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Sample records for naturally contaminated milk

  1. Effective heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in raw milk contaminated with naturally infected feces.

    PubMed

    Rademaker, Jan L W; Vissers, Marc M M; Te Giffel, Meike C

    2007-07-01

    The effectiveness of high-temperature, short holding time (HTST) pasteurization and homogenization with respect to inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was evaluated quantitatively. This allowed a detailed determination of inactivation kinetics. High concentrations of feces from cows with clinical symptoms of Johne's disease were used to contaminate raw milk in order to realistically mimic possible incidents most closely. Final M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentrations varying from 10(2) to 3.5 x 10(5) cells per ml raw milk were used. Heat treatments including industrial HTST were simulated on a pilot scale with 22 different time-temperature combinations, including 60 to 90 degrees C at holding (mean residence) times of 6 to 15 s. Following 72 degrees C and a holding time of 6 s, 70 degrees C for 10 and 15 s, or under more stringent conditions, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were recovered, resulting in >4.2- to >7.1-fold reductions, depending on the original inoculum concentrations. Inactivation kinetic modeling of 69 quantitative data points yielded an E(a) of 305,635 J/mol and an lnk(0) of 107.2, corresponding to a D value of 1.2 s at 72 degrees C and a Z value of 7.7 degrees C. Homogenization did not significantly affect the inactivation. The conclusion can be drawn that HTST pasteurization conditions equal to 15 s at > or =72 degrees C result in a more-than-sevenfold reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  2. Advanced sample preparation for the molecular quantification of Staphylococcus aureus in artificially and naturally contaminated milk.

    PubMed

    Aprodu, Iuliana; Walcher, Georg; Schelin, Jenny; Hein, Ingeborg; Norling, Börje; Rådström, Peter; Nicolau, Anca; Wagner, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Sample treatment is an essential element when using real-time PCR for quantification of pathogens directly on food samples. This study comparatively evaluated three different principles of sample treatment, i.e. immunomagnetic separation based on phage-derived cell wall binding molecules, matrix solubilization and flotation, in order to establish their suitability for quantifying low numbers of Staphylococcus aureus in milk. All three procedures succeeded to remove S. aureus from the milk matrix, either raw or pasteurized, and, as a result of the concentration of the target cells, minimized the effect of milk associated PCR inhibitors. Sample preparation based on immunomagnetic separation albeit of being user friendly, specific and rapid, failed to allow quantification of low and medium numbers (<10(4)CFU) of S. aureus. In a mastitic milk model cell wall binding domain (CBD)-based target cell extraction revealed results most closely matching those derived from culture-based quantification. Both matrix lysis and flotation allowed quantification of S. aureus at a level of 1-10 cells per ml. Both methods resulted in higher numbers of bacterial cell equivalents (bce) than plating could reveal. Since both methods harvest cells that have been subjected to either mechanical and chemical stresses before quantification, we concluded that the higher bce numbers resulted from a disaggregation of S. aureus clusters initially present in the inoculum. Conclusively, since likely each S. aureus cell of a toxigenic strain contributes to enterotoxin production, molecular quantification could provide an even more realistic impact assessment in outbreak investigations than plating does.

  3. The transfer of aflatoxin M1 in milk of ewes fed diet naturally contaminated by aflatoxins and effect of inclusion of dried yeast culture in the diet.

    PubMed

    Battacone, G; Nudda, A; Palomba, M; Mazzette, A; Pulina, G

    2009-10-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate 1) the transfer of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) into the milk of dairy ewes fed diets naturally contaminated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1); 2) the effect of the addition of dried yeast culture in the diet on this transfer; and 3) the alteration of enzymatic activities in the liver of ewes fed diets contaminated with AFB1. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were divided in 4 groups and fed a concentrate mix containing 4 amounts of wheat meal naturally contaminated with aflatoxins. The diet of the control group had no wheat meal, whereas that of treated groups had low, medium, or high amounts of contaminated wheat, which corresponded to 1.13, 2.30, and 5.03 microg of AFB1/kg of feed, respectively. The experiment lasted 14 d. On d 8 to 14 from the beginning of the trial, 12 g/d of a commercial dried yeast product (DYP) of Kluyveromyces lactis was added to the diet of each ewe. The AFM1 concentration in individual milk samples and the blood serum metabolites were measured periodically. The presence of AFM1 was first detected in milk on d 1 of administration, and then its concentration increased and approached a steady-state condition on d 3 simultaneously in all treated groups. The AFM1 in milk at the steady-state condition, which was linearly related to the AFB1 intake, was 39.72, 50.38, and 79.29 ng/L in the low-aflatoxin, medium-aflatoxin, and high-aflatoxin groups, respectively. The AFM1 concentration in milk of the high-aflatoxin group was approximately 1.5-fold greater than the European Commission maximum tolerance level (50 ng/kg). The addition of DYP to the diet did not affect the AFM1 concentration in milk. After the withdrawal of the contaminated concentrate mix, the AFM1 mean concentrations decreased quickly and were no longer detected after 3 d in all treated groups. Daily milk yield and composition did not differ because of aflatoxin treatment. Blood serum parameters (creatinine, glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic

  4. Contaminant Removal From Natural Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Geiger, Cheri L. (Inventor); Reinhart, Debra (Inventor); Fillpek, Laura B. (Inventor); Coon, Christina (Inventor); Devor, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles is used to remediate contaminated natural resources, such as groundwater and soil. In a preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion removes heavy metals, such as lead (pb), from contaminated natural resources. In another preferred embodiment, the zero-valent metal emulsion is a bimetallic emulsion containing zero-valent metal particles doped with a catalytic metal to remediate halogenated aromatic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from natural resources.

  5. Chemical contaminants in breast milk: time trends and regional variability.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Gina M; Weiss, Pilar M

    2002-01-01

    Research on environmentally related chemical contaminants in breast milk spans several decades and dozens of countries. The ability to use this research as an environmental indicator is limited because of a lack of consistent protocols. Data on xenobiotics in breast milk are influenced by choices in sample selection, sample pooling, analysis, and reporting. In addition, most studies have focused only on a small panel of persistent organic pollutants, despite indications that a wide range of additional chemical contaminants may also enter breast milk. Despite these limitations, however, it is possible to draw some generalizations. In this paper we review available data on levels of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), metals, and solvents in breast milk. Examples drawn from around the world illustrate the available data and the patterns that have appeared in various areas over time. Over the past few decades, levels of the organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and dioxins have declined in breast milk in countries where these chemicals have been banned or otherwise regulated. In contrast, the levels of PBDEs are rising. Regional differences in levels of xenobiotics in breast milk are related to historical and current local use patterns. Diet is a major factor that influences breast milk levels of persistent organic pollutants, with patterns in fish consumption playing a particularly significant role. Improved global breast milk monitoring programs would allow for more consistent data on trends over time, detection of new xenobiotics in breast milk, and identification of disproportionately exposed populations. PMID:12055065

  6. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  7. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  8. Human milk: mother nature's prototypical probiotic food?

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michelle K; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "probiotic" is generally attributed to Dr. Ilya Mechnikov, who hypothesized that longevity could be enhanced by manipulating gastrointestinal microbes using naturally fermented foods. In 2001, a report of the FAO and WHO (2001 Oct, http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/fs_-management/en/probiotics.pdf) proposed a more restrictive definition of probiotic, as follows: "a live micro-organism which, when administered in adequate amounts, confers a health benefit on the host." As such, answering the fundamental question posed here-"Is human milk a probiotic?"-requires first grappling with the concept and meaning of the term probiotic. Nonetheless, one must also be convinced that human milk contains bacteria. Indeed, there are scores of publications providing evidence of a paradigm shift in this regard. Variation in the human-milk microbiome may be associated with maternal weight, mode of delivery, lactation state, gestation age, antibiotic use, and maternal health. Milk constituents (e.g., fatty acids and complex carbohydrates) might also be related to the abundance of specific bacterial taxa in milk. Whether these bacteria affect infant health is likely, but more studies are needed to test this hypothesis. In summary, a growing literature suggests that human milk, like all other fluids produced by the body, indeed contains viable bacteria. As such, and recognizing the extensive literature relating breastfeeding to optimal infant health, we propose that human milk should be considered a probiotic food. Determining factors that influence which bacteria are present in milk and if and how they influence the mother's and/or the recipient infant's health remain basic science and public health realms in which almost nothing is known.

  9. Biofilm in milking equipment on a dairy farm as a potential source of bulk tank milk contamination with Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality and safety of raw milk are important attributes for consumers of milk and dairy products. The objective of this study was to assess the presence of a L. monocytogenes biofilm in milking equipment as a potential source of bulk tank milk contamination on a dairy farm. Weekly tests to monit...

  10. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection

    PubMed Central

    Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105°C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. IMPORTANCE M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula

  11. On the disposal of contaminated milk in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Elliott, A J; Wilkins, B T; Mansfield, P

    2001-10-01

    Estimates have been made of the reduction in dissolved oxygen levels in coastal waters that would result from the disposal of contaminated milk following a radiological accident. Two contrasting sites were chosen: the Bristol Channel near Hinkley Point and the coast of Cumbria near Sellafield. The results suggest that the dilution would be sufficiently strong near Hinkley Point, due to vigorous tidal mixing, that the impact on the DO levels of the coastal waters would be negligible. However, at both Sellafield and Heysham the disposal of milk could result in a reduction of the DO by 1-2 mg l(-1). In contrast to shallow estuarine waters, the recovery of oxygen levels due to the effects of re-aeration through surface gas exchange is unlikely to be significant due to the depth of the coastal waters. However, the recovery of the dissolved oxygen levels to ambient conditions following the completion of the discharge would occur on a time scale of about 17 days due to mixing of the DO deficit plume into the surrounding waters.

  12. Characterization of Contaminants from a Sanitized Milk Processing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, Sara; Matos, Sónia; Kluskens, Leon; Vieira, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Milk processing lines offer a wide variety of microenvironments where a diversity of microorganisms can proliferate. We sampled crevices and junctions where, due to deficient reach by typical sanitizing procedures, bacteria can survive and establish biofilms. The sampling sites were the holding cell, cold storage tank, pasteurizer and storage tank - transfer pump junction. The culturable bacteria that were isolated after the sanitation procedure were predominantly Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp, Staphylococcus sciuri and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We assayed several phenotypic characteristics such as the ability to secrete enzymes and siderophores, as well as the capacity of the strains to form biofilms that might contribute to their survival in a mixed species environment. The Pseudomonas spp. isolates were found to either produce proteases or lecithinases at high levels. Interestingly, protease production showed an inverse correlation with siderophore production. Furthermore, all of the Serratia spp. isolates were strong biofilm formers and spoilage enzymes producers. The organisms identified were not mere contaminants, but also producers of proteins with the potential to lower the quality and shelf-life of milk. In addition, we found that a considerable number of the Serratia and Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the pasteurizer were capable of secreting compounds with antimicrobial properties. PMID:22761957

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus sp. FMQ74, a Dairy-Contaminating Isolate from Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Okshevsky, Mira; Regina, Viduthalai R.; Marshall, Ian P. G.; Schreiber, Lars

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Representatives of the genus Bacillus are common milk contaminants that cause spoilage and flavor alterations of dairy products. Bacillus sp. FMQ74 was isolated from raw milk on a Danish dairy farm. To elucidate the genomic basis of this strain’s survival in the dairy industry, a high-quality draft genome was produced. PMID:28126940

  14. Powder infant formula milk contaminated with Enterobacter sakazakii.

    PubMed

    Oonaka, Kenji; Furuhata, Katsunori; Hara, Motonobu; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2010-03-01

    To clarify the route and source of Enterobacter sakazakii infection in a basic study, we analyzed powder infant formula milk (PIF), which may be an important source of infantile infection, regarding contamination with Enterobacteriaceae including this type of bacteria, and conducted drug sensitivity tests with various antimicrobial agents. Enterobacteriaceae was isolated 36 (24.2%) of 149 PIF samples. These comprised of 12 (19.7%) of 61 domestically produced samples and 24 (27.3%) of 88 imported samples. E. sakazakii was isolated in 9 (6.6%) of the 149 PIF samples. These comprised 4 (6.6%) of 61 domestically produced samples and 5 (5.7%) of 88 imported samples. In 8 of the 9 samples in which E. sakazakii was isolated, the bacterial levels were estimated to be 0.36 MPN/100 g. However, one imported sample showed a bacterial level of 0.91 MPN/100 g. In the drug sensitivity tests of E. sakazakii isolated from PIF, we compared the MIC(90) values. E. sakazakii was highly sensitive to 9 agents: cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, cefpirome, cefozopran, gentamicin, meropenem, and ciprofloxacin, and moderately sensitive to 5 agents: piperacillin, erythromycin, minocycline, chloramphenicol, and rifampicin. However, it was resistant to 2 agents, ampicillin and lincomycin.

  15. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    PubMed

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  16. Natural biodegradation of organic contaminants in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W W; Rice, D W

    1998-09-23

    There has recently been a growing awareness that natural processes are degrading contaminants of concern, and that the contribution these natural processes make to achieving cleanup goals needs to be formally considered during site-specific cleanup. Historical case data from a large number of releases has been used to evaluate the expectation for natural attenuation to contribute to the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. The use of historical case data has several advantages, among them: 1) sites can reduce characterization costs by sharing information on key hydrogeologic parameters controlling contaminant fate and transport, and 2) standard reference frameworks can be developed that individual sites can use as a basis of comparison regarding plume behavior. Definition of cleanup times must take into account basic constraints imposed by natural laws governing the transport and natural degradation process of petroleum hydrocarbons. The actual time to reach groundwater cleanup goals is determined by these laws and the limitations on residual subsurface contamination attenuation rates, through either active or natural biological processes. These limitations will practically constrain the time to achieve low concentration cleanup goals. Recognition is needed that sites will need to be transitioned to remediation by natural processes at some point following implementation of active remediation options. The results of an analysis of approximately 1800 California and 600 Texas fuel hydrocarbon (FHC) releases and 2.50 chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) plumes will be summarized. Plume lengths and natural biodegradation potential were evaluated. For FHC releases, 90% of benzene groundwater plumes were less than 280 feet in length and evidence of natural biodegradation was found to be present at all sites studied in detail. For CVOC releases, source strength and groundwater flow velocity are dominant factors controlling groundwater plume

  17. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in the milk of naturally infected ewes.

    PubMed

    Camossi, L G; Greca-Júnior, H; Corrêa, A P F L; Richini-Pereira, V B; Silva, R C; Da Silva, A V; Langoni, H

    2011-05-11

    Toxoplasmosis is the major parasitic disease affecting sheep. It is important for veterinary medicine, animal science and public health since it causes reproductive and economic losses in the herd, as well as damaging human health due to consumption of contaminated meat and milk, which can facilitate zoonotic transmission. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in ovine milk and lack of data in the literature describing differentiation between acute and chronic disease for this species stimulated the elaboration of the present research project. To achieve the aim of this study, the animals were allocated to two groups of 20 ewes each, of which group 1 was composed of animals with positive serology and group 2 with negative serology. Acute and chronic stages of the disease were differentiated by modified direct agglutination test (MAT), in which antigens were fixed with formalin (MAT-AF) and methanol (MAT-AM). The parasite was detected in milk by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the molecular identity of the amplified products was confirmed by sequencing. The serological results indicated that sheep had a chronic infection profile. T. gondii DNA was detected in seven milk samples from five seropositive sheep, and twice in milk of two sheep. Sequences of species shared 97-100% identity with T. gondii. These findings allowed the hypothesis that the peripartum period may also lead to the resurgence of tissue T. gondii tachyzoites cysts which can circulate again and be excreted in the milk. This study used sheep naturally infected with T. gondii as a prerequisite for further investigations on the possible participation of this species in toxoplasmosis epidemiology and as a potential transmission route related to consumption of milk from infected sheep.

  18. Prions in milk from ewes incubating natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Lacroux, Caroline; Simon, Stéphanie; Benestad, Sylvie L; Maillet, Séverine; Mathey, Jacinthe; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Cassard, Hervé; Costes, Pierrette; Bergonier, Dominique; Weisbecker, Jean-Louis; Moldal, Torffin; Simmons, Hugh; Lantier, Frederic; Feraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Grassi, Jacques; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2008-12-01

    Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrP(Sc) accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 microg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species.

  19. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in naturally infected sheep's milk.

    PubMed

    de Santana Rocha, D; de Sousa Moura, R L; Maciel, B M; Guimarães, L A; O'dwyer, H N S; Munhoz, A D; Albuquerque, G R

    2015-07-31

    The objective of this study was to verify whether Toxoplasma gondii is excreted in the milk of naturally infected sheep. In order to accomplish this, 275 lactating ewes were used; these were bred extensively in 17 estates distributed across nine cities. Polymerase chain reaction amplification was used to detect T. gondii DNA in milk samples, and the indirect immunofluorescence test was employed for the detection of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies in the sera, with a cut-off value of 1:64. It was possible to verify the presence of the parasite DNA in 6.5% (18/275) of the studied animals. Anti-T. gondii antibodies were present in 41.5% of the animals studied (114/275). There was no correlation between parasite excretion in milk and the presence of IgG in 38.9% of the studied animals (7/18). The high seropositivity and the presence of parasite DNA in the milk led to the conclusion that T. gondii infection is present in the sheep population in southern and southwestern Bahia, and that there is a risk of the human population becoming infected due to the consumption of raw, in natura milk.

  20. Predicting dioxin-like PCBs soil contamination levels using milk of grazing animal as indicator.

    PubMed

    Perugini, Monia; Nuñez, Esteban Gabriel Herrera; Baldi, Loredana; Esposito, Mauro; Serpe, Francesco Paolo; Amorena, Michele

    2012-11-01

    Dioxin-like PCBs (dl-PCBs) are ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants of recognized negative effects on human health. Assessing highly polluted areas should be an important public health issue. This study proposes to use the milk of grazing animals as a bioindicator of dl-PCB contamination in the environment. The hypothesis is that milk concentration of dl-PCBs are related to soil concentrations of these compounds, and that soils are generally reflective of a larger environmental issue of dl-PCB contamination. In this study, we evaluate the possibility of predicting soil concentrations using milk of sheep, cows and buffalos in a spatial model. For this purpose, samples of soil and milk collected in Campania (Italy) were introduced in a GIS platform to perform geostatistical analysis for building a simple predictive model. The ordinary least squares regressions (OLS) showed a statistically significant correlation (p<0.05) between soil and milk contamination. However, this relationship was spatially variable. Thus, a geographically weighted regression (GWR) was performed, obtaining R(2) values of 0.91, 0.77 and 0.66 for sheep's, buffalo's and cow's milk respectively. Assessed the mathematical relationships between the variables, new data was introduced to evaluate the performance of the model. Predictions of soil contamination with dl-PCBs using sheep's, cow's and buffalo's milk showed a mean error of 23%, 25% and 36% respectively. According to these results the sheep's milk can be considered the best bioindicator of dl-PCBs contamination among the three species. The results of this project evidence the potentialities of the proposed approach to assess bioindicator performance in a spatial predictive model.

  1. Milk Hygiene in Rural Southwestern Uganda: Prevalence of Mastitis and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Bacterial Contaminants of Milk and Milk Products

    PubMed Central

    Ssajjakambwe, Paul; Bahizi, Gloria; Setumba, Christopher; Kisaka, Stevens M. B.; Vudriko, Patrick; Atuheire, Collins; Kabasa, John David

    2017-01-01

    Mastitis and antimicrobial resistance are a big challenge to the dairy industry in sub-Saharan Africa. A study was conducted in Kashongi and Keshunga subcounties of Kiruhura District (in Uganda) where the government and private sector have deliberate programs to improve production efficiency, quality, and safety of milk and its products. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of mastitis, its common causative agents, antimicrobial sensitivity of mastitis causing organisms, and contaminants of processed milk products: yoghurt and ghee. Seventy-one milk, fourteen yoghurt, and three ghee samples were collected from nine farms. Of the 71 cows tested, 54 (76.1%) had mastitis. The mastitis cases from Keshunga were 32 (59.3%) and Kashongi contributed 22 (40.7%) of the cases. The common mastitis causative agents were Staphylococcus spp. (30.8%), Streptococcus spp. (12.3%), Corynebacterium spp.(15.4%), and E. coli (7.7%). Some of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline and penicillin. Prevalent contaminants of yoghurt were Staphylococcus spp. (8.3%), Streptococcus spp. (8.3%), Corynebacterium spp. (8.3%), and E. coli (8.3%), whereas all ghee contained Streptococcus spp. (100%). Prevalence of mastitis, antimicrobial resistance, and contamination of milk products are high in the study area. Targeted programs to prevent and control mastitis as well as antibiotic resistance are recommended. PMID:28246573

  2. Milk Hygiene in Rural Southwestern Uganda: Prevalence of Mastitis and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Bacterial Contaminants of Milk and Milk Products.

    PubMed

    Ssajjakambwe, Paul; Bahizi, Gloria; Setumba, Christopher; Kisaka, Stevens M B; Vudriko, Patrick; Atuheire, Collins; Kabasa, John David; Kaneene, John B

    2017-01-01

    Mastitis and antimicrobial resistance are a big challenge to the dairy industry in sub-Saharan Africa. A study was conducted in Kashongi and Keshunga subcounties of Kiruhura District (in Uganda) where the government and private sector have deliberate programs to improve production efficiency, quality, and safety of milk and its products. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of mastitis, its common causative agents, antimicrobial sensitivity of mastitis causing organisms, and contaminants of processed milk products: yoghurt and ghee. Seventy-one milk, fourteen yoghurt, and three ghee samples were collected from nine farms. Of the 71 cows tested, 54 (76.1%) had mastitis. The mastitis cases from Keshunga were 32 (59.3%) and Kashongi contributed 22 (40.7%) of the cases. The common mastitis causative agents were Staphylococcus spp. (30.8%), Streptococcus spp. (12.3%), Corynebacterium spp.(15.4%), and E. coli (7.7%). Some of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline and penicillin. Prevalent contaminants of yoghurt were Staphylococcus spp. (8.3%), Streptococcus spp. (8.3%), Corynebacterium spp. (8.3%), and E. coli (8.3%), whereas all ghee contained Streptococcus spp. (100%). Prevalence of mastitis, antimicrobial resistance, and contamination of milk products are high in the study area. Targeted programs to prevent and control mastitis as well as antibiotic resistance are recommended.

  3. Natural milk cultures for the production of Argentinian cheeses.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, J A; Binetti, A G; Quiberoni, A; Bailo, N B; Rubiolo, A C; Giraffa, G

    1997-01-01

    Samples (32) of natural milk cultures used in the Santa Fe, Argentina, area for soft and semihard cheese production were examined. The microbial composition (including lactic acid microflora characterization) and technological parameters (acidifying and proteolytic activities) were evaluated. The cultures contained mainly thermophilic lactic acid bacteria, identified as Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus (96.8% of the total strains) and Enterococcus spp. The strains showed a low proteolytic activity. The isolates of S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus exhibited a widespread phage resistance. The nonlactic microflora comprised coliforms, yeasts, spore-forming bacteria and lactate fermentative bacteria. The samples showed an acidity level from 0.38 to 0.69% lactic acid (pH from 4.25 to 5.75). The acidifying activity was optimal at 45 degrees C. The advantages and disadvantages of the employment of natural milk starters are discussed.

  4. Higher Levels of Aflatoxin M1 Contamination and Poorer Composition of Milk Supplied by Informal Milk Marketing Chains in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Naveed; Tipu, Muhammad Yasin; Ishaq, Muhammad; Cowling, Ann; McGill, David; Warriach, Hassan Mahmood; Wynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to observe the seasonal variation in aflatoxin M1 and nutritional quality of milk along informal marketing chains. Milk samples (485) were collected from three different chains over a period of one year. The average concentrations of aflatoxin M1 during the autumn and monsoon seasons (2.60 and 2.59 ppb) were found to be significantly higher (standard error of the difference, SED = 0.21: p = 0.003) than in the summer (1.93 ppb). The percentage of added water in milk was significantly lower (SED = 1.54: p < 0.001) in summer (18.59%) than in the monsoon season (26.39%). There was a significantly different (SED = 2.38: p < 0.001) mean percentage of water added by farmers (6.23%), small collectors (14.97%), large collectors (27.96%) and retailers (34.52%). This was reflected in changes in milk quality along the marketing chain. There was no difference (p = 0.178) in concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk collected from the farmers (2.12 ppb), small collectors (2.23 ppb), large collectors (2.36 ppb) and retailers (2.58 ppb). The high levels of contamination found in this study, which exceed the standards set by European Union (0.05 ppb) and USFDA (0.5 ppb), demand radical intervention by regulatory authorities and mass awareness of the consequences for consumer health and safety. PMID:27929386

  5. Higher Levels of Aflatoxin M1 Contamination and Poorer Composition of Milk Supplied by Informal Milk Marketing Chains in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Naveed; Tipu, Muhammad Yasin; Ishaq, Muhammad; Cowling, Ann; McGill, David; Warriach, Hassan Mahmood; Wynn, Peter

    2016-12-05

    The present study was conducted to observe the seasonal variation in aflatoxin M1 and nutritional quality of milk along informal marketing chains. Milk samples (485) were collected from three different chains over a period of one year. The average concentrations of aflatoxin M1 during the autumn and monsoon seasons (2.60 and 2.59 ppb) were found to be significantly higher (standard error of the difference, SED = 0.21: p = 0.003) than in the summer (1.93 ppb). The percentage of added water in milk was significantly lower (SED = 1.54: p < 0.001) in summer (18.59%) than in the monsoon season (26.39%). There was a significantly different (SED = 2.38: p < 0.001) mean percentage of water added by farmers (6.23%), small collectors (14.97%), large collectors (27.96%) and retailers (34.52%). This was reflected in changes in milk quality along the marketing chain. There was no difference (p = 0.178) in concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk collected from the farmers (2.12 ppb), small collectors (2.23 ppb), large collectors (2.36 ppb) and retailers (2.58 ppb). The high levels of contamination found in this study, which exceed the standards set by European Union (0.05 ppb) and USFDA (0.5 ppb), demand radical intervention by regulatory authorities and mass awareness of the consequences for consumer health and safety.

  6. Microbial contamination of water intended for milk container washing in smallholder dairy farming and milk retailing houses in southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Amenu, Kebede; Shitu, Desalew; Abera, Mesele

    2016-01-01

    The water used during handling and processing of milk products can be potential sources of microbial contamination with possible negative consequences on food safety. Especially, the water used in keeping the hygiene of milking and milk storage utensils is crucial to keep the quality and safety of the products. Therefore, the current study was designed to assess the bacteriological quality of water used for cleaning milking and milk storage equipment in smallholder dairy production in Hawassa and its surroundings. A total of 79 water samples were collected: 26 from milk collecting houses in Hawassa and 53 from selected smallholder dairy farms (Hawassa = 14, Arsi Negele = 29 and Yirgalem = 10). Out of the total samples, 18 samples were collected directly from pipe and 61 from storage containers (46 from narrow opening and 15 from wide opening containers). The overall prevalence of E. coli exceeding zero CFU/ml was 39.2 %. From analyzed samples, high prevalence of positive samples for E. coli was found in water samples taken from wide opening containers (66.7 %). A number of bacteria were isolated and presumptively identified which include Bacillus sp. 6.3 % (n = 5), Citrobacter sp. 1.3 %(n = 1), E. coli 39.2 % (n = 31), Enterobacter sp. 2.5 % (n = 2), Klebisella sp. 7.6 % (n = 6), Micrococcus sp. 6.3 % (n = 5), Pseudomonas sp. 6.3 % (n = 5), Staphylococcus aureus 6.3 % (n = 5), Staphylococcus epidermidis 13.9 % (n = 11) and Streptococcus sp. 1.3 % (n = 1). The bacteriological quality of water especially, water stored in household storage containers in present study area was found to be contaminated with different bacteria indicating potential food safety problem and health risk to the society. In this respect, people handling water should be educated on its proper handling and the risk of contamination during storage. To minimize contamination, materials with narrow mouth and lid should be used. Further study is recommended on

  7. Bioanalytical challenge: A review of environmental and pharmaceuticals contaminants in human milk.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Bianca Rebelo; Barreiro, Juliana Cristina; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2016-10-25

    An overview of bioanalytical methods for the determination of environmental and pharmaceutical contaminants in human milk is presented. The exposure of children to these contaminants through lactation has been widely investigated. The human milk contains diverse proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates and the concentration of these components is drastically altered during the lactation period providing a high degree of an analytical challenge. Sample collection and pretreatment are still considered the Achilles' heel. This review presents liquid chromatographic methods developed in the last 10 years for this complex matrix with focuses in the extraction and quantification steps. Green sample preparation protocols have been emphasized.

