study of Conjugate Natural Convection Heat Transfer Using One Phase Liquid Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdhaidh, F. A.; Hussain, K.; Qi, H. S.

    2014-07-01

    A numerical study in 3-D is performed using water as a cooling fluid to investigate the one phase natural convection heat transfer within enclosure. A heat source representing a computer CPU mounted on one vertical wall of a rectangular enclosure is simulated while a heat sink is installed on the opposite vertical wall of the enclosure. The air flow inside the computer compartment is created by using an exhaust fan, and the flow is assumed to be turbulent. The applied power considered ranges from 15 - 40 W. In order to determine the thermal behaviour of the cooling system, the effect of the heat input and the dimension of the enclosure are investigated. The results illustrate that as the size of the enclosure increase the chip temperature declined. However the drop in the temperature is very small when the width increased more than 50 mm. When the enclosure was filled with water the temperature was reduced by 38%. Also the cooling system maintains the maximum chip temperature at 71.5 °C when the heat input of 40 W was assumed and this is within the current recommended computer electronic chips temperature of no more than 85°C.

  1. Numerical investigation of natural convection of nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquids (NEILs) in enclosure heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Titan C.; Morshed, A. K. M. M.; Khan, Jamil A.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the numerical simulation of natural convection heat transfer of Al2O3 nanoparticle enhanced N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis{trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl} imide ([C4mpyrr][NTf2]) ionic liquid. The simulation was performed in three different enclosures (aspect ratio: 0.5, 1, and 1.5) with heated from below. The temperature dependent thermophysical properties of base ionic liquids (ILs) and nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquids (NEILs) were applied in the numerical simulation. The numerical results were compared with the experimental result. The numerical results show that at a certain Rayleigh number NEILs has a lower Nusselt number compared to the base IL which are consistent with the experimental results. But the percentage of degradation is much less on the numerical results compared to the experimental. However the numerical results match well with the predicted model of using thermophysical properties of NEILs. From these observations it can be concluded that the extra degradation in the experimental results may occur due the particle-fluid interaction, clustering and sedimentation of nanoparticles.

  2. Natural convection experiments in a liquid-saturated porous medium bounded by vertical coaxial cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental effort is presently underway to investigate natural convection phenomena in liquid-saturated porous media utilizing a geometry, and hydrodynamic/thermal boundary conditions, relevant to the problem of nuclear-waste isolation in geologic repositories. During the first phase of this research program, detailed measurements were made of the steady-state thermal field throughout an annular test region bounded by a vertical, constant-heat-flux, inner cylinder and a concentrically-placed, constant-temperature, outer cylinder. An overlying, constant-pressure, fluid layer was utilized to supply a permeable upper surface boundary condition. Results showed the heater surface temperature to increase with increasing vertical distance due to the presence of a buoyantly-driven upflow. The measured temperature difference (..delta..T) between the average heater surface temperature and the constant, outer-surface, temperature was found to be progressively below the straight-line/conduction-only solution for ..delta..T vs power input as the latter was systematically increased. Comparisons between measured results and numerical predictions generated with the finite-element code MARIAH showed very good agreement, thereby contributing to the qualification of this code for repository-design applications.

  3. Influence of wall roughness and thermal coductivity on turbulent natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, Paolo; Pirozzoli, Sergio; Bernardini, Matteo

    2015-11-01

    We study turbulent natural convection in enclosures with conjugate heat transfer. The simplest way to increase the heat transfer in this flow is through rough surfaces. In numerical simulations often constant temperatures are assigned on the walls, but this is an unrealistic condition in laboratory experiments. Therefore, in the DNS, to be of help to experimentalists, it is necessary to solve the heat conduction in the solid walls together with the turbulent flow between the hot and the cold walls. Here the cold wall, 0 . 5 h tick is smooth, and the hot wall has 2D and 3D rough elements of thickness 0 . 2 h above a solid layer 0 . 3 h tick. The simulation is performed in a bi-periodic domain 4 h wide. The Rayleigh number varies from 106 to 108. Two values of the thermal conductivity, one corresponding to copper and the other ten times higher were assumed. It has been found that the Nusselt number behaves as Nu = αRaγ , with α increasing with the solid conductivity and depending of the roughness shape. 3D elements produce a heat transfer greater than 2D elements. An imprinting of the flow structures on the thermal field inside the walls is observed. The one-dimensional spectra at the center, one decade wide, agree with those of forced isotropic turbulence.

  4. Effects of surface radiation on natural convection in a rayleigh-benard square enclosure: steady and unsteady conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridouane, El Hassan; Hasnaoui, Mohammed; Campo, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Coupled laminar natural convection with radiation in air-filled square enclosure heated from below and cooled from above is studied numerically for a wide variety of radiative boundary conditions at the sidewalls. A numerical model based on the finite difference method was used for the solution of mass, momentum and energy equations. The surface-to-surface method was used to calculate the radiative heat transfer. Simulations were performed for two values of the emissivities of the active and insulated walls (ɛ1=0.05 or 0.85, ɛ2=0.05 or 0.85) and Rayleigh numbers ranging from 103 to 2.3×106 . The influence of those parameters on the flow and temperature patterns and heat transfer rates are analyzed and discussed for different steady-state solutions. The existing ranges of these solutions are reported for the four different cases considered. It is founded that, for a fixed Ra, the global heat transfer across the enclosure depends only on the magnitude of the emissivity of the active walls. The oscillatory behavior, characterizing the unsteady-state solutions during the transitions from bicellular flows to the unicellular flow are observed and discussed.

  5. On the Nature of the Transition Between Roll and Cellular Organization in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2017-04-01

    Both observational and numerical studies of the convective boundary layer (CBL) have demonstrated that when surface heat fluxes are small and mean wind shear is strong, convective updrafts tend to organize into horizontal rolls aligned within 10-20° of the geostrophic wind direction. However, under large surface heat fluxes and weak to negligible shear, convection tends to organize into open cells, similar to turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Using a suite of 14 large-eddy simulations (LES) spanning a range of -z_i/L between zero (neutral) and 1041 (highly convective), where z_i is the CBL depth and L is the Obukhov length, the transition between roll- and cellular-type convection is investigated systematically for the first time using LES. Mean vertical profiles including velocity variances and turbulent transport efficiencies, as well the "roll factor," which characterizes the rotational symmetry of the vertical velocity field, indicate the transition occurs gradually over a range of -z_i/L; however, the most significant changes in vertical profiles and CBL organization occur from near-neutral conditions up to about -z_i/L ≈ 15-20. Turbulent transport efficiencies and quadrant analysis are used to characterize the turbulent transport of momentum and heat with increasing -z_i/L. It is found that turbulence transports heat efficiently from weakly to highly convective conditions; however, turbulent momentum transport becomes increasingly inefficient as -z_i/L increases.

  6. On the Nature of the Transition Between Roll and Cellular Organization in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2016-11-01

    Both observational and numerical studies of the convective boundary layer (CBL) have demonstrated that when surface heat fluxes are small and mean wind shear is strong, convective updrafts tend to organize into horizontal rolls aligned within 10-20° of the geostrophic wind direction. However, under large surface heat fluxes and weak to negligible shear, convection tends to organize into open cells, similar to turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Using a suite of 14 large-eddy simulations (LES) spanning a range of -z_i/L between zero (neutral) and 1041 (highly convective), where z_i is the CBL depth and L is the Obukhov length, the transition between roll- and cellular-type convection is investigated systematically for the first time using LES. Mean vertical profiles including velocity variances and turbulent transport efficiencies, as well the "roll factor," which characterizes the rotational symmetry of the vertical velocity field, indicate the transition occurs gradually over a range of -z_i/L ; however, the most significant changes in vertical profiles and CBL organization occur from near-neutral conditions up to about -z_i/L ≈ 15-20. Turbulent transport efficiencies and quadrant analysis are used to characterize the turbulent transport of momentum and heat with increasing -z_i/L . It is found that turbulence transports heat efficiently from weakly to highly convective conditions; however, turbulent momentum transport becomes increasingly inefficient as -z_i/L increases.

  7. CFD Validation Benchmark Dataset for Natural Convection in Nuclear Fuel Rod Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Barton; Jones, Kyle

    2016-11-01

    The present study provide CFD validation benchmark data for coupled fluid flow/convection heat transfer on the exterior of heated rods arranged in a 2 × 2 array. The rod model incorporates grids with swirling veins to resemble a nuclear fuel bundle. The four heated aluminum rods are suspended in an open-circuit wind tunnel. Boundary conditions (BCs) are measured and uncertainties calculated to provide all quantities necessary to successfully conduct a CFD validation exercise. System response quantities (SRQs) are measured for comparing the simulation output to the experiment. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) is used to non-intrusively measure 3-component velocity fields. A through-plane measurement is used for the inflow while laser sheet planes aligned with the flow direction at several downstream locations are used for system response quantities. Two constant heat flux rod surface conditions are presented (400 W/m2 and 700 W/m2) achieving a peak Rayleigh number of 1010 . Uncertainty for all measured variables is reported. The boundary conditions, system response, and all material properties are now available online for download. The U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Engineering University Program provided the funding for these experiments under Grant 00128493.

  8. Nanofluid heat transfer under mixed convection flow in a tube for solar thermal energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Y Raja; Sharma, K V; Kamal, Subhash

    2016-05-01

    The solar flat plate collector operating under different convective modes has low efficiency for energy conversion. The energy absorbed by the working fluid in the collector system and its heat transfer characteristics vary with solar insolation and mass flow rate. The performance of the system is improved by reducing the losses from the collector. Various passive methods have been devised to aid energy absorption by the working fluid. Also, working fluids are modified using nanoparticles to improve the thermal properties of the fluid. In the present work, simulation and experimental studies are undertaken for pipe flow at constant heat flux boundary condition in the mixed convection mode. The working fluid at low Reynolds number in the mixed laminar flow range is undertaken with water in thermosyphon mode for different inclination angles of the tube. Local and average coefficients are determined experimentally and compared with theoretical values for water-based Al2O3 nanofluids. The results show an enhancement in heat transfer in the experimental range with Rayleigh number at higher inclinations of the collector tube for water and nanofluids.

  9. Natural solutal convection in magnetic fluids: First-order phase transition aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Aleksey S.

    2016-10-01

    Concentration stratification of magnetic fluids under the action of external magnetic field can disturb mechanical equilibrium in the system and cause intensive solutal convection. The current paper is devoted to the study of free solutal convection in magnetic fluids undergoing first-order phase transition. Simulation of solutal convection in OpenFOAM package makes it possible to compare numeric results with physical experiment observations. The numeric simulation of convective hydrodynamic flows was carried out in the framework of several theories of first-order phase transition in ferrocolloids. The numerical results are compared with experimental observations in order to choose the theory which predicts most accurately the concentration stratification in magnetic fluids undergoing magneto-controllable first-order phase transition.

  10. The analysis and kinetic energy balance of an upper-level wind maximum during intense convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formation and maintenance of the upper-level wind maximum which formed between 1800 and 2100 GMT, April 10, 1979, during the AVE-SESAME I period, when intense storms and tornadoes were experienced (the Red River Valley tornado outbreak). Radiosonde stations participating in AVE-SESAME I are plotted (centered on Oklahoma). National Meteorological Center radar summaries near the times of maximum convective activity are mapped, and height and isotach plots are given, where the formation of an upper-level wind maximum over Oklahoma is the most significant feature at 300 mb. The energy balance of the storm region is seen to change dramatically as the wind maximum forms. During much of its lifetime, the upper-level wind maximum is maintained by ageostrophic flow that produces cross-contour generation of kinetic energy and by the upward transport of midtropospheric energy. Two possible mechanisms for the ageostrophic flow are considered.

  11. The halt of deep convection in the Greenland Sea: A natural experiment for the study of their causes and effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somavilla Cabrillo, Raquel; Schauer, Ursula; Budeus, Gedeon; Latarius, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    There are only a few sites where the deep ocean is ventilated from the surface. The responsible process known as deep convection is recognized to be a key process on the Earth's climate system, but still it is scarcely observed, and its good representation by global oceanographic and climate models remains unclear. In the Arctic Ocean, the halt of deep convection in the Greenland Sea during the last three decades serves as a natural experiment to study: (1) the conditions that drive the occurrence or not of deep convection and (2) the effects of the halt of deep convection on the thermohaline properties of the deep water masses and circulation both locally and in adjacent ocean basins. Combining oceanic and atmospheric in-situ data together with reanalysis data, we observe that not only on average the winter net heat losses from the ocean to the atmosphere (Qo) have decreased during the last three decades in the Greenland Sea (ΔQo (before the 1980s- after the 1980s) = 25 Wm-2) but the intensity and number of strong cooling events (Qo ≥ 800Wm-2). This last value for convection reaching 2000 m in the Greenland Sea seems critical to make the mixed layer deepening from being a non-penetrative process to one arrested by baroclinic instabilities. Besides, changes in the wind stress curl and preconditioning for deep convection have occurred, hindering also the occurrence of deep convection. Concerning the effects of the halt of deep convection, hydrographic data reveal that the temperature between 2000 meters depth and the sea floor has risen by 0.3 °C in the last 30 years, which is ten times higher than the temperature increase in the global ocean on average, and salinity rose by 0.02 because import of relatively warm and salty Arctic Ocean deep waters continued. The necessary transports to explain the observed changes suggest an increase of Arctic Ocean deep water transport that would have compensated the decrease in deep water formation rate after the 1980s. The

  12. Effect of inclined magnetic field on natural convection melting in a square cavity with a local heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondareva, Nadezhda S.; Sheremet, Mikhail A.

    2016-12-01

    MHD natural convection melting in a square cavity with a local heater has been analyzed numerically. The domain of interest is an enclosure bounded by isothermal vertical walls of low constant temperature and adiabatic horizontal walls. A heat source of constant temperature is located on the bottom wall. An inclined uniform magnetic field affects the natural convective heat transfer and fluid flow inside the melt. The governing equations formulated in dimensionless stream function, vorticity and temperature with corresponding initial and boundary conditions have been solved using implicit finite difference method of the second-order accuracy. The effects of the Rayleigh number, Stefan number, Hartmann number, magnetic field inclination angle and dimensionless time on streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt number at the heat source surface have been analyzed.

  13. Multiple Solutions in Natural Convection in an Air Filled Square Enclosure: Fractal Dimension of Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklouche Benouaguef, S.; Zeghmati, B.; Bouhadef, K.; Daguenet, M.

    In this study, we investigated numerically the transient natural convection in a square cavity with two horizontal adiabatic sides and vertical walls composed of two regions of same size maintained at different temperatures. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and bi-dimensional. The governing equations written in dimensionless form and expressed in terms of stream function and vorticity, have been solved using the Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and the GAUSS elimination method. Calculations were performed for air (Pr = 0.71), with a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 3.7x106. We analysed the effect of the Rayleigh number on the route to the chaos of the system. The first transition has been found from steady-state to oscillatory flow and the second is a subharmonic bifurcation as the Rayleigh number is increased further. For sufficiently small Rayleigh numbers, present results show that the flow is characterized by four cells with horizontal and vertical symmetric axes. The attractor bifurcates from a stable fixed point to a limit cycle for a Rayleigh number varying from 2.5x105 to 2.51x105. A limit cycle settles from Ra = 3x105 and persists until Ra = 5x105. At a Rayleigh number of 2.5x105 the temporal evolution of the Nusselt number Nu(t) was stationary. As the Rayleigh number increases, the flow becomes unstable and bifurcates to a time periodic solution at a critical Rayleigh number between 2.5x105 and 2.51x105. After the first HOPF bifurcation at Ra = 2.51x105, the oscillatory flow undergoes several bifurcations and ultimately evolves into a chaotic flow.

  14. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  15. Convective heat processing of turkey roll: effects on sensory quality and energy usage.

    PubMed

    Brown, N E; Chyuan, J Y

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-four frozen, raw, boneless, ready-to-cook turkey rolls were cooked in an institutional electric convection oven to an internal temperature of 77 degrees C. Six treatment combinations of three cooking temperatures (105 degrees C, 135 degrees C, and 165 degrees C) and two holding conditions (not chilled and chilled for 24 hours) were studied. Turkey rolls from each treatment combination were subjected to three hot-holding times (0, 60, and 120 minutes). Electrical energy usage was monitored during heat processing of the turkey rolls, reheating the turkey slices, and hot holding the turkey slices. Aroma, juicy mouthfeel, texture, flavor, and flavor off-notes of the cooked turkey were evaluated by seven judges using 150-mm unstructured line scales. Chew counts also were recorded. Turkey cooked at 105 degrees C took significantly more time to cook (331 vs. 227 and 203 minutes) but consumed significantly less energy (3.4 vs. 3.8 and 4.5 kWh) than turkey rolls cooked at 135 degrees C and 165 degrees C, respectively. Significantly higher juicy mouthfeel scores were obtained when the turkey roll was cooked in the convection oven at an oven temperature of 105 degrees C, the turkey was not chilled, and the slices were held hot for 60 minutes or less.

  16. Energy Stability of Thermocapillary Convection in Models of the Float Zone Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. P.; Jankowski, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The energy-stability of thermocapillary convection in models of the float-zone, crystal-growing process was studied. Stability limits, as functions of pertinent parameters, that will identify conditions which will not allow the existence of an undesirable oscillatory flow instability were determined. Such instabilities may occur in the space processing of semiconductor materials. The determination of the stability limits will involve two sets of numerical computations: (1) solution of the nonlinear governing equations together with the appropriate boundary conditions to determine the basic state (in general, velocity, pressure and temperature fields and the displacement of free surfaces and interfaces); and (2) solution of a nonlinear Euler-Lagrange systems for the energy-stability limit. Both computations, while difficult, should be within the scope of available computer capability and available concepts in numerical analysis. Finite-element methods are attractive candidates for the numerical work.

  17. Efficient natural-convective heat transfer properties of carbon nanotube sheets and their roles on the thermal dissipation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaohui; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2014-03-12

    In this work, we report our studies related to the natural-convective heat transfer properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets. We theoretically derived the formulas and experimentally measured the natural-convective heat transfer coefficients (H) via electrical heating method. The H values of the CNT sheets containing different layers (1, 2, 3, and 1000) were measured. We found that the single-layer CNT sheet had a unique ability on heat dissipation because of its great H. The H value of the single-layer CNT sheet was 69 W/(m(2) K) which was about twice of aluminum foil in the same environment. As the layers increased, the H values dropped quickly to the same with that of aluminum foil. We also discussed its roles on thermal dissipation, and the results indicated that the convection was a significant way of dissipation when the CNT sheets were applied on macroscales. These results may give us a new guideline to design devices based on the CNT sheets.

  18. Uniform lateral mass flux effect on natural convection of non-Newtonian fluids over a cone in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1998-10-01

    Convective heat transfer in a porous medium has a number of thermal engineering applications such as ceramic processing, nuclear reactor cooling system, crude oil drilling, chemical reactor design, ground water pollution and filtration processes. In this paper, the authors have investigated a boundary layer analysis for uniform lateral mass flux effect on natural convection of non-Newtonian power-law fluids along an isothermal or isoflux vertical cone embedded in a porous medium. Numerical results for the dimensionless temperature profiles as well as the local Nusselt number are presented for the mass flux parameter, viscosity index n and geometry shape parameter {lambda}. The local surface heat transfer increases for the case withdrawal of fluid, the increase of the value of {lambda}. The local Nusselt number is found to be significantly affected by the surface mass flux than the viscosity index.

  19. Performance Analysis and Parametric Study of a Natural Convection Solar Air Heater With In-built Oil Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhote, Yogesh; Thombre, Shashikant

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the thermal performance of the proposed double flow natural convection solar air heater with in-built liquid (oil) sensible heat storage. Unused engine oil was used as thermal energy storage medium due to its good heat retaining capacity even at high temperatures without evaporation. The performance evaluation was carried out for a day of the month March for the climatic conditions of Nagpur (India). A self reliant computational model was developed using computational tool as C++. The program developed was self reliant and compute the performance parameters for any day of the year and would be used for major cities in India. The effect of change in storage oil quantity and the inclination (tilt angle) on the overall efficiency of the solar air heater was studied. The performance was tested initially at different storage oil quantities as 25, 50, 75 and 100 l for a plate spacing of 0.04 m with an inclination of 36o. It has been found that the solar air heater gives the best performance at a storage oil quantity of 50 l. The performance of the proposed solar air heater is further tested for various combinations of storage oil quantity (50, 75 and 100 l) and the inclination (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o, 90o). It has been found that the proposed solar air heater with in-built oil storage shows its best performance for the combination of 50 l storage oil quantity and 60o inclination. Finally the results of the parametric study was also presented in the form of graphs carried out for a fixed storage oil quantity of 25 l, plate spacing of 0.03 m and at an inclination of 36o to study the behaviour of various heat transfer and fluid flow parameters of the solar air heater.

  20. Restructuring Energy Industries: Lessons from Natural Gas

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    For the past 20 years, the natural gas industry has been undergoing a restructuring similar to the transition now confronting the electric power industry. This article presents a summary of some of these gas industry experiences to provide a basis for some insights into energy industry restructuring.

  1. Eulerian-Lagrangian solution of the convection-dispersion equation in natural co-ordinates.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; Milford, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The vast majority of numerical investigations of transport phenomena use an Eulerian formulation for the convenience that the computational grids are fixed in space. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method (ELM) of solution for the convection-dispersion equation is discussed and analyzed. The ELM uses the Lagrangian concept in an Eulerian computational grid system.-from Authors

  2. Impacts of convection on high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Christof; Hintze, Meike; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal subsurface heat storage is increasingly used in order to overcome the temporal disparities between heat production from renewable sources like solar thermal installations or from industrial surplus heat and the heat demand for building climatisation or hot water supply. In this context, high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is a technology to efficiently store and retrieve large amounts of heat using groundwater wells in an aquifer to inject or withdraw hot or cold water. Depending on the local hydrogeology and temperature amplitudes during high-temperature ATES, density differences between the injected hot water and the ambient groundwater may induce significant convective flow components in the groundwater flow field. As a consequence, stored heat may accumulate at the top of the storage aquifer which reduces the heat recovery efficiency of the ATES system. Also, an accumulation of heat at the aquifer top will induce increased emissions of heat to overlying formations with potential impacts on groundwater quality outside of the storage. This work investigates the impacts of convective heat transport on the storage efficiency of a hypothetical high-temperature ATES system for seasonal heat storage as well as heat emissions to neighboring formations by numerical scenario simulations. The coupled groundwater flow and heat transport code OpenGeoSys is used to simulate a medium scale ATES system operating in a sandy aquifer of 20 m thickness with an average groundwater temperature of 10°C and confining aquicludes at top and bottom. Seasonal heat storage by a well doublet (i.e. one fully screened "hot" and "cold" well, respectively) is simulated over a period of 10 years with biannual injection / withdrawal cycles at pumping rates of 15 m³/h and for different scenarios of the temperature of the injected water (20, 35, 60 and 90 °C). Simulation results show, that for the simulated system significant convective heat transport sets in when

  3. A PCM/forced convection conjugate transient analysis of energy storage systems with annular and countercurrent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.; Juhasz, A.

    1991-01-01

    Latent heat energy storage systems with both annular and countercurrent flows are modeled numerically. The change of phase of the phase-change material (PCM) and the transient forced convective heat transfer for the transfer fluid are solved simultaneously as a conjugate problem. A parametric study and a system optimization are conducted. It is found that the energy storage system with the countercurrent flow is an efficient way to absorb heat energy in a short period for pulsed power load space applications.

  4. Convection in pulsating stars. I - Nonlinear hydrodynamics. II - RR Lyrae convection and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellingwerf, R. F.

    1982-11-01

    A nonlinear, nonlocal, time-dependent treatment of convection suitable for use in models of cool giant stars is presented. Local conservation equations plus a diffusive transport equation are used to derive the convective hydrodynamic equations for the case in which turbulent pressure, energy, and viscosity cannot be ignored. The effects of convective overshooting, superadiabatic gradients, convection/pulsation interaction, and time dependence enter this treatment in a natural way. Methods of treating turbulent viscosity and acoustic losses are discussed. Also, an efficient computational scheme for computing the derivatives needed for an implicit hydrodynamic code is outlined. Application to RR Lyrae star envelopes will be presented in a companion paper.

  5. The variable nature of convection in the tropics and subtropics: A legacy of 16 years of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kristen L.; Zuluaga, Manuel D.; Brodzik, Stella R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For over 16 years, the Precipitation Radar of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite detected the three‐dimensional structure of significantly precipitating clouds in the tropics and subtropics. This paper reviews and synthesizes studies using the TRMM radar data to present a global picture of the variation of convection throughout low latitudes. The multiyear data set shows convection varying not only in amount but also in its very nature across the oceans, continents, islands, and mountain ranges of the tropics and subtropics. Shallow isolated raining clouds are overwhelmingly an oceanic phenomenon. Extremely deep and intense convective elements occur almost exclusively over land. Upscale growth of convection into mesoscale systems takes a variety of forms. Oceanic cloud systems generally have less intense embedded convection but can form very wide stratiform regions. Continental mesoscale systems often have more intense embedded convection. Some of the most intense convective cells and mesoscale systems occur near the great mountain ranges of low latitudes. The Maritime Continent and Amazonia exhibit convective clouds with maritime characteristics although they are partially or wholly land. Convective systems containing broad stratiform areas manifest most strongly over oceans. The stratiform precipitation occurs in various forms. Often it occurs as quasi‐uniform precipitation with strong melting layers connected with intense convection. In monsoons and the Intertropical Convergence Zone, it takes the form of closely packed weak convective elements. Where fronts extend into the subtropics, broad stratiform regions are larger and have lower and sloping melting layers related to the baroclinic origin of the precipitation. PMID:27668295

  6. The variable nature of convection in the tropics and subtropics: A legacy of 16 years of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite.

    PubMed

    Houze, Robert A; Rasmussen, Kristen L; Zuluaga, Manuel D; Brodzik, Stella R

    2015-09-01

    For over 16 years, the Precipitation Radar of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite detected the three-dimensional structure of significantly precipitating clouds in the tropics and subtropics. This paper reviews and synthesizes studies using the TRMM radar data to present a global picture of the variation of convection throughout low latitudes. The multiyear data set shows convection varying not only in amount but also in its very nature across the oceans, continents, islands, and mountain ranges of the tropics and subtropics. Shallow isolated raining clouds are overwhelmingly an oceanic phenomenon. Extremely deep and intense convective elements occur almost exclusively over land. Upscale growth of convection into mesoscale systems takes a variety of forms. Oceanic cloud systems generally have less intense embedded convection but can form very wide stratiform regions. Continental mesoscale systems often have more intense embedded convection. Some of the most intense convective cells and mesoscale systems occur near the great mountain ranges of low latitudes. The Maritime Continent and Amazonia exhibit convective clouds with maritime characteristics although they are partially or wholly land. Convective systems containing broad stratiform areas manifest most strongly over oceans. The stratiform precipitation occurs in various forms. Often it occurs as quasi-uniform precipitation with strong melting layers connected with intense convection. In monsoons and the Intertropical Convergence Zone, it takes the form of closely packed weak convective elements. Where fronts extend into the subtropics, broad stratiform regions are larger and have lower and sloping melting layers related to the baroclinic origin of the precipitation.

  7. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.; Balcomb, J. D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-11-01

    Natural convection between spaces in a building which play a major role in energy transfer are discussed. Two situations are investigated: Convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway sizing equation is given for the single door case. Data from airflow monitoring in one two-story house and summary data for five others are presented. The nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  8. On the episodic nature of derecho-producing convective systems in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Walker S.; Mote, Thomas L.; Bentley, Mace L.

