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Sample records for natural product inhibitors

  1. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  2. Natural product inhibitors of ocular angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Rania S.; Basavarajappa, Halesha D.; Corson, Timothy W.

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are characterized by high chemical diversity and biochemical specificity; therefore, they are appealing as lead compounds for drug discovery. Given the importance of angiogenesis to many pathologies, numerous natural products have been explored as potential anti-angiogenic drugs. Ocular angiogenesis underlies blinding eye diseases such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adults of working age, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the elderly. Despite the presence of effective therapy in many cases, these diseases are still a significant health burden. Anti-VEGF biologics are the standard of care, but may cause ocular or systemic side effects after intraocular administration and patients may be refractory. Many anti-angiogenic compounds inhibit tumor growth and metastasis alone or in combination therapy, but a more select subset of them has been tested in the context of ocular neovascular diseases. Here, we review the promise of natural products as anti-angiogenic agents, with a specific focus on retinal and choroidal neovascularization. The multifunctional curcumin and the chalcone isoliquiritigenin have demonstrated promising anti-angiogenic effects in mouse models of DR and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) respectively. The homoisoflavanone cremastranone and the flavonoid deguelin have been shown to inhibit ocular neovascularization in more than one disease model. The isoflavone genistein and the flavone apigenin on the other hand are showing potential in the prevention of retinal and choroidal angiogenesis with long-term administration. Many other products with antiangiogenic potential in vitro such as the lactone withaferin A, the flavonol quercetin, and the stilbenoid combretastatin A4 are awaiting investigation in different ocular disease relevant animal models. These natural products may serve as lead compounds for the design of more specific, efficacious, and affordable

  3. Natural product inhibitors of ocular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Rania S; Basavarajappa, Halesha D; Corson, Timothy W

    2014-12-01

    Natural products are characterized by high chemical diversity and biochemical specificity; therefore, they are appealing as lead compounds for drug discovery. Given the importance of angiogenesis to many pathologies, numerous natural products have been explored as potential anti-angiogenic drugs. Ocular angiogenesis underlies blinding eye diseases such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (DR) in adults of working age, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the elderly. Despite the presence of effective therapy in many cases, these diseases are still a significant health burden. Anti-VEGF biologics are the standard of care, but may cause ocular or systemic side effects after intraocular administration and patients may be refractory. Many anti-angiogenic compounds inhibit tumor growth and metastasis alone or in combination therapy, but a more select subset of them has been tested in the context of ocular neovascular diseases. Here, we review the promise of natural products as anti-angiogenic agents, with a specific focus on retinal and choroidal neovascularization. The multifunctional curcumin and the chalcone isoliquiritigenin have demonstrated promising anti-angiogenic effects in mouse models of DR and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) respectively. The homoisoflavanone cremastranone and the flavonoid deguelin have been shown to inhibit ocular neovascularization in more than one disease model. The isoflavone genistein and the flavone apigenin on the other hand are showing potential in the prevention of retinal and choroidal angiogenesis with long-term administration. Many other products with anti-angiogenic potential in vitro such as the lactone withaferin A, the flavonol quercetin, and the stilbenoid combretastatin A4 are awaiting investigation in different ocular disease-relevant animal models. These natural products may serve as lead compounds for the design of more specific, efficacious, and affordable

  4. Designing Inhibitors Against Fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase: Exploring Natural Products for Novel Inhibitor Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Sabrina; Harris, Katharine M.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products often contain unusual scaffold structures that may be elaborated by combinatorial methods to develop new drug-like molecules. Visual inspection of more than 128 natural products with some type of anti-diabetic activity suggested that a subset might provide novel scaffolds for designing potent inhibitors against fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), an enzyme critical in the control of gluconeogenesis. Using in silico docking methodology, these were evaluated to determine those that exhibited affinity for the AMP binding site. Achyrofuran from the South American plant Achyrocline satureoides, was selected for further investigation. Using the achyrofuran scaffold, inhibitors against FBPase were developed. Compounds 15 and 16 inhibited human liver and pig kidney FBPases at IC50 values comparable to that of AMP, the natural allosteric inhibitor. PMID:20116906

  5. Marine Natural Products with P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its role in drug metabolism and multi-drug resistance (MDR) in several human pathogens and diseases. P-gp is a major cause of drug resistance in cancer, parasitic diseases, epilepsy and other disorders. This review article aims to summarize the research findings on the marine natural products with P-glycoprotein inhibitor properties. Natural compounds that modulate P-gp offer great possibilities for semi-synthetic modification to create new drugs and are valuable research tools to understand the function of complex ABC transporters. PMID:24451193

  6. New natural product carbonic anhydrase inhibitors incorporating phenol moieties.

    PubMed

    Karioti, Anastasia; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Bilia, Anna-Rita; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. The need to find selective CA inhibitors (CAIs) triggered the investigation of natural product libraries, which proved to be a valid source of agents with such an activity, as demonstrated for the phenols, polyamines and coumarins. Herein we report an in vitro inhibition study of human (h) CA isoforms hCAs I, II, IV, VII and XII with a panel of natural polyphenols including flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, isoflavones and depsides, some of which extracted from Quercus ilex and Salvia miltiorrhiza. Several of the investigated derivatives showed interesting inhibition activity and selectivities for inhibiting some important isoforms over the off-target ones hCA I and II.

  7. The natural product berberine is a human prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tarrago, Teresa; Kichik, Nessim; Seguí, Josep; Giralt, Ernest

    2007-03-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase is a cytosolic serine peptidase that hydrolyzes proline-containing peptides at the carboxy terminus. This peptidase has been associated with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and related neuropsychiatric disorders, and therefore may have important clinical implications. Among the strategies used to find novel prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitors, traditional Chinese medicinal plants provide a rich source of unexplored compounds. We used (19)F NMR spectroscopy to search for new prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitors in a library of traditional Chinese medicine plant extracts. Several extracts were identified as powerful inhibitors of this peptidase. The alkaloid berberine was the prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitory molecule isolated from Rhizoma coptidis extract. Berberine inhibited prolyl oligopeptidase in a dose-dependent manner. As berberine is a natural compound that has been safely administered to humans, it opens up new perspectives for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. The results described herein suggest that the initiation of clinical trials in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, or related diseases in which cognitive capabilities are affected should be undertaken with either the extract or pure BBR.

  8. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  9. Marine Natural Product Inhibitors of Neutrophil-Associated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Shun-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are widely recognized to play an important role in acute inflammatory responses, and recent evidence has expanded their role to modulating chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and microbicidal compounds released from neutrophils that are recruited to the site of inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple inflammation-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, atherosclerosis, and hepatitis. Marine organisms are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with potential for industrial and pharmaceutical application. Marine natural products that inhibit neutrophil activation could be used as drugs for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies investigating marine natural products have reported novel anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanisms underlying their actions, which could facilitate our understanding of the molecular events occurring in neutrophils, have not been reported in most of the associated research studies. Therefore, in this review, we will present marine products that inhibit neutrophil-associated inflammation. Furthermore, we will be limiting the detailed discussion to agents with well-investigated molecular targets. PMID:27472345

  10. Anti-cancer glycosidase inhibitors from natural products: a computational and molecular modelling perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashona; Mhlongo, Ndumiso; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of computational tools in pharmaceutics has proven an effectual strategy in creating harmony between the physical and chemical aspects of proteins and potential inhibitors. This is achieved by bringing to life the three dimensional retrospect of biological systems, which takes into consideration computational approaches such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to facilitate drug design and discovery. In this work, we aim to provide a summary of the computational aspects of naturally derived anti-cancer inhibitors targeting the enzyme family of glycosidases. Our study offers insight into the evolution of drug discovery, molecular modelling and molecular binding modes of natural product inhibitors associated with glycosidase enzymes. PMID:25706917

  11. Natural Product Inspired N-Terminal Hsp90 Inhibitors: From Bench to Bedside?

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Anuj; Crowley, Vincent M; Blagg, Brian S J

    2016-01-01

    The 90 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp90) are responsible for the conformational maturation of nascent polypeptides and the rematuration of denatured proteins. Proteins dependent upon Hsp90 are associated with all six hallmarks of cancer. Upon Hsp90 inhibition, protein substrates are degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Consequentially, inhibition of Hsp90 offers a therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of cancer. Natural product inhibitors of Hsp90 have been identified in vitro, which have served as leads for the development of more efficacious inhibitors and analogs that have entered clinical trials. This review highlights the development of natural product analogs, as well as the development of clinically important inhibitors that arose from natural products.

  12. Identification of baicalein as a ferroptosis inhibitor by natural product library screening.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangchun; Song, Xinxin; Sun, Xiaofang; Huang, Jin; Zhong, Meizuo; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2016-05-13

    Ferroptosis, a novel form of regulated cell death, is characterized by oxidative injury from iron accumulation and lipid peroxidation. In a natural product library screening for ferroptosis inhibitor, we found that baicalein is a potent inhibitor of erastin-induced ferroptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Baicalein (also termed 5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid originally obtained from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and Scutellaria lateriflora. We showed that baicalein exhibits remarkable anti-ferroptosis activity compared with well-known ferroptosis inhibitors such as ferrostatin-1, liproxstatin-1, deferoxamine mesylate, and β-mercaptoethanol. At the biochemistry level, baicalein limits erastin-induced ferrous iron production, glutathione depletion, and lipid peroxidation. At the protein level, baicalein suppresses erastin-mediated degradation of glutathione peroxidase 4, a phospholipid hydroperoxidase that protects cells against membrane lipid peroxidation. Thus, baicalein enhances cellular anti-ferroptosis capacity and could be a potential therapeutic agent for ferroptosis-associated tissue injury.

  13. Specificity and affinity of natural product cyclopentapeptide inhibitors against A. fumigatus, human, and bacterial chitinases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco V; Houston, Douglas R; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Hodkinson, Michael; Adams, David J; Shiomi, Kazuro; Omura, Satoshi; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2005-01-01

    Family 18 chitinases play key roles in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. There is a need for specific, potent inhibitors to probe the function of these chitinases in different organisms. Such molecules could also provide leads for the development of chemotherapeuticals with fungicidal, insecticidal, or anti-inflammatory potential. Recently, two natural product peptides, argifin and argadin, have been characterized, which structurally mimic chitinase-chitooligosaccharide interactions and inhibit a bacterial chitinase in the nM-mM range. Here, we show that these inhibitors also act on human and Aspergillus fumigatus chitinases. The structures of these enzymes in complex with argifin and argadin, together with mutagenesis, fluorescence, and enzymology, reveal that subtle changes in the binding site dramatically affect affinity and selectivity. The data show that it may be possible to develop specific chitinase inhibitors based on the argifin/argadin scaffolds.

  14. Potential of Natural Products of Herbal Origin as Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO, E.C. 1.4.3.4) is a flavin-adenine type of enzyme with two isoforms referred to MAO-A and MAO-B that function for oxidation of monoamines. While MAO-A inhibitors are effective as antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs (e.g. chlorgyline, moclobemide, and lazabemide), inhibitors of MAO-B (e.g. Ldeprenyl, pargyline, and rasagiline) are used against neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Considering the need for novel MAO inhibitors due to side effects of the current ones, natural products have become attractive targets for researchers. Up till now, many studies revealed strong MAO inhibitory activity of flavonoid, xanthone, alkaloid, and coumarin derivatives from herbal sources, which also become good models for the synthetic MAO inhibitors. For this purpose, the present review focuses on examples of in vitro and in vivo MAO-inhibiting natural compounds of plant origin from a wide variety of chemical classes isolated mainly between 2000 - 2015.

  15. SARS-CoV protease inhibitors design using virtual screening method from natural products libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhou, Jiaju

    2005-04-15

    Two natural products databases, the marine natural products database (MNPD) and the traditional Chinese medicines database (TCMD), were used to find novel structures of potent SARS-CoV protease inhibitors through virtual screening. Before the procedure, the databases were filtered by Lipinski's ROF and Xu's extension rules. The results were analyzed by statistic methods to eliminate the bias in target-based database screening toward higher molecular weight compounds for enhancing the hit rate. Eighteen lead compounds were recommended by the screening procedure. They were useful for experimental scientists in prioritizing drug candidates and studying the interaction mechanism. The binding mechanism was also analyzed between the best screening compound and the SARS protein. PMID:15693056

  16. Virtual screening of protein kinase C inhibitors from natural product library to modulate general anaesthetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhui; Zhou, Chuixian

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and targeting PKC domain is considered as a strategy to modulate the anaesthetic effects. In this study, we described a synthetic pipeline to perform high-throughput virtual screening against a large library of 3D structural natural products released recently in order to discover those potential PKC modulators. A total of 100 natural products with top scores were raised, from which 12 promising candidates were tested to determine their inhibitory potencies against PKC. As might be expected, the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed a high PKC inhibitory activity (IC50 = 64 nM), and other two tested compounds, i.e. fisetin and tetrahydropapaverine, were also highly potent with their activities at nanomolar level (IC50 = 370 and 190, respectively).

  17. An overview on the potential of natural products as ureases inhibitors: A review☆

    PubMed Central

    Modolo, Luzia V.; de Souza, Aline X.; Horta, Lívia P.; Araujo, Débora P.; de Fátima, Ângelo

    2014-01-01

    Ureases, enzymes that catalyze urea hydrolysis, have received considerable attention for their impact on living organisms’ health and life quality. On the one hand, the persistence of urease activity in human and animal cells can be the cause of some diseases and pathogen infections. On the other hand, food production can be negatively affected by ureases of soil microbiota that, in turn, lead to losses of nitrogenous nutrients in fields supplemented with urea as fertilizer. In this context, nature has proven to be a rich resource of natural products bearing a variety of scaffolds that decrease the ureolytic activity of ureases from different organisms. Therefore, this work compiles the state-of-the-art researches focused on the potential of plant natural products (present in extracts or as pure compounds) as urease inhibitors of clinical and/or agricultural interests. Emphasis is given to ureases of Helicobacter pylori, Canavalia ensiformis and soil microbiota although the active site of this class of hydrolases is conserved among living organisms. PMID:25685542

  18. Salinosporamide Natural Products: Potent 20S Proteasome Inhibitors as Promising Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gulder, Tobias A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are rapidly evolving as potent treatment options in cancer therapy. One of the most promising drug candidates of this type is salinosporamide A from the bacterium Salinispora tropica. This marine natural product possesses a complex, densely functionalized γ-lactam-β-lactone pharmacophore, which is responsible for its irreversible binding to its target, the β subunit of the 20S proteasome. Salinosporamide A entered phase I clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma only three years after its discovery. The strong biological activity and the challenging structure of this compound have fueled intense academic and industrial research in recent years, which has led to the development of more than ten syntheses, the elucidation of its biosynthetic pathway, and the generation of promising structure–activity relationships and oncological data. Salinosporamide A thus serves as an intriguing example of the successful interplay of modern drug discovery and biomedical research, medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, natural product synthesis and analysis, as well as biosynthesis and bioengineering. PMID:20927786

  19. Inhibitors of neutrophil recruitment identified using transgenic zebrafish to screen a natural product library

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingang; Robertson, Anne L.; Li, Jingyu; Chai, Ruth Jinfen; Haishan, Wang; Sadiku, Pranvera; Ogryzko, Nikolay V.; Everett, Martin; Yoganathan, Kanagasundaram; Luo, Hongbo Robert; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Ingham, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to the inflammatory response, but uncontrolled cell migration and excess recruitment of neutrophils and other leukocytes can cause damage to the tissue. Here we describe the use of an in vivo model – the Tg(mpx:GFP)i114 zebrafish line, in which neutrophils are labelled by green fluorescent protein (GFP) – to screen a natural product library for compounds that can affect neutrophil migratory behaviour. Among 1040 fungal extracts screened, two were found to inhibit neutrophil migration completely. Subfractionation of these extracts identified sterigmatocystin and antibiotic PF1052 as the active components. Using the EZ-TAXIScan chemotaxis assay, both compounds were also found to have a dosage-dependent inhibitory effect on murine neutrophil migration. Furthermore, neutrophils treated with PF1052 failed to form pseudopods and appeared round in shape, suggesting a defect in PI3-kinase (PI3K) signalling. We generated a transgenic neutrophil-specific PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) reporter zebrafish line, which revealed that PF1052 does not affect the activation of PI3K at the plasma membrane. In human neutrophils, PF1052 neither induced apoptosis nor blocked AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, we have identified an antibiotic from a natural product library with potent anti-inflammatory properties, and have established the utility of the mpx:GFP transgenic zebrafish for high-throughput in vivo screens for novel inhibitors of neutrophil migration. PMID:24291762

  20. Inhibitors of neutrophil recruitment identified using transgenic zebrafish to screen a natural product library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Robertson, Anne L; Li, Jingyu; Chai, Ruth Jinfen; Haishan, Wang; Sadiku, Pranvera; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Everett, Martin; Yoganathan, Kanagasundaram; Luo, Hongbo Robert; Renshaw, Stephen A; Ingham, Philip W

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to the inflammatory response, but uncontrolled cell migration and excess recruitment of neutrophils and other leukocytes can cause damage to the tissue. Here we describe the use of an in vivo model - the Tg(mpx:GFP)(i114) zebrafish line, in which neutrophils are labelled by green fluorescent protein (GFP) - to screen a natural product library for compounds that can affect neutrophil migratory behaviour. Among 1040 fungal extracts screened, two were found to inhibit neutrophil migration completely. Subfractionation of these extracts identified sterigmatocystin and antibiotic PF1052 as the active components. Using the EZ-TAXIScan chemotaxis assay, both compounds were also found to have a dosage-dependent inhibitory effect on murine neutrophil migration. Furthermore, neutrophils treated with PF1052 failed to form pseudopods and appeared round in shape, suggesting a defect in PI3-kinase (PI3K) signalling. We generated a transgenic neutrophil-specific PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) reporter zebrafish line, which revealed that PF1052 does not affect the activation of PI3K at the plasma membrane. In human neutrophils, PF1052 neither induced apoptosis nor blocked AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, we have identified an antibiotic from a natural product library with potent anti-inflammatory properties, and have established the utility of the mpx:GFP transgenic zebrafish for high-throughput in vivo screens for novel inhibitors of neutrophil migration.

  1. The natural prenylated flavone artelastin is an inhibitor of ROS and NO production.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, F; Cidade, H; van Ufford, L; Beukelman, C; Kijjoa, A; Nascimento, M S J

    2008-04-01

    Artelastin, a prenylated flavone previously isolated from Artocarpus elasticus, was evaluated for its effect on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and nitric oxide (NO) by J774 murine macrophage cell line. Artelastin showed to be an inhibitor of ROS production due to a strong O2- scavenging activity. No effect was observed on the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Artelastin showed also to be an inhibitor of NO production without NO scavenging activity. This flavone seems to interfere with the expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immediately after LPS-IFNgamma-macrophage stimulation.

  2. High-Throughput Screen of Natural Product Libraries for Hsp90 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Jason; Balch, Maurie; Galam, Lakshmi; Girgis, Antwan; Hall, Jessica; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Matts, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 has become the target of intensive investigation, as inhibition of its function has the ability to simultaneously incapacitate proteins that function in pathways that represent the six hallmarks of cancer. While a number of Hsp90 inhibitors have made it into clinical trials, a number of short-comings have been noted, such that the search continues for novel Hsp90 inhibitors with superior pharmacological properties. To identify new potential Hsp90 inhibitors, we have utilized a high-throughput assay based on measuring Hsp90-dependent refolding of thermally denatured luciferase to screen natural compound libraries. Over 4,000 compounds were screen with over 100 hits. Data mining of the literature indicated that 51 compounds had physiological effects that Hsp90 inhibitors also exhibit, and/or the ability to downregulate the expression levels of Hsp90-dependent proteins. Of these 51 compounds, seven were previously characterized as Hsp90 inhibitors. Four compounds, anthothecol, garcinol, piplartine, and rottlerin, were further characterized, and the ability of these compounds to inhibit the refolding of luciferase, and reduce the rate of growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells, correlated with their ability to suppress the Hsp90-dependent maturation of the heme-regulated eIF2α kinase, and deplete cultured cells of Hsp90-dependent client proteins. Thus, this screen has identified an additional 44 compounds with known beneficial pharmacological properties, but with unknown mechanisms of action as possible new inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone machine. PMID:24833337

  3. In vivo efficacy of natural product-inspired irreversible kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barluenga, Sofia; Jogireddy, Rajamalleswaramma; Koripelly, Girish K; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2010-08-16

    Hypothemycin and related resorcylic acid lactones (RAL) bearing a cis-enone moiety have emerged as an alternative pharmacophore to heterocyclic motifs for kinase inhibition, and are endowed with a unique selectivity filter based on the irreversible reaction with a subset of the kinome bearing a suitably positioned cysteine residue. Two prototypical examples of "edited" RAL were evaluated for antitumoral, antimetastatic and antiangiogenic efficacy in an orthotopic murine renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) model. Both compounds (3 and 5) are good inhibitors of VEGFRs in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in vivo with comparable efficacy to sunitinib, an FDA-approved VEGFRs inhibitor. Compound 3 promoted lung metastasis to a similar extent as sunitinib, while compound 5 strongly inhibited lung metastasis. This study attests to the potential of irreversible kinase inhibitors and molecular editing of natural pharmacophores and provides encouraging results to a clinically significant problem. PMID:20623569

  4. Combined 3D-QSAR and Molecular Docking Study for Identification of Diverse Natural Products as Potent Pf ENR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Preeti; Saha, Debasmita; Sharma, Anuj

    2015-01-01

    An in-house library of 200 molecules from natural plant products was designed in order to evaluate their binding to Plasmodium ACP enoyl reductase (ENR), a promising biological target for antimalarial chemotherapeutics. The binding site of PfENR was explored computationally and the molecules were docked using AutoDock. Furthermore, the top-ranked scaffolds from docking studies were also compared with known PfENR inhibitors using 3D-QSAR. To this effect, a 3D-QSAR model was derived from a set of experimentally established PfENR inhibitors, using Comparative Molecular Force Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA). The best optimum CoMFA model exhibited a leave-one-out correlation coefficient (q2) and a noncross- validated correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.630 and 0.911, respectively. The result of this cumulative approach proposed five structurally distinct natural products as potent PfENR inhibitors. This study may lay a stepping stone towards Functional oriented synthesis (FOS) of novel PfENR inhibitors in future. PMID:26517356

  5. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors from Natural Products: Discovery of Next-Generation Antihyperglycemic Agents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition associated with the metabolic impairment of insulin actions, leading to the development of life-threatening complications. Although many kinds of oral antihyperglycemic agents with different therapeutic mechanisms have been marketed, their undesirable adverse effects, such as hypoglycemia, weight gain, and hepato-renal toxicity, have increased demand for the discovery of novel, safer antidiabetic drugs. Since the important roles of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) for glucose homeostasis in the kidney were recently elucidated, pharmacological inhibition of SGLT2 has been considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Since the discovery of the first natural SGLT2 inhibitor, phlorizin, several synthetic glucoside analogs have been developed and introduced into the market. Furthermore, many efforts to find new active constituents with SGLT2 inhibition from natural products are still ongoing. This review introduces the history of research on the development of early-generation SGLT2 inhibitors, and recent progress on the discovery of novel candidates for SGLT2 inhibitor from several natural products that are widely used in traditional herbal medicine. PMID:27618891

  6. Focused library with a core structure extracted from natural products and modified: application to phosphatase inhibitors and several biochemical findings.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Go; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-05-19

    Synthesis of a focused library is an important strategy to create novel modulators of specific classes of proteins. Compounds in a focused library are composed of a common core structure and different diversity structures. In this Account, we describe our design and synthesis of libraries focused on selective inhibitors of protein phosphatases (PPases). We considered that core structures having structural and electronic features similar to those of PPase substrates, phosphate esters, would be a reasonable choice. Therefore, we extracted core structures from natural products already identified as PPase inhibitors. Since many PPases share similar active-site structures, such phosphate-mimicking core structures should interact with many enzymes in the same family, and therefore the choice of diversity structures is pivotal both to increase the binding affinity and to achieve specificity for individual enzymes. Here we present case studies of application of focused libraries to obtain PPase inhibitors, covering the overall process from selection of core structures to identification and evaluation of candidates in the focused libraries. To synthesize a library focused on protein serine-threonine phosphatases (PPs), we chose norcantharidin as a core structure, because norcantharidin dicarboxylate shows a broad inhibition profile toward several PPs. From the resulting focused library, we identified a highly selective PP2B inhibitor, NCA-01. On the other hand, to find inhibitors of dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs), we chose 3-acyltetronic acid extracted from natural product RK-682 as a core structure, because its structure resembles the transition state in the dephosphorylation reaction of DSPs. However, a highly selective inhibitor was not found in the resulting focused library. Furthermore, an inherent drawback of compounds having the highly acidic 3-acyltetronic acid as a core structure is very weak potency in cellulo, probably due to poor cell membrane

  7. Natural Products Screening for the Identification of Selective Monoamine Oxidase-B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (MAO-BIs) are used for the initial therapy of Parkinson’s disease. Also, MAO-BIs have shown to be effective neuroprotective agents in several neurodegenerative diseases. However, some concerns exist regarding the long-term use of these compounds. Meanwhile, natural compounds showed potential MAO-B selective inhibitions. To date, few selective natural MAO-BIs have been identified. Therefore, the current study is designed to identify plants with potent and specific MAO-B inhibition. Study Design In this work, we utilized high throughput screening to evaluate the different plants ethanolic extract for their effectiveness to inhibit recombinant human (h)MAO-A and hMAO-B and to determine the relative selectivity of the top MAO-BI. Methodology Recombinant human isozymes were verified by Western blotting, and the 155 plants were screened. A continuous fluorometric screening assay was performed followed by two separate hMAO-A and hMAO-B microtiter screenings and IC50 determinations for the top extracts. Results In the screened plants, 9% of the extracts showed more than 1.5-fold relative inhibition of hMAO-B (RIB) and another 9% showed more than 1.5-fold relative inhibition of hMAO-A. The top extracts with the most potent RIBs were Psoralea corylifolia seeds, Phellodendron amurense bark, Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots, and Ferula assafoetida roots, with the highest RIB of 5.9-fold. Furthermore, extensive maceration of the promising extracts led to increase inhibitory effects with a preserved RIB as confirmed with luminescence assay. The top four extracts hMAO-BIs were equally potent (IC50= 1.3 to 3.8 μg/mL) with highly significant relative selectivities to inhibit hMAO-B (4.1- to 13.4-fold). Conclusion The obtained results indicate that Psoralea corylifolia seeds, Ferula assafoetida, Glycyrrhiza uralensis roots, and Phellodendron amurense ethanolic extracts have selective inhibitions for human MAO-B. Investigating these plant extracts as

  8. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  9. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, P.G.; Auld, D.S.; Schultz, P.J.; Lovell, S.; Battaile, K.P.; MacArthur, R.; Shen, M.; Tamayo-Castillo, G.; Inglese, J.; Sherman, D.H.

    2011-11-28

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for the discovery of molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, and macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery. Here, we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of actives from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm improves the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of reculturing, extraction, and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by X-ray crystallography.

  10. Titration-based screening for evaluation of natural product extracts: identification of an aspulvinone family of luciferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Patricia G.; Auld, Douglas S.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; MacArthur, Ryan; Shen, Min; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Inglese, James; Sherman, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical diversity of nature has tremendous potential for discovery of new molecular probes and medicinal agents. However, sensitivity of HTS assays to interfering components of crude extracts derived from plants, macro- and microorganisms has curtailed their use in lead discovery efforts. Here we describe a process for leveraging the concentration-response curves (CRCs) obtained from quantitative HTS to improve the initial selection of “actives” from a library of partially fractionated natural product extracts derived from marine actinomycetes and fungi. By using pharmacological activity, the first-pass CRC paradigm aims to improve the probability that labor-intensive subsequent steps of re-culturing, extraction and bioassay-guided isolation of active component(s) target the most promising strains and growth conditions. We illustrate how this process identified a family of fungal metabolites as potent inhibitors of firefly luciferase, subsequently resolved in molecular detail by x-ray crystallography. PMID:22118678

  11. Ultra High Throughput Screening of Natural Product Extracts to Identify Pro-apoptotic Inhibitors of Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hassig, Christian A.; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Kung, Paul; Kiankarimi, Mehrak; Kim, Sylvia; Diaz, Paul W.; Zhai, Dayong; Welsh, Kate; Morshedian, Shana; Su, Ying; O'Keefe, Barry; Newman, David J.; Rusman, Yudi; Kaur, Harneet; Salomon, Christine E.; Brown, Susan G.; Baire, Beeraiah; Michel, Andrew R.; Hoye, Thomas R.; Francis, Subhashree; Georg, Gunda I.; Walters, Michael A.; Divlianska, Daniela B.; Roth, Gregory P.; Wright, Amy E.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins are validated cancer targets comprised of six related proteins. From a drug discovery perspective, these are challenging targets that exert their cellular functions through protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While several isoform-selective inhibitors have been developed using structure-based design or high throughput screening (HTS) of synthetic chemical libraries, no large scale screen of natural product collections has been reported. A competitive displacement fluorescence polarization (FP) screen of nearly 150,000 natural product extracts was conducted against all six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins using fluorochrome-conjugated peptide ligands that mimic functionally-relevant PPIs. The screens were conducted in 1,536-well format and displayed satisfactory overall HTS statistics, with Z’-factor values ranging from 0.72 to 0.83, and a hit confirmation rate between 16-64%. Confirmed active extracts were orthogonally tested in a luminescent assay for caspase-3/7 activation in tumor cells. Active extracts were resupplied and effort toward the isolation of pure active components was initiated through iterative bioassay-guided fractionation. Several previously described altertoxins were isolated from a microbial source and the pure compounds demonstrate activity in both Bcl-2 FP and caspase cellular assays. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of ultra high throughput screening using natural product sources and highlight some of the challenges associated with this approach. PMID:24870016

  12. Screening of the Pan-African Natural Product Library Identifies Ixoratannin A-2 and Boldine as Novel HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A.; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva’a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M.; Rice, Charles M.; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world. PMID:25830320

  13. Screening of the Pan-African natural product library identifies ixoratannin A-2 and boldine as novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva'a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Rice, Charles M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A; Brumme, Zabrina L; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world.

  14. Targeting FASN in Breast Cancer and the Discovery of Promising Inhibitors from Natural Products Derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chien-shan; Wang, Zhiyu; Chen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells process a fundamental change in its bioenergetic metabolism from normal cells on an altered lipid metabolism, also known as the de novo fatty acid synthesis, for sustaining their high proliferation rates. Fatty acid synthesis is now associated with clinically aggressive tumor behavior and tumor cell growth and has become a novel target pathway for chemotherapy development. Although the underlying mechanisms of the altered de novo fatty acid synthesis still remains unclear, recent progress has shown that by targeting Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of endogenous long chain fatty acid could be a critical target for drug discovery. However, relatively few FASN inhibitors have been discovered. With the long history of clinical practices and numerous histological case study reports, traditional Chinese medicine enjoys an important role in seeking bioactive anticancer natural compounds. Herein, we will give an overall picture of the current progress of molecular targeted therapy in cancer fatty acid synthesis, describe the advances in the research on natural products-derived FASN inhibitors and their potential for enhancing our understanding of fatty acids in tumor biology, and may provide new therapeutic moieties for breast cancer patient care. PMID:24778702

  15. Identification of a Series of Tricyclic Natural Products as Potent Broad-Spectrum Inhibitors of Metallo-β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David J.; Hueso-Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Boyd, Helen; Concha, Néstor O.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Gilpin, Martin; Bateson, John H.; Cheever, Christy; Niconovich, Nancy L.; Pearson, Stewart; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Tew, David; Díez, Emilio; Pérez, Paloma; de la Fuente, Jesus; Rees, Michael; Rivera-Sagredo, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    This work describes the discovery and characterization of a novel series of tricyclic natural product-derived metallo-β-lactamase inhibitors. Natural product screening of the Bacillus cereus II enzyme identified an extract from a strain of Chaetomium funicola with inhibitory activity against metallo-β-lactamases. SB236050, SB238569, and SB236049 were successfully extracted and purified from this extract. The most active of these compounds was SB238569, which possessed Ki values of 79, 17, and 3.4 μM for the Bacillus cereus II, Pseudomonas aeruginosa IMP-1, and Bacteroides fragilis CfiA metallo-β-lactamases, respectively, yet none of the compounds exhibited any inhibitory activity against the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia L-1 metallo-β-lactamase (50% inhibitory concentration > 1,000 μM). The lack of activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme and serine β-lactamases demonstrated the selective nature of these compounds. The crystal structure of SB236050 complexed in the active site of CfiA has been obtained to a resolution of 2.5 Å. SB236050 exhibits key polar interactions with Lys184, Asn193, and His162 and a stacking interaction with the indole ring of Trp49 in the flap, which is in the closed conformation over the active site groove. SB236050 and SB238569 also demonstrate good antibacterial synergy with meropenem. Eight micrograms of SB236050 per ml gave rise to an eightfold drop in the MIC of meropenem for two clinical isolates of B. fragilis producing CfiA, making these strains sensitive to meropenem (MIC ≤ 4 μg/ml). Consequently, this series of metallo-β-lactamase inhibitors exhibit the most promising antibacterial synergy activity so far observed against organisms producing metallo-β-lactamases. PMID:12019104

  16. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Huang, Kao-Jean; Weng, Ching-Feng; Shiuan, David

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR). The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank) database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening. PMID:26170618

  17. Screening of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in natural product extracts by capillary electrophoresis in combination with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmei; Li, Feng; Li, Mingxia; Kang, Jingwu

    2015-04-01

    In this study, capillary electrophoresis (CE) combined with HPLC-MS/MS were used as a powerful platform for screening of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in natural product extracts. The screening system has been established by using 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled substrate peptide F-4EBP1, a known mTOR inhibitor AZD8055, and a small chemical library consisted of 18 natural product extracts. Biochemical screening of natural product extracts was performed by CE with laser induced fluorescence detection. The CE separation allowed a quantitative measurement of the phosphorylated product, hence the quantitation of enzymatic inhibition as well as inhibition kinetics. The hits are readily identified as long as the peak area of the phosphorylated product is reduced in comparison with the negative control. Subsequent assay-guided isolation of the active natural product extract was performed with HPLC-MS/MS to track the particular active components. The structures of the identified active components were elucidated by the molecular ions and fragmentation information provided by MS/MS analysis. The CE-based assay method only requires minute pure compounds, which can be readily purified by HPLC. Therefore, the combination of CE and HPLC-MS/MS provides a high-throughput platform for screening bioactive compounds from the crude nature extracts. By taking the advantage of the screening system, salvianolic acid A and C in extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza were discovered as the new mTOR inhibitors.

  18. Discovery of a Potential HER2 Inhibitor from Natural Products for the Treatment of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzong; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Junjie; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer in women worldwide due to the late stage detection and resistance to traditional chemotherapy. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is considered as a validated target in breast cancer therapy. Even though a substantial effort has been made to develop HER2 inhibitors, only lapatinib has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Side effects were observed in a majority of the patients within one year of treatment initiation. Here, we took advantage of bioinformatics tools to identify novel effective HER2 inhibitors. The structure-based virtual screening combined with ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) prediction was explored. In total, 11,247 natural compounds were screened. The top hits were evaluated by an in vitro HER2 kinase inhibition assay. The cell proliferation inhibition effect of identified inhibitors was evaluated in HER2-overexpressing SKBR3 and BT474 cell lines. We found that ZINC15122021 showed favorable ADMET properties and attained high binding affinity against HER2. Moreover, ZINC15122021 showed high kinase inhibition activity against HER2 and presented outstanding cell proliferation inhibition activity against both SKBR3 and BT474 cell lines. Results reveal that ZINC15122021 can be a potential HER2 inhibitor. PMID:27376283

  19. Discovery of a Potential HER2 Inhibitor from Natural Products for the Treatment of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzong; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Junjie; Bao, Jinku; Wu, Chuanfang

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most lethal types of cancer in women worldwide due to the late stage detection and resistance to traditional chemotherapy. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is considered as a validated target in breast cancer therapy. Even though a substantial effort has been made to develop HER2 inhibitors, only lapatinib has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Side effects were observed in a majority of the patients within one year of treatment initiation. Here, we took advantage of bioinformatics tools to identify novel effective HER2 inhibitors. The structure-based virtual screening combined with ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) prediction was explored. In total, 11,247 natural compounds were screened. The top hits were evaluated by an in vitro HER2 kinase inhibition assay. The cell proliferation inhibition effect of identified inhibitors was evaluated in HER2-overexpressing SKBR3 and BT474 cell lines. We found that ZINC15122021 showed favorable ADMET properties and attained high binding affinity against HER2. Moreover, ZINC15122021 showed high kinase inhibition activity against HER2 and presented outstanding cell proliferation inhibition activity against both SKBR3 and BT474 cell lines. Results reveal that ZINC15122021 can be a potential HER2 inhibitor. PMID:27376283

  20. The isolation, total synthesis and structure elucidation of chlorofusin, a natural product inhibitor of the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ryan C.; Lee, Sang Yeul; Searcey, Mark; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of key protein-protein interactions are emerging as exciting therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. One such interaction between MDM2 (HDM2) and p53, that silences the tumour suppression activities of p53, was found to be inhibited by the recently isolated natural product chlorofusin. Synthetic studies on this complex natural product summarized herein have served to reassign its chromophore relative stereochemistry, assign its absolute stereochemistry, and provided access to a series of key analogues and partial structures for biological evaluation. PMID:19642417

  1. The antimicrobial natural product chuangxinmycin and some synthetic analogues are potent and selective inhibitors of bacterial tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Brown, Murray J; Carter, Paul S; Fenwick, Ashley S; Fosberry, Andrew P; Hamprecht, Dieter W; Hibbs, Martin J; Jarvest, Richard L; Mensah, Lucy; Milner, Peter H; O'Hanlon, Peter J; Pope, Andrew J; Richardson, Christine M; West, Andrew; Witty, David R

    2002-11-01

    The antimicrobial natural product chuangxinmycin has been found to be a potent and selective inhibitor of bacterial tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase (WRS). A number of analogues have been synthesised. The interaction with WRS appears to be highly constrained, as only sterically smaller analogues afforded significant inhibition. The only analogue to show inhibition comparable to chuangxinmycin also had antibacterial activity. WRS inhibition may contribute to the antibacterial action of chuangxinmycin.

  2. Combinatorial multicomponent access to natural-products-inspired peptidomimetics: discovery of selective inhibitors of microbial metallo-aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Yanira; Pérez-Labrada, Karell; González-Bacerio, Jorge; Valdés, Gilberto; de los Chávez, María Á; Osuna, Joel; Charli, Jean-Louis; Pascual, Isel; Rivera, Daniel G

    2014-10-01

    The development of selective inhibitors of microbial metallo-aminopeptidases is an important goal in the pursuit of antimicrobials for therapeutic applications. Herein, we disclose a combinatorial approach relying on two Ugi reactions for the generation of peptidomimetics inspired by natural metallo-aminopeptidase inhibitors. The library was screened for inhibitory activity against the neutral metallo-aminopeptidase of Escherichia coli (ePepN) and the porcine kidney cortex metallo-aminopeptidase (pAPN), which was used as a model of the M1-aminopeptidases of mammals. Six compounds showed typical dose-response inhibition profiles toward recombinant ePepN, with two of them being very potent and highly selective for ePepN over pAPN. Another compound showed moderate ePepN inhibition but total selectivity for this bacterial enzyme over its mammalian orthologue at concentrations of physiological relevance. This strategy proved to be useful for the identification of lead compounds for further optimization and development.

  3. Identification of resveratrol oligomers as inhibitors of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator by high-throughput screening of natural products from chinese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaofang; Yu, Bo; Sui, Yujie; Gao, Xin; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been widely used for characterizing CFTR function in epithelial fluid transport and in diseases such as secretory diarrhea, polycystic kidney disease and cystic fibrosis. Few small molecule CFTR inhibitors have been discovered so far from combinatorial compound library. In the present study, we used a high throughput screening (HTS)-based natural product discovery strategy to identify new CFTR inhibitors from Chinese medicinal herbs. By screening 40,000 small molecule fractions from 500 herbal plants, we identified 42 positive fractions from 5 herbs and isolated two compounds that inhibited CFTR conductance from Chinese wild grapevine (Vitis amurensis Rupr). Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies determined the two active compounds as trans-ε-viniferin (TV) and r-2-viniferin (RV), respectively. Both compounds dose-dependently blocked CFTR-mediated iodide influx with IC50 around 20 μM. Further analysis by excised inside-out patch-clamp indicated strong inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-activated CFTR chloride currents by TV and RV. In ex vivo studies, TV and RV inhibited CFTR-mediated short-circuit Cl- currents in isolated rat colonic mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. In a closed-loop mouse model, intraluminal applications of TV (2.5 μg) and RV (4.5 μg) significantly reduced cholera toxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion. The present study identified two resveratrol oligomers as new CFTR inhibitors and validates our high-throughput screening method for discovery of bioactive compounds from natural products with complex chemical ingredients such as herbal plants. PMID:24714160

  4. Identification of Resveratrol Oligomers as Inhibitors of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator by High-Throughput Screening of Natural Products from Chinese Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaofang; Yu, Bo; Sui, Yujie; Gao, Xin; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been widely used for characterizing CFTR function in epithelial fluid transport and in diseases such as secretory diarrhea, polycystic kidney disease and cystic fibrosis. Few small molecule CFTR inhibitors have been discovered so far from combinatorial compound library. In the present study, we used a high throughput screening (HTS)-based natural product discovery strategy to identify new CFTR inhibitors from Chinese medicinal herbs. By screening 40,000 small molecule fractions from 500 herbal plants, we identified 42 positive fractions from 5 herbs and isolated two compounds that inhibited CFTR conductance from Chinese wild grapevine (Vitis amurensis Rupr). Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies determined the two active compounds as trans-ε-viniferin (TV) and r-2-viniferin (RV), respectively. Both compounds dose-dependently blocked CFTR-mediated iodide influx with IC50 around 20 μM. Further analysis by excised inside-out patch-clamp indicated strong inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-activated CFTR chloride currents by TV and RV. In ex vivo studies, TV and RV inhibited CFTR-mediated short-circuit Cl− currents in isolated rat colonic mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. In a closed-loop mouse model, intraluminal applications of TV (2.5 μg) and RV (4.5 μg) significantly reduced cholera toxin–induced intestinal fluid secretion. The present study identified two resveratrol oligomers as new CFTR inhibitors and validates our high-throughput screening method for discovery of bioactive compounds from natural products with complex chemical ingredients such as herbal plants. PMID:24714160

  5. Identification of resveratrol oligomers as inhibitors of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator by high-throughput screening of natural products from chinese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaofang; Yu, Bo; Sui, Yujie; Gao, Xin; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been widely used for characterizing CFTR function in epithelial fluid transport and in diseases such as secretory diarrhea, polycystic kidney disease and cystic fibrosis. Few small molecule CFTR inhibitors have been discovered so far from combinatorial compound library. In the present study, we used a high throughput screening (HTS)-based natural product discovery strategy to identify new CFTR inhibitors from Chinese medicinal herbs. By screening 40,000 small molecule fractions from 500 herbal plants, we identified 42 positive fractions from 5 herbs and isolated two compounds that inhibited CFTR conductance from Chinese wild grapevine (Vitis amurensis Rupr). Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies determined the two active compounds as trans-ε-viniferin (TV) and r-2-viniferin (RV), respectively. Both compounds dose-dependently blocked CFTR-mediated iodide influx with IC50 around 20 μM. Further analysis by excised inside-out patch-clamp indicated strong inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-activated CFTR chloride currents by TV and RV. In ex vivo studies, TV and RV inhibited CFTR-mediated short-circuit Cl- currents in isolated rat colonic mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. In a closed-loop mouse model, intraluminal applications of TV (2.5 μg) and RV (4.5 μg) significantly reduced cholera toxin-induced intestinal fluid secretion. The present study identified two resveratrol oligomers as new CFTR inhibitors and validates our high-throughput screening method for discovery of bioactive compounds from natural products with complex chemical ingredients such as herbal plants.

  6. The natural product dihydrotanshinone I provides a prototype for uncharged inhibitors that bind specifically to the acetylcholinesterase peripheral site with nanomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Beri, Veena; Wildman, Scott A; Shiomi, Kazuro; Al-Rashid, Ziyad F; Cheung, Jonah; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2013-10-22

    Cholinergic synaptic transmission often requires extremely rapid hydrolysis of acetylcholine by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE is inactivated by organophosphates (OPs) in chemical warfare nerve agents. The resulting accumulation of acetylcholine disrupts cholinergic synaptic transmission and can lead to death. A potential long-term strategy for preventing AChE inactivation by OPs is based on evidence that OPs must pass through a peripheral site or P-site near the mouth of the AChE active site gorge before reacting with a catalytic serine in an acylation site or A-site at the base of the gorge. An ultimate goal of this strategy is to design compounds that bind tightly at or near the P-site and exclude OPs from the active site while interfering minimally with the passage of acetylcholine. However, to target the AChE P-site with ligands and potential drugs that selectively restrict access, much more information must be gathered about the structure-activity relationships of ligands that bind specifically to the P-site. We apply here an inhibitor competition assay that can correctly determine whether an AChE inhibitor binds to the P-site, the A-site, or both sites. We have used this assay to examine three uncharged, natural product inhibitors of AChE, including aflatoxin B1, dihydrotanshinone I, and territrem B. The first two of these inhibitors are predicted by the competition assay to bind selectively to the P-site, while territrem B is predicted to span both the P- and A-sites. These predictions have recently been confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Dihydrotanshinone I, with an observed binding constant (KI) of 750 nM, provides a good lead compound for the development of high-affinity, uncharged inhibitors with specificity for the P-site. PMID:24040835

  7. "One-shot" analysis of PDE-5 inhibitors and analogues in counterfeit herbal natural products using an LC-DAD-QTOF system.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Claudio; Pivato, Antonio; Bogialli, Sara; Pastore, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    A highly selective and robust method for simultaneous screening and confirmation of target and non-target phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor analogues within a single chromatographic run in counterfeit herbal products was developed. The protocol, based on an easy and rapid extraction with a water/acetonitrile 1 % formic acid solution, followed by sonication and centrifugation, exploits an LC-diode array detector-quadrupole-time-of-flight (DAD-QTOF) system. The extraction method was optimized both at high concentrations and at trace levels. These two situations are typically encountered in pharmaceutical formulations and herbal food supplements. Carryover effects, never reported before and occurring mainly for vardenafil, were overcome using a polymer-based column. An in-house validation was carried out using five blanks of different bulk matrices spiked with seven standard analytes, namely yohimbine, sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil, homosildenafil, pseudovardenafil and hydroxyhomovardenafil. Reliable quantitation was possible using a conventional standard solution for all the pharmaceutical and herbal samples considered, as matrix effects were eliminated. Accuracy ranged from 80.9 to 108.1 % with overall relative standard deviation (RSD) <11 % (N = 15), measured at 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/g. Limits of detection (LODs) obtained ensured the determination of cross contaminations at nanogram per gram levels. A database with 82 PDE-5 inhibitor analogues was implemented for automatic non-target analysis. Among the 26 samples of dietary supplements and herbal remedies bulk marketed for erectile dysfunctions, three samples were found to be contaminated with both registered and unregistered synthetic PDE-5 inhibitors, i.e. yohimbine, sildenafil, dimethylsildenafil and thiodimethylsildenafil or thiomethisosildenafil. The occurrence of such contaminations, both at trace levels and at pharmaceutical dosage, indicates the illicit use of synthetic PDE-5 analogues

  8. "One-shot" analysis of PDE-5 inhibitors and analogues in counterfeit herbal natural products using an LC-DAD-QTOF system.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Claudio; Pivato, Antonio; Bogialli, Sara; Pastore, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    A highly selective and robust method for simultaneous screening and confirmation of target and non-target phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor analogues within a single chromatographic run in counterfeit herbal products was developed. The protocol, based on an easy and rapid extraction with a water/acetonitrile 1 % formic acid solution, followed by sonication and centrifugation, exploits an LC-diode array detector-quadrupole-time-of-flight (DAD-QTOF) system. The extraction method was optimized both at high concentrations and at trace levels. These two situations are typically encountered in pharmaceutical formulations and herbal food supplements. Carryover effects, never reported before and occurring mainly for vardenafil, were overcome using a polymer-based column. An in-house validation was carried out using five blanks of different bulk matrices spiked with seven standard analytes, namely yohimbine, sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil, homosildenafil, pseudovardenafil and hydroxyhomovardenafil. Reliable quantitation was possible using a conventional standard solution for all the pharmaceutical and herbal samples considered, as matrix effects were eliminated. Accuracy ranged from 80.9 to 108.1 % with overall relative standard deviation (RSD) <11 % (N = 15), measured at 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/g. Limits of detection (LODs) obtained ensured the determination of cross contaminations at nanogram per gram levels. A database with 82 PDE-5 inhibitor analogues was implemented for automatic non-target analysis. Among the 26 samples of dietary supplements and herbal remedies bulk marketed for erectile dysfunctions, three samples were found to be contaminated with both registered and unregistered synthetic PDE-5 inhibitors, i.e. yohimbine, sildenafil, dimethylsildenafil and thiodimethylsildenafil or thiomethisosildenafil. The occurrence of such contaminations, both at trace levels and at pharmaceutical dosage, indicates the illicit use of synthetic PDE-5 analogues

  9. Modification of marine natural product ningalin B and SAR study lead to potent P-glycoprotein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wong, Iris L K; Jin, Wen Bin; Jiang, Tao; Chow, Larry M C; Wan, Sheng Biao

    2014-10-01

    In this study, new marine ningalin B analogues containing a piperazine or a benzoloxy group at ring C have been synthesized and evaluated on their P-gp modulating activity in human breast cancer and leukemia cell lines. Their structure-activity relationship was preliminarily studied. Compounds 19 and 20 are potent P-gp inhibitors. These two synthetic analogues of permethyl ningalin B may be potentially used as effective modulators of P-gp-mediated drug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:25329704

  10. In silico identification of novel kinase inhibitors by targeting B-Raf(v660e) from natural products database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-jie; Wan, Zhi-ning; Chen, Xu-dong; Wu, Chuan-fang; Gao, Guo-long; Liu, Rong; Shi, Zheng; Bao, Jin-ku

    2015-04-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK (MAPK) signaling pathway has gained much attention from scientific community for therapeutic intervention in the past decades, specifically in oncology. Notably, a most prevalent B-Raf(v600e) mutant in Raf kinase family exhibits elevated kinase activity and results in constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway, thus making it a promising drug target for cancer therapy. Herein, virtual screening is applied to identify its potential inhibitors. Following the 25 ns molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, ZINC38541768, ZINC38541767, and ZINC12496469 are identified as B-Raf(v600e) potential inhibitors in a DFG-in conformation. Furthermore, according to the molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method, these three small molecules exhibit similar and good binding affinity toward B-Raf(v600e) (-38.76 kcal mol(-1), -42.60 kcal mol(-1), and -39.04 kcal mol(-1)). At the same time, several critical residues, such as I463, V471 in the P-loop, and DFG motif residue D594 within the A-loop, are also well clarified. All these results may not only indicate some future applications of inhibitors targeting B-Raf(v600e), but also benefit B-Raf(v600e) harboring cancer patients.

  11. Iridoids are natural glycation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    West, Brett J; Deng, Shixin; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Abe, Yumi; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Jensen, C Jarakae

    2016-08-01

    Glycation of amino acid residues in proteins leads to the eventual formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGE formation significantly influences human health and the aging process. AGE accumulation rates may be slowed by modifications to lifestyle or by pharmacological strategies. But the use of therapeutic drugs is not an appropriate means of controlling AGEs within the general population. However, phytochemical constituents in plant-based foods exhibit anti-glycation activities and may be more appropriate for general consumption. Among these phytochemicals are iridoids. The anti-AGE potential of iridoids has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, while also revealing possible mechanisms of action. Inclusion of iridoid food sources in the diet may be a useful component of strategies intended to mitigate AGE accumulation within the body.

  12. Natural products that inhibit carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Davis, Rohan A

    2014-01-01

    The chemical diversity, binding specificity and propensity to interact with biological targets has inspired many researchers to utilize natural products as molecular probes. Almost all reported carbonic anhydrase inhibitors comprise a zinc binding group in their structure of which the primary sulfonamide moiety (-SO2NH2) is the foremost example and to a lesser extent the primary sulfamate (-O-SO2NH2) and sulfamide (-NH-SO2NH2) groups. Natural products that comprise these zinc binding groups in their structure are however rare and relatively few natural products have been explored as a source for novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. This chapter will highlight the recent and growing interest in carbonic anhydrase inhibitors sourced from nature, demonstrating that natural product chemical space presents a rich source of potential alternate chemotypes for the discovery of novel drug-like carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. PMID:24146386

  13. High Throughput Screen Identifies Natural Product Inhibitor of Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanmei; Palmer, Stephanie O.; Munoz, Hector; Bullard, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae are causative agents in a wide range of infections. Genes encoding proteins corresponding to phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS) were cloned from both bacteria. The two forms of PheRS were kinetically evaluated and the Km’s for P. aeruginosa PheRS with its three substrates, phenylalanine, ATP and tRNAPhe were determined to be 48, 200, and 1.2 μM, respectively, while the Km’s for S. pneumoniae PheRS with respect to phenylalanine, ATP and tRNAPhe were 21, 225 and 0.94 μM, respectively. P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS were used to screen a natural compound library and a single compound was identified that inhibited the function of both enzymes. The compound inhibited P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS with IC50’s of 2.3 and 4.9 μM, respectively. The compound had a Ki of 0.83 and 0.98 μM against P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae PheRS, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the compound was determined against a panel of Gram positive and negative bacteria including efflux pump mutants and hyper-sensitive strains. MICs against wild-type P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae cells in culture were determined to be 16 and 32 μg/ml, respectively. The mechanism of action of the compound was determined to be competitive with the amino acid, phenylalanine, and uncompetitive with AT P. There was no inhibition of cytoplasmic protein synthesis, however, partial inhibition of the human mitochondrial PheRS was observed. PMID:25601215

  14. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  15. Recent Advancement in Natural Hyaluronidase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Luciana; Singla, Rajeev Kumar; Ishiki, Hamilton Mitsugu; Mendonca, Francisco Jaime B; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; Barbosa Filho, José Maria; Scotti, Marcus Tullius

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural products for the treatment of disease is one of the oldest cultures exists. Currently, the research of new drugs using natural products shows a poorly explored biodiversity and a great interest of marketing. The enzymatic inhibition by some natural products is investigated among these is the inhibition of hyaluronidase and the consequent reduction of the degradation of hyaluronic acid. So there is a reduction of inflammation and angiogenesis. This study reports the main natural species studied in inhibiting human hyaluronidase that can be the subject of future research for new drugs. PMID:27086786

  16. Natural Product Total Synthesis in the Organic Laboratory: Total Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), a Potent 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor from Honeybee Hives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touaibia, Mohamed; Guay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Natural products play a critical role in modern organic synthesis and learning synthetic techniques is an important component of the organic laboratory experience. In addition to traditional one-step organic synthesis laboratories, a multistep natural product synthesis is an interesting experiment to challenge students. The proposed three-step…

  17. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro. PMID:27473959

  18. Natural Products for Antithrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cen; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Feng-Qin; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Xia, Zhi-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis is considered to be closely related to several diseases such as atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease and stroke, as well as rheumatoid arthritis, hyperuricemia, and various inflammatory conditions. More and more studies have been focused on understanding the mechanism of molecular and cellular basis of thrombus formation as well as preventing thrombosis for the treatment of thrombotic diseases. In reality, there is considerable interest in the role of natural products and their bioactive components in the prevention and treatment of thrombosis related disorders. This paper briefly describes the mechanisms of thrombus formation on three aspects, including coagulation system, platelet activation, and aggregation, and change of blood flow conditions. Furthermore, the natural products for antithrombosis by anticoagulation, antiplatelet aggregation, and fibrinolysis were summarized, respectively. PMID:26075003

  19. Search for aflatoxin and trichothecene production inhibitors and analysis of their modes of action.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Shohei; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Jermnak, Usuma; Takagi, Keiko; Iimura, Kurin; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Suzuki, Michio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxin contamination of crops is a serious problem throughout the world because of its impact on human and animal health as well as economy. Inhibitors of mycotoxin production are useful not only for developing effective methods to prevent mycotoxin contamination, but also for investigating the molecular mechanisms of secondary metabolite production by fungi. We have been searching for mycotoxin production inhibitors among natural products and investigating their modes of action. In this article, we review aflatoxin and trichothecene production inhibitors, including our works on blasticidin S, methyl syringate, cyclo(L-Ala-L-Pro), respiration inhibitors, and precocene II.