  8. Microbial Contamination and Hygiene of Fresh Cow’s Milk Produced by Smallholders in Western Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Jones, Theodore J.D.; Hang’ombe, M. Bernard; Songe, Mwansa M.; Sinkala, Yona; Grace, Delia

    2016-01-01

    A field study was performed to assess safety of smallholder fresh cow’s milk around Mongu, Western Province, Zambia. This involved observation and sampling of milk along the value chain from milking to point-of-sale and storage. Samples were collected from 86 cows, from 9 farmers, selling through two dairy cooperatives, with additional samples from informal markets. Production was very low; around one litre/day/cow and 10 L/day/herd. The milk was typically transported by bicycle in high ambient temperatures without refrigeration until reaching the point-of-sale (journey times of 30–120 min), where it was sold without pasteurisation despite milk-borne zoonoses being endemic (bovine tuberculosis (bTB) and Brucellosis). Although microbiological contamination was initially low, with geometric mean total bacterial count (TBC) of 425 cfu/mL (cfu = colony forming units) upon arrival at point-of-sale, poor hygiene led to high bacterial loads later on (geometric mean TBC > 600,000 cfu/mL after two days refrigeration), with almost all samples culture positive for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. After milking, milk was kept for 100–223 min at temperatures favouring microbial growth (median 34 °C) and sold without a microbial kill step. In this situation limited variation in observed standards of milk hygiene had no significant effect on milk end-product bacterial counts. Options for refrigerated transport are limited. Pasteurisation at the cooperative should be investigated, as this would largely remove pathogenic microbes present in the milk whether resulting from cattle infection or poor hygiene during milking and transportation. As milk is also purchased directly from producers, on-farm milk heating options should also be assessed. Smallholders may benefit from access to national markets by providing milk to large dairies, which have systems for ensuring safety. However, this requires significant investment and an increased and more consistent supply of

  9. Persistent environmental contaminants in human milk: concentrations and time trends in Italy.

    PubMed

    Abballe, Annalisa; Ballard, Terri J; Dellatte, Elena; di Domenico, Alessandro; Ferri, Fabiola; Fulgenzi, Anna Rita; Grisanti, Giulio; Iacovella, Nicola; Ingelido, Anna Maria; Malisch, Rainer; Miniero, Roberto; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Risica, Serena; Ziemacki, Gianni; De Felip, Elena

    2008-08-01

    Breast milk monitoring studies of persistent and toxic environmental contaminants are of primary importance for carrying out an adequate risk assessment at the actual levels of human exposure and represent a major source of information on infant perinatal exposure. Milk specimens from mothers of the general population of the Venice and Rome areas were collected over the 1998-2001 period, pooled, and analyzed for selected persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorodibenzodioxins (PCDDs), polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), organochlorinated pesticides (p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, hexachlorobenzene), and polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and the heavy metals Cd, Co, Cu, Hg, Mn, Pb, Sn, and Zn. The goal was to verify whether mother milk from the Venice area, whose lagoon is partly under direct industrial impact, had a contaminant load greater than that from the Rome area, primarily urban. For mothers from the Venice area, the correlation between fish and fishery product consumption and contaminant concentrations in milk was also explored, with however inconclusive results. The concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs, dioxin-like PCBs, and organochlorinated pesticides determined in this study were compared with those available from a previous analytical work carried out on 1987 human milk pools of domestic origin: the declining trend of the aforesaid contaminants in milk is confirmed to be in agreement with what was observed in other European countries. The breast milk content of (137)Cs and (40)K radionuclides was also determined and compared with data obtained in other research programmes carried out in Italy: the health risk for breastfed infants was deemed to be not significant.

  10. Naturally occurring contamination in the Mancos Shale.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Stan J; Goodknight, Craig S; Tigar, Aaron D; Bush, Richard P; Gil, April

    2012-02-07

    Some uranium mill tailings disposal cells were constructed on dark-gray shale of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Shale of this formation contains contaminants similar to those in mill tailings. To establish the contributions derived from the Mancos, we sampled 51 locations in Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Many of the groundwater samples were saline with nitrate, selenium, and uranium concentrations commonly exceeding 250, 000, 1000, and 200 μg/L, respectively. Higher concentrations were limited to groundwater associated with shale beds, but were not correlated with geographic area, stratigraphic position, or source of water. The elevated concentrations suggest that naturally occurring contamination should be considered when evaluating groundwater cleanup levels. At several locations, seep water was yellow or red, caused in part by dissolved organic carbon concentrations up to 280 mg/L. Most seeps had (234)U to (238)U activity ratios greater than 2, indicating preferential leaching of (234)U. Seeps were slightly enriched in (18)O relative to the meteoric water line, indicating limited evaporation. Conceptually, major ion chemical reactions are dominated by calcite dissolution following proton release from pyrite oxidation and subsequent exchange by calcium for sodium residing on clay mineral exchange sites. Contaminants are likely released from organic matter and mineral surfaces during weathering.

  11. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  12. AFM₁ in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination.

    PubMed

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-10-23

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB₁ is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM₁, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM₁ has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM₁ in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM₁ content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB₁ contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM₁ mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue.

  13. Cesium separation from contaminated milk using magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitantes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2000-11-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster in 1986 contaminated vast regions of prime grazing land. Subsequently, milk produced in the region has been contaminated with small amounts of the long-lived fission product cesium-137, and the Ukraine is seeking to deploy a simple separation process that will remove the Cs and preserve the nutritional value of the milk. Tiny magnetic particles containing crystalline silicotitanates (CST) have been manufactured and tested to this end. The results show that partitioning efficiency is optimized with low ratios of particle mass to volume. To achieve 90% Cs decontamination in a single-stage process, <3 g of magnetic CST per l milk is sufficient with a 30-min mixing time. A two-stage process would utilize <0.4 g/l per stage. The modeling of the magnetic CST system described herein can be achieved rather simply which is important for deployment in the affected Ukraine region.

  14. Assessment of AflatoxinM1 Contamination in UHT Flavored Milk Samples in Karaj, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mashak, Zohreh; Jafari Sohi, Hadi; Heshmati, Ali; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to detect the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in 30 UHT flavored milk samples in Karaj, Alborz province, Iran. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied to analyze AFM1 in the samples. The results showed that aflatoxin M1 was detected in all the UHT flavored milk samples, the AFM1 concentration ranged from 0.015 to 0.14 µg/L. Also, 10 samples (33.3%) were contaminated with more than 0.05 µg/L of European Union regulations for aflatoxin M1. Wherease, according to the proposed Iranian national standard and FDA (0.5 µg/L), none of the samples has not been contaminated more than the maximum AFM1 concentrations threshold. This is the first report discovering the fact that UHT flavored milk is an important contributor to the dietary intake of AFM1 in Iran. PMID:27980575

  15. Transfer of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) from contaminated feed to dairy milk.

    PubMed

    van Asselt, E D; Kowalczyk, J; van Eijkeren, J C H; Zeilmaker, M J; Ehlers, S; Fürst, P; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, M; van der Fels-Klerx, H J

    2013-11-15

    Dietary intake is the predominant route for human exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS). Single pollution events may thus affect human exposure if polluted ground and water is used to produce animal feed or food. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK-) model is derived that describes the uptake of PFOS from contaminated feed by cows and its subsequent elimination through the cows' milk. Parameter values of the model were estimated by fitting to experimental data of a cow feeding trial. Model calculations showed that almost all PFOS ingested is excreted through the cows' milk. The elimination rate, however, was low as the estimated half-life in the cow was 56days and it may, thus, take a long time after an initial pollution event to produce PFOS-free milk. The derived model can be used to estimate the transfer of PFOS through the dairy food chain and can be used for comparison of various contamination routes.

  16. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of sp...

  17. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,…

  18. Milk contamination and resistance to processing conditions determine the fate of Lactococcus lactis bacteriophages in dairies.

    PubMed

    Madera, Carmen; Monjardín, Cristina; Suárez, Juan E

    2004-12-01

    Milk contamination by phages, the susceptibility of the phages to pasteurization, and the high levels of resistance to phage infection of starter strains condition the evolution dynamics of phage populations in dairy environments. Approximately 10% (83 of 900) of raw milk samples contained phages of the quasi-species c2 (72%), 936 (24%), and P335 (4%). However, 936 phages were isolated from 20 of 24 (85%) whey samples, while c2 was detected in only one (4%) of these samples. This switch may have been due to the higher susceptibility of c2 to pasteurization (936-like phages were found to be approximately 35 times more resistant than c2 strains to treatment of contaminated milk in a plate heat exchanger at 72 degrees C for 15 s). The restriction patterns of 936-like phages isolated from milk and whey were different, indicating that survival to pasteurization does not result in direct contamination of the dairy environment. The main alternative source of phages (commercial bacterial starters) does not appear to significantly contribute to phage contamination. Twenty-four strains isolated from nine starter formulations were generally resistant to phage infection, and very small progeny were generated upon induction of the lytic cycle of resident prophages. Thus, we postulate that a continuous supply of contaminated milk, followed by pasteurization, creates a factory environment rich in diverse 936 phage strains. This equilibrium would be broken if a particular starter strain turned out to be susceptible to infection by one of these 936-like phages, which, as a consequence, became prevalent.

  19. Contamination status of persistent organochlorines in human breast milk from Japan: recent levels and temporal trend.

    PubMed

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Muraoka, Masayoshi; Ohtake, Masako; Sudaryanto, Agus; Minh, Nguyen Hung; Ueno, Daisuke; Higaki, Yumi; Ochi, Miyuki; Tsydenova, Oyuna; Kamikawa, Satoko; Tonegi, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yumi; Shimomura, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Junya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-08-01

    Contamination levels of persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and chlordane compounds (CHLs) was examined in human breast milk collected during 2001-2004 from Fukuoka prefecture in Japan. The concentrations of OCs such as dioxins and related compounds, DDTs, CHLs and HCB in human breast milk from primiparae were comparable to or slightly higher than the data obtained during 1998, indicating that the levels of these contaminants in Japanese human breast milk have not decreased since 1998 and Japanese are continuously exposed to these chemicals, presumably via fish intake. In addition, OC levels in human breast milk from primiparae were significantly higher than those from multiparae, implying elimination of OCs via lactation. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were observed between levels of OCs in human breast milk and the age of primiparae. These results indicate that the mothers with higher age may transfer higher amounts of OCs to the first infant than to the infants born afterwards through breast-feeding, and hence the first born children might be at higher risk by OCs.

  20. Milk and serum standard reference materials for monitoring organic contaminants in human samples.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Michele M; Eppe, Gauthier; Focant, Jean-François; Hamilton, Coreen; Heckert, N Alan; Heltsley, Rebecca M; Hoover, Dale; Keller, Jennifer M; Leigh, Stefan D; Patterson, Donald G; Pintar, Adam L; Sharpless, Katherine E; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E; Vander Pol, Stacy S; Wise, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Four new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been developed to assist in the quality assurance of chemical contaminant measurements required for human biomonitoring studies, SRM 1953 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1954 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1957 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Serum, and SRM 1958 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Serum. These materials were developed as part of a collaboration between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with both agencies contributing data used in the certification of mass fraction values for a wide range of organic contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and dibenzofuran (PCDF) congeners. The certified mass fractions of the organic contaminants in unfortified samples, SRM 1953 and SRM 1957, ranged from 12 ng/kg to 2200 ng/kg with the exception of 4,4'-DDE in SRM 1953 at 7400 ng/kg with expanded uncertainties generally <14 %. This agreement suggests that there were no significant biases existing among the multiple methods used for analysis.

  1. [Bacterial contamination of breast milk collected through manual expression and stored at room temperature

    PubMed

    Moulin, Z S; Lamounier, J A; Vieira, M B; Baêta, M; Silva, M A; Araújo, R S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To the determine the bacterial contamination profile of unheated expressed breast milk, collected without rigid hygienic precautions and stored at room temperature for nine hours. The purpose was to give poor lactating mothers the alternative of storing their own milk out of refrigerator. A research on cultural, social and economical aspects as well as on donatorś knowledge about breastfeeding was considered necessary. METHODS: 35 donators were interviewed and an experimental investigation was performed with 33 samples of breast milk stored at room temperature (17 masculine C to 30.5 masculine C) and bacteriologically analyzed at zero, three, six and nine hours after collection. The same breast milk was stored at refrigerator (2 masculine C to 6 masculine C) as a control procedure. Total count of bacterial contents and identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were evaluated.RESULTS: The enterviews revealed the low socio-economical and cultural level of lactating mothers and their little experience in expressing, collecting and using their own milk. Bacteriological data analysis showed mesophyllous average of 7.1x10(3)UFC/mL, acceptable outline of bacterial contamination, despite the use of a simplified hygiene technique. After nine hours, samples stored at room temperature showed final average of bacterial contents similar to the first ones (7.3x10(3)UFC/mL) and without relevant statistic differences from the ones kept under refrigeration (p=0.05) for studied bacterias.CONCLUSION: This study shows that it is possible to use unprocessed breast milk for babýs consumption if it is stored at room temperatures until nine hours after it has been collected. However, mothers have to be told about the possibility of storing breast milk for babies later consumption.

  2. Beta-palmitate - a natural component of human milk in supplemental milk formulas.

    PubMed

    Havlicekova, Zuzana; Jesenak, Milos; Banovcin, Peter; Kuchta, Milan

    2016-03-17

    The composition and function of human milk is unique and gives a basis for the development of modern artificial milk formulas that can provide an appropriate substitute for non-breastfed infants. Although human milk is not fully substitutable, modern milk formulas are attempting to mimic human milk and partially substitute its complex biological positive effects on infants. Besides the immunomodulatory factors from human milk, research has been focused on the composition and structure of human milk fat with a high content of β-palmitic acid (sn-2 palmitic acid, β-palmitate). According to the available studies, increasing the content of β-palmitate added to milk formulas promotes several beneficial physiological functions. β-palmitate positively influences fatty acid metabolism, increases calcium absorption, improves bone matrix quality and the stool consistency, and has a positive effect on the development of the intestinal microbiome.

  3. Quality preservation of deliberately contaminated milk using thyme free and nanoemulsified essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ben Jemaa, Mariem; Falleh, Hanen; Neves, Marcos A; Isoda, Hiroko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Ksouri, Riadh

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of either a solution of Thymus capitatus essential oil or its nanoemulsion on the quality of milk contaminated by bacteria. After 24h of S. aureus inoculation, bacterial growth reached 202×10(3)CFU/ml in the presence of the essential oil while it was limited to 132×10(3)CFU/ml when treated with nanoemulsion. The reduction of antioxidant capacity of milk treated with essential oil was higher when treated with nanoemulsion. Moreover, free essential oil was more efficient in protecting proteins from degradation than the nanoemulsion. For instance, after 24h of E. hirae contamination, 26% of the total proteins were consumed in the presence of nano-encapsulated essential oil, while only 14% of the initial content was consumed when free essential oil was added. Concerning milk acidity increase and the inhibition of peroxide production, no statistical differences have been recorded between the use of free essential oil or its nano-emulsion. In conclusion, bulk or nano-encapsulated T. capitatus essential oil preserve milk quality and can extend its shelf life.

  4. Changing patterns of cow's milk contamination with organochlorine compounds in Israel (1976-1986)

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.; Cucos, S.; Grafstein, O.; Lemesch, C.

    1988-01-01

    Environmental pollution with organochlorine insecticides (OCIs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCGs) has decreased due to restriction and/or banning of these compounds. However, several recent reports indicate that pollution with OCIs and PCBs still does exist, and may be of public and environmental health significance even in developed countries. Cow's milk is one of the most important media where organochlorine compound (OCC) levels are monitored. On the one hand, milk and its products play a central role in human nutrition and, on the other, highly lipophilic OCCs can accumulate in fat-rich milk products. In a previous study, the authors reported a significant decrease in OCC content in both farm and market milk in Israel between the mid-1970s and early 1980s. The clearest decrease was seen in the cases of DDT, dieldrin and lindane, but not as much as for heptachlor epoxide (HE) and PCBs. The present study was undertaken to follow up the observed trends and to determine whether cow's milk contamination with OCC presently poses a public health problem in Israel.

  5. Acute allergic reaction due to milk proteins contaminating lactose added to corticosteroid for injection.

    PubMed

    Eda, Asuka; Sugai, Kazuko; Shioya, Hiromi; Fujitsuka, Asako; Ito, Setsuko; Iwata, Tsutomu; Funabiki, Tetsunori

    2009-03-01

    We encountered two patients with severe cow's milk allergy who reacted strongly to an injection of methylprednisolone sodium succinate (Sol-Medrol 40 mg Pfizer, Japan). They came to our hospital because of an asthmatic attack or urticaria and were treated with Sol-Medrol 40 mg. After the injection, the allergic reaction was immediate. Skin prick tests demonstrated that the beta-lactoglobulin contaminating the lactose of the drug preparation caused the immediate allergic reaction.

  6. Supplementation of cow milk naturally enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols to growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Emerson H.; Mareze-Costa, Cecília E.; Machado, Erica; Agustinho, Bruna C.; Pereira, Lucelia M.; Brito, Márcia N.; Brito, Nilton A.; Zeoula, Lucia M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether intake of cow milk, naturally enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, omega-3) and polyphenols (from propolis extract and vitamin E), from manipulation of cow’s diet, would result in positive metabolic effects in rats from weaning until adulthood. Male Wistar rats were fed a standard chow diet or a hypercaloric diet (metabolically disturbed rats, obese) which was supplemented with either whole common milk, milk enriched with PUFA (PUFA-M) or milk enriched with PUFA and polyphenols (PUFA/P-M), at 5mL/kg body weight,having water as control. Whole milk supplementation increased initial weight gain and reduced gain in the adulthood of rats. Intake of common milk reduced cholesterol levels in non-obese rats and reduced insulin resistance in obese rats. PUFA-milk showed a decreasing effect on plasma triacylglycerol and VLDL concentrations, increasing plasma HDL concentration and reducing adipocyte size of non-obese rats, but no effect was observed in obese rats. PUFA/P-milk in obese rats resulted in greater deposition of muscle mass and mesenteric fat, with a tendency to lower LDL levels, and resulted a visceral fat accumulation in non-obese rats. Thus, whole common milk and PUFA-rich milk have shown to be beneficial in a normal metabolic condition, whereas common milk and milk enriched with PUFA and polyphenols improve metabolic effects of obesity. PMID:28267800

  7. Short communication: Toxicokinetics of ochratoxin A in dairy ewes and carryover to milk following a single or long-term ingestion of contaminated feed.

    PubMed

    Boudra, H; Saivin, S; Buffiere, C; Morgavi, D P

    2013-10-01

    Ruminal microbes have the capacity to inactivate ochratoxins, rendering ruminants less sensitive to this fungal contaminant found in cereal feeds. However, ochratoxin A has been reported in milk surveys. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicokinetics, excretion, and transmission into milk of ochratoxin A using doses similar to those of naturally occurring field contaminations. Six Lacaune dairy ewes in late lactation were separated into 2 groups that received a single dose of contaminated wheat containing 5 or 30 μg of ochratoxin A/kg of body weight. After administration, toxicokinetics and excretion were monitored for 48 h. Subsequently, ewes were administered the corresponding toxin dose daily for 24 d followed by a second toxicokinetics and excretion monitoring period for this long-term exposure. The doses used did not affect production or health of ewes. After a single dose, ochratoxin A and its main metabolite, ochratoxin α, were found in blood 1h postexposure. The maximum blood concentrations of ochratoxin A and α, respectively, were dose dependent and were observed, on average, 6 and 8h after exposure. Long-term exposure increased the maximum concentration of ochratoxin A detected in blood, whereas ochratoxin α was not affected. In contrast, the time to reach the maximum concentration was reduced to 3h for both molecules. Ochratoxins, essentially ochratoxin α, were mainly excreted in feces. Ochratoxin A and α were detected in milk at concentrations that were dose dependent but with a low carryover rate (<0.02%). Chronic administration did not increase the concentration of toxin in milk. Even though ochratoxin A can escape ruminal degradation and traces were found in milk of experimentally exposed ewes, the low carryover of ochratoxin A in milk minimizes the risk to consumers.

  8. Factors that influence the level of contamination of human milk with poly-chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Albers, J M; Kreis, I A; Liem, A K; van Zoonen, P

    1996-02-01

    Polychlorinated organic compounds (POCs) accumulate in tissues with a high fat content. Nursed babies are exposed to POCs through the fat in human milk. Exposure levels are estimated to exceed those considered acceptable as a lifelong daily dose. Nevertheless, mothers are still positively advised as to breast-feeding. In 1988, a survey on contamination of human milk with POCs was carried out in The Netherlands. Levels of ten different organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), eight polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, and seventeen polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and -dibenzofuran (PCDF) congeners were determined by use of gaschromatographic techniques with either electron-capture or mass-spectrometric detection. Information on some factors potentially influencing the level of contamination of human milk was obtained by questionnaires. The estimated response amounted to 71 percent. Regression analysis was used to investigate associations between determining factors and specific contaminants. It appeared that maternal age was positively associated with POC concentrations. Traditional omnivorous diet was associated with lower concentrations of POCs when compared to all other types of diet. The post-pregnancy Quetelet Index [by definition calculated as weight/(length)2] and the cumulated period of previous breast-feeding were negatively associated with POC concentrations. In conclusion, chemical behavior and environmental distribution patterns of the POCs measured in this study, if translated to factors of human exposure, are in accordance with the study results. Exposure levels will decrease if emissions can be further reduced. Still, in the near future, maternal age will probably rise (Vermunt 1992; Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics 1992), whereas the duration of lactation in expected to decline. Consequently, there might be an increase in average POC-concentrations in human milk in the forthcoming years.

  9. Relative hopane content confirming the mineral origin of hydrocarbons contaminating foods and human milk.

    PubMed

    Populin, T; Biedermann, M; Grob, K; Moret, S; Conte, L

    2004-09-01

    Hopanes, triterpenoid hydrocarbons formed under geological conditions, were analysed to confirm the mineral origin of the unresolved complex mixtures of hydrocarbons observed in the gas chromatography with flame ionization detection chromatograms of human milk and certain foodstuffs. The 'relative hopane content' (RHC) is introduced, i.e. it is the area ratio of the sum of the hopanes and the paraffins in the same segment of the chromatogram. The RHC in various mineral oil products (motor oils, hydraulic oils, lubricating oils, Vaseline) was 3.4%, with a relative standard deviation of 19%. The RHC determined in samples of vegetable oils, mussels and clams as well as of human milk containing an unresolved complex mixture of hydrocarbons was in the same range, confirming that these samples were contaminated by mineral oil material.

  10. Chemical hydrogeology in natural and contaminated environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, W.; Baedecker, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical hydrogeology, including organic and inorganic aspects, has contributed to an increased understanding of groundwater flow systems, geologic processes, and stressed environments. Most of the basic principles of inorganic-chemical hydrogeology were first established by investigations of organic-free, regional-scale systems for which simplifying assumptions could be made. The problems of groundwater contamination are causing a shift of emphasis to microscale systems that are dominated by organic-chemical reactions and that are providing an impetus for the study of naturally occurring and manmade organic material. Along with the decrease in scale, physical and chemical heterogeneity become major controls. Current investigations and those selected from the literature demonstrate that heterogeneity increases in importance as the study site decreases from regional-scale to macroscale to microscale. Increased understanding of regional-scale flow systems is demonstrated by selection of investigations of carbonate and volcanic aquifers to show how applications of present-day concepts and techniques can identify controlling chemical reactions and determine their rates; identify groundwater flow paths and determine flow velocity; and determine aquifer characteristics. The role of chemical hydrogeology in understanding geologic processes of macroscale systems is exemplified by selection of investigations in coastal aquifers. Phenomena associated with the mixing zone generated by encroaching sea water include an increase in heterogeneity of permeability, diagenesis of minerals, and formation of geomorphic features, such as caves, lagoons, and bays. Ore deposits of manganese and uranium, along with a simulation model of ore-forming fluids, demonstrate the influence of heterogeneity and of organic compounds on geochemical reactions associated with genesis of mineral deposits. In microscale environments, importance of heterogeneity and consequences of organic reactions in

  11. MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been applied as a knowledge-based remediation technology for organic contaminants in ground water. Development of a site-specific assessment of biotic and abiotic processes that lead to organic contaminant degradation provides the technica...

  12. Polychlorinated dibenzofurans and dibenzo-p-dioxins and other chlorinated contaminants in cow milk from various locations in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Rappe, C.; Nygren, M.; Lindstroem, G.; Buser, H.R.; Blaser, O.; Wuethrich, C.

    1987-10-01

    Six samples of cow milk from various locations in Switzerland were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and other chlorinated contaminants. Sub parts per trillion levels of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDFs and PCDDs were found in all samples. The levels were higher in samples collected in the vicinity of incinerators. Non-2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs were not found in the milk samples.

  13. Contamination of liquid milk and butter with pesticide residues in the Ludhiana district of Punjab state, India.

    PubMed

    Battu, R S; Singh, Balwinder; Kang, B K

    2004-11-01

    An analysis of 92 samples of liquid milk from Ludhiana, India, during 1999-2001 revealed the presence of DDT in 6 (7.4%) samples and of these 2 samples were found to exceed the maximum residue limit (MRL) of DDT fixed at 0.05 mg kg(-1) (on a whole milk basis). HCH residues were detected in 49 (53.3%) samples and constituted only gamma-HCH (lindane). The MRL of lindane is fixed at 0.01 mg kg(-1) (whole milk basis), and all 49 liquid milk samples exceeded this value. These results are indicative of contamination of bovine milk with pesticide residues as a result of the ban on the use of DDT and HCH in agriculture and public health programs. Similarly, analysis of 40 samples of butter showed the presence of DDT and HCH in 28 and 8 samples, respectively. However, none of the samples exceeded the MRL value of either DDT or any isomer of HCH. DDT residues comprised mainly p,p-DDE and p,p-TDE, whereas HCH residues were present as lindane in 6 samples, and 2 samples revealed the presence of beta-HCH. The estimated daily intake of lindane through the consumption of contaminated liquid milk exceeded its acceptable daily intake value for children. Interestingly, none of the liquid milk or butter samples revealed the presence of any commonly used organophosphorus or synthetic pyrethroid insecticides at their detection limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1).

  14. Retrospective analysis of a listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in raw milk goat cheese using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Delhalle, L; Ellouze, M; Yde, M; Clinquart, A; Daube, G; Korsak, N

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, the Belgian authorities reported a Listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in cheese made from raw goat's milk. The presence of an asymptomatic shedder goat in the herd caused this contamination. On the basis of data collected at the time of the episode, a retrospective study was performed using an exposure assessment model covering the production chain from the milking of goats up to delivery of cheese to the market. Predictive microbiology models were used to simulate the growth of L. monocytogenes during the cheese process in relation with temperature, pH, and water activity. The model showed significant growth of L. monocytogenes during chilling and storage of the milk collected the day before the cheese production (median increase of 2.2 log CFU/ml) and during the addition of starter and rennet to milk (median increase of 1.2 log CFU/ml). The L. monocytogenes concentration in the fresh unripened cheese was estimated to be 3.8 log CFU/g (median). This result is consistent with the number of L. monocytogenes in the fresh cheese (3.6 log CFU/g) reported during the cheese contamination episode. A variance-based method sensitivity analysis identified the most important factors impacting the cheese contamination, and a scenario analysis then evaluated several options for risk mitigation. Thus, by using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools, this study provides reliable information to identify and control critical steps in a local production chain of cheese made from raw goat's milk.

  15. Influence of Other Contaminants on Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsall, B.L.; Palumbo, A.V.; Pfiffner, S.M.; Phelps, T.J.; Salpas, P.

    1999-04-19

    Studies at numerous sites have shown high variability in the degradation rates of chlorinated solvents as measured by microcosm studies with 14C labeled contaminants. The ability of nutrient and carbon additions to stimulate degradation can vary widely. Although some of these variations can be related to the structure of the extant microbial community, the presence of other less refractory contaminants may be critical fctors impacting the rate of chlorocarbon mineralization. Relaatively highe rates of TCE degradation have been observed in the DOE K-25 burial grounds with diverse organic loadings as well as in areas that show evidence for hydrocarbon contamination. Similarly, at other sites where there was TCE in the absence of hydrocarbons or other contaminants, the measured degradation rates have often been found to be very low. At various other sites, the intrasite variability in degradation rates appeared to be related to the presence of hydrocarbon contamination. The highest rates were observed at sites with evidence of hydrocarbons. These observations indicated that the viability of natural attenuation as a remediation option for chlorinated solvents might depend in part on the presence co-contaminants such as hydrocarbons or natural matter.

  16. Seasonal patterns of aflatoxin M1 contamination in commercial pasteurised milk from different areas in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suriyasathaporn, Witaya; Nakprasert, Watinee

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) levels were determined in pasteurised milk from five commercial trademarks produced in different areas in Thailand. One hundred and twenty milk samples were collected from local markets in Chiang Mai province, Thailand, to evaluate AFM1 concentrations using immunoaffinity columns and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The overall median AFM1 level was 0.023 µg L(-1) ranging from 0.004 to 0.293 µg L(-1). All trademarks had average AFM1 concentrations lower than 0.05 µg L(-1), with those in Trademarks 3 to 5 being higher than Trademarks 1 and 2 (P < 0.01). All trademarks had different seasonal patterns of AFM1, even though operating in the same area. However, only Trademark 3 showed significant differences of AFM1 levels between seasons. The results suggested that farm management factors, rather than environment factors, were likely to be the main cause of AFM1 contamination in dairy products.

  17. Natural radioactivity contamination problems. Report no. 2. (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides associated with the bauxite, columbium-tantalum, phosphate, tin, pumice, and titanium mineral extraction industries are reported. Data is also presented on radioactivity measurements in ground water, in selected geothermal waters, and in oil production brines. Radiation protection guidance is provided for uranium recovery from wet-process phosphate plants, for soil contamination limits, and for radiological exposure in natural caves. Dose pathways from incidental uses of naturally occurring radioactive materials are presented. Model state regulations for protecting public health and safety from use and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material are outlined.

  18. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    SciTech Connect

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.

    2015-04-24

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant’s milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant’s powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K activities. The obtained mean activity of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg{sup −1}, respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy{sup −1} recommended by ICRP for all ages.

  19. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.

    2015-04-01

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant's milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant's powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activities. The obtained mean activity of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg-1, respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy-1 recommended by ICRP for all ages.

  20. Detection of multiple virulence-associated genes of Listeria monocytogenes by PCR in artificially contaminated milk samples.

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, K J; Nishibori, T; Xiong, H; Matsuyama, T; Fujita, M; Mitsuyama, M

    1994-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of milk in the PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes could be overcome by washing the contaminated milk sample with phosphate-buffered saline and concentrating the bacteria to 1/10 of the original volume. In order to avoid a possible failure in the detection of virulent L. monocytogenes, a one-step procedure which enabled demonstration of three virulence-associated genes, prfA, hlyA, and plcB, simultaneously in a single PCR mixture was developed. Images PMID:8085838

  1. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  2. Use of response biomarkers in milk for assessing exposure to environmental contaminants: the case for dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Diehl-Jones, W L; Bols, N C

    2000-01-01

    Screening for environmental contaminants in milk is generally conducted by chemical analysis, yet such an approach may be time-consuming and expensive, and is not indicative of the physiological consequences of such exposure. The focus of this review is to summarize those constituents of milk that may be altered by maternal exposure to one of the most biologically active environmental pollutants, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and to develop the case for their use as biomarkers of response. Several chemical and/or cellular components of milk are potentially useful as biomarkers, and may be developed as convenient, biologically relevant indicators of maternal exposure to dioxin-like compounds.