    2005-11-01

    Convectively generated windstorms occur over broad temporal and spatial scales; however, one of the larger-scale and most intense of these windstorms has been given the name derecho. This study illustrates the tendency for derecho-producing mesoscale convective systems to group together across the United States - forming a derecho series. The derecho series is recognized as any succession of derechos that develop within a similar synoptic environment with no more than 72 h separating individual events. A derecho dataset for the period 1994-2003 was assembled to investigate the groupings of these extremely damaging convective wind events. Results indicate that over 62% of the derechos in the dataset were members of a derecho series. On average, nearly six series affected the United States annually. Most derecho series consisted of two or three events; though, 14 series during the period of record contained four or more events. Two separate series involved nine derechos within a period of nine days. Analyses reveal that derecho series largely frequent regions of the Midwest, Ohio Valley, and the south-central Great Plains during May, June, and July. Results suggest that once a derecho occurred during May, June, or July, there was a 58% chance that this event was the first of a series of two or more, and about a 46% chance that this was the first of a derecho series consisting of three or more events. The derecho series climatology reveals that forecasters in regions frequented by derechos should be prepared for the probable regeneration of a derecho-producing convective system after an initial event occurs. Copyright

  9. Transition from multiplicity to singularity of steady natural convection in a tilted cubical enclosure.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juan F; Henry, Daniel; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2015-08-01

    The transition from the complex Rayleigh-Bénard convection to the simple heated-from-the-sides configuration in a cubical cavity filled with a Newtonian fluid is numerically studied. The cavity is tilted by an angle θ around its lower horizontal edge and is heated and cooled from two opposite tilted sides. We first analyze the effect of a marginal inclination angle on quasi-Rayleigh-Bénard convection (θ≈0∘), which is a realistic physical approximation to the ideal Rayleigh-Bénard convection. We then yield the critical angles where multiple solutions that were initially found for θ≈0∘ disappear, eventually resulting in the single steady roll solution found in the heated-from-the-sides configuration (θ=90∘). We confirm the existence of critical angles during the transition θ:0∘→90∘, and we demonstrate that such angles are a consequence of either singularities or collisions of bifurcation points in the Rayleigh-number-θ parameter space. We finally derive the most important critical angles corresponding to any Newtonian fluid of Prandtl number greater than that of air.

  10. Stability Analysis of Natural Convection in Vertical Cavities with Lateral Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahata, Hideo

    1999-02-01

    Thermal convection of air in two-dimensional vertical cavities is considered under the boundary conditions of the left and right vertical walls kept at different temperatures and the top and bottom horizontal walls subject to thermal insulation. Linear stability analysis of thermal convection is made with the aid of the Galerkin method in which the field variables are expanded in terms of Chebyshev polynomials and linear growth rates of steady states are computed using the QR algorithm.The results of the stability analysis for air with the Prandtl number 0.71 over the range of the cavity aspect ratio A from 1 to 10 show that with increase of the temperature difference between the two vertical walls the oscillatory motion first generated by the instability of steady convection is in the form of the Tollmien-Schlichting or the internal gravity waves according as A > 3.65 or A < 3.41 while for 3.41 < A < 3.65 the internal gravity waves are first generated after the preceding spatial flow transition of the hydraulic jump.

  11. Transition from multiplicity to singularity of steady natural convection in a tilted cubical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Juan F.; Henry, Daniel; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2015-08-01

    The transition from the complex Rayleigh-Bénard convection to the simple heated-from-the-sides configuration in a cubical cavity filled with a Newtonian fluid is numerically studied. The cavity is tilted by an angle θ around its lower horizontal edge and is heated and cooled from two opposite tilted sides. We first analyze the effect of a marginal inclination angle on quasi-Rayleigh-Bénard convection (θ ≈0∘ ), which is a realistic physical approximation to the ideal Rayleigh-Bénard convection. We then yield the critical angles where multiple solutions that were initially found for θ ≈0∘ disappear, eventually resulting in the single steady roll solution found in the heated-from-the-sides configuration (θ =90∘ ). We confirm the existence of critical angles during the transition θ :0∘→90∘ , and we demonstrate that such angles are a consequence of either singularities or collisions of bifurcation points in the Rayleigh-number-θ parameter space. We finally derive the most important critical angles corresponding to any Newtonian fluid of Prandtl number greater than that of air.

  12. Supergranular Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-12-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Here the opacity is so large that heat flux transport is mainly by convection rather than by photon diffusion. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection , Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni

  13. Seasonal meridional energy balance and thermal structure of the atmosphere of Uranus - A radiative-convective-dynamical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedson, James; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented for the thermodynamics of the seasonal meridional energy balance and thermal structure of the Uranian atmosphere. The model considers radiation and small-scale convection, and dynamical heat fluxes due to large-scale baroclinic eddies. Phase oscillations with a period of 0.5 Uranian year are discerned in the total internal power and global enthalpy storage. The variations in the identity of the main transport agent with the magnitude of the internal heat source are discussed. It is shown that meridional heat transport in the atmosphere is sufficient to lower seasonal horizontal temperature contrasts below those predicted with radiative-convection models.

  14. Environmental data energy technology characterizations: natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Environmental Data Energy Technology Characterizations are publications which are intended to provide policy analysts and technical analysts with basic environmental data associated with key energy technologies. This publication provides backup documentation on natural gas. The transformation of the energy in gas into a more useful form is described in this document in terms of major activity areas in the gas cycle; that is, in terms of activities which produce either an energy product or a fuel leading to the production of an energy product in a different form. The activities discussed in this document are exploration, extraction, purification, power-plants, storage and transportation of natural gas. These activities represent both well-documented and non-documented activity areas. The former activities are characterized in terms of actual operating data with allowance for future modification where appropriate. Emissions are assumed to conform to environmental standards. The other activity areas examined are those like exploration and extraction, where reliance on engineering studies provided the data. The organization of the chapters in this volume is designed to support the tabular presentation in the summary. Each chapter begins with a brief description of the activity under consideration. The standard characteristics, size, availability, mode of functioning, and place in the fuel cycle are presented. Next, major legislative and/or technological factors influencing the commercial operation of the activity are offered. Discussions of resources consumed, residuals produced, and economics follow. To aid in comparing and linking the different activity areas, data for each area are normalized to 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy output from the activity.

  15. Microwave energy versus convected hot air for rapidly drying ceramic tile

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine if microwave energy could provide advantages over the conventional hot air method currently used for rapidly drying ceramic tile. Tiles consisting of a typical fast-fire body formula were dried to 0.5% moisture using a 2.45 GHz, 950W microwave oven and a natural gas-fired roller dryer. Statistical methods were employed to develop equations for predicting microwave energy consumption, tile % moisture and surface temperature given drying time, tile volume and % relative humidity. Microwave drying was found to require 36% less energy than hot air drying. Moisture was removed and surface temperature elevated at faster rates using microwave energy.

  16. Thermomagnetic convective flows in a vertical layer of ferrocolloid: perturbation energy analysis and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Suslov, Sergey A; Bozhko, Alexandra A; Sidorov, Alexander S; Putin, Gennady F

    2012-07-01

    Flow patterns arising in a vertical differentially heated layer of nonconducting ferromagnetic fluid placed in an external uniform transverse magnetic field are studied experimentally and discussed from the point of view of the perturbation energy balance. A quantitative criterion for detecting the parametric point where the dominant role in generating a flow instability is transferred between the thermogravitational and thermomagnetic mechanisms is suggested, based on the disturbance energy balance analysis. A comprehensive experimental study of various flow patterns is undertaken, and the existence is demonstrated of oblique thermomagnetic waves theoretically predicted by Suslov [Phys. Fluids 20, 084101 (2008)] and superposed onto the stationary magnetoconvective pattern known previously. It is found that the wave number of the detected convection patterns depends sensitively on the temperature difference across the layer and on the applied magnetic field. In unsteady regimes its value varies periodically by a factor of almost 2, indicating the appearance of two different competing wave modes. The wave numbers and spatial orientation of the observed dominant flow patterns are found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Weimin

    2012-07-10

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above {approx}0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Hoiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  18. Existence of a steady state of a natural convective flow in a confined medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatel, J.-F.; Marcillat, J.

    1983-04-01

    Experimental results are presented from a study of convective flow in a parallelipiped-shaped cavity with walls maintained at different temperatures. Resistive heaters permitted varying the wall temperatures up to 150 C, and the container could be tilted from 0-90 deg. Air was used as the fluid medium, with Rayleigh numbers from 2000-1,000,000. The flows studied featured the appearances of both steady and unsteady instabilities. Attention was given to vertical movements and a two-dimensional numerical model was defined. Attempts were made to identify the limits of a steady state in terms of the Rayleigh number, the shape factors, and the tilt of the cavity.

  19. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  20. Three-Dimensional Transient Natural Convection in a Horizontal Cylinder: A Numerical Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    difference approximation, Equation (6) C - constant, Equation (6) c -. specific heat at constant pressure P F - nondimensional function of the independent...e = F1 (R,4,Z) (2) w = F2 (R, p ,Z) (CONVECTIVE-STRATIFIED) CONDITION 0 = F3 (R,,Z) where the functions F1 , and F3 represents the assumed...direction. The system of equations solved is: (1) (0) An+ n (1) (0) (0) (0) A =C P ; (A + A ) + 6R(An) + 6z(An) + B] AT n+l n R. n Zn (2) (0) A - A n U

  1. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Batta, A.; Casamassima, V.; Cheng, X.; Choi, Yong Joon; Hwang, Il Soon; Lim, Jun; Meloni, P.; Nitti, F. S.; Dedul, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Komlev, O.; Jaeger, W.; Sedov, A.; Kim, Ji Hak; Puspitarini, D.

    2011-08-01

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  2. A computational analysis of natural convection in a vertical channel with a modified power law non-Newtonian fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.; Greene, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    An implicit finite difference method was applied to analyze laminar natural convection in a vertical channel with a modified power law fluid. This fluid model was chosen because it describes the viscous properties of a pseudoplastic fluid over the entire shear rate range likely to be found in natural convection flows since it covers the shear rate range from Newtonian through transition to simple power law behavior. In addition, a dimensionless similarity parameter is identified which specifies in which of the three regions a particular system is operating. The results for the average channel velocity and average Nusselt number in the asymptotic Newtonian and power law regions are compared with numerical data in the literature. Also, graphical results are presented for the velocity and temperature fields and entrance lengths. The results of average channel velocity and Nusselt number are given in the three regions including developing and fully developed flows. As an example, a pseudoplastic fluid (carboxymethyl cellulose) was chosen to compare the different results of average channel velocity and Nusselt number between a modified power law fluid and the conventional power law model. The results show, depending upon the operating conditions, that if the correct model is not used, gross errors can result.

  3. Emissivity measurements in support of experiments on natural convection between a vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J.E.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental measurements of surface emissivities of three metallic samples have been obtained in support of an experiment aimed at determining natural convection and total heat transfer for a heated vertical cylinder surrounded by an array of cooled vertical tubes. In some cases, the heated stainless steel cylinder was shrouded by a perforated aluminum outer cylinder. The surrounding cooled tubes were also aluminum. In this experiment, heat transfer from the heated tube and the surrounding outer cylinder will occur by a combination of natural convection and radiation. At temperatures near the melting point of aluminum, the radiant contribution is particularly important, accounting for 50% or more of the total heat transfer. Consequently, accurate knowledge of surface emissivities of the heated rods, outer cylinders and surrounding structures is needed in order to predict the system thermal response during the transient. Direct measurements of surface emissivities have been obtained for one stainless steel and two aluminum samples. The measurements were obtained using an infrared pyrometer sensitive to the 8--14 {mu}m wavelength range. A procedure for estimating total hemispherical emissivities based on the measured spectral, normal results is also provided.

  4. Natural convection of a two-dimensional Boussinesq fluid does not maximize entropy production.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stuart; Bullock, Seth

    2014-08-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection is a canonical example of spontaneous pattern formation in a nonequilibrium system. It has been the subject of considerable theoretical and experimental study, primarily for systems with constant (temperature or heat flux) boundary conditions. In this investigation, we have explored the behavior of a convecting fluid system with negative feedback boundary conditions. At the upper and lower system boundaries, the inward heat flux is defined such that it is a decreasing function of the boundary temperature. Thus the system's heat transport is not constrained in the same manner that it is in the constant temperature or constant flux cases. It has been suggested that the entropy production rate (which has a characteristic peak at intermediate heat flux values) might apply as a selection rule for such a system. In this work, we demonstrate with Lattice Boltzmann simulations that entropy production maximization does not dictate the steady state of this system, despite its success in other, somewhat similar scenarios. Instead, we will show that the same scaling law of dimensionless variables found for constant boundary conditions also applies to this system.

  5. Natural convection in horizontal porous layers with localized heating from below

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V. ); Kulacki, F.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Convective flow of fluid through saturated porous media heated from below is of considerable interest, and has been extensively studied. Most of these studies are concerned with either infinite horizontal porous layers or rectangular (or cylindrical) porous cavities with adiabatic vertical walls. A related problem of practical importance occurs when only a portion of the bottom surface is heated and the rest of it is either adiabatic or isothermally cooled. This situation is encountered in several geothermal areas which consists of troughs of volcanic debris contained by walls of nonfragmented ignimbrite. Thus, the model region considered is a locally heated long trough of isotropic porous medium confined by impermeable and insulating surroundings. Also, the recent motivation to study this problem has come from the efforts to identify a geologic repository for nuclear waste disposal. The purpose of the present work is to consider the effects of aspect ratio and Rayleigh number on free convection heat transfer from an isothermal heat source centrally located on the bottom surface of a horizontal porous cavity.

  6. Buoyancy-Driven Natural Convection of Liquid Helium in an Electron Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y. L.; Dodd, J. R.; Willis, W. J.

    2006-04-27

    A small liquid helium test chamber with 1.5 L active volume has been designed and constructed, to make the fundamental measurements of physical properties of electron bubble transports in liquid helium, aimed at developing a new cryogenic neutrino detector, using liquid helium as the detecting medium, for the detection of solar neutrinos. The test chamber is a double-walled cylindrical container equipped with five optical windows and ten high voltage cables. A LN2/LHe cryostat and a needle valve for vapor helium cooling are used to provide a 1.7{approx}4.5 K low temperature environments for the test chamber. One of key issues for the cryogenic design and experimental sensitivity of electron bubble tracking is that of keeping a thermally uniform liquid helium bath. The external heat loads to the chamber will generate a buoyancy-induced convection of liquid helium, which will carry the electron bubbles and accelerate or decelerate their transportation and therefore must be reduced to the minimum, so that the slow motion of the electron bubbles will not be confused by this effect. This paper will present the computational simulation and analysis on thermal convection and uniformity of the test chamber.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER OF IONIC LIQUID IN A RECTANGULAR ENCLOSURE HEATED FROM BELOW

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-07-18

    This paper presents an experimental study of natural convection heat transfer for an Ionic Liquid. The experiments were performed for 1-butyl-2, 3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}]) at a Raleigh number range of 1.26 x 10{sup 7} to 8.3 x 10{sup 7}. In addition to determining the convective heat transfer coefficients, this study also included experimental determination of thermophysical properties of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] such as, density, viscosity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. The results show that the density of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] varies from 1.437-1.396 g/cm{sup 3} within the temperature range of 10-50 C, the thermal conductivity varies from 0.105-0.116 W/m.K between a temperature of 10 to 60 C, the heat capacity varies from 1.015 J/g.K - 1.760 J/g.K within temperature range of 25-340 C and the viscosity varies from 18cp-243cp within temperature range 10-75 C. The results for density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and viscosity were in close agreement with the values in the literature. Measured dimensionless Nusselt number was observed to be higher for the ionic liquid than that of DI water. This is expected as Nusselt number is the ratio of heat transfer by convection to conduction and the ionic liquid has lower thermal conductivity (approximately 18%) than DI water.

  8. Natural convection on a vertical plate in a saturated porous medium with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedda, M.; Sriti, M.; Achemlal, D.

    2014-08-01

    The main goal of this paper is to re-exam a class of exact solutions for the two-dimensional free convection boundary layers induced by a heated vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium with an exponential decaying heat generation. The temperature distribution of the plate has been assumed to vary as a power of the axial coordinate measured from the leading edge of the plate and subjected to an applied lateral mass flux. The boundary layer equations are solved analytically and numerically using a fifth-order Runge-Kutta scheme coupled with the shooting iteration method. As for the classical problem without internal heat generation, it is proved that multiple (unbounded) solutions arise for any and for any suction/injection parameter. For such solutions, the asymptotic behavior as the similarity variable approaches infinity is determined.

  9. Experimental Technique and Assessment for Measuring the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient from Natural Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. Cyril; Vanfossen, G. James, Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Dukhan, Nihad

    1995-01-01

    A technique was developed to cast frozen ice shapes that had been grown on a metal surface. This technique was applied to a series of ice shapes that were grown in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on flat plates. Nine flat plates, 18 inches square, were obtained from which aluminum castings were made that gave good ice shape characterizations. Test strips taken from these plates were outfitted with heat flux gages, such that when placed in a dry wind tunnel, can be used to experimentally map out the convective heat transfer coefficient in the direction of flow from the roughened surfaces. The effects on the heat transfer coefficient for both parallel and accelerating flow will be studied. The smooth plate model verification baseline data as well as one ice roughened test case are presented.

  10. Schlieren visualization of water natural convection in a vertical ribbed channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossa, M.; Misale, M.; Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Schlieren techniques are valuable tools for the qualitative and quantitative visualizations of flows in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines. A large number of schlieren systems have been developed and documented in the literature; majority of applications involve flows of gases, typically air. In this work, a schlieren technique is applied to visualize the buoyancy-induced flow inside vertical ribbed channels using water as convective fluid. The test section consists of a vertical plate made of two thin sheets of chrome-plated copper with a foil heater sandwiched between them; the external sides of the plate are roughened with transverse, square-cross-sectioned ribs. Two parallel vertical walls, smooth and unheated, form with the heated ribbed plate two adjacent, identical and asymmetrically heated, vertical channels. Results include flow schlieren visualizations with colour-band filters, reconstructions of the local heat transfer coefficient distributions along the ribbed surfaces and comparisons with past experiments performed using air as working fluid.

  11. Modification of postfrontal convective clouds and precipitation by natural and anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Daniel; Bangert, Max; Vogel, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Shallow postfrontal convective clouds are thought to be sensitive to the aerosol burden. In our case study we present results of model runs, simulating April 25, 2008. On this day a cold front passes Germany from north to south. During this situation the sea salt aerosol transported by the northerly flow into the model domain replaces the preexisting anthropogenic aerosol. We quantify the effect of the aerosol on the microphysical properties of the convective clouds that develop after the passage of the cold front. The model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009, Bangert et al., 2010) is a comprehensive online coupled model system to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of reactive gaseous and particulate matter. It is used to quantify the feedback processes between aerosols and the. state of the atmosphere on the continental to the regional scale with two-way interactions between different atmospheric processes. The model system enables further investigations of the aerosol-cloud-interactions and associated feedback processes. The model framework contains a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme (Seifert and Beheng, 2006) in combination with sophisticated activation parameterizations (Bangert et al., 2012). We carried out sensitivity runs. One applies a bulk microphysics scheme as used in the operational forecasts of the German weather service. In two of them the aerosol was. prescribed (continental, maritime) and kept constant in space and time. In the fourth one we used the full capabilities of COSMO-ART to simulate the dynamic behavior of aerosol and its feedback with radiation and cloud microphysics. We compare our model results with radar data, satellite IR images, and rain gauges.

  12. Experimental study of a constrained vapor bubble fin heat exchanger in the absence of external natural convection.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sumita; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for a microgravity flight experiment on the International Space Station, a constrained vapor bubble fin heat exchanger (CVB) was operated both in a vacuum chamber and in air on Earth to evaluate the effect of the absence of external natural convection. The long-term objective is a general study of a high heat flux, low capillary pressure system with small viscous effects due to the relatively large 3 x 3 x 40 mm dimensions. The current CVB can be viewed as a large-scale version of a micro heat pipe with a large Bond number in the Earth environment but a small Bond number in microgravity. The walls of the CVB are quartz, to allow for image analysis of naturally occurring interference fringes that give the pressure field for liquid flow. The research is synergistic in that the study requires a microgravity environment to obtain a low Bond number and the space program needs thermal control systems, like the CVB, with a large characteristic dimension. In the absence of natural convection, operation of the CVB may be dominated by external radiative losses from its quartz surface. Therefore, an understanding of radiation from the quartz cell is required. All radiative exchange with the surroundings occurs from the outer surface of the CVB when the temperature range renders the quartz walls of the CVB optically thick (lambda > 4 microns). However, for electromagnetic radiation where lambda < 2 microns, the walls are transparent. Experimental results obtained for a cell charged with pentane are compared with those obtained for a dry cell. A numerical model was developed that successfully simulated the behavior and performance of the device observed experimentally.

  13. MHD Natural Convection Flow of Casson Nanofluid over Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet Through Porous Medium with Chemical Reaction and Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Imran; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of chemical reaction on hydromagnetic natural convection flow of Casson nanofluid induced due to nonlinearly stretching sheet immersed in a porous medium under the influence of thermal radiation and convective boundary condition are performed numerically. Moreover, the effects of velocity slip at stretching sheet wall are also examined in this study. The highly nonlinear-coupled governing equations are converted to nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations. The transformed governing equations are then solved numerically using the Keller box method and graphical results for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle concentration as well as wall shear stress, heat, and mass transfer rate are achieved through MATLAB software. Numerical results for the wall shear stress and heat transfer rate are presented in tabular form and compared with previously published work. Comparison reveals that the results are in good agreement. Findings of this work demonstrate that Casson fluids are better to control the temperature and nanoparticle concentration as compared to Newtonian fluid when the sheet is stretched in a nonlinear way. Also, the presence of suspended nanoparticles effectively promotes the heat transfer mechanism in the base fluid.

  14. Effect of adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from a wavy surface created by attached horizontal cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Harsini, I.; Ashjaee, M.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of a vertical adiabatic wall on the natural convection heat transfer from vertical array of attached cylinders, which can be considered as wavy surface, was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were carried out using Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the commercial FLUENT code was used for numerical study. This paper focuses on the effect of wall-wavy surface spacing and Rayleigh number variation on the local and average free convection heat transfer coefficients from the each cylinder and the wavy surface. Rayleigh number ranges from 2400 to 10,000 and from 300,000 to 1,250,000 based on cylinder diameter and wavy surface height respectively. The local and average Nusselt numbers were determined for the different Rayleigh numbers, and the ratio of wall- wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, and {infinity}. Results are indicated with a single correlation which gives the average Nusselt number as a function of the ratio of the wall-wavy surface spacing to cylinder diameter and the Rayleigh numbers. There is an optimum distance between the wall and wavy surface in which the Nusselt number attain its maximum value. This optimum distance depends on the Rayleigh number. (author)

  15. Natural convection in a flexible sided triangular cavity with internal heat generation under the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selimefendigil, Fatih; Öztop, Hakan F.

    2016-11-01

    In this numerical study, magnetohydrodynamics natural convection in a flexible sided triangular cavity with internal heat generation is investigated. The inclined wall of the cavity is cooled and flexible while the left vertical wall is partially heated. Galerkin weighted residual finite element method is used to solve the governing equations. The effects of pertinent parameters such as external Rayleigh number (between 104 and 106), internal Rayleigh number (between 104 and 107), elastic modulus of flexible wall (between 500 and 105), Hartmann number (between 0 and 40) and inclination angle of the magnetic field (between 0° and 90°) on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics were numerically investigated. It was observed local and averaged Nusselt number enhance with external Rayleigh number but in the vicinity of the upper location of the heater local heat transfer deteriorates due to the inclined wall deformation with increasing external Rayleigh number. Heat transfer reduces with internal Rayleigh number and Hartmann number. Averaged heat transfer decreases 13.25% when internal Rayleigh number is increased from 104 to 107 and decreases 40.56% when Hartmann number is increased from 0 to 10. The reduction in the convection with magnetic field is effective for higher values of external Rayleigh numbers and averaged heat transfer increases with magnetic field inclination angle.

  16. Experimental analysis of natural convection in square cavities heated from below with 2D-PIV and holographic interferometry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Corvaro, F.; Paroncini, M.

    2007-07-15

    A numerical and experimental analysis was performed to study the natural convection heat transfer in a square cavity heated from below and cooled by the sidewalls. The enclosure was filled with air (Pr = 0.71) and a discrete heater was mounted on its lower surface; the effect of three different positions was evaluated. The air temperature distribution and the Nusselt numbers at different Rayleigh numbers on the heated strip were measured by an holographic interferometry thanks to the real-time and the double-exposure technique. The double-exposure technique was performed at steady-state and it was used to obtain the isothermal lines in the cavity at different Rayleigh numbers; while the real-time technique was used to control the presence of the plume oscillations and to determinate the achievement of the steady-state. A 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) was utilized to measure the velocity fields at the same Rayleigh numbers. In particular we analysed the distribution of the velocity vectors and their modulus inside the cavity. The convective phenomenon was studied and the Nusselt numbers were presented as well as the Rayleigh numbers analysed. Moreover experimental and numerical correlations were determined for each position analysed to connect the Rayleigh numbers with the Nusselt numbers. Measured quantities were compared with the numerical results which were obtained with the finite volume code Fluent 6.2.16. (author)

  17. MHD Natural Convection Flow of Casson Nanofluid over Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet Through Porous Medium with Chemical Reaction and Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Imran; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effects of chemical reaction on hydromagnetic natural convection flow of Casson nanofluid induced due to nonlinearly stretching sheet immersed in a porous medium under the influence of thermal radiation and convective boundary condition are performed numerically. Moreover, the effects of velocity slip at stretching sheet wall are also examined in this study. The highly nonlinear-coupled governing equations are converted to nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations. The transformed governing equations are then solved numerically using the Keller box method and graphical results for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle concentration as well as wall shear stress, heat, and mass transfer rate are achieved through MATLAB software. Numerical results for the wall shear stress and heat transfer rate are presented in tabular form and compared with previously published work. Comparison reveals that the results are in good agreement. Findings of this work demonstrate that Casson fluids are better to control the temperature and nanoparticle concentration as compared to Newtonian fluid when the sheet is stretched in a nonlinear way. Also, the presence of suspended nanoparticles effectively promotes the heat transfer mechanism in the base fluid.

  18. Effects of walls temperature variation on double diffusive natural convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid in an enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, G. A.; Dastmalchi, M.; Khorasanizadeh, H.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of wall temperature variations on double diffusive natural convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid in a differentially heated square enclosure with constant temperature hot and cold vertical walls is studied numerically. Transport mechanisms of nanoparticles including Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis that cause heterogeneity are considered in non-homogeneous model. The hot and cold wall temperatures are varied, but the temperature difference between them is always maintained 5 °C. The thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity and density and thermophoresis diffusion and Brownian motion coefficients are considered variable with temperature and volume fraction of nanoparticles. The governing equations are discretized using the control volume method. The results show that nanoparticle transport mechanisms affect buoyancy force and cause formation of small vortexes near the top and bottom walls of the cavity and reduce the heat transfer. By increasing the temperature of the walls the effect of transport mechanisms decreases and due to enhanced convection the heat transfer rate increases.

  19. Laminar natural convective heat transfer in the enclosed evacuated collector tube with East-West symmetric heat input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng-Yun; Ge, Xin-Shi

    1997-03-01

    Heat transfer in the evacuated collector tube is a three-dimensional laminar natural convection problem driven by buoyancy. Because of its complexity, no effective theoretical model is available despite of limited experimental work which is confined to one aspect. The present work aims to depict the convective heat transfer inside a two-ended inclined tube with East-West symmetric heat input using numerical methods. Based on reasonable assumptions, governing equations of the inside fluid are established. The corresponding discretizated equations are solved by employing numerical methods. The calculated results are displayed for velocity and temperature profiles on different cross-sectional planes, which present the flow pattern characterized by upflow and downflow along the axial direction and adherent flow along the peripheral direction, and the heat transfer process from the wall to the center. Furthermore, the transient Nusselt number and average temperature level are shown and discussed. Finally, the parametric effects of the tube radius and the heat input on the flow and heat transfer are also given.