  20. Natural products as photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Saewan, Nisakorn; Jimtaisong, Ampa

    2015-03-01

    The rise in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface has led to a depletion of stratospheric ozone over recent decades, thus accelerating the need to protect human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation such as erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and skin cancer. There are many different ways to protect skin against UV radiation's harmful effects. The most popular way to reduce the amount of UV radiation penetrating the skin is topical application of sunscreen products that contain UV absorbing or reflecting active molecules. Based on their protection mechanism, the active molecules in sunscreens are broadly divided into inorganic and organic agents. Inorganic sunscreens reflect and scatter UV and visible radiation, while organic sunscreens absorb UV radiation and then re-emit energy as heat or light. These synthetic molecules have limited concentration according to regulation concern. Several natural compounds with UV absorption property have been used to substitute for or to reduce the quantity of synthetic sunscreen agents. In addition to UV absorption property, most natural compounds were found to act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory agents, which provide further protection against the damaging effects of UV radiation exposure. Compounds derived from natural sources have gained considerable attention for use in sunscreen products and have bolstered the market trend toward natural cosmetics. This adds to the importance of there being a wide selection of active molecules in sunscreen formulations. This paper summarizes a number of natural products derived from propolis, plants, algae, and lichens that have shown potential photoprotection properties against UV radiation exposure-induced skin damage. PMID:25582033

  1. Natural products as photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Saewan, Nisakorn; Jimtaisong, Ampa

    2015-03-01

    The rise in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface has led to a depletion of stratospheric ozone over recent decades, thus accelerating the need to protect human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation such as erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and skin cancer. There are many different ways to protect skin against UV radiation's harmful effects. The most popular way to reduce the amount of UV radiation penetrating the skin is topical application of sunscreen products that contain UV absorbing or reflecting active molecules. Based on their protection mechanism, the active molecules in sunscreens are broadly divided into inorganic and organic agents. Inorganic sunscreens reflect and scatter UV and visible radiation, while organic sunscreens absorb UV radiation and then re-emit energy as heat or light. These synthetic molecules have limited concentration according to regulation concern. Several natural compounds with UV absorption property have been used to substitute for or to reduce the quantity of synthetic sunscreen agents. In addition to UV absorption property, most natural compounds were found to act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory agents, which provide further protection against the damaging effects of UV radiation exposure. Compounds derived from natural sources have gained considerable attention for use in sunscreen products and have bolstered the market trend toward natural cosmetics. This adds to the importance of there being a wide selection of active molecules in sunscreen formulations. This paper summarizes a number of natural products derived from propolis, plants, algae, and lichens that have shown potential photoprotection properties against UV radiation exposure-induced skin damage.

  2. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory natural products: current status.

    PubMed

    Jachak, Sanjay M

    2006-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are of huge therapeutic benefit in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and various types of inflammatory conditions. The target for these drugs is cyclooxygenase (COX), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the conversion of arachidonic acid into inflammatory prostaglandins. COX-2 selective inhibitors are believed to have the same anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic activities as that of nonselective inhibitor NSAIDs with little or none of the gastrointestinal side effects. Thus, in the last 6-7 years several selective COX-2 inhibitors including coxibs were discovered and introduced into clinic. Recent reports evidence that selective COX-2 inhibitor such as rofecoxib, can lead to thrombotic cardiovascular events through inhibition of prostacyclin formation in the infracted heart. This has resulted in withdrawal of rofecoxib from the clinic in September 2004. Moreover, the COX-2/COX-1 selectivity ratio is vital in the design of COX-2 inhibitory drugs, as it is clear from rofecoxib, which is more than 50-fold COX-2 selective. After looking at all above mentioned facts, natural product-based compounds seem better as these compounds are generally supposed to be devoid of severe side effects. The literature indicates that natural product-based compounds are mainly COX-1 selective. Through minor semi-synthetic changes in the structures, their selectivity towards COX-2 can be increased. The present review article addresses natural product COX inhibitors of plant and marine origin, reported during last ten years and their advantages, possible leads for further development and current status. In addition we describe our experience in the characterization, design and synthesis of potential natural COX inhibitors. PMID:16529558

  3. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2015-02-01

    This review covers the literature published in 2013 for marine natural products (MNPs), with 982 citations (644 for the period January to December 2013) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1163 for 2013), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Reviews, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included.

  4. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the literature published in 2014 for marine natural products (MNPs), with 1116 citations (753 for the period January to December 2014) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1378 in 456 papers for 2014), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Reviews, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included.

  5. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2014-01-17

    This review covers the literature published in 2012 for marine natural products, with 1035 citations (673 for the period January to December 2012) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1241 for 2012), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included. PMID:24389707

  6. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2015-02-01

    This review covers the literature published in 2013 for marine natural products (MNPs), with 982 citations (644 for the period January to December 2013) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1163 for 2013), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Reviews, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included. PMID:25620233

  7. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the literature published in 2014 for marine natural products (MNPs), with 1116 citations (753 for the period January to December 2014) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1378 in 456 papers for 2014), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Reviews, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included. PMID:26837534

  8. Studies on aldose reductase inhibitors from natural products. IV. Constituents and aldose reductase inhibitory effect of Chrysanthemum morifolium, Bixa orellana and Ipomoea batatas.

    PubMed

    Terashima, S; Shimizu, M; Horie, S; Morita, N

    1991-12-01

    The hot water extracts of Chrysanthemum morifolium, Bixa orellana and Ipomoea batatas, were found to have potent inhibitory activity towards lens aldose reductase (AR). Ellagic acid (4) was isolated from C. morifolium and I. batatas, isoscutellarein (7) from B. orellana and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (10) from I. batatas, respectively, as potent inhibitors. PMID:1814628

  9. Natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents for cancers: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Sui; Lei, Jie-Ping; Wei, Guo-Qing; Chen, Hui; Ma, Chao-Ying; Jiang, He-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    Context Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is the only mammalian enzyme to catalyse the synthesis of fatty acid. The expression level of FAS is related to cancer progression, aggressiveness and metastasis. In recent years, research on natural FAS inhibitors with significant bioactivities and low side effects has increasingly become a new trend. Herein, we present recent research progress on natural fatty acid synthase inhibitors as potent therapeutic agents. Objective This paper is a mini overview of the typical natural FAS inhibitors and their possible mechanism of action in the past 10 years (2004-2014). Method The information was collected and compiled through major databases including Web of Science, PubMed, and CNKI. Results Many natural products induce cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting FAS expression, with fewer side effects than synthetic inhibitors. Conclusion Natural FAS inhibitors are widely distributed in plants (especially in herbs and foods). Some natural products (mainly phenolics) possessing potent biological activities and stable structures are available as lead compounds to synthesise promising FAS inhibitors.

  10. Pest management with natural products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2012 Philadelphia ACS Symposium on Natural Products for Pest Management introduced recent discoveries and applications of natural products from insect, terrestrial plant, microbial, and synthetic sources for the management of insects, weeds, plant pathogenic microbes, and nematodes. The symposiu...

  11. Online coupling solid-phase ligand-fishing with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-tandem mass spectrometry for rapid screening and identification of xanthine oxidase inhibitors in natural products.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mi-Jun; Shi, Shu-Yun; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Shui-Han; Cai, Ping; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Screening and analysis of bioactive compounds from natural products is challenging work due to their complexity. This study presents the first report on hyphenation of solid-phase ligand-fishing using immobilized xanthine oxidase microcolumn (IXOM) and high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS) for screening and identification of XO inhibitors from complex mixtures. Solid-phase ligand-fishing system was hyphenated with the HPLC system via four-port switching valve and a six-port injection valve as an interface for transferring effluents from IXOM to HPLC, and collecting chromatograms from LFMC (ligand-fishing microextraction column) and C18 column in a run by only one DAD. Mixtures containing allopurinol (positive control) and tryptophane (negative control) were analyzed in order to verify the specificity and reproducibility of the approach. Subsequently, the newly developed system was applied to screening and identification of XO inhibitors from L. macranthoides and its human microsomal metabolites. Six prototype compounds (3-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid) and three metabolites (3-caffeoyl-epi-quinic acid, 5-caffeoyl-epi-quinic acid, 4-caffeoyl-epi-quinic acid) with XO binding affinities were identified. The XO inhibition activities of six prototype compounds were evaluated and confirmed using in vitro enzymatic assay. With the online system developed here, we present a feasible, selective, and effective strategy for rapid screening and identification of enzyme inhibitors from complex mixtures. PMID:27438719

  12. Natural Products for Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Heather

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review the clinical trial literature on the use and effects of natural products for cancer prevention. DATA SOURCES Clinical trials published in PubMed. CONCLUSION There is a growing body of literature on the use of natural products for cancer prevention. To date, few trials have demonstrated conclusive benefit. Current guidelines recommend against the use of natural products for cancer prevention. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE Clinicians should ask patients about their use of natural products and motivations for use. If patients are using natural products specifically for cancer prevention, they should be counseled on the current guidelines, as well as their options for other cancer prevention strategies. PMID:22281308

  13. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach. PMID:27498895

  14. Supramolecular complexations of natural products.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg; Agrawal, Pawan; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2013-08-21

    Complexations of natural products with synthetic receptors as well as the use of natural products as host compounds are reviewed, with an emphasis on possible practical uses or on biomedical significance. Applications such as separation, sensing, enzyme monitoring, and protection of natural drugs are first outlined. We then discuss examples of complexes with all important classes of natural compounds, such as amino acids, peptides, nucleosides/nucleotides, carbohydrates, catecholamines, flavonoids, terpenoids/steroids, alkaloids, antibiotics and toxins. PMID:23703643

  15. Screening of natural products for antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Silver, L; Bostian, K

    1990-07-01

    Antimicrobial research is geared toward the discovery and development of novel chemical structures such as therapeutic antimicrobial agents. The continuing problem of development of resistance to existing antibacterial agents and the dearth of good antifungal agents motivates this effort toward innovation. Selection of possible new enzyme targets for antibiotic inhibition may be made on theoretical grounds, but it appears premature to select any single, previously unvalidated target for the intensive study required for rational drug design. Instead, a broad screen of chemical entities can be undertaken, dedicated to the discovery of novel antimicrobial inhibitors. A number of target areas are under investigation, including fungal mRNA splicing and bacterial DNA synthesis. A major part of the endeavor is in the historically productive area of natural product screening. To make the best use of natural product resources for the discovery of novel antibiotics, a balance is struct between screening for inhibitors of rationally chosen targets for which clinically useful inhibitors are not yet available, and screening more broadly to ensure that rare activities of unanticipated mode-of-action are not missed.

  16. Pectin as an Extraordinary Natural Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shurui; Fan, Shuanshi; Fang, Songtian; Lang, Xuemei; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Pectin as a novel natural kinetic hydrate inhibitor, expected to be eco-friendly and sufficiently biodegradable, was studied in this paper. The novel crystal growth inhibition (CGI) and standard induction time methods were used to evaluate its effect as hydrate inhibitor. It could successfully inhibit methane hydrate formation at subcooling temperature up to 12.5 °C and dramatically slowed the hydrate crystal growth. The dosage of pectin decreased by 66% and effective time extended 10 times than typical kinetic inhibitor. Besides, its maximum growth rate was no more than 2.0%/h, which was far less than 5.5%/h of growth rate for PVCap at the same dosage. The most prominent feature was that it totally inhibited methane hydrate crystal rapid growth when hydrate crystalline occurred. Moreover, in terms of typical natural inhibitors, the inhibition activity of pectin increased 10.0-fold in induction time and 2.5-fold in subcooling temperature. The extraordinary inhibition activity is closely related to its hydrogen bonding interaction with water molecules and the hydrophilic structure. Finally, the biodegradability and economical efficiency of pectin were also taken into consideration. The results showed the biodegradability improved 75.0% and the cost reduced by more than 73.3% compared to typical commercial kinetic inhibitors. PMID:26996773

  17. Pectin as an Extraordinary Natural Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shurui; Fan, Shuanshi; Fang, Songtian; Lang, Xuemei; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Pectin as a novel natural kinetic hydrate inhibitor, expected to be eco-friendly and sufficiently biodegradable, was studied in this paper. The novel crystal growth inhibition (CGI) and standard induction time methods were used to evaluate its effect as hydrate inhibitor. It could successfully inhibit methane hydrate formation at subcooling temperature up to 12.5 °C and dramatically slowed the hydrate crystal growth. The dosage of pectin decreased by 66% and effective time extended 10 times than typical kinetic inhibitor. Besides, its maximum growth rate was no more than 2.0%/h, which was far less than 5.5%/h of growth rate for PVCap at the same dosage. The most prominent feature was that it totally inhibited methane hydrate crystal rapid growth when hydrate crystalline occurred. Moreover, in terms of typical natural inhibitors, the inhibition activity of pectin increased 10.0-fold in induction time and 2.5-fold in subcooling temperature. The extraordinary inhibition activity is closely related to its hydrogen bonding interaction with water molecules and the hydrophilic structure. Finally, the biodegradability and economical efficiency of pectin were also taken into consideration. The results showed the biodegradability improved 75.0% and the cost reduced by more than 73.3% compared to typical commercial kinetic inhibitors. PMID:26996773

  18. Pectin as an Extraordinary Natural Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shurui; Fan, Shuanshi; Fang, Songtian; Lang, Xuemei; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Pectin as a novel natural kinetic hydrate inhibitor, expected to be eco-friendly and sufficiently biodegradable, was studied in this paper. The novel crystal growth inhibition (CGI) and standard induction time methods were used to evaluate its effect as hydrate inhibitor. It could successfully inhibit methane hydrate formation at subcooling temperature up to 12.5 °C and dramatically slowed the hydrate crystal growth. The dosage of pectin decreased by 66% and effective time extended 10 times than typical kinetic inhibitor. Besides, its maximum growth rate was no more than 2.0%/h, which was far less than 5.5%/h of growth rate for PVCap at the same dosage. The most prominent feature was that it totally inhibited methane hydrate crystal rapid growth when hydrate crystalline occurred. Moreover, in terms of typical natural inhibitors, the inhibition activity of pectin increased 10.0-fold in induction time and 2.5-fold in subcooling temperature. The extraordinary inhibition activity is closely related to its hydrogen bonding interaction with water molecules and the hydrophilic structure. Finally, the biodegradability and economical efficiency of pectin were also taken into consideration. The results showed the biodegradability improved 75.0% and the cost reduced by more than 73.3% compared to typical commercial kinetic inhibitors.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors from the natural origin: a recent perspective.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harun M; Rane, Rajesh; Thapliyal, Neeta; Palkar, Mahesh; Shaikh, Mahamadhanif; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is seen in a number of human tumors like prostate, colon, breast and ovarian. Their expression is correlated with vascularity and often difficult to diagnose. Though a number of active inhibitors and anticancer drugs against EGFR-tyrosine kinase are known, increase in resistance together with many side effects designate the need for new and improved treatments. Natural products and their analoges have significant contribution in the cancer drug discovery and development process. Therefore in the current review we mainly discuss design, synthesis and structural activity relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors from the natural origin.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors from the natural origin: a recent perspective.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harun M; Rane, Rajesh; Thapliyal, Neeta; Palkar, Mahesh; Shaikh, Mahamadhanif; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is seen in a number of human tumors like prostate, colon, breast and ovarian. Their expression is correlated with vascularity and often difficult to diagnose. Though a number of active inhibitors and anticancer drugs against EGFR-tyrosine kinase are known, increase in resistance together with many side effects designate the need for new and improved treatments. Natural products and their analoges have significant contribution in the cancer drug discovery and development process. Therefore in the current review we mainly discuss design, synthesis and structural activity relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors from the natural origin. PMID:25763933

  1. Effects of Novel Isoform-Selective Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Inhibitors on Natural Killer Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Yea, Sung Su; So, Lomon; Mallya, Sharmila; Lee, Jongdae; Rajasekaran, Kamalakannan; Malarkannan, Subramaniam; Fruman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are promising targets for therapeutic development in cancer. The class I PI3K isoform p110α has received considerable attention in oncology because the gene encoding p110α (PIK3CA) is frequently mutated in human cancer. However, little is known about the function of p110α in lymphocyte populations that modulate tumorigenesis. We used recently developed investigational inhibitors to compare the function of p110α and other isoforms in natural killer (NK) cells, a key cell type for immunosurveillance and tumor immunotherapy. Inhibitors of all class I isoforms (pan-PI3K) significantly impaired NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against tumor cells, whereas p110α-selective inhibitors had no effect. In NK cells stimulated through NKG2D, p110α inhibition modestly reduced PI3K signaling output as measured by AKT phosphorylation. Production of IFN-γ and NK cell-derived chemokines was blocked by a pan-PI3K inhibitor and partially reduced by a p110δinhibitor, with lesser effects of p110α inhibitors. Oral administration of mice with MLN1117, a p110α inhibitor in oncology clinical trials, had negligible effects on NK subset maturation or terminal subset commitment. Collectively, these results support the targeting of PIK3CA mutant tumors with selective p110α inhibitors to preserve NK cell function. PMID:24915189

  2. Natural Products as Molecular Messengers*

    PubMed Central

    Meinwald, Jerrold

    2011-01-01

    The chemistry of naturally-occurring compounds has long been pursued in the search for medicines, dyes, pesticides, flavors, and fragrances. In addition, the deeper aim of understanding life itself as a chemical phenomenon has motivated generations of scientists. One consequence of such studies has been the realization that natural products often serve central roles as biological signaling agents. We consider natural products from the viewpoint of the organisms that produce and/or respond to them, and suggest how a naturally-occurring compound may acquire its role in chemical communication. PMID:21190370

  3. Natural products in crop protection.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Cantrell, Charles L; Duke, Stephen O

    2009-06-15

    The tremendous increase in crop yields associated with the 'green' revolution has been possible in part by the discovery and utilization of chemicals for pest control. However, concerns over the potential impact of pesticides on human health and the environment has led to the introduction of new pesticide registration procedures, such as the Food Quality Protection Act in the United States. These new regulations have reduced the number of synthetic pesticides available in agriculture. Therefore, the current paradigm of relying almost exclusively on chemicals for pest control may need to be reconsidered. New pesticides, including natural product-based pesticides are being discovered and developed to replace the compounds lost due to the new registration requirements. This review covers the historical use of natural products in agricultural practices, the impact of natural products on the development of new pesticides, and the future prospects for natural products-based pest management.

  4. Tyrosinase inhibitors from natural and synthetic sources: structure, inhibition mechanism and perspective for the future.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y-J; Uyama, H

    2005-08-01

    Tyrosinase is known to be a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis, involved in determining the color of mammalian skin and hair. Various dermatological disorders, such as melasma, age spots and sites of actinic damage, arise from the accumulation of an excessive level of epidermal pigmentation. In addition, unfavorable enzymatic browning of plant-derived foods by tyrosinase causes a decrease in nutritional quality and economic loss of food products. The inadequacy of current conventional techniques to prevent tyrosinase action encourages us to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors. This article overviews the various inhibitors obtained from natural and synthetic sources with their industrial importance.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition studies by natural leech inhibitors by capillary electrophoresis and competition assay.

    PubMed

    Deloffre, Laurence; Sautiere, Pierre-Eric; Huybrechts, Roger; Hens, Korneel; Vieau, Didier; Salzet, Michel

    2004-06-01

    A protocol to follow the processing of angiotensin I into angiotensin II by rabbit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its inhibition by a novel natural antagonist, the leech osmoregulator factor (LORF) using capillary zonal electrophoresis is described. The experiment was carried out using the Beckman PACE system and steps were taken to determine (a) the migration profiles of angiotensin and its yielded peptides, (b) the minimal amount of angiotensin II detected, (c) the use of different electrolytes and (d) the concentration of inhibitor. We demonstrated that LORF (IPEPYVWD), a neuropeptide previously found in leech brain, is able to inhibit rabbit ACE with an IC(50) of 19.8 micro m. Interestingly, its cleavage product, IPEP exhibits an IC(50) of 11.5 micro m. A competition assay using p-benzoylglycylglycylglycine and insect ACE established that LORF and IPEP fragments are natural inhibitors for invertebrate ACE. Fifty-four percent of insect ACE activity is inhibited with 50 micro m IPEP and 35% inhibition with LORF (25 mm). Extending the peptide at both N- and C-terminus (GWEIPEPYVWDES) and the cleavage of IPEP in IP abolished the inhibitory activity of both peptides. Immunocytochemical data obtained with antisera raised against LORF and leech ACE showed a colocalization between the enzyme and its inhibitor in the same neurons. These results showed that capillary zonal electrophoresis is a useful technique for following enzymatic processes with small amounts of products and constitutes the first evidence of a natural ACE inhibitor in invertebrates.

  6. Natural Inhibitors of Snake Venom Metalloendopeptidases: History and Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Viviane A.; Gomes-Neto, Francisco; Perales, Jonas; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C.; Valente, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    The research on natural snake venom metalloendopeptidase inhibitors (SVMPIs) began in the 18th century with the pioneering work of Fontana on the resistance that vipers exhibited to their own venom. During the past 40 years, SVMPIs have been isolated mainly from the sera of resistant animals, and characterized to different extents. They are acidic oligomeric glycoproteins that remain biologically active over a wide range of pH and temperature values. Based on primary structure determination, mammalian plasmatic SVMPIs are classified as members of the immunoglobulin (Ig) supergene protein family, while the one isolated from muscle belongs to the ficolin/opsonin P35 family. On the other hand, SVMPIs from snake plasma have been placed in the cystatin superfamily. These natural antitoxins constitute the first line of defense against snake venoms, inhibiting the catalytic activities of snake venom metalloendopeptidases through the establishment of high-affinity, non-covalent interactions. This review presents a historical account of the field of natural resistance, summarizing its main discoveries and current challenges, which are mostly related to the limitations that preclude three-dimensional structural determinations of these inhibitors using “gold-standard” methods; perspectives on how to circumvent such limitations are presented. Potential applications of these SVMPIs in medicine are also highlighted. PMID:27571103

  7. Natural Inhibitors of Snake Venom Metalloendopeptidases: History and Current Challenges.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Viviane A; Gomes-Neto, Francisco; Perales, Jonas; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C; Valente, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    The research on natural snake venom metalloendopeptidase inhibitors (SVMPIs) began in the 18th century with the pioneering work of Fontana on the resistance that vipers exhibited to their own venom. During the past 40 years, SVMPIs have been isolated mainly from the sera of resistant animals, and characterized to different extents. They are acidic oligomeric glycoproteins that remain biologically active over a wide range of pH and temperature values. Based on primary structure determination, mammalian plasmatic SVMPIs are classified as members of the immunoglobulin (Ig) supergene protein family, while the one isolated from muscle belongs to the ficolin/opsonin P35 family. On the other hand, SVMPIs from snake plasma have been placed in the cystatin superfamily. These natural antitoxins constitute the first line of defense against snake venoms, inhibiting the catalytic activities of snake venom metalloendopeptidases through the establishment of high-affinity, non-covalent interactions. This review presents a historical account of the field of natural resistance, summarizing its main discoveries and current challenges, which are mostly related to the limitations that preclude three-dimensional structural determinations of these inhibitors using "gold-standard" methods; perspectives on how to circumvent such limitations are presented. Potential applications of these SVMPIs in medicine are also highlighted. PMID:27571103

  8. Natural Products as Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Erin E.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products have evolved to encompass a broad spectrum of chemical and functional diversity. It is this diversity, along with their structural complexity, that enables nature’s small molecules to target a nearly limitless number of biological macromolecules and to often do so in a highly selective fashion. Because of these characteristics, natural products have seen great success as therapeutic agents. However, this vast pool of compounds holds much promise beyond the development of future drugs. These features also make them ideal tools for the study of biological systems. Recent examples of the use of natural products and their derivatives as chemical probes to explore biological phenomena and assemble biochemical pathways are presented here. PMID:20509672

  9. Synthesis of Polycyclic Natural Products

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan Hoang Nguyen

    2003-05-31

    With the continuous advancements in molecular biology and modern medicine, organic synthesis has become vital to the support and extension of those discoveries. The isolations of new natural products allow for the understanding of their biological activities and therapeutic value. Organic synthesis is employed to aid in the determination of the relationship between structure and function of these natural products. The development of synthetic methodologies in the course of total syntheses is imperative for the expansion of this highly interdisciplinary field of science. In addition to the practical applications of total syntheses, the structural complexity of natural products represents a worthwhile challenge in itself. The pursuit of concise and efficient syntheses of complex molecules is both gratifying and enjoyable.

  10. Natural products for dental caries prevention.

    PubMed

    Badria, Farid A; Zidan, Omar A

    2004-01-01

    Selected natural compounds were evaluated for their effects on dental caries due to different strains of Streptococcus mutans bacteria. Out of 39 tested compounds, four (catechol, emetine, quinine, and flavone) showed potent inhibitory activity on different strains of S. mutans at 6.25 microg/mL or less with inhibition of adherence <50%, two compounds (5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy isoflavone and ellagic acid) exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect at 12.5 microg/mL with inhibition to adherence <50%, and 12 compounds exhibited weak antibacterial activity at 125 microg/mL or more with inhibition of adherence <25%. These compounds represent three major classes of natural products: tannins, alkaloids, and flavonoids. Further study for possible application of these compounds as inhibitors for dental caries is underway. PMID:15383236

  11. EIA's Natural Gas Production Data

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    This special report examines the stages of natural gas processing from the wellhead to the pipeline network through which the raw product becomes ready for transportation and eventual consumption, and how this sequence is reflected in the data published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA).

  12. Natural products: DNA double whammy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Kent S.

    2014-06-01

    The lomaiviticins are exceedingly potent antibiotic agents, but the mechanism responsible for this activity has so far been unclear. Now, efficient generation of double-strand breaks in DNA by lomaiviticin A has been linked to the remarkable cytotoxicity of these diazobenzofluorene-containg natural products.

  13. Natural Products from Mangrove Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong-Bo; Ye, Wan-Wan; Han, Ying; Deng, Zi-Xin; Hong, Kui

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves are woody plants located in tropical and subtropical intertidal coastal regions. The mangrove ecosystem is becoming a hot spot for natural product discovery and bioactivity survey. Diverse mangrove actinomycetes as promising and productive sources are worth being explored and uncovered. At the time of writing, we report 73 novel compounds and 49 known compounds isolated from mangrove actinomycetes including alkaloids, benzene derivatives, cyclopentenone derivatives, dilactones, macrolides, 2-pyranones and sesquiterpenes. Attractive structures such as salinosporamides, xiamycins and novel indolocarbazoles are highlighted. Many exciting compounds have been proven as potential new antibiotics, antitumor and antiviral agents, anti-fibrotic agents and antioxidants. Furthermore, some of their biosynthetic pathways have also been revealed. This review is an attempt to consolidate and summarize the past and the latest studies on mangrove actinomycetes natural product discovery and to draw attention to their immense potential as novel and bioactive compounds for marine drugs discovery. PMID:24798926

  14. Natural Product Compounds with Aromatase Inhibitory Activity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so a search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural product compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in non-cellular, cellular, and in vivo studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural product compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review. PMID:20635310

  15. Small molecule inhibition of microbial natural product biosynthesis – An emerging antibiotic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Cisar, Justin S.; Tan, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of natural products modulate critical biological processes in the microorganisms that produce them. Thus, inhibition of the corresponding natural product biosynthesis pathways represents a promising avenue to develop novel antibiotics. In this tutorial review, we describe several recent examples of designed small molecule inhibitors of microbial natural product biosynthesis and their use in evaluating this emerging antibiotic strategy. PMID:18568158

  16. Natural products as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Natural products still play an important role in the medicinal chemistry, especially in some therapeutic areas. As example more than 60% of currently-used anticancer agents are derives from natural sources including plants, marine organisms or micro-organism. Thus natural products (NP) are an high-impact source of new "lead compounds" or new potential therapeutic agents despite the large development of biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry in the drug discovery and development. Many examples of anticancer drugs as paclitaxel, combretastatin, bryostatin and discodermolide have shown the importance of NP in the anticancer chemotherapy through many years. Many organisms have been studied as sources of drugs namely plants, micro-organisms and marine organisms and the obtained NP can be considered a group of "privileged chemical structures" evolved in nature to interact with other organisms. For this reason NP are a good starting points for pharmaceutical research and also for library design. Tubulin and microtubules are one of the most studied targets for the search of anticancer compounds. Microtubule targeting agents (MTA) also named antimitotic agents are compounds that are able to perturb mitosis but are also able to arrest cell growing during interphase. The anticancer drugs, taxanes and vinca alkaloids have established tubulin as important target in cancer therapy. More recently the vascular disrupting agents (VDA) combretastatin analogues were studied for their antimitotics properties. This review will consider the anti mitotic NP and their potential impact in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  17. Fluorescent profiling of natural product producers.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Joel S; Fenical, William; Gulledge, Brian M; Chamberlin, A Richard; La Clair, James J

    2005-07-01

    The identification of natural product producer organisms remains a problem for both isolation and natural product classification. A concise screen is developed through fluorescent modification of a set of natural products that offer a common activity. Through real-time multicolor microscopy, the processing, storage, and effects of a natural product are rapidly screened at the level of the strain and individual organism.

  18. Natural products for cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Demain, Arnold L.; Vaishnav, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Summary For over 40 years, natural products have served us well in combating cancer. The main sources of these successful compounds are microbes and plants from the terrestrial and marine environments. The microbes serve as a major source of natural products with anti‐tumour activity. A number of these products were first discovered as antibiotics. Another major contribution comes from plant alkaloids, taxoids and podophyllotoxins. A vast array of biological metabolites can be obtained from the marine world, which can be used for effective cancer treatment. The search for novel drugs is still a priority goal for cancer therapy, due to the rapid development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, the high toxicity usually associated with some cancer chemotherapy drugs and their undesirable side‐effects increase the demand for novel anti‐tumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side‐effects and/or with greater therapeutic efficiency. This review points out those technologies needed to produce the anti‐tumour compounds of the future. PMID:21375717

  19. Exploiting nature's rich source of proteasome inhibitors as starting points in drug development.

    PubMed

    Gräwert, Melissa Ann; Groll, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Cancer is the No. 2 cause of death in the Western world and one of the most expensive diseases to treat. Thus, it is not surprising, that every major pharmaceutical and biotechnology company has a blockbuster oncology product. In 2003, Millennium Pharmaceuticals entered the race with Velcade®, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for treatment of multiple myeloma and its sales have passed the billion dollar mark. Velcade®'s extremely toxic boronic acid pharmacophore, however, contributes to a number of severe side effects. Nevertheless, the launching of this product has validated the proteasome as a target in fighting cancer and further proteasome inhibitors have entered the market as anti-cancer drugs. Additionally, proteasome inhibitors have found application as crop protection agents, anti-parasitics, immunosuppressives, as well as in new therapies for muscular dystrophies and inflammation. Many of these compounds are based on microbial metabolites. In this review, we emphasize the important role of the structural elucidation of the various unique binding mechanisms of these compounds that have been optimized throughout evolution to target the proteasome. Based on this knowledge, medicinal chemists have further optimized these natural products, resulting in potential drugs with reduced off-target activities.

  20. Antimalarial natural products: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mojab, Faraz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Malaria is an infectious disease commonplace in tropical countries. For many years, major antimalarial drugs consisted of natural products, but since 1930s these drugs have been largely replaced with a series of synthetic drugs. This article tries to briefly indicate that some plants which previously were used to treat malaria, as a result of deficiencies of synthetic drugs, have revived into useful products once more. It also attempts to describe some tests which can be used to evaluate plant extracts for antimalarial activity. Materials and Methods: By referring to some recent literatures, data were collected about plants used for the treatment of malaria, evaluation of plant extracts for antimalarial activity, modes of action of natural antimalarial agents, and recent research on antimalarial plants in Iran and other countries. Results and Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the development of new treatments for malaria. Many countries have a vast precedence in the use of medicinal plants and the required knowledge spans many centuries. Although malaria is controlled in Iran, some researchers tend to study malaria and related subjects. In vitro biological tests for the detection of antimalarial activities in plant extracts are currently available. It is vital that the efficacy and safety of traditional medicines be validated and their active constituents be identified in order to establish reliable quality control measures. PMID:25050231

  1. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of fluorinated natural products.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark C; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-09-21

    Both natural products and synthetic organofluorines play important roles in the discovery and design of pharmaceuticals. The combination of these two classes of molecules has the potential to be useful in the ongoing search for new bioactive compounds but our ability to produce site-selectively fluorinated natural products remains limited by challenges in compatibility between their high structural complexity and current methods for fluorination. Living systems provide an alternative route to chemical fluorination and could enable the production of organofluorine natural products through synthetic biology approaches. While the identification of biogenic organofluorines has been limited, the study of the native organisms and enzymes that utilize these compounds can help to guide efforts to engineer the incorporation of this unusual element into complex pharmacologically active natural products. This review covers recent advances in understanding both natural and engineered production of organofluorine natural products.

  2. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of fluorinated natural products.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark C; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-09-21

    Both natural products and synthetic organofluorines play important roles in the discovery and design of pharmaceuticals. The combination of these two classes of molecules has the potential to be useful in the ongoing search for new bioactive compounds but our ability to produce site-selectively fluorinated natural products remains limited by challenges in compatibility between their high structural complexity and current methods for fluorination. Living systems provide an alternative route to chemical fluorination and could enable the production of organofluorine natural products through synthetic biology approaches. While the identification of biogenic organofluorines has been limited, the study of the native organisms and enzymes that utilize these compounds can help to guide efforts to engineer the incorporation of this unusual element into complex pharmacologically active natural products. This review covers recent advances in understanding both natural and engineered production of organofluorine natural products. PMID:24776946

  3. Glycosylation and Activities of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangliang; Lv, Meijiao; Hu, Jinchuan; Huang, Kunlin; Xu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural products are widely found in nature, their number and variety are numerous, the structures are complex and diverse. These natural products have many physiological and pharmacological activities. Glycosylation can increase the diversity of structure and function of natural product, it has become the focus of drug research and development. The impacts of glycosylation of natural products to water solubility, pharmacological activities, bioavailability, or others were described in this review, which provides a reference for the development and application of glycosylated natural products. PMID:27499190

  4. Identification of Novel Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors of Natural Origin (Part II): In Silico Prediction in Antidiabetic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Sala, Esther; Ojeda, María José; Valls, Cristina; Bladé, Cinta; Mulero, Miquel; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Pujadas, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012) [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity). Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus). Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors. PMID:23028712

  5. Isolation of marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    Marine macro- and micro-biota offer a wealth of chemically diverse compounds that have been evolutionary preselected to modulate biochemical pathways. Many industrial and academic groups are accessing this source using advanced technology platforms. The previous edition of this chapter offered some practical guidance in the process of extraction and isolation of marine natural products with more emphasis on the procedures adapted to the physical and chemical characteristics of the isolated compounds. Automation and direct integration of the isolation technology into high-throughput screening (HTS) systems were also reported. In this edition, we refer to some new topics which are heavily represented in the literature. These include methods for sampling the deep ocean and the procedures for culturing high-pressure-adapted (piezophilic) marine microorganisms to be amenable to laboratory investigation. A brief discussion on genomic-guided approaches to detect the presence of biosynthetic loci even those that are silent or cryptic is also included.

  6. Enantiomeric Natural Products: Occurrence and Biogenesis**

    PubMed Central

    Finefield, Jennifer M.; Sherman, David H.; Kreitman, Martin; Williams, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    In Nature, chiral natural products are usually produced in optically pure form; however, on occasion Nature is known to produce enantiomerically opposite metabolites. These enantiomeric natural products can arise in Nature from a single species, or from different genera and/or species. Extensive research has been carried out over the years in an attempt to understand the biogenesis of naturally occurring enantiomers, however, many fascinating puzzles and stereochemical anomalies still remain. PMID:22555867

  7. Total synthesis and development of bioactive natural products

    PubMed Central

    TATSUTA, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    The first total synthesis and development of a variety of bioactive natural products have been accomplished by using carbohydrates as a chiral source. In addition, practically useful intermediates have been created, analogs of natural products have been prepared, their structure-activity relationships studied, and the large-scale preparations of medicinally useful compounds established. The key target molecules have been the “Big Four” antibiotics (macrolides, aminoglycosides, β-lactams and tetracyclines), pyranonaphthoquinone antibiotics, glycosidase inhibitors, and a side-chain of cephem antibiotics. PMID:18941289

  8. Natural plant enzyme inhibitors. Characterization of an unusual alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from ragi (Eleusine coracana Geartn.).

    PubMed Central

    Shivaraj, B; Pattabiraman, T N

    1981-01-01

    An inhibitor I-1, capable of acting on both alpha-amylase and trypsin, was purified to homogeneity from ragi (finger-millet) grains. The factor was found to be stable to heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 1 h in the presence of NaCl and also was stable over the wide pH range 1-10. Pepsin and Pronase treatment of inhibitor I-1 resulted in gradual loss of both the inhibitory activities. Formation of trypsin-inhibitor I-1 complex, amylase-inhibitor I-1 complex and trypsin-inhibitor I-1-amylase trimer complex was demonstrated by chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-200 column. This indicated that the inhibitor is 'double-headed' in nature. The inhibitor was retained on a trypsin-Sepharose 4B column at pH 7.0. Elution at acidic pH resulted in almost complete recovery of amylase-inhibitory and trypsin-inhibitory activities. alpha-Amylase was retained on a trypsin-Sepharose column to which inhibitor I-1 was bound, but not on trypsin-Sepharose alone. Modification of amino groups of the inhibitor with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid resulted in complete loss of amylase-inhibitory activity but only 40% loss in antitryptic activity. Modification of arginine residues by cyclohexane-1,2-dione led to 85% loss of antitryptic activity after 5 h, but no effect on amylase-inhibitory activity. The results show that a single bifunctional protein factor is responsible for both amylase-inhibitory and trypsin-inhibitory activities with two different reactive sites. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6796040

  9. Natural Products at Work: Structural Insights into Inhibition of the Bacterial Membrane Protein MraY.

    PubMed

    Koppermann, Stefan; Ducho, Christian

    2016-09-19

    Natural(ly) fit: The X-ray crystal structure of the bacterial membrane protein MraY in complex with its natural product inhibitor muraymycin D2 is discussed. MraY catalyzes one of the membrane-associated steps in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and, therefore, represents a promising target for novel antibiotics. Structural insights derived from the protein-inhibitor complex might now pave the way for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27511599

  10. Search for β-Secretase Inhibitors from Natural Spices.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shinichi; Murata, Kazuya; Yoshioka, Yuri; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    The growing number of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients prompted us to seek effective natural resources for the prevention of AD. We focused on the inhibition of β-secretase, which is known to catalyze the production of senile plaque. Sixteen spices used in Asian countries were selected for the screening. Among the extracts tested, hexane extracts obtained from turmeric, cardamom, long pepper, cinnamon, Sichuan pepper, betel, white turmeric and aromatic ginger showed potent inhibitory activities. Their active principles were identified as sesquiterpenoids, monoterpenoids, fatty acid derivatives and phenylpropanoids using GC-MS analyses. The chemical structures and IC50 values of the compounds are disclosed. The results suggest that long-term consumption'of aromatic compounds from spices could be effective in the prevention of AD. PMID:27396206

  11. Search for β-Secretase Inhibitors from Natural Spices.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shinichi; Murata, Kazuya; Yoshioka, Yuri; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    The growing number of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients prompted us to seek effective natural resources for the prevention of AD. We focused on the inhibition of β-secretase, which is known to catalyze the production of senile plaque. Sixteen spices used in Asian countries were selected for the screening. Among the extracts tested, hexane extracts obtained from turmeric, cardamom, long pepper, cinnamon, Sichuan pepper, betel, white turmeric and aromatic ginger showed potent inhibitory activities. Their active principles were identified as sesquiterpenoids, monoterpenoids, fatty acid derivatives and phenylpropanoids using GC-MS analyses. The chemical structures and IC50 values of the compounds are disclosed. The results suggest that long-term consumption'of aromatic compounds from spices could be effective in the prevention of AD.

  12. Non-natural acetogenin analogues as potent Trypanosoma brucei inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Florence, Gordon J; Fraser, Andrew L; Gould, Eoin R; King, Elizabeth F B; Menzies, Stefanie K; Morris, Joanne C; Tulloch, Lindsay B; Smith, Terry K

    2014-11-01

    Neglected tropical diseases remain a serious global health concern. Here, a series of novel bis-tetrahydropyran 1,4-triazole analogues based on the framework of chamuvarinin, a polyketide natural product isolated from the annonaceae plant species are detailed. The analogues synthesized display low micromolar trypanocidal activities towards both bloodstream and insect forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, also known as Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT). A divergent synthetic strategy was adopted for the synthesis of the key tetrahydropyran intermediates to enable rapid access to diastereochemical variation either side of the 1,4-triazole core. The resulting diastereomeric analogues displayed varying degrees of trypanocidal activity and selectivity in structure-activity relationship studies. Together, the biological potency and calculated lipophilicity values indicate that while there is room for improvement, these derivatives may represent a promising novel class of anti-HAT agents.

  13. Rapid screening natural-origin lipase inhibitors from hypolipidemic decoctions by ultrafiltration combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shun; Yu, Runru; Ai, Ni; Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-02-01

    Lipase inhibitors generate hypolipidemic effect that is helpful to control or treat some obesity diseases by inactivating catalytic activity of human pancreatic lipase, a key enzyme involved in triglyceride hydrolysis in vivo. Many traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulae have been effectively used to treat obesity and other fat related diseases for centuries and modern biological experiments demonstrate therapeutic effect of these formulae can be linked to their lipid-lowering capability in blood. These observations suggest that these hypolipidemic decoctions (HDs) could be a promising resource of natural-origin lipase inhibitors. This work described a rapid approach for screening lipase inhibitors from four widely used HDs, including Wu-Ling-San (WLS), Ze-Xie decoction (ZX), Xiao-Xian-Xiong decoction (XXX) and Xiao-Chai-Hu decoction (XCH), by ultrafiltration combing with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Our results showed sixteen natural-origin lipase inhibitors were discovered and identified by high resolution and multistage mass spectrometry. Inhibitory activities of two compounds were confirmed by a functional assay of lipase, which validated the reliability of our approach. Molecular docking simulation was then performed to investigate potential mechanism of action for these compounds. Together we present an efficient method for rapid screening lipase inhibitors from complex natural products, which can be easily accommodated to other important enzymatic system with therapeutic values.

  14. Grassypeptolides As Natural Inhibitors of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 8 and T-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Liu, Yanxia; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Hatano, Ryo; Kuribara, Akiko; Morimoto, Chiko; Ohnuma, Kei; Paul, Valerie J.; Ye, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Natural products made by marine cyanobacteria are often highly modified peptides and depsipeptides that have the potential to act as inhibitors for proteases. In the interest of finding novel protease inhibition activity and selectivity grassypeptolide A (1) was screened against a panel of proteases and found to selectively inhibit DPP8 over DPP4. Grassypeptolides were also found to inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation in activated T-cells, consistent with a putative role of DPP8 in the immune system. These effects were also observed in Jurkat cells, and DPP activity in Jurkat cell cytosol was shown to be inhibited by grassypeptolides. In silico docking suggests two possible binding modes of grassypeptolides – both at the active site of DPP8 and at one of the entrances to the internal cavity. Collectively these results suggest that grassypeptolides may be useful tool compounds in the study of DPP8 function. PMID:24591193

  15. Discovery and Rational Design of Natural-Product-Derived 2-Phenyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[f]chromen-3-amine Analogs as Novel and Potent Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 (DPP-4) Inhibitors for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiliang; Xu, Hongling; Cui, Shichao; Wu, Fangshu; Zhang, Youli; Su, Mingbo; Gong, Yinghui; Qiu, Shaobing; Jiao, Qian; Qin, Chun; Shan, Jiwei; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Jiawei; Yin, Qiao; Xu, Minghao; Liu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Lili; Li, Jia; Xu, Yufang; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Li, Jingya; Li, Honglin

    2016-07-28

    Starting from the lead isodaphnetin, a natural product inhibitor of DPP-4 discovered through a target fishing docking based approach, a series of novel 2-phenyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[f]chromen-3-amine derivatives as potent DPP-4 inhibitors are rationally designed utilizing highly efficient 3D molecular similarity based scaffold hopping as well as electrostatic complementary methods. Those ingenious drug design strategies bring us approximate 7400-fold boost in potency. Compounds 22a and 24a are the most potent ones (IC50 ≈ 2.0 nM) with good pharmacokinetic profiles. Compound 22a demonstrated stable pharmacological effect. A 3 mg/kg oral dose provided >80% inhibition of DPP-4 activity within 24 h, which is comparable to the performance of the long-acting control omarigliptin. Moreover, the efficacy of 22a in improving the glucose tolerance is also comparable with omarigliptin. In this study, not only promising DPP-4 inhibitors as long acting antidiabetic that are clinically on demand are identified, but the target fish docking and medicinal chemistry strategies were successfully implemented.

  16. Podoverine A--a novel microtubule destabilizing natural product from the Podophyllum species.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuyen Thi Ngoc; Gerding-Reimers, Claas; Schölermann, Beate; Stanitzki, Bettina; Henkel, Thomas; Waldmann, Herbert; Ziegler, Slava

    2014-09-15

    Natural products represent compound classes with high chemical and structural diversity and various biological activities. Libraries based on natural products are valuable starting point in the search for novel biologically active substances. Here we report on the identification of the natural product podoverine A from the plant Podophyllum versipelle Hance as a novel tubulin-acting agent. A natural product compound collection was subjected to a high-content screen that monitors changes in cytoskeleton and DNA and podoverine A was identified as inhibitor of mitosis. This natural product causes mitotic arrest and inhibits microtubule polymerization in vitro and in cells by targeting the vinca binding site on tubulin.

  17. Recent Advances in Natural Product Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Cobb, Ryan E.; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have been and continue to be the source and inspiration for a substantial fraction of human therapeutics. Although the pharmaceutical industry has largely turned its back on natural product discovery efforts, such efforts continue to flourish in academia with promising results. Natural products have traditionally been identified from a top-down perspective, but more recently genomics- and bioinformatics-guided bottom-up approaches have provided powerful alternative strategies. Here we review recent advances in natural product discovery from both angles, including diverse sampling and innovative culturing and screening approaches, as well as genomics-driven discovery and genetic manipulation techniques for both native and heterologous expression. PMID:25260043

  18. High throughput Screening to Identify Natural Human Monoamine Oxidase B Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, E; Deiab, S; Park, K; Soliman, KFA

    2012-01-01

    Age-related increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) may contribute to CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, MAO-B inhibitors are used in the treatment of idiopathic Parkinson disease as preliminary monotherapy or adjunct therapy with L-dopa. To date, meager natural sources of MAO-B inhibitors have been identified, and the relative strength, potency and rank of many plants relative to standard drugs such as Selegiline (L-deprenyl, Eldepryl) are not known. In this work, we developed and utilized a high throughput enzyme microarray format to screen and evaluate 905 natural product extracts (0.025–.7 mg/ml) to inhibit human MAO-B derived from BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. The protein sequence of purified enzyme was confirmed using 1D gel electrophoresis-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-tandem mass spectroscopy, and enzyme activity was confirmed by [1] substrate conversion (3-mM benzylamine) to H202 and [2] benzaldehyde. Of the 905 natural extracts tested, the lowest IC50s [<0.07 mg/ml] were obtained with extracts of Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amurense), Bakuchi Seed(Cyamopsis psoralioides), Licorice Root (Glycyrrhiza glabra/uralensis), Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia seed). The data also show, albeit to a lesser extent, inhibitory properties of herbs originating from the mint family (Lamiaceae) and Turmeric, Comfrey, Bringraj, Skullcap, Kava-kava, Wild Indigo, Gentian and Green Tea. In conclusion, the data reflect relative potency information by rank of commonly used herbs and plants that contain human MAO-B inhibitory properties in their natural form. PMID:22887993

  19. Triterpenoids as novel natural inhibitors of human cathepsin L.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Suelem D; De Sousa, Lorena R F; Nebo, Liliane; Maganhi, Stella H; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio; Lima, Maria Inês S; Alves, Marcio F M; Da Silva, M Fátima das G F; Fernandes, João B; Vieira, Paulo C

    2014-09-01

    Cathepsins L (catL) and B play an important role in tumor progression and have been considered promising therapeutic targets in the development of novel anticancer agents. Using a bioactivity-guided fractionation, a series of triterpenoids was identified as a new class of competitive inhibitors towards cathepsin L with affinity values in micromolar range. Among the 14 compounds evaluated, the most promising were 3-epiursolic acid (3), 3-(hydroxyimino)oleanolic acid (9), and 3-(hydroxyimino)masticadienoic acid (13) with IC50 values of 6.5, 2.4, and 2.6 μM on catL, respectively. Most of the evaluated triterpenoids do not inhibit cathepsin B. Thus, the evaluated compounds exhibit a great potential to help in the design of new inhibitors with enhanced potency and affinity towards catL. Docking studies were performed in order to gain insight on the binding mode and SAR of these compounds. PMID:25238076

  20. Counting on natural products for drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Reker, Daniel; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-06-01

    Natural products and their molecular frameworks have a long tradition as valuable starting points for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recently, there has been a revitalization of interest in the inclusion of these chemotypes in compound collections for screening and achieving selective target modulation. Here we discuss natural-product-inspired drug discovery with a focus on recent advances in the design of synthetically tractable small molecules that mimic nature's chemistry. We highlight the potential of innovative computational tools in processing structurally complex natural products to predict their macromolecular targets and attempt to forecast the role that natural-product-derived fragments and fragment-like natural products will play in next-generation drug discovery.

  1. Chitinase inhibitors: extraction of the active framework from natural argifin and use of in situ click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Sugawara, Akihiro; Endo, Ayako; Iguchi, Kanami; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ui, Hideaki; Shiomi, Kazuro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sharpless, K Barry; Omura, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In situ click chemistry is a target-guided synthesis technique for discovering potent protein ligands by assembling azides and alkynes into triazoles inside the affinity site of a target protein. We report the rapid discovery of a new and potent inhibitor of bacterial chitinases by the use of in situ click chemistry. We observed a target-templated formation of a potent triazole inhibitor of the chitinase-catalyzed chitin hydrolysis, through in situ click chemistry between a biologically active azide-containing scaffold and structurally unrelated alkyne fragments. Chitinase inhibitors have chemotherapeutic potential as fungicides, pesticides and antiasthmatics. Argifin, which has been isolated and characterized as a cyclopentapeptide natural product by our research group, shows strong inhibitory activity against chitinases. As a result of our efforts at developing a chitinase inhibitor from an azide-bearing argifin fragment and the application of the chitinase template and a library of alkynes, we rapidly obtained a very potent and new 1,5-disubstituted triazole inhibitor against Serratia marcescens chitinase (SmChi) B. The new inhibitor expressed 300-fold increase in the inhibitory activity against SmChiB compared with that of argifin. To the best of our knowledge, our finding of an enzyme-made 1,5-disubstituted triazole, using in situ click chemistry is the second example reported in the literature.

  2. Super Natural II--a database of natural products.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Priyanka; Erehman, Jevgeni; Gohlke, Björn-Oliver; Wilhelm, Thomas; Preissner, Robert; Dunkel, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Natural products play a significant role in drug discovery and development. Many topological pharmacophore patterns are common between natural products and commercial drugs. A better understanding of the specific physicochemical and structural features of natural products is important for corresponding drug development. Several encyclopedias of natural compounds have been composed, but the information remains scattered or not freely available. The first version of the Supernatural database containing ∼ 50,000 compounds was published in 2006 to face these challenges. Here we present a new, updated and expanded version of natural product database, Super Natural II (http://bioinformatics.charite.de/supernatural), comprising ∼ 326,000 molecules. It provides all corresponding 2D structures, the most important structural and physicochemical properties, the predicted toxicity class for ∼ 170,000 compounds and the vendor information for the vast majority of compounds. The new version allows a template-based search for similar compounds as well as a search for compound names, vendors, specific physical properties or any substructures. Super Natural II also provides information about the pathways associated with synthesis and degradation of the natural products, as well as their mechanism of action with respect to structurally similar drugs and their target proteins. PMID:25300487

  3. Naturally occurring tyrosinase inhibitors: mechanism and applications in skin health, cosmetics and agriculture industries.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Shoukat; Kang, Moonkyu; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2007-09-01

    Tyrosinase is a copper-containing enzyme, which is widely distributed in microorganisms, animals and plants and is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis, involved in determining the color of mammalian skin and hair. In addition, unfavorable enzymatic browning of plant-derived foods by tyrosinase causes a decrease in nutritional quality and economic loss of food products. The inadequacy of current conventional methods to prevent tyrosinase action encourages researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for food and cosmetics. This article presents a study on the importance of tyrosinase, biochemical characteristics, type of inhibitions, activators from various natural sources with its clinical and industrial importance in recent prospects is discussed in this paper. PMID:17605157

  4. Discovery of Potent 17β-Hydroxywithanolides for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer by High-Throughput Screening of a Natural Products Library for Androgen-Induced Gene Expression Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Liu, Manping X; Grunow, Nathan; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Paine-Murrieta, Gillian; Felder, Stephen; Kris, Richard M; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-09-10

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most prevalent cancer among men in Western societies, and those who develop metastatic castration-resistant PC (CRPC) invariably succumb to the disease. The need for effective treatments for CRPC is a pressing concern, especially due to limited durable responses with currently employed therapies. Here, we demonstrate the successful application of a high-throughput gene-expression profiling assay directly targeting genes of the androgen receptor pathway to screen a natural products library leading to the identification of 17β-hydroxywithanolides 1-5, of which physachenolide D (5) exhibited potent and selective in vitro activity against two PC cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3. Epoxidation of 5 afforded physachenolide C (6) with higher potency and stability. Structure-activity relationships for withanolides as potential anti-PC agents are presented together with in vivo efficacy studies on compound 6, suggesting that 17β-hydroxywithanolides are promising candidates for further development as CRPC therapeutics.

  5. The possible presence of natural β-D-glucosidase inhibitors in jujube leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Jo, Youngje; Lim, Seokwon; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Choi, Young Jin

    2016-03-01

    Isoquercitrin is a phenolic compound well-known for having greater health benefits than quercitin, its aglycone derivative, and other related glycosides. However, isoquercitrin is rarely found in nature. Here, we optimized the conditions for the enzymatic transformation of isoquercitrin from rutin that was extracted from jujube leaf using the hesperidinase, enzyme complex containing β-D-glucosidase and α-L-rhamnosidase. The maximum productivity (2.57±0.16mg/mL) was experimentally found under the following conditions: 47.3°C, 52.16h, and pH 5.31, which agreed well with the predicted value (2.65mg/mL). However, the achievement of this maximum yield was due to the absence of β-D-glucosidase activity. Further investigations using a β-D-glucosidase assay and reaction measurements under various conditions revealed that the β-D-glucosidase activity was not blocked by denaturation or known inhibitory factors. Currently, there are no recognized β-D-glucosidase inhibitors present in the jujube leaf; however, our observations strongly suggest that an unidentified β-D-glucosidase inhibitor exists in jujube leaf extract. PMID:26471546

  6. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators. PMID:24473166

  7. Targeting nuclear receptors with marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-27

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators.

  8. Marine Natural Products as Models to Circumvent Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Long, Solida; Sousa, Emília; Kijjoa, Anake; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a serious health problem that in many cases leads to cancer treatment failure. The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which leads to premature efflux of drugs from cancer cells, is often responsible for MDR. On the other hand, a strategy to search for modulators from natural products to overcome MDR had been in place during the last decades. However, Nature limits the amount of some natural products, which has led to the development of synthetic strategies to increase their availability. This review summarizes the research findings on marine natural products and derivatives, mainly alkaloids, polyoxygenated sterols, polyketides, terpenoids, diketopiperazines, and peptides, with P-gp inhibitory activity highlighting the established structure-activity relationships. The synthetic pathways for the total synthesis of the most promising members and analogs are also presented. It is expected that the data gathered during the last decades concerning their synthesis and MDR-inhibiting activities will help medicinal chemists develop potential drug candidates using marine natural products as models which can deliver new ABC transporter inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:27399665

  9. New Synthetic Methods for Hypericum Natural Products

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Insik

    2006-01-01

    Organic chemistry has served as a solid foundation for interdisciplinary research areas, such as molecular biology and medicinal chemistry. An understanding of the biological activities and structural elucidations of natural products can lead to the development of clinically valuable therapeutic options. The advancements of modern synthetic methodologies allow for more elaborate and concise natural product syntheses. The theme of this study centers on the synthesis of natural products with particularly challenging structures and interesting biological activities. The synthetic expertise developed here will be applicable to analog syntheses and to other research problems.

  10. Follow-up of natural products isolation.

    PubMed

    Cannell, Richard J P; Sarker, Satyajit D; Nahar, Lutfun

    2012-01-01

    Follow-up of natural products isolation refers to re-isolation of compound(s) of interest in larger amounts for further pharmacological testing, conclusive structure elucidation, structure modifications to synthesize analogs for structure-activity relationships (SAR) studies, preformulation and formulation studies or clinical trials. In addition to conventional synthetic chemistry approaches, several other methodologies can be applied for following-up natural products isolation. This chapter outlines, with specific examples, various strategies and methods involved in follow-up of natural products isolation. PMID:22367909

  11. Biodegradation potential of a modified natural product

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, W.

    1996-12-31

    Biodegradation potential of a modified natural product for treating petroleum contaminated soils was investigated along with some commercially available microbial cultures in three different scales from a laboratory to pilot to case studies. The modified natural product is lignocellulosic in nature and proprietary product of a company in Iowa. The production process of this product involves mechanical size reduction, blending/coating, and aerobic digestion of hay, corn cob residue, straw or crop residue in presence of poultry manure. The degradation kinetics of the petroleum products in the contaminated soils were measured both directly and indirectly. Residual petroleum products in different soils (treated and untreated) at various time periods were quantified by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis on extracted samples. The indirect assessment of the kinetics of biological activity involved the measurement of CO{sub 2} evolved from flasks (250 ml capacity) containing contaminated soil (about 50 ml) with various treatments. The results indicated that the biodegradation kinetics of petroleum products in the contaminated soils were significantly improved by treatment with this modified natural product. In most cases tested, this product performed significantly better than the available commercial bacterial cultures for biological removal of petroleum products from contaminated soils. This study also demonstrated the significance of temperature and moisture content in biodegradation kinetics.