  3. TOOLS FOR ASSESSING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches at this time for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how we...

  4. High breast milk levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) among four women living adjacent to a PCB-contaminated waste site.

    PubMed Central

    Korrick, S A; Altshul, L

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of contamination by effluents from local electronics manufacturing facilities, the New Bedford Harbor and estuary in southeastern Massachusetts is among the sites in the United States that are considered the most highly contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Since 1993, measures of intrauterine PCB exposure have been obtained for a sample of New Bedford area infants. Among 122 mother-infant pairs, we identified four milk samples with total PCB levels that were significantly higher than the rest, with estimated total PCBs ranging from 1,100 to 2,400 ng/g milk fat compared with an overall mean of 320 ng/g milk fat for the 122 women. The congener profile and history of one case was consistent with past occupational PCB exposures. Otherwise, the source of PCB exposures in these cases was difficult to specify. Environmental exposures including those from fish consumption were likely, whereas residence adjacent to a PCB-contaminated site was considered an unlikely exposure source. In all four cases, the infants were full-term, healthy newborns. Because the developing nervous system is believed to be particularly susceptible to PCBs (for example, prenatal PCB exposures have been associated with prematurity, decrements in birth weight and gestation time, and behavioral and developmental deficits in later infancy and childhood, including decrements in IQ), it is critical to ascertain if breast-feeding is a health risk for the women's infants. Despite the potential for large postnatal PCB exposures via breast milk, there is limited evidence of significant developmental toxicity associated with the transmission of moderate PCB concentrations through breast milk. Breast-feeding is associated with substantial health benefits including better cognitive skills among breast-fed compared with formula-fed infants. We conclude, based on evidence from other studies, that the benefits of breast-feeding probably outweigh any risk from PCB exposures via breast

  5. Contribution to the study of staphylococcus contamination of cows' milk on a number of farms in Algiers: its impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Hamiroune, M; Berber, A; Boubekeur, S

    2014-12-01

    The authors describe a survey and screening programme for staphylococcus. The study covers 14 dairy farms in the Algiers region, from which 203 samples of cows' milk were taken for bacteriological testing. The survey results show that poor husbandry conditions are the main cause of staphylococcus in cows' milk. Staphylococcus was found in the milk of 30% of the cows sampled. These results were influenced by a variety of factors, in that: the contamination rate rose with the number of pregnancies, age, and volume of milk output of the cow, as well as the bedding thickness; the milk contamination rate was greater when milking occurred outside a milking parlour and when it was performed by machine; higher rates of staphylococcus infection were found in the milk of cows at the end of lactation, in red and white breeds, and in those with cylindricalteats. Identification of the bacteria found (staphylococcus) showed that coagulase- negative staphylococci were present in 67.21% of samples, whereas coagulase- positive staphylococci were present in only 32.79%. The average count for the latter was equal to 0.54 x 10(4) colony-forming units per ml of Staphylococcus aureus. Seventy percent of the milk analysed was free from staphylococci and most of the bacteria identified were not pathogenic to consumers (coagulase- negative staphylococci); nevertheless, consuming fresh milk still presents a degree of risk.

  6. Toxic Element Contamination of Natural Health Products and Pharmaceutical Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Schwalfenberg, Gerry; Siy, Anna-Kristen J.; Rodushkin, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Background Concern has recently emerged regarding the safety of natural health products (NHPs)–therapies that are increasingly recommended by various health providers, including conventional physicians. Recognizing that most individuals in the Western world now consume vitamins and many take herbal agents, this study endeavored to determine levels of toxic element contamination within a range of NHPs. Methods Toxic element testing was performed on 121 NHPs (including Ayurvedic, traditional Chinese, and various marine-source products) as well as 49 routinely prescribed pharmaceutical preparations. Testing was also performed on several batches of one prenatal supplement, with multiple samples tested within each batch. Results were compared to existing toxicant regulatory limits. Results Toxic element contamination was found in many supplements and pharmaceuticals; levels exceeding established limits were only found in a small percentage of the NHPs tested and none of the drugs tested. Some NHPs demonstrated contamination levels above preferred daily endpoints for mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic or aluminum. NHPs manufactured in China generally had higher levels of mercury and aluminum. Conclusions Exposure to toxic elements is occurring regularly as a result of some contaminated NHPs. Best practices for quality control–developed and implemented by the NHP industry with government oversight–is recommended to guard the safety of unsuspecting consumers. PMID:23185404

  7. Transmission of murine cytomegalovirus in breast milk: a model of natural infection in neonates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Carol A; Paveglio, Sara A; Lingenheld, Elizabeth G; Zhu, Li; Lefrançois, Leo; Puddington, Lynn

    2011-05-01

    Vertical transmission of viruses in breast milk can expose neonates to infectious pathogens at a time when the capacity of their immune system to control infections is limited. We developed a mouse model to study the outcomes of acquisition of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) when neonates are breastfed by mothers with acute or latent infection. Breast milk leukocytes collected from lactating mice were examined for the presence of MCMV IE-1 mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with Southern analysis. As determined by this criterion, breast milk leukocytes from both acute and latent mothers were positive for MCMV. This mimics the outcome seen in humans with latent cytomegalovirus infection, where reactivation of virus occurs specifically in the lactating mammary gland. Interestingly, intraperitoneal injection of breast milk collected from mothers with latent infection was sufficient to transfer MCMV to neonatal mice, demonstrating that breast milk was a source of virus. Furthermore, we found that MCMV was transmitted from infected mothers to breastfed neonates, with MCMV IE-1 mRNA or infectious virus present in multiple organs, including the brain. In fact, 1 day of nursing was sufficient to transmit MCMV from latent mothers to breastfed neonatal mice. Together, these data validate this mouse model of vertical transmission of MCMV from mothers with acute or latent MCMV infection to breastfed neonates. Its relevance to human disease should prove useful in future studies designed to elucidate the immunological and pathological ramifications of neonatal infection acquired via this natural route.

  8. Determination of transfer rate and nature of the residue(s) in milk from {sup 14}C-atrazine cows

    SciTech Connect

    Thalacker, F.W.; Ash, S.G.; Simoneaux, B.J.

    1996-10-01

    In order to determine the rate of transfer and the nature of the atrazine residues present in milk, lactating dairy cattle were treated with atrazine at three concentrations, 0.764 ppm, 0.0747 ppm and 0.0085 ppm (dry weight of food consumed). The concentrations were selected to bridge the gap between the concentration used for EPA metabolism studies (10 ppm) and the potential exposure level of dairy cattle to atrazine and its chlorotriazine metabolites through feed. The cattle were dosed following the morning milking for nine consecutive days with a single capsule bolus of {sup 14}C-atrazine. Milk was collected twice daily and aliquots of each milking and the individual cow`s daily pool of milk were analyzed by liquid scinitllation counting (LSC). The concentrations of {sup 14}C-residues in the milk plateaued on approximately day 3 and the mean {sup 14}C-atrazine levels in milk were 11.2 ppb, 1.13 ppb and 0.152 ppb for the high, middle and low dosed animals, respectively. The transfer of radioactive level of exposure to {sup 14}C-atrazine. The nature of the residues in milk were determined by extracting milk samples and analysis by HPLC, TLC or Aminex chromatography. Diaminchlorotriazine was the only chlorinated metabolite in the milk, constituting approximately 65% to 75% of the total radioactive residues (TRR).

  9. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing a technical refer...

  10. EVALUATING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR RADIONUCLIDE & ORGANIC CONTAMINATION IN GROUNDWATER (SALT LAKE CITY, UT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for radionuclides and inorganic contaminants is dependent on naturally occurring processes in the subsurface that act without human intervention to reduce the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume or concentration of contaminants. EPA is developing ...

  11. Natural flow and water consumption in the Milk River basin, Montana and Alberta, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the differences between natural and nonnatural Milk River streamflow, to delineate and quantify the types and effects of water consumption on streamflow, and to refine the current computation procedure into one which computes and apportions natural flow. Water consumption consists principally of irrigated agriculture, municipal use, and evapotranspiration. Mean daily water consumption by irrigation ranged from 10 cu ft/sec to 26 cu ft/sec in the Canada part and from 6 cu ft/sec to 41 cu ft/sec in the US part. Two Canadian municipalities consume about 320 acre-ft and one US municipality consumes about 20 acre-ft yearly. Evaporation from the water surface comprises 80% 0 90% of the flow reduction in the Milk River attributed to total evapotranspiration. The current water-budget approach for computing natural flow of the Milk River where it reenters the US was refined into an interim procedure which includes allowances for man-induced consumption and a method for apportioning computed natural flow between the US and Canada. The refined procedure is considered interim because further study of flow routing, tributary inflow, and man-induced consumption is needed before a more accurate procedure for computing natural flow can be developed. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Assessment of natural background levels in potentially contaminated coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Molinari, A; Chidichimo, F; Straface, S; Guadagnini, A

    2014-04-01

    The estimation of natural background levels (NBLs) of dissolved concentrations of target chemical species in subsurface reservoirs relies on a proper assessment of the effects of forcing terms driving flow and transport processes taking place within the system and whose dynamics drive background concentration values. We propose coupling methodologies based on (a) global statistical analyses and (b) numerical modeling of system dynamics to distinguish between the impacts of different types of external forcing components influencing background concentration values. We focus on the joint application of a statistical methodology based on Component Separation and experimental/numerical modeling studies of groundwater flow and transport for the NBL estimation of selected chemical species in potentially contaminated coastal aquifers. We consider a site which is located in Calabria, Italy, and constitutes a typical example of a Mediterranean coastal aquifer which has been subject to intense industrial development. Our study is keyed to the characterization of NBLs of manganese and sulfate and is geared to the proper identification of the importance of a natural external forcing (i.e., seawater intrusion) on NBL assessment. Results from the Component Separation statistical approach are complemented by numerical simulations of the advective-dispersive processes that could influence the distribution of chemical species (i.e., sulfate) within the system. Estimated NBLs for manganese are consistent with the geochemical composition of soil samples. While Component Separation ascribes the largest detected sulfate concentrations to anthropogenic sources, our numerical modeling analysis suggests that they are mainly related to the natural process of seawater intrusion. Our results indicate that the use of statistical methodologies in complex groundwater systems should be assisted by a detailed characterization of the dynamics of natural (and/or induced) processes to distinguish

  13. Farm to Fork Quantitative Risk Assessment of Listeria monocytogenes Contamination in Raw and Pasteurized Milk Cheese in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Uma; Cummins, Enda; Valero, Antonio; Walsh, Des; Dalmasso, Marion; Jordan, Kieran; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to model and quantify the level of Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk cheese (RMc) and pasteurized milk cheese (PMc) from farm to fork using a Bayesian inference approach combined with a quantitative risk assessment. The modeling approach included a prediction of contamination arising from the farm environment as well from cross-contamination within the cheese-processing facility through storage and subsequent human exposure. The model predicted a high concentration of L. monocytogenes in contaminated RMc (mean 2.19 log10 CFU/g) compared to PMc (mean -1.73 log10 CFU/g). The mean probability of illness (P1 for low-risk population, LR) and (P2 for high-risk population, HR, e.g., immunocompromised) adult Irish consumers following exposure to contaminated cheese was 7 × 10(-8) (P1 ) and 9 × 10(-4) (P2 ) for RMc and 7 × 10(-10) (P1 ) and 8 × 10(-6) (P2 ) for PMc, respectively. In addition, the model was used to evaluate performance objectives at various stages, namely, the cheese making and ripening stages, and to set a food safety objective at the time of consumption. A scenario analysis predicted various probabilities of L. monocytogenes contamination along the cheese-processing chain for both RMc and PMc. The sensitivity analysis showed the critical factors for both cheeses were the serving size of the cheese, storage time, and temperature at the distribution stage. The developed model will allow food processors and policymakers to identify the possible routes of contamination along the cheese-processing chain and to reduce the risk posed to human health.

  14. Raman spectral imaging for quantitative contaminant evaluation in skim milk powder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study uses a point-scan Raman spectral imaging system for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial r...

  15. A survey of trace contaminants in natural gas liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wharry, S.M.; Sung, N.J.

    1995-11-01

    A survey of selected contaminants in natural gas liquids (NGL) has been completed for the purpose of determining whether more stringent NGL specifications should be considered by the industry. The survey involved the analysis of over 45 samples from seven independent processors. The trace contaminants that were analyzed include olefins, oxygenated compounds, fluoride, mercury, and arsenic. Not unsurprisingly, the highest levels of olefins were found in the corresponding hydrocarbon streams, (i.e., propylene in the propane streams). The highest levels of oxygenated compounds were found in the propane and raw make streams. The highest fluoride levels were found in the gasoline samples. And finally, for the most part, the mercury and arsenic levels were to close to the detection limits for these samples ({approximately}10 ppb for mercury and {approximately}50 ppb for arsenic) to be able to accurately determine if these contaminants were present in any of the samples. A more exhaustive study would be needed to analyze for these components below these levels. For the olefins, a gas chromatography procedure was used to determine the levels of pentenes and lighter olefins. For the oxygenated compounds, a water extraction method with a gas chromatography follow up was used. This method measures the levels of all water soluble oxygenated compounds, such as the butanols and lighter alcohols as well as acetone. The fluoride analysis involved the determination of the total fluoride per a modified UOP Method 619-83, the Wickbold method. The mercury and arsenic analyses were obtained by first passing the vapor portion of the samples through appropriate trapping media and then desorbing the traps directly into an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer.

  16. Contamination levels and congener distribution of PCDDs, PCDFs and dioxin-like PCBs in buffalo's milk from Caserta province (Italy).

    PubMed

    Esposito, Mauro; Serpe, Francesco Paolo; Neugebauer, Frank; Cavallo, Stefania; Gallo, Pasquale; Colarusso, Germana; Baldi, Loredana; Iovane, Giuseppe; Serpe, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    An extraordinary plan of official control was carried out in 2008 in Campania (Italy) with the aim to monitor polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) levels in buffalo milk and to detect the contaminated farms, most of which are located in Caserta province. For these companies has been ordered seizure and execution of additional analyses has been requested in farms falling in the nearness, within a distance of 3km, for a total of 304 farms examined. Moreover, all non-compliant farms were subjected to a periodic sampling in order to monitor trends in the levels of contamination. In this paper the distribution and the concentrations of 17 PCDD/Fs and 12 dioxin-like PCBs in 460 samples of buffalo milk collected in the province of Caserta (Italy) are presented. The range of WHO-TEQ values for the PCDD/Fs in milk was 0.17pgTEQg(-1)fat and 87.0pgTEQg(-1)fat with a mean value 3.63pgTEQg(-1)fat and medium value 2.25pgTEQg(-1)fat. The concentrations of dioxin-like PCBs in the analysed samples ranged from 0.21pgTEQg(-1)fat to 15.9pgTEQg(-1)fat and the WHO-TEQ values of sum of PCDDs, PCDFs and dl-PCBs ranged from 0.45pgTEQg(-1)fat to 103.0pgTEQg(-1)fat. The geo-referencing analysis allowed to individuate a restricted area of the region object of the present study where is located the majority of the non-compliant farms. The study of the congeners distribution has finally suggested that the likely cause of contamination is to be attributed to the illegal burning of waste.

  17. Goat milk fat naturally enriched with conjugated linoleic acid increased lipoproteins and reduced triacylglycerol in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raphaela; Soares, Juliana; Garcia, Hugo; Nascimento, Claudenice; Medeiros, Maria; Bomfim, Marco; Medeiros, Maria Carmo; Queiroga, Rita

    2014-03-24

    Goat milk is source of different lipids, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA reduces body fat and protect against cardiovascular diseases. In the present study fat from goat milk naturally enriched with CLA was used. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups that received during a 10 week diet with different lipid sources: soybean oil (CON), coconut oil (CO) and goat milk fat naturally enriched with CLA (GM-CLA). We evaluated the effects of a GM-CLA on biochemistry parameters--high density lipoprotein (HDL), triacylglycerol (TAG), TAG/HDL ratio, total cholesterol and glucose, body weight and histopathological aspects of the intestine and liver. GM-CLA increased body weight from the second to the fifth week of the experiment compared to CON. Feed intake differed between the CON group and GM-CLA early in the first to third week of the experiments and later between the ninth and tenth week. The CLA-diet group showed increased levels of HDL, reduced levels of TAG and TAG/HDL ratio and no effect on LDL, but enhanced total cholesterol. Serum glucose of the GM-CLA group showed no difference from the control group. Thus, a GM-CLA diet promoted growth in young rats and acted as protector of cardiovascular function, but further studies are still needed to clarify these effects.

  18. Fixation of soil surface contamination using natural polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Natural polysaccharides were evaluated as alternatives to commercially available dust-control agents for application in buried-waste and contaminated-soil remediation situations. Materials were identified and evaluated with specific criteria in mind: the materials must be environmentally benign and must not introduce any additional hazardous materials; they must be effective for at least 2 or 3 days, but they do not necessarily have to be effective for more than 2 to 3 weeks; they should be relatively resistant to light traffic; they must not interfere with subsequent soil treatment techniques, especially soil washing; and they must be relatively inexpensive. Two products, a pregelled potato starch and a mixture of carbohydrates derived from sugar beets, were selected for evaluation. Testing included small- and large-scale field demonstrations, laboratory physical property analyses, and wind-tunnel evaluations.

  19. ASSESSING THE ROLE OF NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been applied as a knowledge-based remediation technology for organic contaminants in ground water. The application of this technology is being considered for remediation of inorganic contaminants in ground water at hazardous waste sites. ...

  20. DEVELOPING TOOLS FOR MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT LAKE HARTWELL, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments pose a risk to human health and the environment . The management of this risk is currently limited practically to three technologies: dredging, capping, and natural recovery. Monitored natural recovery relies on the natural burial and removal mechanisms to...

  1. Effects of Milk Yield, Feed Composition, and Feed Contamination with Aflatoxin B1 on the Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Dairy Cows’ Milk Investigated Using Monte Carlo Simulation Modelling

    PubMed Central

    van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; Camenzuli, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AfM1) in dairy cows’ milk, given predefined scenarios for milk production, compound feed (CF) contamination with aflatoxin B1 (AfB1), and inclusion rates of ingredients, using Monte Carlo simulation modelling. The model simulated a typical dairy farm in the Netherlands. Six different scenarios were considered, based on two lactation and three CF composition scenarios. AfB1 contamination of the CF was based on results from the Dutch national monitoring programme for AfB1 in feed materials from 2000 until 2010. Monitoring data from feed materials used in CF production for dairy cattle in the Netherlands were used. Additionally, AfB1 contamination data from an incident in maize in 2013 were used. In each scenario, five different transfer equations of AfB1 from feed to AfM1 in the milk were used, and 1000 iterations were run for each scenario. The results showed that under these six scenarios, the weekly farm concentration of AfM1 in milk was above the EC threshold in less than 1% of the iterations, with all five transfer equations considered. However, this increased substantially in weeks when concentrations from the contaminated maize batch were included, and up to 28.5% of the iterations exceeded the EC threshold. It was also observed that an increase in the milk production had a minimal effect on the exceedance of the AfM1 threshold due to an apparent dilution effect. Feeding regimes, including the composition of CF and feeding roughages of dairy cows, should be carefully considered based on the potential AfM1 contamination of the farm’s milk. PMID:27735836

  2. Plasma disposition, milk excretion and parasitological efficacy of mebendazole in donkeys naturally infected by Cyathostominae.

    PubMed

    Gokbulut, Cengiz; Aksit, Dilek; Santoro, Mario; Roncoroni, Cristina; Mariani, Ugo; Buono, Francesco; Rufrano, Domenico; Fagiolo, Antonio; Veneziano, Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Mebendazole (MBZ) has been licensed for use in horses and donkeys, however there are no data available in the literature regarding its pharmacokinetic disposition and efficacy in donkeys. This study was designed to determine the plasma disposition, milk excretion and anthelmintic efficacy of MBZ in donkeys naturally infected by Cyathostominae. The animals were allocated to three groups, each of six donkeys. One group was untreated control (C-group) and the others were treated using a paste formulation of MBZ administered per os at the manufacturer's recommended horse dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight (MBZ 1) and at the double horse dosage 20 mg/kg body weight (MBZ 2). Blood and milk samples were collected at various times between 1h and 120 h post treatment and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. Individual FECs (Faecal Egg Counts) were performed on each animal before the treatment (day-3) and weekly from day 7 until day 56 post treatment using a modified McMaster technique. The plasma concentrations and systemic exposure of MBZ in donkeys were relatively lower compared with the other methylcarbamate benzimidazoles. Dose-dependent plasma dispositions of MBZ were observed at the increased dosage (10 mg/kg vs 20 mg/kg) in donkeys. MBZ was not detected in any milk samples at a dosage of 10 mg/kg. However, the parent drug reached 0.01 μg/ml peak milk concentration at 10.66 h and AUCmilk/AUCplasma value was 0.18 ± 0.02 at a dosage of 20 mg/kg bodyweight. This study indicated that per os administration of MBZ has a minimal disposition rate into the milk and may be used in lactating donkeys with zero milk-withdrawal period. The results of FECRT for both MBZ dosages were efficient (>95% efficacy) until day 28. This trial demonstrates that MBZ oral paste at horse dosage (10 mg/kg B.W.) was effective and safety for the treatment of Cyathostominae in donkeys. Therefore, similar dosage regimens of MBZ could be used for horses and

  3. Dioxins and Nonortho PCBs in Breast Milk of Vietnamese Mothers Living in the Largest Hot Spot of Dioxin Contamination.

    PubMed

    Nghi, Tran Ngoc; Nishijo, Muneko; Manh, Ho Dung; Tai, Pham The; Van Luong, Hoang; Anh, Tran Hai; Thao, Pham Ngoc; Trung, Nguyen Viet; Waseda, Tomoo; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Kido, Teruhiko; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-05-05

    Bien Hoa Air Base is the largest dioxin contamination hot spot in Vietnam. In 2012, we recruited 216 mothers who were living in 10 communities around Bien Hoa Air Base and had delivered newborns at a prefecture hospital, and we investigated recent exposure levels of dioxins and nonortho PCBs in their breast milk. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetraCDD) was present at 2.6 pg/g lipid in primiparae and 2.2 pg/g lipid in multiparae. Among multiparae and total subjects, significant high prevalence of 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD≥5 pg/g lipid and 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD contribution≥40% were observed in mothers living in the five communities closest to Bien Hoa Air Base. The TEQ for nonortho PCBs was 1.6 pg-TEQ/g lipid for primiparae, and this was even lower than that in the unsprayed area. The length of residency was a strong factor to increase dioxins, including 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD. Residency in the five communities with the highest exposure was a specific risk factor for increased 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD in breast milk. Food intake might contribute partly to the increased levels of dioxin congeners other than 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD in breast milk. These results suggest that Bien Hoa Air Base has led to elevated 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD levels in breast milk of mothers in nearby areas even in the recent years.

  4. Anaphylaxis in a milk-allergic child after ingestion of milk-contaminated kosher-pareve-labeled "dairy-free" dessert.

    PubMed

    Jones, R T; Squillace, D L; Yunginger, J W

    1992-03-01

    Milk-allergic persons often rely on kosher labeling to select dairy-free foods. A 2-year-old boy experienced multiple generalized reactions after ingestion of milk or milk products; his serum contained elevated levels of milk-specific IgE antibodies, and his milk skin test was strongly positive. An identical reaction occurred after ingestion of "pareve"-labeled raspberry sorbet. Using an inhibition immunoassay with pooled sera from two milk-sensitive persons as the source of IgE antibodies, we found the milk allergen level in sorbet provided by the family to be 11% of the level found in non-fat dry milk. The milk allergen level in three independently purchased containers of sorbet ranged from 2% to undetectable. The presence of milk in three of four of the sorbets was confirmed by immunoblotting studies, by quantitation of milk proteins by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and by quantitation of lactose by gas chromatography. Subsequently, it was discovered that milk was incorporated into the sorbet when equipment used to package ice cream had been used to package the sorbet. Although kosher labeling may provide assurance to milk-sensitive persons that a particular food does or does not contain milk, such labeling is no guarantee that this is indeed the case.

  5. Milk Thistle Constituents Inhibit Raloxifene Intestinal Glucuronidation: A Potential Clinically Relevant Natural Product-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Gufford, Brandon T; Chen, Gang; Vergara, Ana G; Lazarus, Philip; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2015-09-01

    Women at high risk of developing breast cancer are prescribed selective estrogen response modulators, including raloxifene, as chemoprevention. Patients often seek complementary and alternative treatment modalities, including herbal products, to supplement prescribed medications. Milk thistle preparations, including silibinin and silymarin, are top-selling herbal products that may be consumed by women taking raloxifene, which undergoes extensive first-pass glucuronidation in the intestine. Key constituents in milk thistle, flavonolignans, were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of intestinal UDP-glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs), with IC50s ≤ 10 μM. Taken together, milk thistle preparations may perpetrate unwanted interactions with raloxifene. The objective of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of individual milk thistle constituents on the intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene using human intestinal microsomes and human embryonic kidney cell lysates overexpressing UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10, isoforms highly expressed in the intestine that are critical to raloxifene clearance. The flavonolignans silybin A and silybin B were potent inhibitors of both raloxifene 4'- and 6-glucuronidation in all enzyme systems. The Kis (human intestinal microsomes, 27-66 µM; UGT1A1, 3.2-8.3 µM; UGT1A8, 19-73 µM; and UGT1A10, 65-120 µM) encompassed reported intestinal tissue concentrations (20-310 µM), prompting prediction of clinical interaction risk using a mechanistic static model. Silibinin and silymarin were predicted to increase raloxifene systemic exposure by 4- to 5-fold, indicating high interaction risk that merits further evaluation. This systematic investigation of the potential interaction between a widely used herbal product and chemopreventive agent underscores the importance of understanding natural product-drug interactions in the context of cancer prevention.

  6. Use of lycopene as a natural antioxidant in extending the shelf-life of anhydrous cow milk fat.

    PubMed

    Siwach, Ruby; Tokas, Jayanti; Seth, Raman

    2016-05-15

    Oxidative rancidity in anhydrous cow milk fat leads to reduction in its shelf life. Use of synthetic antioxidants is prevalent in dairy industry to prevent the development of rancidity. Keeping in view the increasing demand for natural additives, the present study was carried out to explore the potential of lycopene as a natural antioxidant in anhydrous cow milk fat. Lycopene at five different levels (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 ppm) and butylated hydroxyl anisole (200 ppm), were incorporated in anhydrous cow milk fat. Potential of lycopene extract to enhance the shelf life of anhydrous cow milk fat was evaluated by measuring Free Fatty Acids, peroxide value, Thiobarbituric Acid value and color value during 12 months of storage at ambient conditions (30°C). Lycopene significantly (p<0.05) prevented the development of oxidative rancidity. Lycopene containing samples scored significantly higher in terms of sensory attributes as compared to control.

  7. Clinical disease and stage of lactation influences shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis into milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD). One mode of transmission of MAP is through ingestion of contaminated milk and colostrum by susceptible calves. The objective of this study was to determine if the amount of MAP shed into the milk and co...

  8. Synthesis of natural flows at selected sites in and near the Milk River basin, Montana, 1928-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cary, L.E.; Parrett, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Natural monthly streamflows were synthesized for the years 1928-89 at 2 sites in the St. Mary River Basin and 11 sites in the Milk River Basin in north- central Montana. The sites are represented as nodes in a streamflow accounting model being developed by the Bureau of Reclamation for the Milk River Basin. Recorded flows at most sites have been affected by human activities, including reservoir storage and irrigation diversions. The flows at the model nodes were corrected for the effects of these activities to obtain synthesized flows. The synthesized flows at nodes with seasonal and short-term records were extended using a statistical technique. The methods of synthesis varied, depending on upstream activities and information available. Flows at sites in the St. Mary River Basin and at the Milk River at Eastern Crossing of International Boundary pre- viously had been synthesized. The flows at mainstem sites downstream from the Milk River at Eastern Crossing were synthesized by adding synthesized natural runoff from intervening drainage areas to natural flows for Milk River at Eastern Crossing. Natural runoff from intervening drainage areas was estimated by multiplying recorded flows at selected index gaging stations on tributary streams by the ratio of the intervening drainage area to the combined drainage area of the index stations. The recorded flows for Milk River at Western Crossing of International Boundary and for Peoples Creek near Dodson, Montana, were assumed to be natural flows. The synthesized annual flows at the mouth of the Milk River compared favorably with the recorded flows near the mouth when the effects of upstream irrigation were considered.

  9. Levels and profiles of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in human breast milk from Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadou, Lida; Malarvannan, Govindan; Covaci, Adrian; Iossifidou, Eleni; Tzafettas, John; Zournatzi-Koiou, Vassiliki; Kalantzi, Olga-Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk samples (n=87) collected between July 2004 and July 2005 from primipara and multipara mothers from Thessaloniki, Greece were analysed for six groups of persistent organic pollutants (POPs): polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). DDTs [median: 410ng/g lipid weight (lw)], PCBs (median: 90ng/g lw) and HCHs (median: 40ng/g lw) were the predominantly identified compounds in all the breast milk samples. Levels of PBDEs (median: 1.5ng/g lw) in human breast milk samples from Thessaloniki, Greece were lower compared to other countries. Maternal age had a positive correlation with most compounds, but not with PBDEs. Women with a higher occupational exposure to PBDEs (i.e., working in office environments) had higher PBDE concentrations than all others and showed strong correlations, especially for BDE 47 and BDE 153. None of the analysed compounds showed any correlation with parity. Based on these levels, the daily intake of each group of POPs via human milk was calculated and compared with the tolerable daily intakes (TDI) or the reference doses (RfD). For the majority of samples (85 out of 87) a higher daily intake of PCBs than the TDI was calculated, while 11 out of 87 samples had a higher HCB intake than the TDI. The TDI and the RfD were not exceeded for DDTs and PBDEs, respectively. This is the first report of brominated flame retardants in human breast milk from Greece.