  20. Physical factors determining the fraction of stored energy recoverable from hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1975-01-01

    This report contains background analyses for the estimates of Nathenson and Muffler (1975) of geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas. The first section discusses heat and fluid recharge potential of geothermal reservoirs. The second section analyzes the physical factors that determine the fraction of stored energy obtainable at the surface from a geothermal reservoir. Conversion of heat to electricity and the use of geothermal energy for direct-heating applications are discussed in the last two sections. Nathenson, Manuel, and Muffler, L.J.P., 1975, Geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction dominated areas, in White, D.E., and Williams, D.L., eds., Assessment of the Geothermal Resources of the United States--1975: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 726, p. 104-121, available at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/cir/cir726

  1. Natural convection in a three-dimensional cavity filled with nanofluid and partially heated: Effect of the hating section dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannad, M.; Abourida, B.; Belarche, L.; Doghmi, H.; Mouzaouit

    2017-03-01

    This study focuses on heat transfer by natural convection in a three dimensional cavity filled with nanoparticles and partially heated from the side with a uniform temperature. The opposite wall of the cavity is maintained in a cold temperature. The effect of nanofluid type on thermal phenomena within the cavity was analyzed for different sizes of the heating section, using the control volume method. The governing parameters are: the Rayleigh number (103≤Ra ≤ 105), the volume fraction (0 ≤ Φ ≤ 0.1), the heating section size (0.5≤ ɛ ≤1), and the nanofluid type. The results represent a great interest in terms of the flow and heat transfer through the cavity depending on the chosen parameters sets.

  2. Numerical analysis of natural convection for non-Newtonian fluid conveying nanoparticles between two vertical parallel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahebi, S. A. R.; Pourziaei, H.; Feizi, A. R.; Taheri, M. H.; Rostamiyan, Y.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, natural convection of non-Newtonian bio-nanofluids flow between two vertical flat plates is investigated numerically. Sodium Alginate (SA) and Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose (SCMC) are considered as the base non-Newtonian fluid, and nanoparticles such as Titania ( TiO2 and Alumina ( Al2O3 were added to them. The effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are calculated through Maxwell-Garnetts (MG) and Brinkman models, respectively. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method (NUM) and three Weighted Residual Methods (WRMs), Collocation (CM), Galerkin (GM) and Least-Square Method (LSM) and Finite-Element Method (FEM), are used to solve the present problem. The influence of some physical parameters such as nanofluid volume friction on non-dimensional velocity and temperature profiles are discussed. The results show that SCMC- TiO2 has higher velocity and temperature values than other nanofluid structures.

  3. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in a Rectangular Water Pool with Internal Heating and Top and Bottom Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong K.; Lee, Seung D.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    During a severe accident, the reactor core may melt and be relocated to the lower plenum to form a hemispherical pool. If there is no effective cooling mechanism, the core debris may heat up and the molten pool run into natural convection. Natural convection heat transfer was examined in SIGMA RP (Simulant Internal Gravitated Material Apparatus Rectangular Pool). The SIGMA RP apparatus comprises a rectangular test section, heat exchanger, cartridge heaters, cooling jackets, thermocouples and a data acquisition system. The internal heater heating method was used to simulate uniform heat source which is related to the modified Rayleigh number Ra'. The test procedure started with water, the working fluid, filling in the test section. There were two boundary conditions: one dealt with both walls being cooled isothermally, while the other had to with only the upper wall being cooled isothermally. The heat exchanger was utilized to maintain the isothermal boundary condition. Four side walls were surrounded by the insulating material to minimize heat loss. Tests were carried out at 10{sup 11} < Ra' < 10{sup 13}. The SIGMA RP tests with an appropriate cartridge heater arrangement showed excellent uniform heat generation in the pool. The steady state was defined such that the temperature fluctuation stayed within {+-}0.2 K over a time period of 5,000 s. The conductive heat transfer was dominant below the critical Rayleigh number Ra'c, whereas the convective heat transfer picked up above Ra'{sub c}. In the top and bottom boundary cooling condition, the upward Nusselt number Nu{sub up} was greater than the downward Nusselt number Nu{sub dn}. In particular, the discrepancy between Nu{sub up} and Nu{sub dn} widened with Ra'. The Nu{sub up} to Nu{sub dn} ratio was varied from 7.75 to 16.77 given 1.45 x 10{sup 12} < Ra' < 9.59 x 10{sup 13}. On the other hand, Nu{sub up} was increased in absence of downward heat transfer for the case of top cooling. The current rectangular pool

  4. Influences of surface hydrophilicity on frost formation on a vertical cold plate under natural convection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhongliang; Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2007-07-15

    Surface hydrophilicity has a strong influence on frost nucleation according to phase transition theory. To study this effect, a close observation of frost formation and deposition processes on a vertical plate was made under free convection conditions. The formation and shape variation of frost crystals during the initial period are described and the frost thickness variation with time on both hydrophobic and plain copper cold surfaces are presented. The various influencing factors are discussed in depth. The mechanism of surface hydrophilicity influence on frost formation was analyzed theoretically. This revealed that increasing the contact angle can increase the potential barrier and restrain crystal nucleation and growth and thus frost deposition. The experimental results show that the initial water drops formed on a hydrophobic surface are smaller and remain in the liquid state for a longer time compared with ones formed on a plain copper surface. It is also observed that the frost layer deposited on a hydrophobic surface is loose and weak. Though the hydrophobic surface can retard frost formation to a certain extent and causes a looser frost layer, our experimental results show that it does not depress the growth of the frost layer. (author)

  5. Natural convection in inclined pipes - A new correlation for heat transfer estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebach, R.; Haberstroh, Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Heat intake minimization is one of the main challenges during the design process of cryogenic storage tanks. It is widely known that connection pipes significantly contribute to this residual heat transfer from ambient temperature conditions to the cold inner vessel. A certain pipe inclination can cause a convective flow field within the fluid. This effect usually increases the total heat transfer much more dramatically than anticipated. In several previous papers we discussed the impact of pipe geometry as well as boundary conditions intensively. However, there is no suitable correlation in literature available which could be used to estimate the total heat transfer properly. The large number of experimental data we gained during our investigations allows us to propose a new correlation in order to predict the total heat transfer through an inclined pipe in function of the inclination angle. In this paper we derivate this new correlation and show its application for heat transfer estimations. Several comparisons are carried out against our own measurements as well as literature data.

  6. Scalings for unsteady natural convection boundary layers on an evenly heated plate with time-dependent heating flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    It is of fundamental significance, especially with regard to application, to fully understand the flow behavior of unsteady natural convection boundary layers on a vertical plate heated by a time-dependent heat flux. Such an understanding is currently scarce. In this paper, the scaling analysis by Lin et al. [Phys. Rev. E 79, 066313 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.066313] using a simple three-region structure for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with Pr >1 under isothermal heating was substantially extended for the case when the heating is due to a time-varying sinusoidal heat flux. A series of scalings was developed for the thermal boundary thickness, the plate temperature, the viscous boundary thicknesses, and the maximum vertical velocity within the boundary layer, which are the major parameters representing the flow behavior, in terms of the governing parameters of the flow, i.e., the Rayleigh number Ra, the Prandtl number Pr, and the dimensionless natural frequency fn of the time-varying sinusoidal heat flux, at the start-up stage, at the transition time scale which represents the ending of the start-up stage and the beginning of the transitional stage of the boundary-layer development, and at the quasi-steady stage. These scalings were validated by comparison to 10 full numerical solutions of the governing equations with Ra, Pr, and fn in the ranges 106≤Ra≤109, 3≤Pr≤100, and 0.01≤fn≤0.1 and were shown in general to provide an accurate description of the flow at different development stages, except for high-Pr runs in which a further, although weak, Pr dependence is present, which cannot be accurately predicted by the current scaling analysis using the simple three-region structure, attributed to the non-boundary-layer nature of the velocity field with high-Pr fluids. Some scalings at the transition time scale and at the quasi-steady stage also produce noticeable deviations from the numerical results when

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  8. Energy stability of thermocapillary convection in a model of the float-zone crystal-growth process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Y.; Neitzel, G. P.; Jankowski, D. F.; Mittelmann, H. D.

    1990-01-01

    Energy stability theory has been applied to a basic state of thermocapillary convection occurring in a cylindrical half-zone of finite length to determine conditions under which the flow will be stable. Because of the finite length of the zone, the basic state must be determined numerically. Instead of obtaining stability criteria by solving the related Euler-Lagrange equations, the variational problem is attacked directly by discretization of the integrals in the energy identity using finite differences. Results of the analysis are values of the Marangoni number below which axisymmetric disturbances to the basic state will decay, for various values of the other parameters governing the problem.

  9. Hawaii Natural Energy Institute annual report, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This tenth anniversary special reviews each project over the past 10 years, with research in progress included for FY83-84 for biomass, geothermal, ocean energy, solar energy, wind research and other renewable energy research. (PSB)

  10. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  11. Unsteady natural convective flow in an enclosure when there are sharp changes in side-wall temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthuizen, P.H.; Paul, J.T.

    1997-07-01

    Natural convective flow in a square enclosure with a section of one of the vertical walls heated and with the opposite wall cooled to a uniform temperature, the remaining walls being adiabatic, has been numerically studied. The temperature of the heated wall section is constant but that of the cold wall varies, in general, in a non-periodic way with time. The main aim of the study was to determine how the nature of the temperature variation at the cooled surface influences the heat transfer rate from the hot surface. The flow has been assumed to be laminar and two-dimensional. Fluid properties have been assumed constant except for the density change with temperature that gives rise to the buoyancy forces. The governing equations have been written in dimensionless form. The resultant equations have been solved using the finite-element method. The solution has the Rayleigh number, the Prandtl number, the dimensionless size and position of the heated wall section and the form of the cold wall dimensionless temperature variation with dimensionless time as parameters. Because of the possible applications that motivated the study, results have only been obtained for a Prandtl number of 0.7. The dimensionless cold section temperature has been assumed to undergo a sharp rise in value followed a short time later by a sharp drop in its value. Results have then been obtained for modified Rayleigh numbers between 1,000 and 1,000,000 for heated wall sections of various dimensionless size and position.

  12. Energy balance in the newborn baby: use of a manikin to estimate radiant and convective heat loss.

    PubMed

    Wheldon, A E

    1982-02-01

    Convective and radiant heat loss from a baby in an incubator were studied using a heated manikin. The mean radiant temperature of surrounding surfaces other than those vertically below the manikin was measured. The coefficients Af and hr were calculated as though this was the mean radiant temperature of the whole environment. The fraction (Af) of the body surface area which exchanged radiant energy with the surroundings increased from 0.48 for a foetal posture to 0.76 for a spreadeagle posture due to a decrease in radiant exchange between opposing body surfaces. The corresponding increase in the coefficient for heat exchange by radiation (hr) was from 3.1 to 4.9 Wm-2 K-1. The coefficient for convection (hc) increased from 4.0 to 5.4 WM-2 K-1 due to a decrease in effective body diameter as the limbs moved away from the trunk. These changes in Af, hr and hc show that posture is important in regulating heat loss from a baby. As the radiant temperature of the incubator canopy was between 2 and 4K below incubator air temperature, a baby loses more heat by radiation than by convection.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-07-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated ( β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined ( β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated ( β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number.

  15. Alternative Natural Energy Sources in Building Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Albert J.; Schubert, Robert P.

    This publication provides a discussion of various energy conserving building systems and design alternatives. The information presented here covers alternative space and water heating systems, and energy conserving building designs incorporating these systems and other energy conserving techniques. Besides water, wind, solar, and bio conversion…

  16. Velocity and temperature field characteristics of water and air during natural convection heating in cans.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Ferruh; Tutar, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Presence of headspace during canning is required since an adequate amount allows forming vacuum during the process. Sealing technology may not totally eliminate all entrapped gases, and headspace might affect heat transfer. Not much attention has been given to solve this problem in computational studies, and cans, for example, were mostly assumed to be fully filled with product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine velocity and temperature evolution of water and air in cans during heating to evaluate the relevance of headspace in the transport mechanism. For this purpose, canned water samples with a certain headspace were used, and required governing continuity, energy, and momentum equations were solved using a finite volume approach coupled with a volume of fluid element model. Simulation results correlated well with experimental results validating faster heating effects of headspace rather than insulation effects as reported in the literature. The organized velocity motions along the air-water interface were also shown. Practical Application: Canning is a universal and economic method for processing of food products, and presence of adequate headspace is required to form vacuum during sealing of the cans. Since sealing technology may not totally eliminate the entrapped gases, mainly air, headspace might affect heating rates in cans. This study demonstrated the increased heating rates in the presence of headspace in contrast with some studies in the literature. By applying the effect of headspace, required processing time for thermally processed foods can be reduced leading to more rapid processes and lower energy consumptions.

  17. An experimental study of natural convection in open-cell aluminum foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jaeger, P.; Reynders, R.; De Schampheleire, S.; T'Joen, C.; Huisseune, H.; Amee, B.; De Paepe, M.

    2012-11-01

    Natural convecton n air-saturated alumnum foam has been measured. A carefully designed experimental setup is built for his ask. The calibraton is done by comparing he results of a flat plate wh literature data, revealing excellent agreement. The nvestigated foams have a pore densiy of 10 and 20 PPI. The bondng of the foam is performed via brazing, or by applying a single epoxy which is enriched wh highly conductve alumna particles. The Rayleigh number is varied between 2500 and 6000, wh he rato of he surface area o he perimeter of he substrate as characteristc length. The foam height is varied between 12 and 25.4 mm. A major difference between both he bondng methods is observed. The brazed samples showed a beter heat ransfer n all cases. Furthermore, when ncreasing he foam height, a clear augmentaton of he heat ransfer is observed. Based on hese results, a correlaton is presented.

  18. Energy stability of thermocapillary convection in a model of the float-zone crystal-growth process. II - Nonaxisymmetric disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. P.; Law, C. C.; Jankowski, D. F.; Mittelmann, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Energy-stability theory has been applied to investigate the stability properties of thermocapillary convection in a half-zone model of the float-zone crystal-growth process. An earlier axisymmetric model has been extended to permit nonaxisymmetric disturbances, thus determining sufficient conditions for stability to disturbances of arbitrary amplitude. The results for nonaxisymmetric disturbances are compared with earlier axisymmetric results, with linear-stability results for a geometry with an infinitely long aspect ratio and with stability boundaries from recent laboratory experiments.

  19. Effect of adiabatic square ribs on natural convection in an asymmetrically heated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi-Saad, Aissa; Kadja, Mahfoud; Popa, Catalin; Polidori, Guillaume

    2017-02-01

    A 2-D numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the effect of two adiabatic square ribs on laminar flow and heat transfer in an asymmetrically heated channel. The two ribs are symmetrically located on each wall, exactly above the heating zone. The computational procedure is made by solving the unsteady bi-dimensional continuity, momentum and energy equations with the finite volume method. The investigations focused more specifically on the influence of ribs sizes on the flow structure and heat transfer enhancement. The results showed that the variation of ribs sizes significantly alters the heat transfer and fluid flow distribution along the channel, especially in the vicinity of protrusions. Also, the results show that streamlines, isotherms, and the number, sizes and formation of vortex structures inside the channel strongly depend on the size of protrusions. The changes in heat transfer parameters have also been presented.

  20. The secondary flow and its stability for natural convection in a tall vertical enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chait, Arnon; Korpela, Seppo A.

    1989-01-01

    The multicellular flow between two vertical parallel plates is numerically simulated using a time-splitting pseudospectral method. The steady flow of air and the time-periodic flow of oil are investigated, and descriptions of these flows using both physical and spectral approaches are presented. The time dependence of the flow and temperature fields of oil are shown, and the dynamics of the process is discussed. The spectral transfer of energy among the axial modes comprising the flow is explored. The three-dimensional linear stabiltiy of the multicellular air flow is parametrically studied. The domain of stable two-dimensional cellular motion is found to be constrained by the Eckhaus instability and by two types of monotone instability. The two-dimensional multicellular flow is unstable above a Grashof number of about 8550.

  1. The secondary flow and its stability for natural convection in a tall vertical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chait, Arnon; Korpela, Seppo A.

    1989-03-01

    The multicellular flow between two vertical parallel plates is numerically simulated using a time-splitting pseudospectral method. The steady flow of air and the time-periodic flow of oil are investigated, and descriptions of these flows using both physical and spectral approaches are presented. The time dependence of the flow and temperature fields of oil are shown, and the dynamics of the process is discussed. The spectral transfer of energy among the axial modes comprising the flow is explored. The three-dimensional linear stabiltiy of the multicellular air flow is parametrically studied. The domain of stable two-dimensional cellular motion is found to be constrained by the Eckhaus instability and by two types of monotone instability. The two-dimensional multicellular flow is unstable above a Grashof number of about 8550.

  2. Moist convection as an energy source for the large-scale motions in Jupiter's atmosphere. Galileo Imaging Team

    PubMed

    Ingersoll; Gierasch; Banfield; Vasavada

    2000-02-10

    Jupiter's dominant large-scale weather patterns (dimensions approximately 10,000 km) are zonal jets and long-lived ovals. The jets have been flowing east and west at constant speeds of up to 180 m s(-1) for over 100 years. These jets receive energy from small-scale eddies, which pump eastward momentum into the eastward jets and westward momentum into the westward jets. This momentum transfer was predicted by numerical models before it was observed on Jupiter. The large ovals roll between the jets in an anticyclonic direction-clockwise in the northern hemisphere and counterclockwise in the southern hemisphere--where they regularly assimilate small anticyclonic eddies. But from where the eddies receive their energy has been an open question. Here we argue that the eddies, which ultimately drive both the jets and the ovals, receive their energy from moist convection. This hypothesis is consistent with observations of jovian lightning, which is an indicator of moist convection. It also explains the anticyclonic rotation and poleward drift of the eddies, and suggests patterns of upwelling and downwelling that resemble the patterns of large-scale axisymmetric overturning in the Earth's atmosphere.

  3. Natural convection in steady solidification - Finite element analysis of a two-phase Rayleigh-Benard problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Galerkin finite-element approximations and Newton's method for solving free boundary problems are combined with computer-implemented techniques from nonlinear perturbation analysis to study solidification problems with natural convection in the melt. The Newton method gives rapid convergence to steady state velocity, temperature and pressure fields and melt-solid interface shapes, and forms the basis for algebraic methods for detecting multiple steady flows and assessing their stability. The power of this combination is demonstrated for a two-phase Rayleigh-Benard problem composed of melt and solid in a veritical cylinder with the thermal boundary conditions arranged so that a static melt with a flat melt-solid interface is always a solution. Multiple cellular flows bifurcating from the static state are detected and followed as Rayleigh number is varied. Changing the boundary conditions to approach those appropriate for the vertical Bridgman solidification system causes imperfections that eliminate the static state. The flow structure in the Bridgman system is related to those for the Rayleigh-Benard system by a continuous evolution of the boundary conditions.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k-ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  5. Secondary flow and its stability for natural convection in tall vertical enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Chait, A.

    1986-01-01

    The multicellular flow in a tall vertical rectangular and annular enclosure was studied by solving the Boussinesq equations with time-splitting pseudospectral methods. Comparison between two time-splitting algorithms is presented, and results show that the method that introduces a time-splitting error in the calculation is unacceptable for simulations of time-dependent large Prandtl number flows. The steady flow of air and the time-periodic flow of oil were investigated, and descriptions of these flows based on physical and spectral approaches are presented. The dependency of the flow on the axial wave length was established and it was found that the maximum heat transfer appears to coincide with the natural axial wave length. Three-dimensional linear stability of the multicellular flow of air in a cartesian slot was also investigated. The domain of stable two-dimensional cellular motions was found to be constrained by the Eckhaus instability and by two types of monotone instabilities. These limit the two-dimensional multicellular flow to Grashof numbers below about 8550. For this reason the flow of air in a sufficiently tall vertical cavity is likely to be three-dimensional in many practical cases.

  6. Natural convection in a bottom-heated top-cooled cubic cavity with a baffle at the median height: experiment and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongmin; Xing, Changhu; Braun, Minel J.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation on the natural convection flow and heat transfer in an enclosure with a single-hole baffle at the median height. The temperature in the fluid is quantified by means of temperature sensitive thermo-chromic liquid crystal (TLC) particles. The fluid flow velocity is measured non-intrusively with a full field particle tracking technique. The three-dimensional numerical model, developed and validated with experimental data, provides a computational tool for further investigation of mass and energy transport through the baffle openings in these types of enclosures. The experimentally visualized and numerically simulated flow structures show a pair of streams across the baffle-hole. The two chambers communicate through this pair of streams which carry the fluid exchange and heat transfer between the two chambers. At the baffle opening, the two streams are aligned in a diagonal direction across of the enclosure. The streams are accelerated and form jet-like flows that drive the whole circulation in the chambers. The jet-like flows leave the baffle opening, approach the vertical centerline of the cavity, and finally impinge on the top/bottom walls.

  7. Mixed convective boundary layer flow over a vertical wedge embedded in a porous medium saturated with a nanofluid: Natural Convection Dominated Regime

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A boundary layer analysis is presented for the mixed convection past a vertical wedge in a porous medium saturated with a nano fluid. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-similar equations and solved numerically by an efficient, implicit, iterative, finite-difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of various physical parameters is performed. Numerical results for the velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles, as well as the friction factor, surface heat and mass transfer rates have been presented for parametric variations of the buoyancy ratio parameter Nr, Brownian motion parameter Nb, thermophoresis parameter Nt, and Lewis number Le. The dependency of the friction factor, surface heat transfer rate (Nusselt number), and mass transfer rate (Sherwood number) on these parameters has been discussed. PMID:21711715

  8. Analysis of Phenix end-of-life natural convection test with the MARS-LMR code

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, H. Y.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, K. L.; Chang, W. P.; Kim, Y. I.

    2012-07-01

    The end-of-life test of Phenix reactor performed by the CEA provided an opportunity to have reliable and valuable test data for the validation and verification of a SFR system analysis code. KAERI joined this international program for the analysis of Phenix end-of-life natural circulation test coordinated by the IAEA from 2008. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the capability of existing SFR system analysis code MARS-LMR and to identify any limitation of the code. The analysis was performed in three stages: pre-test analysis, blind posttest analysis, and final post-test analysis. In the pre-test analysis, the design conditions provided by the CEA were used to obtain a prediction of the test. The blind post-test analysis was based on the test conditions measured during the tests but the test results were not provided from the CEA. The final post-test analysis was performed to predict the test results as accurate as possible by improving the previous modeling of the test. Based on the pre-test analysis and blind test analysis, the modeling for heat structures in the hot pool and cold pool, steel structures in the core, heat loss from roof and vessel, and the flow path at core outlet were reinforced in the final analysis. The results of the final post-test analysis could be characterized into three different phases. In the early phase, the MARS-LMR simulated the heat-up process correctly due to the enhanced heat structure modeling. In the mid phase before the opening of SG casing, the code reproduced the decrease of core outlet temperature successfully. Finally, in the later phase the increase of heat removal by the opening of the SG opening was well predicted with the MARS-LMR code. (authors)

  9. Coupled heat and mass transfer by natural convection adjacent to a permeable horizontal cylinder in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1999-04-01

    Coupled heat and mass transfer (or double-diffusion) driven by buoyancy, due to temperature and concentration variations in a saturated porous medium, has several important applications in geothermal and geophysical engineering such as the migration of moisture through the air contained in fibrous insulation, the extraction of geothermal energy, underground disposal of nuclear wastes, and the spreading of chemical contaminants through water-saturated soil. Here, the heat and mass transfer characteristics of free convection about a permeable horizontal cylinder embedded in porous media under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion are numerically analyzed. The surface of the horizontal cylinder is maintained at a uniform wall temperature and uniform wall concentration. The transformed governing equations are obtained and solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the dimensionless temperature profiles, the dimensionless concentration profiles, the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number are presented. Increasing the buoyancy ratio N and the transpiration parameter f{sub w} increases the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number. For thermally assisting flow, when Lewis number Le increases, the Nusselt (Sherwood) number decreases (increases). Whereas, for thermally opposing flow, both the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number increase with increasing the Lewis number.

  10. Study of heat and mass transfer of water evaporation in a gypsum board subjected to natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannouni, K.; El Abrach, H.; Dhahri, H.; Mhimid, A.

    2016-12-01

    The present paper reports a numerical study to investigate the drying of rectangular gypsum sample based on a diffusive model. Both vertical and low sides of the porous media are treated as adiabatic and impermeable surfaces plate. The upper face of the plate represents the permeable interface. The energy equation model is based on the local thermal equilibrium assumption between the fluid and the solid phases. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used for solving the governing differential equations system. The obtained numerical results concerning the moisture content and the temperature within a gypsum sample were discussed. A comprehensive analysis of the influence of the mass transfer coefficient, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the external temperature, the relative humidity and the diffusion coefficient on macroscopic fields are also investigated. They all presented results in this paper and obtained in the stable regime correspond to time superior than 4000 s. Therefore the numerical error is inferior to 2%. The experimental data and the descriptive information of the approach indicate an excellent agreement between the results of our developed numerical code based on the LBM and the published ones.

  11. Effect of Increased Natural Gas Exports on Domestic Energy Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This report responds to an August 2011 request from the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE\\/FE) for an analysis of "the impact of increased domestic natural gas demand, as exports." Appendix A provides a copy of the DOE\\/FE request letter. Specifically, DOE\\/FE asked the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to assess how specified scenarios of increased natural gas exports could affect domestic energy markets, focusing on consumption, production, and prices.

  12. Numerical analysis of thermogravitational turbulent convection in a closed rectangular region with radiation source of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, G. V.; Nee, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The mathematical modeling of the conjugate heat transfer in a closed rectangular region has been carried out under the conditions of the radiation supply of energy. The temperature and stream function fields obtained by the modeling illustrate a substantially unsteady nature of the conjugate heat exchange process under study. An analysis of temperature distributions in typical cross sections of the solution domain has shown a considerable inhomogeneity of the temperature field. It is found that an increase in the Rayleigh number leads to substantial modifications of the temperature and stream function fields. The influence of the distribution of radiation fluxes over the internal interfaces on the temperature fields and the airflow character is shown. The influence of the turbulization on the heat transfer intensity near the interfaces between media has been estimated. Comparisons of the obtained numerical results with experimental data have shown their good agreement.

  13. Using Mother Nature to Subdue Energy Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a Kansas City elementary school's successful energy conservation via its environmental design that includes the use of ground source heat pumps and computer energy management systems. Also discusses how this design concept contributes to the educational experience of the school's students. (GR)

  14. A comparison of natural convection heat transfer for a staggered versus an aligned array of horizontal spent nuclear fuel rods within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.; Canaan, R.E.; Klein, D.E.

    2000-04-01

    Natural convection heat transfer was experimentally investigated in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular isothermal enclosure. The test conditions were characteristic of a spent-fuel assembly during transport or horizontal dry storage. The assembly was configured with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.33 and backfilled with pressurized helium or nitrogen. The backfill pressure was varied between 1 and 5 atm, while the assembly power was varied between 1 and 5 W per heater rod. The resulting data are presented in the form of Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations, where the Nusselt number has been corrected for thermal radiation using a numerical technique. The staggered-array data are compared to previous data for a similar-pitch aligned rod array (a simulated boiling water reactor fuel assembly) to determine if convective heat transfer is enhanced or hindered in a staggered configuration. For the overall array, both the staggered and aligned configurations yield Nusselt-Rayleigh curves with a three-regime trend, which suggests distinct conduction and convection regimes separated by a transition regime. For lower Rayleigh numbers (10{sup 6}), representative of the conduction regime, the aligned-array Nusselt number is 10 to 12% higher than the corresponding staggered-array value. However, in the convection regime at higher Rayleigh numbers, the staggered-array Nusselt number slightly exceeds the aligned-array Nusselt number. This is attributed to the fact that the staggered array begins to transition into the convection regime at lower Rayleigh number than the aligned array. For both configurations, the slope of the Nusselt-Rayleigh curve in the convection regime suggests turbulent flow conditions.