  12. Flexibility of the Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Pro-domain Enables Productive Binding of Protein Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Valnickova, Zuzana; Sanglas, Laura; Arolas, Joan L.; Petersen, Steen V.; Schar, Christine; Otzen, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) exhibits intrinsic proteolytic activity toward large peptides. The structural basis for this observation was clarified by the crystal structures of human and bovine TAFI. These structures evinced a significant rotation of the pro-domain away from the catalytic moiety when compared with other pro-carboxypeptidases, thus enabling access of large peptide substrates to the active site cleft. Here, we further investigated the flexible nature of the pro-domain and demonstrated that TAFI forms productive complexes with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors from potato, leech, and tick (PCI, LCI, and TCI, respectively). We determined the crystal structure of the bovine TAFI-TCI complex, revealing that the pro-domain was completely displaced from the position observed in the TAFI structure. It protruded into the bulk solvent and was disordered, whereas TCI occupied the position previously held by the pro-domain. The authentic nature of the presently studied TAFI-inhibitor complexes was supported by the trimming of the C-terminal residues from the three inhibitors upon complex formation. This finding suggests that the inhibitors interact with the active site of TAFI in a substrate-like manner. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TAFI is able to form a bona fide complex with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors. This underlines the unusually flexible nature of the pro-domain and implies a possible mechanism for regulation of TAFI intrinsic proteolytic activity in vivo. PMID:20880845

  13. Natural Compounds: DNA Methyltransferase Inhibitors in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jha, Meenakshi; Aggarwal, Ruchi; Jha, Abhimanyu Kumar; Shrivastava, Anju

    2015-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a multistep process which is modulated by several endogenous and environmental factors. Epigenetic changes have been found to be equally responsible for OSCC as genetic changes. A plethora of genes showing hypermethylation have been discovered in OSCC. Since these changes are reversible, a lot of emphasis is on using the natural compounds for their ability to cause demethylation which could lead to reactivation of the inactivated tumor suppressor genes. This review encompasses the promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in OSCC and its possible reversal using natural compounds. In addition, new compounds which could be screened for their demethylating ability have also been proposed. PMID:26210787

  14. Marine actinomycete diversity and natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Paul R; Mincer, Tracy J; Williams, Philip G; Fenical, William

    2005-01-01

    Microbial natural products remain an important resource for drug discovery yet the microorganisms inhabiting the world's oceans have largely been overlooked in this regard. The recent discovery of novel secondary metabolites from taxonomically unique populations of marine actinomycetes suggests that these bacteria add an important new dimension to microbial natural product research. Continued efforts to characterize marine actinomycete diversity and how adaptations to the marine environment affect secondary metabolite production will create a better understanding of the potential utility of these bacteria as a source of useful products for biotechnology.

  15. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  16. Cancer wars: Natural products strike back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basmadjian, Christine; Zhao, Qian; Djehal, Amel; Bentouhami, Embarek; Nebigil, Canan; Johnson, Roger; Serova, Maria; De Gramont, Armand; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Désaubry, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    Natural products have historically been a mainstay source of anticancer drugs, but in the 90’s they fell out of favor in pharmaceutical companies with the emergence of targeted therapies, which rely on antibodies or small synthetic molecules identified by high throughput screening. Although targeted therapies greatly improved the treatment of a few cancers, the benefit has remained disappointing for many sol¬¬id tumors, which revitalized the interest in natural products. With the approval of rapamycin in 2007, twelve novel natural product derivatives have been brought to market. The present review describes the discovery and development of these new anticancer drugs and highlights the peculiarities of natural product and new trends in this exciting field of drug discovery.

  17. Cancer wars: natural products strike back

    PubMed Central

    Basmadjian, Christine; Zhao, Qian; Bentouhami, Embarek; Djehal, Amel; Nebigil, Canan G.; Johnson, Roger A.; Serova, Maria; de Gramont, Armand; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Désaubry, Laurent G.

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have historically been a mainstay source of anticancer drugs, but in the 90's they fell out of favor in pharmaceutical companies with the emergence of targeted therapies, which rely on antibodies or small synthetic molecules identified by high throughput screening. Although targeted therapies greatly improved the treatment of a few cancers, the benefit has remained disappointing for many solid tumors, which revitalized the interest in natural products. With the approval of rapamycin in 2007, 12 novel natural product derivatives have been brought to market. The present review describes the discovery and development of these new anticancer drugs and highlights the peculiarities of natural product and new trends in this exciting field of drug discovery. PMID:24822174

  18. Natural products from the genus tephrosia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinning; Yan, Tao; Gao, Chenghai; Cao, Wenhao; Huang, Riming

    2014-01-01

    The genus Tephrosia, belonging to the Leguminosae family, is a large pantropical genus of more than 350 species, many of which have important traditional uses in agriculture. This review not only outlines the source, chemistry and biological evaluations of natural products from the genus Tephrosia worldwide that have appeared in literature from 1910 to December 2013, but also covers work related to proposed biosynthetic pathways and synthesis of some natural products from the genus Tephrosia, with 105 citations and 168 new compounds.

  19. How EIA Estimates Natural Gas Production

    EIA Publications

    2004-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes estimates monthly and annually of the production of natural gas in the United States. The estimates are based on data EIA collects from gas producing states and data collected by the U. S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) in the Department of Interior. The states and MMS collect this information from producers of natural gas for various reasons, most often for revenue purposes. Because the information is not sufficiently complete or timely for inclusion in EIA's Natural Gas Monthly (NGM), EIA has developed estimation methodologies to generate monthly production estimates that are described in this document.

  20. Cyclic Lipodepsipeptides Produced by Pseudomonas spp. Naturally Present in Raw Milk Induce Inhibitory Effects on Microbiological Inhibitor Assays for Antibiotic Residue Screening

    PubMed Central

    Reybroeck, Wim; De Vleeschouwer, Matthias; Marchand, Sophie; Sinnaeve, Davy; Heylen, Kim; De Block, Jan; Madder, Annemieke; Martins, José C.; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Two Pseudomonas strains, identified as closely related to Pseudomonas tolaasii, were isolated from milk of a farm with frequent false-positive Delvotest results for screening putative antibiotic residues in raw milk executed as part of the regulatory quality programme. Growth at 5 to 7°C of these isolates in milk resulted in high lipolysis and the production of bacterial inhibitors. The two main bacterial inhibitors have a molecular weight of 1168.7 and 1140.7 Da respectively, are heat-tolerant and inhibit Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis, the test strain of most of the commercially available microbiological inhibitor tests for screening of antibiotic residues in milk. Furthermore, these bacterial inhibitors show antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis and also interfere negatively with yoghurt production. Following their isolation and purification with RP-HPLC, the inhibitors were identified by NMR analysis as cyclic lipodepsipeptides of the viscosin group. Our findings bring to light a new challenge for quality control in the dairy industry. By prolonging the refrigerated storage of raw milk, the keeping quality of milk is influenced by growth and metabolic activities of psychrotrophic bacteria such as pseudomonads. Besides an increased risk of possible spoilage of long shelf-life milk, the production at low temperature of natural bacterial inhibitors may also result in false-positive results for antibiotic residue screening tests based on microbial inhibitor assays thus leading to undue production loss. PMID:24853676

  1. Sequence-selective DNA recognition: natural products and nature's lessons.

    PubMed

    Tse, Winston C; Boger, Dale L

    2004-12-01

    Biologically active, therapeutically useful, DNA binding natural products continue to reveal new paradigms for sequence-selective recognition, to enlist beautiful mechanisms of in situ activation for DNA modification, to define new therapeutic targets, to exploit new mechanisms to achieve cellular selectivity, and to provide a rich source of new drugs. These attributes arise in compact structures of complex integrated function.

  2. Natural and Synthetic Polymers as Inhibitors of Drug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of efflux pumps is an emerging approach in cancer therapy and drug delivery. Since it has been discovered that polymeric pharmaceutical excipients such as Tweens® or Pluronics® can inhibit efflux pumps, various other polymers have been investigated regarding their potential efflux pump inhibitory activity. Among them are polysaccharides, polyethylene glycols and derivatives, amphiphilic block copolymers, dendrimers and thiolated polymers. In the current review article, natural and synthetic polymers that are capable of inhibiting efflux pumps as well as their application in cancer therapy and drug delivery are discussed. PMID:17896100

  3. Bacterial self-resistance to the natural proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A.

    PubMed

    Kale, Andrew J; McGlinchey, Ryan P; Lechner, Anna; Moore, Bradley S

    2011-11-18

    Proteasome inhibitors have recently emerged as a therapeutic strategy in cancer chemotherapy, but susceptibility to drug resistance limits their efficacy. The marine actinobacterium Salinispora tropica produces salinosporamide A (NPI-0052, marizomib), a potent proteasome inhibitor and promising clinical agent in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Actinobacteria also possess 20S proteasome machinery, raising the question of self-resistance. We identified a redundant proteasome β-subunit, SalI, encoded within the salinosporamide biosynthetic gene cluster and biochemically characterized the SalI proteasome complex. The SalI β-subunit has an altered substrate specificity profile, 30-fold resistance to salinosporamide A, and cross-resistance to the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. An A49V mutation in SalI correlates to clinical bortezomib resistance from a human proteasome β5-subunit A49T mutation, suggesting that intrinsic resistance to natural proteasome inhibitors may predict clinical outcomes.

  4. Naturally occurring products in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Sankari, Leena S.; Malathi, L.; Krupaa, Jayasri R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been used for the treatment of various diseases and are becoming an important research area for drug discovery. These products, especially phytochemicals have been extensively studies and have exhibited anti-carcinogenic activities by interfering with the initiation, development and progression of cancer through the modulation of various mechanisms including cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. This concept is gaining attention because it is a cost-effective alternative to cancer treatment. In this article, we have discussed some of the naturally occurring products used in cancer treatment. PMID:26015704

  5. Natural product discovery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Katz, Leonard; Baltz, Richard H

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms have provided abundant sources of natural products which have been developed as commercial products for human medicine, animal health, and plant crop protection. In the early years of natural product discovery from microorganisms (The Golden Age), new antibiotics were found with relative ease from low-throughput fermentation and whole cell screening methods. Later, molecular genetic and medicinal chemistry approaches were applied to modify and improve the activities of important chemical scaffolds, and more sophisticated screening methods were directed at target disease states. In the 1990s, the pharmaceutical industry moved to high-throughput screening of synthetic chemical libraries against many potential therapeutic targets, including new targets identified from the human genome sequencing project, largely to the exclusion of natural products, and discovery rates dropped dramatically. Nonetheless, natural products continued to provide key scaffolds for drug development. In the current millennium, it was discovered from genome sequencing that microbes with large genomes have the capacity to produce about ten times as many secondary metabolites as was previously recognized. Indeed, the most gifted actinomycetes have the capacity to produce around 30-50 secondary metabolites. With the precipitous drop in cost for genome sequencing, it is now feasible to sequence thousands of actinomycete genomes to identify the "biosynthetic dark matter" as sources for the discovery of new and novel secondary metabolites. Advances in bioinformatics, mass spectrometry, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and gene expression are driving the new field of microbial genome mining for applications in natural product discovery and development.

  6. Natural product discovery: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Katz, Leonard; Baltz, Richard H

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms have provided abundant sources of natural products which have been developed as commercial products for human medicine, animal health, and plant crop protection. In the early years of natural product discovery from microorganisms (The Golden Age), new antibiotics were found with relative ease from low-throughput fermentation and whole cell screening methods. Later, molecular genetic and medicinal chemistry approaches were applied to modify and improve the activities of important chemical scaffolds, and more sophisticated screening methods were directed at target disease states. In the 1990s, the pharmaceutical industry moved to high-throughput screening of synthetic chemical libraries against many potential therapeutic targets, including new targets identified from the human genome sequencing project, largely to the exclusion of natural products, and discovery rates dropped dramatically. Nonetheless, natural products continued to provide key scaffolds for drug development. In the current millennium, it was discovered from genome sequencing that microbes with large genomes have the capacity to produce about ten times as many secondary metabolites as was previously recognized. Indeed, the most gifted actinomycetes have the capacity to produce around 30-50 secondary metabolites. With the precipitous drop in cost for genome sequencing, it is now feasible to sequence thousands of actinomycete genomes to identify the "biosynthetic dark matter" as sources for the discovery of new and novel secondary metabolites. Advances in bioinformatics, mass spectrometry, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and gene expression are driving the new field of microbial genome mining for applications in natural product discovery and development. PMID:26739136

  7. Using Genomics for Natural Product Structure Elucidation.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Jonathan I; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are the most historically bountiful source of chemical matter for drug development-especially for anti-infectives. With insights gleaned from genome mining, interest in natural product discovery has been reinvigorated. An essential stage in NP discovery is structural elucidation, which sheds light not only on the chemical composition of a molecule but also its novelty, properties, and derivatization potential. The history of structure elucidation is replete with techniquebased revolutions: combustion analysis, crystallography, UV, IR, MS, and NMR have each provided game-changing advances; the latest such advance is genomics. All natural products have a genetic basis, and the ability to obtain and interpret genomic information for structure elucidation is increasingly available at low cost to non-specialists. In this review, we describe the value of genomics as a structural elucidation technique, especially from the perspective of the natural product chemist approaching an unknown metabolite. Herein we first introduce the databases and programs of interest to the natural products chemist, with an emphasis on those currently most suited for general usability. We describe strategies for linking observed natural product-linked phenotypes to their corresponding gene clusters. We then discuss techniques for extracting structural information from genes, illustrated with numerous case examples. We also provide an analysis of the biases and limitations of the field with recommendations for future development. Our overview is not only aimed at biologically-oriented researchers already at ease with bioinformatic techniques, but also, in particular, at natural product, organic, and/or medicinal chemists not previously familiar with genomic techniques.

  8. Computational approaches to natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Medema, Marnix H; Fischbach, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Starting with the earliest Streptomyces genome sequences, the promise of natural product genome mining has been captivating: genomics and bioinformatics would transform compound discovery from an ad hoc pursuit to a high-throughput endeavor. Until recently, however, genome mining has advanced natural product discovery only modestly. Here, we argue that the development of algorithms to mine the continuously increasing amounts of (meta)genomic data will enable the promise of genome mining to be realized. We review computational strategies that have been developed to identify biosynthetic gene clusters in genome sequences and predict the chemical structures of their products. We then discuss networking strategies that can systematize large volumes of genetic and chemical data and connect genomic information to metabolomic and phenotypic data. Finally, we provide a vision of what natural product discovery might look like in the future, specifically considering longstanding questions in microbial ecology regarding the roles of metabolites in interspecies interactions.

  9. Computational approaches to natural product discovery

    PubMed Central

    Medema, Marnix H.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    From the earliest Streptomyces genome sequences, the promise of natural product genome mining has been captivating: genomics and bioinformatics would transform compound discovery from an ad hoc pursuit to a high-throughput endeavor. Until recently, however, genome mining has advanced natural product discovery only modestly. Here, we argue that the development of algorithms to mine the continuously increasing amounts of (meta)genomic data will enable the promise of genome mining to be realized. We review computational strategies that have been developed to identify biosynthetic gene clusters in genome sequences and predict the chemical structures of their products. We then discuss networking strategies that can systematize large volumes of genetic and chemical data, and connect genomic information to metabolomic and phenotypic data. Finally, we provide a vision of what natural product discovery might look like in the future, specifically considering long-standing questions in microbial ecology regarding the roles of metabolites in interspecies interactions. PMID:26284671

  10. Antibiotics: natural products essential to human health.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L

    2009-11-01

    For more than 50 years, natural products have served us well in combating infectious bacteria and fungi. Microbial and plant secondary metabolites helped to double our life span during the 20th century, reduced pain and suffering, and revolutionized medicine. Most antibiotics are either (i) natural products of microorganisms, (ii) semi-synthetically produced from natural products, or (iii) chemically synthesized based on the structure of the natural products. Production of antibiotics began with penicillin in the late 1940s and proceeded with great success until the 1970-1980s when it became harder and harder to discover new and useful products. Furthermore, resistance development in pathogens became a major problem, which is still with us today. In addition, new pathogens are continually emerging and there are still bacteria that are not eliminated by any antibiotic, e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition to these problems, many of the major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned the antibiotic field, leaving much of the discovery efforts to small companies, new companies, and the biotechnology industries. Despite these problems, development of new antibiotics has continued, albeit at a much lower pace than in the last century. We have seen the (i) appearance of newly discovered antibiotics (e.g., candins), (ii) development of old but unutilized antibiotics (e.g., daptomycin), (iii) production of new semi-synthetic versions of old antibiotics (e.g., glycylcyclines, streptogrammins), as well as the (iv) very useful application of old but underutilized antibiotics (e.g., teicoplanin).

  11. Structural basis of sialidase in complex with geranylated flavonoids as potent natural inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngjin; Ryu, Young Bae; Youn, Hyung-Seop; Cho, Jung Keun; Kim, Young Min; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Woo Song; Park, Ki Hun; Eom, Soo Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Sialidase catalyzes the removal of a terminal sialic acid from glycoconjugates and plays a pivotal role in nutrition, cellular interactions and pathogenesis mediating various infectious diseases including cholera, influenza and sepsis. An array of antiviral sialidase agents have been developed and are commercially available, such as zanamivir and oseltamivir for treating influenza. However, the development of bacterial sialidase inhibitors has been much less successful. Here, natural polyphenolic geranylated flavonoids which show significant inhibitory effects against Cp-NanI, a sialidase from Clostridium perfringens, are reported. This bacterium causes various gastrointestinal diseases. The crystal structure of the Cp-NanI catalytic domain in complex with the best inhibitor, diplacone, is also presented. This structure explains how diplacone generates a stable enzyme–inhibitor complex. These results provide a structural framework for understanding the interaction between sialidase and natural flavonoids, which are promising scaffolds on which to discover new anti-sialidase agents. PMID:24816104

  12. Natural Products as Promising Therapeutics for Treatment of Influenza Disease.

    PubMed

    Sencanski, Milan; Radosevic, Draginja; Perovic, Vladimir; Gemovic, Branislava; Stanojevic, Maja; Veljkovic, Nevena; Glisic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The influenza virus represents a permanent global health threat because it circulates not only within but also between numerous host populations, thereby frequently causing unexpected outbreaks in animals and humans with a generally unpredictable course of disease and epidemiology. Conventional influenza therapy is directed against the viral neuraminidase protein, which promotes virus release from infected cells, and the viral ion channel M2, which facilitates viral uncoating. However, these drugs, albeit effective, have a major drawback: their targets are of a highly variable sequence. As a consequence, the virus can readily acquire resistance by mutating the drug targets. Indeed, most seasonal A/H1N1 viruses and the 2009 H1N1 virus are resistant to M2 inhibitors, and a significant proportion of the seasonal A/H1N1 viruses are resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Development of new effective drugs for treatment of disease during the regular influenza seasons and the possible influenza pandemic represents an important goal. The results presented here point out natural products as a promising source of low toxic and widely accessible drug candidates for treatment of the influenza disease. Natural products combined with new therapeutic targets and drug repurposing techniques, which accelerate development of new drugs, serve as an important platform for development of new influenza therapeutics.

  13. Synthetic Biological Approaches to Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jaclyn M; Tang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules produced in Nature continue to be an inspiration for the development of new therapeutic agents. These natural products possess exquisite chemical diversity, which gives rise to their wide range of biological activities. In their host organism, natural products are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways that Nature has meticulously developed. Often times, the complex structures or chemical modifications instated by these pathways are difficult to replicate using traditional synthetic methods. An alternative approach for creating or enhancing the structural variation of natural products is through combinatorial biosynthesis. By rationally reprogramming and manipulating the biosynthetic machinery responsible for their production, unnatural metabolites that were otherwise inaccessible can be obtained. Additionally, new chemical structures can be synthesized or derivatized by developing the enzymes that carry out these complicated chemical reactions into biocatalysts. In this review, we will discuss a variety of combinatorial biosynthetic strategies, their technical challenges, and highlight some recent (since 2007) examples of rationally designed unnatural metabolites, as well as platforms that have been established for the production and modification of clinically important pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:22221832

  14. Identification of Novel Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors of Natural Origin (Part I): Virtual Screening and Activity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Ojeda, Maria José; González-Abuín, Noemí; Sala, Esther; Cereto-Massagué, Adrià; Mulero, Miquel; Valls, Cristina; Pinent, Montserrat; Ardévol, Anna; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Pujadas, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been great interest in determining whether natural products show biological activity toward protein targets of pharmacological relevance. One target of particular interest is DPP-IV whose most important substrates are incretins that, among other beneficial effects, stimulates insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Incretins have very short half-lives because of their rapid degradation by DPP-IV and, therefore, inhibiting this enzyme improves glucose homeostasis. As a result, DPP-IV inhibitors are of considerable interest to the pharmaceutical industry. The main goals of this study were (a) to develop a virtual screening process to identify potential DPP-IV inhibitors of natural origin; (b) to evaluate the reliability of our virtual-screening protocol by experimentally testing the in vitro activity of selected natural-product hits; and (c) to use the most active hit for predicting derivatives with higher binding affinities for the DPP-IV binding site. Methodology/Principal Findings We predicted that 446 out of the 89,165 molecules present in the natural products subset of the ZINC database would inhibit DPP-IV with good ADMET properties. Notably, when these 446 molecules were merged with 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors and the resulting set was classified into 50 clusters according to chemical similarity, there were 12 clusters that contained only natural products for which no DPP-IV inhibitory activity has been previously reported. Nine molecules from 7 of these 12 clusters were then selected for in vitro activity testing and 7 out of the 9 molecules were shown to inhibit DPP-IV (where the remaining two molecules could not be solubilized, preventing the evaluation of their DPP-IV inhibitory activity). Then, the hit with the highest activity was used as a lead compound in the prediction of more potent derivatives. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that our virtual-screening protocol was successful in identifying novel lead compounds for

  15. Psychoactive natural products: overview of recent developments.

    PubMed

    Ujváry, István

    2014-01-01

    Natural psychoactive substances have fascinated the curious mind of shamans, artists, scholars and laymen since antiquity. During the twentieth century, the chemical composition of the most important psychoactive drugs, that is opium, cannabis, coca and "magic mushrooms", has been fully elucidated. The mode of action of the principal ingredients has also been deciphered at the molecular level. In the past two decades, the use of herbal drugs, such as kava, kratom and Salvia divinorum, began to spread beyond their traditional geographical and cultural boundaries. The aim of the present paper is to briefly summarize recent findings on the psychopharmacology of the most prominent psychoactive natural products. Current knowledge on a few lesser-known drugs, including bufotenine, glaucine, kava, betel, pituri, lettuce opium and kanna is also reviewed. In addition, selected cases of alleged natural (or semi-natural) products are also mentioned. PMID:24695249

  16. Countercurrent Separation of Natural Products: An Update

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work assesses the current instrumentation, method development, and applications in countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC), collectively referred to as countercurrent separation (CCS). The article provides a critical review of the CCS literature from 2007 since our last review (J. Nat. Prod.2008, 71, 1489–1508), with a special emphasis on the applications of CCS in natural products research. The current state of CCS is reviewed in regard to three continuing topics (instrumentation, solvent system development, theory) and three new topics (optimization of parameters, workflow, bioactivity applications). The goals of this review are to deliver the necessary background with references for an up-to-date perspective of CCS, to point out its potential for the natural product scientist, and thereby to induce new applications in natural product chemistry, metabolome, and drug discovery research involving organisms from terrestrial and marine sources. PMID:26177360

  17. Regulation of collagenase inhibitor production in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.; Harper, E.

    1987-05-01

    Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes produce an inhibitor of collagenase. This inhibitor is similar to those isolated from normal cartilage tissues. These cells will synthesize proteins in the absence of serum. Since serum contains inhibitors of collagenase, it is necessary to culture cells without serum in order to obtain accurate measurements of enzyme and inhibitor levels. They examined the effect of insulin on inhibitor secretion by cultures of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes. They observed a 2.5 to 3.5 fold stimulation of inhibitory activity in the presence of as little as 10 ng/ml insulin as compared to controls in serum free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 4.5 g/l glucose. The units of inhibitor were determined over a 7 day culture period. Medium was harvested daily and assayed for collagenase activity and for inhibition of a known collagenase from rabbit skin or human skin, using the /sup 14/C-glycine peptide release assay. The amount of inhibitor obtained from days 2 through 7 were: 1.4 unit (control), 3.8 units (10 ng/ml insulin), 5.2 units (1 ..mu..g/ml insulin). The addition of 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP to these chondrocytes in the presence of 1 ..mu..g/ml insulin caused a decrease in the level of inhibitor, suggesting that a dephosphorylation event may be necessary for this stimulation by insulin to occur.

  18. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  19. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  20. New advanced glycation end-products inhibitors from Dichrostachys cinerea Wight & Arn.

    PubMed

    Suresh, G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Radha Krishna Murthy, M; Anand Kumar, D; Rajendra Prasad, K; Ranga Rao, R; Zehra Ali, A; Suresh Babu, K

    2012-01-01

    Free radical scavenging and advanced glycation end-product (AGE) inhibitory potential were evaluated in the crude methanol extract of Dichrostachys cinerea. Bioassay-guided isolation led to the identification of four flavan-3-ols, namely (-)-mesquitol (1), oritin (2), (-)-festidinol (3) and (-)-epicatechin (4). Analysis of structure-activity relationships revealed that the presence of 7,8-dihydroxyl groups in the A-ring of flavan-3-ols in conjunction with 3',4'-dihydroxyls in the B-ring (1) is an important criterion for displaying potent AGE inhibitory activity along with free radical scavenging properties. (-)-Mesquitol (1), oritin (2), and (-)-festidinol (3) were found to be new natural AGE inhibitors. (-)-Mesquitol (1) displayed the most potent AGE inhibitory activity. Results suggest that (-)-mesquitol (1) may serve as an important natural organic lead compound for future development of antiglycating agents along with potent antioxidant activity.

  1. Natural Product Sugar Biosynthesis and Enzymatic Glycodiversification**

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J.; Melançon, Charles E.; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    Many biologically active small molecule natural products produced by microorganisms derive their activities from sugar substituents. Changing the structures of these sugars can have a profound impact on the biological properties of the parent compounds. This realization has inspired attempts to derivatize the sugar moieties of these natural products through exploitation of the sugar biosynthetic machinery. This approach requires an understanding of the biosynthetic pathway of each target sugar and detailed mechanistic knowledge of the key enzymes. Scientists have begun to unravel the biosynthetic logic behind the assembly of many glycosylated natural products, and have found that a core set of enzyme activities is mixed and matched to synthesize the diverse sugar structures observed in nature. Remarkably, many of these sugar biosynthetic enzymes and glycosyltransferases also exhibit relaxed substrate specificity. The promiscuity of these enzymes has prompted efforts to modify the sugar structures and/or alter the glycosylation patterns of natural products via metabolic pathway engineering and/or enzymatic glycodiversification. In applied biomedical research, these studies will enable the development of new glycosylation tools and generate novel glycoforms of secondary metabolites with useful biological activity. PMID:19058170

  2. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Hsu, Wen-Chan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines. PMID:24872930

  3. Metabolic Engineering for the Production of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Tang, Yi; Chooi, Yit-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Natural products and natural product derived compounds play an important role in modern healthcare as frontline treatments for many diseases and as inspiration for chemically synthesized therapeutics. With advances in sequencing and recombinant DNA technology, many of the biosynthetic pathways responsible for the production of these chemically complex and pharmaceutically valuable compounds have been elucidated. With an ever expanding toolkit of biosynthetic components, metabolic engineering is an increasingly powerful method to improve natural product titers and generate novel compounds. Heterologous production platforms have enabled access to pathways from difficult to culture strains; systems biology and metabolic modeling tools have resulted in increasing predictive and analytic capabilities; advances in expression systems and regulation have enabled the fine-tuning of pathways for increased efficiency, and characterization of individual pathway components has facilitated the construction of hybrid pathways for the production of new compounds. These advances in the many aspects of metabolic engineering have not only yielded fascinating scientific discoveries but also make it an increasingly viable approach for the optimization of natural product biosynthesis. PMID:22432617

  4. An Update on Natural Products with Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Karioti, Anastasia; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological processes. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. It is more than 70 years that synthetic compounds, mainly sulfonamides, have been used in clinical practice as diuretics and systemic acting antiglaucoma drugs. Recent studies using natural product libraries and isolated constituents from natural sources (such as fungi and plants) have disclosed novel chemotypes possessing carbonic anhydrase inhibition activities. These natural sources offer new opportunities in the search for new and more effective carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and may serve as new leads for the design and development of future drugs. This review will discuss the most recent advances in the search of naturally occurring products and their synthetic derivatives that inhibit the CAs and their mechanisms of action at molecular level. Plant extracts are not considered in the present review. PMID:26654592

  5. An automated Genomes-to-Natural Products platform (GNP) for the discovery of modular natural products

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Chad W.; Skinnider, Michael A.; Wyatt, Morgan A.; Li, Xiang; Ranieri, Michael R. M.; Yang, Lian; Zechel, David L.; Ma, Bin; Magarvey, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial natural products are a diverse and valuable group of small molecules, and genome sequencing indicates that the vast majority remain undiscovered. The prediction of natural product structures from biosynthetic assembly lines can facilitate their discovery, but highly automated, accurate, and integrated systems are required to mine the broad spectrum of sequenced bacterial genomes. Here we present a genome-guided natural products discovery tool to automatically predict, combinatorialize and identify polyketides and nonribosomal peptides from biosynthetic assembly lines using LC–MS/MS data of crude extracts in a high-throughput manner. We detail the directed identification and isolation of six genetically predicted polyketides and nonribosomal peptides using our Genome-to-Natural Products platform. This highly automated, user-friendly programme provides a means of realizing the potential of genetically encoded natural products. PMID:26412281

  6. New Methodology for Natural Gas Production Estimates

    EIA Publications

    2010-01-01

    A new methodology is implemented with the monthly natural gas production estimates from the EIA-914 survey this month. The estimates, to be released April 29, 2010, include revisions for all of 2009. The fundamental changes in the new process include the timeliness of the historical data used for estimation and the frequency of sample updates, both of which are improved.

  7. Chocolate: A Marvelous Natural Product of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannenbaum, Ginger

    2004-01-01

    The study of chocolate, a natural product, can be beneficial for the chemistry students as they ask frequently about the relevancy of their chemistry classes. The history of chocolate, its chemical and physical changes during processing, its composition, different crystalline forms, tempering and its viscosity are discussed.

  8. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  9. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  10. Natural products in modern life science

    PubMed Central

    Göransson, Ulf; Alsmark, Cecilia; Wedén, Christina; Backlund, Anders

    2010-01-01

    With a realistic threat against biodiversity in rain forests and in the sea, a sustainable use of natural products is becoming more and more important. Basic research directed against different organisms in Nature could reveal unexpected insights into fundamental biological mechanisms but also new pharmaceutical or biotechnological possibilities of more immediate use. Many different strategies have been used prospecting the biodiversity of Earth in the search for novel structure–activity relationships, which has resulted in important discoveries in drug development. However, we believe that the development of multidisciplinary incentives will be necessary for a future successful exploration of Nature. With this aim, one way would be a modernization and renewal of a venerable proven interdisciplinary science, Pharmacognosy, which represents an integrated way of studying biological systems. This has been demonstrated based on an explanatory model where the different parts of the model are explained by our ongoing research. Anti-inflammatory natural products have been discovered based on ethnopharmacological observations, marine sponges in cold water have resulted in substances with ecological impact, combinatory strategy of ecology and chemistry has revealed new insights into the biodiversity of fungi, in depth studies of cyclic peptides (cyclotides) has created new possibilities for engineering of bioactive peptides, development of new strategies using phylogeny and chemography has resulted in new possibilities for navigating chemical and biological space, and using bioinformatic tools for understanding of lateral gene transfer could provide potential drug targets. A multidisciplinary subject like Pharmacognosy, one of several scientific disciplines bridging biology and chemistry with medicine, has a strategic position for studies of complex scientific questions based on observations in Nature. Furthermore, natural product research based on intriguing scientific

  11. Natural production of biological optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kim, Young L.

    2015-03-01

    Synthesis and production in nature often provide ideas to design and fabricate advanced biomimetic photonic materials and structures, leading to excellent physical properties and enhanced performance. In addition, the recognition and utilization of natural or biological substances have been typical routes to develop biocompatible and biodegradable materials for medical applications. In this respect, biological lasers utilizing such biomaterials and biostructures have been received considerable attention, given a variety of implications and potentials for bioimaging, biosensing, implantation, and therapy. However, without relying on industrial facilities, eco-friendly massive production of such optical components or systems has not yet been investigated. We show examples of bioproduction of biological lasers using agriculture and fisheries. We anticipate that such approaches will open new possibilities for scalable eco-friendly `green' production of biological photonics components and systems.

  12. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  13. Natural gas production and consumption 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Total marketed production of natural gas in the United States during 1979 was 20,471 billion cubic feet, an increase of approximately 497 billion cubic feet, or 2.5 percent over 1978. Texas and Louisiana, the two leading producing states, accounted for 70.5 percent of total 1979 marketed production. In 1979, deliveries of natural gas to residential, commercial, industrial, electric utilities, and other consumers totaled 18,141 billion cubic feet. Total consumption, which includes lease, plant, and pipeline fuel in addition to deliveries to consumers, was 20,241 billion cubic feet in 1979 compared to 19,627 billion cubic feet in 1978, an increase of 3.1 percent. Movements of natural gas into and out of each state are presented. Louisiana accounted for the largest quantity of net deliveries, 5,107 billion cubic feet, followed by Texas and Oklahoma with net deliveries of 2,772 billion cubic feet and 914 billion cubic feet, respectively. Imports of natural gas by pipeline from Canada and as liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Algeria totaled 1,253 billion cubic feet in 1979. Total imports increased 288 billion cubic feet, or 29.8 percent, from 1978 levels. Exports of LNG to Japan and pipeline shipments to Canada and Mexico increased 6.0 percent from 52.5 billion cubic feet in 1978 to 55.7 billion cubic feet in 1979. LNG shipments to Japan accounted for 92.1 percent of total exports in 1979.

  14. Competitive product inhibition of aromatase by natural estrogens.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Yarborough, C; Osawa, Y

    1993-03-01

    In order to better understand the function of aromatase, we carried out kinetic analyses to assess the ability of natural estrogens, estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), 16 alpha-OHE1, and estriol (E3), to inhibit aromatization. Human placental microsomes (50 micrograms protein) were incubated for 5 min at 37 degrees C with [1 beta-3H]testosterone (1.24 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 35-150 nM) or [1 beta-3H,4-14C]androstenedione (3.05 x 10(3) dpm 3H/ng, 3H/14C = 19.3, 7-65 nM) as substrate in the presence of NADPH, with and without natural estrogens as putative inhibitors. Aromatase activity was assessed by tritium released to water from the 1 beta-position of the substrates. Natural estrogens showed competitive product inhibition against androgen aromatization. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for testosterone aromatization was 1.5, 2.2, 95, and 162 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 61.8 +/- 2.0 nM (n = 5) for testosterone. The Ki of E1, E2, 16 alpha-OHE1, and E3 for androstenedione aromatization was 10.6, 5.5, 252, and 1182 microM, respectively, where the Km of aromatase was 35.4 +/- 4.1 nM (n = 4) for androstenedione. These results show that estrogen inhibit the process of androgen aromatization and indicate that natural estrogens regulate their own synthesis by the product inhibition mechanism in vivo. Since natural estrogen binds to the active site of human placental aromatase P-450 complex as competitive inhibitors, natural estrogens might be further metabolized by aromatase. This suggests that human placental estrogen 2-hydroxylase activity is catalyzed by the active site of aromatase cytochrome P-450 and also agrees with the fact that the level of catecholestrogens in maternal plasma increases during pregnancy. The relative affinities and concentration of androgens and estrogens would control estrogen and catecholestrogen biosynthesis by aromatase.

  15. European Directive fragrances in natural products.

    PubMed

    Scheman, Andrew; Scheman, Nicole; Rakowski, Ella-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Information on the presence of European Directive fragrance (EUF) allergens in plants and foods is important for numerous reasons. If an individual is allergic to an EUF and is avoiding fragrance, it is possible that they may still be exposed to the allergen in a natural product. In addition, because many of these allergens are also found in foods, it is possible that ingestion of a food containing the allergen may induce systemic contact allergy. Finally, individuals with lip dermatitis may react to contact with foods that contain the allergen. In this article, we have used the data available to identify which plants and foods contain EUF. When available, concentrations of EUF in natural products are provided. The goal of this article is to narrow down the list of botanicals to avoid for specific EUF allergies.

  16. New chemistry from natural product biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Catherine B; Barry, Sarah M

    2016-06-15

    Catalysts are a vital part of synthetic chemistry. However, there are still many important reactions for which catalysts have not been developed. The use of enzymes as biocatalysts for synthetic chemistry is growing in importance due to the drive towards sustainable methods for producing both bulk chemicals and high value compounds such as pharmaceuticals, and due to the ability of enzymes to catalyse chemical reactions with excellent stereoselectivity and regioselectivity. Such challenging transformations are a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways. In this mini-review, we discuss the potential to use biosynthetic pathways as a starting point for biocatalyst discovery. We introduce the reader to natural product assembly and tailoring, then focus on four classes of enzyme that catalyse C─H bond activation reactions to functionalize biosynthetic precursors. Finally, we briefly discuss the challenges involved in novel enzyme discovery.

  17. Genome Mining for Ribosomally Synthesized Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Juan E.; van der Donk, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the number of known peptide natural products that are synthesized via the ribosomal pathway has rapidly grown. Taking advantage of sequence homology among genes encoding precursor peptides or biosynthetic proteins, in silico mining of genomes combined with molecular biology approaches has guided the discovery of a large number of new ribosomal natural products, including lantipeptides, cyanobactins, linear thiazole/oxazole-containing peptides, microviridins, lasso peptides, amatoxins, cyclotides, and conopeptides. In this review, we describe the strategies used for the identification of these ribosomally-synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) and the structures of newly identified compounds. The increasing number of chemical entities and their remarkable structural and functional diversity may lead to novel pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21095156

  18. (+)-discodermolide: a marine natural product against cancer.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Marcus Vinícius Nora

    2004-06-11

    (+)-discodermolide was isolated in 1990 by Gunasekera et al. from the deep-water Caribbean sponge Discodermia dissoluta. It attacks cancer cells in a similar way to the successful cancer drug Taxol that has become the best-selling anticancer drug in history. Taxol is also the first natural product described that stabilizes the microtubules involved in many aspects of cellular biology and that represent an important target of anticancer chemotherapeutics. However, (+)-discodermolide appears to be far more potent than Taxol against tumors that have developed multiple-drug resistance, with an IC50 in the low nanomolar range. Due to these excellent results, this natural product was licensed to Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation in early 1998. The present review covers the history, biological activity, total synthesis, and synthetic analogs of (+)-discodermolide.

  19. New chemistry from natural product biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Catherine B; Barry, Sarah M

    2016-06-15

    Catalysts are a vital part of synthetic chemistry. However, there are still many important reactions for which catalysts have not been developed. The use of enzymes as biocatalysts for synthetic chemistry is growing in importance due to the drive towards sustainable methods for producing both bulk chemicals and high value compounds such as pharmaceuticals, and due to the ability of enzymes to catalyse chemical reactions with excellent stereoselectivity and regioselectivity. Such challenging transformations are a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways. In this mini-review, we discuss the potential to use biosynthetic pathways as a starting point for biocatalyst discovery. We introduce the reader to natural product assembly and tailoring, then focus on four classes of enzyme that catalyse C─H bond activation reactions to functionalize biosynthetic precursors. Finally, we briefly discuss the challenges involved in novel enzyme discovery. PMID:27284036

  20. Marine and soil derived natural products: a new source of novel cardiovascular protective agents targeting the endothelin system.

    PubMed

    Planes, Nadir; Caballero-George, Catherina

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of the endothelin system is a recognized therapeutic approach for treating complex cardiovascular diseases. The search for natural inhibitors of the endothelin system has focused mainly on land, with recent, emerging data suggesting the underestimated potential of marine microorganisms for producing leads with cardioprotective potential. The present work reviews natural products identified as inhibitors of the endothelin system, their origin, their mechanism of action, and their ecological significance.

  1. Natural Product Research in the Australian Marine Invertebrate Dicathais orbita

    PubMed Central

    Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The predatory marine gastropod Dicathais orbita has been the subject of a significant amount of biological and chemical research over the past five decades. Natural products research on D. orbita includes the isolation and identification of brominated indoles and choline esters as precursors of Tyrian purple, as well as the synthesis of structural analogues, bioactivity testing, biodistributional and biosynthetic studies. Here I also report on how well these compounds conform to Lipinski’s rule of five for druglikeness and their predicted receptor binding and enzyme inhibitor activity. The composition of mycosporine-like amino acids, fatty acids and sterols has also been described in the egg masses of D. orbita. The combination of bioactive compounds produced by D. orbita is of interest for further studies in chemical ecology, as well as for future nutraceutical development. Biological insights into the life history of this species, as well as ongoing research on the gene expression, microbial symbionts and biosynthetic capabilities, should facilitate sustainable production of the bioactive compounds. Knowledge of the phylogeny of D. orbita provides an excellent platform for novel research into the evolution of brominated secondary metabolites in marine molluscs. The range of polarities in the brominated indoles produced by D. orbita has also provided an effective model system used to develop a new method for biodistributional studies. The well characterized suite of chemical reactions that generate Tyrian purple, coupled with an in depth knowledge of the ecology, anatomy and genetics of D. orbita provide a good foundation for ongoing natural products research. PMID:23612370

  2. Identification of natural inhibitors of Entamoeba histolytica cysteine synthase from microbial secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Mihoko; Jeelani, Ghulam; Masuda, Yui; Sakai, Kazunari; Tsukui, Kumiko; Waluyo, Danang; Tarwadi; Watanabe, Yoshio; Nonaka, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shiomi, Kazuro

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is a common worldwide diarrheal disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its known side effects and low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers. E. histolytica is also capable of surviving sub-therapeutic levels of metronidazole in vitro. Novel drugs with different mode of action are therefore urgently needed. The sulfur assimilatory de novo L-cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for various cellular activities, including the proliferation and anti-oxidative defense of E. histolytica. Since the pathway, consisting of two reactions catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase), does not exist in humans, it is a rational drug target against amebiasis. To discover inhibitors against the CS of E. histolytica (EhCS), the compounds of Kitasato Natural Products Library were screened against two recombinant CS isozymes: EhCS1 and EhCS3. Nine compounds inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3 with IC50 values of 0.31–490 μM. Of those, seven compounds share a naphthoquinone moiety, indicating the structural importance of the moiety for binding to the active site of EhCS1 and EhCS3. We further screened >9,000 microbial broths for CS inhibition and purified two compounds, xanthofulvin and exophillic acid from fungal broths. Xanthofulvin inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3. Exophillic acid showed high selectivity against EhCS1, but exhibited no inhibition against EhCS3. In vitro anti-amebic activity of the 11 EhCS inhibitors was also examined. Deacetylkinamycin C and nanaomycin A showed more potent amebicidal activity with IC50 values of 18 and 0.8 μM, respectively, in the cysteine deprived conditions. The differential sensitivity of trophozoites against deacetylkinamycin C in the presence or absence of L-cysteine in the medium and the IC50 values against EhCS suggest the amebicidal effect of deacetylkinamycin C is due to

  3. Computational identification of novel natural inhibitors of glucagon receptor for checking type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction of the small peptide hormone glucagon with glucagon receptor (GCGR) stimulates the release of glucose from the hepatic cells during fasting; hence GCGR performs a significant function in glucose homeostasis. Inhibiting the interaction between glucagon and its receptor has been reported to control hepatic glucose overproduction and thus GCGR has evolved as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. Results In the present study, a large library of natural compounds was screened against 7 transmembrane domain of GCGR to identify novel therapeutic molecules that can inhibit the binding of glucagon with GCGR. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamic behaviour of the docked complexes and the molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the ligand binding residues of GCGR were analysed in detail. The top scoring compounds were also compared with already documented GCGR inhibitors- MK-0893 and LY2409021 for their binding affinity and other ADME properties. Finally, we have reported two natural drug like compounds PIB and CAA which showed good binding affinity for GCGR and are potent inhibitor of its functional activity. Conclusion This study contributes evidence for application of these compounds as prospective small ligand molecules against type II diabetes. Novel natural drug like inhibitors against the 7 transmembrane domain of GCGR have been identified which showed high binding affinity and potent inhibition of GCGR PMID:25521597

  4. Standardization for natural product synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huimin; Medema, Marnix H

    2016-08-27

    Standardization is one of the foundational features of modern-day engineering, and the use of standardized parts and processes is a key element that distinguishes bona fide synthetic biology from traditional genetic engineering. Here, we discuss the role of standardization in natural product synthetic biology, focusing on standardization of data on biosynthetic pathways and gene clusters, as well as the role of standardization in the process of biosynthetic gene cluster engineering. PMID:27313083

  5. Natural and Heterologous Production of Bacteriocins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintas, Luis M.; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E.

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria, and their use as natural and nontoxic food preservatives has been the source of considerable interest for the research community. In addition, bacteriocins have been investigated for their potential use in human and veterinary applications and in the animal production field. In the native bacterial strain, most bacteriocins are synthesized as biologically inactive precursors, with N-terminal extensions, that are cleaved concomitantly during export of the bacteriocin by dedicated ABC transporters, or the general secretory pathway (GSP) or Sec-dependent pathway. However, a few bacteriocins are synthesized without an N-terminal extension, and others are circularized through a head-to-tail peptide bond, complicating the elucidation of their processing and transport across the cytoplasmic membrane. The high cost of synthetic bacteriocin synthesis and their low yields from many natural producers recommends the exploration of recombinant microbial systems for the heterologous production of bacteriocins. Other advantages of such systems include production of bacteriocins in safer hosts, increased bacteriocin production, control of bacteriocin gene expression, production of food ingredients with antimicrobial activity, construction of multibacteriocinogenic strains with a wider antagonistic spectrum, a better adaptation of the selected hosts to food environments, and providing antagonistic properties to lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used as starter, protective, or probiotic cultures. The recombinant production of bacteriocins mostly relies on the use of expression vectors that replicate in Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts, whereas the production of bacteriocins in heterologous LAB hosts may be essentially based on the expression of native biosynthetic genes, by exchanging or replacing leader peptides and/or dedicated processing and secretion systems (ABC transporters

  6. Capillary electrophoresis as a novel technique for screening natural flavonoids as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nehmé, Reine; Nehmé, Hala; Roux, Grégory; Destandau, Emilie; Claude, Bérengère; Morin, Philippe

    2013-11-29

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for the first time to evaluate the inhibition activity of aglycone flavonoids (such as quercetin and isorhamnetin) and some of their glycosylated derivatives toward human kinases. The cyclin-dependant kinase 5 (CDK5/p25) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) were chosen since they are very promising biological targets for developing treatments against neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. In a previous work, we developed an in-capillary kinase CE assay where the capillary was used as an enzymatic nanoreactor in which the kinase, its substrate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and its potential inhibitor were mixed by using transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP). The product adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) was then detected at 254nm and quantified. In this work, this assay was improved to reduce, for the first time, the dilution effect commonly observed with the TDLFP approach. Under the new conditions established herein, IC50 values for quercetin, kaempferol and flavopiridol were successfully obtained and were in the same order of magnitude of those reported in the literature using the conventional assay using radioactive (33)P-ATP. It was shown that aglycone flavonoids have an inhibition activity more important than their glycosylated derivatives. CE was also proved to be very efficient for evaluating inhibition activity of complex samples such as crude extracts of sea buckthorn (SBT) berries obtained by solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME). This novel approach to combine SFME technique to a CE-based enzymatic assay is very interesting for evaluating the biological activity of natural material in a fast, simple, economic (no use of neither fluorescent nor radiometric labels) and green (no organic solvents) manner. PMID:24148298

  7. Neurotrophic Natural Products: Chemistry and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Lacoske, Michelle H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and spinal cord injury affect approximately 50 million people worldwide, bringing the total healthcare cost to over 600 billion dollars per year. Nervous system growth factors, that is, neurotrophins, are a potential solution to these disorders, since they could promote nerve regeneration. An average of 500 publications per year attests to the significance of neurotrophins in biomedical sciences and underlines their potential for therapeutic applications. Nonetheless, the poor pharmacokinetic profile of neurotrophins severely restricts their clinical use. On the other hand, small molecules that modulate neurotrophic activity offer a promising therapeutic approach against neurological disorders. Nature has provided an impressive array of natural products that have potent neurotrophic activities. This Review highlights the current synthetic strategies toward these compounds and summarizes their ability to induce neuronal growth and rehabilitation. It is anticipated that neurotrophic natural products could be used not only as starting points in drug design but also as tools to study the next frontier in biomedical sciences: the brain activity map project. PMID:24353244

  8. P-glycoprotein inhibitors of natural origin as potential tumor chemo-sensitizers: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Hossam M.; Al-Abd, Ahmed M.; El-Dine, Riham Salah; El-Halawany, Ali M.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance of solid tumors to treatment is significantly attributed to pharmacokinetic reasons at both cellular and multi-cellular levels. Anticancer agent must be bio-available at the site of action in a cytotoxic concentration to exert its proposed activity. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-dependent membrane transport proteins; it is known to pump substrates out of cells in ATP-dependent mechanism. The over-expression of P-gp in tumor cells reduces the intracellular drug concentrations, which decreases the cytotoxicity of a broad spectrum of antitumor drugs. Accordingly, P-gp inhibitors/blockers are potential enhancer for the cellular bioavailability of several clinically important anticancer drugs such as, anthracyclines, taxanes, vinca alkaloids, and podophyllotoxins. Besides several chemically synthesized P-gp inhibitors/blockers, some naturally occurring compounds and plant extracts were reported for their modulation of multidrug resistance; however, this review will focus only on major classes of naturally occurring inhibitors viz., flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, alkaloids and saponins. PMID:25685543

  9. Phylogenetic approaches to natural product structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Ziemert, Nadine; Jensen, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetics is the study of the evolutionary relatedness among groups of organisms. Molecular phylogenetics uses sequence data to infer these relationships for both organisms and the genes they maintain. With the large amount of publicly available sequence data, phylogenetic inference has become increasingly important in all fields of biology. In the case of natural product research, phylogenetic relationships are proving to be highly informative in terms of delineating the architecture and function of the genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases provide model examples in which individual domain phylogenies display different predictive capacities, resolving features ranging from substrate specificity to structural motifs associated with the final metabolic product. This chapter provides examples in which phylogeny has proven effective in terms of predicting functional or structural aspects of secondary metabolism. The basics of how to build a reliable phylogenetic tree are explained along with information about programs and tools that can be used for this purpose. Furthermore, it introduces the Natural Product Domain Seeker, a recently developed Web tool that employs phylogenetic logic to classify ketosynthase and condensation domains based on established enzyme architecture and biochemical function.

  10. Microbial production of natural raspberry ketone.

    PubMed

    Beekwilder, Jules; van der Meer, Ingrid M; Sibbesen, Ole; Broekgaarden, Mans; Qvist, Ingmar; Mikkelsen, Joern D; Hall, Robert D

    2007-10-01

    Raspberry ketone is an important compound for the flavour industry. It is frequently used in products such as soft drinks, sweets, puddings and ice creams. The compound can be produced by organic synthesis. Demand for "natural" raspberry ketone is growing considerably. However, this product is extremely expensive. Consequently, there is a remaining desire to better understand how raspberry ketone is synthesized in vivo, and which genes and enzymes are involved. With this information we will then be in a better position to design alternative production strategies such as microbial fermentation. This article focuses on the identification and application of genes potentially linked to raspberry ketone synthesis. We have isolated candidate genes from both raspberry and other plants, and these have been introduced into bacterial and yeast expression systems. Conditions have been determined that result in significant levels of raspberry ketone, up to 5 mg/L. These results therefore lay a strong foundation for a potentially renewable source of "natural" flavour compounds making use of plant genes.

  11. Total Synthesis of Natural Products Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maertens, Gaetan; L'homme, Chloe; Canesi, Sylvain

    2014-12-01

    We present a review of natural product syntheses accomplished in our laboratory during the last five years. Each synthetic route features a phenol dearomatization promoted by an environmentally benign hypervalent iodine reagent. The dearomatizations demonstrate the “aromatic ring umpolung” concept, and involve stereoselective remodeling of the inert unsaturations of a phenol into a highly functionalized key intermediate that may contain a quaternary carbon center and a prochiral dienone system. Several new oxidative strategies were employed, including transpositions (1,3-alkyl shift and Prins-pinacol), a polycyclization, an ipso rearrangement, and direct nucleophilic additions at the phenol para position. Several alkaloids, heterocyclic compounds, and a polycyclic core have been achieved, including sceletenone (a serotonin reuptake inhibitor), acetylaspidoalbidine (an antitumor agent), fortucine (antiviral and antitumor), erysotramidine (curare-like effect), platensimycin (an antibiotic), and the main core of a kaurane diterpene (immunosuppressive agent and stimulator of apoptosis). These concise and in some cases enantioselective syntheses effectively demonstrate the importance of hypervalent iodine reagents in the total synthesis of bioactive natural products.

  12. Total synthesis of natural products using hypervalent iodine reagents

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Gaëtan; L'Homme, Chloé; Canesi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of natural product syntheses accomplished in our laboratory during the last 5 years. Each synthetic route features a phenol dearomatization promoted by an environmentally benign hypervalent iodine reagent. The dearomatizations demonstrate the “aromatic ring umpolung” concept, and involve stereoselective remodeling of the inert unsaturations of a phenol into a highly functionalized key intermediate that may contain a quaternary carbon center and a prochiral dienone system. Several new oxidative strategies were employed, including transpositions (1,3-alkyl shift and Prins-pinacol), a polycyclization, an ipso rearrangement, and direct nucleophilic additions at the phenol para position. Several alkaloids, heterocyclic compounds, and a polycyclic core have been achieved, including sceletenone (a serotonin reuptake inhibitor), acetylaspidoalbidine (an antitumor agent), fortucine (antiviral and antitumor), erysotramidine (curare-like effect), platensimycin (an antibiotic), and the main core of a kaurane diterpene (immunosuppressive agent and stimulator of apoptosis). These concise and in some cases enantioselective syntheses effectively demonstrate the importance of hypervalent iodine reagents in the total synthesis of bioactive natural products. PMID:25601909

  13. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa.