  10. Monitored Natural Attenuation For Inorganic Contaminants In Ground Water - Technical Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of ground water contaminated with radionuclides may be achieved using attenuation-based technologies. These technologies may rely on engineered processes (e.g., bioremediation) or natural processes (e.g., monitored natural attenuation) within the subsurface. In gene...

  11. Invited review: Microbial evolution in raw-milk, long-ripened cheeses produced using undefined natural whey starters.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Mucchetti, Germano

    2014-02-01

    The robustness of the starter culture during cheese fermentation is enhanced by the presence of a rich consortium of microbes. Natural starters are consortia of microbes undoubtedly richer than selected starters. Among natural starters, natural whey starters (NWS) are the most common cultures currently used to produce different varieties of cheeses. Undefined NWS are typically used for Italian cooked, long-ripened, extra-hard, raw milk cheeses, such as Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano. Together with raw milk microbiota, NWS are responsible for most cheese characteristics. The microbial ecology of these 2 cheese varieties is based on a complex interaction among starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), which are characterized by their different abilities to grow in a changing substrate. This review aims to summarize the latest findings on Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano to better understand the dynamics of SLAB, which mainly arise from NWS, and NSLAB, which mainly arise from raw milk, and their possible role in determining the characteristics of these cheeses. The review is presented in 4 main sections. The first summarizes the main microbiological and chemical properties of the ripened cheese as determined by cheese-making process variables, as these variables may affect microbial growth. The second describes the microbiota of raw milk as affected by specific milk treatments, from milking to the filling of the cheese milk vat. The third describes the microbiota of NWS, and the fourth reviews the knowledge available on microbial dynamics from curd to ripened cheese. As the dynamics and functionality of complex undefined NWS is one of the most important areas of focus in current food microbiology research, this review may serve as a good starting point for implementing future studies on microbial diversity and functionality of undefined cheese starter cultures.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus antigens reactive with milk immunoglobulin G of naturally infected dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D S; McDonald, J S; Hancock, D; McGuire, T C

    1988-01-01

    A 14- to 26-kilodalton fraction of Staphylococcus aureus exoproteins isolated by molecular sieve chromatography and electroelution from polyacrylamide gels was shown to specifically react with antibodies in milk of naturally infected dairy cows. Silver staining of the antigen preparation electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gels showed the strongest reactivity in the 24- to 26-kilodalton region with lesser staining at lower apparent molecular sizes. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to differentiate infected from uninfected cows for diagnostic purposes. Samples from S. aureus-infected cows reacted in the assay, and samples from uninfected cows did not. There was no correlation between numbers of somatic cells in the samples and reactivity to the antigens. Samples from cows infected with coagulase-negative staphylococci did not react with the antigens. It was found, however, that some samples from uninfected cows that were recently postpartum or producing low amounts of milk contained antibodies which bound the antigens. This was believed to be due to transport from blood to the mammary gland of antibodies which were generated by previous intramammary infections or infections at other sites. Images PMID:3384928

  13. A PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how eff...

  14. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR EVALUATING, MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to
    manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks.
    Understanding ho...

  15. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site.

  16. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling, Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    POWELL, KIMBERLYR.

    2004-05-25

    Implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation method requires a mechanistic understanding of the natural attenuation processes occurring at a given site. For inorganic contaminants, natural attenuation typically involves a decrease in metal toxicity and/or mobility. These natural processes include dilution, dispersion, sorption (including adsorption, absorption, and precipitation), and redox processes. In order to better quantify these processes in terms of metal availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site. These laboratory scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding the solid phases in the soils associated with natural attenuation of the contaminant metals. This data provides input to be evaluated in the definition of the contaminant source term as well as transport of contaminants for site transport models.

  17. NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB CONTAMINATION AT THE SANGAMO-WESTON/TWELVEMILE CREEK/LAKE HARTWELL SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous natural recoy.-contaminated sediments with data from fish and invertebrate studies at lake Hartwell. The previous sediment studies showed that natural capping of contaminated sediments with progressively cleaner sediments over time resulted to concentrations below the 1 ...

  18. A case of sporadic ovine mastitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes and its effect on contamination of raw milk and raw-milk cheeses produced in the on-farm dairy.

    PubMed

    Schoder, Dagmar; Winter, Petra; Kareem, Abdoulla; Baumgartner, Walter; Wagner, Martin

    2003-11-01

    We describe a case of listerial mastitis in a flock of 130 sheep. The animals were housed at a farm where the bulk raw ewe milk was processed to produce raw milk soft cheese. List. monocytogenes was shed from the right mammary complex. Shedding was observed over a period of 99 d. A mean level of 4-56 x 10(4) cfu (colony forming units) Listeria monocytogenes/ml was recovered from the raw milk originating from the infected udder. The numbers ranged from 9 x10(1) to 2.95 x 10(5). The bulk milk was contaminated by approx. 5.7 x 10(3) cfu/ml. In the cheese product, 2.0 x 10(2) cfu List. monocytogenes/g were constantly detectable for a period of 7 d post manufacture. The starter culture used for coagulation had a pivotal influence on the behaviour of List. monocytogenes during cheesemaking. Using the same mesophilic buttermilk culture as used by the farmer allowed numbers of Listeria to increase 60-fold within 12 h owing to a delayed acidification of the bulk milk. Addition of a thermophilic yogurt culture reduced the numbers of Listeria within 8 h of incubation.

  19. Immunosorbent analysis of toxin contamination in milk and ground beef using IgY-based ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical methodology to detect ricin and Shiga toxins (Stx) in food matrices is important because of the potential use of ricin in food as a terrorist weapon, and the presence of Stx in food as a result of contamination with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) that has lead to serious foodborne d...

  20. [Surveillance of perchlorate level in wine, seafood, polished rice, milk, powdered milk and yogurt].

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Matsuda, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate, which may be naturally occurring or artificial in origin, inhibits iodide uptake into the thyroid gland and disturbs thyroid function. In order to investigate perchlorate contamination in foods in Japan, perchlorate levels in 28 wine samples, 20 seafood samples, 10 polished rice samples, 30 milk (include whole milk, composition modified milk, low fat milk, processed milk, milk drink) samples, 10 powdered milk samples and 10 yogurt samples were measured. Perchlorate was found in all wine, milk, powdered milk and yogurt samples tested. Perchlorate levels ranged from 0.2 ng/g to 103 ng/g in wine samples, from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in milk samples, from 3 ng/g to 35 ng/g in powdered milk samples, and from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in yogurt samples. Perchlorate levels in the seafood samples were under the LOQ (0.8 ng/g) in 8 samples and ranged from 0.8 ng/g to 72 ng/g in 12 samples. In all polished rice samples, perchlorate level was under the LOQ (1.0 ng/g).

  1. Lead Levels in the Breast Milk of Nursing Andean Mothers Living in a Lead-Contaminated Environment

    PubMed Central

    Counter, S. Allen; Buchanan, Leo H.; Ortega, Fernando; Chiriboga, Roberto; Correa, Rommy; Collaguaso, María Angela

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of lead (Pb) in breast milk (PbM) and blood (PbB) were measured in a current cohort of lactating mothers living in Andean communities where women of child-bearing age engage in the occupational use of Pb, and compared to results obtained in earlier studies. Mean PbM concentration in the current group of breastfeeding mothers tested in 2012/2013 was 3.73 μg/l (SD: 7.3; range: 0.049 - 28.04), and significantly lower than the 9.83 μg/l (SD: 12.75; range: 0.2 - 49) previously observed in breastfeeding mothers in the study area from 1999 to 2007. Breastfeeding women in the current cohort showed an average PbM/PbB ratio of 3.6%, which is in agreement with other studies. The mean PbB level obtained for the current cohort was 7.8 μg/dl (SD: 5.2; range: 1.4 - 21), and significantly lower than the mean PbB level of 20.8 μg/dl (SD: 16.4; range: 4-73) obtained for the comparison group of breastfeeding mothers tested between 1999-2007. A correlation of .687 between paired PbM and maternal PbB was found, indicating that maternal PbB level is a significant predictor of PbM. Current PbM levels remain higher than international averages, but indicate that maternal Pb exposure has declined over time in the environmentally Pb-contaminated study area. The current reduction in Pb in milk and blood of breastfeeding mothers may be due to adherence to a Pb-exposure education and prevention program initiated by the authors in the study area years earlier, as well as recent improvements in local healthcare delivery. PMID:25072821

  2. Control of extensive chorioptic mange natural infection in lactating dairy cattle without milk withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Aurora; Halliburton, Megan K

    2013-08-01

    Dairy cattle are becoming increasingly complicated to treat in the USA due to the great limitation of approved drugs. Additionally, most drugs require withdrawal times for milk that are not viable for treating entire dairy herds. The objective of this field trial was to determine the efficacy of eprinomectin, one of only two parasiticides approved for lactating dairy cattle, for eradication of naturally occurring chorioptic mange on a commercial dairy farm. All animals present on the farm were treated on the same day and, later, new animals introduced to the premises were treated on arrival. All cows were re-treated at dry-off. Lesion scoring was performed five times over a period of 12 months. A reduction in the proportion of cows with lesions was apparent 3 months after treatment and, although the proportion stayed low, it increased again at 12 months post-treatment. Logistic regression to evaluate factors associated with the presence of mange lesions showed that older cows, late lactation, and recent treatment, were associated with presence of lesions. It also showed that multiple treatments (whole-herd treatment and at dry-off) helped to reduce the presence of lesions. No increase in milk production could be measured, but animal wellbeing improved. The results of this study show that chorioptic mange can be controlled in entire herds, although multiple treatments will be required to potentially eradicate the parasite. The value of the study is that it shows that mange can be controlled in dairy cattle with approved drugs, eliminating the need to use non-approved agents.

  3. Emergency Response Planning to Reduce the Impact of Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water system...

  4. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water – Technical Report Series

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will cover the development and content of new EPA Technical Resource Documents on the application of monitored natural attenuation for inorganic contaminants in ground water. This presentation discusses the various mechanisms that are recognized to result in th...

  5. Site Characterization To Support Use Of Monitored Natural Attentuation For Remediation Of Inorganic Contaminants In Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical recommendations have recently been published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to address site characterization needed to support selection of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for cleanup of inorganic contaminant plumes in groundwater. Immobilization onto ...

  6. Characterization of Contaminant Transport Using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria

    SciTech Connect

    TEH-LUNG KU

    2001-06-01

    Study the migration of nuclear waste contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Radioactive disequilibria among members of these decay-series nuclides can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting.

  7. Data on milk dioxin contamination linked with the location of fodder croplands allow to hypothesize the origin of the pollution source in an Italian valley.

    PubMed

    Desiato, Rosanna; Bertolini, Silvia; Baioni, Elisa; Crescio, Maria Ines; Scortichini, Giampiero; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Sparagna, Bruno; Cuttica, Giancarlo; Ru, Giuseppe

    2014-11-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) have similar toxic, endocrine-disrupting, and carcinogenic activity. They are classified as persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the environment and the tissues of living organisms. High concentrations of PCDD/F and dl-PCB have been detected in bovine milk collected in a Piedmont valley (Northwestern Italy) since 2004. This geographic study describes the local distribution of pollution from PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. Since their presence in animal products could be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated fodder, dioxin levels in cow milk were related to the distribution of fodder cropland parcels. Specifically, the aim of the study was to determine, through an exploratory approach, whether the contamination was consistent with one common point source of contamination or different scattered sources. Data for PCDD/F and dl-PCB concentrations in the bulk milk from 27 herds, sampled over a 4-year period (2004-2007), were matched to the georeferenced land parcels the dairy farmers used for growing fodder. Isopleth maps of dioxin concentrations were estimated with ordinary kriging. The highest level of pollution for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was geographically juxtaposed: in both instances, the location of the local steel plant was within this extremely highly polluted area. The study results support the hypothesis for one common point source of contamination in the valley. The exploratory spatial analysis applied in this research may provide a valuable, novel approach to straightforward identification of a highly likely source of dioxin contamination of dairy products (even in the absence of top soil contamination data).

  8. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  9. Chromatographic separation and detection of contaminants from whole milk powder using a chitosan-modified silver nanoparticles surface-enhanced Raman scattering device.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Lv, Di Y; Zhu, Qing X; Li, Hao; Chen, Hui; Wu, Mian M; Chai, Yi F; Lu, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Methods for the on-site analysis of food contaminants are in high demand. Although portable Raman spectroscopy is commonly used to test food on-site, it can be challenge to achieve this goal with rapid detection and inexpensive substrate. In this study, we detected trace food contaminants in samples of whole milk powder using the methods that combined chromatography with surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection (SERS). We developed a simple and efficient technique to fabricate the paper with chitosan-modified silver nanoparticles as a SERS-active substrate. The soaking time of paper and the concentration of chitosan solution were optimized for chromatographic separation and SERS detection. We then studied the separation properties for real applications including complex sample matrices, and detected melamine at 1mg/L, dicyandiamide at 100mg/L and sodium sulfocyanate at 10mg/L in whole milk powder. As such, our methods have great potential for field-based detection of milk contaminants.

  10. Short communication: Change of naturally occurring benzoic acid during skim milk fermentation by commercial cheese starters.

    PubMed

    Han, Noori; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to investigate the change of naturally occurring benzoic acid (BA) during skim milk fermentation by 4 kinds of commercial cheese starters used in domestic cheese. The culture was incubated at 3-h intervals for 24h at 30, 35, and 40°C. The BA content during fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus STB-01 was detected after 12h at all temperatures, sharply increasing at 30°C. In Lactobacillus paracasei LC431, BA was detected after 9h at all temperatures, sharply increasing until 18h and decreasing after 18h at 30 and 35°C. In the case of R707 (consisting of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris), BA increased from 6h to 15h and decreased after 15h at 40°C. The BA during STB-01 and CHN-11 (1:1; mixture of S. thermophilus, Lc. lactis ssp. lactis, Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris, Lc. lactis ssp. diacetylactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris) fermentation was detected after 3h at 35 and 40°C, sharply increasing up to 12h and decreasing after 15h at 35°C, and after 6h, increasing up to 9h at 30°C. After 3h, it steadily decreased at 40°C. The highest amount of BA was found during the fermentation by R707 at 30°C; 15h with 12.46mg/kg.

  11. MICROBIAL PROCESSES AFFECTING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the alternatives considered for the remediation of soil and ground water at hazardous wastes sites are the use of natural processes to reduce or remove the contaminants of concern. Under favorable conditions, the use of natural attenuation can result in significant cost sa...

  12. Protecting Consumers from Contaminated Drinking Water during Natural Disasters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural disasters can cause damage and destruction to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Communities should plan for and designate an authorized team to manage and prioritize emergency response in devastated areas. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 describe the Environmental...

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Natural Gas Contaminants on Corrosion in Compressed Natural Gas Storage Systems - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, F.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a research program that was conducted to define natural gas contaminant levels necessary to insure that internal corrosion of compressed natural gas (CNG) cylinders does not constitute a hazard over the lifetimes of the cylinders. A literature search was performed and companies in the natural gas transmission and distribution industries were contacted: to identify and determine the composition ranges of contaminants in natural gases; and to obtain information regarding corrosion damage of CNG cylinders and cylinder materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed on the cylinder materials most widely used in CNG cylinders in the United States (4130X and 15B30 steels and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy). Tests were conducted in: natural gases from several producing wells and from an interstate pipeline; and in aqueous solutions saturated with varying concentrations of natural gas contaminants. Also, metallurgical analyses of nine (eight steel and one aluminum), used CNG cylinders were performed. Limiting concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and other CNG contaminants necessary to prevent internal corrosion of CNG fuel and storage cylinders were defined. This knowledge will minimize potential hazards of using CNG as a vehicle fuel. It should also lead to reduced costs of CNG use, since it has been shown that reduction of contaminants to the very low levels currently specified by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Canadian Transport Commission (CTC) is not necessary. A gas-quality standard based on program results is recommended. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has adopted the recommended gas-quality standard.

  14. In-vitro indicators of natural resistance and milk-producing ability in dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Miarelli, Maria; Signorelli, Federica

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the possibility of detecting novel phenotypes of natural resistance at the molecular level through the in-vitro stimulation of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). This study was conducted with 16 healthy buffaloes who were reared for milk production and for whom data on milk-producing ability were available for several lactations. MDMs from circulating monocytes were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide. The response was evaluated using Western blotting to detect the presence of 2 types of proteins separated by electrophoresis: tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, which are indicators of the dynamic control of biochemical pathways, and IkB-alpha (Kappa light polipeptide gene enhancer in B-cells Inhibitor, alpha) protein, which controls the activity of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells-a transcription factor that is responsible for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The results showed that the buffaloes who were positive for IkB-alpha proteins had a significantly higher milk-producing ability than the buffaloes who did not express IkB-alpha. On the contrary, no significant difference was detected between the high and low milk-producing buffaloes with regard to the presence of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This preliminary study indicated that it may be possible to identify the more disease-resistant nonhuman animals on a molecular level. The results, therefore, indicate that an intense selection toward the increase of milk yield could impair natural disease resistance in future dairy buffalo generations.

  15. Post-consumer contamination in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) milk bottles and the design of a bottle-to-bottle recycling process.

    PubMed

    Welle, F

    2005-10-01

    Six hundred conventional recycled HDPE flake samples, which were recollected and sorted in the UK, were screened for post-consumer contamination levels. Each analysed sample consisted of 40-50 individual flakes so that the amount of analysed individual containers was in the range 24,000-30,000 post-consumer milk bottles. Predominant contaminants in hot-washed flake samples were unsaturated oligomers, which can be also be found in virgin high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pellet samples used for milk bottle production. In addition, the flavour compound limonene, the degradation product of antioxidant additives di-tert-butylphenol and low amounts of saturated oligomers were found in higher concentrations in the post-consumer samples in comparison with virgin HDPE. However, the overall concentrations in post-consumer recycled samples were similar to or lower than concentration ranges in comparison with virgin HDPE. Contamination with other HDPE untypical compounds was rare and was in most cases related to non-milk bottles, which are <2.1% of the input material of the recycling process. The maximum concentration found in one sample of 1 g was estimated as 130 mg kg(-1), which corresponds to a contamination of 5200-6500 mg kg(-1) in the individual bottle. The recycling process investigated was based on an efficient sorting process, a hot-washing of the ground bottles, and a further deep-cleaning of the flakes with high temperatures and vacuum. Based on the fact that the contamination levels of post-consumer flake samples are similar to virgin HDPE and on the high cleaning efficiency of the super-clean recycling process especially for highly volatile compounds, the recycling process investigated is suitable for recycled post-consumer HDPE bottles for direct food-contact applications. However, hand-picking after automatically sorting is recommended to decrease the amount of non-milk bottles. The conclusions for suitability are valid, provided that the migration testing of

  16. Geochemistry, biota and natural background levels in an arsenic naturally contaminated volcanic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi, Elisabetta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana; Parrone, Daniele; Rossi, David; Ghergo, Stefano; Lungarini, Silvia; Zoppini, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    The tight links between chemical and ecological status are largely acknowledged as for surface water bodies, while aquifers are still considered as hidden groundwater reservoirs, rather than ecosystems to be preserved. Geochemical and biological interactions play a key role in all subterranean processes, including the dynamics of the fate of anthropogenic contaminants. Studies on groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDE) were mainly focused on karst aquifers so far, but an increased awareness on the importance of water-rock interactions and methodological improvements in microbial ecology are rapidly increasing the level of characterization of groundwater ecosystems in various hydrogeological contexts. Similarly, knowledge about groundwater biodiversity is still limited, especially if porous habitats are concerned. Yet, groundwater and GDEs are populated by a diverse and highly adapted biota, dominated by crustaceans, which provide important ecosystem services and act as biological indicators of chemical and quantitative impact on groundwater resources. In a previous research (Amalfitano et al. 2014), we reported that the microbial community heterogeneity may reflect the lithological and hydrogeological complexity within volcanic and alluvial facies transition in a groundwater body. The quantitative tracking of the microbial community structure allowed disentangling the natural biogeochemical processes evolving within the aquifer flow path. The analyses of groundwater crustaceans assemblages may contribute to shed more light upon the state and dynamics of such ecosystems. In the present research, a comprehensive study of a water table aquifer flowing through a quaternary volcanic district is being performed, including the geochemical (inorganic) composition, the microbial composition, and the analysis of crustacean assemblages . Groundwater samples are periodically collected from private wells and springs under a low anthropic impact. The key issues within the

  17. Evaluation of the effects of natural gas contaminants on corrosion in compressed natural gas storage systems: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, F.F. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a research program that was conducted to define natural gas contaminant levels necessary to insure that internal corrosion of compressed natural gas (CNG) cylinders does not constitute a hazard over the lifetimes of the cylinders. A literature search was performed and companies in the natural gas transmission and distribution industries were contacted: to identify and determine the composition ranges of contaminants in natural gases; and to obtain information regarding corrosion damage of CNG cylinders and cylinder materials. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed on the cylinder materials most widely used in CNG cylinders in the United States (413OX and 15B30 steels and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy). Tests were conducted in: natural gases from several producing wells and from an interstate pipeline; and in aqueous solutions saturated with varying concentrations of natural gas contaminants. Also, metallurgical analyses of nine (eight steel and one aluminum) used CNG cylinders were performed. 12 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Effects on aflatoxin M1 residues in milk by addition of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate to aflatoxin-contaminated diets of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R B; Phillips, T D; Ellis, J A; Kubena, L F; Huff, W E; Petersen, H D

    1991-09-01

    Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS), an anticaking agent for agricultural feeds, was added to aflatoxin (AF)-contaminated diets of 3 lactating dairy cows and evaluated for its potential to reduce aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) residues in milk. During phase I, cows were fed alternating diets that consisted of 200 micrograms of AF/kg of feed for 7 days, 0.5% HSCAS plus 200 micrograms of AF/kg of feed for 7 days, and feed with the HSCAS removed for a final 7 days. The AFM1 milk concentrations from the intervals with HSCAS added to diets were compared with those times when HSCAS was absent. The presence of 0.5% HSCAS in feed containing 200 micrograms of AF/kg reduced AFM1 secretion into the milk by an average of 0.44 micrograms/L (from pretreatment of 1.85 micrograms/L to 1.41 micrograms/L with HSCAS, a 24% reduction). Following a 10-day period of noncontaminated feed consumption and no AFM1 residues in the milk, phase II of the study was begun. The same experimental design as phase I was used, but the dosages of HSCAS and AF were changed to 1.0% and 100 micrograms/kg of feed, respectively. The addition of 1.0% HSCAS in feed containing 100 micrograms of AF/kg decreased AFM1 content in the milk by an average of 0.40 micrograms/L (from a pretreatment of 0.91 micrograms/L to 0.51 micrograms/L when HSCAS was present, a 44% reduction). These findings suggest that HSCAS, a high-affinity sorbent compound for AF in vitro, is capable of reducing the secretion of AFM1 into milk.

  19. Gluten contamination of naturally gluten-free flours and starches used by Canadians with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Terence B; Cleroux, Chantal; Poirier, Christine; Cantin, Isabelle; La Vieille, Sébastien; Hayward, Stephen; Dubois, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    A large national investigation into the extent of gluten cross-contamination of naturally gluten-free ingredients (flours and starches) sold in Canada was performed. Samples (n = 640) were purchased from eight Canadian cities and via the internet during the period 2010-2012 and analysed for gluten contamination. The results showed that 61 of the 640 (9.5%) samples were contaminated above the Codex-recommended maximum level for gluten-free products (20 mg kg⁻¹) with a range of 5-7995 mg kg⁻¹. For the ingredients that were labelled gluten-free the contamination range (5-141 mg kg⁻¹) and number of samples were lower (3 of 268). This picture was consistent over time, with approximately the same percentage of samples above 20 mg kg⁻¹ in both the initial set and the subsequent lot. Looking at the total mean (composite) contamination for specific ingredients the largest and most consistent contaminations come from higher fibre ingredients such as soy (902 mg kg⁻¹), millet (272 mg kg⁻¹) and buckwheat (153 mg kg⁻¹). Of the naturally gluten-free flours and starches tested that do not contain a gluten-free label, the higher fibre ingredients would constitute the greatest probability of being contaminated with gluten above 20 mg kg⁻¹.

  20. [The role of bacterial contamination of milking utensils and disinfecting solutions as a possible cause of clinical mastitis in dairy cows].

    PubMed

    Hässig, M; Sigrist, S M; Corti, S; Giezendanner, N; Stephan, R

    2011-06-01

    Various instruments and utensils used during milking as well as teat dip solutions were examined for contamination with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between contaminated fomites and udder infection in dairy cows. A total of 344 cows from ten dairy farms with the highest rate of clinical mastitis among the farms serviced by the Ambulatory Clinic of the University of Zurich were included in the study. Each farm was visited five times. All lactating cows, with the exception of those undergoing antibiotic treatment, were examined immediately before milking using the California Mastitis Test (CMT). A milk sample was collected from positive quarters. Items used to clean the udder, which included wood wool, paper towels and disinfecting towels as well as the milker's hands and the teat dip cup were swabbed for bacteriological examination. Water samples, samples of teat dip and cleaning solutions were also collected and cultured. Our results demonstrate that cleaning and disinfecting solutions have the potential to transmit udder pathogens and cause clinical mastitis. The most common CNS isolated from quarter samples were S. saprophyticus, S. sciuri and S. chromogenes, and the most common CNS isolated from utensils, cleaning and disinfecting solutions were S. fleuretii, S. vitulus, S. equorum, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, S. succinus and S. saprophyticus.

  1. Analysis of industry-generated data. Part 2: Risk-based sampling plan for efficient self-control of aflatoxin M₁ contamination in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Trevisani, Marcello; Horváth, Zsuzsanna; Serraino, Andrea; Szabó, István J; Kerekes, Kata; Szeitzné-Szabó, Mária; Ambrus, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin M₁ (AFM1) contamination in 21,969 milk samples taken in Italy during 2005-08 and 2010 provided the basis for designing an early warning self-control plan. Additionally, 4148 AFM1 data points from the mycotoxin crisis (2003-04) represented the worst case. No parametric function provided a good fit for the skewed and scattered AFM1 concentrations. The acceptable reference values, reflecting the combined uncertainty of AFM1 measured in consignments consisting of milk from one to six farms, ranged from 40 to 16.7 ng kg(-1), respectively. Asymmetric control charts with these reference values, 40 and 50 ng kg(-1) warning and action limits are recommended to assess immediately the distribution of AFM1 concentration in incoming consignments. The moving window method, presented as a worked example including 5 days with five samples/day, enabled verification of compliance of production with the legal limit in 98% of the consignments at a 94% probability level. The sampling plan developed assumes consecutive analyses of samples taken from individual farms, which makes early detection of contamination possible and also immediate corrective actions if the AFM1 concentration in a consignment exceeds the reference value. In the latter case different control plans with increased sampling frequency should be applied depending on the level and frequency of contamination. As aflatoxin B₁ increases in feed at about the same time, therefore a coordinated sampling programme performed by the milk processing plants operating in a confined geographic area is more effective and economical then the individual ones. The applicability of the sample size calculation based on binomial theorem and the fast response rate resulting from the recommended sampling plan were verified by taking 1000-10,000 random samples with replacement from the experimental databases representing the normal, moderately and highly contaminated periods. The efficiency of the control plan could be

  2. Naturally occurring mercury contamination in a pristine environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidle, W. C.

    1993-04-01

    About 19 percent of sampled residential water wells situated in a pristine, granitic Maine (USA) coastal environment have elevated mercury concentrations according to USEPA standards. There are no identified anthropogenic sources for mercury but some local granitoids have anomalous mercury concentrations in the Waldoboro Pluton Complex (WPC). Site-specific hydrogeologic conditions appear to have aggravated what is otherwise only trace amounts of some naturally occurring toxic analytes in the groundwater in contact with the suspect granitoids of the WPC. The extent of mercury in this crystalline rock environment is examined here. It is prudent to exercise preventive measures and appropriately site water supply wells and not expect complete remediation of the affected homeowners' wells.

  3. Natural attenuation model and biodegradation for 1,1,1-trichloroethane contaminant in shallow groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiang; Zhu, Rui-Li; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui; Liu, Yong-Di; Lu, Shu-Guang; Luo, Qi-Shi; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural attenuation is an effective and feasible technology for controlling groundwater contamination. This study investigated the potential effectiveness and mechanisms of natural attenuation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) contaminants in shallow groundwater in Shanghai by using a column simulation experiment, reactive transport model, and 16S rRNA gene clone library. The results indicated that the majority of the contaminant mass was present at 2–6 m in depth, the contaminated area was approximately 1000 m × 1000 m, and natural attenuation processes were occurring at the site. The effluent breakthrough curves from the column experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of TCA natural attenuation in the groundwater accorded with the advection-dispersion-reaction equation. The kinetic parameter of adsorption and biotic dehydrochlorination of TCA was 0.068 m3/kg and 0.0045 d–1. The contamination plume was predicted to diminish and the maximum concentration of TCA decreased to 280 μg/L. The bacterial community during TCA degradation in groundwater belonged to Trichococcus, Geobacteraceae, Geobacter, Mucilaginibacter, and Arthrobacter. PMID:26379629

  4. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  5. Free-living ameba contamination in natural hot springs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lekkla, Amorn; Sutthikornchai, Chantira; Bovornkitti, Somchai; Sukthana, Yaowalark

    2005-01-01

    Thermo tolerant free-living ameba, Naegleria spp and Acanthamoeba spp contamination in natural hot springs in Thailand were carried out from 13 provinces. The temperature of hot springs water varied from 28 degrees-65 degrees C and pH from 6-8. We found that 38.2 % (26/68) of water samples were positive, Acanthamoeba was 13.2% (9/68) whilst Naegleria was 35.3% (24/68). Contamination by free-living ameba in natural hot springs may pose a significant health risk to people who use such water for recreation activities.