  15. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé Caballero Mora, Karen

    2016-10-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray (CR), gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (UHECR ∼ 1020 eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  16. Tropical deep convective cloud morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, Matthew R.

    A cloud-object partitioning algorithm is developed. It takes contiguous CloudSat cloudy regions and identifies various length scales of deep convective clouds from a tropical, oceanic subset of data. The methodology identifies a level above which anvil characteristics become important by analyzing the cloud object shape. Below this level in what is termed the pedestal region, convective cores are identified based on reflectivity maxima. Identifying these regions allows for the assessment of length scales of the anvil and pedestal of the deep convective clouds. Cloud objects are also appended with certain environmental quantities from the ECMWF reanalysis. Simple geospatial and temporal assessments show that the cloud object technique agrees with standard observations of local frequency of deep-convective cloudiness. Additionally, the nature of cloud volume scale populations is investigated. Deep convection is seen to exhibit power-law scaling. It is suggested that this scaling has implications for the continuous, scale invariant, and random nature of the physics controlling tropical deep convection and therefore on the potentially unphysical nature of contemporary convective parameterizations. Deep-convective clouds over tropical oceans play important roles in Earth's climate system. The response of tropical, deep convective clouds to sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is investigated using this new data set. Several previously proposed feedbacks are examined: the FAT hypothesis, the Iris hypothesis, and the Thermostat hypothesis. When the data are analyzed per cloud object, each hypothesis is broadly found to correctly predict cloud behavior in nature, although it appears that the FAT hypothesis needs a slight modification to allow for cooling cloud top temperatures with increasing SSTs. A new response that shows that the base temperature of deep convective anvils remains approximately constant with increasing SSTs is introduced. These cloud-climate feedbacks are

  17. Note: effect of the tilting angle of the wire on the onset of natural convection in the transient hot wire method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Seok Pil

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, numerical and experimental investigations are systematically performed to identify the effect of the tilting angle of the wire on the onset of natural convection in the transient hot wire method (THWM), a widely accepted technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of various media, especially nanofluids. To validate our numerical simulation code, the numerical results are compared with theoretical solutions as well as with experimental results. Based on the results, we show that the onset time of natural convection in THWM decreases rapidly with the increase of the wire's tilting angle from vertical position. Also, we systematically show the effect of the wire's tilting angle on the linear region, which is a suitable measurement interval, and on the measurement error of THWM.

  18. Influence of radiant energy exchange on the determination of convective heat transfer rates to Orbiter leeside surfaces during entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Temperatures measured at the aerodynamic surface of the Orbiter's thermal protection system (TPS), and calorimeter measurements, are used to determine heating rates to the TPS surface during atmospheric entry. On the Orbiter leeside, where convective heating rates are low, it is possible that a significant portion of the total energy input may result from solar radiation, and for the wing, cross radiation from the hot (relatively) Orbiter fuselage. In order to account for the potential impact of these sources, values of solar- and cross-radiation heat transfer are computed, based upon vehicle trajectory and attitude information and measured surface temperatures. Leeside heat-transfer data from the STS-2 mission are presented, and the significance of solar radiation and fuselage-to-wing cross-radiation contributions to total energy input to Orbiter leeside surfaces is assessed.

  19. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified. Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.

  20. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    DOE PAGES

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified.more » Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.« less

  1. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.; Le Quéré, P.

    2014-02-01

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 108, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  2. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  3. Scalability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) data to VHTR/NGNP RCCS designs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R .B.; Feldman, E. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-07

    Passive safety in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is strongly dependent on the thermal performance of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). Scaled experiments performed in the Natural Shutdown Test Facility (NSTF) are to provide data for assessing and/or improving computer code models for RCCS phenomena. Design studies and safety analyses that are to support licensing of the VHTR will rely on these models to achieve a high degree of certainty in predicted design heat removal rate. To guide in the selection and development of an appropriate set of experiments a scaling analysis has been performed for the air-cooled RCCS option. The goals were to (1) determine the phenomena that dominate the behavior of the RCCS, (2) determine the general conditions that must be met so that these phenomena and their relative importance are preserved in the experiments, (3) identify constraints specific to the NSTF that potentially might prevent exact similitude, and (4) then to indicate how the experiments can be scaled to prevent distortions in the phenomena of interest. The phenomena identified as important to RCCS operation were also the subject of a recent PIRT study. That work and the present work collectively indicate that the main phenomena influencing RCCS heat removal capability are (1) radiation heat transport from the vessel to the air ducts, (2) the integral effects of momentum and heat transfer in the air duct, (3) buoyancy at the wall inside the air duct giving rise to mixed convection, and (4) multidimensional effects inside the air duct caused by non-uniform circumferential heat flux and non-circular geometry.

  4. Climatology of lightning activity in South China and its relationships to precipitation and convective available potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Yijun; Meng, Qing; Chen, Luwen; Dan, Jianru

    2016-03-01

    This study examined lightning activity and its relationship to precipitation and convective available potential energy (CAPE) in South China during 2001-12, based on data from the Guangdong Lightning Location System, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite, and the ERA-Interim dataset. Two areas of high lightning density are identified: one over the Pearl River Delta, and the other to the north of Leizhou Peninsula. Large peak-current cloud-to-ground (LPCCG) lightning (>75 kA) shows weaker land-offshore contrasts than total CG lightning, in which negative cloud-to-ground (NCG) lightning occurs more prominently than positive cloud-to-ground (PCG) lightning on land. While the frequency of total CG lightning shows a main peak in June and a second peak in August, the LPCCG lightning over land shows only a single peak in June. The ratio of positive LPCCG to total lightning is significantly greater during February-April than during other times of the year. Diurnally, CG lightning over land shows only one peak in the afternoon, whereas CG lightning offshore shows morning and afternoon peaks. The rain yield per flash is on the order of 107-108 kg per flash across the analysis region, and its spatial distribution is opposite to that of lightning density. Our data show that lightning activity over land is more sensitive than that over offshore waters to CAPE. The relationships between lightning activity and both precipitation and CAPE are associated with convection activity in the analysis region.

  5. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. III - Energy consumption and energy transport. IV - The intrinsic instability of the magnetic configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    The basic relation is described between conversion of thermal energy into convective fluid motion and convective transport of thermal energy, and the equilibrium configuration of a sunspot's magnetic field is shown to be unstable to the hydromagnetic exchange instability. It is determined that heat transport necessarily accompanies convective driving of fluid motion and that the formation of cool sunspots requires convection extending coherently over several scale heights, a distance of at least 500 km. Several theoretical possibilities for sunspot stabilization are reviewed, and it is suggested that a suitable redistribution of cooling in the umbra may be the stabilization mechanism. It is believed that if cooling extends to a great depth in an elongated portion of a sunspot, the magnetic pressure on the boundary will be reduced, tending to reduce the elongation.

  6. Substantial reduction of the heat losses to ambient air by natural convection from horizontal in-tube flows: impact of an axial bundle of passive baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, A.; Cortés, C.

    This paper is concerned with a distinct and effective technique to insulate horizontal tubes carrying hot fluids without using the variety of insulating materials traditionally utilized in industry. The tubes transport hot fluids and are exposed to a natural convection environment of air at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure. Essentially, an ``equivalent quantity of insulation'' is provided by an envelope of straight symmetric baffles made from a low conductivity material that is affixed to the outer surface of the horizontal tubes. A simple 1-D lumped model of comparable precision to the customary 2-D differential model serves to regulate the thermal interaction between the two perpendicular fluid streams, one horizontal due to internal forced convection and the other vertical due to external natural convection in air. All computations are algebraic and lead to a rapid determination of the two quantities that are indispensable to design engineers: the mean bulk temperatures of the internal hot fluid moving either laminarly or turbulently, together with the degraded levels of heat transfer rates.

  7. Measurement of natural convective heat transfer coefficient along the surface of a heated wire using digital holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Kumar, Manoj; Shakher, Chandra

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, the local convective heat transfer coefficient (h) is measured along the surface of an electrically heated vertical wire using digital holographic interferometry (DHI). Experiments are conducted on wires of different diameters. The experimentally measured values are within the range as given in the literature. DHI is expected to provide a more accurate local convective heat transfer coefficient (h) as the value of the temperature gradient required for the calculation of "h" can be obtained more accurately than by other existing optical interferometric techniques without the use of a phase shifting technique. This is because in digital holography phase measurement accuracy is expected to be higher.

  8. Hawaii Natural Energy Institute: Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This progress report from the University of Hawaii at Manoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology describes state of the art research in tapping the energy in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Researchers are seeking new ways of generating electricity and producing methanol from sugarcane waste and other biomass. They are finding ways to encourage the expanded use of methanol as a transportation fuel. They are creating innovative and cost-efficient methods of producing and storing hydrogen gas, considered the fuel of the future''. Researchers are also developing the techniques and technologies that will enable us to tap the unlimited mineral resources of the surrounding ocean. they are testing methods of using the oceans to reduce the carbon dioxide being discharged to the atmosphere. And they are mapping the strategies by which the seas can become a major source of food, precious metals, and space for living and for industry. The achievements described in this annual report can be attributed to the experience, creativity, painstaking study, perseverance, and sacrifices of our the dedicated corps of researchers.

  9. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Natural Gas Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) Natural Gas Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  10. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel Michael

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liquid core, where gradients in thermal conductivity and composition diffusivities maybe lead to different layers of stable or unstable liquid metal; and, in stars, as most stars contain at least one convective and at least one radiative (stably stratified) zone. Internal waves propagate in stably stratified fluids. The characterization of the internal waves generated by convection is an open problem in geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics. Internal waves can play a dynamically important role via nonlocal transport. Momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves is thought to generate the quasi-biennial oscillation of zonal wind in the equatorial stratosphere, an important physical phenomenon used to calibrate global climate models. Angular momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves may play a crucial role in setting the initial rotation rates of neutron stars. In the last year of life of a massive star, convectively excited internal waves may transport even energy to the surface layers to unbind them, launching a wind. In each of these cases, internal waves are able to transport some quantity--momentum, angular momentum, energy--across large, stable buoyancy gradients. Thus, internal waves represent an important, if unusual, transport mechanism. This thesis advances our understanding of internal wave generation by convection. Chapter 2 provides an underlying theoretical framework to study this problem. It describes a detailed calculation of the

  11. The initial transient of natural convection during copper electrolysis in the presence of an opposing Lorentz force: Current dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuegeng; Mühlenhoff, Sascha; Nikrityuk, Petr A.; Eckert, Kerstin

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic fields are well-established in electrochemistry as an attractive tool to improve both the quality of the deposit as well as the deposition rate. The key mechanism is a mass transfer enhancement by Lorentz-force-driven convection. However, during electrolysis this convection interacts with buoyancy-driven convection, which arises from concentration differences, in a sometimes intriguing way. In the case of a Lorentz force opposing buoyancy, this is due to the growth of a bubble-like zone of less-concentrated cupric ion solution at the lower part of the vertical cathode when copper electrolysis is performed. If buoyancy is strong enough to compete with the Lorentz force, this zone rises along the cathode and causes surprisingly unsteady initial transient behaviour. We explore this initial transient under galvanostatic conditions by analyzing the development of the concentration and velocity boundary layers obtained by Mach-Zehnder interferometry and particle image velocimetry. Particular attention is also paid to higher current densities above the limiting current, obtained from potentiodynamic measurements, at which a chaotic advection takes place. The results are compared by scaling analysis.

  12. Various computational conditions of oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazuto . Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science); Ozoe, Hiroyuki . Inst. of Advanced Material Study)

    1993-03-01

    The finite-difference computational scheme is developed for two-dimensional oscillatory natural convection of zero Prandtl number fluid in an open boat heated and cooled from opposing vertical walls. Various computational conditions are tested, such as the initial condition, time step length, finite-difference width, and finite-difference scheme. Instantaneous contour maps and velocity vectors in oscillatory states are presented in a series of maps to represent the fluctuating characteristics of two-dimensional roll cells. The physical conditions are for a boat with aspect ratio A = 3[minus]5 at Pr = 0 and Gr = 14,000-40,000.

  13. Mathematical modelling of unsteady MHD natural convection flow past a vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass flux in the presence of radiation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Narahari, Marneni; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, a numerical analysis is made for unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) natural convective boundary-layer flow past an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass flux in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference technique is implemented to solve the system of governing equations. Numerical results are obtained for different values of system parameters and analyzed through graphs. The velocity profiles of the present study have been compared with the available results for the limiting case and a good agreement is found between the results.

  14. Transient natural and surface-tension-driven convection in a two-layer gas-and-liquid enclosure with nonuniform radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramzon, B.; Edwards, D. K.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow in a cylindrical enclosure containing a two-layer gas-and-liquid system. The geometric configuration and the boundary conditions of the problem are relevant to the analysis of the preignition processes during the fire accident situation involving a pool of liquid fuel in the vicinity of an ignition source. It is demonstrated that the effects of the natural and thermocapillary convection, radiative transfer, thermal inertia and conduction of the walls bounding the enclosure, as well as, the magnitude of the gravity field play important roles in the development of the temperature and velocity fields in the container.

  15. Easing the natural gas crisis: Reducing natural gas prices through increased deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matt

    2004-12-21

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy and energy efficiency identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but this paper touches on just one potential benefit: displacement of gas-fired electricity generation, which reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE and EE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE and EE. This paper summarizes recent studies that have evaluated the gas-price-reduction effect of RE and EE deployment, analyzes the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, reviews the reasonableness of the effect as portrayed in modeling studies, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE and EE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model. Key findings are summarized.

  16. Phenomenology of turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Chatterjee, Anando; Kumar, Abhishek; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    We simulate Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in which a fluid is confined between two thermally conducting plates. We report results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of RBC turbulence on 40963 grid, the highest resolution hitherto reported, on 65536 cores of Cray XC40, Shaheen II, at KAUST. The non-dimensional parameters of our simulation are: the Rayleigh number Ra = 1 . 1 ×1011 (the highest ever for a pseudo-spectral simulation) and Prandtl number of unity. We present energy flux diagnostics of shell-to-shell (in wave number space) transfer. Furthermore, noting that convective flows are anisotropic due to buoyancy, we quantify anisotropy by subdividing each wavenumber shell into rings and quantify ring energy spectrum. An outstanding question in convective turbulence is the wavenumber scaling of the energy spectrum. Our pseudo-spectral simulations of turbulent thermal convection coupled with novel energy transfer diagnostics have provided a definitive answer to this question. We conclude that convective turbulence exhibits behavior similar to fluid turbulence, that is, Kolmogorov's k - 5 / 3 spectrum with forward and local energy transfers, along with a nearly isotropic energy distribution. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  17. Programming Surface Energy Driven Marangoni Convection in Polymer Thin Films to Generate Topographic Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chae Bin; Janes, Dustin; Arshad, Talha; Katzenstein, Joshua; Prisco, Nathan; McGuffin, Dana; Bonnecaze, Roger; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The Marangoni effect describes how fluid flows in response to gradients in surface energy. We recently developed a method for photochemically preprograming spatial surface energy patterns in glassy polystyrene (PS) thin films. UV irradiation through a mask selectively dehydrogenates the PS, thus increasing surface energy in the UV exposed regions compared to the unexposed regions. After heating the film to the liquid state, transport of polymer occurs from regions of low surface energy to regions of high surface energy. This method can be harnessed to rapidly manufacture polymer films possessing prescribed three-dimensional topographies reflective of the original light exposure pattern. To quantify and verify this phenomenon, a theoretical model that gives a more thorough understanding of the physics of this process, its limits and ways to apply it efficiently for various target metrics will also be presented along with comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental observations. Finally, while PS dehydrogenation can be used to produce a variety of topographical patterns, judicious selection of the photosensitizing compounds in an otherwise transparent polymer expands the use of this method to more readily available light sources.

  18. Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Heightened natural gas prices have emerged as a key energy-policy challenge for at least the early part of the 21st century. With the recent run-up in gas prices and the expected continuation of volatile and high prices in the near future, a growing number of voices are calling for increased diversification of energy supplies. Proponents of renewable energy technologies identify these clean energy sources as an important part of the solution. Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) can hedge natural gas price risk in more than one way, but a recent report by Berkeley Lab evaluates one such benefit in detail: by displacing gas-fired electricity generation, RE reduces natural gas demand and thus puts downward pressure on gas prices. Many recent modeling studies of increased RE deployment have demonstrated that this ''secondary'' effect of lowering natural gas prices could be significant; as a result, this effect is increasingly cited as justification for policies promoting RE. The Berkeley Lab report summarizes recent modeling studies that have evaluated the impact of RE deployment on gas prices, reviews the reasonableness of the results of these studies in light of economic theory and other research, and develops a simple tool that can be used to evaluate the impact of RE on gas prices without relying on a complex national energy model.

  19. Magneto-convection.

    PubMed

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun.

  20. THE DOMINANCE OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: jdolence@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-01

    Multi-dimensional instabilities have become an important ingredient in core-collapse supernova (CCSN) theory. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the driving mechanism of the dominant instability. We compare our parameterized three-dimensional CCSN simulations with other buoyancy-driven simulations and propose scaling relations for neutrino-driven convection. Through these comparisons, we infer that buoyancy-driven convection dominates post-shock turbulence in our simulations. In support of this inference, we present four major results. First, the convective fluxes and kinetic energies in the neutrino-heated region are consistent with expectations of buoyancy-driven convection. Second, the convective flux is positive where buoyancy actively drives convection, and the radial and tangential components of the kinetic energy are in rough equipartition (i.e., K{sub r} {approx} K{sub {theta}} + K{sub {phi}}). Both results are natural consequences of buoyancy-driven convection, and are commonly observed in simulations of convection. Third, buoyant driving is balanced by turbulent dissipation. Fourth, the convective luminosity and turbulent dissipation scale with the driving neutrino power. In all, these four results suggest that in neutrino-driven explosions, the multi-dimensional motions are consistent with neutrino-driven convection.

  1. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  2. Boreal summer intraseasonal variability simulated in the NCEP climate forecast system: insights from moist static energy budget and sensitivity to convective moistening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooraj, K. P.; Seo, Kyong-Hwan

    2013-09-01

    The NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) with the relaxed Arakawa Schubert (RAS, hereafter referred to as CTRL) convection scheme of Moorthi and Suarez exhibits better performance in representing boreal summer tropical intraseasonal variability as compared with a simulation using simplified Arakawa-Schubert scheme. The intraseasonal moist static energy (MSE) budget is analyzed in this version of the CFS model (CTRL), which produces realistic eastward and northward propagation characteristics. The moist and thermodynamic processes involved in the maintenance and propagation of the poleward moving intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) disturbances are examined here. Budget diagnostics show that horizontal MSE advection is the principal component of the budget, contributing to the poleward movement of the convection. The injection of MSE moistens the atmosphere north of the convective area causing the poleward movement of convection by destabilization of the atmosphere. The moistening process is mainly contributed by the climatological wind acting on the anomalous moisture gradient as confirmed from the examination of moisture advection equation. While surface enthalpy fluxes (consisting of radiative and surface turbulent heat fluxes) maintain the ISO anomalies, they oppose the MSE tendency due to horizontal advection thus regulating the poleward propagation characteristics. In addition, the model results show that wind-evaporation feedback dominates over cloud-radiation feedback for ISO propagation; this is in contrast to our estimates using the newly available European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Interim reanalysis. Sensitivity experiments suggest that intraseasonal variability in the CFS model with the RAS scheme is highly sensitive to the parameterization of both the shallow convection and the convective rain evaporation and downdrafts. Removal of these components adversely affects the propagation characteristics and greatly reduces the amplitude of

  3. Optimal Energy Consumption Analysis of Natural Gas Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enbin; Li, Changjun; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    There are many compressor stations along long-distance natural gas pipelines. Natural gas can be transported using different boot programs and import pressures, combined with temperature control parameters. Moreover, different transport methods have correspondingly different energy consumptions. At present, the operating parameters of many pipelines are determined empirically by dispatchers, resulting in high energy consumption. This practice does not abide by energy reduction policies. Therefore, based on a full understanding of the actual needs of pipeline companies, we introduce production unit consumption indicators to establish an objective function for achieving the goal of lowering energy consumption. By using a dynamic programming method for solving the model and preparing calculation software, we can ensure that the solution process is quick and efficient. Using established optimization methods, we analyzed the energy savings for the XQ gas pipeline. By optimizing the boot program, the import station pressure, and the temperature parameters, we achieved the optimal energy consumption. By comparison with the measured energy consumption, the pipeline now has the potential to reduce energy consumption by 11 to 16 percent. PMID:24955410

  4. Optimal energy consumption analysis of natural gas pipeline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enbin; Li, Changjun; Yang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    There are many compressor stations along long-distance natural gas pipelines. Natural gas can be transported using different boot programs and import pressures, combined with temperature control parameters. Moreover, different transport methods have correspondingly different energy consumptions. At present, the operating parameters of many pipelines are determined empirically by dispatchers, resulting in high energy consumption. This practice does not abide by energy reduction policies. Therefore, based on a full understanding of the actual needs of pipeline companies, we introduce production unit consumption indicators to establish an objective function for achieving the goal of lowering energy consumption. By using a dynamic programming method for solving the model and preparing calculation software, we can ensure that the solution process is quick and efficient. Using established optimization methods, we analyzed the energy savings for the XQ gas pipeline. By optimizing the boot program, the import station pressure, and the temperature parameters, we achieved the optimal energy consumption. By comparison with the measured energy consumption, the pipeline now has the potential to reduce energy consumption by 11 to 16 percent.

  5. A simple parameterization for the turbulent kinetic energy transport terms in the convective boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Rizza, Umberto; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Acevedo, Otávio Costa

    2013-02-01

    In this work a parametrization for the transport terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation, valid for a convective boundary layer (CBL) is presented. This is a hard task to accomplish from experimental data, especially because of the difficulty associated to the measurements of pressure turbulent fluctuations, which are necessary to determine the pressure correlation TKE transport term. Thus, employing a large eddy simulation (LES) a full diurnal planetary boundary layer (PBL) cycle was simulated. In this simulation a forcing obtained from experimental data is used, so that the numerical experiment represents a more realistic case than a stationary PBL. For this study all terms of the TKE budget equation were determined for a CBL. From these data, polynomials that describe the TKE transport terms’ vertical profiles were adjusted. The polynomials found are a good description of the LES data, and from them it is shown that a simple formulation that directly relates the transport terms to the TKE magnitude has advantages on other parameterizations commonly used in CBL numerical models. Furthermore, the present study shows that the TKE turbulent transport term dominates over the TKE transport by pressure perturbations and that for most of the CBL these two terms have opposite signs.

  6. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments.

  7. Natural convection in square cavity filled with ferrofluid saturated porous medium in the presence of uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Mehmood, Z.; Abbas, Z.

    2017-02-01

    This article contains numerical results for free convection through square enclosure enclosing ferrofluid saturated porous medium when uniform magnetic field is applied upon the flow along x-axis. Heat is provided through bottom wall and a square blockage placed near left or right bottom corner of enclosure as a heat source. Left and right vertical boundaries of the cavity are considered insulated while upper wall is taken cold. The problem is modelled in terms of system of nonlinear partial differential equations. Finite element method has been adopted to compute numerical simulations of mathematical problem for wide range of pertinent flow parameters including Rayleigh number, Hartman number, Darcy number and Prandtl number. Analysis of results reveals that the strength of streamline circulation is an increasing function of Darcy and Prandtl number where convection heat transfer is dominant for large values of these parameters whereas increase in Hartman number has opposite effects on isotherms and streamline circulations. Thermal conductivity and hence local heat transfer rate of fluid gets increased when ferroparticles are introduced in the fluid. Average Nusselt number increases with increase in Darcy and Rayleigh numbers while it is decreases when Hartman number is increased.

  8. Oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior of a simple model for cool flames, Sal'nikov's reaction, P{yields}A {yields}B, occurring in a spherical batch reactor with varying intensities of natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.N.; Cardoso, S.S.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.

    2008-07-15

    When cool flames, or indeed any exothermic chemical reaction, occur in a fluid inside an unstirred vessel, the heat from the reaction often induces temperature gradients and consequently motion, i.e., natural convection. The intensity of the resulting flow is governed by the Rayleigh number (Ra). This work simulates numerically the behavior of Sal'nikov's reaction, P{yields} A{yields}B, under the influence of natural convection in an unstirred spherical reactor. This reaction is the simplest to exhibit the thermokinetic oscillations characterizing cool flames. The behavior of this system can be represented on a three-dimensional regime diagram, whose axes are ratios of the characteristic timescales ({tau}) for chemical reaction, diffusion (of both heat and mass), and natural convection. Previous work has identified a region of oscillations on this diagram in the purely diffusive limit, when Ra=0. This work extends this analysis to the general 3D space, where diffusion and natural convection are both important. A region in which oscillations are observed has been found for fixed values of the first-order rate constants for Sal'nikov's reaction. There is a distinct change in the shape of the region of oscillations around the critical value of Ra{proportional_to}500, when natural convection becomes important. When diffusion dominates transport (Ra<500), the boundaries between oscillatory and nonoscillatory solutions are largely independent of the ratio of timescales {tau}{sub step}2/{tau}{sub convection} and agree well with the values found previously in the purely diffusive limit. When natural convection is important (Ra>500), the oscillations occur over a wider range of parameters than is the case for a diffusive system. The presence of natural convection also leads to various, more complex behaviors than are seen in the diffusive or well-mixed limits. A region in the regime diagram was found where the oscillations in temperature and the concentration of A have

  9. A new satellite deep convective ice index for tropical climate monitoring: Possible implications for existing oceanic precipitation data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Spencer, Roy W.; Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.

    The tropical atmosphere is continually overturning, with deep moist convective cloud systems exporting energy from the subcloud layer and depositing it in the upper troposphere. A new satellite index of this deep convective activity is based upon measurements of large ice particles in the upper portions of tropical convective complexes. This 20-year record reveals a strong signal of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), with 10 to 15% upward (downward) swings in the deep convective index during El Niño (La Niña). Warming of tropical sea surface temperatures (SST), whether from anthropogenically-produced greenhouse gases or natural climate variability, is expected to be associated with more convective overturning of the atmosphere. While other tropical precipitation climatologies vary dramatically in their support of this relationship, the present deep convective ice (DCI) index shows a strong correlation between interannual variations of tropical convection and SST.

  10. Thermal convection in vertically suspended soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie

    In normal fluids, a temperature difference can create a density difference. In the presence of the gravitational field, denser fluid will fall and lighter fluid will rise, causing fluid motion known as thermal convection. This type of convection can occur on different scales, from a single growing crystal to mantle movement inside the earth. Although many experiments have been conducted in unstably stratified fluids, there have been few laboratory experiments studying convective turbulence in stably stratified fluids, which is more common in nature. Here I present a two-dimensional (2D) convection in a stably stratified vertical soap film. It was found that the interaction between the gravitational potential energy, due to the 2D density fluctuation, and the kinetic energy is important. This interplay between the two energy sources manifests itself in the statistical properties of velocity and 2D density fluctuations in the system. Our experimental findings shed new lights to a turbulent system that strongly couples to a non-passive field.

  11. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell.

    PubMed

    Arp, Trevor B; Barlas, Yafis; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2016-12-14

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light energy harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light-harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we compare the theoretical minimum energy fluctuations in nanoscale quantum heat engine photocells that incorporate one or two photon-absorbing channels and show that fluctuations are naturally suppressed in the two-channel photocell. This intrinsic suppression acts as a passive regulation mechanism that enables the efficient conversion of varying incident solar power into a steady output for absorption over a broad range of the solar spectrum on Earth. Remarkably, absorption in the green portion of the spectrum provides no inherent regulatory benefit, indicating that green light should be rejected in a photocell whose primary role is the regulation of energy flow.