  14. Natural AChE Inhibitors from Plants and their Contribution to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ana Paula; Faraoni, María Belén; Castro, María Julia; Alza, Natalia Paola; Cavallaro, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    As acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are an important therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer’s disease, efforts are being made in search of new molecules with anti-AChE activity. The fact that naturally-occurring compounds from plants are considered to be a potential source of new inhibitors has led to the discovery of an important number of secondary metabolites and plant extracts with the ability of inhibiting the enzyme AChE, which, according to the cholinergic hypothesis, increases the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain, thus improving cholinergic functions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and alleviating the symptoms of this neurological disorder. This review summarizes a total of 128 studies which correspond to the most relevant research work published during 2006-2012 (1st semester) on plant-derived compounds, plant extracts and essential oils found to elicit AChE inhibition. PMID:24381530

  15. Dithiolopyrrolone Natural Products: Isolation, Synthesis and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhiwei; Huang, Sheng; Yu, Yi; Deng, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Dithiolopyrrolones are a class of antibiotics that possess the unique pyrrolinonodithiole (4H-[1,2] dithiolo [4,3-b] pyrrol-5-one) skeleton linked to two variable acyl groups. To date, there are approximately 30 naturally occurring dithiolopyrrolone compounds, including holomycin, thiolutin, and aureothricin, and more recently thiomarinols, a unique class of hybrid marine bacterial natural products containing a dithiolopyrrolone framework linked by an amide bridge with an 8-hydroxyoctanoyl chain linked to a monic acid. Generally, dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against various microorganisms, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and even parasites. Holomycin appeared to be active against rifamycin-resistant bacteria and also inhibit the growth of the clinical pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus N315. Its mode of action is believed to inhibit RNA synthesis although the exact mechanism has yet to be established in vitro. A recent work demonstrated that the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri employs an RNA methyltransferase for self-resistance during the holomycin production. Moreover, some dithiolopyrrolone derivatives have demonstrated promising antitumor activities. The biosynthetic gene clusters of holomycin have recently been identified in S. clavuligerus and characterized biochemically and genetically. The biosynthetic gene cluster of thiomarinol was also identified from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SANK 73390, which was uniquely encoded by two independent pathways for pseudomonic acid and pyrrothine in a novel plasmid. The aim of this review is to give an overview about the isolations, characterizations, synthesis, biosynthesis, bioactivities and mode of action of this unique family of dithiolopyrrolone natural products, focusing on the period from 1940s until now. PMID:24141227

  16. New macrocyclic analogs of the natural histone deacetylase inhibitor FK228; design, synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Minghong; Esposito, Emiliano; Raj, Victor Paul; Muzi, Laura; Zunino, Franco; Zuco, Valentina; Cominetti, Denis; Penco, Sergio; Dal Pozzo, Alma

    2015-11-01

    Among the natural histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), the bicyclic depsipeptide macrolactone FK228 stands out for its unique chemical structure and mechanism of action. In order to expand the chemical diversity, exploiting the FK228 peculiar structure, we have synthesized a collection of 24 simplified novel analogs. A first series consists of bicyclic macrolactones, where the carboxy terminus of the natural compound was substituted by peptidomimetic aminomethylphenylacetic acid derivatives. These analogs, 7a-i, showed submicromolar cytotoxic activity, even though very low inhibitory activity against HDAC enzymes, suggesting that most probably they behave with a mechanism different from the natural compound. One of the most active members in the group, 7g, was evaluated in vivo and exhibited significant antitumor activity. This evidence supports that the activity is unrelated to HDAC inhibition and these compounds represent a novel series of promising active agents. Another analog series consists of monocyclic macrolactones, 9a-c and 10a-d which lack the disulfide bridge and bear the protected sulfur on the linear external chain; they showed similar cytotoxic activities compared to the natural compound, but proved to be very sensitive to the nature of the sulfur protection. In fact, when the sulfur was protected by an 1-octanoyl residue, like in 9b, the product displayed a one digit nanomolar activity. The results provide evidence that our approach may be followed to develop novel series of FK228 analogs. PMID:26481659

  17. [The interactions between natural products and OATP1B1].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei-zhi; Liu, Yu; Bian, Jia-lin; Jin, Meng; Gui, Chun-shan

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is an important liver-specific uptake transporter, which mediates transport of numerous endogenous substances and drugs from blood into hepatocytes. To identify and investigate potential modulators of OATP1B1 from natural products, the effect of 21 frequently used natural compounds and extracts on OATP1B1-mediated fluorescein methotrexate transport was studied by using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing OATP1B1 (CHO-OATP1B1) in 96-well plates. This method could be used for the screening of large compound libraries. Our studies showed that some flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, quercitrin, rutin, chrysanthemum flavonoids and mulberrin) and triterpenoids (e.g., glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhizic acid) were inhibitors of OATP1B1 with IC50 values less than 16 µmol · L(-1). The IC50 value of glycyrrhetinic acid on OATP1B1 was comparable to its blood concentration in clinics, indicating an OATPlB1-mediated drug-drug interaction could occur. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that flavonoids had much higher inhibitory activity than their glycosides. Furthermore, the type and length of saccharides had a significant effect on their activity. In addition, we used OATP1B1 substrates fluvastatin and rosuvastatin as probe drugs to investigate the substrate-dependent effect of several natural compounds on the function of OATP1B1 in vitro. Our results demonstrated that the effect of these natural products on the function of OATPlB1 was substrate-dependent. In summary, this study would be conducive to predicting and avoiding potential OATP1B1-mediated drug-drug and drug-food interactions and thus provide the experimental basis and guidance for rational drug use. PMID:26552146

  18. The chemistry of isoindole natural products

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the chemical and biological aspects of natural products containing an oxidized or reduced isoindole skeleton. This motif is found in its intact or modified form in indolocarbazoles, macrocyclic polyketides (cytochalasan alkaloids), the aporhoeadane alkaloids, meroterpenoids from Stachybotrys species and anthraquinone-type alkaloids. Concerning their biological activity, molecular structure and synthesis, we have limited this review to the most inspiring examples. Within different congeners, we have selected a few members and discussed the synthetic routes in more detail. The putative biosynthetic pathways of the presented isoindole alkaloids are described as well. PMID:24204418

  19. Anti-infective Natural Products from Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are a promising yet underexplored source for novel natural products with potent biological activities. While predominantly cytotoxic compounds have been isolated from cyanobacteria in the past, there are also a significant number of compounds known that possess anti-infective activities. As the need for novel anti-infective lead compounds is high, this manuscript aims at giving a concise overview on the current knowledge about anti-infective secondary metabolites isolated from cyanobacteria. Antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiprotozoal, and molluscicidal activities are discussed. Covering up to February 2015.

  20. Natural products from microbes associated with insects

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Rischer, Maja; Poulsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we review discoveries of secondary metabolites from microbes associated with insects. We mainly focus on natural products, where the ecological role has been at least partially elucidated, and/or the pharmaceutical properties evaluated, and on compounds with unique structural features. We demonstrate that the exploration of specific microbial–host interactions, in combination with multidisciplinary dereplication processes, has emerged as a successful strategy to identify novel chemical entities and to shed light on the ecology and evolution of defensive associations. PMID:26977191

  1. Harnessing osteopontin and other natural inhibitors to mitigate ectopic calcification of bioprosthetic heart valve material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohri, Rachit

    Dystrophic calcification has been the long-standing major cause of bioprosthetic heart valve failure, and has been well studied in terms of the underlying causative mechanisms. Such understanding has yielded several anti-calcification strategies involving biomaterial modification at the preparation stage: chemical alteration, extraction of calcifiable components, or material modification with small-molecule anti-calcific agents. However, newer therapeutic opportunities are offered by the growing illustration of the pathology as a dynamic, actively regulated process involving several gene products, such as osteopontin (OPN), matrix-gla protein (MGP) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Osteopontin, a multi-functional matricellular glycosylated phosphoprotein has emerged as a prime candidate for the role of an in vivo inhibitor of ectopic calcification with two putative mechanisms: crystal poisoning and mineral-dissolution. The full therapeutic realization of its potential necessitates a better understanding of the mechanisms of anti-calcification by osteopontin, as well as appropriate in vivo models in which to evaluate its efficacy, potency and molecular mechanisms. In this work, we pursued the development and characterization of a reliable in vivo model with the OPN-null mouse to simulate the calcification of bioprosthetic valve material, namely glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium (GFBP) tissue. Subsequently, we used the calcification model to evaluate hypotheses based on the anti-calcific potential of osteopontin. Several modes of administering exogenous OPN to the implant site in OPN-null mice were explored, including soluble injected OPN, OPN covalently immobilized on the biomaterial, and OPN adsorbed onto the biomaterial. An investigation of the structure-function aspects of the anti-calcific ability of OPN was also pursued in the in vivo model. The OPN-null mouse was also used as an in vivo test-bed to evaluate the anti-calcific potential of other biomolecules

  2. Fungal natural products in research and development.

    PubMed

    Schueffler, Anja; Anke, Timm

    2014-10-01

    To date approximately 100 000 fungal species are known although far more than one million are expected. The variety of species and the diversity of their habitats, some of them less exploited, allow the conclusion that fungi continue to be a rich source of new metabolites. Besides the conventional fungal isolates, an increasing interest in endophytic and in marine-derived fungi has been noticed. In addition new screening strategies based on innovative chemical, biological, and genetic approaches have led to novel fungal metabolites in recent years. The present review focuses on new fungal natural products published from 2009 to 2013 highlighting the originality of the structures and their biological potential. Furthermore synthetic products based on fungal metabolites as well as new developments in the uses or the biological activity of known compounds or new derivatives are discussed.

  3. Multimodular biocatalysts for natural product assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzer, Dirk; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2001-03-01

    Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides represent a large class of natural products that show an extreme structural diversity and broad pharmacological relevance. They are synthesized from simple building blocks such as amino or carboxy acids and malonate derivatives on multimodular enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), respectively. Although utilizing different substrates, NRPSs and PKSs show striking similarities in the modular architecture of their catalytic domains and product assembly-line mechanism. Among these compounds are well known antibiotics (penicillin, vancomycin and erythromycin) as well as potent immunosuppressive agents (cyclosporin, rapamycin and FK 506). This review focuses on the modular organization of NRPSs, PKSs and mixed NRPS/PKS systems and how modules and domains that build up the biosynthetic templates can be exploited for the rational design of recombinant enzymes capable of synthesizing novel compounds.

  4. Synthetic biology of fungal natural products

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Derek J.; Valiante, Vito; Unkles, Shiela E.; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an ever-expanding field in science, also encompassing the research area of fungal natural product (NP) discovery and production. Until now, different aspects of synthetic biology have been covered in fungal NP studies from the manipulation of different regulatory elements and heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways to the engineering of different multidomain biosynthetic enzymes such as polyketide synthases or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The following review will cover some of the exemplary studies of synthetic biology in filamentous fungi showing the capacity of these eukaryotes to be used as model organisms in the field. From the vast array of different NPs produced to the ease for genetic manipulation, filamentous fungi have proven to be an invaluable source for the further development of synthetic biology tools. PMID:26284053

  5. Production of the α-glycosidase inhibitor 1-deoxynojirimycin from Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Onose, Shinji; Ikeda, Ryoichi; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Yamagishi, Kenji; Higuchi, Ohki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-05-01

    1-Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), a potent α-glycosidase inhibitor, has therapeutic applications in treatments of HIV, Gaucher's disease, and diabetes. DNJ has been extracted from natural sources (mulberry leaves) for therapeutic purposes; however, DNJ ingredients are in limited supply and are costly to obtain on a large scale. Since certain strains of Bacillus and Streptomyces species reportedly produce DNJ, they may serve as potential sources for high-yield DNJ production. In this study, we obtained evidence for a DNJ production in Bacillus subtilis DSM704 by hydrophilic interaction chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, from a screen of 750 microorganisms, we identified additional Bacillus strains (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AS385 and Bacillus subtilis B4) that produce DNJ in large quantities. Investigation of the effect of various culture conditions, using Bacillus subtilis DSM704 and the DNJ high-production Bacillus strains, provided evidence for the importance of sorbitol supplementation on the yield of the DNJ precursor, 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-mannitol, thereby increasing DNJ production. The role of sorbitol in increased DNJ production was supported by an observed increase in mRNA expression of the biosynthetic gene, gabT1. When Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AS385 was cultured in medium supplemented with sorbitol, extracellular DNJ concentration reached a maximum of 460 mg/l of medium (equivalent to 9.20mg/g of freeze-dried medium), indicating that this strain can serve as a source for food- and drug-grade products. These findings not only lead to a further understanding of the DNJ biosynthetic pathway, but also suggest a method for microbial mass production of DNJ for therapeutic applications. PMID:23265519

  6. Plant cell culture strategies for the production of natural products

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Villarreal, Marisol; Howat, Susan; Hong, SunMi; Jang, Mi Ok; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Eun-Kyong; Loake, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a vast chemical cornucopia to support their sessile lifestyles. Man has exploited this natural resource since Neolithic times and currently plant-derived chemicals are exploited for a myriad of applications. However, plant sources of most high-value natural products (NPs) are not domesticated and therefore their production cannot be undertaken on an agricultural scale. Further, these plant species are often slow growing, their populations limiting, the concentration of the target molecule highly variable and routinely present at extremely low concentrations. Plant cell and organ culture constitutes a sustainable, controllable and environmentally friendly tool for the industrial production of plant NPs. Further, advances in cell line selection, biotransformation, product secretion, cell permeabilisation, extraction and scale-up, among others, are driving increases in plant NP yields. However, there remain significant obstacles to the commercial synthesis of high-value chemicals from these sources. The relatively recent isolation, culturing and characterisation of cambial meristematic cells (CMCs), provides an emerging platform to circumvent many of these potential difficulties. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 149-158] PMID:26698871

  7. Protein structure similarity clustering and natural product structure as guiding principles for chemical genomics.

    PubMed

    Koch, M A; Waldmann, H

    2006-01-01

    The majority of all proteins are modularly built from a limited set of approximately 1,000 structural domains. The knowledge of a common protein fold topology in the ligand-sensing cores of protein domains can be exploited for the design of small-molecule libraries in the development of inhibitors and ligands. Thus, a novel strategy of clustering protein domain cores based exclusively on structure similarity considerations (protein structure similarity clustering, PSSC) has been successfully applied to the development of small-molecule inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and the 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases based on the structure of a naturally occurring Cdc25 inhibitor. The efficiency of making use of the scaffolds of natural products as biologically prevalidated starting points for the design of compound libraries is further highlighted by the development of benzopyran-based FXR ligands.

  8. Cholesterol overload impairing cerebellar function: the promise of natural products.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I H

    2015-05-01

    The cerebellum is the part of the brain most involved in controlling motor and cognitive function. The surface becomes convoluted, forming folia that have a characteristic internal structure of three layers including molecular, Purkinje cell, and granular layer. This complex neural network gives rise to a massive signal-processing capability. Cholesterol is a major constituent, derived by de novo synthesis and the blood-brain barrier. Cholesterol is tightly regulated between neurons and glia-that is, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes-and is essential for normal brain development. The axon is wrapped by myelin (cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycosphingolipids) and made up of membranes of oligodendrocytes, separated by periodic gaps in the myelin sheath, called nodes of Ranvier. Hypercholesterolemia is associated with increased oxidative stress and the development of neurotoxicity and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment with natural products has been found to support improved brain function and reduce low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol level. Fish oil is one such product; among the many plant products are: Morus alba leaves, fruit, and bark; pomegranate fruit and peel; Barley β - glucans; date palm; and Allium sativum. The therapeutic potential was discussed in relation with the antilipidemic drugs, statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors).

  9. Natural Products: Insights into Leishmaniasis Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Igor A.; Mazotto, Ana Maria; Cardoso, Verônica; Alves, Renan L.; Amaral, Ana Claudia F.; Silva, Jefferson Rocha de Andrade; Pinheiro, Anderson S.; Vermelho, Alane B.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that affects several populations worldwide, against which there are no vaccines available and the chemotherapy is highly toxic. Depending on the species causing the infection, the disease is characterized by commitment of tissues, including the skin, mucous membranes, and internal organs. Despite the relevance of host inflammatory mediators on parasite burden control, Leishmania and host immune cells interaction may generate an exacerbated proinflammatory response that plays an important role in the development of leishmaniasis clinical manifestations. Plant-derived natural products have been recognized as bioactive agents with several properties, including anti-protozoal and anti-inflammatory activities. The present review focuses on the antileishmanial activity of plant-derived natural products that are able to modulate the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The capability of crude extracts and some isolated substances in promoting an anti-inflammatory response during Leishmania infection may be used as part of an effective strategy to fight the disease. PMID:26538837

  10. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences. PMID:25043880

  11. Antibacterial natural products in medicinal chemistry--exodus or revival?

    PubMed

    von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Hinzen, Berthold; Weigand, Stefan; Häbich, Dieter

    2006-08-01

    To create a drug, nature's blueprints often have to be improved through semisynthesis or total synthesis (chemical postevolution). Selected contributions from industrial and academic groups highlight the arduous but rewarding path from natural products to drugs. Principle modification types for natural products are discussed herein, such as decoration, substitution, and degradation. The biological, chemical, and socioeconomic environments of antibacterial research are dealt with in context. Natural products, many from soil organisms, have provided the majority of lead structures for marketed anti-infectives. Surprisingly, numerous "old" classes of antibacterial natural products have never been intensively explored by medicinal chemists. Nevertheless, research on antibacterial natural products is flagging. Apparently, the "old fashioned" natural products no longer fit into modern drug discovery. The handling of natural products is cumbersome, requiring nonstandardized workflows and extended timelines. Revisiting natural products with modern chemistry and target-finding tools from biology (reversed genomics) is one option for their revival.

  12. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiyong

    2014-08-11

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences.

  13. Consumers of natural health products: natural-born pharmacovigilantes?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural health products (NHPs), such as herbal medicines and vitamins, are widely available over-the-counter and are often purchased by consumers without advice from a healthcare provider. This study examined how consumers respond when they believe they have experienced NHP-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in order to determine how to improve current safety monitoring strategies. Methods Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve consumers who had experienced a self-identified NHP-related ADR. Key emergent themes were identified and coded using content analysis techniques. Results Consumers were generally not comfortable enough with their conventional health care providers to discuss their NHP-related ADRs. Consumers reported being more comfortable discussing NHP-related ADRs with personnel from health food stores, friends or family with whom they had developed trusted relationships. No one reported their suspected ADR to Health Canada and most did not know this was possible. Conclusion Consumers generally did not report their suspected NHP-related ADRs to healthcare providers or to Health Canada. Passive reporting systems for collecting information on NHP-related ADRs cannot be effective if consumers who experience NHP-related ADRs do not report their experiences. Healthcare providers, health food store personnel, manufacturers and other stakeholders also need to take responsibility for reporting ADRs in order to improve current pharmacovigilance of NHPs. PMID:20184759

  14. α-glucosidase inhibitors from plants: A natural approach to treat diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Narwal, Smita; Kumar, Vipin; Prakash, Om

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disease characterized by abnormally high plasma glucose levels, leading to major complications, such as diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular diseases. One of the effective managements of diabetes mellitus, in particular, non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) to decrease postprandial hyperglycemia, is to retard the absorption of glucose by inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, such as α-glucosidase and α-amylase, in the digestive organs. α-Glucosidase is the key enzyme catalyzing the final step in the digestive process of carbohydrates. Hence, α-glucosidase inhibitors can retard the liberation of d-glucose from dietary complex carbohydrates and delay glucose absorption, resulting in reduced postprandial plasma glucose levels and suppression of postprandial hyperglycemia. In recent years, many efforts have been made to identify effective α-glucosidase inhibitors from natural sources in order to develop a physiologic functional food or lead compounds for use against diabetes. Many α-glucosidase inhibitors that are phytoconstituents, such as flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids,anthocyanins, glycosides, phenolic compounds, and so on, have been isolated from plants. In the present review, we focus on the constituents isolated from different plants having α-glucosidase inhibitory potency along with IC50 values. PMID:22096315

  15. α-glucosidase inhibitors from plants: A natural approach to treat diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Narwal, Smita; Kumar, Vipin; Prakash, Om

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disease characterized by abnormally high plasma glucose levels, leading to major complications, such as diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular diseases. One of the effective managements of diabetes mellitus, in particular, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) to decrease postprandial hyperglycemia, is to retard the absorption of glucose by inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, such as α-glucosidase and α-amylase, in the digestive organs. α-Glucosidase is the key enzyme catalyzing the final step in the digestive process of carbohydrates. Hence, α-glucosidase inhibitors can retard the liberation of d-glucose from dietary complex carbohydrates and delay glucose absorption, resulting in reduced postprandial plasma glucose levels and suppression of postprandial hyperglycemia. In recent years, many efforts have been made to identify effective α-glucosidase inhibitors from natural sources in order to develop a physiologic functional food or lead compounds for use against diabetes. Many α-glucosidase inhibitors that are phytoconstituents, such as flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids,anthocyanins, glycosides, phenolic compounds, and so on, have been isolated from plants. In the present review, we focus on the constituents isolated from different plants having α-glucosidase inhibitory potency along with IC50 values. PMID:22096315

  16. Marine natural products with anti-HIV activities in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuefeng; Liu, Juan; Yang, Bin; Lin, Xiuping; Yang, Xian-Wen; Liu, Yonghong

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms have been proven to be excellent sources of biologically active compounds against HIV. This review gives an overview of 132 natural products from marine sources obtained during the last decade (2002-2011), which exhibit anti-HIV activity toward different biological targets. Sponges contribute more than half of all anti-HIV natural products from marine organisms, mainly as alkaloids and cyclic depsipeptides. In addition, some macromolecules are considered as potential anti-HIV agents, including lectins from algae and marine invertebrates, as well as sulfated polysaccharides from algae. In the reviewed marine natural products, many active ingredients act as HIV entry inhibitors, one class of new anti-HIV agents, and may be regarded as potential candidates for the development of novel anti-HIV agents. The other features of development in the marine original anti-HIV natural products in this ten years are also discussed.

  17. Natural furocoumarins as inducers and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 1A1 in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Annette; Schmidt, Melanie; Schmitz, Hans-Joachim; Schrenk, Dieter

    2005-02-15

    Furocoumarins are natural plant constituents present in medicinal plants and in a variety of foods such as grapefruit juice. They are phototoxic and act as potent inhibitors of drug metabolism. We have investigated the interaction of four furocoumarins angelicin, bergamottin, isopimpinellin, and 8-methoxypsoralen with the expression and activity of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated CYP1A1 in rat hepatocytes in primary culture, both in the presence and absence of light. In intact hepatocytes pretreated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and in microsomes isolated thereof, all furocoumarins tested acted as potent inhibitors of CYP1A1 activity bergamottin being the most potent inhibitor in microsomes with an IC(50) of 10 nM in the presence and 60 nM in the absence of light. 8-Methoxypsoralen and angelicin led to a significant induction of CYP1A1 mRNA in hepatocytes, while all furocoumarins except bergamottin increased xenobiotic-responsive element-driven reporter gene expression in transfected H4IIE rat hepatoma cells when light was excluded. Furthermore, all furocoumarins tested induced the expression of endogenous, immunoreactive CYP1A1 protein, primarily in the dark. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that individual furocoumarins present in food and medicinal plants can interfere with AhR-regulated CYP1A1 expression and activity in at least three major ways, i.e., (i) act as highly potent inhibitors of the catalytic activity of CYP1A1 both in the presence and absence of light, (ii) induce CYP1A1 gene expression in the absence of light via activation of the AhR, and (iii) induce CYP1A1 gene expression without activation of the AhR.

  18. The automation of natural product structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, C

    2001-05-01

    The last two or three years have seen exciting developments in the field of computer-assisted structure elucidation (CASE) with a number of programs becoming commercially or freely available. This was the conditio sine qua non for CASE to be widely applied in the daily work of bench chemists and spectroscopists. A number of promising applications have been published in the area of structure generators, deterministic and stochastic CASE tools and property predictions, including the automatic distinction between natural products and artificial compounds, as well as the determination of 3-D structure from a connection table based on IR spectroscopy. Advancements in coupling techniques between chromatographic and spectroscopic methods demonstrate progress towards a fully automated structure elucidation or identification process starting at the earliest steps of obtaining crude extracts.

  19. Spectroscopic Characterization of a Natural Product: Anethole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Victoria P.; Newby, Josh J.

    2013-06-01

    Anethole [(E)-1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene] is a natural product molecule that is commonly recognized as the flavor component of anise, fennel, and licorice. Early jet-cooled spectroscopy of anethole showed the existence of two possible conformations, but did not address details of the vibronic structure. Here, we report the jet-cooled, laser-induced fluorescence and single vibronic level fluorescence spectra of anethole. Analysis of the spectra confirms the existence of two rotamers in the expansion that differ by the relative orientation of the methoxy and propenyl groups. The observed vibronic activity is similar to that of styrene and indicates planar symmetry of both rotamers. Vibrational assignments of anethole are assisted by density functional theory calculations and the results are compared with the analogous motions in styrene. V. H. Grassian, E. R. Bernstein, H. V. Secor and J. I. Seeman J. Phys. Chem. {93, 3470 (1989).

  20. Natural products: a safest approach for obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Neeru; Yadav, Neerja; Sharma, Surendra Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is recognized as a social problem, associated with serious health risks and increased mortality. Numerous trials have been conducted to find and develop new anti-obesity drugs through herbal sources to minimize adverse reactions associated with the present anti-obesity drugs. The use of natural products as medicine has been documented for hundreds of years in various traditional systems of medicines throughout the world. This review focuses on the medicinal plants such as Achyranthus aspera, Camellia sinensis, Emblica officinalis, Garcinia cambogia, Terminalia arjuna, etc., being used traditionally in Ayurvedic, Unani, Siddha and Chinese, etc., systems of medicine. The review also highlights recent reported phytochemicals such as escins, perennisosides, dioscin, gracillin, etc., and the various extracts of the plants like Nelumbo nucifera, Panax japonicas, Cichorium intybus, Cyperus rotundus, Paeonia suffruticosa, etc., which have been successfully identified for the treatment of obesity. PMID:22821661

  1. Novel Chemical Space Exploration via Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Rosén, Josefin; Gottfries, Johan; Muresan, Sorel; Backlund, Anders; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are a rich source of novel compound classes and new drugs. In the present study we have used the chemical space navigation tool ChemGPS-NP to evaluate the chemical space occupancy by NPs and bioactive medicinal chemistry compounds from the database WOMBAT. The two sets differ notable in coverage of chemical space, and tangible lead-like NPs were found to cover regions of chemical space that lack representation in WOMBAT. Property based similarity calculations were performed to identify NP neighbours of approved drugs. Several of the NPs revealed by this method, were confirmed to exhibit the same activity as their drug neighbours. The identification of leads from a NP starting point may prove a useful strategy for drug discovery, in the search for novel leads with unique properties. PMID:19265440

  2. CO Methanation for Synthetic Natural Gas Production.

    PubMed

    Kambolis, Anastasios; Schildhauer, Tilman J; Kröcher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Energy from woody biomass could supplement renewable energy production towards the replacement of fossil fuels. A multi-stage process involving gasification of wood and then catalytic transformation of the producer gas to synthetic natural gas (SNG) represents progress in this direction. SNG can be transported and distributed through the existing pipeline grid, which is advantageous from an economical point of view. Therefore, CO methanation is attracting a great deal of attention and much research effort is focusing on the understanding of the process steps and its further development. This short review summarizes recent efforts at Paul Scherrer Institute on the understanding of the reaction mechanism, the catalyst deactivation, and the development of catalytic materials with benign properties for CO methanation. PMID:26598405

  3. Discovering Natural Product Modulators to Overcome Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance caused by the overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. For several years, it appeared that direct inhibition of ABC transporters would be the cheapest and most efficient way to combat this problem. Unfortunately, progress in finding a potent, selective inhibitor to modulate ABC transporters and restore drug sensitivity in multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been slow and challenging. Candidate drugs should ideally be selective, potent and relatively non-toxic. Many researchers in recent years have turned their attention to utilizing natural products as the building blocks for the development of the next generation of inhibitors, especially after the disappointing results obtained from inhibitors of the first three generations at the clinical trial stage. The first step is to discover natural substances (distinct from the first three generation inhibitors) that are potent, selective and relatively non-toxic in order to be used clinically. Here, we present a brief overview of the prospect of using natural products to modulate the function of ABC drug transporters clinically and their impact on human physiology and pharmacology. PMID:21118092

  4. Natural Products as a Foundation for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products have contributed to the development of many drugs for diverse indications. While most U.S. pharmaceutical companies have reduced or eliminated their in-house natural product groups, new paradigms and new enterprises have evolved to carry on a role for natural products in the pharmaceutical industry. Many of the reasons for the decline in popularity of natural products are being addressed by the development of new techniques for screening and production. This overview aims to inform pharmacologists of current strategies and techniques that make natural products a viable strategic choice for inclusion in drug discovery programs. PMID:20161632

  5. Elucidating Molecular Interactions of Natural Inhibitors with HPV-16 E6 Oncoprotein through Docking Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Galande, Sneha; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Varma, Ashok K

    2014-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The life-threatening infection caused by HPV demands the need for designing anticancerous drugs. In the recent years, different compounds from natural origins, such as carrageenan, curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, indole-3-carbinol, jaceosidin, and withaferin, have been used as a hopeful source of anticancer therapy. These compounds have been shown to suppress HPV infection by different researchers. In the present study, we explored these natural inhibitors against E6 oncoprotein of high-risk HPV-16, which is known to inactivate the p53 tumor suppressor protein. A robust homology model of HPV-16 E6 was built to anticipate the interaction mechanism of E6 oncoprotein with natural inhibitory molecules using a structure-based drug designing approach. Docking analysis showed the interaction of these natural compounds with the p53-binding site of E6 protein residues 113-122 (CQKPLCPEEK) and helped the restoration of p53 functioning. Docking analysis, besides helping in silico validation of natural compounds, also helps understand molecular mechanisms of protein-ligand interactions.

  6. Elucidating Molecular Interactions of Natural Inhibitors with HPV-16 E6 Oncoprotein through Docking Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Lingaraja; Galande, Sneha; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Varma, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The life-threatening infection caused by HPV demands the need for designing anticancerous drugs. In the recent years, different compounds from natural origins, such as carrageenan, curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, indole-3-carbinol, jaceosidin, and withaferin, have been used as a hopeful source of anticancer therapy. These compounds have been shown to suppress HPV infection by different researchers. In the present study, we explored these natural inhibitors against E6 oncoprotein of high-risk HPV-16, which is known to inactivate the p53 tumor suppressor protein. A robust homology model of HPV-16 E6 was built to anticipate the interaction mechanism of E6 oncoprotein with natural inhibitory molecules using a structure-based drug designing approach. Docking analysis showed the interaction of these natural compounds with the p53-binding site of E6 protein residues 113-122 (CQKPLCPEEK) and helped the restoration of p53 functioning. Docking analysis, besides helping in silico validation of natural compounds, also helps understand molecular mechanisms of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:25031569

  7. Influence of natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitor on organics degradation and nitrogen transformation during sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Li, Kun; Chen, Meixue; Tong, Juan; Qi, Lu; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-01-01

    Sludge composting is one of the most widely used treatments for sewage sludge resource utilization. Natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitor (NI) are widely used during composting and land application for nitrogen conservation, respectively. Three composting reactors (A--the control, B--natural zeolite addition, and C--3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) addition) were established to investigate the influence of NI and natural zeolite addition on organics degradation and nitrogen transformation during sludge composting conducted at the lab scale. The results showed that, in comparison with the control, natural zeolite addition accelerated organics degradation and the maturity of sludge compost was higher, while the DMPP addition slowed down the degradation of organic matters. Meanwhile, the nitrogen transformation functional genes including those responses for nitrification (amoA and nxrA) and denitrification (narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ) were quantified through quantitative PCR (qPCR) to investigate the effects of natural zeolites and DMPP addition on nitrogen transformation. Although no significant difference in the abundance of nitrogen transformation functional genes was observed between treatments, addition of both natural zeolite and DMPP increases the final total nitrogen content by 48.6% and 23.1%, respectively. The ability of natural zeolite for nitrogen conservation was due to the absorption of NH3 by compost, and nitrogen conservation by DMPP was achieved by the source reduction of denitrification. Besides, it was assumed that the addition of natural zeolite and DMPP may affect the activity of these genes instead of the abundance. PMID:26358216

  8. Influence of natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitor on organics degradation and nitrogen transformation during sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Li, Kun; Chen, Meixue; Tong, Juan; Qi, Lu; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-01-01

    Sludge composting is one of the most widely used treatments for sewage sludge resource utilization. Natural zeolite and nitrification inhibitor (NI) are widely used during composting and land application for nitrogen conservation, respectively. Three composting reactors (A--the control, B--natural zeolite addition, and C--3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) addition) were established to investigate the influence of NI and natural zeolite addition on organics degradation and nitrogen transformation during sludge composting conducted at the lab scale. The results showed that, in comparison with the control, natural zeolite addition accelerated organics degradation and the maturity of sludge compost was higher, while the DMPP addition slowed down the degradation of organic matters. Meanwhile, the nitrogen transformation functional genes including those responses for nitrification (amoA and nxrA) and denitrification (narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ) were quantified through quantitative PCR (qPCR) to investigate the effects of natural zeolites and DMPP addition on nitrogen transformation. Although no significant difference in the abundance of nitrogen transformation functional genes was observed between treatments, addition of both natural zeolite and DMPP increases the final total nitrogen content by 48.6% and 23.1%, respectively. The ability of natural zeolite for nitrogen conservation was due to the absorption of NH3 by compost, and nitrogen conservation by DMPP was achieved by the source reduction of denitrification. Besides, it was assumed that the addition of natural zeolite and DMPP may affect the activity of these genes instead of the abundance.

  9. Validity of Eucaryote Inhibitors for Assessing Production and Grazing Mortality of Marine Bacterioplankton †

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gordon T.; Pace, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    Application of eucaryote inhibitors to the estimation of production and grazing mortality of bacterioplankton was evaluated. Exposure to a range of concentrations of thiram, cycloheximide, and neutral red (0.4 to 210, 36 to 1,777, 4 to 346 μM, respectively) was 98 to 100% effective at inhibiting growth of a chrysomonad in culture. Exposure to colchicine and griseofulvin (50 to 1,000 μM for both) yielded only 24 to 94 and 53 to 79% inhibition, respectively. Exposures to thiram, neutral red, and griseofulvin were 90 to 100% effective at inhibiting growth in culture of a ciliate, Cyclidium sp., and the responses to colchicine and cycloheximide were variable (64 to 100 and 0 to 100% inhibition, respectively). Thiram and neutral red inhibited field populations of nanozooplankton more effectively than cycloheximide and colchicine. Direct effects of eucaryote inhibitors on growing cultures of bacterioplankton varied with parameters measured and duration of exposure. After 3-day exposures, specific growth rates and “instantaneous” heterotrophic potential ([14C]glucose uptake) were not consistently affected, but biosynthetic activity (RNA and DNA syntheses) was depressed. The degree of inhibition of isolates and field populations of phytoplankton depended upon type of inhibitor and phytoplankton species. In field experiments, it was possible to calculate rates of bacterioplankton production and grazing mortality for only 16 of 29 inhibitor experiments and for 4 of 10 size fractionation experiments. Bacterioplankton production and mortality estimates varied greatly with the eucaryote inhibitor used, and those derived from inhibition techniques were substantially different from those derived from fractionation techniques. The poor performances of both techniques are attributed to the following: (i) effects of inhibitors on phytoplankton, (ii) indirect effects of the inhibitors on bacterioplankton, and (iii) insufficient separation of grazers from prey by filtration

  10. Natural gas production from Arctic gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The natural gas hydrates of the Messoyakha field in the West Siberian basin of Russia and those of the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area on the North Slope of Alaska occur within a similar series of interbedded Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstone and siltstone reservoirs. Geochemical analyses of gaseous well-cuttings and production gases suggest that these two hydrate accumulations contain a mixture of thermogenic methane migrated from a deep source and shallow, microbial methane that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or was first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. Studies of well logs and seismic data have documented a large free-gas accumulation trapped stratigraphically downdip of the gas hydrates in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area. The presence of a gas-hydrate/free-gas contact in the Prudhoe Bay-Kuparuk River area is analogous to that in the Messoyakha gas-hydrate/free-gas accumulation, from which approximately 5.17x10[sup 9] cubic meters (183 billion cubic feet) of gas have been produced from the hydrates alone. The apparent geologic similarities between these two accumulations suggest that the gas-hydrated-depressurization production method used in the Messoyakha field may have direct application in northern Alaska. 30 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Use of natural health products in children

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Andrea; Etchegary, Holly; Godwin, Marshall; McCrate, Farah; Crellin, John; Mathews, Maria; Law, Rebecca; Newhook, Leigh Anne; Kinden, Jody

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a more thorough understanding of why parents choose to give their children natural health products (NHPs), parents’ sources of information about NHPs, and the extent of disclosure and conversation with family doctors about the use of NHPs. Design Qualitative study. Setting Newfoundland and Labrador. Participants Parents of children who were using NHPs (N = 20). Methods Individual, semistructured interviews were carried out with parents to obtain a better understanding of the reasoning behind the use of NHPs. Key themes emerging from the qualitative data were identified according to a number of criteria, including relevance to the research objectives, frequency with which a theme was mentioned, relative importance of the themes based on the amount of text taken up to address an issue, and emphasis (eg, emphatic or emotional speech). Main findings The types of NHPs used by parents participating in this study varied, except for the use of multivitamins. In addition, use of the products themselves was variable and inconsistent. Parents reported few concerns about the use of NHPs. The most commonly reported source of information about NHPs was family and friends. Most participants had not spoken to their family doctors about the use of NHPs. Conclusion Participants considered NHPs to be “natural” and seemed to equate this assessment with safety. This might explain why these parents sought advice and information from family and friends rather than from their family doctors and often failed to disclose the use of NHPs to their children’s family doctors. PMID:23946044

  12. Chocolate: A Marvelous Natural Product of Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Ginger

    2004-08-01

    Chocolate is a natural product as ubiquitous as television. Of course, it is eaten, but it is also found in air fresheners, marking pens, flavoring in a multitude of products including soda pop, and as an aroma in "chocolate-dyed" T-shirts. However, most of us are completely unaware of the complex chemical reactions that take place to produce chocolate and the necessary technology that has evolved to produce chocolate and all its byproducts. Processing results in a mixture of many components, an interesting contrast to most of the simple, one-step reactions introduced at the high school level. This article is a survey of chocolate from tree to table. After a brief introduction to the history of chocolate and how and where it is grown, the manufacturing process is examined, and the chemistry is explored. A bit of the jargon used in the industry is mentioned. Cocoa butter is a significant ingredient in chocolate, and an investigation of it introduces triglycerides, fatty acids, polymorphic behavior, and molecular packing of the fats in chocolate and how they affect the tempering process. There is a brief discussion of chocolate's non-Newtonian behavior and the resulting challenges presented in the manufacturing process. See Featured Molecules Featured on the Cover

  13. Production of a specific extracellular inhibitor of TRPM3 channels

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, J; Milligan, C J; Zeng, F; Jones, C; Beech, D J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Isoform-specific ion channel blockers are useful for target validation in drug discovery and can provide the basis for new therapeutic agents and aid in determination of physiological functions of ion channels. The aim of this study was to generate a specific blocker of human TRPM3 channels as a tool to help investigations of this member of the TRP cationic channel family. Experimental approach: A polyclonal antibody (TM3E3) was made to a conserved peptide of the third extracellular (E3) loop of TRPM3 and tested for binding and functional effect. Studies of channel activity were made by whole-cell planar patch-clamp and fura-2 intracellular Ca2+ measurement. Key results: Ionic current mediated by TRPM3 was inhibited partially by TM3E3 over a period of 5–10 min. Ca2+ entry in TRPM3-expressing cells was also partially inhibited by TM3E3 in a peptide-specific manner and independently of the type of agonist used to activate TRPM3. TM3E3 had no effect on TRPC5, TRPV4, TRPM2 or an endogenous ATP response. Conclusions and implications: The data show the successful development of a specific TRPM3 inhibitor and give further confidence in E3 targeting as an approach to producing isoform-specific ion channel blockers. PMID:18604232

  14. Use of natural health products in children

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Marshall; Crellin, John; Mathews, Maria; Chowdhury, Nurun L.; Newhook, Leigh Anne; Pike, Andrea; McCrate, Farah; Law, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine how common it is for parents to give natural health products (NHPs) to their children, which NHPs are being used, why they are being used, and parents’ assessments of the benefits and side effects of NHPs. Design Survey. Setting Newfoundland and Labrador. Participants Parents waiting in their family doctors’ offices. Main outcome measures Parent and child demographic characteristics; pediatric chronic medical conditions affecting the children; prescribed medications, over-the-counter medications, and NHPs used by the children; why the medications and NHPs were being used, the dose, and parents’ assessments of the effectiveness and side effects; and where parents had heard about the NHPs, whether they had told their physicians that the children were taking the products, and where they had obtained the products. Results A total of 202 (53.4%) of the 378 eligible adults who were approached completed the survey. This represented 333 children. Mean (SD) age of the children was 5.1 (3.3) years. Overall, 28.7% of parents reported using nonvitamin NHPs for their children. A total of 137 children (41.1%) had taken NHPs (including vitamins); 61.1% of the NHPs being used were vitamins. The remainder fell under teas (primarily chamomile and green teas), echinacea, fish or omega-3 oils, and a large category of “other” products. These NHPs were most commonly used to improve general health, improve immunity, and prevent colds and infections. Approximately half of the parents (51.7%) believed their children had benefited from taking NHPs, and 4.4% believed their children had experienced adverse side effects. Slightly less than half of the parents (45.0%) had informed their physicians that their children were taking NHPs. Conclusion Overall, 45.5% of parents attending physicians’ offices reported using NHPs in their children. If vitamins are not included in the definition of NHPs, this rate drops to 28.7%. Parents most commonly use NHPs

  15. The polygenic nature of inhibitors in hemophilia A: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Schwarz, John; Menius, Erika D.; Pavlova, Anna; Oldenburg, Johannes; Kessing, Bailey; DiMichele, Donna M.; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Studies of determinants of development of inhibitory Abs to factor VIII in people with hemophilia A indicate a complex process involving multiple factors. The Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort was formed to extend our understanding of the genetic background of risk. The study group contains 833 subjects from 3 independent cohorts: brother pairs and singletons with and without a history of inhibitors, as well as 104 brother pairs discordant for inhibitor status. Using an Illumina iSelect platform, 13 331 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from 1081 genes, primarily immune response and immune modifier genes, were typed. Each cohort was analyzed separately with results combined using a meta-analytic technique. After adjustment for potential confounders, 53 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be significant predictors of inhibitor status using the criteria of odds ratios in the same direction in all cohorts or allowing for a 20% interval around an odds ratio = 1 in 1 of the 3 and significant in at least 2. Of the 53 markers, 13 had meta P < .001. Eight of the 53 were significant predictors among the discordant pairs. Results support the complexity of the immune response and encourage further research with the goal of understanding the pathways involved. PMID:23223434

  16. Production, purification and characterisation of recombinant Fahsin, a novel antistasin-type proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Eric C; Roem, Dorina; Bulder, Ingrid; Dieker, Miranda; Voerman, Gerard; Hack, C Erik

    2005-11-01

    Serine proteinases from inflammatory cells, including polymorphonuclear neutrophils, are involved in various inflammatory disorders, like pulmonary emphysema and rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibitors of these serine proteinases are potential drug candidates for the treatment of these disorders, since they prevent the unrestricted proteolysis. This study describes a novel specific antistasin-type inhibitor of neutrophil serine proteinases, we called Fahsin. This inhibitor was purified from the Nile leech Limnatis nilotica, sequenced and heterologously expressed using a synthetic gene in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, yielding 0.5 g(-l) of the protein in the culture medium. Recombinant Fahsin was purified to homogeneity and characterised by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Inhibition-kinetic analysis showed that recombinant Fahsin is a fast, tight-binding inhibitor of human neutrophil elastase with inhibition constant in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, recombinant Fahsin was, in contrast to various other neutrophil elastase inhibitors, insensitive to chemical oxidation and biological oxidation via myeloperoxidase-generated free oxygen radicals. Thus, Fahsin constitutes a novel member of a still expanding family of naturally occurring inhibitors of serine proteinases with potential therapeutic use for treatment of human diseases.

  17. A Historical Overview of Natural Products in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Daniel A.; Urban, Sylvia; Roessner, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Historically, natural products have been used since ancient times and in folklore for the treatment of many diseases and illnesses. Classical natural product chemistry methodologies enabled a vast array of bioactive secondary metabolites from terrestrial and marine sources to be discovered. Many of these natural products have gone on to become current drug candidates. This brief review aims to highlight historically significant bioactive marine and terrestrial natural products, their use in folklore and dereplication techniques to rapidly facilitate their discovery. Furthermore a discussion of how natural product chemistry has resulted in the identification of many drug candidates; the application of advanced hyphenated spectroscopic techniques to aid in their discovery, the future of natural product chemistry and finally adopting metabolomic profiling and dereplication approaches for the comprehensive study of natural product extracts will be discussed. PMID:24957513

  18. Naturally occurring variability in the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 and development of cell entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brower, Evan T; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-23

    Naturally occurring genetic variability across HIV-1 subtypes causes amino acid polymorphisms in encoded HIV-1 proteins including the envelope glycoproteins associated with viral entry. The effects of amino acid polymorphisms on the mechanism of HIV-1 entry into cells, a process initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor, are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that amino acid polymorphisms affect the structural stability and domain cooperativity of gp120 and that those differences are reflected in the binding mechanism of the viral envelope glycoprotein to the cell surface receptor and coreceptor. Moreover, subtype differences also affect the binding behavior of experimental HIV cell entry inhibitors. While gp120-A has a slightly lower denaturation temperature than gp120-B, the most notable stability difference is that for gp120-B the van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratio (DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH) is 0.95 whereas for gp120-A is 0.6, indicative of more cooperative domain/domain interactions in gp120-B, as this protein more closely approaches a two-state transition. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that CD4 and 17b (a surrogate antibody for the chemokine coreceptor) exhibit 7- and 3-fold weaker binding affinities for gp120-A. The binding of these proteins as well as that of the experimental entry inhibitor NBD-556 induces smaller conformational changes in gp120-A as evidenced by significantly smaller binding enthalpies and binding entropies. Together, these results describe the effects of gp120 polymorphisms on binding to host cell receptors and emphasize that guidelines for developing future entry inhibitors must recognize and deal with genomic differences between HIV strains.

  19. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura C.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, these new antagonists appear to suppress P. aeruginosa virulence factor production through a pathway that is independent of LasR and RhlR. PMID:25597392

  20. Structure and Function of Macroalgal Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Young, Ryan M; Schoenrock, Kathryn M; von Salm, Jacqueline L; Amsler, Charles D; Baker, Bill J

    2015-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of marine phyco-derived secondary metabolites in the 1950s there has been a rapid increase in the description of new algal natural products. These metabolites have multiple ecological roles as well as commercial value as potential drugs or lead compounds. With the emergence of resistance to our current arsenal of drugs as well as the development of new chemotherapies for currently untreatable diseases, new compounds must be sourced. As outlined in this chapter algae produce a diverse range of chemicals many of which have potential for the treatment of human afflictions.In this chapter we outline the classes of metabolites produced by this chemically rich group of organisms as well as their respective ecological roles in the environment. Algae are found in nearly every environment on earth, with many of these organisms possessing the ability to shape the ecosystem they inhabit. With current challenges to climate stability, understanding how these important organisms interact with their environment as well as one another might afford better insight into how they respond to a changing climate.

  1. Computational Study on New Natural Compound Inhibitors of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Yu, Shanshan; Su, Jing; Sun, Liankun

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) are key enzymes in glucose metabolism, negatively regulating pyruvate dehyrogenase complex (PDC) activity through phosphorylation. Inhibiting PDKs could upregulate PDC activity and drive cells into more aerobic metabolism. Therefore, PDKs are potential targets for metabolism related diseases, such as cancers and diabetes. In this study, a series of computer-aided virtual screening techniques were utilized to discover potential inhibitors of PDKs. Structure-based screening using Libdock was carried out following by ADME (adsorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and toxicity prediction. Molecular docking was used to analyze the binding mechanism between these compounds and PDKs. Molecular dynamic simulation was utilized to confirm the stability of potential compound binding. From the computational results, two novel natural coumarins compounds (ZINC12296427 and ZINC12389251) from the ZINC database were found binding to PDKs with favorable interaction energy and predicted to be non-toxic. Our study provide valuable information of PDK-coumarins binding mechanisms in PDK inhibitor-based drug discovery. PMID:26959013

  2. Study of Ellagic Acid as a Natural Elastase Inhibitor by Spectroscopic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X.; Yang, X.; Cao, Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A new natural inhibitor, ellagic acid (EA), was developed, and its inhibition efficiency on elastase was studied by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results proved that EA is a potent elastase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 1.44 mg/mL by UV-vis spectroscopy, and the inhibition mechanism of elastase was confirmed by fluorescence quenching. The interacting between EA and elastase was mainly based on the static quenching owing to the complex formation when the concentration of EA was ≤40 μM. Fluorescence quenching mainly occurred via dynamic quenching with increasing EA concentration. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH and ΔS were calculated to be -86.35 kJ/mol and -165.88 J/mol · K, respectively, indicating that the interactions between EA and elastase were mainly due to van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding. The synchronous fl uorescence spectra showed that binding of EA to elastase can induce conformational changes in elastase.

  3. Evaluation of Potential Genotoxicity of HIV Entry Inhibitors Derived from Natural Sources

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E.; Arra, Manoj; Liu, Yanze; Guo, Huijun; Swartz, Glenn; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Breneman, Curt; Shekhtman, Alexander; Canki, Mario

    2014-01-01

    AIDS is a global pandemic that has seen the development of novel and effective treatments to improve the quality of life of those infected and reduction of spread of the disease. Palmitic Acid (PA), which we identified and isolated from Sargassum fusiforme, is a naturally occurring fatty acid that specifically inhibits HIV entry by binding to a novel pocket on the CD4 receptor. We also identified a structural analogue, 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), as a more effective HIV entry inhibitor with a 20-fold increase in efficacy. We have used the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of 2-BP as a platform to identify new small chemical molecules that fit into the various identified active sites in an effort to identify more potent CD4 entry inhibitors. To validate further drug development, we tested the PA and 2-BP scaffold molecules for genotoxic potential. The FDA and International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) recommends using a standardized 3-test battery for testing compound genotoxicity consisting of the bacterial reverse mutation assay, mouse lymphoma assay, and rat micronucleus assay. PA and 2-BP and their metabolites tested negative in all three genotoxicty tests. 2-BP is the first derivative of PA to undergo pre-clinical screening, which will enable us to now test multiple simultaneous small chemical structures based on activity in scaffold modeling across the dimension of pre-clinical testing to enable transition to human testing. PMID:24667334

  4. Analogs of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors clear malaria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Tor, Anna; Wilkinson, Barrie; Moss, Steven; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G; Bautista, José M; Mirando, Adam C; Francklyn, Christopher S; Varon, Sònia; Royo, Miriam; Cortés, Alfred; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2014-12-23

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Emerging resistance to existing antimalarial drugs drives the search for new antimalarials, and protein translation is a promising pathway to target. Here we explore the potential of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family as a source of antimalarial drug targets. First, a battery of known and novel ARS inhibitors was tested against Plasmodium falciparum cultures, and their activities were compared. Borrelidin, a natural inhibitor of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS), stands out for its potent antimalarial effect. However, it also inhibits human ThrRS and is highly toxic to human cells. To circumvent this problem, we tested a library of bioengineered and semisynthetic borrelidin analogs for their antimalarial activity and toxicity. We found that some analogs effectively lose their toxicity against human cells while retaining a potent antiparasitic activity both in vitro and in vivo and cleared malaria from Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice, resulting in 100% mice survival rates. Our work identifies borrelidin analogs as potent, selective, and unexplored scaffolds that efficiently clear malaria both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25489076

  5. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  6. Importance of microbial natural products and the need to revitalize their discovery.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L

    2014-02-01

    Microbes are the leading producers of useful natural products. Natural products from microbes and plants make excellent drugs. Significant portions of the microbial genomes are devoted to production of these useful secondary metabolites. A single microbe can make a number of secondary metabolites, as high as 50 compounds. The most useful products include antibiotics, anticancer agents, immunosuppressants, but products for many other applications, e.g., antivirals, anthelmintics, enzyme inhibitors, nutraceuticals, polymers, surfactants, bioherbicides, and vaccines have been commercialized. Unfortunately, due to the decrease in natural product discovery efforts, drug discovery has decreased in the past 20 years. The reasons include excessive costs for clinical trials, too short a window before the products become generics, difficulty in discovery of antibiotics against resistant organisms, and short treatment times by patients for products such as antibiotics. Despite these difficulties, technology to discover new drugs has advanced, e.g., combinatorial chemistry of natural product scaffolds, discoveries in biodiversity, genome mining, and systems biology. Of great help would be government extension of the time before products become generic. PMID:23990168

  7. The impact of enzyme engineering upon natural product glycodiversification

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gavin J; Gantt, Richard W; Thorson, Jon S

    2015-01-01

    Glycodiversification of natural products is an effective strategy for small molecule drug development. Recently, improved methods for chemo-enzymatic synthesis of glycosyl donors has spurred the characterization of natural product glycosyltransferases (GTs), revealing that the substrate specificity of many naturally occurring GTs as too stringent for use in glycodiversification. Protein engineering of natural product GTs has emerged as an attractive approach to overcome this limitation. This review highlights recent progress in the engineering/evolution of enzymes relevant to natural product glycodiversification with a particular focus upon GTs. PMID:18678278

  8. Exploration of natural enzyme inhibitors with hypoglycemic potentials amongst Eucalyptus Spp. by in vitro assays

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Baishakhi; Mitra, Analava; Katakam, Prakash; Singla, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence and potency of natural enzyme inhibitors with hypoglycemic potentials amongst Eucalyptus Spp. by in vitro assays. METHODS: The leaf extracts of the three different Eucalyptus species [E. globulus (EG), E. citriodora (EC), E. camaldulensis (ECA)] were subjected to in vitro assay procedures to explore the prevalence of natural enzyme inhibitors (NEIs) after preliminary qualitative and quantitative phytochemical evaluations, to study their inhibitory actions against the enzymes like α-amylase, α-glucosidase, aldose reductase, angiotensin converting enzyme and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 playing pathogenic roles in type 2 diabetes. The antioxidant potential and total antioxidant capacity of the species were also evaluated. RESULTS: Major bioactive compounds like polyphenols (341.75 ± 3.63 to 496.85 ± 3.98) and flavonoids (4.89 ± 0.01 to 7.15 ± 0.02) were found in appreciable quantity in three species. Based on the IC50 values of the extracts under investigation, in all assays the effectivity was in the order of EG > ECA > EC. The results of the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay showed that the reducing ability of the species was also in the order of EG > ECA > EC. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.81-0.99) was found between the phenolic contents and the inhibitory potentials of the extracts against the targeted enzymes. CONCLUSION: These results show immense hypoglycemic potentiality of the Eucalyptus Spp. and a remarkable source of NEIs for a future phytotherapeutic approach in Type 2 diabetes. PMID:24748933

  9. Blood cholinesterase in rats fed an insect resistance apple clone containing a natural cholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Stoewsand, G S; Anderson, J L; Brown, S K

    1994-01-01

    A crab apple clone (Malus brevipes 1021), highly resistant to the apple maggot, is being used in breeding programs developing commercial apple cultivars. This study has discovered that this crab apple contains a natural cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor that caused a 17.5% in vitro inhibition of rat blood ChE activity. This crab apple also showed a relatively high total (titratable) acidity of 1.28%. The commercial, nonresistant, apple cultivar McIntosh was capable of causing a 7.9% inhibition of blood ChE in vitro. The total acidity in McIntosh was 0.45%. A 4-wk feeding study compared 2 groups of 5-wk-old Fischer 344 male rats fed diets containing 45% of either M. brevipes or McIntosh freeze-dried apples to a third (control) group of rats fed a semipurified diet. In vivo blood ChE activities were similar in all groups of rats, as well as hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell counts. The liver mixed-function oxidase activity through aminopyrine N-demethylase in the rats fed the apple diets was higher than the controls, but p-nitroanisole O-demethylase activity was induced only in the animals fed the maggot-resistant crab apple. Lowered growth with concomitant lowered food intake, in the otherwise healthy rats fed the maggot-resistant crab apple diet, was attributed to the less palatable, highly acidic fruit. This study indicates that the natural ChE inhibitor in the insect-resistant apple M. brevipes is apparently detoxified upon ingestion.

  10. Screening alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors from natural compounds by molecular docking in silico.

    PubMed

    Jhong, Chien-Hung; Riyaphan, Jirawat; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chia, Yi-Chen; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor is a common oral anti-diabetic drug used for controlling carbohydrates normally converted into simple sugars and absorbed by the intestines. However, some adverse clinical effects have been observed. The present study seeks an alternative drug that can regulate the hyperglycemia by down-regulating alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activity by molecular docking approach to screen the hyperglycemia antagonist against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase activities from the 47 natural compounds. The docking data showed that Curcumin, 16-hydroxy-cleroda-3,13-dine-16,15-olide (16-H), Docosanol, Tetracosanol, Antroquinonol, Berberine, Catechin, Quercetin, Actinodaphnine, and Rutin from 47 natural compounds had binding ability towards alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase as well. Curcumin had a better biding ability of alpha-amylase than the other natural compounds. Analyzed alpha-glucosidase activity reveals natural compound inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) are Curcumin, Actinodaphnine, 16-H, Quercetin, Berberine, and Catechin when compared to the commercial drug Acarbose (3 mM). A natural compound with alpha-amylase inhibitors (below 0.5 mM) includes Curcumin, Berberine, Docosanol, 16-H, Actinodaphnine/Tetracosanol, Catechin, and Quercetin when compared to Acarbose (1 mM). When taken together, the implication is that molecular docking is a fast and effective way to screen alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase inhibitors as lead compounds of natural sources isolated from medicinal plants.

  11. Natural Product Biosynthetic Diversity and Comparative Genomics of the Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Elke; Gugger, Muriel; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of slow-growing photosynthetic bacteria and a prolific source of natural products with intricate chemical structures and potent biological activities. The bulk of these natural products are known from just a handful of genera. Recent efforts have elucidated the mechanisms underpinning the biosynthesis of a diverse array of natural products from cyanobacteria. Many of the biosynthetic mechanisms are unique to cyanobacteria or rarely described from other organisms. Advances in genome sequence technology have precipitated a deluge of genome sequences for cyanobacteria. This makes it possible to link known natural products to biosynthetic gene clusters but also accelerates the discovery of new natural products through genome mining. These studies demonstrate that cyanobacteria encode a huge variety of cryptic gene clusters for the production of natural products, and the known chemical diversity is likely to be just a fraction of the true biosynthetic capabilities of this fascinating and ancient group of organisms.

  12. Advanced glycation end-products inhibitors isolated from Schisandra grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Poornima, B; Kumar, D Anand; Siva, Bandi; Venkanna, A; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Kumar, K; Tiwari, Ashok K; Babu, K Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Free radicals scavenging and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) inhibitory potentials in crude chloroform extract of Schisandra grandiflora were evaluated. Bioassay-guided isolation of the chloroform extract led to the identification of 24 compounds. Among the isolates, ( ± ) gomisin M1, arisantetralone C and D, macelignan, saurulignan B and SZ-MO displayed potent-free radical scavenging as well as AGEs inhibitory potentials. This is the first report identifying the presence of AGEs inhibitory activity and assigning AGEs inhibitory activity to these compounds. Therefore, our research finds new application of traditional medicinal plant S. grandiflora having capacity to reduce formation and accumulation of AGEs in diabetes.