  6. Determination of naturally occurring oestrogens and androgens in retail samples of milk and eggs.

    PubMed

    Courant, F; Antignac, J P; Maume, D; Monteau, F; Andre, F; Le Bizec, B

    2007-12-01

    The occurrence of the main steroid hormones (oestrone, 17alpha-oestradiol, 17beta-oestradiol, 17alpha-testosterone, 17beta-testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, 4-androstenedione), especially in milk and eggs, was investigated. An analytical method based on GC-MS/MS was developed for steroid measurement at an ultra-trace level in food products. The limits of detection for oestrogens were about 5 and 30 ng kg(-1) in milk and eggs, respectively. For androgens, the limits of detection were around 10 and 50 ng kg(-1) in milk and eggs, respectively. The method was applied to milk and egg samples collected in a French supermarket. In milk, oestrone was found at levels between 100 and 300 ng l(-1), while 17beta-oestradiol levels were estimated to be near 20 ng l(-1). 17alpha-testosterone was found to be from 50 ng l(-1) in skimmed milk to 85 ng l(-1) in whole milk. In egg samples, oestrone and 17beta-oestradiol were found at 1.5 and 0.9 microg kg(-1), respectively, while 17alpha-oestradiol was found to be in lower concentrations (i.e. around 0.55 microg kg(-1)). Regarding androgens, 17alpha- and 17beta-testosterone were estimated at 1.9 and 1.3 microg kg(-1), respectively. These results represent a first attempt to estimate the food exposure to steroid hormones. In the future, the collection of additional data should permit the comparison between this exogenous dietary intake and the daily endogenous production in pre-pubertal children as a basis of risk assessment regarding endocrine disruption linked to these molecules for this critical population.

  7. Retention of contaminants in northern natural peatlands treating mine waste waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Katharina; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Klöve, Björn

    2014-05-01

    The mining industry in Finland is growing, leading to an increasing number of working and proposed mine sites. As a consequence, the amount of mine waste waters created is likewise increasing. This poses a great challenge for water management and purification, as these mine waste waters can lead to severe environmental and health consequences when released to receiving water bodies untreated. In the past years, the use of natural peatlands for cost-effective passive waste water treatment has been increasing. In this study, the fate of mine water contaminants in a treatment peatland receiving process waters from the Kittilä gold mine was investigated. Special attention was paid to the fate of potentially harmful substances such as arsenic, antimony or nickel. During the 4 years of operation, the peatland removed contaminants from process waters at varying efficiencies. While arsenic, antimony and nickel were retained at high efficiencies (>80% retention), other contaminants such as zinc, sulfate or iron were not retained or even leaching from the peatland. Soil samples taken in 2013 showed a linear increase of arsenic, antimony and nickel concentration in the peatland as compared to earlier sampling times, in agreement with the good retention efficiencies for those contaminants. Measured concentrations exceeded guideline values for contaminated soils, indicating that the prolonged use of treatment peatlands leads to high soil contamination and restrict further uses of the peatlands without remediation measures. Soil and pore water samples were taken along a transect with varying distance from the process water distribution ditch and analyzed for total and more easily mobile concentrations of contaminants (peat soil) as well as total and dissolved contaminants (water samples). Concentrations of contaminants such as arsenic, manganese or antimony in peat and pore water samples were highest near the distribution ditch and decreased with increasing distance from the

  8. Serum or breast milk immunoglobulins mask the self-reactivity of human natural IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Manoylov, Iliyan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    B cells producing IgG antibodies specific to a variety of self- or foreign antigens are a normal constituent of the immune system of all healthy individuals. These naturally occurring IgG antibodies are found in the serum, external secretions, and pooled human immunoglobulin preparations. They bind with low affinity to antigens, which can also be targets for pathologic autoantibodies. An enhancement of naturally occurring IgG autoantibody activity was observed after treatment of human IgG molecules with protein-destabilizing agents. We have investigated the interactions of human immunoglobulins that were obtained from serum or from breast milk of healthy individuals or IVIg with human liver antigens. Proteins from an individual serum or milk were isolated by two methods, one of which included exposure to low pH and the other did not. Purified serum, mucosal IgM, IgA, and the fraction containing immunoglobulin G F(ab')2 fragments each inhibited the binding of a single donor or pooled IgG to human liver antigens. Our study presents findings regarding the role of the breast milk or serum antibodies in blocking the self-reactivity of IgG antibodies. It supports the suggestion that not IVIg only, but also the pooled human IgM and IgA might possess a potent beneficial immunomodulatory activity in autoimmune patients.

  9. Nationwide Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 contamination in natural rivers of Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Honjo, Mie N; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Uchii, Kimiko; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2012-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) disease is a significant threat for common and koi carp cultivators and for freshwater ecosystems. To determine the prevalence of CyHV-3 in Japanese rivers, a nationwide survey of all national class-A rivers was undertaken in the Summer of 2008. The virus was concentrated from river water samples using the cation-coated filter method. CyHV-3 DNA was detected in 90 rivers, representing 90% of 103 successfully analysed rivers. More than 100,000 copies of CyHV-3 DNA per litre of sample were detected in four rivers, higher than that reported during the Yura River outbreak in 2007. For CyHV-3-positive rivers, the log CyHV-3 density was negatively correlated with the water temperature on the sampling date and positively correlated with the suspended solids and dissolved oxygen, which are annually averaged for each river. Our results demonstrate that virus detection using molecular biology techniques is a powerful tool for monitoring the presence of CyHV-3 in natural environments.

  10. Natural releases from contaminated groundwater, Example Reference Biosphere 2B.

    PubMed

    Simón, I; Naito, M; Thorne, M C; Walke, R

    2005-01-01

    Safety assessment is a tool which, by means of an iterative procedure, allows the evaluation of the performance of a disposal system and its potential impact on human health and the environment. Radionuclides from a deep geological disposal facility may not reach the surface environment until many tens of thousands of years after closure of the facility. The BIOMASS Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment developed Examples of "Reference Biospheres" to illustrate the use of the methodology and to demonstrate how biosphere models can be developed and justified as being fit for purpose. The practical examples are also intended to be useful in their own right. The Example Reference Biosphere 2B presented here involves the consideration of alternative types of geosphere-biosphere interfaces and calculation of doses to members of hypothetical exposure groups arising from a wide range of exposure pathways within agricultural and semi-natural environments, but without allowing for evolution of the corresponding biosphere system. The example presented can be used as a generic analysis in some situations although it was developed around a relatively specific conceptual model. It should be a useful practical example, but the above numerical results are not intended to be understood as prescribed biosphere 'conversion factors'.

  11. The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point's (HACCP) concept as applied to some chemical, physical and microbiological contaminants of milk on dairy farms. A prototype.

    PubMed

    Lievaart, J J; Noordhuizen, J P T M; van Beek, E; van der Beek, C; van Risp, A; Schenkel, J; van Veersen, J

    2005-03-01

    Quality management on dairy farms becomes more and more important regarding the different areas of animal health, animal welfare and food safety. Monitoring animals, farm conditions and farm records can be extended with risk identification and risk management. The hazard analysis critical control point's system is useful as an on farm strategy to control the product as well as the production process on the areas of animal health, animal welfare and food safety. This article deals in detail with the question how to develop a qualitative method where risk can be defined as an interaction between probability and impact. Two parts of the production process (milk harvest and treatment of cows) where used as an example how to apply the hazard analysis critical control point's system on chemical, physical and microbiological contaminants of milk. Not just only by summarizing the different critical checkpoints for each area but also by giving them a precise judgement of probability and impact.

  12. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, D.A.; Laase, A.D. ); Locke, D.A. )

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended.

  13. Potential effect of natural gas wells on alluvial groundwater contamination at the Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, D.A.; Laase, A.D.; Locke, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of a request for further information about several abandoned natural gas wells at the US Department of Energy`s Kansas City Plant (KCP). The request was prompted by an old map showing several, possibly eight, natural gas wells located under or near what is now the southeast corner of the Main Manufacturing Building at KCP. Volatile organic compound contamination in the alluvial aquifer surrounding the gas wells might possibly contaminate the bedrock aquifer if the gas wells still exist as conduits. Several circumstances exist that make it doubtful that contamination is entering the bedrock aquifers: (1) because regional groundwater flow in the bedrock beneath the KCP is expected to be vertically upward, contaminants found in the alluvial aquifer should not migrate down the old wells; (2) because of the low hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock units, contaminant transport would be extremely slow if the contaminants were migrating down the wells; and (3) casing, apparently set through the alluvium in all of the wells, would have deteriorated and may have collapsed; if the casing collapsed, the silty clays in the alluvium would also collapse and seal the well. No definitive information has been discovered about the exact location of the wells. No further search for or consideration of the old gas wells is recommended.

  14. Gluten Contamination in Naturally or Labeled Gluten-Free Products Marketed in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anil K.; Gatti, Simona; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Monachesi, Chiara; Padella, Lucia; Baldo, Giada Del; Annibali, Roberta; Lionetti, Elena; Catassi, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Background: A strict and lifelong gluten-free diet is the only treatment of celiac disease. Gluten contamination has been frequently reported in nominally gluten-free products. The aim of this study was to test the level of gluten contamination in gluten-free products currently available in the Italian market. Method: A total of 200 commercially available gluten-free products (including both naturally and certified gluten-free products) were randomly collected from different Italian supermarkets. The gluten content was determined by the R5 ELISA Kit approved by EU regulations. Results: Gluten level was lower than 10 part per million (ppm) in 173 products (86.5%), between 10 and 20 ppm in 9 (4.5%), and higher than 20 ppm in 18 (9%), respectively. In contaminated foodstuff (gluten > 20 ppm) the amount of gluten was almost exclusively in the range of a very low gluten content. Contaminated products most commonly belonged to oats-, buckwheat-, and lentils-based items. Certified and higher cost gluten-free products were less commonly contaminated by gluten. Conclusion: Gluten contamination in either naturally or labeled gluten-free products marketed in Italy is nowadays uncommon and usually mild on a quantitative basis. A program of systematic sampling of gluten-free food is needed to promptly disclose at-risk products. PMID:28178205

  15. Presence of emerging contaminants in Natural Wetlands: L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, P. V.; Blasco, C.; Andreu, V.; Pascual, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Picó, Y.

    2009-04-01

    latter found in 63 of the 65 analyzed samples in concentrations between 0.01 g/L and 248 mg/L. Others pharmaceuticals present in less quantities were: ciprofloxacin, codeine, diazepam, fenofibrate, ibuprofen, norfloxacin, metoprolol, ofloxacin, propanolol, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. These results demonstrate the incidence of these pollutants in the Natural Park of ĹAlbufera, probably because raw sewage flows into the lake from houses and industries nears its shores. Increased pollution is threatening the sustainable use of ĹAlbufera, a vital resource for this touristic area. References: [1] N. Esiobu, L. Armenta, J. Ike, Int. J. Environ. Health 12. (2002), 133. [2] D. Löffler, T. A. Ternes, J. Chromatogr. A. 1021 (2003), 133-144.

  16. Aflatoxins in Rice Artificially Contaminated with Aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus under Natural Storage in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Satoshi; Doi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Masahiko; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Ikeda, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin (AFT) contamination is frequent in foods grown in tropical regions, including rice. Although AFTs are generally not found in temperate-region foods, global warming has affected typical temperate-region climates, potentially permitting the contamination of foods with AFT-producing Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus). Here we investigated the AFT production in rice during storage under natural climate conditions in Japan. We examined AFTs in brown rice and rough rice artificially contaminated with A. flavus for 1 year in Japan, and we subjected AFTs in white rice to the same treatment in airtight containers and examined the samples in warm and cold seasons, simulating the storage of white rice in general households. In the brown rice, AFTs increased after 2 months (March) and peaked after 9 months (October). The AFT contamination in the rough rice was minimal. After the polishing and cooking of the brown rice, AFTs were undetectable. In the white rice stored in airtight containers, AFTs increased after 1 month (August) and peaked after 2 months (September). Minimal AFTs were detected in the cold season. Thus, AFT contamination in rice may occur in temperate regions following A. flavus contamination. The storage of rice as rough rice could provide be useful for avoiding AFT contamination.

  17. Nature and biosynthesis of galacto-oligosaccharides related to oligosaccharides in human breast milk

    PubMed Central

    Intanon, Montira; Arreola, Sheryl Lozel; Pham, Ngoc Hung; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Haltrich, Dietmar; Nguyen, Thu-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are prominent among the functional components of human breast milk. While HMO have potential applications in both infants and adults, this potential is limited by the difficulties in manufacturing these complex structures. Consequently, functional alternatives such as galacto-oligosaccharides are under investigation, and nowadays, infant formulae are supplemented with galacto-oligosaccharides to mimic the biological effects of HMO. Recently, approaches toward the production of defined human milk oligosaccharide structures using microbial, fermentative methods employing single, appropriately engineered microorganisms were introduced. Furthermore, galactose-containing hetero-oligosaccharides have attracted an increasing amount of attention because they are structurally more closely related to HMO. The synthesis of these novel oligosaccharides, which resemble the core of HMO, is of great interest for applications in the food industry. PMID:24571717

  18. Non-dioxin-like PCB and PBDE deposition on Zea mays L. leaves: modelled contamination in milk from dairy animals fed on silage.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Gianfranco; Abate, Vittorio; di Domenico, Alessandro; Esposito, Mauro; Fulgenzi, Anna Rita; Iacovella, Nicola; Serpe, Francesco Paolo; Tassinari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) can intercept airborne pollutants before their deposition on soil. Selected non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (Σ6NDL-PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (Σ8PBDEs) with feed and food safety relevance were measured on maize leaves harvested for silage in dairy animals from 28 fields in Italy. Analyses were carried out by gas chromatography coupled to high- and low-resolution mass spectrometry. Contamination ranged from 0.65 to 5.3 ng g(-1) with 12% moisture for Σ6NDL-PCBs, and from 2.7 to 6.2 for Σ8 PBDEs. Modelled contamination in cow's milk was estimated to fall within the range 0.27-16 ng g(-1) for PCBs, 0.17-1.9 for PBDE number 47, and 0.22-2.1 for PBDE number 99 on a lipid basis. The results indicate that maize silage alone may raise Σ6NDL-PCB contamination in dairy milk up to the 95th percentile in the European Union. Results are discussed in terms of air quality standards able to support food safety.

  19. NATURAL ARSENIC CONTAMINATION OF HOLOCENE ALLUVIAL AQUIFERS BY LINKED TECTONIC, WEATHERING, AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linked tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in Holocene alluvial aquifers, which are the main threat to human health around the world. These groundwaters are commonly found a long distance from their ultimate source of...

  20. U.S. EPA WORKSHOP ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a one-day seminar to present an overview of site characterization approaches to support evaluation of the potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as a remedy for inorganic contaminants in ground water. These se...

  1. WORKSHOP ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a one-day seminar to present an overview of site characterization approaches to support evaluation of the potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as a remedy for inorganic contaminants in ground water. These sem...

  2. NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB - CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN A FRESH WATER LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: An ongoing study of natural recovery of sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is being pursued at the Sangamo-Weston/Twelvemile Creek/Lake Hartwell Superfund Site (i.e., the Lake Hart...

  3. Monitored natural attenuation of a long-term petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites: a case study.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Ravi; Nandy, Subhas; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Kumar, R P; Chadalavada, Sreenivasulu; Chen, Zuliang; Bowman, Mark

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated the potential of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remedial option for groundwater at a long-term petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site in Australia. Source characterization revealed that total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as the major contaminant of concern in the smear zone and groundwater. Multiple lines of evidence involving the geochemical parameters, microbiological analysis, data modelling and compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis all demonstrated natural attenuation of hydrocarbons occurring in the groundwater via intrinsic biodegradation. Groundwater monitoring data by Mann-Kendall trend analysis using properly designed and installed groundwater monitoring wells shows the plume is stable and neither expanding nor shrinking. The reason for stable plume is due to the presence of both active source and natural attenuation on the edge of the plume. Assuming no retardation and no degradation the contaminated plume would have travelled a distance of 1,096 m (best case) to 11,496 m (worst case) in 30 years. However, the plume was extended only up to about 170 m from its source. The results of these investigations provide strong scientific evidence for natural attenuation of TPH in this contaminated aquifer. Therefore, MNA can be applied as a defensible management option for this site following significant reduction of TPH in the source zone.

  4. Long-term assessment of natural attenuation: statistical approach on soils with aged PAH contamination.

    PubMed

    Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Chenot, Elodie-Denise; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Schwartz, Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Natural attenuation processes valorization for PAH-contaminated soil remediation has gained increasing interest from site owners. A misunderstanding of this method and a small amount of data available does not encourage its development. However, monitored natural attenuation (MNA) offers a valuable, cheaper and environmentally friendly alternative to more classical options such as physico-chemical treatments (e.g., chemical oxidation, thermal desorption). The present work proposes the results obtained during a long-term natural attenuation assessment of historically contaminated industrial soils under real climatic conditions. This study was performed after a 10 year natural attenuation period on 60 off-ground lysimeters filled with contaminated soils from different former industrial sites (coking industry, manufactured gas plants) whose initial concentration of PAH varied between 380 and 2,077 mg kg(-1). The analysed parameters included leached water characterization, soil PAH concentrations, evaluation of vegetation cover quality and quantity. Results showed a good efficiency of the PAH dissipation and limited transfer of contaminants to the environment. It also highlighted the importance of the fine soil fractions in controlling PAH reactivity. PAH dissipation through water leaching was limited and did not present a significant risk for the environment. This PAH water concentration appeared however as a good indicator of overall dissipation rate, thereby illustrating the importance of pollutant availability in predicting its degradation potential.

  5. Nutritional chemoprevention of urinary tract tumors (UTT) induced by lithogenic agents: risk for UTT in children exposed to melamine-contaminated milk formulas.

    PubMed

    Vara Messler, M; Cremonezzi, D C; Soria, E A; Eynard, A R

    2012-01-01

    Urinary tract tumors are tenth in frequency, and many environmental carcinogens are excreted by urine. Interplay between chronic inflammatory urolithiasis and urothelial carcinogenesis is not well understood. Experimental evidences show that dietary melamine induce these events even at low concentrations. This is important because thousands of children were exposed to melamine through intentionally contaminated milk formula worldwide. We propose that an increased risk for urinary tumors in adult life may occur and screenings for early urinary signs may be necessary. Therefore, urothelial biology, melamine carcinogenic potential, and related epidemiology are discussed, recommending a preventive dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid-based supplementation, since they modulate such interplay in rodents.

  6. Field Investigation of Natural Attenuation of a Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifer, Gyeonggi Province, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, K.; Bae, G.

    2004-12-01

    In remediation of a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer, natural attenuation may be significant as a remedial alternative. Therefore, natural attenuation should be investigated in the field in order to effectively design and evaluate the remediation strategy at the contaminated site. This study focused on evaluating the natural attenuation for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) at a contaminated site in South Korea. At the study site, the aquifer is composed of a high permeable gravel layer and relatively low permeable sandy-silt layers. Groundwater level vertically fluctuated between 1m and 2m throughout the year (April, 2003~June, 2004) and showed direct response to rainfall events. Chemical analyses of sampled groundwater were performed to investigate the concentrations of various chemical species which are associated with the natural attenuation processes. To evaluate the degree of the biodegradation, the expressed biodegradation capacity (EBC) analysis was done using aerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, manganese reduction, ferric iron reduction, and sulfate reduction as an indicator. High EBC value of sulfate indicate that anaerobic biodegradation by sulfate reduction was a dominant process of mineralization of BTEX at this site. The EBC values decrease sensitively when heavy rainfall occurs due to the dilution and inflow of electron acceptors through a gravel layer. The first-order biodegradation rates of BTEX were estimated by means of the Buscheck and Alcantar method (1995). Results show that the natural attenuation rate of benzene was the highest among the BTEX.

  7. Natural Attenuation Software (NAS): A computer program for estimating remediation times of contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, E.; Widdowson, M.; Brauner, S.; Chapelle, F.; Casey, C.; ,

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a modeling system called Natural Attenuation Software (NAS). NAS was designed as a screening tool to estimate times of remediation (TORs), associated with monitored natural attenuation (MNA), to lower groundwater contaminant concentrations to regulatory limits. Natural attenuation processes that NAS models include advection, dispersion, sorption, biodegradation, and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution. This paper discusses the three main interactive components of NAS: 1) estimation of the target source concentration required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits, 2) estimation of the time required for NAFL contaminants in the source area to attenuate to a predetermined target source concentration, and 3) estimation of the time required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits after source reduction. The model's capability is illustrated by results from a case study at a MNA site, where NAS time of remediation estimates compared well with observed monitoring data over multiple years.

  8. Distinguishing Between Site Waste, Natural, and Other Sources of Contamination at Uranium and Thorium Contaminated Sites - 12274

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, David C.

    2012-07-01

    Uranium and thorium processing and milling sites generate wastes (source, byproduct, or technically enhanced naturally occurring material), that contain contaminants that are similar to naturally occurring radioactive material deposits and other industry wastes. This can lead to mis-identification of other materials as Site wastes. A review of methods used by the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency to distinguish Site wastes from potential other sources, enhanced materials, and natural deposits, at three different thorium mills was conducted. Real case examples demonstrate the importance of understanding the methods of distinguishing wastes. Distinguishing between Site wastes and enhanced Background material can be facilitated by establishing and applying a formal process. Significant project cost avoidance may be realized by distinguishing Site wastes from enhanced NORM. Collection of information on other potential sources of radioactive material and physical information related to the potential for other radioactive material sources should be gathered and reported in the Historical Site Assessment. At a minimum, locations of other such information should be recorded. Site decision makers should approach each Site area with the expectation that non site related radioactive material may be present and have a process in place to distinguish from Site and non Site related materials. (authors)

  9. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant

    PubMed Central

    HE, Hongping; ZHONG, Yuanhong; LIANG, Xiaoliang; TAN, Wei; ZHU, Jianxi; Yan WANG, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature. PMID:25958854

  10. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongping; Zhong, Yuanhong; Liang, Xiaoliang; Tan, Wei; Zhu, Jianxi; Yan Wang, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature.

  11. Microplastic contamination in natural mussel beds from a Brazilian urbanized coastal region: Rapid evaluation through bioassessment.

    PubMed

    Santana, M F M; Ascer, L G; Custódio, M R; Moreira, F T; Turra, A

    2016-05-15

    Microplastic pollution (particles <5mm) is a widespread marine threat and a trigger for biological effects, especially if ingested. The mussel Perna perna, an important food resource, was used as bioindicator to investigate the presence of microplastic pollution on Santos estuary, the most urbanized area of the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. A simple and rapid assessment showed that 75% of sampled mussels had ingested microplastics, an issue of human and environmental concern. All sampling points had contaminated mussels and this contamination had no clear pattern of distribution along the estuary. This was the first time that microplastic bioavailability was assessed in nature for the southern hemisphere and that wild P. perna was found contaminated with this pollutant. This is an important issue that should be better assessed due to an increase in seafood consumption and culture in Brazil and worldwide.

  12. HIGH BREAST MILK LEVELS OF POLYCHLORINATEDE BIPHENYLS (PCBS) AMONG FOUR WOMEN LIVING ADJACENT TO A PCB-CONTAMINATED WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a consequence of contamination by effluents from local electronics manufacturing facilities, the New Bedford Harbor and estuary in southeastern Massachusetts is among the sites in the United States that are considered the most highly contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (...

  13. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors’ code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses.

  14. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2–36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors’ code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10–11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1–1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses. PMID:26198990

  15. Cyclic Lipodepsipeptides Produced by Pseudomonas spp. Naturally Present in Raw Milk Induce Inhibitory Effects on Microbiological Inhibitor Assays for Antibiotic Residue Screening

    PubMed Central

    Reybroeck, Wim; De Vleeschouwer, Matthias; Marchand, Sophie; Sinnaeve, Davy; Heylen, Kim; De Block, Jan; Madder, Annemieke; Martins, José C.; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Two Pseudomonas strains, identified as closely related to Pseudomonas tolaasii, were isolated from milk of a farm with frequent false-positive Delvotest results for screening putative antibiotic residues in raw milk executed as part of the regulatory quality programme. Growth at 5 to 7°C of these isolates in milk resulted in high lipolysis and the production of bacterial inhibitors. The two main bacterial inhibitors have a molecular weight of 1168.7 and 1140.7 Da respectively, are heat-tolerant and inhibit Geobacillus stearothermophilus var. calidolactis, the test strain of most of the commercially available microbiological inhibitor tests for screening of antibiotic residues in milk. Furthermore, these bacterial inhibitors show antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis and also interfere negatively with yoghurt production. Following their isolation and purification with RP-HPLC, the inhibitors were identified by NMR analysis as cyclic lipodepsipeptides of the viscosin group. Our findings bring to light a new challenge for quality control in the dairy industry. By prolonging the refrigerated storage of raw milk, the keeping quality of milk is influenced by growth and metabolic activities of psychrotrophic bacteria such as pseudomonads. Besides an increased risk of possible spoilage of long shelf-life milk, the production at low temperature of natural bacterial inhibitors may also result in false-positive results for antibiotic residue screening tests based on microbial inhibitor assays thus leading to undue production loss. PMID:24853676

  16. Insights for transformation of contaminants in leachate at a tropical landfill dominated by natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke; Tong, Huanhuan; Giannis, Apostolos; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to track the long-term trends of contaminants distribution in the old landfill of Singapore through monitored natural attenuation and to explore the main parameters that rule such transition. Contaminants distribution, including dissolved organic matter (DOM), inorganic species, heavy metals, and organic compounds, was investigated via monitoring wells in the years 1997, 2004 and 2011. The data revealed that the distribution of contaminants possessed selective attention of spots associated with leachate movement. The hydrogeology of the landfill governed the fate and transportation of contaminants. More specifically, strong statistical correlations were identified between DOM and certain constituents in the leachate, suggesting enhanced mobilization potential. However, the leachate composition exhibited limited correspondence to the nearby solid waste, indicating the minor effect induced by the partitioning coefficient. The presence of sulphate unveiled air intrusion, suggesting increased stability of the landfill, where enhanced biodegradation occurred at earlier period responsible for higher BOD removal. Afterwards other parameters continued to facilitate the compounds removal resulting in overall low concentrations of the contaminants.

  17. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling: Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, Kimberly P.; Serkiz, Steven M.; Pishko, Adrian L.; Kaplan, Daniel L.; Lee, Cindy M.; Schank, Anja

    2005-08-18

    To quantify metal natural attenuation processes in terms of environmental availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Despite significant heterogeneity resulting both from natural and anthropogenic factors, sequential extraction results demonstrate that pH is a controlling factor in the prediction of the distribution of metal contaminants within the solid phases in soils at the site as well as the contaminant partitioning between the soil and the soil solution. Results for beryllium, the most mobile metal evaluated, exhibit increasing attenuation along the plume flow path which corresponds to an increasing plume pH. These laboratory- and field-scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding partitioning of metals to soils at the site (one of the major attenuation mechanisms for the metals at the field site). Subsequently, these data have been used in the definition of the contaminant source terms and contaminant transport factors in risk modeling for the site.

  18. A MULTI-ORD LAB AND REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well the ...

  19. Milk Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in all forms, including condensed, derivative, dry, evaporated, goat’s milk and milk from other animals, lowfat, malted, ... avoid milk from other domestic animals. For example, goat's milk protein is similar to cow's milk protein ...

  20. Effects of deoxynivalenol in naturally contaminated wheat on feed intake and health status of horses.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Anna-Katharina; Kersten, Susanne; Dänicke, Sven; Coenen, Manfred; Vervuert, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    The present study examined the short-term effects of deoxynivalenol (DON), administered at two different concentrations via a feed preparation using naturally contaminated wheat, on feed intake, liver and kidney metabolism and immunomodulatory properties in horses. Twelve geldings were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments for 21 days. DON was provided via naturally contaminated wheat (14.6 ± 6.5 mg DON/kg dry matter). The daily feed intake was adjusted to 4 kg of wheat and 1.7 kg of silage per 100 kg of body weight (BW). Horses were fed one of the following diets: control wheat with 0% contaminated wheat (CON), wheat mixture containing 53 ± 2% of DON-contaminated wheat [low DON intake (LDI)] or wheat mixture containing 78 ± 4% of DON-contaminated wheat [high DON intake (HDI)]. CON, LDI and HDI corresponded to a targeted daily DON intake via the complete ration of <5, 50 and 75 μg/kg BW, respectively. None of the horses demonstrated any clinical signs commonly associated with the intake of DON such as colic or depression. HDI was associated with lower daily wheat intake on day 21. Serum DON concentrations increased with higher DON intake. The non-toxic DON metabolite, deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1) was only detected on day 21 of the DON feeding period. No changes in haematological and serum parameters or serum globulins or in the ex vivo proliferation response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were observed. These results suggest that horses are less sensitive to DON exposure than other domestic species, for example, swine. Therefore, the European Commission guidance value for critical DON concentrations in swine feed (complete diet) of 0.9 mg/kg could be safely applied for rations intended for feeding adult horses as well.

  1. A new database on contaminant exposure and effects in terrestrial vertebrates for natural resource managers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Pearson, J.L.; Garrett, L.J.; Erwin, R.M.; Walz, A.; Ottinger, M.A.; Barrett, H.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) program of the Department of the Interior is focused to identify and understand effects of contaminant stressors on biological resources under their stewardship. Despite the desire of many to continuously monitor the environmental health of our estuaries, much can be learned by summarizing existing temporal, geographic, and phylogenetic contaminant information. To this end, retrospective contaminant exposure and effects data for amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals residing within 30 km of Atlantic coast estuaries are being assembled through searches of published literature (e.g., Fisheries Review, Wildlife Review, BIOSIS Previews) and databases (e.g., US EPA Ecological Incident Information System; USGS Diagnostic and Epizootic Databases), and compilation of summary data from unpublished reports of government natural resource agencies, private conservation groups, and universities. These contaminant exposure and effect data for terrestrial vertebrates (CEE-TV) are being summarized using Borland dBASE in a 96- field format, including species, collection time and site coordinates, sample matrix, contaminant concentration, biomarker and bioindicator responses, and source of information (N>1500 records). This CEE-TV database has been imported into the ARC/INFO geographic information system (GIS), for purposes of examining geographic coverage and trends, and to identify critical data gaps. A preliminary risk assessment will be conducted to identify and characterize contaminants and other stressors potentially affecting terrestrial vertebrates that reside, migrate through or reproduce in these estuaries. Evaluations are underway, using specific measurement and assessment endpoints, to rank and prioritize estuarine ecosystems in which terrestrial vertebrates are potentially at risk for purposes of prediction and focusing future biomonitoring efforts.