  12. Convective heat transfer in buildings: recent research results. Rev

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, F.; Gadgil, A.; Kammerud, R.; Altmayer, E.; Nansteel, M.W.

    1982-10-01

    Recent experimental and numerical studies of convective heat transfer in buildings are described, and important results are presented. The experimental work has been performed on small-scale, water-filled enclosures; the numerical analysis results have been produced by a computer program based on a finite-difference scheme. The convective processes investigated in this research are: (1) natural convective heat transfer between room surfaces and the adjacent air, (2) natural convective heat transfer between adjacent rooms through a doorway or other openings, and (3) forced convection between the building and its external environment (such as wind-driven ventilation through windows, doors, or other openings). Results obtained at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for surface convection coefficients are compared with existing ASHRAE correlations, and differences can have a significant impact on the accuracy of building energy analysis computer simulations. Interzone coupling correlations obtained from experimental work are in reasonable agreement with recently published experimental results and with earlier published work. Numerical simulations of wind-driven natural ventilation are presented. They exhibit good qualitative agreement with published wind-tunnel data.

  13. Scaling of heat flux and energy spectrum for very large Prandtl number convection.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ambrish; Verma, Mahendra K; Mishra, Pankaj K

    2014-02-01

    Under the limit of infinite Prandtl number, we derive analytical expressions for the large-scale quantities, e.g., Péclet number Pe, Nusselt number Nu, and rms value of the temperature fluctuations θ(rms). We complement the analytical work with direct numerical simulations, and show that Nu ∼ Ra(γ) with γ ≈ (0.30-0.32), Pe ∼ Ra(η) with η ≈ (0.57-0.61), and θ(rms) ∼ const. The Nusselt number is observed to be an intricate function of Pe, θ(rms), and a correlation function between the vertical velocity and temperature. Using the scaling of large-scale fields, we show that the energy spectrum E(u)(k) ∼ k(-13/3), which is in a very good agreement with our numerical results. The entropy spectrum E(θ)(k), however, exhibits dual branches consisting of k(-2) and k(0) spectra; the k(-2) branch corresponds to the Fourier modes θ[over ̂](0,0,2n), which are approximately -1/(2 nπ). The scaling relations for Prandtl number beyond 10(2) match with those for infinite Prandtl number.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Open-Ended Channels with Application to Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, V.; Tkachenko, O. A.; Giroux-Julien, S.; Ménézo, C.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of the flow and heat transfer in open-ended channel formed by the double skin façade have been undertaken in order to improve understanding of the phenomena and to apply it to passive cooling of building integrated photovoltaic systems. Both uniform heating and non-uniform heating configurations in which heat sources alternated with unheated zones on both skins were studied. Different periodic and asymmetric heating modes have been considered for the same aspect ratio 1/15 of wall distance to wall height and for periodicity 1/15 and 4/15 of heated/unheated zones and heat input, 220 W/m2. In computational study three dimensional transient LES simulation was carried out. It is shown that in comparison to uniformly heating configuration, non-uniformly heating configuration enhances both convective heat transfer and chimney effect.

  15. Precision Photometry to Study the Nature of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Schubnell, Michael

    2011-01-30

    Over the past decade scientists have collected convincing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, leading to the conclusion that the content of our universe is dominated by a mysterious 'dark energy'. The fact that present theory cannot account for the dark energy has made the determination of the nature of dark energy central to the field of high energy physics. It is expected that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics is required to fully understand the accelerating universe. Discovering the nature of dark energy is a very difficult task, and requires experiments that employ a combination of different observational techniques, such as type-Ia supernovae, gravitational weak lensing surveys, galaxy and galaxy cluster surveys, and baryon acoustic oscillations. A critical component of any approach to understanding the nature of dark energy is precision photometry. This report addresses just that. Most dark energy missions will require photometric calibration over a wide range of intensities using standardized stars and internal reference sources. All of the techniques proposed for these missions rely on a complete understanding of the linearity of the detectors. The technical report focuses on the investigation and characterization of 'reciprocity failure', a newly discovered count-rate dependent nonlinearity in the NICMOS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. In order to quantify reciprocity failure for modern astronomical detectors, we built a dedicated reciprocity test setup that produced a known amount of light on a detector, and to measured its response as a function of light intensity and wavelength.

  16. Scales of Free Convection around a Vertical Cylinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lira, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    The natural scales of the laminar steady-state free convection flow regime surrounding an isothermal vertical cylinder are established. It is shown that nondimensionalizing the momentum and energy equations in terms of the Rayleigh or Boussinesq numbers allows the use of the Prandtl number as a criterion to establish whether the motive buoyancy…

  17. Can Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency PutDownward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-06-01

    High and volatile natural gas prices have increasingly led to calls for investments in renewable energy and energy efficiency. One line of argument is that deployment of these resources may lead to reductions in the demand for and price of natural gas. Many recent U.S.-based modeling studies have demonstrated that this effect could provide significant consumer savings. In this article we evaluate these studies, and benchmark their findings against economic theory, other modeling results, and a limited empirical literature. We find that many uncertainties remain regarding the absolute magnitude of this effect, and that the reduction in natural gas prices may not represent an increase in aggregate economic wealth. Nonetheless, we conclude that many of the studies of the impact of renewable energy and energy efficiency on natural gas prices appear to have represented this effect within reason, given current knowledge. These studies specifically suggest that a 1% reduction in U.S. natural gas demand could lead to long-term average wellhead price reductions of 0.8% to 2%, and that each megawatt-hour of renewable energy and energy efficiency may benefit natural gas consumers to the tune of at least $7.5 to $20.

  18. Topical report : CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.

    2007-05-16

    The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The United States Department of Energy has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS. At this time no reference design is available for the NGNP. The General Atomics (GA) gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) has been used in many analyses as a starting reference design. In the GT-MHR the reactor outlet temperature is 850 C, while the target outlet reactor temperature in VHTR is 1000 C. VHTR scoping studies with a reactor outlet temperature of 1000 C have been performed at GA and INEL. Although the reactor outlet temperature in the VHTR is significantly higher than in the GT-MHR, the peak temperature in the reactor vessel (which is the heat source for the RCCS) is not drastically different. In this work, analyses have been performed using reactor vessel

  19. Combined effects of suction/injection and wall surface curvature on natural convection flow in a vertical micro-porous annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Aina, B.; Muhammad, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates analytically the hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour of a fully developed natural convection flow in a vertical micro-porous-annulus (MPA) taking into account the velocity slip and temperature jump at the outer surface of inner porous cylinder and inner surface of outer porous cylinder. A closed — form solution is presented for velocity, temperature, volume flow rate, skin friction and rate of heat transfer expressed as a Nusselt number. The influence of each governing parameter on hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour is discussed with the aid of graphs. During the course of investigation, it is found that as suction/injection on the cylinder walls increases, the fluid velocity and temperature is enhanced. In addition, it is observed that wall surface curvature has a significant effect on flow and thermal characteristics.

  20. Influence of non steady gravity on natural convection during micro-gravity solidification of semiconductors. I - Time scale analysis. II - Implications for crystal growth experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, P. R.; Motakef, S.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of temporal variations in the magnitude of gravity on natural convection during unidirectional solidification of semiconductors. It is shown that the response time to step changes in g at low Rayleigh numbers is controlled by the momentum diffusive time scale. At higher Rayleigh numbers, the response time to increases in g is reduced because of inertial effects. The degree of perturbation of flow fields by transients in the gravitational acceleration on the Space Shuttle and the Space Station is determined. The analysis is used to derive the requirements for crystal growth experiments conducted on low duration low-g vehicles. Also, the effectiveness of sounding rockets and KC-135 aircraft for microgravity experiments is examined.

  1. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter.

  2. Nonlinear Radiation Heat Transfer Effects in the Natural Convective Boundary Layer Flow of Nanofluid Past a Vertical Plate: A Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  3. Comparison of Natural Convection Flows Under VHTR Type Conditions Modeled by both the Conservation and Incompressible Forms of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Aur´elia Esteve; Kurt D. Hamman; Dana A. Knoll; Ryosuke Park; William Taitano

    2010-06-01

    This manuscript illustrates a comparative study to analyze the physical differences between numerical simulations obtained with both the conservation and incompressible forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for natural convection flows in simple geometries. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the incompressible flow assumption (which is based upon constant density advection, divergence-free flow, and the Boussinesq gravitational body force approximation) differs from the conservation form (which only assumes that the fluid is a continuum) when solving flows driven by gravity acting upon density variations resulting from local temperature gradients. Driving this study is the common use of the incompressible flow assumption in fluid flow simulations for nuclear power applications in natural convection flows subjected to a high heat flux (large temperature differences). A series of simulations were conducted on two-dimensional, differentially-heated rectangular geometries and modeled with both hydrodynamic formulations. From these simulations, the selected characterization parameters of maximum Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, and normalized pressure reduction were calculated. Comparisons of these parameters were made with available benchmark solutions for air with the ideal gas assumption at both low and high heat fluxes. Additionally, we generated specific force quantities and velocity and temperature distributions to provide a basis for further analysis. The simulations and analysis were then extended to include helium at the Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) normal operating conditions. Our results show that the consequences of incorporating the incompressible flow assumption in high heat flux situations may lead to unrepresentative results. The results question the use of the incompressible flow assumption for simulating fluid flow in an operating nuclear reactor, where large temperature variations are present.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Natural Convection Flows Simulated by both the Conservation and Incompressible Forms of the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Differentially-Heated Square Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Aurélia Esteve; Kurt D. Hamman; Dana A. Knoll; Ryosuke Park; William Taitano

    2009-01-01

    This report illustrates a comparative study to analyze the physical differences between numerical simulations obtained with both the conservation and incompressible forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for natural convection flows in simple geometries. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the incompressible flow assumption (which is based upon constant density advection, divergence-free flow, and the Boussinesq gravitational body force approximation) differs from the conservation form (which only assumes that the fluid is a continuum) when solving flows driven by gravity acting upon density variations resulting from local temperature gradients. Driving this study is the common use of the incompressible flow assumption in fluid flow simulations for nuclear power applications in natural convection flows subjected to a high heat flux (large temperature differences). A series of simulations were conducted on two-dimensional, differentially-heated rectangular geometries and modeled with both hydrodynamic formulations. From these simulations, the selected characterization parameters of maximum Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, and normalized pressure reduction were calculated. Comparisons of these parameters were made with available benchmark solutions for air with the ideal gas assumption at both low and high heat fluxes. Additionally, we generated body force, velocity, and divergence of velocity distributions to provide a basis for further analysis. The simulations and analysis were then extended to include helium at the Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) normal operating conditions. Our results show that the consequences of incorporating the incompressible flow assumption in high heat flux situations may lead to unrepresentative results. The results question the use of the incompressible flow assumption for simulating fluid flow in an operating nuclear reactor, where large temperature variations are present. The results show that the use of

  5. Convection in White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith L.; Shipman, H.; Dalessio, J.; M, M.

    2012-01-01

    Convection is one of the largest sources of theoretical uncertainty in our understanding of stellar physics. Current studies of convective energy transport are based on the mixing length theory. Originally intended to depict turbulent flows in engineering situations, MLT enjoys moderate success in describing stellar convection. However, problems arising from MLT's incompleteness are apparent in studies ranging from determinations of the ages of massive stars, to understanding the structure F and early A stars, to predicting the pulsation periods of solar stars, to understanding the atmosphere of Titan. As an example for white dwarfs, Bergeron et al. (1995) show that model parameters such as flux, line profiles, energy distribution, color indices, and equivalent widths are extremely sensitive to the assumed MLT parameterization. The authors find systematic uncertainties ranging from 25% for effective temperatures to 11% for mass and radius. The WET is engaged in a long term project to empirically determine the physical properties of convection in the atmospheres of pulsating white dwarfs. The technique, outlined by Montgomery et al. (2010), uses information from nonlinear (non-sinusoidal) pulse shapes of the target star to empirically probe the physical properties of its convection zone. Approximately two thirds of all white dwarfs show nonlinear characteristics in their light curves. We present current results from WET targets in 2008-2011.

  6. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Techniacl progress report, June 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  7. A fast algorithm for Direct Numerical Simulation of natural convection flows in arbitrarily-shaped periodic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, D.; Stalio, E.; Corticelli, M. A.; Barozzi, G. S.

    2015-11-01

    A parallel algorithm is presented for the Direct Numerical Simulation of buoyancy- induced flows in open or partially confined periodic domains, containing immersed cylindrical bodies of arbitrary cross-section. The governing equations are discretized by means of the Finite Volume method on Cartesian grids. A semi-implicit scheme is employed for the diffusive terms, which are treated implicitly on the periodic plane and explicitly along the homogeneous direction, while all convective terms are explicit, via the second-order Adams-Bashfort scheme. The contemporary solution of velocity and pressure fields is achieved by means of a projection method. The numerical resolution of the set of linear equations resulting from discretization is carried out by means of efficient and highly parallel direct solvers. Verification and validation of the numerical procedure is reported in the paper, for the case of flow around an array of heated cylindrical rods arranged in a square lattice. Grid independence is assessed in laminar flow conditions, and DNS results in turbulent conditions are presented for two different grids and compared to available literature data, thus confirming the favorable qualities of the method.

  8. On sound generation by turbulent convection: A new look at old results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Stein, R. F.; Ulmschneider, P.

    1994-03-01

    We have revisited the problem of acoustic wave generation by turbulent convection in stellar atmospheres. The theory of aerodynamically generated sound, originally developed by Lighthill and later modified by Stein to include the effects of stratification, has been used to estimate the acoustic wave energy flux generated in solar and stellar convection zones. We correct the earlier computations by incorporating an improved description of the spatial and temporal spectrum of the turbulent convection. We show the dependence of the resulting wave fluxes on the nature of the turbulence, and compute the wave energy spectra and wave energy fluxes generated in the Sun on the basis of a mixing-length model of the solar convection zone. In contrast to the previous results, we show that the acoustic energy generation does not depend very sensitively on the turbulent energy spectrum. However, typical total acoustic fluxes of order FA = 5 x 107 ergs/sq cm/s with a peak of the acoustic frequency spectrum near omega = 100 mHz are found to be comparable to those previously calculated. The acoustic flux turns out to be strongly dependent on the solar model, scaling with the mixing-length parameter alpha as alpha3.8. The computed fluxes most likely constitute a lower limit on the acoustic energy produced in the solar convection zone if recent convection simulations suggesting the presence of shocks near the upper layers of the convection zone apply to the Sun.

  9. On sound generation by turbulent convection: A new look at old results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Stein, R. F.; Ulmschneider, P.

    1994-01-01

    We have revisited the problem of acoustic wave generation by turbulent convection in stellar atmospheres. The theory of aerodynamically generated sound, originally developed by Lighthill and later modified by Stein to include the effects of stratification, has been used to estimate the acoustic wave energy flux generated in solar and stellar convection zones. We correct the earlier computations by incorporating an improved description of the spatial and temporal spectrum of the turbulent convection. We show the dependence of the resulting wave fluxes on the nature of the turbulence, and compute the wave energy spectra and wave energy fluxes generated in the Sun on the basis of a mixing-length model of the solar convection zone. In contrast to the previous results, we show that the acoustic energy generation does not depend very sensitively on the turbulent energy spectrum. However, typical total acoustic fluxes of order F(sub A) = 5 x 10(exp 7) ergs/sq cm/s with a peak of the acoustic frequency spectrum near omega = 100 mHz are found to be comparable to those previously calculated. The acoustic flux turns out to be strongly dependent on the solar model, scaling with the mixing-length parameter alpha as alpha(exp 3.8). The computed fluxes most likely constitute a lower limit on the acoustic energy produced in the solar convection zone if recent convection simulations suggesting the presence of shocks near the upper layers of the convection zone apply to the Sun.

  10. Department of Energy power generation programs for natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bajura, R.A.

    1995-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring two major programs to develop high efficiency, natural gas fueled power generation technologies. These programs are the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program and the Fuel Cell Program. While natural gas is gaining acceptance in the electric power sector, the improved technology from these programs will make gas an even more attractive fuel, particularly in urban areas where environmental concerns are greatest. Under the auspices of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE), the 8-year ATS Program is developing and will demonstrate advanced gas turbine power systems for both large central power systems and smaller industrial-scale systems. The large-scale systems will have efficiencies significantly greater than 60 percent, while the industrial-scale systems will have efficiencies with at least an equivalent 15 percent increase over the best 1992-vintage technology. The goal is to have the system ready for commercial offering by the year 2000.

  11. Marangoni Convection Induced Ripple on Grazing Incidence Liquid Metal Mirror (GILMM) Used for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R

    2001-08-27

    A spatial variation of temperature in the sodium film on the surface of the grazing incidence liquid metal mirror (GILMM) will give rise to convection due to the temperature dependent variation in surface tension. This is called thermal capillary convection or the Marangoni effect and causes the surface to have ripples or waves. This note estimates the magnitude of this effect and finds, with care, design parameters can be chosen to make the resulting ripples sufficiently small so that a laser beam can be focused on a target of 1/4 mm spot size at 30 m distance, for example. Smaller spot sizes are discussed.

  12. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  13. Supergranulation, a convective phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2015-08-01

    Observation of the Solar photosphere through high resolution instruments have long indicated that the surface of the Sun is not a tranquil, featureless surface but is beset with a granular appearance. These cellular velocity patterns are a visible manifestation of sub- photospheric convection currents which contribute substantially to the outward transport of energy from the deeper layers, thus maintaining the energy balance of the Sun as a whole.Convection is the chief mode of transport in the outer layers of all cool stars such as the Sun (Noyes,1982). Convection zone of thickness 30% of the Solar radius lies in the sub-photospheric layers of the Sun. Convection is revealed on four scales. On the scale of 1000 km, it is granulation and on the scale of 8-10 arcsec, it is Mesogranulation. The next hierarchial scale of convection ,Supergranules are in the range of 30-40 arcsec. The largest reported manifestation of convection in the Sun are ‘Giant Cells’or ‘Giant Granules’, on a typical length scale of about 108 m.'Supergranules' is caused by the turbulence that extends deep into the convection zone. They have a typical lifetime of about 20hr with spicules marking their boundaries. Gas rises in the centre of the supergranules and then spreads out towards the boundary and descends.Broadly speaking supergranules are characterized by the three parameters namely the length L, the lifetime T and the horizontal flow velocity vh . The interrelationships amongst these parameters can shed light on the underlying convective processes and are in agreement with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence as applied to large scale solar convection (Krishan et al .2002 ; Paniveni et. al. 2004, 2005, 2010).References:1) Noyes, R.W., The Sun, Our Star (Harvard University Press, 1982)2) Krishan, V., Paniveni U., Singh , J., Srikanth R., 2002, MNRAS, 334/1,2303) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J., Srikanth, R., 2004, MNRAS, 347, 1279-12814) Paniveni , U., Krishan, V., Singh, J

  14. Survey on a cold-energy supply system using natural energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-03-01

    This paper examines how unused cold energy sources are distributed and exist in the natural world and also evaluates the feasibility of the system to take out these cold energy sources by the use of solar energy, etc. and to supply them as cold energy to the surrounding area. Using a heat supply model building located at the dam-lake side, the system is outlined in the following three cases: dam-lake water and commercial electric power source system; dam-lake water and photovoltaic power generation system; and conventional energy system. These are viewed in terms of economy and effective energy utilization. When using a cold energy source below 10 C directly for the cold energy supply, a large effect is expected in terms of cost and energy. In a combination with the photovoltaic power generation, the problem is measured against snowfall, etc. The cold energy supply system which uses dam-lake water as a heat source of the heat pump has a large significance. A marked effect can be expected from a combination of an ice making heat pump and low temperature dam-lake water, in terms of effective energy utilization and cost reduction.

  15. Stabilised dG-FEM for incompressible natural convection flows with boundary and moving interior layers on non-adapted meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Philipp W.; Lube, Gert

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents heavily grad-div and pressure jump stabilised, equal- and mixed-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for non-isothermal incompressible flows based on the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. In this framework, the enthalpy-porosity model for multiphase flow in melting and solidification problems can be employed. By considering the differentially heated cavity and the melting of pure gallium in a rectangular enclosure, it is shown that both boundary layers and sharp moving interior layers can be handled naturally by the proposed class of non-conforming methods. Due to the stabilising effect of the grad-div term and the robustness of discontinuous Galerkin methods, it is possible to solve the underlying problems accurately on coarse, non-adapted meshes. The interaction of heavy grad-div stabilisation and discontinuous Galerkin methods significantly improves the mass conservation properties and the overall accuracy of the numerical scheme which is observed for the first time. Hence, it is inferred that stabilised discontinuous Galerkin methods are highly robust as well as computationally efficient numerical methods to deal with natural convection problems arising in incompressible computational thermo-fluid dynamics.

  16. CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS. Topical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-16

    The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The USDOE has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convective Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS.

  17. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  18. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  19. Modeling Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, James R.; Elliott, Nancy A.; Hurteau, Laura; Schulz, Amanda

    2004-01-01

    Students must understand the fundamental process of convection before they can grasp a wide variety of Earth processes, many of which may seem abstract because of the scales on which they operate. Presentation of a very visual, concrete model prior to instruction on these topics may facilitate students' understanding of processes that are largely…

  20. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  1. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  2. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  3. Hawaii Natural Energy Institute annual report, July 1981-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report includes brief progress reports on the 35 research and development projects in geothermal energy, ocean energy, biomass energy, wind energy, solar energy, and other renewable energy sources. (DLC)

  4. 75 FR 27340 - Energy Efficiency of Natural Gas Infrastructure and Operations Conference; Supplemental Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Efficiency of Natural Gas Infrastructure and Operations Conference...) in the Commission Meeting Room at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street,...

  5. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, F. A.; Beyer, P.; Fuhr, G.; Monnier, A.; Benkadda, S.

    2014-08-15

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry, the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindrical geometry, but in toroidal geometry the convective thermal flux and the poloidal rotation appear only with the islands overlapping of the linear coupling between neighbouring poloidal wavenumbers m, m – 1, and m + 1.

  6. Melt convection effects on the critical velocity of particle engulfment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Catalina, A.; Curreri, P. A.

    1997-04-01

    Liquid convection ahead of the solidifying interface alters particle behavior in the vicinity of the interface. This effect has not been quantified to date. Relevant directional solidification experiments were conducted using samples of varying thicknesses, as well as normal and low-gravity experiments. A mixture of transparent biphenyl matrix and spherical glass particles, as well as one of succinonitrile matrix with polystyrene particles were used. Two experimental setups were used: a horizontal gradient heating facility (HGF) for horizontal solidification, and a Bridgman-type furnace (BF) for vertical solidification. The convection level during solidification in the HGF was varied by changing the distance between the glass slides containing the composite sample. The BF was used on ground and during parabolic flights, and thus the convection level was changed by alternating low-gravity and high-gravity solidified regions. It was found that the convection level and/or particle buoyancy significantly influences the critical velocity for particle engulfment. At higher natural convection during solidification the critical velocity increases by up to 40%. At very high convection levels engulfment may become impossible because particles fail to interact with the interface. A systematic analysis of some theoretical models was performed in an attempt to evaluate the present level of theoretical understanding of the problem. Methods of evaluating the surface energies required for model validation are also presented.

  7. Harvesting energy from the natural vibration of human walking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiqing; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Guang; Yang, Jin; Bai, Peng; Su, Yuanjie; Jing, Qingsheng; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-12-23

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), a unique technology for harvesting ambient mechanical energy based on the triboelectric effect, has been proven to be a cost-effective, simple, and robust approach for self-powered systems. However, a general challenge is that the output current is usually low. Here, we demonstrated a rationally designed TENG with integrated rhombic gridding, which greatly improved the total current output owing to the structurally multiplied unit cells connected in parallel. With the hybridization of both the contact-separation mode and sliding electrification mode among nanowire arrays and nanopores fabricated onto the surfaces of two contact plates, the newly designed TENG produces an open-circuit voltage up to 428 V, and a short-circuit current of 1.395 mA with the peak power density of 30.7 W/m(2). Relying on the TENG, a self-powered backpack was developed with a vibration-to-electric energy conversion efficiency up to 10.62(±1.19) %. And it was also demonstrated as a direct power source for instantaneously lighting 40 commercial light-emitting diodes by harvesting the vibration energy from natural human walking. The newly designed TENG can be a mobile power source for field engineers, explorers, and disaster-relief workers.

  8. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    SciTech Connect

    Carnall, Michael; Dale, Larry; Lekov, Alex

    2011-07-26

    A primary justification for the establishment of energy efficiency standards for home appliances is the existence of information deficiencies and externalities in the market for appliances. For example, when a long-term homeowner purchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximize the value of her purchase by comparing the life-cycle cost of ownership of available units, including both total installed cost - purchase price plus installation costs - and operating cost in the calculus. Choice of the appliance with the lowest life-cycle costs leads to the most economically efficient balance between capital cost and fuel cost. However, if the purchaser's expected period of ownership is shorter than the useful life of the appliance, or the purchaser does not pay for the fuel used by the appliance, as is often the case with rental property, fuel cost will be external to her costs, biasing her decision toward spending less on fuel efficiency and resulting in the purchase of an appliance with greater than optimal fuel usage. By imposing an efficiency standard on appliances, less efficient appliances are made unavailable, precluding less efficient purchases and reducing fuel usage. The reduction in fuel demanded by residential users affects the total demand for such fuels as natural gas, for example. Reduced demand implies that residential customers are willing to purchase less gas at each price level. That is, the demand curve, labeled D{sub 0} in Figure 1, shifts to the left to D{sub 1}. If there is no change in the supply function, the supply curve will intersect the demand curve at a lower price. Residential demand is only one component of the total demand for natural gas. It is possible that total demand will decline very little if demand in other sectors increases substantially in response to a decline in the price. If demand does decrease, modeling studies generally confirm the intuition that reductions in demand for natural gas will result in reductions in its

  9. Nonlinear Convection in Mushy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae; Anderson, Daniel M.; Schulze, T. P.

    1996-01-01

    When alloys solidify in a gravitational field there are complex interactions between solidification and natural, buoyancy-driven convection that can alter the composition and impair the structure of the solid product. The particular focus of this project has been the compositional convection within mushy layers that occurs in situations where the lighter component of the alloy is rejected into the melt during solidification by cooling from below. The linear stability of such a situation was previously described and has been further elucidated in a number of published articles. Here we describe some recent developments in the study of nonlinear evolution of convection in mushy layers.