  13. Dearomatization Strategies in the Synthesis of Complex Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Stéphane P.; Porco, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Evolution in the field of the total synthesis of natural products has led to exciting developments over the last decade. Numerous chemo-selective and enantioselective methodologies have emerged from total syntheses, resulting in efficient access to many important natural product targets. This Review highlights recent developments concerning dearomatization, a powerful strategy for the total synthesis of architecturally complex natural products wherein planar, aromatic scaffolds are converted to three-dimensional molecular architectures. PMID:21506209

  14. Marine Natural Products: A Way to New Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of marine natural products (low molecular weight bioregulators) is a rapidly developing scientific field at the intersection of biology and chemistry. Investigations aimed at detecting, identifying, and understanding the structure of marine natural products have led to the discovery of 20,000 new substances, including those characterized by an extremely high physiological activity. Some results and prospects of works aimed at creating new drugs on the basis of marine natural products are discussed herein. PMID:22649599

  15. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation.

  16. Chloroplastic oxidative burst induced by tenuazonic acid, a natural photosynthesis inhibitor, triggers cell necrosis in Eupatorium adenophorum Spreng.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Yin, Chunyan; Qiang, Sheng; Zhou, Fenyan; Dai, Xinbin

    2010-03-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA), a nonhost-specific phytotoxin produced by Alternaria alternata, was determined to be a novel natural photosynthesis inhibitor owning several action sites in chloroplasts. To further elucidate the mode of its action, studies were conducted to assess the production and involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the toxic activity of TeA. A series of experiments indicated that TeA treatment can induce chloroplast-derived ROS generation including not only (1)O(2) but also superoxide radical, H(2)O(2) and hydroxyl radicals in Eupatorium adenophorum mesophyll cells, resulting from electron leakage and charge recombination in PSII as well as thylakoid overenergization due to inhibition of the PSII electron transport beyond Q(A) and the reduction of end acceptors on the PSI acceptor side and chloroplast ATPase activity. The initial production of TeA-induced ROS was restricted to chloroplasts and accompanied with a certain degree of chloroplast damage. Subsequently, abundant ROS were quickly dispersed throughout whole cell and cellular compartments, causing a series of irreversible cellular harm such as chlorophyll breakdown, lipid peroxidation, plasma membrane rupture, chromatin condensation, DNA cleavage, and organelle disintegration, and finally resulting in rapid cell destruction and leaf necrosis. These results show that TeA causing cell necrosis of host-plants is a result of direct oxidative damage from chloroplast-mediated ROS eruption.

  17. Solid phase synthesis of complex natural products and libraries thereof.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, K C; Pfefferkorn, J A

    2001-01-01

    Natural products have served as an important source of medicinal compounds and pharmaceutical leads over the last century. Within the last 10 years, significant interest has developed in applying combinatorial chemistry techniques to the study of natural products and their biological activities. In this review, we examine several representative efforts wherein natural product skeletons have been constructed or immobilized on solid support and subsequently derivatized, giving rise to analog libraries useful in understanding the structure-activity relationships of the parent natural product. Issues such as target selection, library design, linker development, automation, and library characterization are addressed. PMID:11774224

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors modulate kynurenic acid production in rat brain cortex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zakrocka, Izabela; Turski, Waldemar A; Kocki, Tomasz

    2016-10-15

    It is well established that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the brain and that glutamate activates the brain centers responsible for blood pressure control. An antagonist of glutamate, kynurenic acid (KYNA) was shown to decrease blood pressure after intracerebral administration. KYNA is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan produced from the breakdown of kynurenine by kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT), mainly within astrocytes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (lisinopril, perindopril and ramipril) on KYNA production and KAT activity in the rat brain cortex in vitro. The effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on KYNA production was examined on rat brain cortical slices incubated for 2h in the presence of l-kynurenine and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To analyze KAT I and KAT II activity, brain cortical homogenates were incubated for 2h with L-kynurenine and the tested drugs. KYNA was separated by HPLC and quantified fluorometrically. Among the examined angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, lisinopril increased KYNA production, perindopril was ineffective, and ramipril decreased KYNA synthesis in rat brain cortical slices. Lisinopril increased KAT I activity and perindopril did not affect it. However, ramipril lowered KAT I activity in rat brain cortex in vitro. Neither lisinopril nor perindopril affected KAT II activity, but ramipril decreased KAT II activity in the rat brain cortex in vitro. Our study reveals that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors show various influences on KYNA production in rat brain cortical slices and activity of KATs.

  19. [Current impact of natural products in the discovery of anticancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Monneret, C

    2010-07-01

    Since the middle of 1990s, the development of combinatorial chemistry along with the high throughput screening have led to some lack of interest for natural products from the pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, purification and optimization of natural compounds are very often difficult and animal experimentations need enough supply of natural sources or alternatively need sophisticated total synthesis. In oncology, this increased disinterest was also closely connected with the rapid expansion of monoclonal antibodies and synthetic protein kinase inhibitors. However since 2005, with the approval of five new drugs by the FDA (trabectedin, ixabepilone, temsirolimus, everolimus and Vinflunine), it appears that natural products are still present as direct or indirect sources of drugs. On the other hand, a third generation of natural product has arisen, which relies upon bioengineering using genetically altered producer organisms. This is particularly true of the polyketides where bioengineering harnesses their natural flexibility to expand their structural diversity. Several programs are going on to produce antibiotics, anticancer drugs or immunosuppressant. This combinatorial approach makes drug discovery by bioengineering complementary with conventional medicinal chemistry. With the approval of Mylotarg by the FDA, increased interest has also been devoted to immunoconjugates, which represent a way by which highly cytotoxic natural products such as dolastatin, calicheamycin, duocarmycin and maytansin may be targeted to cancer cells while limiting their side-effects. PMID:20637355

  20. Flocculation Causes Inhibitor Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Second-Generation Bioethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Johan O.; Mapelli, Valeria; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast has long been considered the microorganism of choice for second-generation bioethanol production due to its fermentative capacity and ethanol tolerance. However, tolerance toward inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic materials is still an issue. Flocculating yeast strains often perform relatively well in inhibitory media, but inhibitor tolerance has never been clearly linked to the actual flocculation ability per se. In this study, variants of the flocculation gene FLO1 were transformed into the genome of the nonflocculating laboratory yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D. Three mutants with distinct differences in flocculation properties were isolated and characterized. The degree of flocculation and hydrophobicity of the cells were correlated to the length of the gene variant. The effect of different strength of flocculation on the fermentation performance of the strains was studied in defined medium with or without fermentation inhibitors, as well as in media based on dilute acid spruce hydrolysate. Strong flocculation aided against the readily convertible inhibitor furfural but not against less convertible inhibitors such as carboxylic acids. During fermentation of dilute acid spruce hydrolysate, the most strongly flocculating mutant with dense cell flocs showed significantly faster sugar consumption. The modified strain with the weakest flocculation showed a hexose consumption profile similar to the untransformed strain. These findings may explain why flocculation has evolved as a stress response and can find application in fermentation-based biorefinery processes on lignocellulosic raw materials. PMID:25172866

  1. Flocculation causes inhibitor tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for second-generation bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Westman, Johan O; Mapelli, Valeria; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J; Franzén, Carl Johan

    2014-11-01

    Yeast has long been considered the microorganism of choice for second-generation bioethanol production due to its fermentative capacity and ethanol tolerance. However, tolerance toward inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic materials is still an issue. Flocculating yeast strains often perform relatively well in inhibitory media, but inhibitor tolerance has never been clearly linked to the actual flocculation ability per se. In this study, variants of the flocculation gene FLO1 were transformed into the genome of the nonflocculating laboratory yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D. Three mutants with distinct differences in flocculation properties were isolated and characterized. The degree of flocculation and hydrophobicity of the cells were correlated to the length of the gene variant. The effect of different strength of flocculation on the fermentation performance of the strains was studied in defined medium with or without fermentation inhibitors, as well as in media based on dilute acid spruce hydrolysate. Strong flocculation aided against the readily convertible inhibitor furfural but not against less convertible inhibitors such as carboxylic acids. During fermentation of dilute acid spruce hydrolysate, the most strongly flocculating mutant with dense cell flocs showed significantly faster sugar consumption. The modified strain with the weakest flocculation showed a hexose consumption profile similar to the untransformed strain. These findings may explain why flocculation has evolved as a stress response and can find application in fermentation-based biorefinery processes on lignocellulosic raw materials.

  2. Secondary metabolomics: natural products mass spectrometry goes global.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Roland D; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2009-08-21

    A global LC-MS metabolite analysis of wild-type Pseudomonas auerigunosa and mutants targeting the natural product pyochelin revealed the production of previously unknown metabolites, the 2-alkyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole-4-carboxylates.

  3. Secondary metabolomics: natural products mass spectrometry goes global.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Roland D; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2009-08-21

    A global LC-MS metabolite analysis of wild-type Pseudomonas auerigunosa and mutants targeting the natural product pyochelin revealed the production of previously unknown metabolites, the 2-alkyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole-4-carboxylates. PMID:19817465

  4. How polyamine synthesis inhibitors and cinnamic acid affect tropane alkaloid production.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Patricia L; Alvarez, María A; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra I

    2007-01-01

    Hairy roots of Brugmansia candida produce the tropane alkaloids scopolamine and hyoscyamine. In an attempt to divert the carbon flux from competing pathways and thus enhance productivity, the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors cyclohexylamine (CHA) and methylglyoxal-bis-guanylhydrazone (MGBG) and the phenylalanine-ammonia-lyase inhibitor cinnamic acid were used. CHA decreased the specific productivity of both alkaloids but increased significantly the release of scopolamine (approx 500%) when it was added in the mid-exponential phase. However, when CHA was added for only 48 h during the exponential phase, the specific productivity of both alkaloids increased (approx 200%), favoring scopolamine. Treatment with MGBG was detrimental to growth but promoted release into the medium of both alkaloids. However, when it was added for 48 h during the exponential phase, MGBG increased the specific productivity (approx 200%) and release (250- 1800%) of both alkaloids. Cinnamic acid alone also favored release but not specific productivity. When a combination of CHA or MGBG with cinnamic acid was used, the results obtained were approximately the same as with each polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor alone, although to a lesser extent. Regarding root morphology, CHA inhibited growth of primary roots and ramification. However, it had a positive effect on elongation of lateral roots. PMID:17416978

  5. Engineered Biosynthesis of Natural Products in Heterologous Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Li, Bing-Zhi; Liu, Duo; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Yan; Jia, Bin; Zeng, Bo-Xuan; Zhao, Huimin; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms and plants are a major resource of antibacterial and anticancer drugs as well as industrially useful compounds. However, the native producers often suffer from low productivity and titers. Here we summarize the recent applications of heterologous biosynthesis for the production of several important classes of natural products such as terpenoids, flavonoids, alkaloids, and polyketides. In addition, we will discuss the new tools and strategies at multi-scale levels including gene, pathway, genome and community levels for highly efficient heterologous biosynthesis of natural products. PMID:25960127

  6. New natural products as new leads for antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Lister, Troy; May-Dracka, Tricia L

    2014-01-15

    Natural products have been a rich source of antibacterial drugs for many decades, but investments in this area have declined over the past two decades. The purpose of this review article is to provide a recent survey of new natural product classes and the mechanisms by which they work. PMID:24388805

  7. High rate of methane leakage from natural gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Natural gas production is growing as the United States seeks domestic sources of relatively clean energy. Natural gas combustion produces less carbon dioxide emissions than coal or oil for the amount of energy produced. However, one source of concern is that some natural gas leaks to the atmosphere from the extraction point, releasing methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

  8. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Erika A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody–drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products. PMID:26833854

  9. Marinopyrroles: Unique Drug Discoveries Based on Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongshi

    2016-01-01

    Natural products provide a successful supply of new chemical entities (NCEs) for drug discovery to treat human diseases. Approximately half of the NCEs are based on natural products and their derivatives. Notably, marine natural products, a largely untapped resource, have contributed to drug discovery and development with eight drugs or cosmeceuticals approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency, and ten candidates undergoing clinical trials. Collaborative efforts from drug developers, biologists, organic, medicinal, and natural product chemists have elevated drug discoveries to new levels. These efforts are expected to continue to improve the efficiency of natural product-based drugs. Marinopyrroles are examined here as a case study for potential anticancer and antibiotic agents.

  10. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Erika A; Gademann, Karl

    2016-03-14

    Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody-drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products.

  11. QSAR modeling and molecular interaction analysis of natural compounds as potent neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaying; Mei, Hu

    2016-04-26

    Different QSAR models of 40 natural compounds as neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs) are developed to comprehend chemical-biological interactions and predict activities against neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens. Based on the constitutional, topological and conformational descriptors, R(2) and Q(2) values of the obtained SRA model are 0.931 and 0.856. The R(2) and Q(2) values of the constructed HQSAR and almond models are 0.903 and 0.767, 0.904 and 0.511, respectively. Based on the pharmacophore alignment, R(2) and Q(2) values of the optimal CoMSIA model are 0.936 and 0.654. Moreover, Rtest(2) and Qext(2) of values of SRA, HQSAR, almond and CoMSIA models are 0.611 and 0.565, 0.753 and 0.750, 0.612 and 0.582, 0.582 and 0.571, respectively. So, QSAR models have good predictive capability. They can be further used to evaluate and screen new compounds. Moreover, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic factors have high contributions to activities. To understand molecular interactions between natural compounds and NA from Clostridium perfringens, molecular docking is investigated. The docking results elucidate that Arg266, Asp291, Asp328, Tyr485, Glu493, Arg555, Arg615 and Tyr655 are especially the key residues in the active site of 2bf6. Hydrogen bonds and electrostatics are key factors, which impact the interactions between NIs and NA. So, the influential factors of interactions between NIs and NA in the docking results are in agreement with the QSAR results. PMID:27008437

  12. Ansamycin inhibitors of Hsp90: nature's prototype for anti-chaperone therapy.

    PubMed

    Porter, James R; Ge, Jie; Lee, John; Normant, Emmanuel; West, Kip

    2009-01-01

    The ansamycin class of natural products is well known for its anti-tumor effects and has been extensively studied by cancer researchers for nearly four decades. The first description of geldanamycin in the scientific literature appeared in 1970 and nearly thirty years later the semi-synthetic derivative 17-AAG, or tanespimycin, entered Phase 1 clinical trials. In the subsequent years, three additional geldanamycin derivatives have entered clinical evaluation. Kosan Biosciences developed 17-DMAG or alvespimycin hydrochloride for clinical evaluation as both an intravenous and oral product. Infinity Pharmaceuticals is developing IPI-504 or retaspimycin hydrochloride as an intravenous product, which is in several Phase 2 clinical trials; IPI-504 is the hydroquinone hydrochloride salt of 17-AAG. More recently, Infinity Pharmaceuticals initiated a Phase 1 clinical trial with an oral formulation of 17-AG (IPI-493), the major metabolite of 17-AAG and IPI-504. Since a vast amount of scientific literature exists regarding the ansamycin field and Hsp90 inhibition, this review will survey key milestones in the development of the natural product class as anti-cancer drugs including discovery of the compounds and their anti-tumor effects, identification of Hsp90 as their biological target, the structure-activity relationships that have been identified in this interesting class of compounds, and development of clinical candidates for the treatment of cancer patients. A brief overview of important pre-clinical development data from each clinical lead is also provided.

  13. The Structural Biology of Enzymes Involved in Natural Product Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Phillips, George N.

    2012-01-01

    The glycosylation of microbial natural products often dramatically influences the biological and/or pharmacological activities of the parental metabolite. Over the past decade, crystal structures of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and attachment of novel sugars found appended to natural products have emerged. In many cases, these studies have paved the way to a better understanding of the corresponding enzyme mechanism of action and have served as a starting point for engineering variant enzymes to facilitate to production of differentially-glycosylated natural products. This review specifically summarizes the structural studies of bacterial enzymes involved in biosynthesis of novel sugar nucleotides. PMID:22688446

  14. Carotenoid inhibitors reduce strigolactone production and Striga hermonthica infection in rice.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Verstappen, Francel; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2010-12-01

    The strigolactones are internal and rhizosphere signalling molecules in plants that are biosynthesised through carotenoid cleavage. They are secreted by host roots into the rhizosphere where they signal host-presence to the symbiotic arbuscular mycrorrhizal (AM) fungi and the parasitic plants of the Orobanche, Phelipanche and Striga genera. The seeds of these parasitic plants germinate after perceiving these signalling molecules. After attachment to the host root, the parasite negatively affects the host plant by withdrawing water, nutrients and assimilates through a direct connection with the host xylem. In many areas of the world these parasites are a threat to agriculture but so far very limited success has been achieved to minimize losses due to these parasitic weeds. Considering the carotenoid origin of the strigolactones, in the present study we investigated the possibilities to reduce strigolactone production in the roots of plants by blocking carotenoid biosynthesis using carotenoid inhibitors. Hereto the carotenoid inhibitors fluridone, norflurazon, clomazone and amitrole were applied to rice either through irrigation or through foliar spray. Irrigation application of all carotenoid inhibitors and spray application of amitrole significantly decreased strigolactone production, Striga hermonthica germination and Striga infection, also in concentrations too low to affect growth and development of the host plant. Hence, we demonstrate that the application of carotenoid inhibitors to plants can affect S. hermonthica germination and attachment indirectly by reducing the strigolactone concentration in the rhizosphere. This finding is useful for further studies on the relevance of the strigolactones in rhizosphere signalling. Since these inhibitors are available and accessible, they may represent an efficient technology for farmers, including poor subsistence farmers in the African continent, to control these harmful parasitic weeds.

  15. Validity of eucaryote inhibitors for assessing production and grazing mortality of marine bacterioplankton. [Cyclidium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.T.; Pace, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Application of eucaryote inhibitors to the estimation of production and grazing mortality of bacterioplankton was evaluated. Exposure to a range of concentrations of thiram, cycloheximide, and neutral red (0.4 to 210, 36 to 1777, 4 to 346 ..mu..M, respectively) was 98 to 100% effective at inhibiting growth of a chrysomonad in culture. Exposure to colchicine and griseofulvin (50 to 1000 ..mu..M for both) yielded only 24 to 94 and 53 to 79% inhibition, respectively. Exposures to thiram, neutral red, and griseofulvin were 90 to 100% effective at inhibiting the growth in culture of a ciliate, Cyclidium sp., and the responses to colchicine and cycloheximide were variable (64 to 100 and 0 to 100% inhibition, respectively). Thiram and neutral red inhibited field populations of nanozooplankton more effectively than cycloheximide and colchicine. Direct effects of eucaryote inhibitors on growing cultures of bacterioplankton varied with parameters measured and duration of exposure. After 3-day exposures, specific growth rates and instantaneous heterotrophic potential ((/sup 14/C)glucose uptake) were not consistently affected, but biosynthetic activity (RNA and DNA syntheses) was depressed. The degree of inhibition of isolates and field populations of phytoplankton depended upon type of inhibitor and phytoplankton species. In field experiments, it was possible to calculate rates of bacterioplankton production and grazing mortality for only 16 of 29 inhibitor experiments and for 4 of 10 size fractionation experiments. Because of the inconsistent results obtained in this investigation, the authors strongly recommend exercising caution in the application of inhibitor techniques to ecological problems, especially in phototrophically dominated systems.

  16. Challenges and Triumphs to Genomics-Based Natural Product Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Paul R.; Chavarria, Krystle L.; Fenical, William; Moore, Bradley S.; Ziemert, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing is rapidly changing the field of natural products research by providing opportunities to assess the biosynthetic potential of strains prior to chemical analysis or biological testing. Ready access to sequence data is driving the development of new bioinformatic tools and methods to identify the products of silent or cryptic pathways. While genome mining has fast become a useful approach to natural product discovery, it has also become clear that identifying pathways of interest is much easier than finding the associated products. This has led to bottlenecks in the discovery process that must be overcome for the potential of genomics-based natural product discovery to be fully realized. In this perspective, we address some of these challenges in the context of our work with the marine actinomycete genus Salinispora, which is proving to be a useful model with which to apply genome mining as an approach to natural product discovery. PMID:24104399

  17. Products of the Black Sea alga Phyllophora nervosa as corrosion inhibitor for steel in acids

    SciTech Connect

    Popelyukh, G.M.; Andrianov, A.M.; Burtnenko, L.M.; Gazha, P.A.; Talavira, L.I.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the inhibiting properties of the processing products of the Black Sea red seaweed Phyllophora nervosa on specimens of steel St3 in phosphoric and hydrochloric acids of various concentrations at temperatures in the range from 30 to 95 /sup 0/C. They have studied how the concentrations of urotropin, sodium chloride, and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions influence the protective properties of the seaweed inhibitor. They have made preliminary investigations of the mechanisms of the protective action.

  18. Na+/H+ exchanger-1 inhibitors decrease myocardial superoxide production via direct mitochondrial action.

    PubMed

    Garciarena, Carolina D; Caldiz, Claudia I; Correa, María V; Schinella, Guillermo R; Mosca, Susana M; Chiappe de Cingolani, Gladys E; Cingolani, Horacio E; Ennis, Irene L

    2008-12-01

    The possibility of a direct mitochondrial action of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE-1) inhibitors decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed in cat myocardium. Angiotensin II and endothelin-1 induced an NADPH oxidase (NOX)-dependent increase in anion superoxide (O(2)(-)) production detected by chemiluminescence. Three different NHE-1 inhibitors [cariporide, BIIB-723, and EMD-87580] with no ROS scavenger activity prevented this increase. The mitochondria appeared to be the source of the NOX-dependent ROS released by the "ROS-induced ROS release mechanism" that was blunted by the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel blockers 5-hydroxydecanoate and glibenclamide, inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain with rotenone, and inhibition of the permeability transition pore (MPTP) by cyclosporin A. Cariporide also prevented O(2)(-) production induced by the opening of mK(ATP) with diazoxide. Ca(2+)-induced swelling was evaluated in isolated mitochondria as an indicator of MPTP formation. Cariporide decreased mitochondrial swelling to the same extent as cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid, confirming its direct mitochondrial action. Increased O(2)(-) production, as expected, stimulated ERK1/2 and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase phosphorylation. This was also prevented by cariporide, giving additional support to the existence of a direct mitochondrial action of NHE-1 inhibitors in preventing ROS release. In conclusion, we report a mitochondrial action of NHE-1 inhibitors that should lead us to revisit or reinterpret previous landmark observations about their beneficial effect in several cardiac diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Further studies are needed to clarify the precise mechanism and site of action of these drugs in blunting MPTP formation and ROS release. PMID:18801963

  19. Compound library development guided by protein structure similarity clustering and natural product structure.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marcus A; Wittenberg, Lars-Oliver; Basu, Sudipta; Jeyaraj, Duraiswamy A; Gourzoulidou, Eleni; Reinecke, Kerstin; Odermatt, Alex; Waldmann, Herbert

    2004-11-30

    To identify biologically relevant and drug-like protein ligands for medicinal chemistry and chemical biology research the grouping of proteins according to evolutionary relationships and conservation of molecular recognition is an established method. We propose to employ structure similarity clustering of the ligand-sensing cores of protein domains (PSSC) in conjunction with natural product guided compound library development as a synergistic approach for the identification of biologically prevalidated ligands with high fidelity. This is supported by the concepts that (i) in nature spatial structure is more conserved than amino acid sequence, (ii) the number of fold types characteristic for all protein domains is limited, and (iii) the underlying frameworks of natural product classes with multiple biological activities provide evolutionarily selected starting points in structural space. On the basis of domain core similarity considerations and irrespective of sequence similarity, Cdc25A phosphatase, acetylcholinesterase, and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases type 1 and type 2 were grouped into a similarity cluster. A 147-member compound collection derived from the naturally occurring Cdc25A inhibitor dysidiolide yielded potent and selective inhibitors of the other members of the similarity cluster with a hit rate of 2-3%. Protein structure similarity clustering may provide an experimental opportunity to identify supersites in proteins.

  20. Spatial and Temporal Control of Fungal Natural Product Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Yun; Keller, Nancy P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their oftentimes-elusive ecological role, fungal natural products have, for better or worse, impacted our daily lives tremendously owing to their diverse and potent bioactive properties. This Janus-faced nature of fungal natural products inevitably ushered in a field of research dedicated towards understanding the ecology, organisms, genes, enzymes, and biosynthetic pathways that give rise to this arsenal of diverse and complex chemistry. Ongoing research in fungal secondary metabolism has not only increased our appreciation for fungal natural products as an asset but also sheds light on the pivotal role that these once-regarded “metabolic wastes” play in fungal biology, defense, and stress response in addition to their potential contributions towards human mycoses. Full orchestration of secondary metabolism requires not only the seamless coordination between temporal and spatial control of SM-associated machineries (e.g. enzymes, cofactors, intermediates, and end-products) but also integration of these machineries into primary metabolic processes and established cellular mechanisms. An intriguing, but little known aspect of microbial natural product synthesis lies in the spatial organization of both pathway intermediates and enzymes responsible for the production of these compounds. In this highlight, we summarize some major breakthroughs in understanding the genes and regulation of fungal natural product synthesis and introduce the current state of knowledge on the spatial and temporal control of fungal natural product synthesis. PMID:25142354

  1. Using Video Production in Teaching Natural History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Linda S.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a course that uses video production projects to entice lower level students into independent field investigation, reinforce their scientific curiosity, and build their confidence in the value of their own observations. Discusses the rationale behind using video, the lab structure, the success of this approach, and logistics and…

  2. Investigation of the use of Maillard reaction inhibitors for the production of patatin-carbohydrate conjugates.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Karboune, Salwa

    2014-12-17

    Selected Maillard reaction inhibitors, including aminoguanidine, cysteine, pyridoxamine, and sodium bisulfite, were evaluated for their effect on the production of carbohydrate conjugated proteins with less cross-linking/browning. Patatin (PTT), a major potato protein, was glycated with galactose, xylose, galactooligosaccharides, xylooligosaccharides, galactan, and xylan under controlled conditions. The effectiveness of the inhibitors to control the glycation reaction was assessed by monitoring the glycation extent, the protein cross-linking, and the formation of dicarbonyl compounds. Sodium bisulfite was the most effective inhibitor for PTT-galactose and PTT-xylan reaction systems (reaction control ratios of 210.0 and 12.8). On the other hand, aminoguanidine and cysteine led to the highest reaction control ratios for the PTT-xylose/xylooligosaccharide (160.0 and 143.0) and PTT-galactooligosaccharides/galactan (663.0 and 71.0) reaction systems, respectively. The use of cysteine and aminoguanidine as inhibitors led to 1.7-99.4% decreases in the particle size distribution of the PTT conjugates and to 0.4-9.3% increases in their relative digestibility, per 5% blocked lysine.

  3. Investigation of the use of Maillard reaction inhibitors for the production of patatin-carbohydrate conjugates.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Karboune, Salwa

    2014-12-17

    Selected Maillard reaction inhibitors, including aminoguanidine, cysteine, pyridoxamine, and sodium bisulfite, were evaluated for their effect on the production of carbohydrate conjugated proteins with less cross-linking/browning. Patatin (PTT), a major potato protein, was glycated with galactose, xylose, galactooligosaccharides, xylooligosaccharides, galactan, and xylan under controlled conditions. The effectiveness of the inhibitors to control the glycation reaction was assessed by monitoring the glycation extent, the protein cross-linking, and the formation of dicarbonyl compounds. Sodium bisulfite was the most effective inhibitor for PTT-galactose and PTT-xylan reaction systems (reaction control ratios of 210.0 and 12.8). On the other hand, aminoguanidine and cysteine led to the highest reaction control ratios for the PTT-xylose/xylooligosaccharide (160.0 and 143.0) and PTT-galactooligosaccharides/galactan (663.0 and 71.0) reaction systems, respectively. The use of cysteine and aminoguanidine as inhibitors led to 1.7-99.4% decreases in the particle size distribution of the PTT conjugates and to 0.4-9.3% increases in their relative digestibility, per 5% blocked lysine. PMID:25400165

  4. Non-empirical analysis of the nature of the inhibitor active-site interactions in leucine aminopeptidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; K ȩdzierski, P.; Sokalski, W. A.

    1999-11-01

    Non-empirical analysis of the physical nature of the intermolecular interactions between several leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors and various constituents of the enzyme active site has been performed using a direct version of the hybrid variation-perturbation decomposition of SCF and MP2 interaction energies. The interaction energy terms obtained at different theory levels have been correlated with experimentally measured activities of the inhibitors, indicating that the more advanced the quantum-chemical method and, the larger the active-site model, the better is the correlation between calculated and measured binding energies. The electrostatic multipole term constitutes the dominant contribution in the total interaction energy, whereas Zn 2+488 and Lys +262 enzyme residues play the crucial role in the binding of these inhibitors by leucine aminopeptidase.

  5. In silico prediction of tyrosinase and adenylyl cyclase inhibitors from natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Fong, Pedro; Tong, Henry H Y; Chao, Chi M

    2014-02-01

    Although many herbal medicines are effective in the treatment of hyperpigmentation, the potency of different constituents remains unknown. In this work, more than 20,000 herbal ingredients from 453 herbs were docked into the crystal structures of adenylyl cyclase and a human homology tyrosinase model using Surflex-Dock. These two enzymes are responsible for melanin production and inhibition of them may attain a skin-whitening effect superior to currently available agents. The essential drug properties for topical formulation of the herbal ingredients, including skin permeability, sensitization, irritation, corrosive and carcinogenic properties were predicted by Dermwin, Skin Sensitization Alerts (SSA), Skin Irritation Corrosion Rules Estimation Tool (SICRET) and Benigni/Bossa rulebase module of Toxtree. Moreover, similarity ensemble and pharmacophore mapping approaches were used to forecast other potential targets for these herbal compounds by the software, SEArch and PharmMapper. Overall, this study predicted seven compounds to have advanced drug-like properties over the well-known effective tyrosinase inhibitors, arbutin and kojic acid. These seven compounds have the highest potential for further in vitro and in vivo investigation with the aim of developing safe and high-efficacy skin-whitening agents.

  6. Fungi as a source of natural coumarins production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tania Maria; Tavares, Lorena Benathar Ballod; de Oliveira, Débora

    2016-08-01

    Natural coumarins and derivatives are compounds that occur naturally in several organisms (plant, bacteria, and fungi) consisting of fused benzene and α-pyrone rings. These compounds show high technological potential applications in agrochemical, food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics industries. Therefore, the need for bulk production of coumarins and the advancement of the chemical and pharmaceutical industries led to the development of synthetic coumarin. However, biotransformation process, synthetic bioengineering, metabolic engineering, and bioinformatics have proven effective in the production of natural products. Today, these biological systems are recognized as green chemistry innovation and business strategy. This review article aims to report the potential of fungi for synthesis of coumarin. These microorganisms are described as a source of natural products capable of synthesizing many bioactive metabolites. The features, classification, properties, and industrial applications of natural coumarins as well as new molecules obtained by basidiomycetes and ascomycetes fungi are reported in order to explore a topic not yet discussed in the scientific literature. PMID:27364626

  7. Fungi as a source of natural coumarins production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tania Maria; Tavares, Lorena Benathar Ballod; de Oliveira, Débora

    2016-08-01

    Natural coumarins and derivatives are compounds that occur naturally in several organisms (plant, bacteria, and fungi) consisting of fused benzene and α-pyrone rings. These compounds show high technological potential applications in agrochemical, food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics industries. Therefore, the need for bulk production of coumarins and the advancement of the chemical and pharmaceutical industries led to the development of synthetic coumarin. However, biotransformation process, synthetic bioengineering, metabolic engineering, and bioinformatics have proven effective in the production of natural products. Today, these biological systems are recognized as green chemistry innovation and business strategy. This review article aims to report the potential of fungi for synthesis of coumarin. These microorganisms are described as a source of natural products capable of synthesizing many bioactive metabolites. The features, classification, properties, and industrial applications of natural coumarins as well as new molecules obtained by basidiomycetes and ascomycetes fungi are reported in order to explore a topic not yet discussed in the scientific literature.

  8. Plant Natural Products Targeting Bacterial Virulence Factors.

    PubMed

    Silva, Laura Nunes; Zimmer, Karine Rigon; Macedo, Alexandre José; Trentin, Danielle Silva

    2016-08-24

    Decreased antimicrobial efficiency has become a global public health issue. The paucity of new antibacterial drugs is evident, and the arsenal against infectious diseases needs to be improved urgently. The selection of plants as a source of prototype compounds is appropriate, since plant species naturally produce a wide range of secondary metabolites that act as a chemical line of defense against microorganisms in the environment. Although traditional approaches to combat microbial infections remain effective, targeting microbial virulence rather than survival seems to be an exciting strategy, since the modulation of virulence factors might lead to a milder evolutionary pressure for the development of resistance. Additionally, anti-infective chemotherapies may be successfully achieved by combining antivirulence and conventional antimicrobials, extending the lifespan of these drugs. This review presents an updated discussion of natural compounds isolated from plants with chemically characterized structures and activity against the major bacterial virulence factors: quorum sensing, bacterial biofilms, bacterial motility, bacterial toxins, bacterial pigments, bacterial enzymes, and bacterial surfactants. Moreover, a critical analysis of the most promising virulence factors is presented, highlighting their potential as targets to attenuate bacterial virulence. The ongoing progress in the field of antivirulence therapy may therefore help to translate this promising concept into real intervention strategies in clinical areas. PMID:27437994

  9. Temporal dynamics of natural product biosynthesis in marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Eduardo; Jones, Adam C; Byrum, Tara; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, William H

    2011-03-29

    Sessile marine organisms are prolific sources of biologically active natural products. However, these compounds are often found in highly variable amounts, with the abiotic and biotic factors governing their production remaining poorly understood. We present an approach that permits monitoring of in vivo natural product production and turnover using mass spectrometry and stable isotope ((15)N) feeding with small cultures of various marine strains of the natural product-rich cyanobacterial genus Lyngbya. This temporal comparison of the amount of in vivo (15)N labeling of nitrogen-containing metabolites represents a direct way to discover and evaluate factors influencing natural product biosynthesis, as well as the timing of specific steps in metabolite assembly, and is a strong complement to more traditional in vitro studies. Relative quantification of (15)N labeling allowed the concurrent measurement of turnover rates of multiple natural products from small amounts of biomass. This technique also afforded the production of the neurotoxic jamaicamides to be more carefully studied, including an assessment of how jamaicamide turnover compares with filament growth rate and primary metabolism and provided new insights into the biosynthetic timing of jamaicamide A bromination. This approach should be valuable in determining how environmental factors affect secondary metabolite production, ultimately yielding insight into the energetic balance among growth, primary production, and secondary metabolism, and thus aid in the development of methods to improve compound yields for biomedical or biotechnological applications.

  10. A novel natural product inspired scaffold with robust neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective action

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Maitra, Swati; Reddy, R Gajendra; Das, Tapatee; Jhelum, Priya; Kootar, Scherazad; Rajan, Wenson D.; Samanta, Anumita; Samineni, Ramesh; Pabbaraja, Srihari; Kernie, Steven G.; Mehta, Goverdhan; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In search for drugs to treat neuropsychiatric disorders wherein neurotrophic and neurogenic properties are affected, two neurotrophically active small molecules specially crafted following natural product leads based on 2-oxa-spiro[5.5]-undecane scaffold, have been thoroughly evaluated for their neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective potential in ex vivo primary culture and in vivo zebrafish and mouse models. The outcome of in vivo investigations suggest that one of these molecules is more neurotrophic than neurogenic while the other one is more neurogenic than neurotrophic and the former exhibits remarkable neuroprotection in a mouse acute ischemic stroke model. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds appear to be through the TrkB-MEK-ERK-CREB-BDNF pathway as pre-treatment with neurotrophin receptor TrkB inhibitor ANA-12 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 attenuates the neurotrophic action of compounds. PMID:26388493

  11. Accessing the Hidden Majority of Marine Natural Products Through Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Mohamed S.; Ruffner, Duane E.; Cao, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Tiny marine animals represent an untapped reservoir for undiscovered, bioactive natural products. However, their small size and extreme chemical variability preclude traditional chemical approaches to discovering new bioactive compounds. Here, we use a metagenomic method to directly discover and rapidly access cyanobactin class natural products from these variable samples, providing proof-of-concept for genome based discovery and supply of marine natural products. We also address practical optimization of complex, multistep ribosomal peptide pathways in heterologous hosts, which is still very challenging. The resulting methods and concepts will be applicable to ribosomal peptide and other biosynthetic pathways. PMID:21542088

  12. Genetic regulation and manipulation for natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianwei; Wu, Qihao; Hawas, Usama W; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Natural products are an important source of modern medical development, e.g., antibiotics, anticancers, immune modulators, etc. and will continue to be a powerful driving force for the discovery of novel potential drugs. In the heterologous hosts, natural products are biosynthesized using dedicated metabolic networks. By gene engineering, pathway reconstructing, and enzyme engineering, metabolic networks can be modified to synthesize novel compounds containing enhanced structural feature or produce a large quantity of known valuable bioactive compounds. The review introduces some important technical platforms and relevant examples of genetic regulation and manipulation to improve natural product titers or drive novel secondary metabolite discoveries.

  13. Current Trends in Bioethanol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Substrate, Inhibitor Reduction, Growth Variables, Coculture, and Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Fassil

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol is one of the most commonly used biofuels in transportation sector to reduce greenhouse gases. S. cerevisiae is the most employed yeast for ethanol production at industrial level though ethanol is produced by an array of other yeasts, bacteria, and fungi. This paper reviews the current and nonmolecular trends in ethanol production using S. cerevisiae. Ethanol has been produced from wide range of substrates such as molasses, starch based substrate, sweet sorghum cane extract, lignocellulose, and other wastes. The inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates can be reduced by repeated sequential fermentation, treatment with reducing agents and activated charcoal, overliming, anion exchanger, evaporation, enzymatic treatment with peroxidase and laccase, in situ detoxification by fermenting microbes, and different extraction methods. Coculturing S. cerevisiae with other yeasts or microbes is targeted to optimize ethanol production, shorten fermentation time, and reduce process cost. Immobilization of yeast cells has been considered as potential alternative for enhancing ethanol productivity, because immobilizing yeasts reduce risk of contamination, make the separation of cell mass from the bulk liquid easy, retain stability of cell activities, minimize production costs, enable biocatalyst recycling, reduce fermentation time, and protect the cells from inhibitors. The effects of growth variables of the yeast and supplementation of external nitrogen sources on ethanol optimization are also reviewed. PMID:27379305

  14. Production of Substitute Natural Gas from Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-01-31

    The goal of this research program was to develop and demonstrate a novel gasification technology to produce substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. The technology relies on a continuous sequential processing method that differs substantially from the historic methanation or hydro-gasification processing technologies. The thermo-chemistry relies on all the same reactions, but the processing sequences are different. The proposed concept is appropriate for western sub-bituminous coals, which tend to be composed of about half fixed carbon and about half volatile matter (dry ash-free basis). In the most general terms the process requires four steps (1) separating the fixed carbon from the volatile matter (pyrolysis); (2) converting the volatile fraction into syngas (reforming); (3) reacting the syngas with heated carbon to make methane-rich fuel gas (methanation and hydro-gasification); and (4) generating process heat by combusting residual char (combustion). A key feature of this technology is that no oxygen plant is needed for char combustion.

  15. Taxonomy, Physiology, and Natural Products of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Barka, Essaid Ait; Vatsa, Parul; Sanchez, Lisa; Gaveau-Vaillant, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cedric; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Clément, Christophe; Ouhdouch, Yder; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-03-01

    Actinobacteria are Gram-positive bacteria with high G+C DNA content that constitute one of the largest bacterial phyla, and they are ubiquitously distributed in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Many Actinobacteria have a mycelial lifestyle and undergo complex morphological differentiation. They also have an extensive secondary metabolism and produce about two-thirds of all naturally derived antibiotics in current clinical use, as well as many anticancer, anthelmintic, and antifungal compounds. Consequently, these bacteria are of major importance for biotechnology, medicine, and agriculture. Actinobacteria play diverse roles in their associations with various higher organisms, since their members have adopted different lifestyles, and the phylum includes pathogens (notably, species of Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Propionibacterium, and Tropheryma), soil inhabitants (e.g., Micromonospora and Streptomyces species), plant commensals (e.g., Frankia spp.), and gastrointestinal commensals (Bifidobacterium spp.). Actinobacteria also play an important role as symbionts and as pathogens in plant-associated microbial communities. This review presents an update on the biology of this important bacterial phylum. PMID:26609051

  16. Natural and within-farmland biodiversity enhances crop productivity.

    PubMed

    Carvalheiro, Luísa Gigante; Veldtman, Ruan; Shenkute, Awraris Getachew; Tesfay, Gebreamlak Bezabih; Pirk, Christian Walter Werner; Donaldson, John Sydney; Nicolson, Susan Wendy

    2011-03-01

    Ongoing expansion of large-scale agriculture critically threatens natural habitats and the pollination services they offer. Creating patches with high plant diversity within farmland is commonly suggested as a measure to benefit pollinators. However, farmers rarely adopt such practice, instead removing naturally occurring plants (weeds). By combining pollinator exclusion experiments with analysis of honeybee behaviour and flower-visitation webs, we found that the presence of weeds allowed pollinators to persist within sunflower fields, maximizing the benefits of the remaining patches of natural habitat to productivity of this large-scale crop. Weed diversity increased flower visitor diversity, hence ameliorating the measured negative effects of isolation from natural habitat. Although honeybees were the most abundant visitors, diversity of flower visitors enhanced honeybee movement, being the main factor influencing productivity. Conservation of natural patches combined with promoting flowering plants within crops can maximize productivity and, therefore, reduce the need for cropland expansion, contributing towards sustainable agriculture.

  17. Reinvigorating natural product combinatorial biosynthesis with synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunji; Moore, Bradley S; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2015-09-01

    Natural products continue to play a pivotal role in drug-discovery efforts and in the understanding if human health. The ability to extend nature's chemistry through combinatorial biosynthesis--altering functional groups, regiochemistry and scaffold backbones through the manipulation of biosynthetic enzymes--offers unique opportunities to create natural product analogs. Incorporating emerging synthetic biology techniques has the potential to further accelerate the refinement of combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust platform for the diversification of natural chemical drug leads. Two decades after the field originated, we discuss the current limitations, the realities and the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, including the engineering of substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes and the development of heterologous expression systems for biosynthetic pathways. We also propose a new perspective for the combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products that could reinvigorate drug discovery by using synthetic biology in combination with synthetic chemistry.

  18. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products.

    PubMed

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G M; de Oliveira, Luiz F C

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle (Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a nu1 band at ca. 1520 cm(-1), in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a nu1 band at 1537 cm(-1) which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. A correlation between nu1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm(-1)) of the nu1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit nu1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm(-1), respectively. On the basis of the correlation between nu1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm(-1) and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm(-1), which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form. PMID:12909134

  19. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  20. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of novel natural cathepsin L inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of a cancerous cell takes place when it ceases to respond to growth-inhibiting signals and multiplies uncontrollably and can detach and move to other parts of the body; the process called as metastasis. A particular set of cysteine proteases are very active during cancer metastasis, Cathepsins being one of them. They are involved in tumor growth and malignancy and have also been reported to be overexpressed in tumor cell lines. In the present study, a combinatorial approach comprising three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR), ligand-based pharmacophore modelling and search followed by cathepsin L structure-based high throughput screening was carried out using an initial set of 28 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives as cathepsin L inhibitors. A 3D QSAR was derived using the alignment of a common thiosemicarbazone substructure. Essential structural features responsible for biological activity were taken into account for development of a pharmacophore model based on 29 congeneric thiosemicarbazone derivatives. This model was used to carry out an exhaustive search on a large dataset of natural compounds. A further cathepsin L structure-based screen identified two top scoring compounds as potent anti-cancer leads. Results The generated 3D QSAR model showed statistically significant results with an r2 value of 0.8267, cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 of 0.7232, and a pred_r2 (r2 value for test set) of 0.7460. Apart from these, a high F test value of 30.2078 suggested low probability of the model's failure. The pharmacophoric hypothesis chosen for searching the natural compound libraries was identified as DDHRR, where two Ds denote 2 hydrogen donors, H represents a hydrophobic group and two Rs represent aromatic rings, all of which are essential for the biological activity. We report two potential drug leads ZINC08764437 (NFP) and ZINC03846634 (APQ) obtained after a combined approach of pharmacophore

  1. Design and synthesis of analogues of natural products.

    PubMed

    Maier, Martin E

    2015-05-21

    In this article strategies for the design and synthesis of natural product analogues are summarized and illustrated with some selected examples. Proven strategies include diverted total synthesis (DTS), function-oriented synthesis (FOS), biology-oriented synthesis (BIOS), complexity to diversity (CtD), hybrid molecules, and biosynthesis inspired synthesis. The latter includes mutasynthesis, the synthesis of natural products encoded by silent genes, and propionate scanning. Most of the examples from our group fall in the quite general concept of DTS. Thus, in case an efficient strategy to a natural product is at hand, modifications are possible at almost any stage of a synthesis. However, even for compounds of moderate complexity, organic synthesis remains a bottle neck. Unless some method for predicting the biological activity of a designed molecule becomes available, the design and synthesis of natural product analogues will remain what it is now, namely it will largely rely on trial and error. PMID:25829247

  2. Mining the Metabiome: Identifying Novel Natural Products from Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Schneider, Jessica S.; Brady, Sean F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Microbial-derived natural products provide the foundation for most of the chemotherapeutic arsenal available to contemporary medicine. In the face of a dwindling pipeline of new lead structures identified by traditional culturing techniques and an increasing need for new therapeutics, surveys of microbial biosynthetic diversity across environmental metabiomes have revealed enormous reservoirs of as yet untapped natural products chemistry. In this review we touch on the historical context of microbial natural product discovery and discuss innovations and technological advances that are facilitating culture-dependent and culture-independent access to new chemistry from environmental microbiomes with the goal of re-invigorating the small molecule therapeutics discovery pipeline. We highlight the successful strategies that have emerged and some of the challenges that must be overcome to enable the development of high-throughput methods for natural product discovery from complex microbial communities. PMID:25237864

  3. Protein Engineering Towards Natural Product Synthesis and Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, Angelica O.; Cacho, Ralph A.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    A dazzling array of enzymes is used by nature in making structurally complex natural products. These enzymes constitute a molecular toolbox that may be used in the construction and fine-tuning of pharmaceutically active molecules. Aided by technological advancements in protein engineering, it is now possible to tailor the activities and specificities of these enzymes as biocatalysts in the production of both natural products and their unnatural derivatives. These efforts are crucial in drug discovery and development, where there is a continuous quest for more potent agents. Both rational and random evolution techniques have been utilized in engineering these enzymes. This review will highlight some examples from several large families of natural products. PMID:22006344

  4. Use of Brown Algae to Demonstrate Natural Products Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lee A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information is provided on the natural products found in marine organisms in general and the brown algae in particular. Also provided are the procedures needed to isolate D-mannitol (a primary metabolite) and cholesterol from brown algae. (JN)

  5. Carbazole is a naturally occurring inhibitor of angiogenesis and inflammation isolated from antipsoriatic coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Jack L. Arbiser; Baskaran Govindarajan; Traci E. Battle; Rebecca Lynch; David A. Frank; Masuko Ushio-Fukai; Betsy N. Perry; David F. Stern; G. Tim Bowden; Anquan Liu; Eva Klein; Pawel J. Kolodziejski; N. Tony Eissa; Chowdhury F. Hossain; Dale G. Nagle

    2006-06-15

    Coal tar is one of the oldest and an effective treatment for psoriasis. Coal tar has been directly applied to the skin, or used in combination with UV light as part of the Goeckerman treatment. The use of coal tar has caused long-term remissions in psoriasis, but has fallen out of favor because the treatment requires hospitalization and coal tar is poorly acceptable aesthetically to patients. Thus, determining the active antipsoriatic component of coal tar is of considerable therapeutic interest. We fractionated coal tar into its components, and tested them using the SVR angiogenesis inhibitor assay. Treatment of SVR endothelial cells with coal tar fractions resulted in the isolation of a single fraction with antiangiogenic activity. The active antiangiogenic compound in coal tar is carbazole. In addition to antiangiogenic activity, carbazole inhibited the production of inflammatory IL-15 by human mononuclear cells. IL-15 is elevated in psoriasis and is thought to contribute to psoriatic inflammation. Carbazole treatment also reduced activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is proinflammatory and elevated in psoriasis. The effect of carbazole on upstream pathways in human psoriasis was determined, and carbazole was shown to inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription (stat)3-mediated transcription, which has been shown to be relevant in human psoriasis. IL-15, iNOS, and stat3 activation require the activation of the small GTPase rac for optimal activity. Carbazole was found to inhibit rac activation as a mechanism for its inhibition of downstream inflammatory and angiogenic pathways. Given its antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activities, carbazole is likely a major component of the antipsoriatic activity of coal tar. Carbazole and derivatives may be useful in the therapy of human psoriasis.

  6. Inhibitors of Serine Proteases in Regulating the Production and Function of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel; Majchrzak-Gorecka, Monika; Grygier, Beata; Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Osiecka, Oktawia; Cichy, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), DNA webs released into the extracellular environment by activated neutrophils, are thought to play a key role in the entrapment and eradication of microbes. However, NETs are highly cytotoxic and a likely source of autoantigens, suggesting that NET release is tightly regulated. NET formation involves the activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), which cleaves histones, leading to chromatin decondensation. We and others have recently demonstrated that inhibitors of NE, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and SerpinB1, restrict NET production in vitro and in vivo. SLPI was also identified as a NET component in the lesional skin of patients suffering from the autoinflammatory skin disease psoriasis. SLPI-competent NET-like structures (a mixture of SLPI with neutrophil DNA and NE) stimulated the synthesis of interferon type I (IFNI) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in vitro. pDCs uniquely respond to viral or microbial DNA/RNA but also to nucleic acids of “self” origin with the production of IFNI. Although IFNIs are critical in activating the antiviral/antimicrobial functions of many cells, IFNIs also play a role in inducing autoimmunity. Thus, NETs decorated by SLPI may regulate skin immunity through enhancing IFNI production in pDCs. Here, we review key aspects of how SLPI and SerpinB1 can control NET production and immunogenic function. PMID:27446090

  7. Total synthesis and biological activity of natural product Urukthapelstatin A.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Tantisantisom, Worawan; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2013-07-19

    Herein we report the first total synthesis of the natural product Urkuthaplestatin A (Ustat A) utilizing a convergent synthetic strategy. The characterization and biological activity match those of the previously published natural product. Interestingly, several intermediates, including the linear and serine cyclized precursors, show a 100-fold decrease in cytotoxicity, with IC50's in the low micromolar range. These data indicate that the rigidity and the consecutive aromatic heterocyclic system are responsible for the biological activity. PMID:23819711

  8. Marine natural products sourced from marine-derived Penicillium fungi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Guang; Liu, Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Liu, Hai-Shan; Zhu, Wei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Marine micro-organisms have been proven to be a major source of marine natural products (MNPs) in recent years, in which filamentous fungi are a vital source of bioactive natural products for their large metagenomes and more complex genetic backgrounds. This review highlights the 390 new MNPs from marine-derived Penicillium fungi during 1991 to 2014. These new MNPs are categorized based on the environment sources of the fungal hosts and their bioactivities are summarized.

  9. Anti-Enterovirus 71 Agents of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Lishu; Ma, Shurong; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    This review, with 42 references, presents the fascinating area of anti-enterovirus 71 natural products over the last three decades for the first time. It covers literature published from 2005-2015 and refers to compounds isolated from biogenic sources. In total, 58 naturally-occurring anti-EV71 compounds are recorded. PMID:26370955

  10. Syntheses of Cyclic Guanidine-Containing Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuyong; De, Saptarshi; Chen, Chuo

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring guanidine derivatives frequently display medicinally useful properties. Among them, the higher order pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids, the dragmacidins, the crambescidins/batzelladines, and the saxitoxins/tetradotoxins have stimulated the development of many new synthetic methods over the past decades. We provide here an overview of the syntheses of these cyclic guanidine-containing natural products. PMID:25684829

  11. A comprehensive review of glycosylated bacterial natural products

    PubMed Central

    Elshahawi, Sherif I.; Shaaban, Khaled A.; Kharel, Madan K.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic analysis of all naturally-occurring glycosylated bacterial secondary metabolites reported in the scientific literature up through early 2013 is presented. This comprehensive analysis of 15 940 bacterial natural products revealed 3426 glycosides containing 344 distinct appended carbohydrates and highlights a range of unique opportunities for future biosynthetic study and glycodiversification efforts. PMID:25735878

  12. Anti-Enterovirus 71 Agents of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Lishu; Ma, Shurong; Liu, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    This review, with 42 references, presents the fascinating area of anti-enterovirus 71 natural products over the last three decades for the first time. It covers literature published from 2005-2015 and refers to compounds isolated from biogenic sources. In total, 58 naturally-occurring anti-EV71 compounds are recorded.

  13. Natural Product Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli: Mentha Monoterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Toogood, H S; Tait, S; Jervis, A; Ní Cheallaigh, A; Humphreys, L; Takano, E; Gardiner, J M; Scrutton, N S

    2016-01-01

    The era of synthetic biology heralds in a new, more "green" approach to fine chemical and pharmaceutical drug production. It takes the knowledge of natural metabolic pathways and builds new routes to chemicals, enables nonnatural chemical production, and/or allows the rapid production of chemicals in alternative, highly performing organisms. This route is particularly useful in the production of monoterpenoids in microorganisms, which are naturally sourced from plant essential oils. Successful pathways are constructed by taking into consideration factors such as gene selection, regulatory elements, host selection and optimization, and metabolic considerations of the host organism. Seamless pathway construction techniques enable a "plug-and-play" switching of genes and regulatory parts to optimize the metabolic functioning in vivo. Ultimately, synthetic biology approaches to microbial monoterpenoid production may revolutionize "natural" compound formation. PMID:27417932

  14. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Asp kinase toward its natural substrates and feedback inhibitors: a docking and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, M; Babajan, B; Anuradha, C M; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, C; Madhusudana, P; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem, compounded by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-TB co-infection and recent emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB. In this context, aspartokinase of mycobacterium tuberculosis has drawn attention for designing novel anti-TB drugs. Asp kinase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate and involved in the branched biosynthetic pathway leading to the synthesis of amino acids lysine, threonine, methionine and isoleucine. An intermediate of lysine biosynthetic branch, mesodiaminopimelate is also a component of the peptidoglycan which is a component of bacterial cell wall. To interfere with the production of all these amino acids and cell wall, it is possible to inhibit Asp kinase activity. This can be achieved using Asp kinase inhibitors. In order to design novel Asp kinase inhibitors as effective anti-TB drugs, it is necessary to have an understanding of the binding sites of Asp kinase. As no crystal structure of the enzyme has yet been published, we built a homology model of Asp kinase using the crystallized Asp kinase from M. Jannaschii, as template structures (2HMF and 3C1M). After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and VERIFY-3D. The results of molecular docking studies with natural substrates, products and feedback inhibitors are in agreement with the published data and showed that ACT domain plays an important role in binding to ligands. Based on the docking conformations, pharmacophore model can be developed by probing the common features of ligands. By analyzing the results, ACT domain architecture, certain key residues that are responsible for binding to feedback inhibitors and natural substrates were identified. This would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Asp kinase and providing insights

  15. Natural fiber production, harvesting, and preliminary processing: options and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of natural fibers and plant oils in bio-products introduces numerous logistical challenges not typically encountered with non-agricultural resources. Once it has been determined that a plant material is suitable for commercial development, the production, harvesting, and processing s...

  16. Butanol production from hydrothermolysis-pretreated switchgrass: Quantification of inhibitors and detoxification of hydrolyzate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kan; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Ezeji, Thaddeus C; Ujor, Victor; Overton, Jonathan C; Berning, Kalli; Wilkins, Mark R; Tanner, Ralph S

    2015-08-01

    The present study evaluated butanol production from switchgrass based on hydrothermolysis pretreatment. The inhibitors present in the hydrolyzates were measured. Results showed poor butanol production (1g/L) with non-detoxified hydrolyzate. However, adjusting the pH of the non-detoxified hydrolyzate to 6 and adding 4 g/L CaCO3 increased butanol formation to about 6g/L. There was about 1g/L soluble lignin content (SLC), and various levels of furanic and phenolic compounds found in the non-detoxified hydrolyzate. Detoxification of hydrolyzates with activated carbon increased the butanol titer to 11 g/L with a total acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) concentration of 17 g/L. These results show the potential of butanol production from hydrothermolysis pretreated switchgrass. PMID:25898092

  17. A RIPK2 inhibitor delays NOD signalling events yet prevents inflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Nachbur, Ueli; Stafford, Che A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Zhan, Yifan; Lindqvist, Lisa M; Fiil, Berthe K; Khakham, Yelena; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Sandow, Jarrod J; Falk, Hendrik; Holien, Jessica K; Chau, Diep; Hildebrand, Joanne; Vince, James E; Sharp, Phillip P; Webb, Andrew I; Jackman, Katherine A; Mühlen, Sabrina; Kennedy, Catherine L; Lowes, Kym N; Murphy, James M; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Parker, Michael W; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Lew, Andrew M; Huang, David C S; Lessene, Guillaume; Silke, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors recognize antigens including bacterial peptidoglycans and initiate immune responses by triggering the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through activating NF-κB and MAP kinases. Receptor interacting protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) is critical for NOD-mediated NF-κB activation and cytokine production. Here we develop and characterize a selective RIPK2 kinase inhibitor, WEHI-345, which delays RIPK2 ubiquitylation and NF-κB activation downstream of NOD engagement. Despite only delaying NF-κB activation on NOD stimulation, WEHI-345 prevents cytokine production in vitro and in vivo and ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. Our study highlights the importance of the kinase activity of RIPK2 for proper immune responses and demonstrates the therapeutic potential of inhibiting RIPK2 in NOD-driven inflammatory diseases.