  2. Unravelling a 'miner's myth' that environmental contamination in mining towns is naturally occurring.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Louise Jane; Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Australia has a long history of metal mining and smelting. Extraction and processing have resulted in elevated levels of toxic metals surrounding mining operations, which have adverse health effects, particularly to children. Resource companies, government agencies and employees often construct 'myths' to down play potential exposure risks and responsibility arising from operating emissions. Typical statements include: contaminants are naturally occurring, the wind blows emissions away from residential areas, contaminants are not bioavailable, or the problem is a legacy issue and not related to current operations. Evidence from mining and smelting towns shows that such 'myths' are exactly that. In mining towns, the default and primary defence against contamination is that elevated metals in adjacent urban environments are from the erosion and weathering of the ore bodies over millennia-hence 'naturally occurring'. Not only is this a difficult argument to unravel from an evidence-based perspective, but also it causes confusion and delays remediation work, hindering efforts to reduce harmful exposures to children. An example of this situation is from Broken Hill, New South Wales, home to one of the world's largest lead-zinc-silver ore body, which has been mined continuously for over 130 years. Environmental metal concentration and lead isotopic data from soil samples collected from across Broken Hill are used to establish the nature and timing of lead contamination. We use multiple lines of evidence to unravel a 'miner's myth' by evaluating current soil metal concentrations and lead isotopic compositions, geological data, historical environmental assessments and old photographic evidence to assess the impacts from early smelting along with mining to the surface soils in the city.

  3. Sequential Leaching of Chromium Contaminated Sediments - A Study Characterizing Natural Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, D.; Ding, M.; Beroff, S.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Ware, D.; Harris, R.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural attenuation is an important process in slowing down the transport of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), an anthropogenic environmental contaminant, either by adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments, or by reduction to nontoxic trivalent chromium, Cr(III). The capacity and mechanism of attenuation is explored in this sequential leaching study of different particle size fractions of chromium contaminated sediments and similar uncontaminated sediments from the regional aquifer near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Using this leaching protocol each sediment sample is split in two: one half is leached three times using a 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate/carbonate solution, while the second half is leached three times using a 0.01 M nitric acid, followed by two consecutively increasing magnitudes of nitric acid concentrations. Based on the amphoteric nature of chromium, alkaline leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(VI) sorbed on the sediment, whereas acid leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(III). The weak acid is predicted to release the attenuated anthropogenic Cr(III), without affecting Cr-bearing minerals. The sequential, stronger, acid is anticipated to leach Cr(III)-incorporated in the minerals. The efficiency and validation of the sequential leaching method is assessed by comparing the leaching behavior of bentonite and biotite samples, with and without loaded Cr(VI). A 97% chromium mass balance of leached Cr(VI)-loaded bentonite and biotite proves the viability of this method for further use on leaching contaminated sediments. By comparing contaminated and uncontaminated sediment leachate results, of chromium and other major and trace elements, the signature of anthropogenic chromium is determined. Further mineralogical characterization of the sediments provides a quantitative measure of the natural attenuation capacity for chromium. Understanding these results is pertinent in delineating the optimal procedure for the remediation of Cr(VI) in the regional aquifer

  4. Role of natural attenuation in modeling the leaching of contaminants in the risk analysis framework.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2013-01-15

    Natural attenuation (NA) processes occurring in the subsurface can significantly affect the impact on groundwater from contamination sources located in the vadose zone, especially when mobile and readily biodegradable compounds, such as BTEX, are present. Besides, in the last decades several studies have shown natural attenuation to take place also for more persistent compounds, such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nevertheless, common risk analysis frameworks, based on the ASTM RBCA (Risk Based Corrective Action) approach, do not include NA pathways in the fate and transport models, thus possibly leading to an overestimation of the calculated risk. The aim of this study was to provide an insight on the relevance of the different key natural attenuation processes usually taking place in the subsurface and to highlight for which contamination scenarios their inclusion in the risk-analysis framework could provide a more realistic risk assessment. To this end, an analytical model accounting for source depletion and biodegradation, dispersion and diffusion during leaching was developed and applied to several contamination scenarios. These scenarios included contamination by BTEX, characterized by relatively high mobility and biodegradation rate, and PAHs, i.e. a more persistent class of compounds. The obtained results showed that BTEX are likely to be attenuated in the source zone due to their mobility and ready biodegradation (assuming biodegradation constant rates in the order of 0.01-1 d(-1)). Instead, attenuation along transport through the vadose zone was found to be less important, as the residence time of the contaminant in the unsaturated zone is often too low with respect to the time required to get a relevant biodegradation of BTEX. On the other hand, heavier compounds such as PAHs, were found to be attenuated during leaching since the residence time in the vadose zone can reach values up to thousands of years. In these cases, even with the

  5. Characteristics of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli from meat and milk products of different origins and association with food producing animals as main contamination sources.

    PubMed

    Martin, Annett; Beutin, Lothar

    2011-03-15

    Shiga toxin-producing strains of Escherichia coli (STEC) cause diarrhoea and haemorrhagic colitis in humans. Most human infections are attributed to consumption of STEC contaminated foodstuff. Food producing animals constitute important reservoirs of STEC and serve as source of food contamination. In this study, we have analyzed 593 foodborne STEC strains for their serotypes and for nine virulence genes (stx1, stx1c, stx1d, stx2, stx2b, stx2e, stx2g, E-hly and eae). The 593 STEC strains grouped into 215 serotypes, and 123 serotypes (57.2%) were represented each by only one STEC isolate. Fifteen serotypes (7.0%) were attributed to 198 (33.3%) of the 593 STEC strains. The foodborne STEC were grouped into different categories in relation to the species of the food producing animal (cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, red deer, wild-boar and hare). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses revealed significant similarities between the animal origin of the food and the virulence markers of foodborne STEC. Significant associations (p<0.001) were found for stx1 and for stx2 with bovine meat and milk products. The stx2e gene was significantly (p<0.001) associated with STEC from pork and wild boar meat. Stx1c and stx2b genes were significantly (p<0.001) more frequent in STEC from deer meat, as well as from meat and milk products derived from sheep and goats. Using logistic regression models we detected significant (p<0.01) combinations between stx1, stx2 and E-hly genes and STEC from bovine meat. The combination of stx1c and stx2b genes was significant (p<0.001) for STEC derived from red deer, sheep and goat products. The properties of foodborne STEC were compared with published data on faecal STEC from food producing animals. Virulence profiles and serotypes of STEC from food showed remarkable similarities to those of faecal STEC that were from the same animal species. The findings from our study clearly indicate that the food producing animals represent the most important

  6. Some Technological Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Dahi and Datshi, Naturally Fermented Milk Products of Bhutan

    PubMed Central

    Shangpliang, H. N. J.; Sharma, Sharmila; Rai, Ranjita; Tamang, Jyoti P.

    2017-01-01

    Dahi and datshi are common naturally fermented milk (NFM) products of Bhutan. Population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in dahi (pH 3.7) and datshi (pH 5.2) was 1.4 × 107 and 3.9 × 108 cfu/ml, respectively. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing isolates of LAB from dahi and datshi were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. LAB strains were tested for some technological properties. All LAB strains except E. faecalis CH2:17 caused coagulation of milk at both 30°C for 48 h. Only E. faecium DH4:05 strain was resistant to pH 3. No significant difference (P > 0.05) of viable counts was observed in MRS broth with and without lysozyme. All LAB strains grew well in 0.3% bile showing their ability to tolerate bile salt. None of the LAB strains showed >70% hydrophobicity. This study, being the first of its microbiological analysis of the NFM of Bhutan, has opened up to an extent of research work that gives a new insight to the products. PMID:28203227

  7. Field Investigations of Natural Attenuation and Trench Application in a Heterogeneous Shallow Contaminated Aquifer with Free-Phase LNAPLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Bae, G.; Lee, K.

    2009-05-01

    This study focused on the evaluation of natural attenuation of groundwater and the applicability of trench method for intercepting the contaminant plume in a highly contaminated aquifer with dissolved hydrocarbons and free phase LNAPLs. Several times of groundwater sampling and subsequential geochemical analyses were carried out over a period of 6 years. The selected aquifer is composed of a high permeability gravel layer that acts as a preferential pathway of LNAPLs when the groundwater fluctuates by 1-2 m. The results of field investigations show that the NA of hydrocarbon contaminants had sufficient ability to mineralize the contaminants but the remediation rate was lower than that observed at the other sites because the LNAPL source has not completely removed yet. After the installation of the trench, long term monitoring of contaminant concentration indicates that the expanding of the contaminant plume is greatly controlled by the trench. The Mann-Kendall trend analyses show that BTEX contaminant plume in the source area has reached "STABLE" with high contaminant concentration for the whole period but the contaminant plume in down-gradient area was "DECREASING" with low contaminant concentrations due to the role of the trench. Approximately 98% of the contaminants were intercepted by the trench and the intercepted rates of the contaminant were approximately 1,469 ~ 2,393 g/year.

  8. Analysis of breast milk to assess exposure to chlorinated contaminants in Kazakstan: high levels of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in agricultural villages of southern Kazakstan.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, K; Petreas, M X; Chuvakova, T; Kazbekova, G; Druz, N; Seminova, G; Sharmanov, T; Hayward, D; She, J; Visita, P; Winkler, J; McKinney, M; Wade, T J; Grassman, J; Stephens, R D

    1998-01-01

    To assess levels of chlorinated contaminants in breast milk, we measured organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in breast milk samples collected in 1994 according to the World Health Organization protocol from 92 donors that were representative of regional populations in southern Kazakstan. High levels (10-120 pg/g fat) of 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most toxic of the PCDD/PCDF congeners, were found in breast milk samples from an agricultural region. TCDD was the major contributor (75%) to the international toxicity equivalents of these samples. The same distinctive PCDD/PCDF congener pattern was found in 15 breast milk samples and 4 serum samples collected in 1996 in a follow-up study, and has now been confirmed by three analytical laboratories. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9831540

  9. Monitored Natural Attenuation of ino9rganic Contaminants Treatability Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Crapse, K

    2004-05-19

    The identification and quantification of key natural attenuation processes for inorganic contaminants at D-Area is detailed herein. Two overarching goals of this evaluation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy were (1) to better define the availability of inorganic contaminants as potential sources for transport to groundwater and uptake by environmental receptors and (2) to understand the site-specific mechanisms controlling attenuation of these inorganic contaminants through tandem geochemical and biological characterization. Data collected in this study provides input for more appropriate site groundwater transport models. Significant natural attenuation is occurring at D-Area as evidenced by relatively low aqueous concentrations of constituents of concern (COCs) (Be, Ni, U, and As) at all locations characterized and the decrease in groundwater concentrations with increasing distance from the source. The observed magnitude of decrease in groundwater concentrations of COCs with distance from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) could not be accounted for by the modeled physical attenuation processes of dilution/dispersion. This additional attenuation, i.e., the observed difference between the groundwater concentrations of COCs and the modeled physical attenuation, is due to biogeochemical processes occurring at the D-Area. In tandem geochemical and microbiological characterization studies designed to evaluate the mechanisms contributing to natural attenuation, pH was the single parameter found to be most predictive of contaminant attenuation. The increasing pH with distance from the source is likely responsible for increased sorption of COCs to soil surfaces within the aquifer at D-Area. Importantly, because the sediments appear to have a high buffering capacity, the acid emanating from the DCPRB has been neutralized by the soil, and these conditions have led to large Kd values at the site. Two major types of soils are present at

  10. Radon as a naturally occurring tracer for the assessment of residual NAPL contamination of aquifers.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael; Paschke, Albrecht; Lau, Steffen; Geyer, Wolfgang; Knöller, Kay

    2007-02-01

    The noble gas radon has a strong affinity to non-aqueous phase-liquids (NAPLs). That property makes it applicable as naturally occurring partitioning tracer for assessing residual NAPL contamination of aquifers. In a NAPL contaminated aquifer, radon dissolved in the groundwater partitions preferably into the NAPL. The magnitude of the resulting radon deficit in the groundwater depends on the NAPL-specific radon partition coefficient and on the NAPL saturation of the pore space. Hence, if the partition coefficient is known, the NAPL saturation is attainable by determination of the radon deficit. After a concise discussion of theoretical aspects regarding radon partitioning into NAPL, related experimental data and results of a field investigation are presented. Aim of the laboratory experiments was the determination of radon partition coefficients of multi-component NAPLs of environmental concern. The on-site activities were carried out in order to confirm the applicability of the "radon method" under field conditions.

  11. Microbial interactions with naturally occurring hydrophobic sediments: Influence on sediment and associated contaminant mobility.

    PubMed

    Droppo, I G; Krishnappan, B G; Lawrence, J R

    2016-04-01

    The erosion, transport and fate of sediments and associated contaminants are known to be influenced by both particle characteristics and the flow dynamics imparted onto the sediment. The influential role of bitumen containing hydrophobic sediments and the microbial community on sediment dynamics are however less understood. This study links an experimental evaluation of sediment erosion with measured sediment-associated contaminant concentrations and microbial community analysis to provide an estimate of the potential for sediment to control the erosion, transport and fate of contaminants. Specifically the paper addresses the unique behaviour of hydrophobic sediments and the role that the microbial community associated with hydrophobic sediment may play in the transport of contaminated sediment. Results demonstrate that the hydrophobic cohesive sediment demonstrates unique transport and particle characteristics (poor settling and small floc size). Biofilms were observed to increase with consolidation/biostabilization times and generated a unique microbial consortium relative to the eroded flocs. Natural oil associated with the flocs appeared to be preferentially associated with microbial derived extracellular polymeric substances. While PAHs and naphthenic acid increased with increasing shear (indicative of increasing loads), they tended to decrease with consolidation/biostabilization (CB) time at similar shears suggesting a chemical and/or biological degradation. PAH and napthenic acid degrading microbes decreased with time as well, which may suggest that there was a reduced pool of PAHs and naphthenic acids available resulting in their die off. This study emphasizes the importance that any management strategies and operational assessments for the protection of human and aquatic health incorporate the sediment (suspended and bed sediment) and biological (biofilm) compartments and the energy dynamics within the system in order to better predict contaminant

  12. Transfer kinetics and coefficients of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs from forage contaminated by Chernobyl fallout to milk of cows

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbri, S.; Sogni, R.; Lusardi, E.

    1994-04-01

    A experiment was conducted to study kinetics, transfer coefficients, and biological half-lives of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs from feed to milk. A cow was fed a diet containing alfalfa hay contaminated by Chernobyl fallout for 14.5 wk. The time-dependent activity in milk was approximated by a two-compartment model with fast biological half-lives of 2, 0.9, and 1 d and slow biological half-lives of 36.9, 8.7, and 12.4 d for {sup 90}Sr, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs respectively. The transfer coefficients determined in the experiment were 0.0008 d L{sup -1} for {sup 90}Sr, 0.0029 d L{sup -1} for {sup 137}Cs, and 0.0031 d L{sup -1} for {sup 137}Cs. The biological elimination phases of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were described by a two-compartment model while a one-compartment model was proposed for {sup 90}Sr. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of ultraviolet light on bacterial contaminants inoculated into whole milk and colostrum, and on colostrum immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R V; Bicalho, M L; Machado, V S; Lima, S; Teixeira, A G; Warnick, L D; Bicalho, R C

    2014-05-01

    Raw milk and colostrum can harbor dangerous microorganisms that can pose serious health risks for animals and humans. According to the USDA, more than 58% of calves in the United States are fed unpasteurized milk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UV light on reduction of bacteria in milk and colostrum, and on colostrum IgG. A pilot-scale UV light continuous (UVC) flow-through unit (45 J/cm(2)) was used to treat milk and colostrum. Colostrum and sterile whole milk were inoculated with Listeria innocua, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Salmonella serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Acinetobacter baumannii before being treated with UVC. During UVC treatment, samples were collected at 5 time points and bacteria were enumerated using selective media. The effect of UVC on IgG was evaluated using raw colostrum from a nearby dairy farm without the addition of bacteria. For each colostrum batch, samples were collected at several different time points and IgG was measured using ELISA. The UVC treatment of milk resulted in a significant final count (log cfu/mL) reduction of Listeria monocytogenes (3.2 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Salmonella spp. (3.7 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), Escherichia coli (2.8 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), Staph. aureus (3.4 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Streptococcus spp. (3.4 ± 0.4 log cfu/mL reduction), and A. baumannii (2.8 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction). The UVC treatment of milk did not result in a significant final count (log cfu/mL) reduction for M. smegmatis (1.8 ± 0.5 log cfu/mL reduction). The UVC treatment of colostrum was significantly associated with a final reduction of bacterial count (log cfu/mL) of Listeria spp. (1.4 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Salmonella spp. (1.0 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), and Acinetobacter spp. (1.1 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), but not of E. coli (0.5 ± 0.3 log cfu/mL reduction), Strep. agalactiae (0.8 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction), and

  14. Human milk banking.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Esther Marie; Wood, Angela; Fiske, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Forms of human milk banking and donation have been present for more than a century worldwide, but, since 1985, the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HM BANA) has established guidelines to make the use of donor's breast milk safe and the second best form of feeding to maternal breast milk for a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infant. The Indiana Mother's Human Milk Bank provides an extensive and meticulous process of selecting breast milk donors. The process begins with a phone interview with a potential donor and includes the review of the donor's medical records, blood laboratory screening, medication and dietary intake, as well as consent from the donor's pediatrician. The milk bank follows steps of collecting, storing, and receiving the breast milk in accordance with the guidelines of the HM BANA. Pasteurization is the method used to ensure the proper heating and cooling of breast milk. Despite the rigorous pasteurization method, the donor's breast milk will not lose most of the important beneficial components needed for sick or ill NICU infants. Every batch of pasteurized breast milk will be cultured for any possible contamination and shipped to NICUs after it has been cleared by laboratory testing.

  15. Effect of commercial-scale high-temperature, short-time pasteurization on the viability of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in naturally infected cows' milk.

    PubMed

    Grant, Irene R; Hitchings, Edward I; McCartney, Alan; Ferguson, Fiona; Rowe, Michael T

    2002-02-01

    Raw cows' milk naturally infected with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was pasteurized with an APV HXP commercial-scale pasteurizer (capacity 2,000 liters/h) on 12 separate occasions. On each processing occasion, milk was subjected to four different pasteurization treatments, viz., 73 degrees C for 15 s or 25 s with and without prior homogenization (2,500 lb/in(2) in two stages), in an APV Manton Gaulin KF6 homogenizer. Raw and pasteurized milk samples were tested for M. paratuberculosis by immunomagnetic separation (IMS)-PCR (to detect the presence of bacteria) and culture after decontamination with 0.75% (wt/vol) cetylpyridinium chloride for 5 h (to confirm bacterial viability). On 10 of the 12 processing occasions, M. paratuberculosis was detectable by IMS-PCR, culture, or both in either raw or pasteurized milk. Overall, viable M. paratuberculosis was cultured from 4 (6.7%) of 60 raw and 10 (6.9%) of 144 pasteurized milk samples. On one processing day, in particular, M. paratuberculosis appeared to have been present in greater abundance in the source raw milk (evidenced by more culture positives and stronger PCR signals), and on this occasion, surviving M. paratuberculosis bacteria were isolated from milk processed by all four heat treatments, i.e., 73 degrees C for 15 and 25 s with and without prior homogenization. On one other occasion, surviving M. paratuberculosis bacteria were isolated from an unhomogenized milk sample that had been heat treated at 73 degrees C for 25 s. Results suggested that homogenization increases the lethality of subsequent heat treatment to some extent with respect to M. paratuberculosis, but the extended 25-s holding time at 73 degrees C was found to be no more effective at killing M. paratuberculosis than the standard 15-s holding time. This study provides clear evidence that M. paratuberculosis bacteria in naturally infected milk are capable of surviving commercial high-temperature, short-time pasteurization if they are present in

  16. Effect of Commercial-Scale High-Temperature, Short-Time Pasteurization on the Viability of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in Naturally Infected Cows' Milk

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Irene R.; Hitchings, Edward I.; McCartney, Alan; Ferguson, Fiona; Rowe, Michael T.

    2002-01-01

    Raw cows' milk naturally infected with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was pasteurized with an APV HXP commercial-scale pasteurizer (capacity 2,000 liters/h) on 12 separate occasions. On each processing occasion, milk was subjected to four different pasteurization treatments, viz., 73°C for 15 s or 25 s with and without prior homogenization (2,500 lb/in2 in two stages), in an APV Manton Gaulin KF6 homogenizer. Raw and pasteurized milk samples were tested for M. paratuberculosis by immunomagnetic separation (IMS)-PCR (to detect the presence of bacteria) and culture after decontamination with 0.75% (wt/vol) cetylpyridinium chloride for 5 h (to confirm bacterial viability). On 10 of the 12 processing occasions, M. paratuberculosis was detectable by IMS-PCR, culture, or both in either raw or pasteurized milk. Overall, viable M. paratuberculosis was cultured from 4 (6.7%) of 60 raw and 10 (6.9%) of 144 pasteurized milk samples. On one processing day, in particular, M. paratuberculosis appeared to have been present in greater abundance in the source raw milk (evidenced by more culture positives and stronger PCR signals), and on this occasion, surviving M. paratuberculosis bacteria were isolated from milk processed by all four heat treatments, i.e., 73°C for 15 and 25 s with and without prior homogenization. On one other occasion, surviving M. paratuberculosis bacteria were isolated from an unhomogenized milk sample that had been heat treated at 73°C for 25 s. Results suggested that homogenization increases the lethality of subsequent heat treatment to some extent with respect to M. paratuberculosis, but the extended 25-s holding time at 73°C was found to be no more effective at killing M. paratuberculosis than the standard 15-s holding time. This study provides clear evidence that M. paratuberculosis bacteria in naturally infected milk are capable of surviving commercial high-temperature, short-time pasteurization if they are present in raw milk in sufficient numbers

  17. Practical improvement of the radiological quality of milk produced by peasant farmers in the territories of Belarus contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. The ETHOS project.

    PubMed

    Lepicard, S; Dubreuil, G H

    2001-01-01

    The Chernobyl post-accident situation has highlighted how the sudden emergence of persistent radioactive contamination in the environment is severely affecting the quality of life of the inhabitants in the concerned territories. The management of this situation is complex, mainly conditioned by the ability of the inhabitants themselves to be directly involved in the process of improving their living conditions. In this process, quality of life cannot be restricted solely to the dimension of radiological risk, but needs to encompass the diverse aspects of daily living, including the social, psychological, economic, political and ethical aspects. This paper presents the experience of the involvement of a group of peasant farmers from a village in the Republic of Belarus, in the process of improving the radiological quality of privately produced milk. This experience took place in the context of the ETHOS project, funded by the radiation protection research programme of the European Commission. The principal objective was to implement a complementary approach to the rehabilitation strategies adopted so far in the contaminated territories of the Republic of Belarus. This paper retraces the process of involvement of the inhabitants in a working group. It describes the characterisation of the situation by local actors, the opening of new possible actions to improve the radiological quality of milk at the individual level and the positive consequences at the scale of the village. The ETHOS project also illustrates how the scientific knowledge accumulated over many years since the Chernobyl accident in the field of radiation protection and radioecology can enter into local practices in the form of practical tools, which can be used by the population to produce significant improvements in the radiological situation.

  18. Imbalance of Nature due to Contaminant Loads in the Culiacan River Watershed, Sinaloa, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Páez, F.; Ley-Aispuro, E.

    2013-05-01

    The Culiacan River discharges runoff from a large agricultural watershed into the wetlands at Ensenada de Pabellones ranked as a priority marine region of Mexico due to its high biodiversity and the economic importance of its fishing resources. This research estimated potential contaminant loads for BOD5, TSS, N and P from stormwater runoff and associated land use in the watershed. Previous studies had demonstrated the imbalance of nature due to land use change causing contamination by heavy metals, pesticides, sediment, phosphorus and eutrophication (Lopez and Osuna, 2002; Green and Paez, 2004, Gonzalez et al., 2006; Osuna et al., 2007). The methodology included: Characterizing the watershed according to land use, soil, vegetation, annual runoff and population density by sub-watershed; estimating the potential contaminant load and annual average concentrations of contaminants using the PLOAD program, comparing the result with monitored contaminant concentrations; and identifying the impact of pollutant loads in the watershed and coastal ecosystems and proposing management strategies to reduce or reverse the imbalance of nature caused by contamination in the Culiacan River watershed. Calculated contaminant loads in tonne/year were 13,682.4 of BOD5; 503,621.8 of TSS; 5,975.7 of N and 1,789.1 of P. The Tamazula and Humaya rivers watersheds provide 72% of the total load of BOD5, 68.5% of TSS, 77.6% of N and 62.7% of P discharged to the wetlands. Monitored results include: 89% of temperature observations were above 21°C, which is stressful to aquatic life due to a subsequent decrease in dissolved oxygen; 100% of the observations of P exceeded the ecological criteria for water quality; 71.5% of the observations for DO from 2001 to 2011, were above the ecological criteria for protection of aquatic life and 91.5% met the criteria for use in drinking water; 100% of the observations for BOD5 values remained in the range of Excellent to Good; 22% of the observations for the

  19. Immobilization of metals in contaminated soils using natural polymer-based stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xue; Li, Aimin; Yang, Hu

    2017-03-01

    Three low-cost natural polymer materials, namely, lignin (Ln), carboxymethyl cellulose, and sodium alginate, were used for soil amendment to immobilize lead and cadmium in two contaminated soil samples collected from a mining area in Nanjing, China. The remediation effects of the aforementioned natural polymers were evaluated by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and sequential extractions. The stabilizers could lower the bioavailability of Pb and Cd in the contaminated soils, and the amount of the exchangeable forms of the aforementioned two metals were reduced evidently. TCLP results showed that the leaching concentrations of Pb and Cd were decreased by 5.46%-71.1% and 4.25%-49.6%, respectively, in the treated soils. The contents of the organic forms of the two metals both increased with the increase in stabilizer dose on the basis of the redistribution of metal forms by sequential extractions. These findings were due to the fact that the abundant oxygen-containing groups on the polymeric amendments were effective in chelating and immobilizing Pb and Cd, which have been further confirmed from the metal adsorptions in aqueous solutions. Moreover, Ln achieved the greatest effect among the three polymers under study because of the former's distinct three-dimensional molecular structure, showing the preferential immobilization of Pb over Cd in soils also. Thus, the above-mentioned natural polymers hold great application potentials for reducing metal ion entry into the food chain at a field scale.

  20. Background in the context of land contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Read, D; Read, G D; Thorne, M C

    2013-06-01

    The financial implications of choosing a particular threshold for clearance of radioactively contaminated land are substantial, particularly when one considers the volume of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) created each year by the production and combustion of fossil fuels and the exploitation of industrial minerals. Inevitably, a compromise needs to be reached between the level of environmental protection sought and the finite resources available for remediation. In the case of natural series radionuclides, any anthropogenic input is always superimposed on the inventory already present in the soil; this 'background' inventory is conventionally disregarded when assessing remediation targets. Unfortunately, the term is not well defined and the concept of 'background dose' is open to alternative interpretations. In this paper, we address the issue of natural background from a geochemical rather than from a solely radiological perspective, illustrating this with an example from the china clay industry. We propose a simple procedure for decision making based on activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides and their progeny. Subsequent calculations of dose need to take into account the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the contamination, which in the case of NORM are invariably reflected in uranium series disequilibrium.

  1. Emergency response planning to reduce the impact of contaminated drinking water during natural disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Craig L.; Adams, Jeffrey Q.

    2011-12-01

    Natural disasters can be devastating to local water supplies affecting millions of people. Disaster recovery plans and water industry collaboration during emergencies protect consumers from contaminated drinking water supplies and help facilitate the repair of public water systems. Prior to an event, utilities and municipalities can use "What if"? scenarios to develop emergency operation, response, and recovery plans designed to reduce the severity of damage and destruction. Government agencies including the EPA are planning ahead to provide temporary supplies of potable water and small drinking water treatment technologies to communities as an integral part of emergency response activities that will ensure clean and safe drinking water.

  2. Influence of dams on sediment continuity: A study case of a natural metallic contamination.

    PubMed

    Frémion, Franck; Bordas, François; Mourier, Brice; Lenain, Jean-François; Kestens, Tim; Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra

    2016-03-15

    Sediments play an important role on the quality of aquatic ecosystems, notably in the reservoir areas where they can either be a sink or a source of contaminants, depending on the management and hydrological conditions. The physicochemical properties of 25 surface sediments samples of a reservoir catchment (Vaussaire, Cantal, France) were studied. Results show a strong influence of dam presence, notably on the grain size and organic matter (OM) contents. The concentrations of trace metals and metalloids (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were also measured and compared with worldwide reservoir concentrations and international sediment quality guideline levels in order to assess the intensity of the metallic contamination. Cr and Ni are the trace elements presenting the significantly highest values at the catchment scale. Enrichment Factors (EF), calculated using both local and national backgrounds, show that metals have mainly a natural origin, explaining especially the Cr and Ni values, linked with the composition of parental rocks. Unexpectedly, all the observed metal concentrations are lower in the reservoir than upstream and downstream, which might be related to the high fresh OM inputs in the reservoir, diluting the global metallic contamination. Multivariate statistical analyses, carried out in order to identify the relationship between the studied metals and sediment characteristics, tend to support this hypothesis, confirming the unusually low influence of such poorly-degraded OM on trace element accumulation in the reservoir.