  10. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  11. Feasibility study for use of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for VHTR water-cooled RCCS shutdown.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.; Farmer, M.T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-08-31

    -normal operating conditions. The standpipes are headered (in groups of four in the prototype) to water supply (header) tanks that are situated well above the reactor vessel to facilitate natural convection cooling during a loss of forced flow event. During normal operations, the water is pumped from a heat sink located outside the containment to the headered inlets to the standpipes. The water is then delivered to each standpipe through a centrally located downcomer that passes the coolant to the bottom of each pipe. The water then turns 180{sup o} and rises up through the annular gap while extracting heat from the reactor cavity due to a combination of natural convection and radiation across the gap between the reactor vessel and standpipes. The water exits the standpipes at the top where it is headered (again in groups of four) into a return line that passes the coolant to the top of the header tank. Coolant is drawn from each tank through a fitting located near the top of the tank where it flows to the heat rejection system located outside the containment. This completes the flow circuit for normal operations. During off-normal conditions, forced convection water cooling in the RCCS is presumed to be lost, as well as the ultimate heat sink outside the containment. In this case, water is passively drawn from an open line located at the bottom of the header tank. This line is orificed so that flow bypass during normal operations is small, yet the line is large enough to provide adequate flow during passive operations to remove decay heat while maintaining acceptable fuel temperatures. In the passive operating mode, water flows by natural convection from the bottom of the supply tank to the standpipes, and returns through the normal pathway to the top of the tanks. After the water reaches saturation and boiling commences, steam will pass through the top of the tanks and be vented to atmosphere. In the experiment system shown in Fig. 4, a steam condensation and collection system is

  12. Analysis of fluid-solid interaction in MHD natural convection in a square cavity equally partitioned by a vertical flexible membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehryan, S. A. M.; Ghalambaz, Mohammad; Ismael, Muneer A.; Chamkha, Ali J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates numerically the problem of unsteady natural convection inside a square cavity partitioned by a flexible impermeable membrane. The finite element method with the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) technique has been used to model the interaction of the fluid and the membrane. The horizontal walls of the cavity are kept adiabatic while the vertical walls are kept isothermal at different temperatures. A uniform magnetic field is applied onto the cavity with different orientations. The cavity has been provided by two eyelets to compensate volume changes due the movement of the flexible membrane. A parametric study is carried out for the pertinent parameters, which are the Rayleigh number (105-108), Hartmann number (0-200) and the orientation of the magnetic field (0-180°). The change in the Hartmann number affects the shape of the membrane and the heat transfer in the cavity. The angle of the magnetic field orientation also significantly affects the shape of the membrane and the heat transfer in the cavity.

  13. Natural convection heat transfer from horizontal concentric and eccentric cylinder systems cooling in the ambient air and determination of inner cylinder location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atayılmaz, Ş. Özgür; Demir, Hakan; Sevindir, Mustafa Kemal; Ağra, Özden; Teke, İsmail; Dalkılıç, Ahmet Selim

    2017-03-01

    Heat transfer characteristics of horizontal copper concentric cylinders in the case of natural convection was investigated numerically and experimentally. While the inner cylinder had an electric heater to keep it at a constant temperature, annulus was filled with water. There were two different test sections as bare and concentric cylinder systems located in different ambient temperatures in a conditioned room for the comparison of the results. Comparison of average Nusselt numbers for the air side of the concentric cylinder system and the effective thermal conductivity of the annulus were calculated with both experimental data, numerical results and a well-known correlation. Annulus and the air side isotherms and streamlines are shown for RaL = 9 × 105-5 × 106 and Ra = 2 × 105-7 × 105 respectively. Additionally, a numerical study was conducted by forming eccentric cylinder systems to determine the optimum location of inner cylinder to maximize the heat transfer rate. Comparison of heat transfer rates from bare and concentric horizontal cylinders were done under steady state conditions. Heat transfer enhancement, the effect of the decrease in condensing temperature of the inner cylinder surface on COP of an ideal Carnot refrigeration cycle and rise in COP were determined in the study. Also the optimum location of inner cylinder to maximize the heat transfer rate was determined as at the bottom quadrant of outer cylinder.

  14. 75 FR 13644 - TORP Terminal LP, Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal Liquefied Natural Gas Deepwater Port License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Maritime Administration TORP Terminal LP, Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal Liquefied Natural Gas...) for the TORP Terminal LP, Bienville Offshore Energy Terminal (BOET) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG..., both are identified in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Summary of the Application TORP Terminal...

  15. Convective heat transfer in buildings: Recent research results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Nansteel, M.

    1982-04-01

    Small scale water filled enclosures were used to study convective heat transfer in buildings. The convective processes investigated are: (1) natural convective heat transfer between room surfaces and the adjacent air; (2) natural convective heat transfer between adjacent rooms through a doorway or other openings; and (3) forced convection between the building and its external environment (such as, wind driven ventilation through windows, doors, or other openings). Results for surface convection coefficients are compared with existing ASHRAE coorelations and differences of as much as 20% are observed. Numerical simulations of wind driven natural ventilation exhibit good qualitative agreement with published wind tunnel data.

  16. A Dynamically Computed Convective Time Scale for the Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many convective parameterization schemes define a convective adjustment time scale τ as the time allowed for dissipation of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The Kain–Fritsch scheme defines τ based on an estimate of the advective time period for deep con...

  17. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  18. 76 FR 63613 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26464] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee... meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished... recommendations to the SEAB on how to improve the safety and environmental performance of natural gas...

  19. Scale-free convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Convection is one of the fundamental mechanism to transport energy, e.g., in planetology, oceanography as well as in astrophysics where stellar structure customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale parameter to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height of the star, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented the first fully analytical scale-free theory of convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of convection determines all the properties of convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium (being it a either a star, an ocean, a primordial planet). The new theory of convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory in astrophysical environment are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm in stars with

  20. Scale-free convection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    Convection is one of the fundamental mechanisms to transport energy, e.g., in planetology, oceanography, as well as in astrophysics where stellar structure is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale parameter to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height of the star, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun. No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in the literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty. In a recent paper (Pasetto et al. 2014) we presented the first fully analytical scale-free theory of convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of convection determines all the properties of convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium (be it a star, an ocean, or a primordial planet). The new theory of convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism. We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory in astrophysical environment are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm in stars with

  1. 76 FR 67158 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of... of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. The public meeting...

  2. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-06

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  3. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  4. Pathways to Decarbonization. Natural Gas and Renewable Energy. Lessons Learned from Energy System Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, Jacquelyn; Arent, Douglas J.; Logan, Jeffrey; Cochran, Jaquelin; Zinaman, Owen; Stark, Camila

    2015-04-30

    Ensuring the resilience, reliability, flexibility, and affordability of the U.S. electric grid is increasingly important as the country addresses climate change and an aging infrastructure. State and federal policy and actions by industry, non-profits, and others create a dynamic framework for achieving these goals. Three principle low-carbon generation technologies have formed the basis for multiple scenarios leading toward a low-carbon, resilient, and affordable power system. While there is no “silver bullet,” one avenue identified by key stakeholders is the opportunity to invest in natural gas (NG) and renewable resources, both of which offer abundant domestic resource bases and contribute to energy independence, carbon mitigation, and economic growth. NG and renewable electricity (RE) have traditionally competed for market share in the power sector, but there is a growing experience base and awareness for their synergistic use (Cochran et al. 2014). Building upon these observations and previous work, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA), in collaboration with the Center for the New Energy Economy and the Gas Technology Institute, convened a series of workshops in 2014 to explore NG and RE synergies in the U.S. power sector. This report captures key insights from the workshop series, Synergies of Natural Gas and Renewable Energy: 360 Degrees of Opportunity, as well as supporting economic valuation analyses conducted by JISEA researchers that quantify the value proposition of investing in NG and RE together as complements.

  5. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  6. THE SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE OF STELLAR CONVECTION AND ITS SCALING IN THE HIGH-RAYLEIGH-NUMBER REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-02-10

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique test bed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation owing to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of three-dimensional stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of convective flows are established within a star’s interior. While these simulations are nonmagnetic and nonrotating in nature, they demonstrate two robust phenomena. When run with sufficiently high Rayleigh number, the integrated kinetic energy of the convection becomes effectively independent of thermal diffusion, but the spectral distribution of that kinetic energy remains sensitive to both of these quantities. A simulation that has converged to a diffusion-independent value of kinetic energy will divide that energy between spatial scales such that low-wavenumber power is overestimated and high-wavenumber power is underestimated relative to a comparable system possessing higher Rayleigh number. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the current inconsistencies between models and observations.

  7. A Family of Convective-Like Energy-Stable Outflow Boundary Conditions for Incompressible Flow Simulations on Severely-Truncated Unbounded Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Suchuan

    2016-11-01

    A large class of flow problems are spatially developing and involves physically unbounded domains, e.g. wakes, jets, and shear layers. To numerically simulate such problems, it is necessary to truncate the domain to a finite size, and some open boundary condition (a.k.a. outflow boundary condition) will be required at the artificial boundary. Backflow instability is a commonly encountered issue with outflows or open boundaries at moderate and high Reynolds numbers. Simulations have been observed to instantly blow up when strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow/open boundary. In this talk we present a family of convective-like open boundary conditions that effectively overcomes the backflow instability. A prominent feature of these boundary conditions is that they all ensure the energy stability of the system, even in situations where strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow/open boundary. The proposed boundary conditions unify and provide an underlying connection between the usual convective boundary condition and the traction-free boundary condition. Several canonical wake and jet problems in open domains will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the method for overcoming backflow instability. This work is partially supported by NSF (DMS-1318820 and DMS-1522537).

  8. Putting downward pressure on natural gas prices: The impact of renewable energy and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; St. Clair, Matthew

    2004-05-20

    Increased deployment of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) is expected to reduce natural gas demand and in turn place downward pressure on gas prices. A number of recent modeling studies include an evaluation of this effect. Based on data compiled from those studies summarized in this paper, each 1% reduction in national natural gas demand appears likely to lead to a long-term average wellhead gas price reduction of 0.75% to 2.5%, with some studies predicting even more sizable reductions. Reductions in wellhead prices will reduce wholesale and retail electricity rates, and will also reduce residential, commercial, and industrial gas bills. We further find that many of these studies appear to represent the potential impact of RE and EE on natural gas prices within the bounds of current knowledge, but that current knowledge of how to estimate this effect is extremely limited. While more research is therefore needed, existing studies suggest that it is not unreasonable to expect that any increase in consumer electricity costs attributable to RE and/or EE deployment may be substantially offset by the corresponding reduction in delivered natural gas prices. This effect represents a wealth transfer (from natural gas producers to consumers) rather than a net gain in social welfare, and is therefore not a standard motivation for policy intervention on economic grounds. Reducing gas prices and thereby redistributing wealth may still be of importance in policy circles, however, and may be viewed in those circles as a positive ancillary effect of RE and EE deployment.

  9. Stability of two-dimensional (2D) natural convection flows in air-filled differentially heated cavities: 2D/3D disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihe; Le Quéré, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Following our previous two-dimensional (2D) studies of flows in differentially heated cavities filled with air, we studied the stability of 2D natural convection flows in these cavities with respect to 3D periodic perturbations. The basis of the numerical methods is a time-stepping code using the Chebyshev spectral collocation method and the direct Uzawa method for velocity-pressure coupling. Newton's iteration, Arnoldi's method and the continuation method have been used in order to, respectively, compute the 2D steady-state base solution, estimate the leading eigenmodes of the Jacobian and perform linear stability analysis. Differentially heated air-filled cavities of aspect ratios from 1 to 7 were investigated. Neutral curves (Rayleigh number versus wave number) have been obtained. It turned out that only for aspect ratio 7, 3D stationary instability occurs at slightly higher Rayleigh numbers than the onset of 2D time-dependent flow and that for other aspect ratios 3D instability always takes place before 2D time-dependent flows. 3D unstable modes are stationary and anti-centro-symmetric. 3D nonlinear simulations revealed that the corresponding pitchfork bifurcations are supercritical and that 3D instability leads only to weak flow in the third direction. Further 3D computations are also performed at higher Rayleigh number in order to understand the effects of the weak 3D fluid motion on the onset of time-dependent flow. 3D flow structures are responsible for the onset of time-dependent flow for aspect ratios 1, 2 and 3, while for larger aspect ratios they do not alter the transition scenario, which was observed in the 2D cases and that vertical boundary layers become unstable to traveling waves.

  10. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  11. Coupled radiative convective equilibrium simulations with explicit and parameterized convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, Cathy; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-09-01

    Radiative convective equilibrium has been applied in past studies to various models given its simplicity and analogy to the tropical climate. At convection-permitting resolution, the focus has been on the organization of convection that appears when using fixed sea surface temperature (SST). Here the SST is allowed to freely respond to the surface energy. The goals are to examine and understand the resulting transient behavior, equilibrium state, and perturbations thereof, as well as to compare these results to a simulation integrated with parameterized cloud and convection. Analysis shows that the coupling between the SST and the net surface energy acts to delay the onset of self-aggregation and may prevent it, in our case, for a slab ocean of less than 1 m. This is so because SST gradients tend to oppose the shallow low-level circulation that is associated with the self-aggregation of convection. Furthermore, the occurrence of self-aggregation is found to be necessary for reaching an equilibrium state and avoiding a greenhouse-like climate. In analogy to the present climate, the self-aggregation generates the dry and clear subtropics that allow the system to efficiently cool. In contrast, strong shortwave cloud radiative effects, much stronger than at convection-permitting resolution, prevent the simulation with parameterized cloud and convection to fall into a greenhouse state. The convection-permitting simulations also suggest that cloud feedbacks, as arising when perturbing the equilibrium state, may be very different, and in our case less negative, than what emerges from general circulation models.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Buoyancy Driven Convection During PDAMNA Thin Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents results from numerical simulations as well as laboratory experiments of buoyancy driven convection in an ampoule under varying heating and gravitational acceleration loadings. The modeling effort in this work resolves the large scale natural convective motion that occurs in the fluid during photodeposition of polydiacetelene films which is due to energy absorbed by the growth solution from a UV source. Consequently, the growth kinetics of the film are ignored in the model discussed here, and also a much simplified ampoule geometry is considered. The objective of this work is to validate the numerical prediction on the strength and structure of buoyancy driven convection that could occur under terrestrial conditions during nonlinear optical film growth. The validation is used to enable a reliable predictive capability on the nature and strength of the convective motion under low gravity conditions. The ampoule geometry is in the form of a parallelepiped with rectangular faces. The numerical results obtained from the solution to the Boussinesq equations show that natural convection will occur regardless of the orientation of the UV source with respect to the gravity vector. The least strong convective motion occurred with the UV beam directed at the top face of the parallelepiped. The strength of the convective motion was found to be almost linearly proportional to the total power of the UV source. Also, it was found that the strength of the convective motion decreased linearly with the gravity due to acceleration. The pattern of the convective flow on the other hand, depended on the source location.

  13. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  14. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  15. Convective heater

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  16. 76 FR 31318 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of... (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act... directed by the Secretary. The Natural Gas Subcommittee was established to provide advice...

  17. 76 FR 34070 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy, DOE. ACTION... Advisory Board (SEAB), Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished pursuant to the Federal Advisory..., operational issues and other activities as directed by the Secretary. The Natural Gas Subcommittee...

  18. 76 FR 34070 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee AGENCY: Department of Energy, DOE. ACTION... Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished pursuant to the Federal Advisory..., operational issues and other activities as directed by the Secretary. The Natural Gas Subcommittee...

  19. 76 FR 34071 - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Natural Gas Subcommittee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Natural Gas Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: Department of Energy, DoE... Advisory Board (SEAB), Natural Gas Subcommittee. SEAB was reestablished pursuant to the Federal Advisory... issues, operational issues and other activities as directed by the Secretary. The Natural...

  20. Modeling of heat explosion with convection.

    PubMed

    Belk, Michael; Volpert, Vitaly

    2004-06-01

    The work is devoted to numerical simulations of the interaction of heat explosion with natural convection. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We show how complex regimes appear through successive bifurcations leading from a stable stationary temperature distribution without convection to a stationary symmetric convective solution, stationary asymmetric convection, periodic in time oscillations, and finally aperiodic oscillations. A simplified model problem is suggested. It describes the main features of solutions of the complete problem.

  1. Properties of semi-convection and convective overshooting for massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, C. Y.; Li, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The properties of semi-convection and core convective overshooting of stars with masses of 15 and 30 M⊙ are calculated in the present article. New methods are used to deal with semi-convection. Different entropy gradients are used when adopting the Schwarzschild and Ledoux methods, which are used to confine the convective boundary and calculate the turbulent quantities: {{partial } overline{s}}/{{partial } r}=-({c_p}/{H_P})(nabla -nabla _ad) when the Schwarzschild method is adopted and {{partial } overline{s}}/{{partial } r}=-({c_p}/{H_P})(nabla -nabla _ad-nabla _{μ }) when the Ledoux method is adopted. Core convective overshooting and semi-convection are treated as a whole and their development is found to present almost opposing tendencies: more intensive core convective overshooting leads to weaker semi-convection. The influence of different parameters and convection processing methods on the turbulent quantities is analysed in this article. Increasing the mixing-length parameter α leads to more turbulent dynamic energy in the convective core and prolongs the overshooting distance but depresses the development of semi-convection. Adoption of the Ledoux method leads to overshooting extending further and semi-convection development being suppressed.

  2. Smart procurement of naturally generated energy (SPONGE) for PHEVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yingqi; Häusler, Florian; Griggs, Wynita; Crisostomi, Emanuele; Shorten, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new engine management system for hybrid vehicles to enable energy providers and car manufacturers to provide new services. Energy forecasts are used to collaboratively orchestrate the behaviour of engine management systems of a fleet of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEVs) to absorb oncoming energy in a smart manner. Cooperative algorithms are suggested to manage the energy absorption in an optimal manner for a fleet of vehicles, and the mobility simulator SUMO (Simulation of Urban MObility) is used to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed idea.

  3. Internally cooled convection: A fillip for Philip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlengiero, M.; Emanuel, K. A.; von Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss a simplified mathematical description of internally cooled convection that includes a constant adiabatic lapse rate and an internal energy sink. The latter provides a representation of radiative cooling and, in combination, these two effects break the up-down symmetry of the vertical motions by making the convection penetrative in the upper portion of the fluid layer. At large enough turbulent intensity of the motion, the dynamics is dominated by intense convective updrafts that generate a strongly skewed distribution of vertical velocities. The numerical exploration of this model system exhibits a qualitatively useful description of atmospheric convection.

  4. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  5. Energy, Natural Resources, and the Environment in the Eighties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission for a National Agenda for the Eighties, Washington, DC.

    Presented are the findings of a national panel which investigated the present situation and future policy options regarding energy and the environment. Three sections comprise the report: (1) a chapter dealing with energy supply, consumption, pricing and policy; (2) an analysis of environmental issues such as land use, toxic substances,…

  6. Nature's Energy, Module B. Fourth Grade. Pilot Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasco County Schools, Dade City, FL.

    This booklet is one of a set of learning modules on energy for use by students and teachers in the fourth grade. This module examines man's use of fossil fuels, electricity production, and other energy sources. Included are laboratory activities and values exercises. (BT)

  7. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C.

    1993-09-01

    This paper will present a summary of past and present accomplishments of the Natural Phenomena Hazards Program that has been ongoing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1975. The Natural Phenomena covered includes earthquake; winds, hurricanes, and tornadoes; flooding and precipitation; lightning; and volcanic events. The work is organized into four major areas (1) Policy, requirements, standards, and guidance (2) Technical support, research development, (3) Technology transfer, and (4) Oversight.

  8. QCD nature of dark energy at finite temperature: Cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Katırcı, N.

    2016-05-01

    The Veneziano ghost field has been proposed as an alternative source of dark energy, whose energy density is consistent with the cosmological observations. In this model, the energy density of the QCD ghost field is expressed in terms of QCD degrees of freedom at zero temperature. We extend this model to finite temperature to search the model predictions from late time to early universe. We depict the variations of QCD parameters entering the calculations, dark energy density, equation of state, Hubble and deceleration parameters on temperature from zero to a critical temperature. We compare our results with the observations and theoretical predictions existing at different eras. It is found that this model safely defines the universe from quark condensation up to now and its predictions are not in tension with those of the standard cosmology. The EoS parameter of dark energy is dynamical and evolves from -1/3 in the presence of radiation to -1 at late time. The finite temperature ghost dark energy predictions on the Hubble parameter well fit to those of Λ CDM and observations at late time.

  9. Mesoscale aspects of convective storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The structure, evolution and mechanisms of mesoscale convective disturbances are reviewed and observation techniques for "nowcasting" their nature are discussed. A generalized mesometeorological scale is given, classifying both low and high pressure systems. Mesoscale storms are shown often to induce strong winds, but their wind speeds are significantly less than those accompanied by submesoscale disturbances, such as tornadoes, downbursts, and microbursts. Mesoscale convective complexes, severe storm wakes, and flash floods are considered. The understanding of the evolution of supercells is essential for improving nowcasting capabilities and a very accurate combination of radar and satellite measurements is required.

  10. On the heat and mass transfer analogy for natural convection of non-dilute binary mixtures of ideal gases in cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hua; Lauriat, Guy

    2009-03-01

    An extension of a slightly compressible flow model to double-diffusive convection of a binary mixture of ideal gases enclosed in a cavity is presented. The problem formulation is based on a low Mach number approximation and the impermeable surface assumption is not invoked. The main objectives of this paper are the statement of a new problem formulation, and the analysis of some significant results showing the influence of density variations on transient solutions for pure thermal or pure solutal convection. At steady-state, it is shown that the heat and mass transfer analogy may be applied for non-dilute mixtures at parameter ranges larger than those usually considered. To cite this article: H. Sun, G. Lauriat, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  11. Changes in Natural Gas Monthly Consumption Data Collection and the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    EIA Publications

    2010-01-01

    Beginning with the December 2010 issue of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) will present natural gas consumption forecasts for the residential and commercial sectors that are consistent with recent changes to the Form EIA-857 monthly natural gas survey.

  12. Strategies for Learning the Nature of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the observed cosmic acceleration is widely ranked among the very most compelling of all outstanding problems in physical science. Many believe that nothing short of a revolution will be required in order to integrate the cosmic acceleration (often attributed to "dark energy") with our understanding of fundamental physics. The DETF was formed at the request of DOE, NASA and NSF as a joint subcommittee of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC) and the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to give advice on optimizing our program of dark energy studies. To this end we have assessed a wide variety of possible techniques and strategies. I will present our main conclusions and discuss their implications.

  13. Temperature-Driven Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohan, Richard J.; Vandegrift, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Warm air aloft is stable. This explains the lack of strong winds in a warm front and how nighttime radiative cooling can lead to motionless air that can trap smog. The stability of stratospheric air can be attributed to the fact that it is heated from above as ultraviolet radiation strikes the ozone layer. On the other hand, fluid heated from below is unstable and can lead to Bernard convection cells. This explains the generally turbulent nature of the troposphere, which receives a significant fraction of its heat directly from the Earth's warmer surface. The instability of cold fluid aloft explains the violent nature of a cold front, as well as the motion of Earth's magma, which is driven by radioactive heating deep within the Earth's mantle. This paper describes how both effects can be demonstrated using four standard beakers, ice, and a bit of food coloring.

  14. Nonregenerative natural resources in a sustainable system of energy supply.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Alex M; Hamacher, Thomas

    2012-03-12

    Following the lead of the European Union in introducing binding measures to promote the use of regenerative energy forms, it is not unreasonable to assume that the global demand for combustible raw materials for energy generation will be reduced considerably in the second half of this century. This will not only have a favourable effect on the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere, but will also help preserve fossil fuels-important as raw materials in the chemical industry-for future generations. Nevertheless, associated with the concomitant massive shift to regenerative energy forms, there will be a strong demand for other exhaustible raw materials, in particular metals, some of which are already regarded as scarce. After reviewing the debate on mineral depletion between "cornucopians" and "pessimists", we discuss the meaning of mineral "scarcity", particularly in the geochemical sense, and mineral "exhaustion". The expected drastic increase in demand for mineral resources caused by demographic and societal pressures, that is, due to the increase in in-use stock, is emphasised. Whilst not discussing the issue of "strong" versus "weak" sustainability in detail, we conclude that regenerative energy systems-like nearly all resource-consuming systems in our society-do not necessarily satisfy generally accepted sustainability criteria. In this regard, we discuss some current examples, namely, lithium and cobalt for batteries, rare earth-based permanent magnets for wind turbines, cadmium and tellurium for solar cells and copper for electrical power distribution.

  15. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States

  16. Mantle convection on modern supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Mohr, Marcus; Waluga, Christian; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures demand an interdisciplinary co-design. Here we report about recent advances of the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups in computer sciences, mathematics and geophysical application under the leadership of FAU Erlangen. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection assessing the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  17. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  18. Stabilization functions of unforced cumulus clouds - Their nature and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Jorge A.; Bras, Rafael L.; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and the spatial distribution of cumuli within an unforced cumulus cloud field are investigated. The thermodynamic effects of convection are quantified as functions of changes of convective available potential energy (CAPE) induced by the convective overturning, and the time rate of change of CAPE is parameterized in terms of a kernel of influence or stabilization function. A three-dimensional cloud model is used to infer and quantify stabilization functions by performing single-cloud experiments. On the basis of the results obtained, a new hypothesis with respect to the spatial distribution of cumuli is postulated, which states that, under completely homogeneous external conditions and assuming a spatially random distribution of cloud-triggering mechanisms, the spatial distribution of cumuli in the resulting cloud field must be regular, as opposed to either random or clustered, because cumulus clouds tend to reduce the available energy for convection, thereby inhibiting further convection nearby.

  19. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-05-15

    Advocates of energy efficiency and renewable energy have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that these sources provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are available--in particular, gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps) and physical, fixed-price gas contracts. Whether energy efficiency and renewable energy can provide price stability at lower cost than these alternative means is therefore a key question for resource acquisition planners. In this paper we evaluate the cost of hedging gas price risk through financial hedging instruments. To do this, we compare the price of a 10-year natural gas swap (i.e., what it costs to lock in prices over the next 10 years) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e., what the market is expecting spot natural gas prices to be over the next 10 years). We find that over the past two years natural gas users have had to pay a premium as high as $0.76/mmBtu (0.53/242/kWh at an aggressive 7,000 Btu/kWh heat rate) over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost to hedge gas price risk exposure is potentially large enough - particularly if incorporated by policymakers and regulators into decision-making practices - to tip the scales away from new investments in variable-price, natural gas-fired generation and in favor of fixed-price investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  20. On the nature of dark energy: the lattice Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2013-05-01

    There is something unknown in the cosmos. Something big. Which causes the acceleration of the Universe expansion, that is perhaps the most surprising and unexpected discovery of the last decades, and thus represents one of the most pressing mysteries of the Universe. The current standard ΛCDM model uses two unknown entities to make everything fit: dark energy and dark matter, which together would constitute more than 95 % of the energy density of the Universe. A bit like saying that we have understood almost nothing, but without openly admitting it. Here we start from the recent theoretical results that come from the extension of general relativity to antimatter, through CPT symmetry. This theory predicts a mutual gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter. Our basic assumption is that the Universe contains equal amounts of matter and antimatter, with antimatter possibly located in cosmic voids, as discussed in previous works. From this scenario we develop a simple cosmological model, from whose equations we derive the first results. While the existence of the elusive dark energy is completely replaced by gravitational repulsion, the presence of dark matter is not excluded, but not strictly required, as most of the related phenomena can also be ascribed to repulsive-gravity effects. With a matter energy density ranging from ˜5 % (baryonic matter alone, and as much antimatter) to ˜25 % of the so-called critical density, the present age of the Universe varies between about 13 and 15 Gyr. The SN Ia test is successfully passed, with residuals comparable with those of the ΛCDM model in the observed redshift range, but with a clear prediction for fainter SNe at higher z. Moreover, this model has neither horizon nor coincidence problems, and no initial singularity is requested. In conclusion, we have replaced all the tough problems of the current standard cosmology (including the matter-antimatter asymmetry) with only one question: is the gravitational

  1. Model for hydromagnetic convection in a magnetized fluid.

    PubMed

    Macek, Wiesław M; Strumik, Marek

    2010-08-01

    We consider convection in a horizontally magnetized viscous fluid layer in the gravitational field heated from below with a vertical temperature gradient. Following Rayleigh-Bénard scenario and using a general magnetohydrodynamic approach, we obtain a simple set of four ordinary differential equations. In addition to the usual three-dimensional Lorenz model a new variable describes the profile of the induced magnetic field. We show that nonperiodic oscillations are influenced by anisotropic magnetic forces resulting not only in an additional viscosity but also substantially modifying nonlinear forcing of the system. On the other hand, this can stabilize convective motion of the flow. However, for certain values of the model parameters we have identified a deterministic intermittent behavior of the system resulting from bifurcation. In this way, we have identified here a basic mechanism of intermittent release of energy bursts, which is frequently observed in space and laboratory plasmas. Hence, we propose this model as a useful tool for the analysis of intermittent behavior of various environments, including convection in planets and stars. Therefore, we hope that our simple but still a more general nonlinear model could shed light on the nature of hydromagnetic convection.