  18. Epigenetic Manipulation of a Filamentous Fungus by the Proteasome-Inhibitor Bortezomib Induces the Production of an Additional Secondary Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    VanderMolen, Karen M.; Darveaux, Blaise A.; Chen, Wei-Lun; Swanson, Steven M.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of epigenetic modifiers, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, has been explored increasingly as a technique to induce the production of additional microbial secondary metabolites. The application of such molecules to microbial cultures has been shown to upregulate otherwise suppressed genes, and in several cases has led to the production of new molecular structures. In this study, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was used to induce the production of an additional metabolite from a filamentous fungus (Pleosporales). The induced metabolite was previously isolated from a plant, but the configuration was not assigned until now; in addition, an analogue was isolated from a degraded sample, yielding a new compound. Proteasome inhibitors have not previously been used in this application and offer an additional tool for microbial genome mining. PMID:24955237

  19. Natural Products Towards the Discovery of Potential Future Antithrombotic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Globally, thrombosis-associated disorders are one of the main contributors to fatalities. Besides genetic influences, there are some acquired and environmental risk factors dominating thrombotic diseases. Although standard regimens have been used for a long time, many side effects still occur which can be life threatening. Therefore, natural products are good alternatives. Although the quest for antithrombotic natural products came to light only since the end of last century, in the last two decades, a considerable number of natural products showing antithrombotic activities (antiplatelet, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic) with no or minimal side effects have been reported. In this review, several natural products used as antithrombotic agents including medicinal plants, vegetables, fruits, spices and edible mushrooms which have been discovered in the last 15 years and their target sites (thrombogenic components, factors and thrombotic pathways) are described. In addition, the side effects, limitations and interactions of standard regimens with natural products are also discussed. The active compounds could serve as potential sources for future research on antithrombotic drug development. As a future direction, more advanced researches (in quest of the target cofactor or component involved in antithrombotic pathways) are warranted for the development of potential natural antithrombotic medications (alone or combined with standard regimens) to ensure maximum safety and efficacy. PMID:26951101

  20. Plant-Derived Natural Products for Parkinson's Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, T; Vinayagam, J; Singh, R; Jaisankar, P; Mohanakumar, K P

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived natural products have made their own niche in the treatment of neurological diseases since time immemorial. Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, has no cure and the treatment available currently is symptomatic. This chapter thoughtfully and objectively assesses the scientific basis that supports the increasing use of these plant-derived natural products for the treatment of this chronic and progressive disorder. Proper considerations are made on the chemical nature, sources, preclinical tests and their validity, and mechanisms of behavioural or biochemical recovery observed following treatment with various plants derived natural products relevant to PD therapy. The scientific basis underlying the neuroprotective effect of 6 Ayurvedic herbs/formulations, 12 Chinese medicinal herbs/formulations, 33 other plants, and 5 plant-derived molecules have been judiciously examined emphasizing behavioral, cellular, or biochemical aspects of neuroprotection observed in the cellular or animal models of the disease. The molecular mechanisms triggered by these natural products to promote cell survivability and to reduce the risk of cellular degeneration have also been brought to light in this study. The study helped to reveal certain limitations in the scenario: lack of preclinical studies in all cases barring two; heavy dependence on in vitro test systems; singular animal or cellular model to establish any therapeutic potential of drugs. This strongly warrants further studies so as to reproduce and confirm these reported effects. However, the current literature offers scientific credence to traditionally used plant-derived natural products for the treatment of PD. PMID:27651267

  1. Natural product-based nanomedicine: recent advances and issues

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Rebekah; Wu, Ling; Zhang, Chenming; Davis, Richey M; Xu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been used in medicine for many years. Many top-selling pharmaceuticals are natural compounds or their derivatives. These plant- or microorganism-derived compounds have shown potential as therapeutic agents against cancer, microbial infection, inflammation, and other disease conditions. However, their success in clinical trials has been less impressive, partly due to the compounds’ low bioavailability. The incorporation of nanoparticles into a delivery system for natural products would be a major advance in the efforts to increase their therapeutic effects. Recently, advances have been made showing that nanoparticles can significantly increase the bioavailability of natural products both in vitro and in vivo. Nanotechnology has demonstrated its capability to manipulate particles in order to target specific areas of the body and control the release of drugs. Although there are many benefits to applying nanotechnology for better delivery of natural products, it is not without issues. Drug targeting remains a challenge and potential nanoparticle toxicity needs to be further investigated, especially if these systems are to be used to treat chronic human diseases. This review aims to summarize recent progress in several key areas relevant to natural products in nanoparticle delivery systems for biomedical applications. PMID:26451111

  2. Reinvigorating natural product combinatorial biosynthesis with synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunji; Moore, Bradley S.; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2016-01-01

    Natural products continue to play a pivotal role in drug discovery efforts and in understanding human health. The ability to extend nature’s chemistry through combinatorial biosynthesis – altering functional groups, regiochemistry, and scaffold backbones through manipulation of biosynthetic enzymes – offers unique opportunities to create natural product analogues. Incorporating emerging synthetic biology techniques has the potential to further accelerate the refinement of combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust platform for the diversification of natural chemical drug leads. Two decades after the field originated, we discuss the current limitations, realities, and the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, including the engineering of substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes and the development heterologous expression systems for biosynthetic pathways. We also propose a new perspective for the combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products that could reinvigorate drug discovery by using synthetic biology in combination with synthetic chemistry. PMID:26284672

  3. Chasing the treasures of the sea - bacterial marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Gulder, Tobias A M; Moore, Bradley S

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial marine natural products are an important source of novel lead structures for drug discovery. The cytotoxic properties of many of these secondary metabolites are of particular interest for the development of new anticancer agents. Tremendous advances in marine molecular biology, genome sequencing, and bioinformatics have paved the way to fully exploit the biomedical potential of marine bacterial products. In addition, unique biosynthetic enzymes discovered from bacteria from the sea have begun to emerge as powerful biocatalysts in medicinal chemistry and total synthesis. The increasingly interdisciplinary field of marine natural product chemistry thus strongly impacts future developments in medicine, chemistry, and biology.

  4. Antibacterial Optimization of 4-Aminothiazolyl Analogues of the Natural Product GE2270 A: Identification of the Cycloalkylcarboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, Matthew J.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Amaral, Kerri; Brewer, Jason T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Dewhurst, Janetta M.; Dzink-Fox, JoAnne; Gangl, Eric; Goldovitz, Julie; Jain, Akash; Mullin, Steve; Neckermann, Georg; Osborne, Colin; Palestrant, Deborah; Patane, Michael A.; Rann, Elin M.; Sachdeva, Meena; Shao, Jian; Tiamfook, Stacey; Whitehead, Lewis; Yu, Donghui

    2012-11-09

    4-Aminothiazolyl analogues of the antibiotic natural product GE2270 A (1) were designed, synthesized, and optimized for their activity against Gram positive bacterial infections. Optimization efforts focused on improving the physicochemical properties (e.g., aqueous solubility and chemical stability) of the 4-aminothiazolyl natural product template while improving the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity. Structure-activity relationships were defined, and the solubility and efficacy profiles were improved over those of previous analogues and 1. These studies identified novel, potent, soluble, and efficacious elongation factor-Tu inhibitors, which bear cycloalkylcarboxylic acid side chains, and culminated in the selection of development candidates amide 48 and urethane 58.

  5. Does species diversity limit productivity in natural grassland communities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, J.B.; Anderson, T.M.; Smith, M.D.; Seabloom, E.; Andelman, S.J.; Meche, G.; Weiher, E.; Allain, L.K.; Jutila, H.; Sankaran, M.; Knops, J.; Ritchie, M.; Willig, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and experimental studies of synthesized assemblages indicate that under particular circumstances species diversity can enhance community productivity through niche complementarity. It remains unclear whether this process has important effects in mature natural ecosystems where competitive feedbacks and complex environmental influences affect diversity-productivity relationships. In this study, we evaluated diversity-productivity relationships while statistically controlling for environmental influences in 12 natural grassland ecosystems. Because diversity-productivity relationships are conspicuously nonlinear, we developed a nonlinear structural equation modeling (SEM) methodology to separate the effects of diversity on productivity from the effects of productivity on diversity. Meta-analysis was used to summarize the SEM findings across studies. While competitive effects were readily detected, enhancement of production by diversity was not. These results suggest that the influence of small-scale diversity on productivity in mature natural systems is a weak force, both in absolute terms and relative to the effects of other controls on productivity. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Electronic nature of the transition state for nucleoside hydrolase. A blueprint for inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, B A; Schramm, V L

    1993-07-20

    A new approach to understanding transition-state structure is presented which involves the sequential application of experimental and computational methods. A family of experimentally determined kinetic isotope effects is fit simultaneously in a vibrational analysis to provide a geometric model of the transition state. The electrostatic potential surface of the geometric model is defined by molecular orbital calculations to detail the electronic nature of the transition state. The method provides both geometric and charge information for the enzyme-stabilized transition state. Electrostatic potential surface calculations were applied to the N-glycohydrolase reaction catalyzed by nucleoside hydrolase from the trypanosome Crithidia fasciculata. A geometric model of the transition-state structure for the enzymatic hydrolysis of inosine by nucleoside hydrolase has been established by the analysis of a family of kinetic isotope effects [Horenstein, B.A., Parkin, D.W., Estupinan, B., & Schramm, V.L. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 10788]. The transition state has substantial oxycarbonium ion character, but the results of electrostatic potential calculations indicate that the transition-state charge is distributed over the ribosyl ring rather than existing as a localized C+-O<==>C = O+ resonance pair. The electrostatic potential surfaces of the substrate and enzyme-bound products differ considerably from that of the transition state. At the transition state both hypoxanthine and ribose demonstrate regions of positive charge. The positive charge on the ribosyl oxycarbonium ion is moderated by association with an enzyme-directed water nucleophile. The enzyme-bound products contain adjacent areas of negative charge. The electrostatic potential surfaces provide novel insights into transition-state structure and the forces causing release of products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being. PMID:25961523

  8. Computer-Aided Drug Design of Bioactive Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Songtawee, Napat; Simeon, Saw; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been an integral part of sustaining civilizations because of their medicinal properties. Past discoveries of bioactive natural products have relied on serendipity, and these compounds serve as inspiration for the generation of analogs with desired physicochemical properties. Bioactive natural products with therapeutic potential are abundantly available in nature and some of them are beyond exploration by conventional methods. The effectiveness of computational approaches as versatile tools for facilitating drug discovery and development has been recognized for decades, without exception, in the case of natural products. In the post-genomic era, scientists are bombarded with data produced by advanced technologies. Thus, rendering these data into knowledge that is interpretable and meaningful becomes an essential issue. In this regard, computational approaches utilize the existing data to generate knowledge that provides valuable understanding for addressing current problems and guiding the further research and development of new natural-derived drugs. Furthermore, several medicinal plants have been continuously used in many traditional medicine systems since antiquity throughout the world, and their mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, the utilization of computational approaches and advanced synthetic techniques would yield great benefit to improving the world's health population and well-being.

  9. Culture-independent discovery of natural products from soil metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Katz, Micah; Hover, Bradley M; Brady, Sean F

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial natural products have proven to be invaluable starting points in the development of many currently used therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, traditional culture-based methods for natural product discovery have been deemphasized by pharmaceutical companies due in large part to high rediscovery rates. Culture-independent, or "metagenomic," methods, which rely on the heterologous expression of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA), have the potential to provide access to metabolites encoded by a large fraction of the earth's microbial biosynthetic diversity. As soil is both ubiquitous and rich in bacterial diversity, it is an appealing starting point for culture-independent natural product discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of the history of soil metagenome-driven natural product discovery studies and elaborates on the recent development of new tools for sequence-based, high-throughput profiling of environmental samples used in discovering novel natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. We conclude with several examples of these new tools being employed to facilitate the recovery of novel secondary metabolite encoding gene clusters from soil metagenomes and the subsequent heterologous expression of these clusters to produce bioactive small molecules.

  10. The Traditional Medicine and Modern Medicine from Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haidan; Ma, Qianqian; Ye, Li; Piao, Guangchun

    2016-04-29

    Natural products and traditional medicines are of great importance. Such forms of medicine as traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, Kampo, traditional Korean medicine, and Unani have been practiced in some areas of the world and have blossomed into orderly-regulated systems of medicine. This study aims to review the literature on the relationship among natural products, traditional medicines, and modern medicine, and to explore the possible concepts and methodologies from natural products and traditional medicines to further develop drug discovery. The unique characteristics of theory, application, current role or status, and modern research of eight kinds of traditional medicine systems are summarized in this study. Although only a tiny fraction of the existing plant species have been scientifically researched for bioactivities since 1805, when the first pharmacologically-active compound morphine was isolated from opium, natural products and traditional medicines have already made fruitful contributions for modern medicine. When used to develop new drugs, natural products and traditional medicines have their incomparable advantages, such as abundant clinical experiences, and their unique diversity of chemical structures and biological activities.

  11. The Traditional Medicine and Modern Medicine from Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haidan; Ma, Qianqian; Ye, Li; Piao, Guangchun

    2016-01-01

    Natural products and traditional medicines are of great importance. Such forms of medicine as traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, Kampo, traditional Korean medicine, and Unani have been practiced in some areas of the world and have blossomed into orderly-regulated systems of medicine. This study aims to review the literature on the relationship among natural products, traditional medicines, and modern medicine, and to explore the possible concepts and methodologies from natural products and traditional medicines to further develop drug discovery. The unique characteristics of theory, application, current role or status, and modern research of eight kinds of traditional medicine systems are summarized in this study. Although only a tiny fraction of the existing plant species have been scientifically researched for bioactivities since 1805, when the first pharmacologically-active compound morphine was isolated from opium, natural products and traditional medicines have already made fruitful contributions for modern medicine. When used to develop new drugs, natural products and traditional medicines have their incomparable advantages, such as abundant clinical experiences, and their unique diversity of chemical structures and biological activities. PMID:27136524

  12. Berberine as a natural source inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Liang, Qiang; Hou, Baorong

    2005-12-01

    Berberine was abstracted from coptis chinensis and its inhibition efficiency on corrosion of mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 was investigated through weight loss experiment, electrochemical techniques and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) with energy disperse spectrometer (EDS). The weight loss results showed that berberine is an excellent corrosion inhibitor for mild steel immersed in 1 M H 2SO 4. Potentiodynamic curves suggested that berberine suppressed both cathodic and anodic processes for its concentrations higher than 1.0 × 10 -4 M and mainly cathodic reaction was suppressed for lower concentrations. The Nyquist diagrams of impedance for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 containing berberine with different concentrations showed one capacitive loop, and the polarization resistance increased with the inhibitor concentration rising. A good fit to Flory-Huggins isotherm was obtained between surface coverage degree and inhibitor concentration. The surface morphology and EDS analysis for mild steel specimens in sulfuric acid in the absence and presence of the inhibitor also proved the results obtained by the weight loss and electrochemical experiments. The correlation of inhibition effect and molecular structure of berberine was then discussed by quantum chemistry study.

  13. Potential antimalarials from African natural products: A reviw

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Bashir; Shittu, Oluwatosin Kudirat; Kabiru, Adamu Yusuf; Jigam, Ali Audu; Umar, Maimuna Bello; Berinyuy, Eustace Bonghan; Alozieuwa, Blessing Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains an overwhelming infectious disease with significant health challenges in African and other endemic countries globally. Resistance to antimalarial drugs has become one of the most momentous challenges to human health, and thus has necessitated the hunt for new and effective drugs. Consequently, few decades have witnessed a surfeit of research geared to validate the effectiveness of commonly used traditionally medicines against malaria fever. The present review work focuses on documenting natural products from African whose activity has been reported in vivo or in vitro against malaria parasite. Literature was collected using electronic search of published articles (Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Sciencedirect, and Science domain) that report on antiplasmodial activity of natural products from differernts Africa region. A total of 652 plant taxa from 146 families, 134 isolated antimalarial compounds from 39 plants species, 2 herbal formulations and 4 insect/products were found to be reported in literature from 1996 to 2015. Plants species from family Asteraceae (11.04%), Fababceae (8.128%), Euphorbiaceae (5.52%), Rubiaceas (5.52%), and Apocyanaceae (5.214%), have received more scientific validation than others. African natural products possess remarkable healing properties as revealed in the various citations as promising antimalarial agents. Some of these natural products from Africa demonstrate high, promising or low activities against Plasmodium parasite. This study also shows that natural products from Africa have a huge amount of novel antimalarial compounds that could serve as a leads for the development of new and effective antiplasmodial drugs. However, in a view of bridging the gap in knowledge, clinical validation of these natural products are of paramount importance. PMID:26649238

  14. Potential antimalarials from African natural products: A reviw.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Bashir; Shittu, Oluwatosin Kudirat; Kabiru, Adamu Yusuf; Jigam, Ali Audu; Umar, Maimuna Bello; Berinyuy, Eustace Bonghan; Alozieuwa, Blessing Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains an overwhelming infectious disease with significant health challenges in African and other endemic countries globally. Resistance to antimalarial drugs has become one of the most momentous challenges to human health, and thus has necessitated the hunt for new and effective drugs. Consequently, few decades have witnessed a surfeit of research geared to validate the effectiveness of commonly used traditionally medicines against malaria fever. The present review work focuses on documenting natural products from African whose activity has been reported in vivo or in vitro against malaria parasite. Literature was collected using electronic search of published articles (Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Sciencedirect, and Science domain) that report on antiplasmodial activity of natural products from differernts Africa region. A total of 652 plant taxa from 146 families, 134 isolated antimalarial compounds from 39 plants species, 2 herbal formulations and 4 insect/products were found to be reported in literature from 1996 to 2015. Plants species from family Asteraceae (11.04%), Fababceae (8.128%), Euphorbiaceae (5.52%), Rubiaceas (5.52%), and Apocyanaceae (5.214%), have received more scientific validation than others. African natural products possess remarkable healing properties as revealed in the various citations as promising antimalarial agents. Some of these natural products from Africa demonstrate high, promising or low activities against Plasmodium parasite. This study also shows that natural products from Africa have a huge amount of novel antimalarial compounds that could serve as a leads for the development of new and effective antiplasmodial drugs. However, in a view of bridging the gap in knowledge, clinical validation of these natural products are of paramount importance.

  15. The myeloperoxidase product hypochlorous acid generates irreversible high-density lipoprotein receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Veronika; Ljubojevic, Senka; Haybaeck, Johannes; Holzer, Michael; El-Gamal, Dalia; Schicho, Rudolf; Pieske, Burkert; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been described in several chronic inflammatory diseases, like chronic renal insufficiency, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Recent findings revealed that AOPPs are inhibitors of the major high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, scavenger receptor class B, type 1 (SR-BI). Here we investigated what oxidation induced structural alterations convert plasma albumin into an HDL-receptor inhibitor. Approach and Results Exposure of albumin to the physiological oxidant, hypochlorous acid, generated high affinity SR-BI ligands. Protection of albumin lysine-residues prior exposure to hypochlorous acid as well as regeneration of N-chloramines after oxidation of albumin completely prevented binding of oxidized albumin to SR-BI, indicating that modification of albumin lysine-residues is required to generate SR-BI ligands. Of particular interest, N-chloramines within oxidized albumin promoted irreversible binding to SR-BI, resulting in permanent receptor blockade. We observed that the SR-BI inhibitory activity of albumin isolated from chronic kidney disease patients correlated with the content of the myeloperoxidase-specific oxidation product 3-chlorotyrosine and was associated with alterations in the composition of HDL. Conclusion Given that several potential atheroprotective activities of HDL are mediated by SR-BI, the present results raise the possibility that oxidized plasma albumin, through permanent SR-BI blockade, contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23493288

  16. Evaluating the antioxidant capacity of natural products: a review on chemical and cellular-based assays.

    PubMed

    López-Alarcón, Camilo; Denicola, Ana

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with several pathologies like cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, cancer and even aging. It has been suggested that a diet rich in antioxidants would be beneficial to human health and a lot of interest is focused on the determination of antioxidant capacity of natural products. Different chemical methods have been developed including the popular ORAC that evaluates the potential of a sample as inhibitor of a target molecule oxidation. Chemical-based methods are useful for screening, they are low cost, high-throughput and yield an index value (expressed as equivalents of Trolox) that allows comparing and ordering different products. More recently, nanoparticles-based assays have been developed to sense the antioxidant power of natural products. However, the antioxidant capacity indexes obtained by chemical assays cannot extrapolate the performance of the sample in vivo. Considering that antioxidant action is not limited to scavenging free radicals but includes upregulation of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes, modulation of redox cell signaling and gene expression, it is necessary to move to cellular assays in order to evaluate the potential antioxidant activity of a compound or extract. Animal models and human studies are more appropriate but also more expensive and time-consuming, making the cell culture assays very attractive as intermediate testing methods. Cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays, activation of redox transcription factors, inhibition of oxidases or activation of antioxidant enzymes are reviewed and compared with the classical in vitro chemical-based assays for evaluation of antioxidant capacity of natural products.

  17. Capturing the Essence of Organic Synthesis: From Bioactive Natural Products to Designed Molecules in Today’s Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.

    2010-01-01

    In this perspective article, I outline my group’s research involving the chemical syntheses of medicinally important natural products, exploration of their bioactivity, and development of new asymmetric carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. The article also highlights our approach to molecular design and synthesis of conceptually novel inhibitors against target proteins involved in the pathogenesis human diseases, including AIDS and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:20936876

  18. Enhancement of a pentacyclic tyrosine kinase inhibitor production in Cladosporium cf. cladosporioides by Cladosporol.

    PubMed

    Assante, Gemma; Bava, Adriana; Nasini, Gianluca

    2006-02-01

    The binaphthyl derivative cladosporol 3 was supplied from 60 to 200 mg l(-1) to shaken cultures of Cladosporium cf. cladosporioides. Compared to blank, fungal biomass was not affected by adding cladosporol till 100 mg l(-1): it rather increased at higher ratios between 150 and 200 mg l(-1). The production of the major pentacyclic metabolite 1, a cytokine production and tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was enhanced tenfold when cladosporol was supplied at the highest ratio (200 mg l(-1)) to shaken growing cultures of the fungus. The bioconversion of cladosporol to cladosporol D through reductive cleavage of the epoxide group was also observed. Interest in this kind of metabolites lies in their potential activity vs DNA topoisomerase I.

  19. Plant extracts as natural antioxidants in meat and meat products.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manzoor Ahmad; Bosco, Sowriappan John Don; Mir, Shabir Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Antioxidants are used to minimize the oxidative changes in meat and meat products. Oxidative changes may have negative effects on the quality of meat and meat products, causing changes in their sensory and nutritional properties. Although synthetic antioxidants have already been used but in recent years, the demand for natural antioxidants has been increased mainly because of adverse effects of synthetic antioxidants. Thus most of the recent investigations have been directed towards the identification of natural antioxidants from various plant sources. Plant extracts have been prepared using different solvents and extraction methods. Grape seed, green tea, pine bark, rosemary, pomegranate, nettle and cinnamon have exhibited similar or better antioxidant properties compared to some synthetic ones. This review provides the recent information on plant extracts used as natural antioxidants in meat and meat products, specifically red meat.

  20. Plant extracts as natural antioxidants in meat and meat products.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manzoor Ahmad; Bosco, Sowriappan John Don; Mir, Shabir Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Antioxidants are used to minimize the oxidative changes in meat and meat products. Oxidative changes may have negative effects on the quality of meat and meat products, causing changes in their sensory and nutritional properties. Although synthetic antioxidants have already been used but in recent years, the demand for natural antioxidants has been increased mainly because of adverse effects of synthetic antioxidants. Thus most of the recent investigations have been directed towards the identification of natural antioxidants from various plant sources. Plant extracts have been prepared using different solvents and extraction methods. Grape seed, green tea, pine bark, rosemary, pomegranate, nettle and cinnamon have exhibited similar or better antioxidant properties compared to some synthetic ones. This review provides the recent information on plant extracts used as natural antioxidants in meat and meat products, specifically red meat. PMID:24824531

  1. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26978396

  2. In situ natural product discovery via an artificial marine sponge.

    PubMed

    La Clair, James J; Loveridge, Steven T; Tenney, Karen; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Chapman, Eli; Crews, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing international interest in exploring and developing the therapeutic potential of marine-derived small molecules. Balancing the strategies for ocean based sampling of source organisms versus the potential to endanger fragile ecosystems poses a substantial challenge. In order to mitigate such environmental impacts, we have developed a deployable artificial sponge. This report provides details on its design followed by evidence that it faithfully recapitulates traditional natural product collection protocols. Retrieving this artificial sponge from a tropical ecosystem after deployment for 320 hours afforded three actin-targeting jasplakinolide depsipeptides that had been discovered two decades earlier using traditional sponge specimen collection and isolation procedures. The successful outcome achieved here could reinvigorate marine natural products research, by producing new environmentally innocuous sources of natural products and providing a means to probe the true biosynthetic origins of complex marine-derived scaffolds. PMID:25004127

  3. Anti-cancer natural products isolated from chinese medicinal herbs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a number of natural products isolated from Chinese herbs have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, suppress angiogenesis, retard metastasis and enhance chemotherapy, exhibiting anti-cancer potential both in vitro and in vivo. This article summarizes recent advances in in vitro and in vivo research on the anti-cancer effects and related mechanisms of some promising natural products. These natural products are also reviewed for their therapeutic potentials, including flavonoids (gambogic acid, curcumin, wogonin and silibinin), alkaloids (berberine), terpenes (artemisinin, β-elemene, oridonin, triptolide, and ursolic acid), quinones (shikonin and emodin) and saponins (ginsenoside Rg3), which are isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs. In particular, the discovery of the new use of artemisinin derivatives as excellent anti-cancer drugs is also reviewed. PMID:21777476

  4. Genomic basis for natural product biosynthetic diversity in the actinomycetes†

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Markus; Ikeda, Haruo; Moore, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    The phylum Actinobacteria hosts diverse high G + C, Gram-positive bacteria that have evolved a complex chemical language of natural product chemistry to help navigate their fascinatingly varied lifestyles. To date, 71 Actinobacteria genomes have been completed and annotated, with the vast majority representing the Actinomycetales, which are the source of numerous antibiotics and other drugs from genera such as Streptomyces, Saccharopolyspora and Salinispora. These genomic analyses have illuminated the secondary metabolic proficiency of these microbes – underappreciated for years based on conventional isolation programs – and have helped set the foundation for a new natural product discovery paradigm based on genome mining. Trends in the secondary metabolomes of natural product-rich actinomycetes are highlighted in this review article, which contains 199 references. PMID:19844637

  5. In Situ Natural Product Discovery via an Artificial Marine Sponge

    PubMed Central

    La Clair, James J.; Loveridge, Steven T.; Tenney, Karen; O'Neil–Johnson, Mark; Chapman, Eli; Crews, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    There is continuing international interest in exploring and developing the therapeutic potential of marine–derived small molecules. Balancing the strategies for ocean based sampling of source organisms versus the potential to endanger fragile ecosystems poses a substantial challenge. In order to mitigate such environmental impacts, we have developed a deployable artificial sponge. This report provides details on its design followed by evidence that it faithfully recapitulates traditional natural product collection protocols. Retrieving this artificial sponge from a tropical ecosystem after deployment for 320 hours afforded three actin–targeting jasplakinolide depsipeptides that had been discovered two decades earlier using traditional sponge specimen collection and isolation procedures. The successful outcome achieved here could reinvigorate marine natural products research, by producing new environmentally innocuous sources of natural products and providing a means to probe the true biosynthetic origins of complex marine–derived scaffolds. PMID:25004127

  6. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26978396

  7. Recent advances in deep-sea natural products.

    PubMed

    Skropeta, Danielle; Wei, Liangqian

    2014-08-01

    Covering: 2009 to 2013. This review covers the 188 novel marine natural products described since 2008, from deep-water (50->5000 m) marine fauna including bryozoa, chordata, cnidaria, echinodermata, microorganisms, mollusca and porifera. The structures of the new compounds and details of the source organism, depth of collection and country of origin are presented, along with any relevant biological activities of the metabolites. Where reported, synthetic studies on the deep-sea natural products have also been included. Most strikingly, 75% of the compounds were reported to possess bioactivity, with almost half exhibiting low micromolar cytotoxicity towards a range of human cancer cell lines, along with a significant increase in the number of microbial deep-sea natural products reported.

  8. Recent advances in deep-sea natural products.

    PubMed

    Skropeta, Danielle; Wei, Liangqian

    2014-08-01

    Covering: 2009 to 2013. This review covers the 188 novel marine natural products described since 2008, from deep-water (50->5000 m) marine fauna including bryozoa, chordata, cnidaria, echinodermata, microorganisms, mollusca and porifera. The structures of the new compounds and details of the source organism, depth of collection and country of origin are presented, along with any relevant biological activities of the metabolites. Where reported, synthetic studies on the deep-sea natural products have also been included. Most strikingly, 75% of the compounds were reported to possess bioactivity, with almost half exhibiting low micromolar cytotoxicity towards a range of human cancer cell lines, along with a significant increase in the number of microbial deep-sea natural products reported. PMID:24871201

  9. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action.

  10. Use of metabolic inhibitors to estimate protozooplankton grazing and bacterial production in a monomictic eutrophic lake with an anaerobic hypolimnion

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.W.; Porter, K.G.

    1986-07-01

    Inhibitors of eucaryotes (cycloheximide and amphotericin B) and procaryotes (penicillin and chloramphenical) were used to estimate bacterivory and bacterial production in a eutrophic lake. Bacterial production appeared to be slightly greater than protozoan grazing in the aerobic waters of Lake Oglethorpe. Use of penicillin and cycloheximide yielded inconsistent results in anaerobic water and in aerobic water when bacterial production was low. Production measured by inhibiting eucaryotes with cycloheximide did not always agree with (/sup 3/H)thymidine estimates or differential filtration methods. Laboratory experiments showed that several common freshwater protozoans continued to swim and ingest bacterium-size latex beads in the presence of the eucaryote inhibitor. Penicillin also affected grazing rates of some ciliates. The authors recommended that caution and a corroborating method be used when estimating ecologically important parameters with specific inhibitors.

  11. The impact of natural products upon modern drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, A

    2008-06-01

    In the period 1970-2006, a total of 24 unique natural products were discovered that led to an approved drug. We analyze these successful leads in terms of drug-like properties, and show that they can be divided into two equal subsets. The first falls in the 'Lipinski universe' and complies with the Rule of Five. The second is a 'parallel universe' that violates the rules. Nevertheless, the latter compounds remain largely compliant in terms of logP and H-bond donors, highlighting the importance of these two metrics in predicting bioavailability. Natural products are often cited as an exception to Lipinski's rules. We believe this is because nature has learned to maintain low hydrophobicity and intermolecular H-bond donating potential when it needs to make biologically active compounds with high molecular weight and large numbers of rotatable bonds. In addition, natural products are more likely than purely synthetic compounds to resemble biosynthetic intermediates or endogenous metabolites, and hence take advantage of active transport mechanisms. Interestingly, the natural product leads in the Lipinski and parallel universe had an identical success rate (50%) in delivering an oral drug.

  12. NATURAL PRODUCTS: A CONTINUING SOURCE OF NOVEL DRUG LEADS

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, Gordon M.; Newman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    1. Background Nature has been a source of medicinal products for millennia, with many useful drugs developed from plant sources. Following discovery of the penicillins, drug discovery from microbial sources occurred and diving techniques in the 1970s opened the seas. Combinatorial chemistry (late 1980s), shifted the focus of drug discovery efforts from Nature to the laboratory bench. 2. Scope of Review This review traces natural products drug discovery, outlining important drugs from natural sources that revolutionized treatment of serious diseases. It is clear Nature will continue to be a major source of new structural leads, and effective drug development depends on multidisciplinary collaborations. 3. Major Conclusions The explosion of genetic information led not only to novel screens, but the genetic techniques permitted the implementation of combinatorial biosynthetic technology and genome mining. The knowledge gained has allowed unknown molecules to be identified. These novel bioactive structures can be optimized by using combinatorial chemistry generating new drug candidates for many diseases. 4 General Significance: The advent of genetic techniques that permitted the isolation / expression of biosynthetic cassettes from microbes may well be the new frontier for natural products lead discovery. It is now apparent that biodiversity may be much greater in those organisms. The numbers of potential species involved in the microbial world are many orders of magnitude greater than those of plants and multi-celled animals. Coupling these numbers to the number of currently unexpressed biosynthetic clusters now identified (>10 per species) the potential of microbial diversity remains essentially untapped. PMID:23428572

  13. A natural product based DOS library of hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Ganesh; Agarwal, Shalini; Sharma, Vijeta; Madurkar, Sanjay M; Munshi, Parthapratim; Singh, Shailja; Sen, Subhabrata

    2015-05-01

    Here we described a natural product inspired modular DOS strategy for the synthesis of a library of hybrid systems that are structurally and stereochemically disparate. The main scaffold is a pyrroloisoquinoline motif, that is synthesized from tandem Pictet-Spengler lactamization. The structural diversity is generated via "privileged scaffolds" that are attached at the appropriate site of the motif. Screening of the library compounds for their antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine sensitive 3D7 cells indicated few compounds with moderate activity (20-50 μM). A systematic comparison of structural intricacy between the library members and a natural product dataset obtained from ZINC(®) revealed comparable complexity. PMID:25794788

  14. Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring : Annual Report 1989.

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

    1991-01-01

    Project 83-7 was established under the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) habitat improvement projects, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject (Part 1) are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density data from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) management and research activities. Primary objectives of the intensive monitoring subproject (Part 2) are to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and to develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Field work began in 1987 in the upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). 22 refs., 10 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Structures of aminophenol dioxygenase in complex with intermediate, product and inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, De Feng; Zhang, Jia Yue; Hou, Yan Jie; Liu, Lei; Hu, Yonglin; Liu, Shuang Jiang; Wang, Da Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by nonhaem Fe(II) enzymes containing the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has been extensively studied in recent years. Here, crystal structures of 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase, an enzyme that represents a minor group of extradiol dioxygenases and that catalyses the ring opening of 2-aminophenol, in complex with the lactone intermediate (4Z,6Z)-3-iminooxepin-2(3H)-one and the product 2-aminomuconic 6-semialdehyde and in complex with the suicide inhibitor 4-nitrocatechol are reported. The Fe-ligand binding schemes observed in these structures revealed some common geometrical characteristics that are shared by the published structures of extradiol dioxygenases, suggesting that enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of noncatecholic compounds are very likely to utilize a similar strategy for dioxygen activation and the fission of aromatic rings as the canonical mechanism. The Fe-ligation arrangement, however, is strikingly enantiomeric to that of all other 2-His-1-carboxylate enzymes apart from protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase. This structural variance leads to the generation of an uncommon O(-)-Fe(2+)-O(-) species prior to O(2) binding, which probably forms the structural basis on which APD distinguishes its specific substrate and inhibitor, which share an analogous molecular structure.

  16. Biofilm production by Zymomonas mobilis enhances ethanol production and tolerance to toxic inhibitors from rice bran hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Todhanakasem, Tatsaporn; Sangsutthiseree, Atit; Areerat, Kamonchanok; Young, Glenn M; Thanonkeo, Pornthap

    2014-09-25

    Microorganisms play a significant role in bioethanol production from lignocellulosic material. A challenging problem in bioconversion of rice bran is the presence of toxic inhibitors in lignocellulosic acid hydrolysate. Various strains of Zymomonas mobilis (ZM4, TISTR 405, 548, 550 and 551) grown under biofilm or planktonic modes were used in this study to examine their potential for bioconversion of rice bran hydrolysate and ethanol production efficiencies. Z. mobilis readily formed bacterial attachment on plastic surfaces, but not on glass surfaces. Additionally, the biofilms formed on plastic surfaces steadily increased over time, while those formed on glass were speculated to cycle through accumulation and detachment phases. Microscopic analysis revealed that Z. mobilis ZM4 rapidly developed homogeneous biofilm structures within 24 hours, while other Z. mobilis strains developed heterogeneous biofilm structures. ZM4 biofilms were thicker and seemed to be more stable than other Z. mobilis strains. The percentage of live cells in biofilms was greater than that for planktonic cells (54.32 ± 7.10% vs. 28.69 ± 3.03%), suggesting that biofilms serve as a protective niche for growth of bacteria in the presence of toxic inhibitors in the rice bran hydrolysate. The metabolic activity of ZM4 grown as a biofilm was also higher than the same strain grown planktonically, as measured by ethanol production from rice bran hydrolysate (13.40 ± 2.43 g/L vs. 0.432 ± 0.29 g/L, with percent theoretical ethanol yields of 72.47 ± 6.13% and 3.71 ± 5.24% respectively). Strain TISTR 551 was also quite metabolically active, with ethanol production by biofilm and planktonically grown cells of 8.956 ± 4.06 g/L and 0.0846 ± 0.064 g/L (percent theoretical yields were 48.37 ± 16.64% and 2.046 ± 1.58%, respectively). This study illustrates the potential for enhancing ethanol production by utilizing bacterial biofilms in the bioconversion of a readily available and normally unusable

  17. The natural products parthenolide and andrographolide exhibit anti-cancer stem cell activity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Ellen J; Williams, John T; Huynh, Daniel T; Iannotti, Michael J; Han, Changho; Barrios, Francis J; Kendall, Stephen; Glackin, Carlotta A; Colby, David A; Kirshner, Julia

    2011-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy where nearly all patients succumb to a relapse. The current preclinical models of MM target the plasma cells, constituting the bulk of the tumor, leaving the cancer stem cells to trigger a relapse. Utilizing a three-dimensional tissue culture system where cells were grown in extracellular matrix designed to reconstruct human bone marrow, we tested the anti-multiple myeloma cancer stem cell (MM-CSC) potential of two natural product inhibitors of nuclear factor κB (NFκB). Here we show that parthenolide and andrographolide are potent anti-MM-CSC agents. Both natural products demonstrated preferential toxicity toward MM-CSCs over non-tumorigenic MM cells. Addition of the bone marrow stromal compartment abrogated andrographolide activity while having no effect on parthenolide cytoxicity. This is the first report of a natural product with anti-CSC activity in myeloma, suggesting that it has the potential to improve the survival of patients with MM by eliminating the relapse-causing MM-CSCs. PMID:21417826

  18. Identification of antidepressant drug leads through the evaluation of marine natural products with neuropsychiatric pharmacophores

    PubMed Central

    Diers, Jeffrey A.; Ivey, Kelly D.; El-Alfy, Abir; Shaikh, Jamaluddin; Wang, Jiajia; Kochanowska, Anna J.; Stoker, John F.; Hamann, Mark T.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment is a valuable resource for drug discovery due to its diversity of life and associated secondary metabolites. However, there is very little published data on the potential application of marine natural products to treat neuropsychiatric disorders. Many natural products derived from chemically defended organisms in the marine environment have pharmacophores related to serotonin or clinically utilized antidepressant drugs. Therefore, in the present study, compounds selected for their structural similarity to serotonin or established antidepressants were evaluated for antidepressant-like activity using the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice. The antidepressant positive controls, citalopram (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and despiramine (tricyclic antidepressant) both dose-dependently reduced immobility time in the forced swim and tail suspension tests. Two marine natural product compounds tested, aaptamine and 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, also produced significant antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test. In the tail suspension test, the antidepressant-like effects of 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine were confirmed, whereas aaptamine failed to produce significant results. None of the tested compounds induced hyperlocomotion, indicating that nonspecific stimulant effects could not account for the observed antidepressant-like actions of the compounds. These studies highlight the potential to rationally select marine derived compounds for treating depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:18037479

  19. Impact of Non-Enzymatic Glycation in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Role of Natural Products in Prevention.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saheem; Farhan, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Non-enzymatic protein glycosylation is the addition of free carbonyls to the free amino groups of proteins, amino acids, lipoproteins and nucleic acids resulting in the formation of early glycation products. The early glycation products are also known as Maillard reaction which undergoes dehydration, cyclization and rearrangement to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). By and large the researchers in the past have also established that glycation and the AGEs are responsible for most type of metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurological disorders and aging. The amassing of AGEs in the tissues of neurodegenerative diseases shows its involvement in diseases. Therefore, it is likely that inhibition of glycation reaction may extend the lifespan of an individual. The hunt for inhibitors of glycation, mainly using in vitro models, has identified natural compounds able to prevent glycation, especially polyphenols and other natural antioxidants. Extrapolation of results of in vitro studies on the in vivo situation is not straightforward due to differences in the conditions and mechanism of glycation, and bioavailability problems. Nevertheless, existing data allow postulating that enrichment of diet in natural anti-glycating agents may attenuate glycation and, in consequence may halt the aging and neurological problems. PMID:27651252

  20. Effect of nutrient limitation of cyanobacteria on protease inhibitor production and fitness of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Sadler, Thomas; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Herbivore-plant interactions have been well studied in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as they are crucial for the trophic transfer of energy and matter. In nutrient-rich freshwater ecosystems, the interaction between primary producers and herbivores is to a large extent represented by Daphnia and cyanobacteria. The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and ponds has, at least partly, been attributed to cyanotoxins, which negatively affect the major grazer of planktonic cyanobacteria, i.e. Daphnia. Among these cyanotoxins are the widespread protease inhibitors. These inhibitors have been shown (both in vitro and in situ) to inhibit the most important group of digestive proteases in the gut of Daphnia, i.e. trypsins and chymotrypsins, and to reduce Daphnia growth. In this study we grew cultures of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain BM25 on nutrient-replete, N-depleted or P-depleted medium. We identified three different micropeptins to be the cause for the inhibitory activity of BM25 against chymotrypsins. The micropeptin content depended on nutrient availability: whereas N limitation led to a lower concentration of micropeptins per biomass, P limitation resulted in a higher production of these chymotrypsin inhibitors. The altered micropeptin content of BM25 was accompanied by changed effects on the fitness of Daphnia magna: a higher content of micropeptins led to lower IC50 values for D. magna gut proteases and vice versa. Following expectations, the lower micropeptin content in the N-depleted BM25 caused higher somatic growth of D. magna. Therefore, protease inhibitors can be regarded as a nutrient-dependent defence against grazers. Interestingly, although the P limitation of the cyanobacterium led to a higher micropeptin content, high growth of D. magna was observed when they were fed with P-depleted BM25. This might be due to reduced digestibility of P-depleted cells with putatively thick mucilaginous sheaths. These findings indicate that

  1. Effect of nutrient limitation of cyanobacteria on protease inhibitor production and fitness of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Sadler, Thomas; Von Elert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Herbivore-plant interactions have been well studied in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems as they are crucial for the trophic transfer of energy and matter. In nutrient-rich freshwater ecosystems, the interaction between primary producers and herbivores is to a large extent represented by Daphnia and cyanobacteria. The occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and ponds has, at least partly, been attributed to cyanotoxins, which negatively affect the major grazer of planktonic cyanobacteria, i.e. Daphnia. Among these cyanotoxins are the widespread protease inhibitors. These inhibitors have been shown (both in vitro and in situ) to inhibit the most important group of digestive proteases in the gut of Daphnia, i.e. trypsins and chymotrypsins, and to reduce Daphnia growth. In this study we grew cultures of the cyanobacterium Microcystis sp. strain BM25 on nutrient-replete, N-depleted or P-depleted medium. We identified three different micropeptins to be the cause for the inhibitory activity of BM25 against chymotrypsins. The micropeptin content depended on nutrient availability: whereas N limitation led to a lower concentration of micropeptins per biomass, P limitation resulted in a higher production of these chymotrypsin inhibitors. The altered micropeptin content of BM25 was accompanied by changed effects on the fitness of Daphnia magna: a higher content of micropeptins led to lower IC50 values for D. magna gut proteases and vice versa. Following expectations, the lower micropeptin content in the N-depleted BM25 caused higher somatic growth of D. magna. Therefore, protease inhibitors can be regarded as a nutrient-dependent defence against grazers. Interestingly, although the P limitation of the cyanobacterium led to a higher micropeptin content, high growth of D. magna was observed when they were fed with P-depleted BM25. This might be due to reduced digestibility of P-depleted cells with putatively thick mucilaginous sheaths. These findings indicate that

  2. Natural killer cells are essential for the ability of BRAF inhibitors to control BRAFV600E-mutant metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrari de Andrade, Lucas; Ngiow, Shin F; Stannard, Kimberley; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Kalimutho, Murugan; Khanna, Kum Kum; Tey, Siok-Keen; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Zitvogel, Laurence; Martinet, Ludovic; Smyth, Mark J

    2014-12-15

    BRAF(V600E) is a major oncogenic mutation found in approximately 50% of human melanoma that confers constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway and increased melanoma growth. Inhibition of BRAF(V600E) by oncogene targeting therapy increases overall survival of patients with melanoma, but is unable to produce many durable responses. Adaptive drug resistance remains the main limitation to BRAF(V600E) inhibitor clinical efficacy and immune-based strategies could be useful to overcome disease relapse. Tumor microenvironment greatly differs between visceral metastasis and primary cutaneous melanoma, and the mechanisms involved in the antimetastatic efficacy of BRAF(V600E) inhibitors remain to be determined. To address this question, we developed a metastatic BRAF(V600E)-mutant melanoma cell line and demonstrated that the antimetastatic properties of BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 (a research analogue of vemurafenib) require host natural killer (NK) cells and perforin. Indeed, PLX4720 not only directly limited BRAF(V600E)-induced tumor cell proliferation, but also affected NK cell functions. We showed that PLX4720 increases the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CD69 expression, and proliferation of mouse NK cells in vitro. NK cell frequencies were significantly enhanced by PLX4720 specifically in the lungs of mice with BRAF(V600E) lung metastases. Furthermore, PLX4720 also increased human NK cell pERK1/2, CD69 expression, and IFNγ release in the context of anti-NKp30 and IL2 stimulation. Overall, this study supports the idea that additional NK cell-based immunotherapy (by checkpoint blockade or agonists or cytokines) may combine well with BRAF(V600E) inhibitor therapy to promote more durable responses in melanoma.

  3. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z.

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  4. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II with natural products extracted from plants, mushrooms and honey.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Huseyin; Can, Zehra; Yildiz, Oktay; Kolayli, Sevgi; Innocenti, Alessio; Scozzafava, Gabriele; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-06-01

    Different natural products and secondary metabolites from mushrooms, teas, honeys, mosses, plants and seaweeds were investigated for their in vitro inhibitory effects on human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, E.C.4.2.1.1) isoforms I and II. Inhibition data were correlated with the total phenol content in the extract and investigated with the pure compounds believed to be responsible for this activity. Methanolic extracts were prepared for 17 such pure chemicals present in the natural products and for 41 diverse natural products. The IC(50) values were in the range of 0.11-66.50 μg/mL against hCA I and of 0.09-54.54 μg/mL against hCA II, respectively. The total phenol content was in the range of 0.02-1318.96 (as milligrams of gallic acid equivalents) per gram of sample. These data offer new insights on possible novel classes of CA inhibitors based on natural products, possessing a range of chemical structures not present in the classical inhibitors with pharmacological applications, such as the sulfonamides and sulfamates. PMID:21740099

  5. Mechanism Targeted Discovery of Antitumor Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Mora, Flor D.; Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Kim, Yong-Pil

    2010-01-01

    Antitumor drug discovery programs aim to identify chemical entities for use in the treatment of cancer. Many strategies have been used to achieve this objective. Natural products have always played a major role in anticancer medicine and the unique metabolites produced by marine organisms have increasingly become major players in antitumor drug discovery. Rapid advances have occurred in the understanding of tumor biology and molecular medicine. New insights into mechanisms responsible for neoplastic disease are significantly changing the general philosophical approach towards cancer treatment. Recently identified molecular targets have created exciting new means for disrupting tumor-specific cell signaling, cell division, energy metabolism, gene expression, drug resistance, and blood supply. Such tumor-specific treatments could someday decrease our reliance on traditional cytotoxicity-based chemotherapy and provide new less toxic treatment options with significantly fewer side effects. Novel molecular targets and state-of-the-art molecular mechanism-based screening methods have revitalized antitumor research and these changes are becoming an ever-increasing component of modern antitumor marine natural products research. This review describes marine natural products identified using tumor-specific mechanism-based assays for regulators of angiogenesis, apoptosis, cell cycle, macromolecule synthesis, mitochondrial respiration, mitosis, multidrug efflux, and signal transduction. Special emphasis is placed on natural products directly discovered using molecular mechanism-based screening. PMID:15279579

  6. Low Carbon Technology Options for the Natural Gas Electricity Production

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultimate goal of this task is to perform environmental and economic analysis of natural gas based power production technologies (different routes) to investigate and evaluate strategies for reducing emissions from the power sector. It is a broad research area. Initially, the...

  7. Natural Products for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ríos, José Luis; Francini, Flavio; Schinella, Guillermo R

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia. High blood sugar can produce long-term complications such as cardiovascular and renal disorders, retinopathy, and poor blood flow. Its development can be prevented or delayed in people with impaired glucose tolerance by implementing lifestyle changes or the use of therapeutic agents. Some of these drugs have been obtained from plants or have a microbial origin, such as galegine isolated from Galega officinalis, which has a great similarity to the antidiabetic drug metformin. Picnogenol, acarbose, miglitol, and voglibose are other antidiabetic products of natural origin. This review compiles the principal articles on medicinal plants used for treating diabetes and its comorbidities, as well as mechanisms of natural products as antidiabetic agents. Inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, effects on glucose uptake and glucose transporters, modification of mechanisms mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity, modification of gene expression, and activities of hormones involved in glucose homeostasis such as adiponectin, resistin, and incretin, and reduction of oxidative stress are some of the mechanisms in which natural products are involved. We also review the most relevant clinical trials performed with medicinal plants and natural products such as aloe, banaba, bitter melon, caper, cinnamon, cocoa, coffee, fenugreek, garlic, guava, gymnema, nettle, sage, soybean, green and black tea, turmeric, walnut, and yerba mate. Compounds of high interest as potential antidiabetics are: fukugetin, palmatine, berberine, honokiol, amorfrutins, trigonelline, gymnemic acids, gurmarin, and phlorizin. PMID:26132858

  8. Current perspectives in drug discovery against tuberculosis from natural products.

    PubMed

    Nguta, Joseph Mwanzia; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G A

    2015-09-01

    Currently, one third of the world's population is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), while 8.9-9.9 million new and relapse cases of tuberculosis (TB) are reported yearly. The renewed research interests in natural products in the hope of discovering new and novel antitubercular leads have been driven partly by the increased incidence of multidrug-resistant strains of MTB and the adverse effects associated with the first- and second-line antitubercular drugs. Natural products have been, and will continue to be a rich source of new drugs against many diseases. The depth and breadth of therapeutic agents that have their origins in the secondary metabolites produced by living organisms cannot be compared with any other source of therapeutic agents. Discovery of new chemical molecules against active and latent TB from natural products requires an interdisciplinary approach, which is a major challenge facing scientists in this field. In order to overcome this challenge, cutting edge techniques in mycobacteriology and innovative natural product chemistry tools need to be developed and used in tandem. The present review provides a cross-linkage to the most recent literature in both fields and their potential to impact the early phase of drug discovery against TB if seamlessly combined. PMID:27649863

  9. The Utility of Metabolomics in Natural Product and Biomarker Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Daniel G.; Oh, Joonseok; Keasling, Adam; Colson, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolomics is a well-established rapidly developing research field involving quantitative and qualitative metabolite assessment within biological systems. Recent improvements in metabolomics technologies reveal the unequivocal value of metabolomics tools in natural products discovery, gene-function analysis, systems biology and diagnostic platforms. Scope of review We review of some of the prominent metabolomics methodologies employed in data acquisition and analysis of natural products and disease-related biomarkers. Major conclusions This review demonstrates that metabolomics represents a highly adaptable technology with diverse applications ranging from environmental toxicology to disease diagnosis. Metabolomic analysis is shown to provide a unique snapshot of the functional genetic status of an organism by examining its biochemical profile, with relevance toward resolving phylogenetic associations involving horizontal gene transfer and distinguishing subgroups of genera possessing high genetic homology, as well as an increasing role in both elucidating biosynthetic transformations of natural products and detecting preclinical biomarkers of numerous disease states. General significance This review expands the interest in multiplatform combinatorial metabolomic analysis. The applications reviewed range from phylogenetic assignment, biosynthetic transformations of natural products, and the detection of preclinical biomarkers. PMID:25151044

  10. Genomes to natural products PRediction Informatics for Secondary Metabolomes (PRISM)

    PubMed Central

    Skinnider, Michael A.; Dejong, Chris A.; Rees, Philip N.; Johnston, Chad W.; Li, Haoxin; Webster, Andrew L. H.; Wyatt, Morgan A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial natural products are an invaluable source of evolved bioactive small molecules and pharmaceutical agents. Next-generation and metagenomic sequencing indicates untapped genomic potential, yet high rediscovery rates of known metabolites increasingly frustrate conventional natural product screening programs. New methods to connect biosynthetic gene clusters to novel chemical scaffolds are therefore critical to enable the targeted discovery of genetically encoded natural products. Here, we present PRISM, a computational resource for the identification of biosynthetic gene clusters, prediction of genetically encoded nonribosomal peptides and type I and II polyketides, and bio- and cheminformatic dereplication of known natural products. PRISM implements novel algorithms which render it uniquely capable of predicting type II polyketides, deoxygenated sugars, and starter units, making it a comprehensive genome-guided chemical structure prediction engine. A library of 57 tailoring reactions is leveraged for combinatorial scaffold library generation when multiple potential substrates are consistent with biosynthetic logic. We compare the accuracy of PRISM to existing genomic analysis platforms. PRISM is an open-source, user-friendly web application available at http://magarveylab.ca/prism/. PMID:26442528

  11. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  12. Natural products with health benefits from marine biological resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ocean is the cradle of lives, which provides a diverse array of intriguing natural products that has captured scientists’ attention in the past few decades due to their significant and extremely potent biological activities. In addition to being rich sources for pharmaceutical drugs, marine nat...

  13. The Synthesis of Quinolone Natural Products from Pseudonocardia sp.

    PubMed Central

    Salvaggio, Flavia; Hodgkinson, James T.; Carro, Laura; Geddis, Stephen M.; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Welch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis of four quinolone natural products from the actinomycete Pseudonocardia sp. is reported. The key step involved a sp2–sp3 Suzuki–Miyaura reaction between a common boronic ester lateral chain and various functionalised quinolone cores. The quinolones slowed growth of E. coli and S. aureus by inducing extended lag phases.

  14. Natural products from true mangrove flora: source, chemistry and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xiao, Qiang; Xu, Jing; Li, Min-Yi; Pan, Jian-Yu; Yang, Mei-hua

    2008-10-01

    The mangrove flora is a diverse group of salt-tolerant plants growing in tropical and subtropical intertidal estuarine zones. This review summarizes the source, chemistry and bioactivities of natural products from true mangrove species worldwide. It includes 349 metabolites and 150 references. The molecular phylogeny and chemotaxonomy of true mangrove plants is discussed.

  15. Heterologous production of active ribonuclease inhibitor in Escherichia coli by redox state control and chaperonin coexpression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic Ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), belonging to the RNH1 family, is distinguished by unique features - a high sensitivity to oxidation due to the large number of reduced cysteins and a high hydrophobicity, which made most production approaches so far unsuccessful or resulted in very low yields. In this work efficient in vivo folding of native RI in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm was obtained by external addition of a reducing agent in tandem with oxygen limitation and overproduction of a molecular chaperonin. After optimisation of the production conditions in the shake flask scale the process was scaled up to high cell densities by applying a glucose limited fed-batch procedure. Results RI production in a T7 RNA polymerase based system results in accumulation of aggregated inactive product in inclusion bodies. Combination of addition of the reductant DTT, low production temperature and coexpression of the chaperonin GroELS resulted in high level production of approximately 25 mg g-1 CDW active RI in E. coli ER2566 pET21b, corresponding to approximately 800 kU g-1 cell wet weight. Further conditional screening under fed-batch-like conditions with the EnBase® technology and scale up into the bioreactor scale resulted in an efficient high cell density glucose and oxygen limited fed-batch process with a final cell dry weight of 25 g L-1 and a total RI yield of app. 625 mg L-1 (volumetric activity of 80,000 kU L-1). The E. coli based production constructs showed a very high robustness. The recombinant culture maintained its productivity despite the combination of the toxic growth conditions, the substrate limited production mode in tandem with a high level expression of several recombinant proteins, the set of molecular chaperonins and the target protein (RI). Conclusions High level production of active RI in E. coli in a T7 RNA polymerase expression system depends on the following factors: (i) addition of a reducing agent, (ii) low production

  16. Natural product derived insecticides: discovery and development of spinetoram.

    PubMed

    Galm, Ute; Sparks, Thomas C

    2016-03-01

    This review highlights the importance of natural product research and industrial microbiology for product development in the agricultural industry, based on examples from Dow AgroSciences. It provides an overview of the discovery and development of spinetoram, a semisynthetic insecticide derived by a combination of a genetic block in a specific O-methylation of the rhamnose moiety of spinosad coupled with neural network-based QSAR and synthetic chemistry. It also emphasizes the key role that new technologies and multidisciplinary approaches play in the development of current spinetoram production strains.