  3. Method validation for norovirus detection in naturally contaminated irrigation water and fresh produce.

    PubMed

    El-Senousy, Waled Morsy; Costafreda, M Isabel; Pintó, Rosa M; Bosch, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Human enteric viruses are shed in extremely high numbers in the feces of infected individuals, becoming environmental contaminants and eventually leading to contamination of a variety of foodstuffs at the pre-harvest stage. Among these foods at risk is fresh produce and irrigation water is a major vehicle for crop contamination. In the present study, a standardized molecular method for quantitative virus assay has been evaluated in different types of fresh produce and in irrigation water for human norovirus (NoV) detection. Two different virus concentration procedures, polyethylene-glycol precipitation (PEG) and organic flocculation (OF), were employed. The procedures were initially assayed in spiked samples and later validated on naturally contaminated samples from the Nile Delta in Egypt. Overall, PEG provided significantly (p<0.05) better virus recoveries than OF for both irrigation water and salad vegetable virus analysis. NoV GI and GII recoveries in spiked irrigation water ranged from 22.0% to 43.3% and from 12.6% to 16.4% with the PEG and OF methods, respectively. In experimentally contaminated salad vegetables, virus recoveries ranged from 28.0% to 48.0% and from 14.0% to 18.8% by PEG precipitation and OF, respectively. Using PEG precipitation, NoV was found in 31.9% of naturally contaminated irrigation water samples. Both NoV GI and GII were detected in these samples with genome copy numbers of around 10(2) per liter. Virus analyses performed in naturally contaminated fresh produce that included green onion, watercress, radish, leek, and lettuce show that NoV GI was present in 20.8%-34.0% of the samples with genome copy numbers of around 10(2) per gram. When OF was employed, NoV was found in 25.0% of the irrigation water samples. Both genogroups could be found in these samples with genome copy numbers of around 10 per liter. In fresh produce, GI was present in 16.0%-25.7% of the samples with genome copy numbers per gram of around 10. Surprisingly, NoV GII

  4. Analytical method for optimal source reduction with monitored natural attenuation in contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widdowson, M.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Brauner, J.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    A method is developed for optimizing monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and the reduction in the aqueous source zone concentration (??C) required to meet a site-specific regulatory target concentration. The mathematical model consists of two one-dimensional equations of mass balance for the aqueous phase contaminant, to coincide with up to two distinct zones of transformation, and appropriate boundary and intermediate conditions. The solution is written in terms of zone-dependent Peclet and Damko??hler numbers. The model is illustrated at a chlorinated solvent site where MNA was implemented following source treatment using in-situ chemical oxidation. The results demonstrate that by not taking into account a variable natural attenuation capacity (NAC), a lower target ??C is predicted, resulting in unnecessary source concentration reduction and cost with little benefit to achieving site-specific remediation goals.

  5. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in naturally and artificially contaminated laying hen feces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M F M; Schulz, J; Hartung, J

    2013-02-01

    Infected laying hens regularly excrete large amounts of Campylobacter jejuni with their feces, which represent a reservoir of infection within the flock and for animals in the region. However, the knowledge about survival times of C. jejuni in these feces is still scarce. Therefore, orienting laboratory experiments were carried out under controlled conditions to estimate the survival times of C. jejuni both in artificially and naturally contaminated laying hen feces. In 6 different laying hen flocks (3 Campylobacter-free and 3 Campylobacter-positive flocks), fresh excreta were randomly collected and pooled in 20-g samples per flock. In the laboratory, each of the 3 pooled samples from the Campylobacter-free barns were homogenized and mixed with 10 mL of a freshly prepared C. jejuni suspension (3 × 10(8) cfu/mL). The other 3 samples were homogenized only. The 6 samples were stored at 20 ± 1°C and 40 to 60% RH in 2 different incubators. Specimens of 2 g were taken from all 6 samples 1 h after storage and daily at the same time during the next 10 consecutive days and investigated on culturable C. jejuni. The survival times of culturable C. jejuni ranged from 72 to 96 h in artificially inoculated feces and varied from 120 to 144 h in naturally colonized flocks. The flaA typing by RFLP confirmed that the isolates from the artificially contaminated feces were identical with the added strain. A total of 5 different flaA types were identified from the naturally contaminated feces, and survival of these isolates was dependent on flaA type. The demonstrated survival times indicate that contaminated fresh feces are an important reservoir of C. jejuni, representing a permanent source of infection over at least 6 d after excretion. It shows the considerable potential of fresh feces in transmitting the agent within and between flocks during that period. This 6-d span should be considered when poultry manure is applied to land as organic fertilizer.

  6. Glutathione-Conjugates of Deoxynivalenol in Naturally Contaminated Grain Are Primarily Linked via the Epoxide Group.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Silvio; Stanic, Ana; Hofgaard, Ingerd S; Kluger, Bernhard; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Miles, Christopher O

    2016-11-11

    A glutathione (GSH) adduct of the mycotoxin 4-deoxynivalenol (DON), together with a range of related conjugates, has recently been tentatively identified by LC-MS of DON-treated wheat spikelets. In this study, we prepared samples of DON conjugated at the 10- and 13-positions with GSH, Cys, CysGly, γ-GluCys and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The mixtures of conjugates were used as standards for LC-HRMS analysis of one of the DON-treated wheat spikelet samples, as well as 19 Norwegian grain samples of spring wheat and 16 grain samples of oats that were naturally-contaminated with DON at concentrations higher than 1 mg/kg. The artificially-contaminated wheat spikelets contained conjugates of GSH, CysGly and Cys coupled at the olefinic 10-position of DON, whereas the naturally-contaminated harvest-ripe grain samples contained GSH, CysGly, Cys, and NAC coupled mainly at the 13-position on the epoxy group. The identities of the conjugates were confirmed by LC-HRMS comparison with authentic standards, oxidation to the sulfoxides with hydrogen peroxide, and examination of product-ion spectra from LC-HRMS/MS analysis. No γ-GluCys adducts of DON were detected in any of the samples. The presence of 15-O-acetyl-DON was demonstrated for the first time in Norwegian grain. The results indicate that a small but significant proportion of DON is metabolized via the GSH-conjugation pathway in plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo conjugation of trichothecenes via their epoxy group, which has generally been viewed as unreactive. Because conjugation at the 13-position of DON and other trichothecenes has been shown to be irreversible, this type of conjugate may prove useful as a biomarker of exposure to DON and other 12,13-epoxytrichothecenes.

  7. Time Evolution of Activity Concentration of Natural Emitters in a Scenario Affected By Previous Phosphogypsum Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, M.; Mantero, J.; Mosqueda, F.; Hurtado, S.; Manjón, G.; Vaca, F.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-01

    The estuary formed by the confluence of Tinto and Odiel river-mouths is located in the South of Spain, close to Huelva town. This estuary has been deeply studied through the years because it has a double particularity. On one hand, since the beginning of the 1960s, the estuary has been affected by direct and indirect phosphogypsum (pg.) releases from two phosphoric acid and fertilizers factories that are working in the area. On the other hand, the pyrite mining operations upstream the Odiel and Tinto rivers has caused historically the formation of H2SO4, through oxidation of the natural sulphur deposits, the acidification of the waters and the consequent mobilisation of heavy metals from the mining area to the Huelva estuary. As a consequence, enhancement contamination levels in natural emitters from the 238U series were found in the surroundings of the factories in the previous years to 1998. However, in 1998 the management policy of waste releases drastically changed in the area, and direct discharges to Tinto and Odiel River had to be ceased. A thorough study of the affected zone is being carried out. Riverbed sediments and water samples have been analyzed from four different sampling campaigns in the estuary during the years 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2005. Different radioanalytical techniques have been employed to obtain the activity concentrations of U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po. Furthermore, the results for the rates of de-contamination of the area are presented. This data will be discussed in order to establish the present status of the contamination in the area, and moreover, to predict the time-evolution of the self-cleaning

  8. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Evidence of Natural Attenuation at the Gas Station Contaminated with Fuel Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Oh, I.; Suk, H.; Lee, K.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater flow, hydrochemistry and the carbon isotope composition (d13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured to know the effect of natural attenuation which is induced by biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon at the abandoned gas station contaminated fuel hydrocarbons. The aquifer sediment consists of 4 to 5 m of unconsolidated and weathered soils overlying granite. The monitoring results of water level showed the immediate response of that to rainfall. This implies that the site is an unconfined aquifer or is located at the near of groundwater recharge area. The contaminant transport modeling using GMS showed that the contaminants, BTEX, transported to two main directions, south and southwest from UST and pipeline. These results were proved by the filed observation of the BTEX from the groundwater seepage at the streams of south and southwest area. The geochemical indicator of natural attenuation, red iron precipitate, was also observed at the groundwater seepage. The hydrochemical indicators, Fe(II), Mn(II), sufides, and methane, of terminal electron accepting processes represented the sulfate reducing and methanogenesis environment of the site. d13C values of DIC ranged from -20.2 to -9.3 permil and increased in the source zone by the microbial degradation of hydrocarbon under methanogenic condition. The enrichment of isotopically heavy C is caused by the production of light 12CH4 from microbial respiration. The molar ratio of Ca to HCO3 is about 2.5 and this indicates the contribution of microbial oxidation of fuel hydrocarbon to DIC in groundwater. The geochemical modeling using PHREEQC showed the oversaturation of siderite, rhodocrosite and goethite and the saturation index of calcite increased as the increase of bicarbonate, indicating the enhanced microbial degradation. From the research results, the mineralogical, hydrological and microbiological factors can exert influence on groundwater chemistry and d13C of DIC.

  9. Glutathione-Conjugates of Deoxynivalenol in Naturally Contaminated Grain Are Primarily Linked via the Epoxide Group

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Silvio; Stanic, Ana; Hofgaard, Ingerd S.; Kluger, Bernhard; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Miles, Christopher O.

    2016-01-01

    A glutathione (GSH) adduct of the mycotoxin 4-deoxynivalenol (DON), together with a range of related conjugates, has recently been tentatively identified by LC-MS of DON-treated wheat spikelets. In this study, we prepared samples of DON conjugated at the 10- and 13-positions with GSH, Cys, CysGly, γ-GluCys and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The mixtures of conjugates were used as standards for LC-HRMS analysis of one of the DON-treated wheat spikelet samples, as well as 19 Norwegian grain samples of spring wheat and 16 grain samples of oats that were naturally-contaminated with DON at concentrations higher than 1 mg/kg. The artificially-contaminated wheat spikelets contained conjugates of GSH, CysGly and Cys coupled at the olefinic 10-position of DON, whereas the naturally-contaminated harvest-ripe grain samples contained GSH, CysGly, Cys, and NAC coupled mainly at the 13-position on the epoxy group. The identities of the conjugates were confirmed by LC-HRMS comparison with authentic standards, oxidation to the sulfoxides with hydrogen peroxide, and examination of product-ion spectra from LC-HRMS/MS analysis. No γ-GluCys adducts of DON were detected in any of the samples. The presence of 15-O-acetyl-DON was demonstrated for the first time in Norwegian grain. The results indicate that a small but significant proportion of DON is metabolized via the GSH-conjugation pathway in plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo conjugation of trichothecenes via their epoxy group, which has generally been viewed as unreactive. Because conjugation at the 13-position of DON and other trichothecenes has been shown to be irreversible, this type of conjugate may prove useful as a biomarker of exposure to DON and other 12,13-epoxytrichothecenes. PMID:27845722

  10. Time Evolution of Activity Concentration of Natural Emitters in a Scenario Affected By Previous Phosphogypsum Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Hurtado, S.; Mantero, J.; Manjon, G.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Mosqueda, F.; Vaca, F.

    2008-08-07

    The estuary formed by the confluence of Tinto and Odiel river-mouths is located in the South of Spain, close to Huelva town. This estuary has been deeply studied through the years because it has a double particularity. On one hand, since the beginning of the 1960s, the estuary has been affected by direct and indirect phosphogypsum (pg.) releases from two phosphoric acid and fertilizers factories that are working in the area. On the other hand, the pyrite mining operations upstream the Odiel and Tinto rivers has caused historically the formation of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, through oxidation of the natural sulphur deposits, the acidification of the waters and the consequent mobilisation of heavy metals from the mining area to the Huelva estuary. As a consequence, enhancement contamination levels in natural emitters from the {sup 238}U series were found in the surroundings of the factories in the previous years to 1998. However, in 1998 the management policy of waste releases drastically changed in the area, and direct discharges to Tinto and Odiel River had to be ceased.A thorough study of the affected zone is being carried out. Riverbed sediments and water samples have been analyzed from four different sampling campaigns in the estuary during the years 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2005. Different radioanalytical techniques have been employed to obtain the activity concentrations of U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Furthermore, the results for the rates of de-contamination of the area are presented. This data will be discussed in order to establish the present status of the contamination in the area, and moreover, to predict the time-evolution of the self-cleaning.

  11. Evaluation of rhamnolipid addition on the natural attenuation of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Mitsue M; Gavazza, Sávia; Kato, Mario T; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2016-07-07

    The aim of the present study was to assess the bioremediation of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil. The following two experiments were performed: natural attenuation (NA) and stimulated natural attenuation (SNA), using rhamnolipid as biosurfactant. Sediment samples were accommodated into glass columns and then contaminated with diesel oil on the top. The column profiles were separated into surface, middle, and bottom for the analyses. The 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prioritized by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) were monitored for 349 days. Those with three and four rings showed increasing concentrations through the operation period in the middle and bottom samples, particularly between days 111 and 338, and in the SNA experiment. Those with five and six rings were also detected in the deeper portions of the columns, suggesting the percolation of PAHs with a high molecular weight. Total organic carbon was reduced by 91 and 89 % in the NA and SNA samples, respectively, although no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the two treatments. The analyses by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis indicated a slight shift in the microbial community structure over the experiments. Microorganisms belonging to the γ-Proteobacteria phylum were the main bacteria involved. The archaeal community exhibited dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, indicating the obligate anaerobic biodegradation of intermediate compounds from hydrocarbon degradation.

  12. Review of the Occurrence of Anti-infectives in Contaminated Wastewaters and Natural and Drinking Waters

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Pedro A.; François, Matthieu; Gagnon, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Objective Anti-infectives are constantly discharged at trace levels in natural waters near urban centers and agricultural areas. They represent a cause for concern because of their potential contribution to the spread of anti-infective resistance in bacteria and other effects on aquatic biota. We compiled data on the occurrence of anti-infectives published in the last 24 years in environmental water matrices. The collected information was then compared with the available ecotoxicologic values to evaluate potential environmental concerns. Data sources We used Web of Science and Google Scholar to search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals written in the English language since 1984. Data extraction Information on compound concentrations in wastewaters and natural and drinking waters, the source of contamination, country of provenance of the samples, year of publication, limits of quantification, and method of analysis was extracted. Data synthesis From the 126 different substances analyzed in environmental waters, 68 different parent compounds and 10 degradation products or metabolites have been quantified to date. Environmental concentrations vary from about 10−1 to 109 ng/L, depending on the compound, the matrix, and the source of contamination. Conclusions Detrimental effects of anti-infectives on aquatic microbiota are possible with the constant exposure of sensitive species. Indirect impact on human health cannot be ruled out when considering the potential contribution of high anti-infective concentrations to the spreading of anti-infective resistance in bacteria. PMID:19479007

  13. Occurrence of Natural Contaminants of Emerging Concern in the Douro River Estuary, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Rita; Maia, Alexandra; Santos, Mariana; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth; Ribeiro, Cláudia Maria Rosa

    2016-02-01

    Many studies demonstrated the presence of diverse environmental contaminants in the Douro River estuary, such as natural and synthetic estrogens, pharmaceuticals, industrial compounds and pesticides. This estuary is located between two densely populated cities and is highly impacted due to anthropogenic activities, such as industry and agriculture. Although the presence of mycotoxins and phytoestrogens, such as lignans and coumestrans, in the aquatic environment is reported by some authors, their occurrence in Portuguese waters was not investigated yet. To evaluate the presence of phytoestrogens, phytosterols and mycotoxins in Douro River estuary, water samples were collected seasonally at nine sampling points, preconcentrated by solid phase extraction and analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Local flora was collected on the riverside, in the same sampling points, for identification and evaluation of the possible relation to the presence of phytoestrogens and/or phytosterols in the estuarine water. Results showed the ubiquitous presence of mycotoxins, namely deoxynivalenol up to 373.5 ng L(-1). Both phytoestrogens and phytosterols showed a possible seasonal fluctuation, which is in accordance to the life cycle of the local flora and agricultural practices. Physicochemical parameters were also determined for water quality evaluation. This study revealed for the first time the presence of mycotoxins and lignans in estuarine waters from Portugal, and highlights the need to consider natural contaminants in future monitoring programs.

  14. Deployment Plan for Bioremediation and Natural Attenuation for In Situ Restoration of Chloroethene-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, L.N.; Starr, R.C.; Sorenson, K.S.; Smith, R.W.; Phelps, T.J.

    1999-03-01

    This deployment plan describes a project funded by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective is to facilitate deployment of enhanced in situ bioremediation (ISB) an monitored natural attenuation (MNA) or chloroethene-contaminated groundwater to DOE sites. Enhanced ISB accelerates dechlorination of chloroethenes under anaerobic conditions by providing nutrients to the microbial community. Natural attenuation does not require nutrient addition. Enhanced ISB in the upgradient portion of a contaminant plume couples with MNA in the downgradient portion is being implemented at Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Selected DOE sites will be screened to assess their suitability for enhanced ISB/MNA. Tasks include: (1) characterization of the TAN microbial community and correlation of community characteristics with chloroethene degradation ability, (2) installation of wells to facilitate evaluation of MNA at TAN, (3) monitoring to better delineate MNA at TAN, and (4) screening of selected other DOE sites for suitability of ISB/MNA, and limited supplemental characterization. Data evaluation will provide a sound technical basis for decision makers to consider use of enhanced ISB and MNA, alone or together, as remedial technologies for these sites.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of Naturally Occurring Estrogens and Mycoestrogens in Milk by Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Samperi, Roberto; Ventura, Salvatore; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-10-14

    A simple, fast, and reproducible method for the simultaneous determination of natural estrogens and mycoestrogens (resorcylic acid lactones) in milk by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI-MS/MS) is described. The extraction was carried out by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using graphitized carbon black as solid sorbent. The use of carbon black allowed us to avoid any type of sample pretreatment, and the extraction was performed simply by diluting milk samples in water. Correlation coefficient values were obtained in the range between 0.9991 and 1, with good recoveries (67-107% at the lowest spiked level), repeatability (4.8-16.8%), and reproducibility (3.2-16.3%). Moreover, a very low matrix effect was observed for both estrogens and mycoestrogens. With respect to a previous method based on SPE with Oasis MAX cartridges, the one here described allowed us to detect all the analytes under investigation, at the lowest tested concentration level, including free estrogens (in particular estriol). Finally, the developed UHPLC/ESI-MS/MS method was applied to the analysis of some whole milk samples from different lactating animals (cow, goat, and donkey) as well as ultrahigh-temperature-treated cow milk and powder milk samples.

  16. Characterization of contaminant transport using naturally-occurring U-series disequilibria. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, M.; Ku, T.L.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of the research is to study the migratory behavior of contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium- and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Naturally occurring U- and Th-series disequilibria can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting. The authors are developing a realistic model of contaminant migration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer beneath the INEEL by evaluating the retardation processes involved in the rock/water interaction. The major tasks are to: (1) determine the natural distribution of U, Th, Pa and Ra isotopes in the groundwater as well as in rock minerals and sorbed phases, and (2) study rock/water interaction processes using U/Th series disequilibria and a statistical analysis-based model code for the calculation of in-situ retardation factors of radionuclides and rock/water interaction time scales. This study will also provide an improved understanding of the hydrogeologic features of the site and their impact on the migration of contaminants. This report summarizes results after 20 months of a 36-month project. Studies performed at LANL include analysis of the long-lived nuclides {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 231}Pa by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Studies performed at the Univ. of Southern California include the measurement of short-lived naturally occurring radionuclides by decay-counting techniques and the development of models to predict the migration behavior of these radionuclides. Initial efforts began with analysis of 31, 0.5L water samples obtained through routine sampling by USGS and INEEL personnel. One significant observation from these data is that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios are highest in waters that emanate from local recharge

  17. Detection and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in the blood and milk of naturally infected donkeys (Equus asinus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide zoonotic protozoan. Consumption of raw milk from infected animals is considered a risk factor for acquiring toxoplasmosis in humans. Recently, donkey milk has been indicated for therapeutic and nutritional purposes and T. gondii infection is common in donkeys. The pu...

  18. Optimization of methods for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is primarily shed into the feces but it has also been isolated from the milk and colostrum of cows. Because of this, there exists concern about transfer of the organism from dam to calf and about the prevalence of MAP in the milk supply. The prevalen...

  19. Contaminant immobilization and nutrient release by biochar soil amendment: roles of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Lima, Isabel M; Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2010-08-01

    Contamination of soil interstitial waters by labile heavy metals such as Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) is of worldwide concern. Carbonaceous materials such as char and activated carbon have received considerable attention in recent years as soil amendment for both sequestering heavy metal contaminants and releasing essential nutrients like sulfur. Information is currently lacking in how aging impacts the integrity of biochars as soil amendment for both agricultural and environmental remediation purposes. Major contributors to biochar aging in soils are: sorption of environmental constituents, especially natural organic matter (NOM), and oxidation. To investigate the impact of NOM and organic fractions of chars, we employed broiler litter-derived chars and steam-activated carbons that underwent varying degrees of carbonization, in the presence and absence of NOM having known carboxyl contents. For aging by oxidation, we employed phosphoric acid activated carbons that underwent varying degrees of oxidation during activation. The results suggest that the organic fractions of biochars, and NOM having high carboxyl contents can mobilize Cu(II) retained by alkaline soil. Base treatment of broiler litter-derived char formed at low pyrolysis temperature (350 degrees C) improved the immobilization of all heavy metals investigated, and the extent of immobilization was similar to, or slightly greater than pecan shell-derived phosphoric acid activated carbons. Portions of total sulfur were released in soluble form in soil amended with broiler litter-derived carbons, but not pecan shell-derived phosphoric acid activated carbons.

  20. Natural radioactivity and metal contamination of river sediments in the Calabria region, south of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, F.; Marguccio, S.; D'Agostino, M.; Belvedere, A.; Belmusto, G.

    2016-05-01

    River sediments from eight different sites of the coast of Calabria, south of Italy, were sampled to determine natural radioactivity and metal concentrations, in order to assess any possible radiological hazard, the level of contamination and the possible anthropogenic impact in the area. Gamma and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry were employed and results of this study show that the mean activity concentrations of radium (in secular equilibrium with uranium) ranged from 15.1Bq/kg to 26.7Bq/kg, that of thorium from 21.8Bq/kg to 48.3Bq/kg and that of potassium from 541.3Bq/kg to 1452.2Bq/kg. In terms of mean mass concentrations, XRF analysis revealed that uranium was lower than 1.5ppm (minimum detectable value), thorium ranged from 6.1ppm to 10.3ppm while potassium ranged from 2.5% to 4.4%. The degree of sediment contaminations were computed using an enrichment factor (EF) and geoaccumulation index ( I geo for some potential hazardous elements. Results suggested that enrichment factor and geoaccumulation values of Pb and Mn were greatest among the studied metals. The study revealed that on the basis of computed indexes, the eight investigated rivers can be classified as no polluted ones.

  1. Toxic effects of fermented and unfermented sorghum meal diets naturally contaminated with mycotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Kazanas, N; Ely, R W; Fields, M L; Erdman, J W

    1984-01-01

    Male weanling rats fed diets containing fermented and unfermented tannin-free sorghum meals naturally contaminated with traces of ochratoxin A, zearalenone, and an unidentified toxic substance developed anorexia. Mean changes in body weight over a 28-day feeding period for rats fed fermented and unfermented sorghum meal and ANCR casein diets of 8% protein were -2.8, +13.8, and +100.5 g, respectively. Rats fed fermented sorghum meal developed alopecia; hematological findings showed a decreased mean corpuscular volume, hypochromic microcytosis, balanced leukopenia, and hypoproteinuria . Histological findings showed testicular hypoplasia of the germinal epithelium and no mature spermatozoa. Necrosis and mineralization in Henle's loop were also observed. No damage was apparent to the liver, cerebellum, cerebrum, spleen, or adrenal glands. Images PMID:6234860

  2. Pulsed gas injection: a minimum effort approach for enhanced natural attenuation of chlorobenzene in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Balcke, Gerd Ulrich; Paschke, Heidrun; Vogt, Carsten; Schirmer, Mario

    2009-07-01

    Chlorobenzene-contaminated groundwater was used to assess pulsed gas sparging as a minimum effort aeration strategy to enhance intrinsic natural attenuation. In contrast to existing biosparging operations, oxygen was supplied at minimum rate by reducing the gas injection frequency to 0.33 day(-1). Field tests in a model aquifer were conducted in a 12 m long reactor, filled with indigenous aquifer material and continuously recharged with polluted groundwater over 3 years. The closed arrangement allowed yield balances, cost accounting as well as the investigation of spatial distributions of parameters which are sensitive to the biodegradation process. Depending on the injection frequency and on the gas chosen for injection (pure oxygen or air) oxygen-deficient conditions prevailed in the aquifer. Despite the limiting availability of dissolved oxygen in the groundwater, chlorobenzene degradation under oxygen-deficient conditions proved to be more effective than under conditions with dissolved oxygen being available in high concentrations.

  3. Detection and isolation of Salmonella from naturally contaminated alfalfa seeds following an outbreak investigation.

    PubMed

    Inami, G B; Moler, S E

    1999-06-01

    Naturally contaminated alfalfa seeds, epidemiologically linked to foodborne disease outbreaks in Oregon and British Columbia, were tested for the presence of Salmonella. Ten sample units from the suspected lot were sprouted and grown for 4 days. After enrichment of the grown sprouts, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and culture method (modified procedure of the Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual) were used for the detection and isolation of Salmonella. Four of the 10 sample units were positive with the EIA; however, 5 of the 10 sample units were culture positive (four were positive for Salmonella serotype Newport and a fifth was positive for Salmonella serotype Albany and serotype Schwarzengrund). The positive alfalfa seed sample units were further tested after shredding, soaking, and washing before culturing. Results suggest that sprouting and shredding methods may yield greater detection and recovery rates of Salmonella, but more research with a larger sample size is warranted.

  4. Extraction recoveries and stability of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins in naturally contaminated samples.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S M; Vale, P; Botelho, M J; Gomes, S S

    2009-02-01

    During the last few years the occurrence of a high percentage of esters of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxins has been observed in shellfish from the Portuguese coast. Most of the commercial bivalves contain DSP toxins in ester forms, either acyl derivatives of okadaic acid (OA) or of dinophysistoxin-2 (DTX-2). The stability of these toxins in shellfish tissues and in raw methanol extracts was investigated in two different naturally contaminated species, mussel and carpet shell, over a 4-week period. The results for both species revealed that DSP toxins were more stable in tissue than in raw methanol extracts. Losses of DSP toxins were seen in the first 2 weeks and were more than 30%, but after that a period of stabilization was observed. The decrease was due probably from losses of esters of OA and DTX-2, the free toxins were stable over the period studied. The extraction most commonly used for chemical and biochemical assays relied on methanolic extraction with aqueous 80% methanol. In this work we have tested the extraction solvent on the extractability of DSP toxins from several naturally contaminated species. A single dispersive extraction with methanol, with solvent ratios of 70%, 80%, 90% and 100%, were tested. After alkaline hydrolysis of esterified toxins and clean-up with hexane and dichloromethane, the samples were analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The recovery of DSP toxins increased with increasing percentages of methanol up to 90%. A decrease in recovery with 100% methanol was observed probably due to problems during the liquid-liquid partitioning.

  5. Distribution of potentially bioavailable natural organic carbon in aquifer sediments at a chloroethene-contaminated site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, L.K.; Widdowson, M.A.; Chapelle, F.H.; Novak, J.T.; Boncal, J.E.; Lebrón, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of natural organic carbon was investigated at a chloroethene-contaminated site where complete reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to vinyl chloride and ethene was observed. In this study, operationally defined potentially bioavailable organic carbon (PBOC) was measured in surficial aquifer sediment samples collected at varying depths and locations in the vicinity of a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source and aqueous phase plume. The relationship between chloroethene concentrations and PBOC levels was examined by comparing differences in extractable organic carbon in aquifer sediments with minimal chloroethene exposure relative to samples collected in the source zone. Using performance-monitoring data, direct correlations with PBOC were also developed with chloroethene concentrations in groundwater. Results show a logarithm-normal distribution for PBOC in aquifer sediments with a mean concentration of 187  mg/kg. PBOC levels in sediments obtained from the underlying confining unit were generally greater when compared to sediments collected in the sandy surficial aquifer. Results demonstrated a statistically significant inverse correlation (p=0.007) between PBOC levels in aquifer sediments and chloroethene concentrations for selected monitoring wells in which chloroethene exposure was the highest. Results from laboratory exposure assays also demonstrated that sediment samples exhibited a reduction in PBOC levels of 35% and 73%, respectively, after a 72-h exposure period to PCE (20,000  μg/L). These results support the notion that PBOC depletion in sediments may be expected in chloroethene-contaminated aquifers, which has potential implications for the long-term sustainability of monitored natural attenuation.

  6. Importance of heterocylic aromatic compounds in monitored natural attenuation for coal tar contaminated aquifers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Philipp; Sagner, Anne; Tiehm, Andreas; Martus, Peter; Wendel, Thomas; Grathwohl, Peter

    2011-11-01

    NSO heterocycles (HET) are typical constituents of coal tars. However, HET are not yet routinely monitored, although HET are relatively toxic coal tar constituents. The main objectives of the study is therefore to review previous studies and to analyse HET at coal tar polluted sites in order to assess the relevance of HET as part of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) or any other long-term monitoring programme. Hence, natural attenuation of typical HET (indole, quinoline, carbazole, acridine, methylquinolines, thiophene, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, benzofuran, dibenzofuran, methylbenzofurans, dimethylbenzofurans and xanthene) were studied at three different field sites in Germany. Compound-specific plume lengths were determined for all main contaminant groups (BTEX, PAH and HET). The results show that the observed plume lengths are site-specific and are above 250 m, but less than 1000 m. The latter, i.e. the upper limit, however mainly depends on the level of investigation, the considered compound, the lowest measured concentration and/or the achieved compound-specific detection limit and therefore cannot be unequivocally defined. All downstream contaminant plumes exhibited HET concentrations above typical PAH concentrations indicating that some HET are generally persistent towards biodegradation compared to other coal tar constituents, which results in comparatively increased field-derived half-lives of HET. Additionally, this study provides a review on physicochemical and toxicological parameters of HET. For three well investigated sites in Germany, the biodegradation of HET is quantified using the centre line method (CLM) for the evaluation of bulk attenuation rate constants. The results of the present and previous studies suggest that implementation of a comprehensive monitoring programme for heterocyclic aromatic compounds is relevant at sites, if MNA is considered in risk assessment and for remediation.