  2. The Turbulent Diffusivity of Convective Overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Schwab, Josiah; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars; Timmes, Frank; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey; Oishi, Jeffrey; Brown, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    There are many natural systems with convectively unstable fluid adjacent to stably stratified fluid; including the Earth's atmosphere, most stars, and perhaps even the Earth's liquid core. The convective motions penetrating into the stable region can enhance mixing, leading to changes in transport within the stable region. This work describes convective overshoot simulations. To study the extra mixing due to overshoot, we evolve a passive tracer field. The horizontal average of the passive tracer quickly approaches a self-similar state. The self-similar state is the solution to a diffusion equation with a spatially dependent turbulent diffusivity. We find the extra mixing due to convection can be accurately modeled as a turbulent diffusivity, and discuss implications of this turbulent diffusivity for the astrophysical problem of mixing in convectively bounded carbon flames.

  3. Augmenting convection-enhanced delivery through simultaneous co-delivery of fluids and laser energy with a fiberoptic microneedle device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, R. Lyle; Ecker, Tobias; Andriani, Rudy; Robertson, John; Rossmeisl, John; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a new infusion catheter, based on our fiberoptic microneedle device (FMD), designed with the objective of photothermally augmenting the volumetric dispersal of infused therapeutics. We hypothesize that concurrent delivery of laser energy, causing mild localized photothermal heating (4-5 °C), will increase the spatial dispersal of infused chemotherapy over a long infusion period. Agarose brain phantoms, which mimic the brain's mechanical and fluid conduction properties, were constructed from 0.6 wt% Agarose in aqueous solution. FMDs were fabricated by adhering a multimode fiberoptic to a silica capillary tube, such that their flat-polished tips co-terminated. Continuous wave 1064 nm light was delivered simultaneously with FD&C Blue #2 (5%) dye into phantoms. Preliminary experiments, where co-delivery was tested against fluid delivery alone (through symmetrical infusions into in vivo rodent models), were also conducted. In the Agarose phantoms, volumetric dispersal was demonstrated to increase by more than 3-fold over a four-hour infusion time frame for co-delivery relative to infusion-only controls. Both forward and backward (reflux) infusions were also observed to increase slightly. Increased volumetric dispersal was demonstrated with co-delivery in an in vivo rodent model. Photothermal augmentation of infusion was demonstrated to influence the directionality and increase the volume of dye dispersal in Agarose brain phantoms. With further development, FMDs may enable a greater distribution of chemotherapeutic agents during CED therapy of brain tumors.

  4. Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority (NELHA): Hawaii Ocean Science & Technology Park; Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

    DOE Data Explorer

    Olson, K.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-01

    A partnership with the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  5. Fate of inflation and the natural reduction of vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, Akika; Morikawa, Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    In the standard cosmology, an artificial fine tuning of the potential is inevitable for vanishing cosmological constant, though slow-rolling uniform scalar field easily causes cosmic inflation. We focus on the general fact that any potential with negative region can temporally halt the cosmic expansion at the end of inflation, where the field tends to diverge. This violent evolution naturally causes particle production and strong instability of the uniform configuration of the fields. Decaying of this uniform scalar field would leave vanishing cosmological constant as well as locally collapsed objects. The universe then continues to evolve into the standard Freedman model. We study the detail of the instability, based on the linear analysis, and the subsequent fate of the scalar field, based on the non-linear numerical analysis. The collapsed scalar field would easily exceed the Kaup limiting mass and forms primordial black holes, which may play an important role in galaxy formation in later stages of cosmic expansion. We systematically describe the above scenario by identifying the scalar field as the boson field condensation (BEC) and the inflation as the process of phase transition of them.

  6. Energy Functional Based on Natural Orbitals and Occupancies for Static Properties of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, Denis

    2009-08-26

    The possibility to use functionals of occupation numbers and natural orbitals for interacting fermions is discussed as an alternative to multi-reference energy density functional method. An illustration based on the two-level Lipkin model is discussed.

  7. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  8. The parameter space of windy convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluskin, David

    2016-11-01

    In horizontally periodic Rayleigh-Bénard convection at large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), wavenumber-zero horizontal winds can arise spontaneously and dramatically alter the flow. The resulting "windy convection" has been observed in 2D domains and horizontally anisotropic 3D domains. As Ra is raised, the fraction of total kinetic energy contained in the wind approaches 100%. Vertical heat transport is greatly depressed by the wind and grows very slowly (if at all) as Ra is raised. Two different types of windy convection have been observed at different Prandtl numbers (Pr). At smaller Pr, heat is vertically convected almost exclusively during discrete bursts that are separated by long quiescent phases. At larger Pr, convective transport remains significant at all times. Convection can thus be identified as either windy or non-windy, and windy states can be either bursting or non-bursting. The regions of the Ra-Pr parameter plane in which each type of convection can occur remain poorly understood, as do transitions between these regions. This talk will summarize the phenomenon of windy convection in 2D and 3D and present a preliminary exploration of the Ra-Pr plane in the 2D case. Partially supported by NSF award DMS-1515161.

  9. Exploring the Potential Business Case for Synergies Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.; Arent, D.

    2014-02-01

    Natural gas and renewable energy each contribute to economic growth, energy independence, and carbon mitigation, sometimes independently and sometimes collectively. Often, natural gas and renewables are considered competitors in markets, such as those for bulk electricity. This paper attempts to address the question, 'Given near- and long-term needs for abundant, cleaner energy sources and decarbonization, how can more compelling business models be created so that these two domestic forms of energy work in greater concert?' This paper explores revenue opportunities that emerge from systems-level perspectives in 'bulk energy' (large-scale electricity and natural gas production, transmission, and trade) and four 'distribution edge' subsectors: industrial, residential, commercial, and transportation end uses.

  10. The Surface Energy Budget and Precipitation Efficiency for Convective Systems During TOGA, COARE, GATE, SCSMEX and ARM: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Shie, C.-L.; Johnson, D; Simpson, J.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model is used to simulate convective systems that developed in various geographic locations. Observed large-scale advective tendencies for potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and horizontal momentum derived from field campaigns are used as the main forcing. By examining the surface energy budgets, the model results show that the two largest terms are net condensation (heating/drying) and imposed large-scale forcing (cooling/moistening) for tropical oceanic cases. These two terms arc opposite in sign, however. The contributions by net radiation and latent heat flux to the net condensation vary in these tropical cases, however. For cloud systems that developed over the South China Sea and eastern Atlantic, net radiation (cooling) accounts for about 20% or more of the net condensation. However, short-wave heating and long-wave cooling are in balance with each other for cloud systems over the West Pacific region such that the net radiation is very small. This is due to the thick anvil clouds simulated in the cloud systems over the Pacific region. Large-scale cooling exceeds large-scale moistening in the Pacific and Atlantic cases. For cloud systems over the South China Sea, however, there is more large-scale moistening than cooling even though the cloud systems developed in a very moist environment. though For three cloud systems that developed over a mid-latitude continent, the net radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes play a much more important role. This means the accurate measurement of surface fluxes and radiation is crucial for simulating these mid-latitude cases.

  11. Essays on environmental, energy, and natural resource economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    My dissertation focuses on examining the interrelationship among the environment, energy and economic development. In the first essay, I explore the effects of increased uncertainty over future output prices, input costs and productivity levels on intertemporal emission permits trading. In a dynamic programming setting, a permit price is a convex function of each of these three sources of uncertainty. Increased uncertainty about future market conditions increases the expected permit price and causes risk-neutral firms to reduce ex ante emissions to smooth marginal abatement costs over time. Empirical analysis shows that increased price volatility induced by electricity market restructuring could explain 8-11% of the allowances banked during Phase I of the U.S. sulfur dioxide trading program. Numerical simulation suggests that high uncertainty may generate substantial initial compliance costs, thereby deterring new entrants and reducing efficiency; sharp emission spikes are also more likely to occur under industry-wide uncertainty shocks. In the second essay, I examine whether electricity restructuring improves the efficiency of U.S. nuclear power generation. Based on the full sample of 73 investor-owned nuclear plants in the United States from 1992 to 1998, I estimate cross-sectional and longitudinal efficiency changes associated with restructuring, at the plant level. Various modeling strategies are presented to deal with the policy endogeneity bias that high cost plants are more likely to be restructured. Overall, I find a strikingly positive relationship between the multiple steps of restructuring and plant operating efficiency. In the third essay, I estimate the economic impact of China's national land conversion program on local farm-dependent economies. The impact of the program on 14 industrial sectors in Gansu provinces are investigated using an input-output model. Due to regulatory restrictions, the agricultural sector cannot automatically expand or shrink

  12. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  13. An experimental study of unsteady natural convection in a reservoir model subject to periodic thermal forcing using combined PIV and PIT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Tomasz Piotr; Lei, Chengwang; Patterson, John C.

    2009-07-01

    The present experimental investigation is concerned with the transient flow response in a reservoir model to periodic heating and cooling at the water surface. The experiment reveals a stable stratification of the water body during the heating phase and an unsteady mixing flow in the reservoir during the cooling phase. It is shown that thermal instabilities play an important role in breaking up the residual circulation and initiating a reverse flow circulation in deep waters after the switch of thermal forcing from heating to cooling. Moreover, the heating from the water surface results in a stable large-scale convective roll that is clearly observed in the experiment. The present flow visualization is carried out with the application of thermo-chromic liquid crystals. Quantitative temperature and velocity fields are extracted using Particle Image Thermometry and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques. Understanding of the flow mechanisms pertinent to this problem is important for predicting the transport of nutrients and pollutants across reservoirs.

  14. Joule heating effects on unsteady natural convection flow near a moving semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahari, Marneni; Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Nagarani, P.

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady MHD free convective boundary-layer flow along an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer have been investigated numerically. The effects of chemical reaction, thermal radiation and Joule heating are incorporated in the governing equations. Crank-Nicolson finite-difference method is used to solve the governing coupled non-linear partial differential equations. The influence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and Joule heating on flow characteristics are presented graphically and discussed in detailed. To validate the present numerical results, a comparison study has been performed with the previously published results and found that the results are in excellent agreement. It is found that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers decreases with the intensification of magnetic field and the local Sherwood number slightly decreases with the increase of radiation parameter.

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Natural Gas Consumption and Prices

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    The natural gas consumption and price modules of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model are designed to provide consumption and end-use retail price forecasts for the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in the nine Census districts and natural gas working inventories in three regions. Natural gas consumption shares and prices in each Census district are used to calculate an average U.S. retail price for each end-use sector.

  16. Numerical modeling of enclosure convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duh, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical study on the steady and unsteady natural convection in two-dimensional rectangular enclosures has been performed by a time-accurate ADI finite difference scheme. The study covered a range of Rayleigh numbers between 1000 and 10 to the 7th, aspect ratios between 0.2 and 10.0, and tilt angles between -90 (heating from bottom) and +90 deg (heating from top). Various Prandtl numbers have been studied, but only the results of water (Pr = 7.0) are reported here due to space limitations. The physics revealed, however, includes the convection phenomena and the Rayleigh-Benard stability, as well as the combined mechanism of these two. The onset of secondary cells is determined by using a velocity map, which is simpler and cleaner, instead of a streamline plot. The critical Ra number for the occurrence of these secondary cells is shown to be lower than can be detected by experimental studies. On the Rayleigh-Benard stability part, a second transition from stable single-cell convection to periodic multicellular convection is disclosed.

  17. Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-03-04

    Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

  18. 77 FR 39693 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ..., Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Fisher's Island Tidal Energy Project, which would be... Sea Dragon tidal turbines at a rated capacity of 100 kilowatts, (2) an estimated 12.6 kilometers...

  19. Natural variation in Brachypodium disctachyon: Deep Sequencing of Highly Diverse Natural Accessions (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Sean

    2013-03-01

    Sean Gordon of the USDA on "Natural variation in Brachypodium disctachyon: Deep Sequencing of Highly Diverse Natural Accessions" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  20. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  1. Toward the renewables - A natural gas/solar energy transition strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. A.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The inevitability of an energy transition from today's non-renewable fossil base toward a renewable energy base is considered from the viewpoint of the need for a national transition strategy. Then, one such strategy is offered. Its technological building blocks are described in terms of both energy use and energy supply. The strategy itself is then sketched at four points in its implementation; (1) initiation, (2) early transition, (3) late transition, and (4) completion. The transition is assumed to evolve from a heavily natural gas-dependent energy economy. It then proceeds through its transition toward a balanced, hybrid energy system consisting of both centralized and dispersed energy supply technologies supplying hydrogen and electricity from solar energy. Related institutional, environmental and economic factors are examined briefly.

  2. 18 CFR 2.400 - Statement of interpretation of waste concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... interpretation of waste concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for qualifying small power production... concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for qualifying small power production facilities. For purposes of deciding whether natural gas may be considered as waste as the primary energy source...

  3. 18 CFR 2.400 - Statement of interpretation of waste concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... interpretation of waste concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for qualifying small power production... concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for qualifying small power production facilities. For purposes of deciding whether natural gas may be considered as waste as the primary energy source...

  4. 18 CFR 2.400 - Statement of interpretation of waste concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... interpretation of waste concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for qualifying small power production... concerning natural gas as the primary energy source for qualifying small power production facilities. For purposes of deciding whether natural gas may be considered as waste as the primary energy source...

  5. Numerical and Experimental Studies of the Natural Convection Flow Within a Horizontal Cylinder Subjected to a Uniformly Cold Wall Boundary Condition. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Poly. Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Numberical solutions are obtained for the quasi-compressible Navier-Stokes equations governing the time dependent natural convection flow within a horizontal cylinder. The early time flow development and wall heat transfer is obtained after imposing a uniformly cold wall boundary condition on the cylinder. Solutions are also obtained for the case of a time varying cold wall boundary condition. Windware explicit differ-encing is used for the numerical solutions. The viscous truncation error associated with this scheme is controlled so that first order accuracy is maintained in time and space. The results encompass a range of Grashof numbers from 8.34 times 10,000 to 7 times 10 to the 7th power which is within the laminar flow regime for gravitationally driven fluid flows. Experiments within a small scale instrumented horizontal cylinder revealed the time development of the temperature distribution across the boundary layer and also the decay of wall heat transfer with time.

  6. Turbulent Convection in ADAF-SSD Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia, J.; Camenzind, M.

    The cold Shakura & Sunyaev disk (SSD) has proven very successful in describing spectra of acctretion flows onto stellar objects like white dwarfs. But discrepancies arise if one tries to model accretion onto stellar black holes or even AGN. These objects feature an additional hot, hart component which cannot be accounted for even including the transonic nature of the flow. It is clear that cold disk and hot gas must co-exist in a small volume. One possible model is the transition from an outer cold SSD to an inner hot advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF). We investigate such models using time-dependent 1D height integrated Euler equations including detailed energy transport mechanisms like turbulent convection and an additional radiative transfer equation. We find global self-consistent solution with ADAF-SSD transitions. We confirm the expected behaviour away from the transition region. While in the outer SSD viscous heating is irradiated through the surface, radiative processes become very ineffective due to small optical depth in the inner ADAF. Here viscous heating is balanced by advective cooling, ie. is transported with the flow towards the central object. Near the transition turbulent convection pumps energy from the hot ADAF along the outward entropy gradient upwind against the flow into the transition region. There the associated flux drops sharply due to sharply decreasing temperature. The deposited energy is orders of magnitude larger and viscous heating and can only be balanced by increased radiative cooling. On the other hand photons escapes radially from the optically thick SSD into the optically thin ADAF where we expect them to be comptonized and could explain the hart part of the spectrum.

  7. Estimating the gross moist stability in shallow and deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. A.; Jong, B. T.; Chou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Gross moist stability has been used to study the link between tropical deep convection and large scale circulation in a moist static energy (MSE) budget. Here we aim to calculate the gross moist stability from more realistic profiles of vertical velocity and extend it beyond deep convection, adding shallow convection. Based on a principal component analysis, we were able to decompose the vertical velocity into two leading modes, which are dominated by deep and shallow convection, respectively. According to the deep and shallow modes, we calculate the gross moist stability for these two modes and discuss the roles of deep and shallow convection in the MSE budget. The gross moist stability of deep convection tends to be positive in the tropics, while that of shallow convection is negative over most areas of the tropics. This implies that deep convection exports MSE to stabilize the atmosphere and shallow convection imports MSE to enhance deep convection and destabilize the atmosphere. Based on the spatial distribution, moisture tends to reduce the gross moist stability of deep convection, while dry static energy has little impact. Deeper deep convection tends to have greater gross moist stability. For shallow convection, on the other hand, the gross moist stability is affected not only by low-level moisture but also mid-level moisture. Both moister low-level and drier mid-level moisture reduce the gross moist stability of shallow convection. Greater low-level dry static energy, which is associated with warmer sea surface temperature, also tends to reduce gross moist stability.

  8. Magnetic field effect on natural convection and entropy generation in a half-moon shaped cavity with semi-circular bottom heater having different ferrofluid inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Rabbi, Khan Md.; Saha, Sourav; Hasan, MN; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-06-01

    In this study magneto-hydrodynamic convection in a half-moon shaped cavity filled with ferrofluid has been analyzed numerically. The cavity has two semi-circular bottom heaters and effect of the distance between these two heaters (λ = 0.1 , 0.4) has been thoroughly investigated. Numerical simulation has been carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh number (Ra =103 ∼107), Hartmann number (Ha = 0 ∼ 100) and inclination angle of magnetic field (γ = 0 ° ∼ 90 °) to understand the flow field, thermal field and entropy generation respectively. Cobalt-kerosene and Fe3 O4 -water ferrofluids are used for the present investigation and considered as a single phase fluid. Galerkin weighted residual method of finite element analysis has been used for numerical solution. The code validation and grid independency test have been carried out to justify the numerical accuracy. It has been observed that increment of magnetic field reduces the heat transfer rate, whereas increment of heater distance augments the heat transfer rate significantly. Results are discussed on the basis of Nusselt number (Nu), Bejan number (Be) and shown by contours and 3D plots. It has also been found that λ = 0.4 always shows better heat transfer rate and entropy optimization.

  9. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  10. 76 FR 69720 - NaturEner Rim Rock Wind Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission NaturEner Rim Rock Wind Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of NaturEner Rim Rock Wind Energy, LLC's application for...

  11. The potential impact of renewable energy deployment on natural gas prices in New England

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2004-09-20

    Concerns about the price and supply of natural gas have deepened in recent years both nationally and in New England. Renewable energy (RE) technologies can directly hedge natural gas price risk by reducing the need to purchase variable-price natural gas-fired electricity generation, and replacing that generation with fixed-price renewable electricity supply. In addition to its direct contribution to price stability, an increasing number of studies show that renewable energy deployment can also put downward pressure on natural gas prices by reducing demand for gas among gas-fired generators. These gas price reductions are, in turn, expected to reduce electricity prices and--more importantly--directly reduce consumer natural gas bills. Many recent studies have found that this effect may be significant, substantially benefiting consumers. These studies are reviewed in the attached paper, published in the proceedings of a recent national energy conference. An important consideration is that--strictly speaking--this price reduction represents a consumer benefit that comes at the expense of producers; it therefore represents a wealth transfer, not a net gain in social welfare. That said, current concerns about the price and supply of natural gas suggest that policymakers may want to pursue actions that reduce the strain of high prices on consumer energy bills.

  12. Characterization of residuals from ice particles and droplets sampled in mid-latitude natural and aviation-influenced cirrus and in tropical deep convective cloud systems during ML-CIRRUS and ACRIDICON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Schulz, Christiane; Klimach, Thomas; Krüger, Mira; Schneider, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Airborne sampling of cloud particles inside different cirrus cloud types and inside deep convective clouds was conducted during the HALO missions ML-CIRRUS over Europe in March/April 2014 and ACRIDICON over Amazonia in September 2014. ML-CIRRUS aims at the investigation of the for-mation, evolution, microphysical state and radiative effects of different natural and aviation-induced cirrus clouds in the mid-latitudes. The main objectives of ACRIDICON are the microphysical vertical profiling, vertical aerosol transport and the cloud processing of aerosol particles (compari-son in- and outflow) of tropical deep convective cloud systems in clean and polluted air masses and over forested and deforested regions. The hydrometeors (drops and ice particles) are sampled by a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) which has to be installed in the front part of the upper fuselage of the HALO aircraft. Such an intake position implies a size dependent abundance of cloud particles with respect to ambient conditions that was studied by particle trajectory simulations (Katrin Witte, HALO Technical Note 2008-003-A). On the other hand, this sampling location avoids that large ice crystals which could potentially bias the cloud particle sampling by shattering and break-up at the inlet shroud and tip enter the inlet. Both aspects as well as the flight conditions of HALO were taken into account for an optimized CVI design for HALO (HALO-CVI). Interstitial particles are pre-segregated and the condensed phase is evaporated/sublimated by the CVI, such that the residuals from cloud droplets and ice particles (CDR and IPR) can be microphysically and chemically analyzed by respective aerosol sensors located in the cabin. Although an even more comprehensive characterization of CDR and IPR was carried out, we like to report on the following measurements of certain aerosol properties. Particle number concentra-tion and size distribution are measured by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an

  13. Stellar convection 3: Convection at large Rayleigh numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    A three dimensional study of convection in a self gravitating sphere of Boussinesq fluid with a Rayleigh number of 10 to the 10th power and a Prandtl of 1 is presented. The velocity and temperature of the fluid are computed at the largest wavelengths using spectral methods. A confirmation that the fluid is anisotropic and that the energy spectra are not smooth functions of wavelength but have a large amount of fine structure is discussed. The parameterization of the transport properties of the unresolvable inertial subrange with eddy viscosities and diffusivities is described. The time dependent fluctuations in the energy spectra and how they cascade from large to small wavelengths is examined.

  14. Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Markets

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    This report responds to a May 29, 2014 request from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) for an update of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) January 2012 study of liquefied natural gas (LNG) export scenarios. This updated study, like the prior one, is intended to serve as an input to be considered in the evaluation of applications to export LNG from the United States under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act, which requires DOE to grant a permit to export domestically produced natural gas unless it finds that such action is not consistent with the public interest. Appendix A provides a copy of the DOE/FE request letter.

  15. Three-dimensional Spherical Simulations of Solar Convection. I. Differential Rotation and Pattern Evolution Achieved with Laminar and Turbulent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Elliott, Julian R.; Toomre, Juri; Clune, Tom L.; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Gilman, Peter A.

    2000-03-01

    Rotationally constrained convection possesses velocity correlations that transport momentum and drive mean flows such as differential rotation. The nature of this transport can be very complex in turbulent flow regimes, where large-scale, coherent vorticity structures and mean flows can be established by smaller scale turbulence through inverse cascades. The dynamics of the highly turbulent solar convection zone therefore may be quite different than in early global-scale numerical models, which were limited by computational resources to nearly laminar flows. Recent progress in high-performance computing technology and ongoing helioseismic investigations of the dynamics of the solar interior have motivated us to develop more sophisticated numerical models of global-scale solar convection. Here we report three-dimensional simulations of compressible, penetrative convection in rotating spherical shells in both laminar and turbulent parameter regimes. The convective structure in the laminar case is dominated by ``banana cells,'' but the turbulent case is much more complex, with an intricate, rapidly evolving downflow network in the upper convection zone and an intermittent, plume-dominated structure in the lower convection zone and overshoot region. Convective patterns generally propagate prograde at low latitudes and retrograde at high latitudes relative to the local rotation. The differential rotation profiles show some similarity with helioseismic determinations of the solar rotation but still exhibit significantly more cylindrical alignment. Strong, intermittent, vortical downflow lanes and plumes play an important dynamical role in turbulent flow regimes and are responsible for significant differences relative to laminar flows with regard to momentum and energy transport and to the structure of the overshoot region at the base of the convection zone.

  16. A Perspective of petroleum, natural gas, and coal bed methane on the energy security of India

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, M.K.; Paul, B.

    2008-07-01

    The global energy requirement has grown at a phenomenal rate and the consumption of primary energy sources has been a very high positive growth. This article focuses on the consumption of different primary energy sources and it identifies that coal will continue to remain as the prime energy in the foreseeable future. It examines energy requirement perspectives for India and demands of petroleum, natural gas, and coal bed methane in the foreseeable future. It discusses the state of present day petroleum and petrochemical industries in the country and the latest advances in them to take over in the next few years. The regional pattern of consumption of primary energy sources shows that oil remains as the largest single source of primary energy in most parts of the world. However, gas dominates as the prime source in some parts of the world. Economic development and poverty alleviation depend on securing affordable energy sources and for the country's energy security; it is necessary to adopt the latest technological advances in petroleum and petrochemical industries by supportive government policies. But such energy is very much concerned with environmental degradation and must be driven by contemporary managerial acumen addressing environmental and social challenges effectively. Environmental laws for the abatement of environmental degradation are discussed in this paper. The paper concludes that energy security leading to energy independence is certainly possible and can be achieved through a planned manner.

  17. Use of evapotranspiration model based on energy balance in the Ebinur Lake Wetland Nature Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qingsan; Shi, Qingdong; Wang, Zhi; Gao, Wei; Chang, Shunli

    2009-06-01

    An evapotranspiration model based on the energy balance for different vegetation types in arid area was built in the study, and applied to the natural ecological system of Lake Ebinur wetland nature reserve in Xinjiang. The spatial-temporal dynamic change of the vegetation evapotranspiration in the study area was computed, and the evapotranspiration of three typical vegetations was analyzed and compared. The ground meteorological data were used to test the model. The results show that the evapotranspiration of all the natural system is about 10mm/d, and the maximum is over 20mm/d and occurs between May and August. The evapotranspiration of three typical arid vegetations was estimated in sequence of Populus euphratica Oliv. Tamarix chinensis Lour. Haloxylon ammodendron (Meye)Bge. Finally, it is suggested that the ground surface vegetation types and arid characteristics are most important in the establishment of the evapotranspiration model of natural ecological system based on energy balance in arid areas.

  18. Nature-replicated nano-in-micro structures for triboelectric energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Seol, Myeong-Lok; Woo, Jong-Ho; Lee, Dong-Il; Im, Hwon; Hur, Jae; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2014-10-15

    Triboelectric nanogenerators with nature-replicated interface structures are presented. Effective contact areas of the triboelectric surfaces are largely enhanced because of the densely packed nano-in-micro hierarchical structures in nature. The enlarged contact area causes stronger triboelectric charge density, which results in output power increment. The interface engineering also allows the improved humidity resistance, which is an important parameter for the stable energy harvesting.

  19. Analysis and clustering of natural gas consumption data for thermal energy use forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Alessandro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, after a brief analysis of the connections between the uses of natural gas and thermal energy use, the natural gas consumption data related to Italian market are analyzed and opportunely clustered in order to compute the typical consumption profile in different days of the week in different seasons and for the different class of users: residential, tertiary and industrial. The analysis of the data shows that natural gas consumption profile is mainly related to seasonality pattern and to the weather conditions (outside temperature, humidity and wind chiller). There is also an important daily pattern related to industrial and civil sector that, at a lower degree than the previous one, does affect the consumption profile and have to be taken into account for defining an effective short and mid term thermal energy forecasting method. A possible mathematical structure of the natural gas consumption profile is provided. Due to the strong link between thermal energy use and natural gas consumption, this analysis could be considered the first step for the development of a model for thermal energy forecasting.