  17. Natural product derived insecticides: discovery and development of spinetoram.

    PubMed

    Galm, Ute; Sparks, Thomas C

    2016-03-01

    This review highlights the importance of natural product research and industrial microbiology for product development in the agricultural industry, based on examples from Dow AgroSciences. It provides an overview of the discovery and development of spinetoram, a semisynthetic insecticide derived by a combination of a genetic block in a specific O-methylation of the rhamnose moiety of spinosad coupled with neural network-based QSAR and synthetic chemistry. It also emphasizes the key role that new technologies and multidisciplinary approaches play in the development of current spinetoram production strains. PMID:26582335

  18. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  19. First total synthesis of (+)-broussonetine W: glycosidase inhibition of natural product & analogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying-Ying; Kinami, Kyoko; Kato, Atsushi; Jia, Yue-Mei; Li, Yi-Xian; Fleet, George W J; Yu, Chu-Yi

    2016-06-14

    The first total synthesis of (+)-broussonetine W (4), a naturally-occurring pyrrolidine iminosugar isolated from the traditional Chinese medical plant Broussonetia kazinoki SIEB (Moraceae), has been completed through a concise synthetic route starting from the readily available d-arabinose derived cyclic nitrone 10 in 11 steps and 31% overall yield, with regioselective installation of the α,β-unsaturated ketone functional group by the elimination of HBr from α-bromoketone as the key step. A number of analogs of (+)-broussonetine W (4) with variable side chain length, different polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine core configurations or saturated cyclohexanones have also been prepared to explore the glycosidase inhibition and the preliminary structure-activity relationship of this intriguing class of compounds. Glycosidase inhibition studies identified the natural product (+)-broussonetine W (4) as a selective and potent inhibitor of β-galactosidase (IC50 = 0.03 μM), while its enantiomer was a selective and potent inhibitor of α-glucosidase (IC50 = 0.047 μM). It was found that the configuration of the polyhydroxylated pyrrolidine ring played a key role on their glycosidase inhibitory activities. The length of side chain and α,β-unsaturated ketone functional group also exhibited some effect on their glycosidase inhibition. PMID:27184090

  20. Fishing for Nature's Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Nadia; Tai, Hongmei; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide and significantly impacts their quality of life. Moreover, life threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction, blindness, and renal disorders, increase the morbidity rate associated with diabetes. Various natural products from medicinal plants have shown potential as antidiabetes agents in cell-based screening systems. However, many of these potential "hits" fail in mammalian tests, due to issues such as poor pharmacokinetics and/or toxic side effects. To address this problem, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model has been developed as a "bridge" to provide an experimentally convenient animal-based screening system to identify drug candidates that are active in vivo. In this review, we discuss the application of zebrafish to drug screening technologies for diabetes research. Specifically, the discovery of natural product-based antidiabetes compounds using zebrafish will be described. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that antidiabetic natural compounds can be identified in zebrafish using activity guided fractionation of crude plant extracts. Moreover, the development of fluorescent-tagged glucose bioprobes has allowed the screening of natural product-based modulators of glucose homeostasis in zebrafish. We hope that the discussion of these advances will illustrate the value and simplicity of establishing zebrafish-based assays for antidiabetic compounds in natural products-based laboratories.

  1. Fishing for Nature's Hits: Establishment of the Zebrafish as a Model for Screening Antidiabetic Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nadia; Tai, Hongmei; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects millions of people worldwide and significantly impacts their quality of life. Moreover, life threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction, blindness, and renal disorders, increase the morbidity rate associated with diabetes. Various natural products from medicinal plants have shown potential as antidiabetes agents in cell-based screening systems. However, many of these potential “hits” fail in mammalian tests, due to issues such as poor pharmacokinetics and/or toxic side effects. To address this problem, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model has been developed as a “bridge” to provide an experimentally convenient animal-based screening system to identify drug candidates that are active in vivo. In this review, we discuss the application of zebrafish to drug screening technologies for diabetes research. Specifically, the discovery of natural product-based antidiabetes compounds using zebrafish will be described. For example, it has recently been demonstrated that antidiabetic natural compounds can be identified in zebrafish using activity guided fractionation of crude plant extracts. Moreover, the development of fluorescent-tagged glucose bioprobes has allowed the screening of natural product-based modulators of glucose homeostasis in zebrafish. We hope that the discussion of these advances will illustrate the value and simplicity of establishing zebrafish-based assays for antidiabetic compounds in natural products-based laboratories. PMID:26681965

  2. Synthesis of C11-Desmethoxy Soraphen A1α: A Natural Product Analogue That Inhibits Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A synthesis of C11-desmethoxy soraphen A1α is described that proceeds in just 14 steps from readily available starting materials. This natural product analogue was identified as a target of interest in a program aimed at identifying novel natural product-inspired inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) as potential anticancer therapeutics. While describing the most efficient synthesis of a soraphen A1α analogue (total syntheses of the natural product have been reported that proceed in 25 to ≥40 linear steps), we also present data supporting the conclusion that C11-heteroatom functionality is a beneficial but unnecessary structural characteristic of soraphen A1α analogues for inhibiting ACC. PMID:24639892

  3. Dietary supplements and natural products in breast cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Kado, Karl; Forsyth, Andrew; Patel, Priyesh Ramesh; Schwartz, Janice Ann

    2012-01-01

    The association between breast cancer and modifiable health behaviors is well supported. At least one-half of all cancers are suggested to have a dietary component. It is not surprising therefore that many of the dietary agents and natural health products that have attracted the attentions of scientists and practitioners are now moving into clinical trials. In this report, we review 65 clinical intervention trials evaluating over 30 dietary supplements and natural health products for use in breast cancer. The products being tested in these trials fall broadly into the following categories: (i) vitamins, minerals, cofactors; (ii) herbal extracts; (iii) amino acids; (iv) fatty acids; (v) animal products; (vi) probiotics; (vii) phytochemicals; and (viii) combination formulations. Trial outcome measures include risk modification, efficacy testing (with dietary supplements alone or dietary supplement-anticancer drug combinations), toxicity reduction, biomarker identification, symptom management, and quality of life parameters. The wide range of interests in natural product testing at the clinical trial level supports the potential utility of these agents in the breast cancer prevention, treatment, and management regimens of the future.

  4. Natural aristolactams and aporphine alkaloids as inhibitors of CDK1/cyclin B and DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Marti, Guillaume; Eparvier, Véronique; Morleo, Barbara; Le Ven, Jessica; Apel, Cécile; Bodo, Bernard; Amand, Séverine; Dumontet, Vincent; Lozach, Olivier; Meijer, Laurent; Guéritte, Françoise; Litaudon, Marc

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to find potent inhibitors of the protein kinases DYRK1A and CDK1/Cyclin B, a systematic in vitro evaluation of 2,500 plant extracts from New Caledonia and French Guyana was performed. Some extracts were found to strongly inhibit the activity of these kinases. Four aristolactams and one lignan were purified from the ethyl acetate extracts of Oxandra asbeckii and Goniothalamus dumontetii, and eleven aporphine alkaloids were isolated from the alkaloid extracts of Siparuna pachyantha, S. decipiens, S. guianensis and S. poeppigii. Among these compounds, velutinam, aristolactam AIIIA and medioresinol showed submicromolar IC50 values on DYRK1A. PMID:23467012

  5. Natural Products as a Source for Antileishmanial and Antitrypanosomal Agents.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Marcus Tullius; Scotti, Luciana; Ishiki, Hamilton; Ribeiro, Frederico Fávaro; Cruz, Rayssa Marques Duarte da; Oliveira, Michelle Pedrosa de; Mendonça, Francisco Jaime Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Natural products are compounds extracted from plants, marine organisms, fungi or bacteria. Many researches for new drugs are based on these natural molecules, mainly by beneficial effects on health, health, efficacy, and therapeutic safety. Leishmaniosis, Chagas disease and African sleeping sickness are neglected diseases caused by the Leishmania and Trypanosoma ssp. parasites. These infections mainly affect population of developing countries; they have different symptoms, and may often lead to death. The therapeutic drugs available to treat these diseases are either obsolete, toxic, or have questionable efficacy, possibly through encountering resistance. Discovery of new, safe, effective, and affordable molecules is urgently needed. Natural organisms, as marine metabolites, alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, terpene and coumarins provide innumerable molecules with the potential to treat these diseases. This study examines studies of natural bioactive compounds as antileishmanial and antitrypanosomal agents. PMID:27682867

  6. Biosynthesis and Function of Polyacetylenes and Allied Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Minto, Robert E.; Blacklock, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    Polyacetylenic natural products are a substantial class of often unstable compounds containing a unique carbon-carbon triple bond functionality, that are intriguing for their wide variety of biochemical and ecological functions, economic potential, and surprising mode of biosynthesis. Isotopic tracer experiments between 1960 and 1990 demonstrated that the majority of these compounds are derived from fatty acid and polyketide precursors. During the past decade, research into the metabolism of polyacetylenes has swiftly advanced, driven by the cloning of the first genes responsible for polyacetylene biosynthesis in plants, moss, fungi, and actinomycetes, and the initial characterization of the gene products. The current state of knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular genetics of polyacetylenic secondary metabolic pathways will be presented together with an up-to-date survey of new terrestrial and marine natural products, their known biological activities, and a discussion of their likely metabolic origins. PMID:18387369

  7. Manipulating Natural Product Biosynthetic Pathways via DNA Assembler

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    DNA assembler is an efficient synthetic biology method for constructing and manipulating biochemical pathways. The rapidly increasing number of sequenced genomes provides a rich source for discovery of gene clusters involved in synthesizing new natural products. However, both discovery and economical production are hampered by our limited knowledge in manipulating most organisms and the corresponding pathways. By taking advantage of yeast in vivo homologous recombination, DNA assembler synthesizes an entire expression vector containing the target biosynthetic pathway and the genetic elements needed for DNA maintenance and replication. Here we use the spectinabilin clusters originated from two hosts as examples to illustrate the guidelines of using DNA assembler for cluster characterization and silent cluster activation. Such strategies offer unprecedented versatility in cluster manipulation, bypass the traditional laborious strategies to elicit pathway expression, and provide a new platform for de novo cluster assembly and genome mining for discovering new natural products. PMID:24903884

  8. Synthetic biology tools for bioprospecting of natural products in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Unkles, Shiela E; Valiante, Vito; Mattern, Derek J; Brakhage, Axel A

    2014-04-24

    Filamentous fungi have the capacity to produce a battery of natural products of often unknown function, synthesized by complex metabolic pathways. Unfortunately, most of these pathways appear silent, many in intractable organisms, and their products consequently unidentified. One basic challenge is the difficulty of expressing a biosynthesis pathway for a complex natural product in a heterologous eukaryotic host. Here, we provide a proof-of concept solution to this challenge and describe how the entire penicillin biosynthesis pathway can be expressed in a heterologous host. The method takes advantage of a combination of improved yeast in vivo cloning technology, generation of polycistronic mRNA for the gene cluster under study, and an amenable and easily manipulated fungal host, i.e., Aspergillus nidulans. We achieve expression from a single promoter of the pathway genes to yield a large polycistronic mRNA by using viral 2A peptide sequences to direct successful cotranslational cleavage of pathway enzymes.

  9. Natural gas production from hydrate dissociation: An axisymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.; Ji, Chuang; Smith, D.H.

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes an axisymmetric model for natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing well. During the hydrate dissociation, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are analyzed. The system of governing equations is solved by a finite difference scheme. For different well pressures and reservoir temperatures, distributions of temperature and pressure in the reservoir, as well as the natural gas production from the well are evaluated. The numerical results are compared with those obtained by a linearization method. It is shown that the gas production rate is a sensitive function of well pressure. The simulation results are compared with the linearization approach and the shortcomings of the earlier approach are discussed.

  10. Huntingtin cleavage product A forms in neurons and is reduced by gamma-secretase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mutation in Huntington's disease is a polyglutamine expansion near the N-terminus of huntingtin. Huntingtin expressed in immortalized neurons is cleaved near the N-terminus to form N-terminal polypeptides known as cleavage products A and B (cpA and cpB). CpA and cpB with polyglutamine expansion form inclusions in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. The formation of cpA and cpB in primary neurons has not been established and the proteases involved in the formation of these fragments are unknown. Results Delivery of htt cDNA into the mouse striatum using adeno-associated virus or into primary cortical neurons using lentivirus generated cpA and cpB, indicating that neurons in brain and in vitro can form these fragments. A screen of small molecule protease inhibitors introduced to clonal striatal X57 cells and HeLa cells identified compounds that reduced levels of cpA and are inhibitors of the aspartyl proteases cathepsin D and cathepsin E. The most effective compound, P1-N031, is a transition state mimetic for aspartyl proteases. By western blot analysis, cathepsin D was easily detected in clonal striatal X57 cells, mouse brain and primary neurons, whereas cathepsin E was only detectible in clonal striatal X57 cells. In primary neurons, levels of cleavage product A were not changed by the same compounds that were effective in clonal striatal cells or by mRNA silencing to partially reduce levels of cathepsin D. Instead, treating primary neurons with compounds that are known to inhibit gamma secretase activity either indirectly (Imatinib mesylate, Gleevec) or selectively (LY-411,575 or DAPT) reduced levels of cpA. LY-411,575 or DAPT also increased survival of primary neurons expressing endogenous full-length mutant huntingtin. Conclusion We show that cpA and cpB are produced from a larger huntingtin fragment in vivo in mouse brain and in primary neuron cultures. The aspartyl protease involved in forming cpA has cathepsin-D like properties in

  11. Semi-synthetic derivatives of natural isoflavones from Maclura pomifera as a novel class of PDE-5A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ribaudo, Giovanni; Pagano, Mario Angelo; Pavan, Valeria; Redaelli, Marco; Zorzan, Maira; Pezzani, Raffaele; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Vendrame, Tiziano; Bova, Sergio; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Natural (iso)flavonoids have been recently reported to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and induce vasorelaxation, albeit the results described in the literature are discordant. The cGMP-selective isoform PDE-5A, in particular, represents the target of sildenafil and its analogues in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and pulmonary hypertension by promoting relaxation in vascular smooth muscle through the activation of the NO/cGMP pathway. We undertook this study to verify if osajin and pomiferin, two natural prenylated isoflavones and major constituents of Maclura pomifera extracts previously investigated for their anticancer, antibacterial and antidiabetic properties, show inhibitory activity on PDE-5A. These two isoflavones were isolated from the plant extracts and then synthetically modified to obtain a set of semi-synthetic derivatives with slight and focused modifications on the natural scaffold. The compounds were at first screened against PDE-5A in vitro and, based on the encouraging results, further tested for their relaxant effect on isolated rat artery rings. Computational docking studies were also carried out to explore the mode of interaction with the target protein. The obtained data were compared to the behaviour of the well-known PDE-5A inhibitor sildenafil. Our results demonstrate that semi-synthetic derivatives of osajin and pomiferin show an inhibitory effect on the isolated enzyme that, for some of the compounds, is accompanied by a vasorelaxant activity. Based on our findings, we propose the here described isoflavones as potential lead compounds for the development, starting from natural scaffolds, of a new class of PDE-5A inhibitors with vasorelaxant properties.

  12. DNA sequence, products, and transcriptional pattern of the genes involved in production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17.

    PubMed

    Genilloud, O; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1989-02-01

    The 3.8-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA that contains the genes required for production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 was sequenced. The sequence contains four open reading frames which were shown to be translated in vivo by the construction of fusions to lacZ. The location of these open reading frames fits well with the location of the four microcin B17 production genes, mcbABCD, identified previously through genetic complementation. The products of the four genes have been identified, and the observed molecular weights of the proteins agree with those predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The transcription of these genes was studied by using fusions to lacZ and physical mapping of mRNA start sites. Three promoters were identified in this region. The major promoter for all the genes is a growth phase-regulated OmpR-dependent promoter located upstream of mcbA. A second promoter is located within mcbC and is responsible for a low-level basal expression of mcbD. A third promoter, located within mcbD, promotes transcription in the reverse direction starting within mcbD and extending through mcbC. The resulting mRNA appears to be an untranslated antisense transcript that could play a regulatory role in the expression of these genes.

  13. Evaluation of proposed natural corrosion inhibitors for X-52 carbon steel in ethanol media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Rafael F.

    This work describes the testing performed for corrosion control actions for X-52 carbon steel in ethanol media by using inhibitors, the following compounds were included: linalyl formate, linalyl acetate, linalyl butyrate, citronellyl acetate and 1-pentylallyl acetate. The experiments were performed in an electrochemical 3 electrode system with an X-52 steel rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) with rotational speed adjusted to 130 RPM. The system was deaerated by bubbling nitrogen gas into the ethanol solution. The Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) technique was used to characterize the metal/electrolyte interface. Experimental testing was performed in anhydrous ethanol solution with 5 mM or 10 mM of one inhibitor. Surface analyses for the corroded surfaces were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and White light interferometry (WLI). The results suggest that linalyl formate promotes the highest corrosion inhibition efficiency at 10 mM, followed by citronellyl acetate and linalyl butyrate. At this concentration, 1-pentylallyl acetate and linalyl acetate have not promoted corrosion inhibition. At a concentration of 5 mM, linalyl formate, linalyl acetate and linalyl butyrate promoted high inhibition efficiencies during the first hours but none was able to promote a longer protection than one day, possibly due to chemical degradation, chemical reactions and/or reduced surface coverage. The linalyl formate is considered the best chemical for inhibition purposes, especially at the concentration of 10 mM.

  14. Snake Venom PLA2s Inhibitors Isolated from Brazilian Plants: Synthetic and Natural Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, B. M. A.; Santos, J. D. L.; Xavier, B. M.; Almeida, J. R.; Resende, L. M.; Martins, W.; Marcussi, S.; Marangoni, S.; Stábeli, R. G.; Calderon, L. A.; Soares, A. M.; Da Silva, S. L.; Marchi-Salvador, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites. PMID:24171158

  15. Snake venom PLA2s inhibitors isolated from Brazilian plants: synthetic and natural molecules.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, B M A; Santos, J D L; Xavier, B M; Almeida, J R; Resende, L M; Martins, W; Marcussi, S; Marangoni, S; Stábeli, R G; Calderon, L A; Soares, A M; Da Silva, S L; Marchi-Salvador, D P

    2013-01-01

    Ophidian envenomation is an important health problem in Brazil and other South American countries. In folk medicine, especially in developing countries, several vegetal species are employed for the treatment of snakebites in communities that lack prompt access to serum therapy. However, the identification and characterization of the effects of several new plants or their isolated compounds, which are able to inhibit the activities of snake venom, are extremely important and such studies are imperative. Snake venom contains several organic and inorganic compounds; phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are one of the principal toxic components of venom. PLA2s display a wide variety of pharmacological activities, such as neurotoxicity, myotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, anticoagulant, hemorrhagic, and edema-inducing effects. PLA2 inhibition is of pharmacological and therapeutic interests as these enzymes are involved in several inflammatory diseases. This review describes the results of several studies of plant extracts and their isolated active principles, when used against crude snake venoms or their toxic fractions. Isolated inhibitors, such as steroids, terpenoids, and phenolic compounds, are able to inhibit PLA2s from different snake venoms. The design of specific inhibitors of PLA2s might help in the development of new pharmaceutical drugs, more specific antivenom, or even as alternative approaches for treating snakebites.

  16. Differential regulation of CD3- and CD28-induced IL-2 and IFN-gamma production by a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor XR774 from Cladosporium cf. cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, R; Depledge, P; Rawlins, P; Dhanjal, N; Manic, A; Wrigley, S; Foxwell, B; Moore, M

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of CD28 signalling after an immune response impedes T cell activation and can lead to immunosuppression. To identify inhibitors of anti-CD28 induced IL-2 production, a library of fungal metabolites was screened in a cell-based, high throughput assay. A reduced novel benzofluoranthene, tentatively named as (6bS, 7R, 8S)-7-methoxy-4, 8, 9-trihydroxy-1, 6b, 7, 8-tetrahydro-2H-benzo[j] fluoranthen-3-one (XR774), from Cladosporium cf. cladosporioides, was isolated. XR774 inhibited IL-2 mRNA and protein expression induced by anti-CD28 and anti-CD3 but had no effect on IL-2 induction by PMA and ionomycin. Moreover, XR774 inhibited the activity of the tyrosine kinases, Fyn, Lck, Abl and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with nanomolar activity, whereas micromolar concentrations of XR774 were ineffective on the serine-threonine kinase, PKA. Kinetic analysis of Fyn kinase inhibition was consistent with XR774 as a competitive inhibitor with respect to ATP. In peripheral blood, mononuclear cells (PBMC), XR774 inhibited anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 induced IL-2 and IL-2R alpha chain (CD25) expression but was consistently less active for inhibition of IFN-gamma production. On stimulation with PMA and anti-CD28, XR774 inhibited IL-2 production but had no effect on CD25 expression and enhanced IFN-gamma production. In contrast, the ansamycin, geldanamycin, inhibited both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production induced by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 or PMA and anti-CD28. No significant associated cytotoxicity or inhibition of protein synthesis was observed at concentrations up to 14 microM. Thus, XR774 represents a novel class of pharmacological agent with selective biological activities that distinguish it from other natural product inhibitors, such as the ansamycins.

  17. Initial and bulk extraction of natural products isolation.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a growing interest in the study of natural products, especially as part of drug discovery programs. Secondary metabolites can be extracted from a variety of natural sources, including plants, microbes, marine animals, insects, and amphibians. This chapter focuses principally on laboratory-scale processes of initial and bulk extraction from plant and microbial sources. With regard to plant natural products, the steps required for the preparation of the material prior to extraction, including aspects concerning plant selection, collection, identification, drying, and grinding, are detailed. The various extraction methods available (maceration, ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction, percolation, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized solvent extraction, extraction under reflux, steam distillation, and acid/based extraction) are reviewed. Regarding microbial natural products, this chapter covers issues relating to the isolation and culture of microorganisms and presents the extraction methods available for the recovery of microbial metabolites. Methods of minimizing compound degradation, artifacts formation, extract contamination with external impurities, and enrichment of extracts with desired metabolites are also examined.

  18. Differential sensitivity of polyhydroxyalkanoate producing bacteria to fermentation inhibitors and comparison of polyhydroxybutyrate production from Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas pseudoflava

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is determine the relative sensitivity of a panel of seven polyhydroxyalkanoate producing bacteria to a panel of seven lignocellulosic-derived fermentation inhibitors representing aliphatic acids, furans and phenolics. A further aim was to measure the polyhydroxybutyrate production of select organisms on lignocellulosic-derived monosaccharides arabinose, xylose, glucose and mannose. Findings We examined the sensitivity of seven polyhydroxyalkanoate producing bacteria: Azohydromonas lata, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas olevorans, Pseudomonas pseudoflava and Ralstonia eutropha, against seven fermentation inhibitors produced by the saccharification of lignocellulose: acetic acid, levulinic acid, coumaric acid, ferulic acid, syringaldehyde, furfural, and hyroxymethyfurfural. There was significant variation in the sensitivity of these microbes to representative phenolics ranging from 0.25-1.5 g/L coumaric and ferulic acid and between 0.5-6.0 g/L syringaldehyde. Inhibition ranged from 0.37-4 g/L and 0.75-6 g/L with acetic acid and levulinic acid, respectively. B. cepacia and P. pseudoflava were selected for further analysis of polyhydroxyalkanoate production. Conclusions We find significant differences in sensitivity to the fermentation inhibitors tested and find these variations to be over a relevant concentration range given the concentrations of inhibitors typically found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Of the seven bacteria tested, B. cepacia demonstrated the greatest inhibitor tolerance. Similarly, of two organisms examined for polyhydroxybutyrate production, B. cepacia was notably more efficient when fermenting pentose substrates. PMID:23734728

  19. Natural and synthetic iminosugars as carbohydrate processing enzyme inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wrodnigg, Tanja M; Steiner, Andreas J; Ueberbacher, Bernhard J

    2008-01-01

    Iminosugars, featuring a basic nitrogen at the hetero atom position in carbohydrate rings, gain increasing interest in the search for novel approaches towards cancer drug development. This compound class is known as competitive inhibitors of carbohydrate manipulation enzymes, such as glycosidases, which are involved in tumor cell invasion and migration. Such enzymes are also responsible for the attachment of oligosaccharides to the cell surface of tumor cells, displayed as glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans, which play an important role in malignant phenotype and tumor growth. Furthermore, cancer cells show an extremely active lysosomal system which is reflected by enhancement of glycoprotein turnover. Iminosugars were found to interact with glycosyl hydrolases responsible for this kind of action in cancer cells and thus open a new compound class in the research field of finding new anti-cancer activities. This review will focus on the role of iminosugars in cancer therapy and will give an overview of their properties.

  20. Identification of Suitable Natural Inhibitor against Influenza A (H1N1) Neuraminidase Protein by Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Maheswata; Jena, Lingaraja; Rath, Surya Narayan

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus, also known as swine flu is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality since 2009. There is a need to explore novel anti-viral drugs for overcoming the epidemics. Traditionally, different plant extracts of garlic, ginger, kalmegh, ajwain, green tea, turmeric, menthe, tulsi, etc. have been used as hopeful source of prevention and treatment of human influenza. The H1N1 virus contains an important glycoprotein, known as neuraminidase (NA) that is mainly responsible for initiation of viral infection and is essential for the life cycle of H1N1. It is responsible for sialic acid cleavage from glycans of the infected cell. We employed amino acid sequence of H1N1 NA to predict the tertiary structure using Phyre2 server and validated using ProCheck, ProSA, ProQ, and ERRAT server. Further, the modelled structure was docked with thirteen natural compounds of plant origin using AutoDock4.2. Most of the natural compounds showed effective inhibitory activity against H1N1 NA in binding condition. This study also highlights interaction of these natural inhibitors with amino residues of NA protein. Furthermore, among 13 natural compounds, theaflavin, found in green tea, was observed to inhibit H1N1 NA proteins strongly supported by lowest docking energy. Hence, it may be of interest to consider theaflavin for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation. PMID:27729839

  1. Analysis, occurrence, fate and risks of proton pump inhibitors, their metabolites and transformation products in aquatic environment: A review.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Christina I; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2016-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) which include omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole, are extensively used for the relief of gastro-intestinal disorders. Despite their high worldwide consumption, PPIs are extensively metabolized in human bodies and therefore are not regularly detected in monitoring studies. Very recently, however, it has been shown that some omeprazole metabolites may enter and are likely to persist in aquatic environment. Hence, to fully assess the environmental exposures and risks associated with PPIs, it is important to better understand and evaluate the fate and behavior not only of the parent compound but also of their metabolites and their transformation products arising from biotic and abiotic processes (hydrolysis, photodegradation, biodegradation etc.) in the environment. In this light, the purpose of this review is to summarize the present state of knowledge on the introduction and behavior of these chemicals in natural and engineering systems and highlight research needs and gaps. It draws attention to their transformation, the increase contamination by their metabolites/TPs in different environmental matrices and their potential adverse effects in the environment. Furthermore, existing research on analytical developments with respect to sample treatment, separation and detection of PPIs and their metabolites/TPs is provided.

  2. Marine natural products: a new wave of drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Montaser, Rana; Luesch, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    The largely unexplored marine world that presumably harbors the most biodiversity may be the vastest resource to discover novel ‘validated’ structures with novel modes of action that cover biologically relevant chemical space. Several challenges, including the supply problem and target identification, need to be met for successful drug development of these often complex molecules; however, approaches are available to overcome the hurdles. Advances in technologies such as sampling strategies, nanoscale NMR for structure determination, total chemical synthesis, fermentation and biotechnology are all crucial to the success of marine natural products as drug leads. We illustrate the high degree of innovation in the field of marine natural products, which in our view will lead to a new wave of drugs that flow into the market and pharmacies in the future. PMID:21882941

  3. Molecular Recognition of Natural Products by Resorc[4]arene Receptors.

    PubMed

    D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Ghirga, Francesca; Quaglio, Deborah; Cerreto, Antonella; Ingallina, Cinzia; Tafi, Andrea; Botta, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    This review is aimed at providing an overview of the up-to-now published literature on resorc[4]arene macrocycles exploited as artificial receptors for the molecular recognition of some classes of natural products. A concise illustration of the main synthetic strategies developed to afford the resorc[4]arene scaffold is followed by a report on the principles of the gas-phase investigation of recognition phenomena by mass spectrometry (MS). Emphasis is placed on gas-phase studies of diastereoisomeric complexes generated inside a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer by resorc[4]arene receptors towards a series of natural products, namely amino acids, amphetamine, ethanolamine neurotransmitters, dipeptides, vinca alkaloids and nucleosides. The literature outcomes discussed here, taken largely from our own revisited work, have been completed by references to other studies, in order to draw a broader picture of this rapidly evolving field of research. PMID:26654589

  4. Target prices for mass production of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for global cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Andrew; Gotham, Dzintars; Fortunak, Joseph; Meldrum, Jonathan; Erbacher, Isabelle; Martin, Manuel; Shoman, Haitham; Levi, Jacob; Powderly, William G; Bower, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective To calculate sustainable generic prices for 4 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Background TKIs have proven survival benefits in the treatment of several cancers, including chronic myeloid leukaemia, breast, liver, renal and lung cancer. However, current high prices are a barrier to treatment. Mass production of low-cost generic antiretrovirals has led to over 13 million people being on HIV/AIDS treatment worldwide. This analysis estimates target prices for generic TKIs, assuming similar methods of mass production. Methods Four TKIs with patent expiry dates in the next 5 years were selected for analysis: imatinib, erlotinib, lapatinib and sorafenib. Chemistry, dosing, published data on per-kilogram pricing for commercial transactions of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and quotes from manufacturers were used to estimate costs of production. Analysis included costs of excipients, formulation, packaging, shipping and a 50% profit margin. Target prices were compared with current prices. Global numbers of patients eligible for treatment with each TKI were estimated. Results API costs per kg were $347–$746 for imatinib, $2470 for erlotinib, $4671 for lapatinib, and $3000 for sorafenib. Basing on annual dose requirements, costs of formulation/packaging and a 50% profit margin, target generic prices per person-year were $128–$216 for imatinib, $240 for erlotinib, $1450 for sorafenib, and $4020 for lapatinib. Over 1 million people would be newly eligible to start treatment with these TKIs annually. Conclusions Mass generic production of several TKIs could achieve treatment prices in the range of $128–$4020 per person-year, versus current US prices of $75161–$139 138. Generic TKIs could allow significant savings and scaling-up of treatment globally, for over 1 million eligible patients. PMID:26817636

  5. Naturally Occurring Variability in the Envelope Glycoprotein of HIV-1 and the Development of Cell Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brower, Evan T.; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring genetic variability across HIV-1 subtypes causes amino acid polymorphisms in encoded HIV-1 proteins including the envelope glycoproteins associated with viral entry. The effects of amino acid polymorphisms on the mechanism of HIV-1 entry into cells, a process initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor, are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that amino acid polymorphisms affect the structural stability and domain cooperativity of gp120 and that those differences are reflected in the binding mechanism of the viral envelope glycoprotein to the cell surface receptor and coreceptor. Moreover, subtype differences also affect the binding behavior of experimental HIV cell entry inhibitors. While gp120-A has a slightly lower denaturation temperature than gp120-B, the most notable stability difference is that for gp120-B the van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratio (ΔHvH/ΔH) is 0.95 whereas for gp120-A is 0.6, indicative of more cooperative domain/domain interactions in gp120-B, as this protein more closely approaches a two-state transition. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that CD4 and 17b (a surrogate antibody for the chemokine coreceptor) exhibit 7 and 3-fold weaker binding affinities for gp120-A. The binding of these proteins as well as that of the experimental entry inhibitor NBD-556 induce smaller conformational changes in gp120-A as evidenced by significantly smaller binding enthalpies and binding entropies. Together, these results describe the effects of gp120 polymorphisms on binding to host cell receptors and emphasize that guidelines for developing future entry inhibitors must recognize and deal with genomic differences between HIV strains. PMID:20166763

  6. The C7N aminocyclitol family of natural products.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Taifo

    2003-02-01

    This review covers microbial secondary metabolites classified in the family of C7N aminocyclitols, a relatively new class of natural products that is increasingly gaining recognition due to their significant biomedical and agricultural uses. Their discovery and structure determinations, their biosynthetic origin, biological properties, chemical synthesis, as well as their further development for pharmaceutical uses are described. The literature from 1970 to July 2002 is reviewed, with 269 references cited.

  7. Xylochemistry--Making Natural Products Entirely from Wood.

    PubMed

    Stubba, Daniel; Lahm, Günther; Geffe, Mario; Runyon, Jason W; Arduengo, Anthony J; Opatz, Till

    2015-11-16

    The first total synthesis of the dimeric berberine alkaloid ilicifoline (ilicifoline B) is reported. Its carbon skeleton is constructed from ferulic acid, veratrole, and methanol. The synthesis reported herein employs starting materials solely derived from wood. The natural product is thus constructed entirely from renewable resources. The same strategy is applied to a formal total synthesis of morphinan alkaloids. The use of wood-derived building blocks (xylochemicals) instead of the conventional petrochemicals represents a sustainable alternative to classical synthetic approaches.

  8. Formaldehyde--a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Wait, Annemarie F; Brandmayr, Caterina; Stripp, Sven T; Cavazza, Christine; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2011-02-01

    Dihydrogen (H(2)) production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases is strongly inhibited by formaldehyde (methanal) in a reaction that is rapid, reversible, and specific to this type of hydrogenase. This discovery, using three [FeFe]-hydrogenases that are homologous about the active site but otherwise structurally distinct, was made by protein film electrochemistry, which measures the activity (as electrical current) of enzymes immobilized on an electrode; importantly, the inhibitor can be removed after addition. Formaldehyde causes rapid loss of proton reduction activity which is restored when the solution is exchanged. Inhibition is confirmed by conventional solution assays. The effect depends strongly on the direction of catalysis: inhibition of H(2) oxidation is much weaker than for H(2) production, and formaldehyde also protects against CO and O(2) inactivation. By contrast, inhibition of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is weak. The results strongly suggest that formaldehyde binds at, or close to, the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases at a site unique to this class of enzyme--highly conserved lysine and cysteine residues, the bridgehead atom of the dithiolate ligand, or the reduced Fe(d) that is the focal center of catalysis.

  9. Formaldehyde--a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Wait, Annemarie F; Brandmayr, Caterina; Stripp, Sven T; Cavazza, Christine; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2011-02-01

    Dihydrogen (H(2)) production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases is strongly inhibited by formaldehyde (methanal) in a reaction that is rapid, reversible, and specific to this type of hydrogenase. This discovery, using three [FeFe]-hydrogenases that are homologous about the active site but otherwise structurally distinct, was made by protein film electrochemistry, which measures the activity (as electrical current) of enzymes immobilized on an electrode; importantly, the inhibitor can be removed after addition. Formaldehyde causes rapid loss of proton reduction activity which is restored when the solution is exchanged. Inhibition is confirmed by conventional solution assays. The effect depends strongly on the direction of catalysis: inhibition of H(2) oxidation is much weaker than for H(2) production, and formaldehyde also protects against CO and O(2) inactivation. By contrast, inhibition of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is weak. The results strongly suggest that formaldehyde binds at, or close to, the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases at a site unique to this class of enzyme--highly conserved lysine and cysteine residues, the bridgehead atom of the dithiolate ligand, or the reduced Fe(d) that is the focal center of catalysis. PMID:21204519

  10. Production of Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A by the Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain AP16

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. PMID:24727275

  11. Interactions between Natural Health Products and Oral Anticoagulants: Spontaneous Reports in the Italian Surveillance System of Natural Health Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Angelica; Gallo, Eugenia; Benemei, Silvia; Vietri, Michele; Lapi, Francesco; Volpi, Roberta; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Gori, Luigi; Mugelli, Alessandro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Vannacci, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The safety of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) use can be compromised by many popular herbal supplements taken by individuals. The literature reports that 30% of warfarin-treated patients self-medicates with herbs. Possible interactions represent an health risk. We aimed to identify all herbs-oral anticoagulants interactions collected in the Italian database of suspected adverse reactions to “natural health” products. Methods. The Italian database of spontaneous reports of suspected adverse reactions to natural products was analyzed to address herb-VKAs interactions. Results. From 2002 to 2009, we identified 12 reports with 7 cases of INR reduction in patients treated with warfarin (n = 3) and acenocoumarol (n = 4), and 5 cases of INR increase (all warfarin associated). It was reported 8 different herbal products as possibly interacting. Discussion. Our study confirms the risk of interactions, highlighting the difficulty to characterize them and their mechanisms and, finally, prevent their onset. The reported data underline the urgent need of healthcare providers being aware of the possible interaction between natural products and VKA, also because of the critical clinical conditions affecting patients. This is the first step to have the best approach to understand possible INR alterations linked to herb-VKA interaction and to rightly educate patients in treatment with VKA. PMID:21274401

  12. Automated genome mining of ribosomal peptide natural products

    SciTech Connect

    Mohimani, Hosein; Kersten, Roland; Liu, Wei; Wang, Mingxun; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Bandeira, Nuno; Moore, Bradley S.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-07-31

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), especially from microbial sources, are a large group of bioactive natural products that are a promising source of new (bio)chemistry and bioactivity (1). In light of exponentially increasing microbial genome databases and improved mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomic platforms, there is a need for computational tools that connect natural product genotypes predicted from microbial genome sequences with their corresponding chemotypes from metabolomic datasets. Here, we introduce RiPPquest, a tandem mass spectrometry database search tool for identification of microbial RiPPs and apply it for lanthipeptide discovery. RiPPquest uses genomics to limit search space to the vicinity of RiPP biosynthetic genes and proteomics to analyze extensive peptide modifications and compute p-values of peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). We highlight RiPPquest by connection of multiple RiPPs from extracts of Streptomyces to their gene clusters and by the discovery of a new class III lanthipeptide, informatipeptin, from Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM 40736 as the first natural product to be identified in an automated fashion by genome mining. The presented tool is available at cy-clo.ucsd.edu.

  13. Mining and engineering natural-product biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2007-07-01

    Natural products continue to fulfill an important role in the development of therapeutic agents. In addition, with the advent of chemical genetics and high-throughput screening platforms, these molecules have become increasingly valuable as tools for interrogating fundamental aspects of biological systems. To access the vast portion of natural-product structural diversity that remains unexploited for these and other applications, genome mining and microbial metagenomic approaches are proving particularly powerful. When these are coupled with recombineering and related genetic tools, large biosynthetic gene clusters that remain intractable or cryptic in the native host can be more efficiently cloned and expressed in a suitable heterologous system. For lead optimization and the further structural diversification of natural-product libraries, combinatorial biosynthetic engineering has also become indispensable. However, our ability to rationally redesign biosynthetic pathways is often limited by our lack of understanding of the structure, dynamics and interplay between the many enzymes involved in complex biosynthetic pathways. Despite this, recent structures of fatty acid synthases should allow a more accurate prediction of the likely architecture of related polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase multienzymes. PMID:17576425

  14. Antimycobacterial natural products--an opportunity for the Colombian biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Juan; Coy, Ericsson David; Stashenko, Elena

    2011-12-01

    It is estimated that one-third part of the world population is infected with the tubercle bacillus. While only a small percentage of infected individuals will develop clinical tuberculosis, each year there are approximately eight million new cases and two million deaths. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is thus responsible for more human mortality than any other single microbial species. The goals of tuberculosis control are focused to cure active disease, prevent relapse, reduce transmission and avert the emergence of drug-resistance. For over 50 years, natural products have served us well on combating infectious bacteria and fungi. During the 20th century, microbial and plant secondary metabolites have helped to double our life span, reduced pain and suffering, and revolutionized medicine. Colombia is a megadiverse country with enormous potential to offer leads for new antimycobacterial drugs. The principal aim of this article is to show a state of the art on antimycobacterial natural products research in Colombia compared to the rest of the world, in order to develop programs for bioprospecting with a view to determining the biological activity for pharmaceutical and industrial application of natural products in our country.

  15. Natural products and colon cancer: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression phases. Thus, the multistage sequence of events has many phases for prevention and intervention. Chemoprevention, a novel approach for controlling cancer, involves the use of specific natural products or synthetic chemical agents to reverse, suppress or prevent premalignancy before the development of invasive cancer. Several natural products, such as, grains, nuts, cereals, spices, fruits, vegetables, beverages, medicinal plants and herbs and their various phytochemical constituents including, phenolics, flavonoids, carotenoids, alkaloids, nitrogen containing as well as organosulfur compounds confer protective effects against wide range of cancers including colon cancer. Since diet has an important role in the etiology of colon cancer, dietary chemoprevention received attention for colon cancer prevention. However, identification of an agent with chemopreventive potential requires in vitro studies, efficacy and toxicity studies in animal models before embarking on human clinical trials. A brief introduction about colon cancer and the role of some recent natural products in colon cancer chemoprevention with respect to multiple molecular mechanisms in various in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies are described in this review. PMID:19884979

  16. Natural Products as a Source for Novel Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    Natural products have historically been of crucial importance in the identification and development of antibacterial agents. Interest in these systems has waned in recent years, but the rapid emergence of resistant bacterial strains has forced their re-evaluation as a route to identify novel chemical skeletons with antibacterial activity for elaboration in drug development. This overview examines the current situation, highlights new natural product systems which have been found, together with re-examination of some old ones, and new technologies for their identification. While natural products certainly have the potential to re-emerge as a key start-point in antibacterial drug discovery, reports of new or reinvestigated structures need to be supported with sufficient quality chemical (solubility, stability), biochemical (including toxicity in particular, along with target information) and microbiological [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and resistance frequency] validation data to assist in the identification of promising hit structures and to avoid wasted effort from trawling over already cultivated territory. This is particularly important in a resource-limited research environment. PMID:27267698

  17. Natural products as a rich source of tau-targeting drugs for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Calcul, Laurent; Zhang, Bo; Jinwal, Umesh K; Dickey, Chad A; Baker, Bill J

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia, affecting more than 5.4 million people in the USA. Although the cause of AD is not well understood, the cholinergic, amyloid and tau hypotheses were proposed to explain its development. Drug discovery for AD based on the cholinergic and amyloid theories have not been effective. In this article we summarize tau-based natural products as AD therapeutics from a variety of biological sources, including the anti-amyloid agent curcumin, isolated from turmeric, the microtubule stabilizer paclitaxel, from the Pacific Yew Taxus brevifolia, and the Streptomyces-derived Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin. The overlooked approach of clearing tau aggregation will most likely be the next objective for AD drug discovery. PMID:22924511

  18. Isolation and identification of novel propoxyphenyl thiosildenafil found in natural health food product.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyoung Moon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Park, Hyoung-Joon; Hwang, Insun; Heo, Ok-Soon; Kim, Woo Seong

    2014-01-01

    A novel phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor was found in a natural health food product. The previously unknown sildenafil analogue was isolated using preparative HPLC. The structure of the compound was elucidated using HPLC with diode array detection (DAD), time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). An [M + H](+) ion was detected at m/z 505.2077 by LC-TOF/MS that was consistent with C23H32N6O3S2 (-0.98 ppm). By NMR analysis, the analogue was identified as 1-methyl-5-(5-(4-methylpiperazin-1-ylsulfonyl)-2-propoxyphenyl)-3-propyl-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine-7(6H)-thione. In this structure, the ethoxy group of thiosildenafil was substituted by a propoxy group of the unknown compound. Therefore, this novel thiosildenafil analogue was named propoxyphenyl thiosildenafil. PMID:24382302

  19. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention.

  20. Natural gas production problems : solutions, methodologies, and modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Herrin, James M.; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Basinski, Paul M.; Olsson, William Arthur; Arnold, Bill Walter; Broadhead, Ronald F.; Knight, Connie D.; Keefe, Russell G.; McKinney, Curt; Holm, Gus; Holland, John F.; Larson, Rich; Engler, Thomas W.; Lorenz, John Clay

    2004-10-01

    Natural gas is a clean fuel that will be the most important domestic energy resource for the first half the 21st centtuy. Ensuring a stable supply is essential for our national energy security. The research we have undertaken will maximize the extractable volume of gas while minimizing the environmental impact of surface disturbances associated with drilling and production. This report describes a methodology for comprehensive evaluation and modeling of the total gas system within a basin focusing on problematic horizontal fluid flow variability. This has been accomplished through extensive use of geophysical, core (rock sample) and outcrop data to interpret and predict directional flow and production trends. Side benefits include reduced environmental impact of drilling due to reduced number of required wells for resource extraction. These results have been accomplished through a cooperative and integrated systems approach involving industry, government, academia and a multi-organizational team within Sandia National Laboratories. Industry has provided essential in-kind support to this project in the forms of extensive core data, production data, maps, seismic data, production analyses, engineering studies, plus equipment and staff for obtaining geophysical data. This approach provides innovative ideas and technologies to bring new resources to market and to reduce the overall environmental impact of drilling. More importantly, the products of this research are not be location specific but can be extended to other areas of gas production throughout the Rocky Mountain area. Thus this project is designed to solve problems associated with natural gas production at developing sites, or at old sites under redevelopment.

  1. Effects of nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitors and its implication on natural killer T-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihyun; Ryu, Kyoungju; Ko, Younghyeh; Park, Chaehwa

    2005-10-01

    Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) is a highly aggressive disease. Despite the use of various treatment regimens, the prognosis of NKTL is poor, and new treatment strategies need to be determined. Because of the significant survival potential, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB has become one of the major targets for drug development. In this study, we explored the effect and action mechanism of NF-kappaB inhibitors, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin, on NKTL cell lines (NKL, NK-92 and HANK1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that NF-kappaB was constitutively active in HANK1, a chemoresistant cell line. BAY 11-7082 and curcumin suppressed NF-kappaB activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which finally resulted in cell death. BAY 11-7082- and curcumin-induced cell death was associated with downregulation of Bcl-xL, cyclin D1, XIAP and c-FLIP, followed by caspase-8, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and activation. Given that the chemoresistant NK-92 cells respond to NF-kappaB inhibitors but not to conventional drugs, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin could be potentially useful for achieving improved outcome in chemotherapy-refractory NKTL.

  2. A natural carbonized leaf as polysulfide diffusion inhibitor for high-performance lithium-sulfur battery cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sheng-Heng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-06-01

    Attracted by the unique tissue and functions of leaves, a natural carbonized leaf (CL) is presented as a polysulfide diffusion inhibitor in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The CL that is covered on the pure sulfur cathode effectively suppresses the polysulfide shuttling mechanism and enables the use of pure sulfur as the cathode. A low charge resistance and a high discharge capacity of 1320 mA h g(-1) arise from the improved cell conductivity due to the innately integral conductive carbon network of the CL. The unique microstructure of CL leads to a high discharge/charge efficiency of >98 %, low capacity fade of 0.18 % per cycle, and good long-term cyclability over 150 cycles. The structural gradient and the micro/mesoporous adsorption sites of CL effectively intercept/trap the migrating polysulfides and facilitate their reutilization. The green CL polysulfide diffusion inhibitor thus offers a viable approach for developing high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

  3. [Production of plant-derived natural products in yeast cells - A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-03-01

    Plant-derived natural products (PNPs) have been widely used in pharmaceutical and nutritional fields. So far, the main method to produce PNPs is extracting them from their original plants, however, there remains lots of problems. With the concept of synthetic biology, construction of yeast cell factories for production of PNPs provides an alternative way. In this review, we will focus on PNPs' market and application, research progress for production of artemisinin, research progress for production of terpenes, alkaloids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) and recent technology development to give a brief introduction of construction of yeast cells for production of PNPs.

  4. Isolation and identification of precocenes and piperitone from essential oils as specific inhibitors of trichothecene production by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Tsuyuki, Rie; Takahashi, Haruo; Nakajima, Takashi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2009-02-11

    Inhibitors of deoxynivalenol production by Fusarium graminearum are useful for protecting crops from deoxynivalenol contamination. We isolated precocenes and piperitone from the essential oils of Matricaria recutita and Eucalyptus dives, respectively, as specific inhibitors of the production of 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, a biosynthetic precursor of deoxynivalenol. Precocenes I and II and piperitone inhibited 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol production by F. graminearum in a liquid culture with IC(50) values of 16.6, 1.2, and 306 microM, respectively, without inhibiting fungal growth. Precocene II also inhibited deoxynivalenol production by the fungus in a solid culture on rice with an IC(50) value of 2.0 ppm. Precocene II and piperitone decreased the mRNA levels of Tri4, Tri5, Tri6, and Tri10 encoding proteins required for deoxynivalenol biosynthesis. PMID:19191669

  5. Natural inhibitors of pancreatic lipase as new players in obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Ana Laura; Milagro, Fermín I; Boque, Noemí; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2011-05-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by an excessive weight for height due to an enlarged fat deposition such as adipose tissue, which is attributed to a higher calorie intake than the energy expenditure. The key strategy to combat obesity is to prevent chronic positive impairments in the energy equation. However, it is often difficult to maintain energy balance, because many available foods are high-energy yielding, which is usually accompanied by low levels of physical activity. The pharmaceutical industry has invested many efforts in producing antiobesity drugs; but only a lipid digestion inhibitor obtained from an actinobacterium is currently approved and authorized in Europe for obesity treatment. This compound inhibits the activity of pancreatic lipase, which is one of the enzymes involved in fat digestion. In a similar way, hundreds of extracts are currently being isolated from plants, fungi, algae, or bacteria and screened for their potential inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity. Among them, extracts isolated from common foodstuffs such as tea, soybean, ginseng, yerba mate, peanut, apple, or grapevine have been reported. Some of them are polyphenols and saponins with an inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase activity, which could be applied in the management of the obesity epidemic.

  6. Natural inhibitors of pancreatic lipase as new players in obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Ana Laura; Milagro, Fermín I; Boque, Noemí; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2011-05-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by an excessive weight for height due to an enlarged fat deposition such as adipose tissue, which is attributed to a higher calorie intake than the energy expenditure. The key strategy to combat obesity is to prevent chronic positive impairments in the energy equation. However, it is often difficult to maintain energy balance, because many available foods are high-energy yielding, which is usually accompanied by low levels of physical activity. The pharmaceutical industry has invested many efforts in producing antiobesity drugs; but only a lipid digestion inhibitor obtained from an actinobacterium is currently approved and authorized in Europe for obesity treatment. This compound inhibits the activity of pancreatic lipase, which is one of the enzymes involved in fat digestion. In a similar way, hundreds of extracts are currently being isolated from plants, fungi, algae, or bacteria and screened for their potential inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity. Among them, extracts isolated from common foodstuffs such as tea, soybean, ginseng, yerba mate, peanut, apple, or grapevine have been reported. Some of them are polyphenols and saponins with an inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase activity, which could be applied in the management of the obesity epidemic. PMID:21412692

  7. Enhancement of dimethylsulfide production by anoxic stress in natural seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Yuko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Inomata, Satoshi; Wada, Shigeki; Thume, Kathleen; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-05-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is produced by phytoplankton in the ocean and plays an important role in biogeochemical cycles and climate system of the Earth. Previous field studies reported a possible relationship between DMS enhancement and anoxic condition, although the governing processes are still to be identified. Here we show the first direct evidence for the enhancement of DMS production by natural planktonic assemblages caused by anoxic stress. Under the anoxic condition, DMS production was considerably enhanced and DMS bacterial consumption was inhibited, resulting in an eightfold higher rate of gross DMS production than that under the oxic condition. Our results demonstrated that anoxic stress is one of important "environmental factors" in the marine DMS dynamics, suggesting the possible global importance due to ubiquity of anoxic conditions in the coastal oceans. This process would become more important in the future due to expansion of coastal hypoxic and anoxic zones by global warming.

  8. The development of novel inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production based on substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrozolones

    SciTech Connect

    Laufersweiler, Matthew; Brugel, Todd; Clark, Michael; Golebiowski, Adam; Bookland, Roger; Laughlin, Steven; Sabat, Mark; Townes, Jennifer; VanRens, John; De, Biswanath; Hsieh, Lily; Heitmeyer, Sandra; Juergens, Karen; Brown, Kimberly; Mekel, Marlene; Walter, Richard; Janusz, Michael

    2010-11-16

    Novel substituted [5,5]-bicyclic pyrzazolones are presented as inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) production. Many of these compounds show low nanomolar activity against lipopolysaccaride (LPS)-induced TNF-{alpha} production in THP-1 cells. This class of molecules was co-crystallized with mutated p38, and several analogs showed good oral bioavailability in the rat. Oral activity of these compounds in the rat iodoacetate model for osteoarthritis is discussed.

  9. Effects of natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitors on anticancer drug efflux transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tomohiro; Hiroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Uwai, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein plays an important role in cancer chemotherapy. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play critical roles in development and progression of cancer. In this study, the effects of natural compounds that can inhibit NF-κB activation on the function of P-glycoprotein were investigated using human MDR1 gene-transfected KB/MDR1 cells. The accumulation of daunorubicin or rhodamine 123, fluorescent substrates of P-glycoprotein, in KB/MDR1 cells increased in the presence of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE), licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, lupeol, zerumbone, thymoquinone, emodin, and anethol had no effects. The ATPase activities of P-glycoprotein were stimulated by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated NF-κB activation was inhibited by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, and xanthohumol. KB/MDR1 cells were sensitized to vinblastine cytotoxicity by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol, showing that these natural NF-κB inhibitors reverse multidrug resistance. These results suggest that natural compounds, such as CAPE, licochalcone A, and anacardic acid, have dual inhibitory effects on the anticancer drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein and NF-κB activation, and may become useful to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Dose-Dependent Suppression of Cytokine production from T cells by a Novel Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Delta Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Way, Emily E.; Trevejo-Nunez, Giraldina; Kane, Lawrence P.; Steiner, Bart H.; Puri, Kamal D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Chen, Kong

    2016-01-01

    There remains a significant need for development of effective small molecules that can inhibit cytokine-mediated inflammation. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) is a direct upstream activator of AKT, and plays a critical role in multiple cell signaling pathways, cell cycle progression, and cell growth, and PI3K inhibitors have been approved or are in clinical development. We examined novel PI3Kdelta inhibitors, which are highly selective for the p110delta isoform of in CD3/CD28 stimulated T-cell cytokine production. In vitro generated CD4+ T effector cells stimulated in the presence of a PI3Kdelta inhibitor demonstrated a dose-dependent suppression of cytokines produced by Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells. This effect was T-cell intrinsic, and we observed similar effects on human PBMCs. Th17 cells expressing a constitutively activated form of AKT were resistant to PI3Kdelta inhibition, suggesting that the inhibitor is acting through AKT signaling pathways. Additionally, PI3Kdelta inhibition decreased IL-17 production in vivo and decreased neutrophil recruitment to the lung in a murine model of acute pulmonary inflammation. These experiments show that targeting PI3Kdelta activity can modulate T-cell cytokine production and reduce inflammation in vivo, suggesting that PI3Kdelta inhibition could have therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:27461849

  11. Slow conformational dynamics of an endonuclease persist in its complex with its natural protein inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, S. B.; Czisch, M.; Wechselberger, R.; Kaptein, R.; Hemmings, A. M.; James, R.; Kleanthous, C.; Moore, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the isolated DNase domain uniformly labeled with 13C/15N bound to unlabeled Im9 contain more signals than expected for a single DNase conformer, consistent with the bound DNase being present in more than one form. The presence of chemical exchange cross peaks in 750 MHz 15N-1H-15N HSQC-NOESY-HSQC spectra for backbone NH groups of Asp20, Lys21, Trp22, Leu23, Lys69, and Asn70 showed that the bound DNase was in dynamic exchange. The rate of exchange from the major to the minor form was determined to be 1.1 +/- 0.2 s(-1) at 298 K. Previous NMR studies have shown that the free DNase interchanges between two conformers with a forward rate constant of 1.61 +/- 0.11 s(-1) at 288 K, and that the bound Im9 is fixed in one conformation. The NMR studies of the bound DNase show that Im9 binds similarly to both conformers of the DNase and that the buried Trp22 is involved in the dynamic process. For the free DNase, all NH groups within a 9 A radius of any point of the Trp22 ring exhibit heterogeneity suggesting that a rearrangement of the position of this side chain is connected with the conformational interchange. The possible functional significance of this feature of the DNase is discussed. PMID:10794413

  12. Mutations in the Proteolipid Subunits of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase Provide Resistance to Indolotryptoline Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Indolotryptoline natural products represent a small family of structurally unique chromopyrrolic acid-derived antiproliferative agents. Like many prospective anticancer agents before them, the exploration of their potential clinical utility has been hindered by the limited information known about their mechanism of action. To study the mode of action of two closely related indolotryptolines (BE-54017, cladoniamide A), we selected for drug resistant mutants using a multidrug resistance-suppressed (MDR-sup) Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain. As fission yeast maintains many of the basic cancer-relevant cellular processes present in human cells, it represents an appealing model to use in determining the potential molecular target of antiproliferative natural products through resistant mutant screening. Full genome sequencing of resistant mutants identified mutations in the c and c′ subunits of the proteolipid substructure of the vacuolar H+-ATPase complex (V-ATPase). This collection of resistance-conferring mutations maps to a site that is distant from the nucleotide-binding sites of V-ATPase and distinct from sites found to confer resistance to known V-ATPase inhibitors. Acid vacuole staining, cross-resistance studies, and direct c/c′ subunit mutagenesis all suggest that indolotryptolines are likely a structurally novel class of V-ATPase inhibitors. This work demonstrates the general utility of resistant mutant selection using MDR-sup S. pombe as a rapid and potentially systematic approach for studying the modes of action of cytotoxic natural products. PMID:25319670

  13. Polyphenols-rich natural products for treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dragan, S; Andrica, F; Serban, Maria-Corina; Timar, R

    2015-01-01

    Currently, experimental and clinical evidences showed that polyphenols-rich natural products, like nutraceuticals and food supplements, may offer unique treatment modalities in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), due to their biological properties. Natural products modulate the carbohydrate metabolism by various mechanisms, such as restoring beta-cells integrity and physiology, enhancing insulin releasing activity, and the glucose using. Sea buckthorn berries, red grapes, bilberries, chokeberries and popular drinks like cocoa, coffee and green tea are all rich in polyphenols and may decrease the insulin response, offer in g a natural alternative of treatment in diabetes. Therefore, researches are now focused on potential efficacies of different types of polyphenols, including flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans, anthocyans and stilbenes. Animal and human studies showed that polyphenols modulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, decrease glycemia and insulin resistance, increase lipid metabolism and optimize oxidative stress and inflammatory processes. It is important to understand the proper dose and duration of supplementation with polyphenols-rich extracts in order to guide effective therapeutic interventions in diabetic patients.