  20. Determination of Surface Energy of Natural Zeolite by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgiç, Ceyda; Karakehya, Naile

    2016-10-01

    In this study, surface energy of natural zeolite was investigated using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Purified zeolite was prepared from natural zeolite applying decantation and centrifugation process together. For IGC studies, retention time of n-octane, n-nonane and n-decane were measured at infinite dilution conditions, between 250 and 280 °C. Dispersive component of the surface energy (γd S)of purified zeolite was calculated. γd S values calculated using Schultz et al methods decrease with temperature.

  1. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  2. Power spectra of solar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Labonte, B. J.; Braun, D. C.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convective motions on the sun are studied using Kitt Peak Doppler images and power spectra of convection. The power peaks at a scale of about 29,000 km and drops off smoothly with wavenumber. There is no evidence of apparent energy excess at the scale of the mesogranulation proposed by other authors. The vertical and horizontal power for each wavenumber are obtained and used to calculate the vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation. The amplitude of vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation are 0.034 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.38 (+ or - 0.01) km/s, respectively. The corresponding rms values are 0.024 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.27 (+ or - 0.01) km/s.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW-COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; T.E. Owen; D.L. George; A. Minachi; M.G. Nored; C.J. Schwartz

    2004-03-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} began a multi-year project co-funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The project goal is to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype retrofit natural gas energy flow meter in 2000-2001 included: (1) evaluation of the inferential gas energy analysis algorithm using supplemental gas databases and anticipated worst-case gas mixtures; (2) identification and feasibility review of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen diluent content; (3) experimental performance evaluation of infrared absorption sensors for carbon dioxide diluent content; and (4) procurement of a custom ultrasonic transducer and redesign of the ultrasonic pulse reflection correlation sensor for precision speed-of-sound measurements. A prototype energy meter module containing improved carbon dioxide and speed-of-sound sensors was constructed and tested in the GRI Metering Research Facility at SwRI. Performance of this module using transmission-quality natural gas and gas containing supplemental carbon dioxide up to 9 mol% resulted in gas energy determinations well within the inferential algorithm worst-case tolerance of {+-}2.4 Btu/scf (nitrogen diluent gas measured by gas chromatograph). A two-week field test was performed at a gas-fired power plant to evaluate the inferential algorithm and the data acquisition requirements needed to adapt the prototype energy meter module to practical field site conditions.

  4. Transverse Bursts in Inclined Layer Convection: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Wiener, Richard; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2002-03-01

    We report experimental results on inclined layer convection in a fluid of Prandtl number σ ≈ 1. A codimension-two point divides regions of buoyancy-driven convection (longitudinal rolls) at lower angles from shear-driven convection (transverse rolls) at higher angles (Daniels et al. PRL 84: 5320, 2000). In the region of buoyancy-driven convection, near the codimension-two point, we observe longitudinal rolls with intermittent, localized, subharmonic transverse bursts. The patterns are spatiotemporally chaotic. With increasing temperature difference the bursts increase in duration and number. We examine the details of the bursting process (e.g. the energy of longitudinal, transverse, and mixed modes) and compare our results to bursting processes in other systems. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant DMR-0072077 and the IGERT program in nonlinear systems, grant DGE-9870631.

  5. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Jeffrey; Heath, Garvin; Macknick, Jordan; Paranhos, Elizabeth; Boyd, William; Carlson, Ken

    2012-11-01

    Domestic natural gas production was largely stagnant from the mid-1970s until about 2005. However, beginning in the late 1990s, advances linking horizontal drilling techniques with hydraulic fracturing allowed drilling to proceed in shale and other formations at much lower cost. The result was a slow, steady increase in unconventional gas production. The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset from the wider dialogue on natural gas; regarding the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity; existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and changes in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns; natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices; and demand for natural gas in the electric sector.

  6. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent convection with a variable gravity and Keplerian rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal convection was proposed as a possible mechanism for generation and maintenance of turbulence in the inner accretion disk regime of the primordial solar nebula. It is of fundamental interest to design experiments with the basic physical features of the solar nebula conditions cannot be produced in the laboratory, numerical simulations of hydrodynamic flows, which have been very successful in describing aerodynamic flows, can be suitable modified to provide experimental data for solar nebula modelling. The goals are to modify an extant, proven hydrodynamics code with the most important features of the solar nebula and other thin accretion disks: bouyancy terms to generate convection, internal heating representing the release of gravitational potential energy, a variable gravity linearly proportional the the distance from the vertical midplane due to centrifugal balance, rapid rotation with axis aligned with gravity, and Keplerian rotational shear; to determine the effect that these features have on the turbulent convection by introducing them individually and to determine the cumulative nature of the turbulent convection for accretion disk conditions; and to model the convection and the turbulence. In this manner, prior solar nebula models can be tested and their deficiencies rectified.

  8. The Highest Energy Particles in Nature (Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Alan

    2002-10-30

    The study of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) has attracted great attention in recent years. I will outline why there is such interest and review the existing experimental data that has led to an apparent enigma, as the cosmic rays of 1020 eV must be young but no sources are seen nearby. After a brief survey of proposals made to explain this enigma, I will give an overview of the prospects and promise of the Pierre Auger Observatory that has now been recording showers for over a year with its Engineering Array.

  9. Towards a parameterization of convective wind gusts in Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largeron, Yann; Guichard, Françoise; Bouniol, Dominique; Couvreux, Fleur; Birch, Cathryn; Beucher, Florent

    2014-05-01

    ] who focused on the wet tropical Pacific region, and linked wind gusts to convective precipitation rates alone, here, we also analyse the subgrid wind distribution during convective events, and quantify the statistical moments (variance, skewness and kurtosis) in terms of mean wind speed and convective indexes such as DCAPE. Next step of the work will be to formulate a parameterization of the cold pool convective gust from those probability density functions and analytical formulaes obtained from basic energy budget models. References : [Carslaw et al., 2010] A review of natural aerosol interactions and feedbacks within the earth system. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10(4):1701{1737. [Engelstaedter et al., 2006] North african dust emissions and transport. Earth-Science Reviews, 79(1):73{100. [Knippertz and Todd, 2012] Mineral dust aerosols over the sahara: Meteorological controls on emission and transport and implications for modeling. Reviews of Geophysics, 50(1). [Marsham et al., 2011] The importance of the representation of deep convection for modeled dust-generating winds over west africa during summer.Geophysical Research Letters, 38(16). [Marticorena and Bergametti, 1995] Modeling the atmospheric dust cycle: 1. design of a soil-derived dust emission scheme. Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(D8):16415{16. [Menut, 2008] Sensitivity of hourly saharan dust emissions to ncep and ecmwf modeled wind speed. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984{2012), 113(D16). [Pierre et al., 2012] Impact of vegetation and soil moisture seasonal dynamics on dust emissions over the sahel. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984{2012), 117(D6). [Redelsperger et al., 2000] A parameterization of mesoscale enhancement of surface fluxes for large-scale models. Journal of climate, 13(2):402{421.

  10. 75 FR 30388 - Natural Currents Energy Services, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... operate in-stream tidal turbines to power the office buildings and marinas within the site. Natural... preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Highlands New Jersey Tidal Energy Project, which would be located on the Shrewsbury River,...

  11. Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid Removal Process

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient NGL recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale, and pilot-scale testing - so that it can be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization.

  12. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  13. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  14. The Effect of Natural Gas Supply on US Renewable Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C.; Bistline, J.; Inman, M.; Davis, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increased use of natural gas has been promoted as a means of decarbonizing the US power sector, because of superior generator efficiency and lower CO2 emissions per unit of electricity than coal. We model the effect of different gas supplies on the US power sector and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Across a range of climate policies, we find that more abundant natural gas decreases use of both coal and renewable energy technologies in the future. Without a climate policy, overall energy use also increases as the gas supply increases. With reduced deployment of lower-carbon renewable energies and increased electricity consumption, the effect of higher gas supplies on GHG emissions is small: cumulative emissions 2013-2055 in our high gas supply scenario are 2% less than in our low gas supply scenario, when there are no new climate policies and a methane leakage rate of 1.5% is assumed. Assuming leakage rates of 0 or 3% does not substantially alter this finding. In our results, only climate policies bring about a significant reduction in future CO2 emissions within the US electricity sector. Our results suggest that without strong limits on GHG emissions or policies that explicitly encourage renewable energy, more abundant natural gas may actually slow the process of decarbonization, primarily by delaying deployment of renewable energy technologies.

  15. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  16. The Coupling of Convection, Large-Scale Atmospheric Dynamics, Surface Radiation, and Sea-Surface Temperature Hot Spots as Characterized by MODIS, TRMM, CERES, and ECMWF-Interim Reanalysis Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubar, T. L.; Behrangi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding ocean-atmosphere interactions over the tropics is paramount to understanding climate and even climate sensitivity, especially as they relate to Earth's highest surface temperatures. We examine the coupling and feedbacks between very high SSTs, which we refer to as SST hot spots above 30˚C, and deep convection, precipitation, large-scale dynamics, and the surface energy budget. Using extensive time series and hovmoller analyses in areas most favorable for hot spot formation - just south of the equator in the central Pacific, where SSTs > 30˚C for up to two months/year in one 20˚ longitude by 10˚ latitude box, we show that maximum large-scale ascent, deep convective cloud fraction, rain rates, and upward latent heat fluxes are observed during the decay stage of hot spots, during maximum -∂SST/∂t. Considered as part of a predator-prey system, convection preys on the hot spots until depleted, after which convection draws down and SSTs eventually rise again, illustrating the strongly coupled nature of the ocean-atmosphere system. The nature of the relationship of SST and deep convection varies both as a function of time scale and SST window. Climatologically, deep convection, rain rate, and upward ω500 maximize at an SST of 30˚C over the tropics, approximately 1.5˚C above the SST peak. In contrast, (∂convection/∂SST)max corresponds to the climatological SST peak. Interannually, both the SST peak and the convection peak SST are highest during the 2009/2010 El Nino. At the synoptic scale, deep convection positively correlates most strongly with SST when SST leads by 5-20 days, but mostly during 70-day time windows that contain SSTs>30˚C, suggesting the importance of hot spots on convection and large-scale dynamics at synoptic to submonthly timescales. Synoptic ∂SST/∂t and convection are most strongly negatively correlated at zero-day lag, but only weakly correlated at longer time scales, unlike SSTmax and (deep convection)max, which are

  17. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

  18. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  19. Assessing the promise of natural gas hydrates as an unconventional source of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Timothy

    2007-03-01

    Gas hydrates are a naturally occurring ``ice-like'' combination of natural gas and water that have the potential to provide an immense resource of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. The amount of natural gas contained in the world's gas hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders-of-magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and technically recoverable undiscovered resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters as reported in the ``U.S. Geological Survey 2000 World Petroleum Assessment.'' Despite the enormous range in reported gas hydrate volumetric estimates, even the lowest reported estimates seem to indicate that gas hydrates are a much greater resource of natural gas than conventional accumulations. However, it is important to note that none of these assessments has predicted how much gas could actually be produced from the world's gas hydrate accumulations. Proposed methods of gas recovery from hydrates generally deal with dissociating or ``melting'' in-situ gas hydrates by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. Computer models have been developed to evaluate natural gas production from hydrates by both heating and depressurization. Depressurization is considered to be the most economically promising method for the production of natural gas from gas hydrates. Estimates vary on when gas hydrate production will play a significant role in the total world energy mix; however, it is possible that hydrates will be able to provide a sustainable supply of gas for the world's future energy needs.

  20. Driving forces: Slab subduction and mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    Mantle convection is the mechanism ultimately responsible for most geological activity at Earth's surface. To zeroth order, the lithosphere is the cold outer thermal boundary layer of the convecting mantle. Subduction of cold dense lithosphere provides tha major source of negative buoyancy driving mantle convection and, hence, surface tectonics. There are, however, importnat differences between plate tectonics and the more familiar convecting systems observed in the laboratory. Most important, the temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of mantle rocks makes the thermal boundary layer mechanically strong, leading to nearly rigid plates. This strength stabilizes the cold boundary layer against small amplitude perturbations and allows it to store substantial gravitational potential energy. Paradoxically, through going faults at subduction zones make the lithosphere there locally weak, allowing rapid convergence, unlike what is observed in laboratory experiments using fluids with temperature dependent viscosities. This bimodal strength distribution of the lithosphere distinguishes plate tectonics from simple convection experiments. In addition, Earth has a buoyant, relatively weak layer (the crust) occupying the upper part of the thermal boundary layer. Phase changes lead to extra sources of heat and bouyancy. These phenomena lead to observed richness of behavior of the plate tectonic style of mantle convection.

  1. Sunward convection in both polar caps

    SciTech Connect

    Reiff, P.H.

    1982-08-01

    The geomagnetic storm of July 29, 1977 has been the object of concentrated study. The latter part of the day (1800--2300 UT) is particularly interesting because it is a period of extremely strong, almost directly northward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF). Such northward IMF's have been related to periods of reversed (i.e., sunward) convection in the polar cap, and this day is no exception. Zanetti et al. (1981), using Triad magnetometer data, show magnetic perturbations implying reversed convection in the northern polar cap, while the Birkeland currents in the southern polar cap are very weak. They give two possible interpretations: (1) merging occurs preferentially in the northern cusp region, and therefore reversed convection is restricted to the northern polar cap or (2) the currents flow predominantly in the sunlit northern polar cap because its conductivity is higher. This paper shows convection data from both the northern polar cap (S3-3) and the southern polar cap (AE-C). In both cases, regions of reversed convection are seen. Therefore the asymmetry of the Birkeland currents is more likely caused by a conductivity asymmetry than a convection asymmetry. It is likely that the low-energy ions seen deep in the polar cap may be traped on closed field lines after merging on both tail lobe boundaries.

  2. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  3. Thermo-electro-hydrodynamic convection under microgravity: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Yoshikawa, Harunori N.; Tadie Fogaing, Mireille; Travnikov, Vadim; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies on thermo-electro-hydrodynamic (TEHD) convection are reviewed with focus on investigations motivated by the analogy with natural convection. TEHD convection originates in the action of the dielectrophoretic force generated by an alternating electric voltage applied to a dielectric fluid with a temperature gradient. This electrohydrodynamic force is analogous to Archimedean thermal buoyancy and can be regarded as a thermal buoyancy force in electric effective gravity. The review is concerned with TEHD convection in plane, cylindrical, and spherical capacitors under microgravity conditions, where the electric gravity can induce convection without any complexities arising from geometry or the buoyancy force due to the Earth’s gravity. We will highlight the convection in spherical geometry, comparing developed theories and numerical simulations with the GEOFLOW experiments performed on board the International Space Station (ISS).

  4. Energy saving due to natural ventilation in housing blocks in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lezcano, RA; Hormigos-Jiménez, S.

    2016-07-01

    Getting a healthy and comfortable indoor environment in homes in southern Europe is a complicated task. In continental climates, with very cold temperatures in winter and very hot in summer, energy consumption greatly increases with air conditioning significant spending. To propose action guidelines for use of natural ventilation and to develop effective design strategies is essential. Therefore, and given a specific building type block of flats in Madrid, this article focuses on establishing what periods of the year natural ventilation is required to reduce energy consumption in air conditioning, also considering the quality of the outdoor environment and the design of the building. To develop this, a statistical study of the chosen type, that allows studying the direction and the wind speed in the area, is performed. Analysis of wind pressures in holes in the facade is performed by means of numerical simulations of fluid flow (CFD) inside to later infer in the natural ventilation rate required within policy parameters. With the data obtained, a study of energy saving is made as a function of natural ventilation rate established for the building type.

  5. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  6. Pcr by Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) allows for highly sensitive and specific amplification of DNA. It is the backbone of many genetic experiments and tests. Recently, three labs independently uncovered a novel and simple way to perform a PCR reaction. Instead of repetitive heating and cooling, a temperature gradient across the reaction vessel drives thermal convection. By convection, the reaction liquid circulates between hot and cold regions of the chamber. The convection triggers DNA amplification as the DNA melts into two single strands in the hot region and replicates into twice the amount in the cold region. The amplification progresses exponentially as the convection moves on. We review the characteristics of the different approaches and show the benefits and prospects of the method.

  7. Mixed Convection in the VHTR in the Event of a LOFA

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is supporting the development of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) concept as the primary focus of it next generation nuclear power plant (NGNP) program. The VHTR is cooled by forcing helium downwards through the core into the lower plenum and out the hot duct. In the event that the coolant circulators are lost, the driving pressure drop across the core will reduce to zero and there will be the opportunity for natural circulation to occur. During the time that the circulators are powering down, the heat transfer in the core from the graphite blocks to the helium coolant will transform from turbulent forced convection to mixed convection, where buoyancy effects become important, to free or natural convection, where buoyancy is dominant. Analysis of the nature of the forced, mixed and free convection is best done using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software that can provide fine details of the flow and heat transfer. However, CFD analysis involves approximations in the results because of the finite nature of the spatial and temporal discretizations required, the inexact nature of the turbulence models that are used and the finite precision of the computers employed. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the CFD computations. Validation is accomplished by comparing results from specific CFD computations to experimental data that have been taken specifically for the purpose of validation and that are related to the physical phenomena in question. The present report examines the flow and heat transfer parameters (dimensionless numbers) that characterize the flow and reports ranges for their values based on specific CFD studies performed for the VHTR.

  8. Precursors of deep moist convection in a subkilometer global simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaura, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yashiro, Hisashi; Tomita, Hirofumi; Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    Deep moist convection in the atmosphere plays an important role in cloudy weather disturbances, such as hurricanes, and even in the global climate. The convection often causes disastrous heavy rainfall, and predicting such convection is therefore critical for both disaster prevention and climate projection. Although the key parameters for convection have been pointed out, understanding the preprocesses of convection is a challenging issue. Here we identified the precursors of convection by analyzing a global simulated data set with very high resolution in time and space. We found that the mass convergence near the Earth's surface changed significantly several minutes before the initiation of early convection (the formation of cumulus clouds), which occurred with the increase in the convective available potential energy (CAPE). Decomposition of the statistical data revealed that a higher-CAPE environment resulted in stronger convection than in the stronger-convergence case. Furthermore, for the stronger-convergence case, the precursor was detected earlier than the total average (10-15 min before the initiation), whereas the amplitude of maximum velocity was not so strong as the higher-CAPE case. This suggests that the strength of convection is connected with CAPE, and the predictability is sensitive to the convergence.

  9. Multiple convection patterns and thermohaline flow in an idealized OGCM

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmstorf, S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper investigates how multiple steady states arise in an ocean general circulation model, caused by the fact that many different convection patterns can be stable under the same surface boundary conditions. Two alternative boundary conditions are used in the experiments: classical mixed boundary conditions and a diffusive atmospheric heat balance combined with fixed salt fluxes. In both cases, transitions between different quasi-steady convection patterns can be triggered by briefly adding fresh water at convection sites. Either a large-scale freshwater anomaly is used to completely erase the previous convection pattern or a {open_quotes}surgical{close_quotes} anomaly is added to single grid points to turn off convection there. Under classical mixed-boundary conditions, different convection sites can lead to different overturning rates of deep water. The dynamics of the convection-driven flow is analyzed in some detail. With an energy balance atmosphere, in contrast, the overturning rate is very robust, apparently regulated by a negative thermal feedback. In spite of this, different convection patterns are associated with very different climatic states, since the heat transport of the deep circulation depends strongly on where convection takes place. It is suggested that considerable climate variability in the North Atlantic could be caused by changes in high-latitude convection.

  10. Mesoscale/convective interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, P. A.; Sun, W. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A novel cumulus parameterization scheme (CPS) has been developed in order to account for mesoscale/convective-scale interaction which considers both the mesoscale and convective scale mass and moisture budgets, under the assumption that the heating rate is a maximum for given environmental conditions. The basis of the CPS is a detailed, quasi-one-dimensional cloud model that calculates mass and moisture fluxes similar to those calculated by the Schlesinger (1978) three-dimensional model.

  11. Complex spatiotemporal convection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, W.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews recent efforts to describe complex patterns in isotropic fluids (Rayleigh-Bénard convection) as well as in anisotropic liquid crystals (electro-hydrodynamic convection) when driven away from equilibrium. A numerical scheme for solving the full hydrodynamic equations is presented that allows surprisingly well for a detailed comparison with experiments. The approach can also be useful for a systematic construction of models (order parameter equations).

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

  13. Effect of Energy Polydispersity on the Nature of Lennard-Jones Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-08-11

    In the companion paper [ Ingebrigtsen , T. S. ; Tanaka , H. J. Phys. Chem. B 2015 , 119 , 11052 ] the effect of size polydispersity on the nature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids, which represent most molecular liquids without hydrogen bonds, was studied. More specifically, it was shown that even highly size polydisperse LJ liquids are Roskilde-simple (RS) liquids. RS liquids are liquids with strong correlation between constant volume equilibrium fluctuations of virial and potential energy and are simpler than other types of liquids. Moreover, it was shown that size polydisperse LJ liquids have isomorphs to a good approximation. Isomorphs are curves in the phase diagram of RS liquids along which structure, dynamics, and some thermodynamic quantities are invariant in dimensionless (reduced) units. In this paper, we study the effect of energy polydispersity on the nature of LJ liquids. We show that energy polydisperse LJ liquids are RS liquids. However, a tendency of particle segregation, which increases with the degree of polydispersity, leads to a loss of strong virial-potential energy correlation but is mitigated by increasing temperature and/or density. Isomorphs are a good approximation also for energy polydisperse LJ liquids, although particle-resolved quantities display a somewhat poorer scaling compared to the mean quantities along the isomorph.

  14. The role of mesoscale kinetic energy in natural occurring phytoplankton blooms and export in Drake Passage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. R.; Veron, F.; Oliver, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is an iron limited, high nitrate, low chlorophyll region that draws considerable attention as a potential site for carbon drawdown through iron fertilization. However, there are no prolonged in-situ observations of the mechanisms driving naturally occurring blooms in this region. Here we present results from an APEX biofloat that continuously profiled the Drake Passage from ~ 2,000 m to the surface every two days. The biofloat measured the development and export of a naturally occurring phytoplankton bloom in the Drake Passage. Our analysis indicates that low levels of mesoscale kinetic energy coincided with the observed phytoplankton bloom. We postulate that low KE level are a precondition for bloom onset in the Drake Passage, which is confirmed by satellite observations. High levels of mesoscale kinetic energy immediately followed the phytoplankton bloom and appear to have facilitated organic carbon export to the deep ocean by changing the neutral density depths of aggregated cells. Furthermore, satellite observations in Drake Passage suggest that high levels of mesoscale kinetic energy limit bloom formation. We suggest that low mesoscale kinetic energy is a precondition for bloom formation in the Drake Passage before other potentially limiting factors become significant (e.g. grazing relation, macronutrients, micronutrients). If mesoscale kinetic energy were to impose a limitation on phytoplankton concentrations across the entire Southern Ocean, there may be regions unsuitable for geoengineered draw down of atmospheric carbon dioxide through large scale iron additions.

  15. On the generation of sound by turbulent convection. I - A numerical experiment. [in solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Thomas J.; Cattaneo, Fausto; Malagoli, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of the origin of the solar p-modes, we study the generation of acoustic waves by turbulent convection. Our approach uses the results of high-resolution 3D simulations as the experimental basis for our investigation. The numerical experiment describes the evolution of a horizontally periodic layer of vigorously convecting fluid. The sound is measured by a procedure, based on a suitable linearization of the equations of compressible convection that allows the amplitude of the acoustic field to be determined. Through this procedure we identify unambiguously some 400 acoustic modes. The total energy of the acoustic field is found to be a fraction of a percent of the kinetic energy of the convection. The amplitudes of the observed modes depend weakly on (horizontal) wavenumber but strongly on frequency. The line widths of the observed modes typically exceed the natural linewidths of the modes as inferred from linear theory. This broadening appears to be related to the (stochastic) interaction between the modes and the underlying turbulence which causes abrupt, episodic events during which the phase coherence of the modes is lost.

  16. Theory of stellar convection: removing the mixing-length parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Cropper, M.; Grebel, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by Mixing-Length Theory, which makes use of the mixing length-scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing length-scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scaleheight, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun. No strong arguments exist to suggest that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and at all evolutionary phases. The aim of this study is to present a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing-length parameter. We present a self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection that determines the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and of the surrounding medium. This new theory is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame comoving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convectively unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time-dependent formalism. We obtain an analytical, non-local, time-dependent subsonic solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The theory is suitable for the outer convective zones of solar type stars and stars of all mass on the main-sequence band. The predictions of the new theory are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm for the most accurate calibrator, the Sun, with very satisfactory results.

  17. Theory of Stellar Convection: Removing the Mixing-Length parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection determines all the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium. The new theory of stellar convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory are compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm with exceptional results for atmosphere models of the Sun and all the stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  18. Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P. ); Short, S.A. ); McDonald, J.R. ); McCann, M.W. Jr. and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA ); Murray, R.C. ); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. On the sensitivity of the diurnal cycle in the Amazon to convective intensity.

    PubMed

    Itterly, Kyle F; Taylor, Patrick C; Dodson, Jason B; Tawfik, Ahmed B

    2016-07-27

    Climate and reanalysis models contain large water and energy budget errors over tropical land related to the misrepresentation of diurnally forced moist convection. Motivated by recent work suggesting that the water and energy budget is influenced by the sensitivity of the convective diurnal cycle to atmospheric state, this study investigates the relationship between convective intensity, the convective diurnal cycle, and atmospheric state in a region of frequent convection-the Amazon. Daily, 3-hourly satellite observations of top of atmosphere (TOA) fluxes from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Ed3a SYN1DEG and precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 data sets are collocated with twice daily Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive observations from 2002 to 2012 and hourly flux tower observations. Percentiles of daily minimum outgoing longwave radiation are used to define convective intensity regimes. The results indicate a significant increase in the convective diurnal cycle amplitude with increased convective intensity. The TOA flux diurnal phase exhibits 1-3 h shifts with convective intensity, and precipitation phase is less sensitive. However, the timing of precipitation onset occurs 2-3 h earlier and the duration lasts 3-5 h longer on very convective compared to stable days. While statistically significant changes are found between morning atmospheric state and convective intensity, variations in upper and lower tropospheric humidity exhibit the strongest relationships with convective intensity and diurnal cycle characteristics. Lastly, convective available potential energy (CAPE) is found to vary with convective intensity but does not explain the variations in Amazonian convection, suggesting that a CAPE-based convective parameterization will not capture the observed behavior without incorporating the sensitivity of convection to column humidity.

  20. Photoelectrochemical power, chemical energy and catalytic activity for organic evolution on natural pyrite interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tributsch, H; Fiechter, S; Jokisch, D; Rojas-Chapana, J; Ellmer, K

    2003-04-01

    Natural pyrite (FeS2) has frequently been discussed as a material involved in CO2 fixation in presence of H2S and as a possible catalyst for the origin of life. A straightforward chemical fixation of carbon dioxide as proposed by Wächtershauser could not be verified from thermo-chemical equilibrium calculations by minimizing Gibb's Free Energy in the system C, O, H, S, Fe and appears unlikely due to the experimentally encountered large overpotentials involved in CO2 fixation. However, the hypothesis, by W. R. Edwards, that pyrite in shallow coastal waters may have been involved, can be sustained. In this case, daily available photoelectrochemical power from FeS2/Fe2+/3+ interfaces could have made the difference in combination with electrochemical processes, such as hydrogen insertion, and the solubilization of pyrite by the amino acid cysteine to yield dissolved chemical energy. Periodical changes in energy supply could also have entrained primitive self-organization processes for organic-biological evolution. Natural samples from thirteen ore deposits have been investigated photoelectrochemically. Efficient light-induced current generation has been found with several of these samples so that photoelectrochemical processes generated by pyrite have to be considered as naturally occurring phenomena, which could have been even more pronounced in oxygen deficient environments. Pyrite from the Murgul mine in Turkey of suboceanic volcanic origin was closer examined as a model system to understand the morphology and chemistry of pyrite photoactivity.