  14. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  15. Natural products as potential cancer therapy enhancers: A preclinical update

    PubMed Central

    Agbarya, Abed; Ruimi, Nili; Epelbaum, Ron; Ben-Arye, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that arises as a consequence of alterations in many physiological processes. Recently, hallmarks of cancer were suggested that include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis, along with two emerging hallmarks including reprogramming energy metabolism and escaping immune destruction. Treating multifactorial diseases, such as cancer with agents targeting a single target, might provide partial treatment and, in many cases, disappointing cure rates. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that the regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Since ancient times, plants, herbs, and other natural products have been used as healing agents. Moreover, the majority of the medicinal substances available today have their origin in natural compounds. Traditionally, pharmaceuticals are used to cure diseases, and nutrition and herbs are used to prevent disease and to provide an optimal balance of macro- and micro-nutrients needed for good health. We explored the combination of natural products, dietary nutrition, and cancer chemotherapeutics for improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutics and negating side effects. PMID:26770737

  16. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  17. Effects of alpha-amylase and its inhibitors on acid production from cooked starch by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, S; Miyasawa-Hori, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Mayanagi, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated acid production from cooked starch by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis, and the effects of alpha-amylase inhibitors (maltotriitol and acarbose) and xylitol on acid production. Streptococcal cell suspensions were anaerobically incubated with various carbohydrates that included cooked potato starch in the presence or absence of alpha-amylase. Subsequently, the fall in pH and the acid production rate at pH 7.0 were measured. In addition, the effects of adding alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol to the reaction mixture were evaluated. In the absence of alpha-amylase, both the fall in pH and the acid production rate from cooked starch were small. On the other hand, in the presence of alpha-amylase, the pH fell to 3.9-4.4 and the acid production rate was 0.61-0.92 micromol per optical density unit per min. These values were comparable to those for maltose. When using cooked starch, the fall in pH by S. sanguinis and S. mitis was similar to that by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. For all streptococci, alpha-amylase inhibitors caused a decrease in acid production from cooked starch, although xylitol only decreased acid production by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. These results suggest that cooked starch is potentially acidogenic in the presence of alpha-amylase, which occurs in the oral cavity. In terms of the acidogenic potential of cooked starch, S. sanguinis and S. mitis were comparable to S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol might moderate this activity. PMID:19136828

  18. Mimicking a natural pathway for de novo biosynthesis: natural vanillin production from accessible carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Tao, Fei; Du, Huaiqing; Xu, Ping

    2015-09-02

    Plant secondary metabolites have been attracting people's attention for centuries, due to their potentials; however, their production is still difficult and costly. The rich diversity of microbes and microbial genome sequence data provide unprecedented gene resources that enable to develop efficient artificial pathways in microorganisms. Here, by mimicking a natural pathway of plants using microbial genes, a new metabolic route was developed in E. coli for the synthesis of vanillin, the most widely used flavoring agent. A series of factors were systematically investigated for raising production, including efficiency and suitability of genes, gene dosage, and culture media. The metabolically engineered strain produced 97.2 mg/L vanillin from l-tyrosine, 19.3 mg/L from glucose, 13.3 mg/L from xylose and 24.7 mg/L from glycerol. These results show that the metabolic route enables production of natural vanillin from low-cost substrates, suggesting that it is a good strategy to mimick natural pathways for artificial pathway design.

  19. Mimicking a natural pathway for de novo biosynthesis: natural vanillin production from accessible carbon sources

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Tao, Fei; Du, Huaiqing; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites have been attracting people’s attention for centuries, due to their potentials; however, their production is still difficult and costly. The rich diversity of microbes and microbial genome sequence data provide unprecedented gene resources that enable to develop efficient artificial pathways in microorganisms. Here, by mimicking a natural pathway of plants using microbial genes, a new metabolic route was developed in E. coli for the synthesis of vanillin, the most widely used flavoring agent. A series of factors were systematically investigated for raising production, including efficiency and suitability of genes, gene dosage, and culture media. The metabolically engineered strain produced 97.2 mg/L vanillin from l-tyrosine, 19.3 mg/L from glucose, 13.3 mg/L from xylose and 24.7 mg/L from glycerol. These results show that the metabolic route enables production of natural vanillin from low-cost substrates, suggesting that it is a good strategy to mimick natural pathways for artificial pathway design. PMID:26329726

  20. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients.

  1. Extracellular production of riboflavin-binding protein, a potential bitter inhibitor, by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Maehashi, Kenji; Matano, Mami; Saito, Makiko; Udaka, Shigezo

    2010-05-01

    Riboflavin-binding protein (RBP) is a glycophosphoprotein found in hen eggs. We previously identified the extraordinary characteristic of RBP in reducing bitterness. For a more detailed study on the mode of action and industrial application of this characteristic, we investigated the microbial production of recombinant RBP (rRBP). We constructed a chicken RBP gene expression vector by inserting the RBP cDNA in pNCMO2, the Escherichia coli-Brevibacillus choshinensis shuttle vector. B. choshinensis HPD31 transformants produced 0.8g/l of processed and unglycosylated RBP in a soluble form in the culture supernatant. However, the expressed RBP was partially dimerized and monomeric RBP was purified by two step anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatographies. The purified rRBP elicited bitterness reduction against quinine and caffeine, although it largely lost its riboflavin-binding ability. These results indicated that glycosylation and riboflavin-binding ability are not essential for the bitterness reduction of RBP. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the Brevibacillus system for the expression and secretion of RBP as a new type of bitterness inhibitor. PMID:20045733

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  3. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  4. Natural Products from Marine Fungi—Still an Underrepresented Resource

    PubMed Central

    Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2016-01-01

    Marine fungi represent a huge potential for new natural products and an increased number of new metabolites have become known over the past years, while much of the hidden potential still needs to be uncovered. Representative examples of biodiversity studies of marine fungi and of natural products from a diverse selection of marine fungi from the author’s lab are highlighting important aspects of this research. If one considers the huge phylogenetic diversity of marine fungi and their almost ubiquitous distribution, and realizes that most of the published work on secondary metabolites of marine fungi has focused on just a few genera, strictly speaking Penicillium, Aspergillus and maybe also Fusarium and Cladosporium, the diversity of marine fungi is not adequately represented in investigations on their secondary metabolites and the less studied species deserve special attention. In addition to results on recently discovered new secondary metabolites of Penicillium species, the diversity of fungi in selected marine habitats is highlighted and examples of groups of secondary metabolites produced by representatives of a variety of different genera and their bioactivities are presented. Special focus is given to the production of groups of derivatives of metabolites by the fungi and to significant differences in biological activities due to small structural changes. PMID:26784209

  5. Water Resources and Natural Gas Production from the Marcellus Shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soeder, Daniel J.; Kappel, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The Marcellus Shale is a sedimentary rock formation deposited over 350 million years ago in a shallow inland sea located in the eastern United States where the present-day Appalachian Mountains now stand (de Witt and others, 1993). This shale contains significant quantities of natural gas. New developments in drilling technology, along with higher wellhead prices, have made the Marcellus Shale an important natural gas resource. The Marcellus Shale extends from southern New York across Pennsylvania, and into western Maryland, West Virginia, and eastern Ohio (fig. 1). The production of commercial quantities of gas from this shale requires large volumes of water to drill and hydraulically fracture the rock. This water must be recovered from the well and disposed of before the gas can flow. Concerns about the availability of water supplies needed for gas production, and questions about wastewater disposal have been raised by water-resource agencies and citizens throughout the Marcellus Shale gas development region. This Fact Sheet explains the basics of Marcellus Shale gas production, with the intent of helping the reader better understand the framework of the water-resource questions and concerns.

  6. Natural Products from Marine Fungi--Still an Underrepresented Resource.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Johannes F

    2016-01-16

    Marine fungi represent a huge potential for new natural products and an increased number of new metabolites have become known over the past years, while much of the hidden potential still needs to be uncovered. Representative examples of biodiversity studies of marine fungi and of natural products from a diverse selection of marine fungi from the author's lab are highlighting important aspects of this research. If one considers the huge phylogenetic diversity of marine fungi and their almost ubiquitous distribution, and realizes that most of the published work on secondary metabolites of marine fungi has focused on just a few genera, strictly speaking Penicillium, Aspergillus and maybe also Fusarium and Cladosporium, the diversity of marine fungi is not adequately represented in investigations on their secondary metabolites and the less studied species deserve special attention. In addition to results on recently discovered new secondary metabolites of Penicillium species, the diversity of fungi in selected marine habitats is highlighted and examples of groups of secondary metabolites produced by representatives of a variety of different genera and their bioactivities are presented. Special focus is given to the production of groups of derivatives of metabolites by the fungi and to significant differences in biological activities due to small structural changes.

  7. Quality of healing of gastric ulcers: Natural products beyond acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-02-15

    Gastric ulcer is a chronic disease featured with unexpected complications, including bleeding, stenosis and perforation, as well as a high incidence of recurrence. Clinical treatments for gastric ulcer have allowed the rapid development of potent anti-ulcer drugs during the last several decades. Gastric ulcer healing is successful with conventional treatments including H2-receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been essential for ulcer healing and prevention of complications. Additionally, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is effective in reducing ulcer recurrence and leads to physiological changes in the gastric mucosa which affect the ulcer healing process. However, in spite of these advancements, some patients have suffered from recurrence or intractability in spite of continuous anti-ulcer therapy. A new concept of the quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) was initiated that considers the reconstruction of the mucosal structure and its function for preventing ulcer recurrence. Although several gastroprotection provided these achievements of the QOUH, which PPI or other acid suppressants did not accomplish, we found that gastroprotection that originated from natural products, such as a newer formulation from either Artemisia or S-allyl cysteine from garlic, were very effective in the QOUH, as well as improving clinical symptoms with fewer side effects. In this review, we will introduce the importance of the QOUH in ulcer healing and the achievements from natural products.

  8. A Direct, Early Stage Guanidinylation Protocol for the Synthesis of Complex Aminoguanidine-containing Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Christopher E; Chamberland, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The guanidine functional group, displayed most prominently in the amino acid arginine, one of the fundamental building blocks of life, is an important structural element found in many complex natural products and pharmaceuticals. Owing to the continual discovery of new guanidine-containing natural products and designed small molecules, rapid and efficient guanidinylation methods are of keen interest to synthetic and medicinal organic chemists. Because the nucleophilicity and basicity of guanidines can affect subsequent chemical transformations, traditional, indirect guanidinylation is typically pursued. Indirect methods commonly employ multiple protection steps involving a latent amine precursor, such as an azide, phthalimide, or carbamate. By circumventing these circuitous methods and employing a direct guanidinylation reaction early in the synthetic sequence, it was possible to forge the linear terminal guanidine containing backbone of clavatadine A to realize a short and streamlined synthesis of this potent factor XIa inhibitor. In practice, guanidine hydrochloride is elaborated with a carefully constructed protecting array that is optimized to survive the synthetic steps to come. In the preparation of clavatadine A, direct guanidinylation of a commercially available diamine eliminated two unnecessary steps from its synthesis. Coupled with the wide variety of known guanidine protecting groups, direct guanidinylation evinces a succinct and efficient practicality inherent to methods that find a home in a synthetic chemist's toolbox. PMID:27684512

  9. Productivity of wet soils: Biomass of cultivated and natural vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.A.

    1988-12-01

    Wet soils, soils which have agronomic limitations because of excess water, comprise 105 million acres of non-federal land in the conterminous United States. Wet soils which support hydrophytic plants are ''wetlands'', and are some of the most productive natural ecosystems in the world. When both above- and belowground productivity are considered, cattail (Typha latifolia) is the most productive temperate wetland species (26.4 Mg/ha/year). Both cattail and reed (Phragmites australis) have aboveground productivities of about 13 Mg/ha/year. Although average aboveground yields of reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) are lower (9.5 Mg/ha/year), techniques for its establishment and cultivation are well-developed. Other herbaceous wetland species which show promise as biomass crops include sedge (Carex spp.), river bulrush (Scirpus fluviatilis) and prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata). About 40% of wet soils in the conterminous US are currently cultivated, and they produce one-quarter of the major US crops. Most of this land is artificially drained for crops such as corn, soybeans, and vegetables. US wetlands are drained for agriculture at the rate of 223,000 ha/yr. Paddies flooded with water are used to grow rice, cranberries, and wild rice. Forage and live sphagnum moss are products of undrained wetlands. A number of federal and state regulations apply to the draining or irrigation of wetlands, but most do not seriously restrict their use for agriculture. 320 refs., 36 tabs.

  10. Peptidylarginine Deiminase Inhibitor Suppresses Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation and MPO-ANCA Production

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Daigo; Shida, Haruki; Hattanda, Fumihiko; Miyoshi, Arina; Masuda, Sakiko; Nishio, Saori; Tomaru, Utano; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis, wherein, MPO-ANCA plays a critical role in the pathogenesis. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from activated neutrophils are composed of extracellular web-like DNA and antimicrobial proteins, including MPO. Diverse stimuli, such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ligands of toll-like receptors (TLR), induce NETs. Although TLR-mediated NET formation can occur with preservation of living neutrophilic functions (called vital NETosis), PMA-stimulated neutrophils undergo cell death with NET formation (called suicidal NETosis). In the process of suicidal NETosis, histones are citrullinated by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). Since this step is necessary for decondensation of DNA, PAD4 plays a pivotal role in suicidal NETosis. Although NETs are essential for elimination of microorganisms, excessive formation of NETs has been suggested to be implicated in MPO-ANCA production. This study aimed to determine if pan-PAD inhibitors could suppress MPO-ANCA production in vivo. At first, NETs were induced in peripheral blood neutrophils derived from healthy donors (1 × 106/ml) by stimulation with 20 nM PMA with or without 20 μM propylthiouracil (PTU), an anti-thyroid drug. We then determined that the in vitro NET formation was inhibited completely by 200 μM Cl-amidine, a pan-PAD inhibitor. Next, we established mouse models with MPO-ANCA production. BALB/c mice were given intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of PMA (50 ng at days 0 and 7) and oral PTU (2.5 mg/day) for 2 weeks. These mice were divided into two groups; the first group was given daily i.p. injection of PBS (200 μl/day) (n = 13) and the other group with daily i.p. injection of Cl-amidine (0.3 mg/200 μl PBS/day) (n = 7). Two weeks later, citrullination as an indicator of NET formation in the peritoneum and serum MPO-ANCA titer was compared

  11. [Screening of the active ingredients in natural products by capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmei; Kang, Jingwu

    2013-07-01

    A new strategy for screening the crude natural extracts and quickly identifying the bioactive compounds was developed. In combination with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) , the biologically active compounds, such as the enzyme i n the crude natural extract ca n be quickly identified by capillary electrophoresis (CE) -based activity assay. The crude natural extracts were assayed by a CE-based enzyme inhibitor screening method, and the active extract was isolated by HPLC-MS/MS with a semipreparative column. Then, each eluted component was assayed again with the CE-based assay method. Finally, the structures of the identified active compounds were elucidated by MS/MS analysis. Acetylcholinesterase ( ACHE), its substrate acetylthiocholine chloride ( AThCh), as well as the crude extract of Rhizoma coptidis were utilized for the proof of the methodology. Seven isoquinoline alkaloids, namely jatrorrhizine, epiberberine, columbamine, coptisine, corysamine, palmatine and berberine were identified to be active as the inhibitors of ACHE. Their IC50 values were 40, 442, 38, 182, 419, 54 and 16 micromol/L, respectively. Compared with the traditional screening methods, the method is characterized with several advantages, such as extremely low sample and reagent consumption, high speed of analysis, high sensitivity of detection, high throughput in terms of preparation of the natural products by HPLC. Overall, the results demonstrate that the method is valuable for the screening of the bioactive compounds in the crude natural extracts.

  12. Ecological and Pharmacological Activities of Antarctic Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Avila, Conxita

    2016-06-01

    Antarctic benthic communities are regulated by abundant interactions of different types among organisms, such as predation, competition, etc. Predators are usually sea stars, with omnivorous habits, as well as other invertebrates. Against this strong predation pressure, many organisms have developed all sorts of defensive strategies, including chemical defenses. Natural products are thus quite common in Antarctic organisms with an important ecological and pharmacological potential. In this paper, the chemical defenses of the Antarctic organisms studied during the ECOQUIM and ACTIQUIM projects, as well as their pharmacological potential, are reviewed. For the ecological defenses, predation against the sea star Odontaster validus is analyzed and evaluated along depth gradients as well as considering the lifestyle of the organisms. For the pharmacological activity, the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities tested are evaluated here. Very often, only crude extracts or fractions have been tested so far, and therefore, the natural products responsible for such activities remain yet to be identified. Even if the sampling efforts are not uniform along depth, most ecologically active organisms are found between 200 and 500 m depth. Also, from the samples studied, about four times more sessile organisms possess chemical defenses against the sea star than the vagile ones; these represent 50 % of sessile organisms and 35 % of the vagile ones, out of the total tested, being active. Pharmacological activity has not been tested uniformly in all groups, but the results show that relevant activity is found in different phyla, especially in Porifera, Cnidaria, Bryozoa, and Tunicata, but also in others. No relationship between depth and pharmacological activity can be established with the samples tested so far. More studies are needed in order to better understand the ecological relationships among Antarctic invertebrates mediated by natural products and

  13. Ecological and Pharmacological Activities of Antarctic Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Avila, Conxita

    2016-06-01

    Antarctic benthic communities are regulated by abundant interactions of different types among organisms, such as predation, competition, etc. Predators are usually sea stars, with omnivorous habits, as well as other invertebrates. Against this strong predation pressure, many organisms have developed all sorts of defensive strategies, including chemical defenses. Natural products are thus quite common in Antarctic organisms with an important ecological and pharmacological potential. In this paper, the chemical defenses of the Antarctic organisms studied during the ECOQUIM and ACTIQUIM projects, as well as their pharmacological potential, are reviewed. For the ecological defenses, predation against the sea star Odontaster validus is analyzed and evaluated along depth gradients as well as considering the lifestyle of the organisms. For the pharmacological activity, the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities tested are evaluated here. Very often, only crude extracts or fractions have been tested so far, and therefore, the natural products responsible for such activities remain yet to be identified. Even if the sampling efforts are not uniform along depth, most ecologically active organisms are found between 200 and 500 m depth. Also, from the samples studied, about four times more sessile organisms possess chemical defenses against the sea star than the vagile ones; these represent 50 % of sessile organisms and 35 % of the vagile ones, out of the total tested, being active. Pharmacological activity has not been tested uniformly in all groups, but the results show that relevant activity is found in different phyla, especially in Porifera, Cnidaria, Bryozoa, and Tunicata, but also in others. No relationship between depth and pharmacological activity can be established with the samples tested so far. More studies are needed in order to better understand the ecological relationships among Antarctic invertebrates mediated by natural products and

  14. Green Extraction of Natural Products: Concept and Principles

    PubMed Central

    Chemat, Farid; Vian, Maryline Abert; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The design of green and sustainable extraction methods of natural products is currently a hot research topic in the multidisciplinary area of applied chemistry, biology and technology. Herein we aimed to introduce the six principles of green-extraction, describing a multifaceted strategy to apply this concept at research and industrial level. The mainstay of this working protocol are new and innovative technologies, process intensification, agro-solvents and energy saving. The concept, principles and examples of green extraction here discussed, offer an updated glimpse of the huge technological effort that is being made and the diverse applications that are being developed. PMID:22942724

  15. 30 CFR 260.116 - How do I measure natural gas production on my eligible lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I measure natural gas production on my... do I measure natural gas production on my eligible lease? You must measure natural gas production on... natural gas, measured according to part 250, subpart L of this title, equals one barrel of oil...

  16. Inhibition of mast cell secretion by oxidation products of natural polyamines.

    PubMed

    Vliagoftis, H; Boucher, W S; Mak, L L; Theoharides, T C

    1992-05-28

    Mast cells secrete many biologically active compounds upon stimulation by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific antigen (Ag), anaphylatoxins, as well as a number of cationic compounds which include drugs, kinins and neuropeptides. The effects of the two naturally occurring polyamines, spermine (SP) and spermidine (SPD), on mast cell secretion were studied because they have been implicated in the modulation of cellular processes, possibly through their cationic charge or the regulation of calcium ions. SP and SPD over the range of 10(-7) to 10(-4) M inhibited the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) triggered by compound 48/80 (C48/80) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as long as at least 2% calf serum (CS) was present. SP also inhibited secretion of both histamine and serotonin stimulated immunologically by using IgE and anti-rat IgE. This inhibition was not accompanied by cytotoxicity. The major available polyamine metabolites tested, N1-acetyl spermine (N1-acSP) and N8-acetyl spermidine (N8-acSPD), also showed inhibition in the presence of CS, whereas putrescine, N8,N1-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA) and benzylamine did not. Fetal bovine serum (FBS), as well as human and rat serum, which do not contain polyamine oxidase, did not result in any inhibition with the polyamines tested. Inhibitors of the polyamine oxidase blocked the polyamine effect, indicating that the inhibition of mast cell secretion must derive from aldehydes produced from these polyamines. Addition of the aldehyde inhibitor phenylhydrazine (phi-HDZ), simultaneously with, but not following the polyamines, blocked their inhibitory effect, further strengthening the involvement of aldehydes. These results indicate that naturally occurring polyamines may regulate mast cell secretion through metabolic products of polyamine oxidase, a similar enzyme of which is also present in human liver, placenta and pregnant serum.

  17. Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: define a rational approach for inhibitor design, using the most probable molecular mechanism; improve the performance of inhibitors; test inhibitors on Colorado School of Mines apparatuses and the Exxon flow loop; and promote sharing field and flow loop results. This report presents the results of the progress on these four goals.

  18. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-18

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

  19. Identification of Five Structurally Unrelated Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Natural-Derivative Database

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song-Lin; Chen, Yicai; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by means of small signal molecules in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). QS enables bacteria to organize their activities at the population level, including the coordinated secretion of virulence factors. Certain small-molecule compounds, known as quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), have been shown to effectively block QS and subsequently attenuate the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as increasing its susceptibility to both antibiotics and the immune system. In this study, a structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) approach was used for the discovery of novel QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies as quorum-sensing inhibitors. Using a live reporter assay for quorum sensing, 5 compounds were found to be able to inhibit QS-regulated gene expression in P. aeruginosa in a dose-dependent manner. The most promising compound, G1, was evaluated by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis, and it was found to significantly affect the abundance of 46 proteins (19 were upregulated; 27 were downregulated) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. It specifically reduced the expression of several quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors, such as protease IV, chitinase, and pyoverdine synthetases. G1 was also able to reduce extracellular DNA release and inhibited the secretion of the virulence factor, elastase, whose expression is regulated by LasR. These results demonstrate the utility of SB-VS for the discovery of target-specific QSIs. PMID:24002091

  20. Two pairs of farnesyl phenolic enantiomers as natural nitric oxide inhibitors from Ganoderma sinense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Fei; Xu, Feng; Ding, Li-Qin; Zhang, Qian; Li, Hui-Xiang; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Li-Qing; Zhu, Li-Han; Chen, Li-Xia; Qiu, Feng

    2016-07-15

    Four new farnesyl phenolic compounds, ganosinensols A-D (1-4) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma sinense. Two pairs of enantiomers, 1/2, and 3/4 were isolated by HPLC using a Daicel Chiralpak IE column. Their structures were elucidated from extensive spectroscopic analyses and comparison with literature data. The absolute configurations of 1-4 were assigned by ECD spectra. All of these isolated compounds showed potent inhibitory activity against LPS-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 values from 1.15 to 2.26μM. PMID:27256914

  1. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  2. En route from artificial to natural: Evaluation of inhibitors of mannose-specific adhesion of E. coli under flow.

    PubMed

    Möckl, Leonhard; Fessele, Claudia; Despras, Guillaume; Bräuchle, Christoph; Lindhorst, Thisbe K

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the properties of six Escherichia coli adhesion inhibitors under static and under flow conditions. On mannan-covered model substrates and under static conditions, all inhibitors were able to almost completely abolish lectin-mediated E. coli adhesion. On a monolayer of living human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), the inhibitors reduced adhesion under static conditions as well, but a large fraction of bacteria still managed to adhere even at highest inhibitor concentrations. In contrast, under flow conditions E. coli did not exhibit any adhesion to HMEC-1 not even at inhibitor concentrations where significant adhesion was detected under static conditions. This indicates that the presence of shear stress strongly affects inhibitor properties and must be taken into account when evaluating the potency of bacterial adhesion inhibitors.

  3. Prospect for natural bitumen production development in Republic of Tatarstan

    SciTech Connect

    Rakutin, Yu.; Muslimov, R.; Volkov, Yu.

    1995-12-31

    The Republic of Tatarstan possesses large volumes of natural bitumen and extremely viscous heavy oil reserves. However to date processing oils of this kind is not economically viable but in the future heavy oils can become an alternative to conventional crude oil. The authors have developed a feasibility study of the prospects for the small bitumen-producing complexes construction for bitumen production and in-place bitumen processing in a simple scheme. The bitumen-producing complex will provide in situ recovery of bitumen with the surface cluster spacing of wells, transportation of bitumen produced to the central terminal, field primary bitumen processing by combining the functions of desalting, dewatering, and deasphalting of extracted bitumen. The field processing facilities, steam generators, compressors and so on will be housed in the central terminal. The central terminal will handle up to three fields which are 2-3 km distance from each other and from the central terminal. The objective of the field processing is to reduce sulphur and metal contents and remove water and salts from the bitumen. Thanks to bitumen-producing complex creating and providing high bitumen quality the economical efficiency of the natural bitumen production will be improved and enable environmental disturbance to be minimized.

  4. Natural Vitamin D Content in Animal Products1

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Alexandra; Walther, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Humans derive most vitamin D from the action of sunlight in their skin. However, in view of the current Western lifestyle with most daily activities taking place indoors, sun exposure is often not sufficient for adequate vitamin D production. For this reason, dietary intake is also of great importance. Animal foodstuffs (e.g., fish, meat, offal, egg, dairy) are the main sources for naturally occurring cholecalciferol (vitamin D-3). This paper therefore aims to provide an up-to-date overview of vitamin D-3 content in various animal foods. The focus lies on the natural vitamin D-3 content because there are many countries in which foods are not regularly fortified with vitamin D. The published data show that the highest values of vitamin D are found in fish and especially in fish liver, but offal also provides considerable amounts of vitamin D. The content in muscle meat is generally much lower. Vitamin D concentrations in egg yolks range between the values for meat and offal. If milk and dairy products are not fortified, they are normally low in vitamin D, with the exception of butter because of its high fat content. However, as recommendations for vitamin D intake have recently been increased considerably, it is difficult to cover the requirements solely by foodstuffs. PMID:23858093

  5. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K.; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete’s biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets. PMID:26697425

  6. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete's biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets. PMID:26697425

  7. Diverse Natural Products from Dichlorocyclobutanones: An Evolutionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Deprés, Jean-Pierre; Delair, Philippe; Poisson, Jean-François; Kanazawa, Alice; Greene, Andrew E

    2016-02-16

    11-Nor PGE2 was prepared in our laboratory several years ago and used to obtain the corresponding ring-expanded γ-butyrolactam, γ-butyrolactone, and cyclopentanone derivatives. The conversion of a cyclobutanone into a cyclopentanone had relatively little precedent and merited further study. It was soon found that the presence of a single chlorine adjacent to the carbonyl not only greatly accelerated the reaction with ethereal diazomethane, but also substantially enhanced its regioselectivity; not surprisingly, a second chlorine further increased both. The confluence of this finding and the discovery by Krepski and Hassner that the presence of phosphorus oxychloride significantly improved the Zn-mediated dehalogenation procedure for the preparation of α,α-dichlorocyclobutanones from olefins provided the starting point for decades' worth of exciting adventures in natural product synthesis. A wide variety of naturally occurring 5-membered carbocycles (e.g., hirsutanes, cuparenones, bakkanes, guaianolides, azulenes) could thus be prepared by using dichloroketene-olefin cycloaddition, followed by regioselective one-carbon ring expansion with diazomethane. Importantly, it was also found that natural γ-butyrolactones (e.g., β-oxygenated γ-butyrolactones, lactone fatty acids) could be secured through regioselective Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of cycloadducts with m-CPBA and that naturally occurring γ-butyrolactam derivatives (e.g., amino acids, pyrrolidines, pyrrolizidines, indolizidines) could be efficiently obtained by regioselective Beckmann ring expansion of the adducts with O-(mesitylenesulfonyl)hydroxylamine (Tamura's reagent). These 5-membered carbocycles, γ-butyrolactones, and γ-butyrolactam derivatives were generally secured in enantiopure form through the use of either intrinsically chiral olefins or olefins bearing Stericol, a highly effective chiral auxiliary developed specifically for this "three-atom olefin annelation" approach. In addition

  8. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  9. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  10. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  11. Production of calcification inhibitors by rat calvaria and bone cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Ohya, K; Meyer, J L; Felix, R; Fleisch, H

    1988-07-01

    Inhibition of calcium phosphate crystal formation was assessed in conditioned medium from cultured rat calvaria and rat calvaria cells. The amount of inhibitor activity was measured by determining the amount of hydroxyapatite needed to induce calcium phosphate precipitation in a solution with a constant calcium phosphate supersaturation. Rat calvaria in culture released inhibitor activity. This activity was separated by chromatography on a Bio-Gel P4 column into a high molecular weight (HMW) fraction and a low molecular weight (LMW) fraction. The latter contained, among others, citrate and pyrophosphate (PPi), but the concentration of these was too low to account for the total activity observed. The identity of the HMW and the remaining LMW inhibitors are at present unknown. Various populations of calvaria cells also produced these two types of inhibitors, 20% of the LMW being due to PPi. Fibroblasts produced only the HMW type of inhibitors. These results suggest that cells might control the process of biologic calcification by regulating the amount of inhibitors they produce.

  12. [Effects of urease and nitrification inhibitors on alleviating the oxidation and leaching of soil urea's hydrolyzed product ammonium].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Lijun; Wu, Zhijie

    2005-02-01

    With simulation test of in-situ soil column, this paper studied the effects of urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ), nitrification inhibitors coated calcium carbide (ECC) and dicyandiamide (DCD),and their different combinations on the persistence, oxidation, and leaching of soil urea's hydrolyzed product ammonium. The results showed that compared with other treatments, the combination of HQ and DCD could effectively inhibit the oxidation of the ammonium, and make it as exchangeable form reserve in soil in a larger amount and a longer period. The inhibition of this oxidation not only decreased the accumulation of oxidized product NO3- in soil, but also decreased the potential of NO3- leaching, making the NO3- only leach to 5-10 cm in depth, and the leached amount significantly decreased. PMID:15852915

  13. [Effects of urease and nitrification inhibitors on alleviating the oxidation and leaching of soil urea's hydrolyzed product ammonium].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Lijun; Wu, Zhijie

    2005-02-01

    With simulation test of in-situ soil column, this paper studied the effects of urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ), nitrification inhibitors coated calcium carbide (ECC) and dicyandiamide (DCD),and their different combinations on the persistence, oxidation, and leaching of soil urea's hydrolyzed product ammonium. The results showed that compared with other treatments, the combination of HQ and DCD could effectively inhibit the oxidation of the ammonium, and make it as exchangeable form reserve in soil in a larger amount and a longer period. The inhibition of this oxidation not only decreased the accumulation of oxidized product NO3- in soil, but also decreased the potential of NO3- leaching, making the NO3- only leach to 5-10 cm in depth, and the leached amount significantly decreased.

  14. ACTIVITY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AGAINST SOME PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI.

    PubMed

    La Torre, A; Caradonia, F; Gianferro, M; Molinu, M G; Battaglia, V

    2014-01-01

    The requirement of environmental protection and food safety is perceived with always major interest by public opinion and it is consistent with European Union legislation on the sustainable use of pesticides (Directive 2009/128/EC). This directive requires member states to promote low pesticide-input, giving priority to non-chemical methods and low risk plant protection products. In order to contribute to the achievement of these objectives antifungal activity of natural substances, characterized by a good toxicological and ecotoxicological profile, was tested. Essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, essential oil of Syzygium aromaticum and extract from Mimosa tenuiflora were tested against Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (races 1 and 2). In vitro tests involved determination of radial growth of the colonies of fungi in the presence of varying concentrations of tested products in agar media and determination of germination percentage in the presence of tested product at various concentrations. The products based on essential oil of M. alternifolia were also tested in vivo on tomato fruits wounded and artificially inoculated with A. alternata or with B. cinerea. The in vitro tests showed the antifungal activity of both essential oils instead the extract from M. tenuiflora exhibited poor antifungal activity and only against A. alternata and B. cinerea. The results on tomato fruits showed inhibition of grey mould and black mould by essential oil of M. alternifolia. The antifungal activity increased with increasing concentrations. In conclusion, the obtained results in the present study showed promising prospects for the utilisation of investigated products to reduce the using of antifungal chemicals and to achieve a more sustainable use of pesticides. PMID:26080478

  15. The search for novel drug leads for predominately antitumor therapies by utilizing mother nature's pharmacophoric libraries.

    PubMed

    Kingston, David G I; Newman, David J

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in the use of natural products and compounds derivedfrom natural products as agents for the treatment of cancer and other diseases are reviewed. The antitumor agents discussed include tubulin interactive agents, inhibitors of topoisomerases I and II, caspase activators, proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, protein kinase inhibitors, and inhibitors of hypoxia inducible factor 1. It can be concluded that, despite a perceived lack of popularity in recent years, the use of natural product scaffolds in searching for drug leads is still being practiced.

  16. The Inhibitory Effect of Natural Products on Protein Fibrillation May Be Caused by Degradation Products – A Study Using Aloin and Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Lobbens, Eva S.; Foderà, Vito; Nyberg, Nils T.; Andersen, Kirsten; Jäger, Anna K.; Jorgensen, Lene; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Protein fibrillation is the pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases and also complicates the manufacturing and use of protein drugs. As a case study, the inhibitory activity of the natural compound aloin against insulin fibrillation was investigated. Based on Thioflavin T assays, high-performance liquid chromatography and transmission electron microscopy it was found that a degradation product of aloin, formed over weeks of storage, was able to significantly inhibit insulin fibrillation. The activity of the stored aloin was significantly reduced in the presence of small amounts of sodium azide or ascorbic acid, suggesting the active compound to be an oxidation product. A high-performance liquid chromatography method and a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method were developed to investigate the degradation products in the aged aloin solution. We found that the major compounds in the solution were aloin A and aloin B. In addition, 10-hydroxy aloin and elgonica dimers were detected in smaller amounts. The identified compounds were isolated and tested for activity by means of Thioflavin T assays, but no activity was observed. Thus, the actual fibrillation inhibitor is an as yet unidentified and potentially metastable degradation product of aloin. These results suggest that degradation products, and in particular oxidation products, are to be considered thoroughly when natural products are investigated for activity against protein fibrillation. PMID:26882071

  17. Current lead natural products for the chemotherapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    2000-09-01

    A large variety of natural products have been described as anti-HIV agents, and for a portion thereof the target of interaction has been identified. Cyanovirin-N, a 11-kDa protein from Cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) irreversibly inactivates HIV and also aborts cell-to-cell fusion and transmission of HIV, due to its high-affinity interaction with gp120. Various sulfated polysaccharides extracted from seaweeds (i.e., Nothogenia fastigiata, Aghardhiella tenera) inhibit the virus adsorption process. Ingenol derivatives may inhibit virus adsorption at least in part through down-regulation of CD4 molecules on the host cells. Inhibition of virus adsorption by flavanoids such as (-)epicatechin and its 3-O-gallate has been attributed to an irreversible interaction with gp120 (although these compounds are also known as reverse transcriptase inhibitors). For the triterpene glycyrrhizin (extracted from the licorice root Glycyrrhiza radix) the mode of anti-HIV action may at least in part be attributed to interference with virus-cell binding. The mannose-specific plant lectins from Galanthus, Hippeastrum, Narcissus, Epipac tis helleborine, and Listera ovata, and the N-acetylgl ucosamine-specific lectin from Urtica dioica would primarily be targeted at the virus-cell fusion process. Various other natural products seem to qualify as HIV-cell fusion inhibitors: the siamycins [siamycin I (BMY-29304), siamycin II (RP 71955, BMY 29303), and NP-06 (FR901724)] which are tricyclic 21-amino-acid peptides isolated from Streptomyces spp that differ from one another only at position 4 or 17 (valine or isoleucine in each case); the betulinic acid derivative RPR 103611, and the peptides tachyplesin and polyphemusin which are highly abundant in hemocyte debris of the horseshoe crabs Tachypleus tridentatus and Limulus polyphemus, i.e., the 18-amino-acid peptide T22 from which T134 has been derived. Both T22 and T134 have been shown to block T-tropic X4 HIV-1 strains through a specific

  18. Air quality concerns of unconventional oil and natural gas production.

    PubMed

    Field, R A; Soltis, J; Murphy, S

    2014-05-01

    Increased use of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") in unconventional oil and natural gas (O & NG) development from coal, sandstone, and shale deposits in the United States (US) has created environmental concerns over water and air quality impacts. In this perspective we focus on how the production of unconventional O & NG affects air quality. We pay particular attention to shale gas as this type of development has transformed natural gas production in the US and is set to become important in the rest of the world. A variety of potential emission sources can be spread over tens of thousands of acres of a production area and this complicates assessment of local and regional air quality impacts. We outline upstream activities including drilling, completion and production. After contrasting the context for development activities in the US and Europe we explore the use of inventories for determining air emissions. Location and scale of analysis is important, as O & NG production emissions in some US basins account for nearly 100% of the pollution burden, whereas in other basins these activities make up less than 10% of total air emissions. While emission inventories are beneficial to quantifying air emissions from a particular source category, they do have limitations when determining air quality impacts from a large area. Air monitoring is essential, not only to validate inventories, but also to measure impacts. We describe the use of measurements, including ground-based mobile monitoring, network stations, airborne, and satellite platforms for measuring air quality impacts. We identify nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds (VOC), ozone, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and methane as pollutants of concern related to O & NG activities. These pollutants can contribute to air quality concerns and they may be regulated in ambient air, due to human health or climate forcing concerns. Close to well pads, emissions are concentrated and exposure to a wide range of

  19. Air quality concerns of unconventional oil and natural gas production.

    PubMed

    Field, R A; Soltis, J; Murphy, S

    2014-05-01

    Increased use of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") in unconventional oil and natural gas (O & NG) development from coal, sandstone, and shale deposits in the United States (US) has created environmental concerns over water and air quality impacts. In this perspective we focus on how the production of unconventional O & NG affects air quality. We pay particular attention to shale gas as this type of development has transformed natural gas production in the US and is set to become important in the rest of the world. A variety of potential emission sources can be spread over tens of thousands of acres of a production area and this complicates assessment of local and regional air quality impacts. We outline upstream activities including drilling, completion and production. After contrasting the context for development activities in the US and Europe we explore the use of inventories for determining air emissions. Location and scale of analysis is important, as O & NG production emissions in some US basins account for nearly 100% of the pollution burden, whereas in other basins these activities make up less than 10% of total air emissions. While emission inventories are beneficial to quantifying air emissions from a particular source category, they do have limitations when determining air quality impacts from a large area. Air monitoring is essential, not only to validate inventories, but also to measure impacts. We describe the use of measurements, including ground-based mobile monitoring, network stations, airborne, and satellite platforms for measuring air quality impacts. We identify nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds (VOC), ozone, hazardous air pollutants (HAP), and methane as pollutants of concern related to O & NG activities. These pollutants can contribute to air quality concerns and they may be regulated in ambient air, due to human health or climate forcing concerns. Close to well pads, emissions are concentrated and exposure to a wide range of

  20. Identification of a selective thieno[2,3-c]pyridine inhibitor of COT kinase and TNF-alpha production.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Kevin; Allen, Hamish; Bischoff, Agnieszka; Clabbers, Anca; Dixon, Richard; Fix-Stenzel, Shannon; Friedman, Michael; Gaumont, Yvette; George, Dawn; Gordon, Thomas; Grongsaard, Pintipa; Janssen, Bernd; Jia, Yong; Moskey, Maria; Quinn, Christopher; Salmeron, Andres; Thomas, Christine; Wallace, Grier; Wishart, Neil; Yu, Zhengtian

    2009-03-15

    COT (Tpl2 in mice) is a serine/threonine MAP3 kinase that regulates production of TNF-alpha and other pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta via the ERK/MAP kinase pathway. As TNF-alpha and IL-1beta are clinically validated targets for therapeutic intervention in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), blocking COT provides a potential avenue for amelioration of disease. Herein we describe identification of a cellular active selective small molecule inhibitor of COT kinase.

  1. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products.

    PubMed

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F; Gomes, Tatiana C B; Leal, Alexandre S; Morais, Vanessa A D; Oliveira, Marize S; Ferreira, Marli B; Gomes, Mateus B; Paschoal, Fabiano N; von S Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E G

    2012-10-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg(-1) and 1.0 µg kg(-1) respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg(-1)). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  2. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F.; Gomes, Tatiana C. B.; Leal, Alexandre S.; Morais, Vanessa A. D.; Oliveira, Marize S.; Ferreira, Marli B.; Gomes, Mateus B.; Paschoal, Fabiano N.; von S. Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A.; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg-1 and 1.0 µg kg-1 respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg-1). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  3. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions.

  4. Application of bacterial cytological profiling to crude natural product extracts reveals the antibacterial arsenal of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nonejuie, Poochit; Trial, Rachelle M; Newton, Gerald L; Lamsa, Anne; Ranmali Perera, Varahenage; Aguilar, Julieta; Liu, Wei-Ting; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit

    2016-05-01

    Although most clinically used antibiotics are derived from natural products, identifying new antibacterial molecules from natural product extracts is difficult due to the complexity of these extracts and the limited tools to correlate biological activity with specific molecules. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) provides a rapid method for mechanism of action determination on plates and in complex natural product extracts and for activity-guided purification. We prepared an extract from Bacillus subtilis 3610 that killed the Escherichia coli lptD mutant and used BCP to observe two types of bioactivities in the unfractionated extract: inhibition of translation and permeablization of the cytoplasmic membrane. We used BCP to guide purification of the molecules responsible for each activity, identifying the translation inhibitors bacillaene and bacillaene B (glycosylated bacillaene) and demonstrating that two molecules contribute to cell permeabilitization, the bacteriocin subtilosin and the cyclic peptide sporulation killing factor. Our results suggest that bacillaene mediates translational arrest, and show that bacillaene B has a minimum inhibitory concentration 10 × higher than unmodified bacillaene. Finally, we show that BCP can be used to screen strains on an agar plate without the need for extract preparation, greatly saving time and improving throughput. Thus, BCP simplifies the isolation of novel natural products, by identifying strains, crude extracts and fractions with interesting bioactivities even when multiple activities are present, allowing investigators to focus labor-intensive steps on those with desired activities.

  5. Natural products and food components with anti-Helicobacter pylori activities

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Trang, Vu Thu; Morimoto, Norihito; Nishida, Yoshie; Matsumura, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes in over half of the world’s population. H. pylori that establishes life-long infection in the stomach is definitely associated with gastro-duodenal diseases and a wide variety of non-gastrointestinal tract conditions such as immune thrombocytopenia. Triple therapy which consists of a proton pump inhibitor and combinations of two antibiotics (amoxicillin, clarithromycin or amoxicillin, metronidazol) is commonly used for H. pylori eradication. Recently, the occurrence of drug-resistant H. pylori and the adverse effect of antibiotics have severely weakened eradication therapy. Generally antibiotics induce the disturbance of human gastrointestinal microflora. Furthermore, there are inappropriate cases of triple therapy such as allergy to antibiotics, severe complications (liver and/or kidney dysfunction), the aged and people who reject the triple therapy. These prompt us to seek alterative agents instead of antibiotics and to develop more effective and safe therapy with these agents. The combination of these agents actually may result in lower a dose of antibiotics. There are many reports world-wide that non-antibiotic substances from natural products potentially have an anti-H. pylori agent. We briefly review the constituents derived from nature that fight against H. pylori in the literature with our studies. PMID:25083070

  6. Natural Product-Derived Drugs for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have been used as drugs for millennia, and the therapeutic potential of natural products has been studied for more than a century. Since the mid-1880s, approximately 60% of drugs have originated from natural products. Recently, the importance of using natural products has increased, as has interest in discovering efficient new drugs. Natural drugs are desirable for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. This review discusses the discovery and development of drugs derived from natural products for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25349576

  7. Conformation-Activity Relationships of Polyketide Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik M.; Wilson, Matthew R.; Taylor, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Polyketides represent an important class of secondary metabolites that interact with biological targets connected to a variety of disease-associated pathways. Remarkably, nature’s assembly lines, polyketide synthases, manufacture these privileged structures through a combinatorial mixture of just a few structural units. This review highlights the role of these structural elements in shaping a polyketide’s conformational preferences, the use of computer-based molecular modeling and solution NMR studies in the identification of low-energy conformers, and the importance of conformational analogues in probing the bound conformation. In particular, this review covers several examples wherein conformational analysis complements classic structure-activity relationships in the design of biologically active natural product analogues. PMID:25974024

  8. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  9. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts. PMID:26161970

  10. Marine Natural Products from New Caledonia--A Review.

    PubMed

    Motuhi, Sofia-Eléna; Mehiri, Mohamed; Payri, Claude Elisabeth; La Barre, Stéphane; Bach, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    Marine micro- and macroorganisms are well known to produce metabolites with high biotechnological potential. Nearly 40 years of systematic prospecting all around the New Caledonia archipelago and several successive research programs have uncovered new chemical leads from benthic and planktonic organisms. After species identification, biological and/or pharmaceutical analyses are performed on marine organisms to assess their bioactivities. A total of 3582 genera, 1107 families and 9372 species have been surveyed and more than 350 novel molecular structures have been identified. Along with their bioactivities that hold promise for therapeutic applications, most of these molecules are also potentially useful for cosmetics and food biotechnology. This review highlights the tremendous marine diversity in New Caledonia, and offers an outline of the vast possibilities for natural products, especially in the interest of pursuing collaborative fundamental research programs and developing local biotechnology programs. PMID:26999165

  11. Natural Product Discovery through Improved Functional Metagenomics in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Hala A; Low-Beinart, Lila; Obiajulu, Joseph U; Brady, Sean F

    2016-08-01

    Because the majority of environmental bacteria are not easily culturable, access to many bacterially encoded secondary metabolites will be dependent on the development of improved functional metagenomic screening methods. In this study, we examined a collection of diverse Streptomyces species for the best innate ability to heterologously express biosynthetic gene clusters. We then optimized methods for constructing high quality metagenomic cosmid libraries in the best Streptomyces host. An initial screen of a 1.5 million-membered metagenomic library constructed in Streptomyces albus, the species that exhibited the highest propensity for heterologous expression of gene clusters, led to the identification of the novel natural product metatricycloene (1). Metatricycloene is a tricyclic polyene encoded by a reductive, iterative polyketide-like gene cluster. Related gene clusters found in sequenced genomes appear to encode a largely unexplored collection of structurally diverse, polyene-based metabolites. PMID:27447056

  12. 2-Nitroethenylbenzenes as natural products in millipede defense secretions.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Omura, Hisashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2002-07-01

    The white millipede Eucondylodesmus elegans Miyosi (Polydesmida: Doratodesmidae) secretes odoriferous droplets from the glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was shown to be composed of a mixture of (1E)- and (1Z)-2-nitroethenylbenzenes (2-3 microg per millipede), identified by GC/MS analyses and synthesis. This is the first identification of these compounds as natural products. A granulated sugar block baited with the synthetic compound (more than 0.71 microg) demonstrated repellent activity against foraging wild ants, indicating that the compound functioned as a defense substance against potential predators. alpha,beta,2,3,4,5,6-d7-(1E)-2-Nitroethenylbenzene was detected by GC/MS analysis in the millipede secretion after feeding with alpha,beta,beta,2,3,4,5,6-d8-L-phenylalanine, indicating that L-phenylalanine is the precursor of these compounds.

  13. Can Invalid Bioactives Undermine Natural Product-Based Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput biology has contributed a wealth of data on chemicals, including natural products (NPs). Recently, attention was drawn to certain, predominantly synthetic, compounds that are responsible for disproportionate percentages of hits but are false actives. Spurious bioassay interference led to their designation as pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS). NPs lack comparable scrutiny, which this study aims to rectify. Systematic mining of 80+ years of the phytochemistry and biology literature, using the NAPRALERT database, revealed that only 39 compounds represent the NPs most reported by occurrence, activity, and distinct activity. Over 50% are not explained by phenomena known for synthetic libraries, and all had manifold ascribed bioactivities, designating them as invalid metabolic panaceas (IMPs). Cumulative distributions of ∼200,000 NPs uncovered that NP research follows power-law characteristics typical for behavioral phenomena. Projection into occurrence–bioactivity–effort space produces the hyperbolic black hole of NPs, where IMPs populate the high-effort base. PMID:26505758

  14. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  15. Can Invalid Bioactives Undermine Natural Product-Based Drug Discovery?

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jonathan; McAlpine, James B; Friesen, J Brent; Chen, Shao-Nong; Graham, James; Pauli, Guido F

    2016-03-10

    High-throughput biology has contributed a wealth of data on chemicals, including natural products (NPs). Recently, attention was drawn to certain, predominantly synthetic, compounds that are responsible for disproportionate percentages of hits but are false actives. Spurious bioassay interference led to their designation as pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS). NPs lack comparable scrutiny, which this study aims to rectify. Systematic mining of 80+ years of the phytochemistry and biology literature, using the NAPRALERT database, revealed that only 39 compounds represent the NPs most reported by occurrence, activity, and distinct activity. Over 50% are not explained by phenomena known for synthetic libraries, and all had manifold ascribed bioactivities, designating them as invalid metabolic panaceas (IMPs). Cumulative distributions of ∼200,000 NPs uncovered that NP research follows power-law characteristics typical for behavioral phenomena. Projection into occurrence-bioactivity-effort space produces the hyperbolic black hole of NPs, where IMPs populate the high-effort base. PMID:26505758

  16. Deoxygedunin, a natural product with potent neurotrophic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung-Wuk; Liu, Xia; Chan, Chi Bun; France, Stefan A; Sayeed, Iqbal; Tang, Wenxue; Lin, Xi; Xiao, Ge; Andero, Raul; Chang, Qiang; Ressler, Kerry J; Ye, Keqiang

    2010-01-01

    Gedunin, a family of natural products from the Indian neem tree, possess a variety of biological activities. Here we report the discovery of deoxygedunin, which activates the mouse TrkB receptor and its downstream signaling cascades. Deoxygedunin is orally available and activates TrkB in mouse brain in a BDNF-independent way. Strikingly, it prevents the degeneration of vestibular ganglion in BDNF -/- pups. Moreover, deoxygedunin robustly protects rat neurons from cell death in a TrkB-dependent manner. Further, administration of deoxygedunin into mice displays potent neuroprotective, anti-depressant and learning enhancement effects, all of which are mediated by the TrkB receptor. Hence, deoxygedunin imitates BDNF's biological activities through activating TrkB, providing a powerful therapeutic tool for treatment of various neurological diseases. PMID:20644624

  17. Marine Natural Products from New Caledonia—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Motuhi, Sofia-Eléna; Mehiri, Mohamed; Payri, Claude Elisabeth; La Barre, Stéphane; Bach, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Marine micro- and macroorganisms are well known to produce metabolites with high biotechnological potential. Nearly 40 years of systematic prospecting all around the New Caledonia archipelago and several successive research programs have uncovered new chemical leads from benthic and planktonic organisms. After species identification, biological and/or pharmaceutical analyses are performed on marine organisms to assess their bioactivities. A total of 3582 genera, 1107 families and 9372 species have been surveyed and more than 350 novel molecular structures have been identified. Along with their bioactivities that hold promise for therapeutic applications, most of these molecules are also potentially useful for cosmetics and food biotechnology. This review highlights the tremendous marine diversity in New Caledonia, and offers an outline of the vast possibilities for natural products, especially in the interest of pursuing collaborative fundamental research programs and developing local biotechnology programs. PMID:26999165

  18. 2-Nitroethenylbenzenes as natural products in millipede defense secretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Ômura, Hisashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2002-05-01

    The white millipede Eucondylodesmus elegans Miyosi (Polydesmida: Doratodesmidae) secretes odoriferous droplets from the glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was shown to be composed of a mixture of (1E)- and (1Z)-2-nitroethenylbenzenes (2-3 µg per millipede), identified by GC/MS analyses and synthesis. This is the first identification of these compounds as natural products. A granulated sugar block baited with the synthetic compound (more than 0.71 µg) demonstrated repellent activity against foraging wild ants, indicating that the compound functioned as a defense substance against potential predators. α,β,2,3,4,5,6-d7-(1E)-2-Nitroethenylbenzene was detected by GC/MS analysis in the millipede secretion after feeding with α,β,β,2,3,4,5,6-d8-L-phenylalanine, indicating that L-phenylalanine is the precursor of these compounds.

  19. Natural products in medicine: transformational outcome of synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Janek; Truchon, Jean-François; Bennani, Youssef L

    2014-11-26

    This review brings to the forefront key synthetic modifications on natural products (NPs) that have yielded successful drugs. The emphasis is placed on the power of targeted chemical transformations in enhancing the therapeutic value of NPs through optimization of pharmacokinetics, stability, potency, and/or selectivity. Multiple classes of NPs such as macrolides, opioids, steroids, and β-lactams used to treat a variety of conditions such as cancers, infections, inflammation are exemplified. Molecular modeling or X-ray structures of NP/protein complexes supporting the observed boost in therapeutic value of the modified NPs are also discussed. Significant advancement in synthetic chemistry, in structure determination, and in the understanding of factors controlling pharmacokinetics can now better position drug discovery teams to undertake NPs as valuable leads. We hope that the beneficial NPs synthetic modifications outlined here will reignite medicinal chemists' interest in NPs and their derivatives.

  20. Temperature effects on fish production across a natural thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J; Ólafsson, Ólafur P; Demars, Benoît O L; Friberg, Nikolai; Guðbergsson, Guðni; Hannesdóttir, Elísabet R; Jackson, Michelle C; Johansson, Liselotte S; McLaughlin, Órla B; Ólafsson, Jón S; Woodward, Guy; Gíslason, Gísli M

    2016-09-01

    Global warming is widely predicted to reduce the biomass production of top predators, or even result in species loss. Several exceptions to this expectation have been identified, however, and it is vital that we understand the underlying mechanisms if we are to improve our ability to predict future trends. Here, we used a natural warming experiment in Iceland and quantitative theoretical predictions to investigate the success of brown trout as top predators across a stream temperature gradient (4-25 °C). Brown trout are at the northern limit of their geographic distribution in this system, with ambient stream temperatures below their optimum for maximal growth, and above it in the warmest streams. A five-month mark-recapture study revealed that population abundance, biomass, growth rate, and production of trout all increased with stream temperature. We identified two mechanisms that contributed to these responses: (1) trout became more selective in their diet as stream temperature increased, feeding higher in the food web and increasing in trophic position; and (2) trophic transfer through the food web was more efficient in the warmer streams. We found little evidence to support a third potential mechanism: that external subsidies would play a more important role in the diet of trout with increasing stream temperature. Resource availability was also amplified through the trophic levels with warming, as predicted by metabolic theory in nutrient-replete systems. These results highlight circumstances in which top predators can thrive in warmer environments and contribute to our knowledge of warming impacts on natural communities and ecosystem functioning. PMID:26936833