  7. Applicability of a Lactobacillus amylovorus strain as co-culture for natural folate bio-enrichment of fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Laiño, Jonathan Emiliano; Juarez del Valle, Marianela; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; LeBlanc, Jean Guy Joseph

    2014-11-17

    The ability of 55 strains from different Lactobacillus species to produce folate was investigated. In order to evaluate folic acid productivity, lactobacilli were cultivated in the folate-free culture medium (FACM). Most of the tested strains needed folate for growth. The production and the extent of vitamin accumulation were distinctive features of individual strains. Lactobacillus amylovorus CRL887 was selected for further studies because of its ability to produce significantly higher concentrations of vitamin (81.2 ± 5.4 μg/L). The safety of this newly identified folate producing strain was evaluated through healthy experimental mice. No bacterial translocation was detected in liver and spleen after consumption of CRL887 during 7 days and no undesirable side effects were observed in the animals that received this strain. This strain in co-culture with previously selected folate producing starter cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus CRL871, and Streptococcus thermophilus CRL803 and CRL415) yielded a yogurt containing high folate concentrations (263.1 ± 2.4 μg/L); a single portion of which would provide 15% of the recommended dietary allowance. This is the first report where a Lactobacillus amylovorus strain was successfully used as co-culture for natural folate bio-enrichment of fermented milk.

  8. Mobilization Of Polonium-210 In Naturally-Contaminated Groundwater, Churchill County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, R. L.; Stillings, L. L.; Cutler, N.

    2009-12-01

    Polonium-210 activities in groundwater rarely exceed about 40 mBq/L because it strongly binds to sediments. The recent discovery of natural 210Po at levels ranging from below 1 to 6,300±280 mBq/L in 62 drinking-water wells in Lahontan Valley, Churchill County, Nevada, led to a geochemical investigation of the processes responsible for its mobilization from the aquifer sediments. The source of the 210Po is radioactive decay of uranium in sediments transported into the valley by erosion of granitic rocks in the Sierra Nevada during the Pleistocene. There is little spatial or depth variability in 210Pb activity in study-area sediments (average 35 Bq/kg) and detailed analysis at a contaminated well indicates mobilization of <0.5 percent of the 210Po in the sediments would account for all of the 210Po in the well water. Elevated 210Po activities (>200 mBq/L) are associated with anoxic water (DO <0.1 mg/L) with high pH (commonly >9.0). Investigations in the 1980s by William Burnett and colleagues of naturally-contaminated wells in Florida showed that 210Po was mobilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria and remained in solution as long as sulfides did not accumulate above certain levels. Similarly, δ34SSO4 values in Lahontan Valley indicate that significant sulfate reduction has occurred in wells containing >200 mBq/L of 210Po, but sulfide is not accumulating and its concentrations are low (<0.03 mg/L) in 25 of 28 of those wells. In our working hypothesis, mobilization of 210Po in Lahontan Valley is linked to reduction of Mn oxides by sulfide in an anaerobic sulfur cycle (Figure 1). Such a sulfur cycle is consistent with the high pH, less than predicted δ18OSO4 values, low sulfide concentrations, and presence of elemental sulfur in the water. Results from the Nevada and Florida investigations suggest that 210Po contamination may be more widespread than previously recognized, occurring in groundwater near uranium-mine operations and other uranium containing sediments when

  9. Virus recovering from strawberries: Evaluation of a skimmed milk organic flocculation method for assessment of microbiological contamination.

    PubMed

    Melgaço, Fabiana Gil; Victoria, Matias; Corrêa, Adriana Abreu; Ganime, Ana Carolina; Malta, Fábio Correia; Brandão, Marcelo Luiz Lima; de Mello Medeiros, Valéria; de Oliveira Rosas, Carla; Bricio, Silvia Maria Lopes; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2016-01-18

    Skimmed milk organic flocculation method was adapted, optimized and compared with polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and filtration methods for recovering viruses from a strawberry matrix. Spiking experiments with norovirus genogroup II genotype 4 (NoV GII.4) and murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) demonstrated that the organic flocculation method associated with a glycine elution buffer, filter bag and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) showed a recovery percentage of 2.5 and 32 times higher than PEG precipitation and filtration methodologies for NoV recovering. Furthermore, this method was used for investigating NoV and human adenoviruses (HAdVs) in 90 samples of fresh strawberries commercialized in Rio de Janeiro markets. NoV GI and GII were not detected in those samples and MNV-1, used as internal process control (IPC), was recovered in 95.5% (86) of them. HAdVs were detected in 18 (20.0%) samples and characterized by nucleotide sequencing as Human Mastadenovirus specie F and as type specie HAdV-2. Bacterial analysis did not detect Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes, however, 3.3% of fecal coliforms were detected in those samples. These results indicate the organic flocculation method as an alternative for recovering enteric viruses from strawberries, emphasizing a need for virus surveillance in food matrices.

  10. Mobilization of arsenic and other naturally occurring contaminants in groundwater of the Main Ethiopian Rift aquifers.

    PubMed

    Rango, Tewodros; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary; Bianchini, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms of arsenic (As) and other naturally occurring contaminants (F(-), U, V, B, and Mo) mobilization from Quaternary sedimentary aquifers of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and their enrichment in the local groundwater. The study is based on systematic measurements of major and trace elements as well as stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in groundwater, coupled with geochemical and mineralogical analyses of the aquifer rocks. The Rift Valley aquifer is composed of rhyolitic volcanics and Quaternary lacustrine sediments. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) results revealed that MER rhyolites (ash, tuff, pumice and ignimbrite) and sediments contain on average 72 wt. % and 65 wt. % SiO2, respectively. Petrographic studies of the rhyolites indicate predominance of volcanic glass, sanidine, pyroxene, Fe-oxides and plagioclase. The As content in the lacustrine sediments (mean = 6.6 mg/kg) was higher than that of the rhyolites (mean: 2.5 mg/kg). The lacustrine aquifers of the Ziway-Shala basin in the northern part of MER were identified as high As risk zones, where mean As concentration in groundwater was 22.4 ± 33.5 (range of 0.60-190 μg/L) and 54% of samples had As above the WHO drinking water guideline value of 10 μg/L. Field As speciation measurements showed that most of the groundwater samples contain predominantly (~80%) arsenate-As(V) over arsenite-As(III) species. The As speciation together with field data of redox potential (mean Eh = +73 ± 65 mV) and dissolved-O2 (6.6 ± 2.2 mg/L) suggest that the aquifer is predominantly oxidative. Water-rock interactions, including the dissolution of volcanic glass produces groundwater with near-neutral to alkaline pH (range 6.9-8.9), predominance of Na-HCO3 ions, and high concentration of SiO2 (mean: 85.8 ± 11.3 mg/L). The groundwater data show high positive correlation of As with Na, HCO3, U, B, V, and Mo (R(2) > 0.5; p < 0.001). Chemical modeling of the groundwater indicates that Fe-oxides and

  11. Survival of Escherichia coli O26:H11 exceeds that of Escherichia coli O157:H7 as assessed by simulated human digestion of contaminated raw milk cheeses.

    PubMed

    Miszczycha, Stéphane D; Thévenot, Jonathan; Denis, Sylvain; Callon, Cécile; Livrelli, Valérie; Alric, Monique; Montel, Marie-Christine; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Thevenot-Sergentet, Delphine

    2014-02-17

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of human foodborne outbreaks. The consumption of raw milk dairy products may be an important route of STEC infection. For successful foodborne transmission, STEC strains must survive stress conditions met during gastrointestinal transit in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of two STEC strains of serotypes O157:H7 and O26:H11 during simulated human digestion in the TNO gastro-Intestinal tract Model (TIM) of contaminated uncooked pressed cheeses. The survival of cheese microflora during in vitro gastrointestinal transit was also determined for the first time. The level of STEC increased from 2 log₁₀ CFU/ml to 4 log₁₀ CFU/g during the first 24h of cheese making and remained stable at around 4 log₁₀ CFU/g during cheese ripening and conservation. During transit through the artificial stomach and duodenum, levels of STEC decreased: 0.2% of E. coli O157:H7 and 1.8% of E. coli O26:H11 were recovered at 150 min in the gastric compartment, compared with 14.3% for the transit marker. Bacterial resumption was observed in the jejunum and ileum: 35.8% of E. coli O157:H7 and 663.2% of E. coli O26:H11 were recovered at 360 min in the ileal compartment, compared with 12.6% for the transit marker. The fate of STEC was strain-dependent, the survival of E. coli O26:H11 being 13 times greater than that of E. coli O157:H7 at the end of digestion in the cumulative ileal deliveries. These data provide a better understanding of STEC behavior during gastrointestinal transit in humans after ingestion of contaminated cheese.

  12. Natural attenuation and biosurfactant-stimulated bioremediation of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Débora M; Chagas-Spinelli, Alessandra C O; Gavazza, Sávia; Florencio, Lourdinha; Kato, Mario T

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the bioremediation, by natural attenuation (NA) and by natural attenuation stimulated (SNA) using a rhamnolipid biosurfactant, of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil. Sediment samples (30 cm) were put into 35 cm glass columns, and the concentrations of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prioritized by the US Environmental Protection Agency were monitored for 111 days. Naphthalene percolated through the columns more than the other PAHs, and, in general, the concentrations of the lower molecular weight PAHs, consisting of two and three aromatic rings, changed during the first 45 days of treatment, whereas the concentrations of the higher molecular weight PAHs, consisting of four, five, and six rings, were more stable. The higher molecular weight PAHs became more available after 45 days, in the deeper parts of the columns (20-30 cm). Evidence of degradation was observed only for some compounds, such as pyrene, with a total removal efficiency of 82 and 78 % in the NA and SNA treatments, respectively, but without significant difference. In the case of total PAH removal, the efficiencies were significantly different of 82 and 67 %, respectively.

  13. Method for HEV detection in raw pig liver products and its implementation for naturally contaminated food.

    PubMed

    Martin-Latil, Sandra; Hennechart-Collette, Catherine; Guillier, Laurent; Perelle, Sylvie

    2014-04-17

    It is now recognized that Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is not confined to developing countries. HEV infection is a growing public health concern in industrialized countries where the disease is mainly autochthonous, caused by HEV genotypes 3 and 4 and is today considered to be zoonotic. HEV causes acute hepatitis in humans, predominantly through contamination of food and water. Due to the low concentrations found in food and water samples, an efficient and rapid virus concentration method is required for routine control. Because of the absence of a reliable cell culture method for the main enteric viruses most commonly involved in the outbreaks, reverse transcription quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) is now widely used for the detection of RNA viruses in all types of samples. The aim of this study was to provide a rapid and sensitive method for detecting HEV in pig liver products. A method which includes a virus concentration step by PEG has been chosen from 9 protocols to be further validated. We used a one-step duplex RT-qPCR for detecting HEV and the murine norovirus (MNV-1) used as a process control for monitoring the quality of the whole extraction procedure. The mean recovery rates of the HEV and MNV-1 obtained from pig liver sausages were respectively 3.94% and 2.92%, increasing in figatelli to 18.38% and 13.11% respectively. This method also proved to be effective for HEV detection in naturally contaminated foodstuffs containing raw pig liver.

  14. Assessment of three approaches of bioremediation (Natural Attenuation, Landfarming and Bioagumentation - Assistited Landfarming) for a petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Guarino, C; Spada, V; Sciarrillo, R

    2017-03-01

    Contamination with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) subsequent to refining activities, is currently one of the major environmental problems. Among the biological remediation approaches, landfarming and in situ bioremediation strategies are of great interest. Purpose of this study was to verify the feasibility of a remediation process wholly based on biological degradation applied to contaminated soils from a decommissioned refinery. This study evaluated through a pot experiment three bioremediation strategies: a) Natural Attenuation (NA), b) Landfarming (L), c) Bioaugmentation-assisted Landfarming (LB) for the treatment of a contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). After a 90-days trial, Bioagumentation - assistited Landfarming approach produced the best results and the greatest evident effect was shown with the most polluted samples reaching a reduction of about 86% of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), followed by Landfarming (70%), and Natural Attenuation (57%). The results of this study demonstrated that the combined use of bioremediation strategies was the most advantageous option for the treatment of contaminated soil with petroleum hydrocarbons, as compared to natural attenuation, bioaugmentation or landfarming applied alone. Besides, our results indicate that incubation with an autochthonous bacterial consortium may be a promising method for bioremediation of TPH-contaminated soils.

  15. Effects of oil and natural or synthetic vitamin E on ruminal and milk fatty acid profiles in cows receiving a high-starch diet.

    PubMed

    Zened, A; Troegeler-Meynadier, A; Najar, T; Enjalbert, F

    2012-10-01

    Among trans fatty acids, trans-10,cis-12 CLA has negative effects on cow milk fat production and can affect human health. In high-yielding dairy cows, a shift from the trans-11 to the trans-10 pathway of biohydrogenation (BH) can occur in the rumen of cows receiving high-concentrate diets, especially when the diet is supplemented with unsaturated fat sources. In some but not all experiments, vitamin E has been shown to control this shift. To ascertain the effects of vitamin E on this shift of BH pathway, 2 studies were conducted. The first study explored in vitro the effects of addition of natural (RRR-α-tocopherol acetate) and synthetic (dl-α-tocopherol acetate) vitamin E. Compared with control and synthetic vitamin E, the natural form resulted in a greater trans-10/trans-11 ratio; however, the effect was very low, suggesting that vitamin E was neither a limiting factor for rumen BH nor a modulator of the BH pathway. An in vivo study investigated the effect of natural vitamin E (RRR-α-tocopherol) on this shift and subsequent milk fat depression. Six rumen-fistulated lactating Holstein cows were assigned to a 2×2 crossover design. Cows received 20-kg DM of a control diet based on corn silage with 22% of wheat, and after 2 wk of adaptation, the diet was supplemented with 600 g of sunflower oil for 2 more weeks. During the last week of this 4-wk experimental period, cows were divided into 2 groups: an unsupplemented control group and a group receiving 11 g of RRR-α-tocopherol acetate per day. A trans-10 shift of ruminal BH associated with milk fat depression due to oil supplementation of a high-wheat diet was observed, but vitamin E supplementation of dairy cows did not result in a reversal toward a trans-11 BH pathway, and did not restore milk fat content.

  16. Supplemental treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with natural milk antibodies against enteromicrobes and their toxins: results of an open-labelled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental factors, particularly commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, may be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether natural milk antibodies against a wide spectrum of pathogenic enteromicobes and their toxins modify the disease activity in RA. Methods Twenty patients with RA, whose disease activity was uncontrolled by authentic medications due to drug resistance, complications and/or risk factors were treated for 3 months with an oral administration of a whey protein concentrate (WPC) containing high levels of natural milk antibodies. Eighteen background-matched RA patients, not supplemented with milk antibody adjunct, were used as controls. Results Statistically significant reduction of arthritis symptoms and improvement of intestinal disorders were observed only in the test group: effective in 8 (44%), possibly effective in 2 (12%) and not effective in 8 (44%) of 18 patients treated (2 patients withdrew) based on an ad hoc "evaluation point", the sum of variables that are improved more than 20% among the 8 core variables used for the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) response criteria. This disease modifying effect of the WPC disappeared upon cessation of treatment, but was reappeared upon reintroduction of it. Importantly, 7 of 8 non-responders carry DR15 haplotype (DRB1-1501 and 1502), whereas only 1 of 7 responders was DR15 positive (risk ratio: 6.1). Furthermore, the pre-clinical serum anti-LPS and anti-type II collagen antibody levels in the responders were higher or tended to be higher than those in the non-responders, suggesting that there are 2 sub-types of RA based on an interaction between gastrointestinal pathogens and MHC class II haplotypes. Conclusions The natural milk antibody preparation containing high levels antibodies against pathogenic enteromicrobes and their toxins seems to be effective in a certain RA subset, and deserves more attention as a

  17. Milk Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the usual cause, but milk from sheep, goats, buffalo and other mammals also can cause a ... react to cow's milk will react to sheep's, goat's and buffalo's milk. Less commonly, people allergic to ...

  18. Flow-Weighted Natural Contaminant Contribution and Borehole Geophysical Characterization of Three Water-Supply Wells in New Hampshire

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2008, the USEPA, NHDES and US Geological Survey initiated a data collection effort to evaluate borehole characterization methods for identifying natural contaminant flow into bedrock water-supply wells. The investigation: 1) tests methods at a variety of bedrock supply well sy...

  19. Dietary anhydrous milk fat naturally enriched with conjugated linoleic acid and vaccenic acid modify cardiovascular risk biomarkers in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Meza, M S; Mendoza-López, M R; García-Barradas, O; Sanchez-Otero, M G; Silva-Hernández, E R; Angulo, J O; Oliart-Ros, R M

    2013-08-01

    Saturated and trans fatty acids have been associated with the risk to develop cardiovascular diseases. However, health-promoting effects are associated with consumption of anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and ruminant trans fatty acids, such as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and vaccenic acid (VA) contained in the lipid fraction of milk and dairy products. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of AMF naturally enriched with CLA and VA in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), using sterculic oil to inhibit the conversion of VA into CLA. The administration of AMF to SHR during 7 weeks exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk biomarkers (reduction of insulin, blood lipids, increase of adiponectin). When sterculic oil was included, some parameters were further ameliorated (reduction of insulin, increase of adiponectin). Sterculic oil alone reduced body weight and adiposity, and improved blood pressure, adiponectin and triglyceride levels.

  20. Modeling of arsenic adsorption kinetics of synthetic and contaminated groundwater on natural laterite.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Sharma, Himanshu; Basu, Jayanta Kumar; De, Sirshendu

    2009-12-30

    A simple shrinking core model is applied to predict the adsorption kinetics of arsenite and arsenate species onto natural laterite (NL) in a stirred tank adsorber. The proposed model is a two-resistance model, in which two unknown parameters, external mass transfer coefficient (K(f)) and pore diffusion coefficient (D(e)) are estimated by comparing the simulation concentration profile with the experimental data using a nonlinear optimization technique. The model is applied under various operating conditions, e.g., initial arsenic concentration, NL dose, NL particle size, temperature, stirring speed, etc. Estimated values of D(e) and K(f) are found to be in the range of 2.2-2.6 x 10(-11)m(2)/s and 1.0-1.4 x 10(-6)m/s at 305K for different operating conditions, respectively. D(e) and K(f) values are found to be increasing with temperature and stirrer speed, respectively. Calculated values of Biot numbers indicate that both external mass transfer and pore diffusion are important during the adsorption. The model is also applied satisfactorily to predict the arsenic adsorption kinetics of arsenic contaminated groundwater-NL system and can be used to scale up.

  1. Assessment of the Use of Natural Materials for the Remediation of Cadmium Soil Contamination

    PubMed Central

    de O. Pinto, Tatiana; García, Andrés C.; Guedes, Jair do N.; do A. Sobrinho, Nelson M. B.; Tavares, Orlando C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Rice plants accumulate cadmium (Cd2+) within the grain, increasing the danger of human exposure. Natural materials have been used in soil remediation, but few studies have examined the risks (based on the bioavailability of these metals to plants) of using these materials, so the practice remains controversial. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of biochar produced from sugarcane bagasse, vermicompost (VC), vermicompost solid residue (VCR) and humin for remediation of Cd2+-contaminated soils. We characterized the interactions between these materials and Cd2+ and evaluated their capacity to alter Cd2+ availability to rice plants. Our results show that under the conditions in this study, biochar and humin were not effective for soil remediation. Although biochar had high Cd2+ retention, it was associated with high Cd2+ bioavailability and increased Cd2+ accumulation in rice plants. VC and VCR had high Cd2+ retention capacity as well as low Cd2+ availability to plants. These characteristics were especially notable for VCR, which was most effective for soil remediation. The results of our study demonstrate that in the tested materials, the bioavailability of Cd2+ to plants is related to their structural characteristics, which in turn determine their retention of Cd2+. PMID:27341440

  2. Fate of ochratoxin a during cooking of naturally contaminated polished rice.

    PubMed

    Park, Je Won; Chung, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Chan; Kim, Young-Bae

    2005-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin widespread in cereals, occurs in polished rice that is consumed as cooked rice after washing and steaming. Cooking decreases OTA levels in food to varying extents, but little is known about how cooking changes the biological activity of this mycotoxin. We therefore evaluated the fate of OTA during rice cooking to determine the OTA residues and cytotoxic potential in vitro. Water-washed rice, ordinary cooked rice, and pressure-cooked rice were prepared from three polished rice lots naturally contaminated with OTA. Residual OTA in each sample was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), whereas in vitro cytotoxicity of OTA to C6 glioma cells, susceptible to low levels (nanograms per milliliter) of OTA, was used to confirm the chemical analysis. OTA concentration, as determined by HPLC analysis, in the cooked rice by both types of cookers was significantly lower than (59 to 75%) in the raw polished rice and water-washed rice. The cytotoxicity of the OTA that remained in the pressure-cooked rice from three lots was markedly decreased (approximately 20%, P < 0.05) when compared with other samples in respective lots. This confirms that cooking lowers OTA residues. Although washing polished rice with water had little effect on OTA levels, pressure steaming appeared to be the critical cooking step not only to reduce OTA residues in polished rice before reaching the consumer as the dietary staple of cooked rice, but also to diminish cytotoxicity of OTA.

  3. Natural attenuation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation in 4-chloroaniline-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Tongarun, Roongnapa; Luepromchai, Ekawan; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2008-02-01

    Bioremediation treatments including natural attenuation (NA), biostimulation (BS), and bioaugmentation (BA) were performed and compared regarding the degradation of 4-chloroaniline (4CA) contaminating two types of agricultural soil collected from Nakornnayok (NN) and Chiangmai (CM) provinces, Thailand. Despite the different soil properties, both soil types exhibited intrinsic potential for biodegradation. 4CA degradation by NA in loam soil-NN was fairly effective (ca. 40%), while in sandy-clay loam soil-CM it occurred poorly (<10%). Compared to NA, BS with aniline and BA with 4CA-degrading Klebseilla sp. CA17 were comparatively more effective techniques, although the degradation occurred differently in each soil type. In soil-NN, the biodegradation of 4CA took place at a higher rate, achieving biodegradation of 70-75% within 4 weeks, than in soil-CM, i.e., up to 40-46% within 8 weeks. During each treatment, changes in soil microbial activity, numbers of 4CA-degrading micro-organisms, and dynamic modification of soil microbial community structure were also monitored. The results suggest that both BS and BA are feasible techniques for bioremediation of 4CA accumulated in soil, although the biodegrading efficiency in soil environment depends not only on site characteristics but also on the characteristics of either indigenous microbial population or the survival and stability of bioaugmented cultures.

  4. Short-Term and Long-Term Biological Effects of Chronic Chemical Contamination on Natural Populations of a Marine Bivalve

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Marianne; Murillo, Laurence; Becquet, Vanessa; Churlaud, Carine; Fruitier-Arnaudin, Ingrid; Huet, Valérie; Lacroix, Camille; Pante, Eric; Le Floch, Stéphane; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the effects of chronic chemical contamination on natural populations of marine organisms is complex due to the combined effects of different types of pollutants and environmental parameters that can modulate the physiological responses to stress. Here, we present the effects of a chronic contamination in a marine bivalve by combining multiple approaches that provide information on individual and population health. We sampled variegated scallops (Mimachlamys varia) at sites characterized by different contaminants and contamination levels to study the short and long-term (intergenerational) responses of this species to physiological stress. We used biomarkers (SOD, MDA, GST, laccase, citrate synthase and phosphatases) as indicators of oxidative stress, immune system alteration, mitochondrial respiration and general metabolism, and measured population genetic diversity at each site. In parallel, concentration of 14 trace metals and 45 organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, pesticides) in tissues were measured. Scallops were collected outside and during their reproductive season to investigate temporal variability in contaminant and biomarker levels. Our analyses revealed that the levels of two biomarkers (Laccase-type phenoloxidase and malondialdehyde) were significantly correlated with Cd concentration. Additionally, we observed significant seasonal differences for four of the five biomarkers, which is likely due to the scallop reproductive status at time of sampling. As a source of concern, a location that was identified as a reference site on the basis of inorganic contaminant levels presented the same level of some persistent organic pollutants (DDT and its metabolites) than more impacted sites. Finally, potential long-term effects of heavy metal contamination were observed for variegated scallops as genetic diversity was depressed in the most polluted sites. PMID:26938082

  5. The Dnieper River Aquatic System Radioactive Contamination; Long-tern Natural Attenuation And Remediation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovych, Oleg; Laptev, Genadiy; Kanivets, Vladimir; Konoplev, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Near 27 year passed after the Chernobyl Accident, and the experience gained to study radionuclide behavior in the aquatic systems and to mitigate water contamination are still pose of interest for scientists, society and regulatory austerities. There are different aspects of radionuclide transport in the environment were studied since the Chernobyl fallout in 1986 covered the river catchments, wetlands, river, lakes/reservoirs and reached the Black Sea. The monitoring time series data set and also data on the radionuclides behavior studies in the water bodies (river, lakes and the Black Sea) are available now in Ukraine and other affected countries. Its causation analyses, considering the main geochemical, physical and chemical and hydrological process, governing by radionuclide mobility and transport on the way from the initially contaminated catchments, through the river-reservoir hydrological system to the Black Sea can help in better understanding of the main factors governing be the radionuclide behavior in the environment. Radionuclide washout and its hydrological transport are determined speciation of radionuclides as well as soil types and hydrological mode and also geochemistry and landscape conditions at the affected areas. Mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides are determined by ratio of radionuclide chemical forms in fallout and site-specific environmental characteristics determining rates of leaching, fixation/remobilization as well as sorption-desorption of mobile fraction (its solid-liquid distribution). In many cases the natural attenuation processes governing by the above mentioned processes supported by water flow transportation and sedimentation played the key role in self-rehabilitation of the aquatic ecosystems. The models developed during post-Chernobyl decade and process parameters studies can help in monitoring and remediation programs planed for Fukusima Daichi affected watersheds areas as well. Some most important monitoring data

  6. Contaminant Immobilization and Nutrient Release by Biochar Soil Amendment: Roles of Natural Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of soil interstitial waters by labile heavy metals such as CuII, CdII, and NiII is of worldwide concern. Carbonaceous materials such as char and activated carbon have received considerable attention in recent years as soil amendment for both sequestering heavy metal contaminants and r...

  7. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in natural soils and the impact on mobility of inorganic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Kosson, David S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Young, Lily Y.; Hacherl, Eric L.; Scala, David J.

    2002-10-03

    Inorganic contaminants, such as heavy metals and radionuclides, can adhere to insoluble Fe(III) minerals resulting in decreased mobility of these contaminants through subsurface environments. Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (DIRB), by reducing insoluble Fe(III) to soluble Fe(II), may enhance contaminant mobility. The Savannah River Site, South Carolina (SRS), has been subjected to both heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The overall objective of this project is to investigate the release of inorganic contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides that are bound to solid phase soil Fe complexes and to elucidate the mechanisms for mobilization of these contaminants that can be associated with microbial Fe(III) reduction. This is being accomplished by (i) using uncontaminated and contaminated soils from SRS as prototype systems, (ii) evaluating the diversity of DIRBs within the samples and isolating cultures for further study, (iii) using batch microcosms to evaluate the bioavailability of Fe(III) from pure minerals and SRS soils, (iv) developing kinetic and mass transfer models that reflect the system dynamics, and (v) carrying out soil column studies to elucidate the dynamics and interactions amongst Fe(III) reduction, remineralization and contaminant mobility.

  8. ESTIMATING THE RATE OF NATURAL BIOATTENUATION OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINANTS BY A MASS CONSERVATION APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent field and experimental research has shown that certain classes of subsurface contaminants can biodegrade at many sites. A number of site specific factors influences the rate of biodegradation, which helps determine the ultimate extent of contamination at these sites. The...

  9. Screening Cereals Quality by Electronic Nose: the Example of Mycotoxins Naturally Contaminated Maize and Durum Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnoli, Anna; Dell'Orto, Vittorio; Savoini, Giovanni; Cheli, Federica

    2009-05-01

    Mycotoxins represent an heterogeneous group of toxic compounds from fungi metabolism. Due to the frequent occurrence of mycotoxins in cereals commodities the develop of cost/effective screening methods represent an important topic to ensure food and feed safety. In the presented study a commercial electronic nose constituted by ten MOS (Metal Oxide Sensors) was applied to verify the possibility of discriminating between mycotoxins contaminated and non-contaminated cereals. The described analytical approach was able to discriminate contaminated and non-contaminated samples both in the case of aflatoxins infected maize and deoxynivalenol infected durum wheat samples. In the case of maize data two sensors from the array revealed a partial relation with the level of aflatoxins. These results could be promising for a further improvement of electronic nose application in order to develop a semi-quantitative screening approach to mycotoxins contamination.

  10. Optimization of methods for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two decontamination chemicals, hexadecylpyridinium choride (HPC) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine-sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH), were compared for their efficacy of reducing the growth of non-specific microorganisms in milk while minimally affecting the recovery of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis ...

  11. Shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis into milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows over complete lactation cycles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary mode of transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is fecal-oral. However, MAP is also shed into the milk and colostrum of infected cows. The objective of this study was to identify if an association exists between stage of MAP infection and days in lactation with ...

  12. Nature and extent of metal-contaminated soils in urban environments (keynote talk).

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W

    2016-08-01

    Research on the nature and extent of metal-contaminated soil began with an urban garden study in Baltimore, MD (USA). Largest quantities of soil metals were clustered in the inner city with lesser amounts scattered throughout metropolitan Baltimore. The probability values of metal clustering varied from P value 10(-15)-10(-23) depending on element. The inner-city clustering of lead (Pb) could not be explained by Pb-based paint alone. A major Pb source was tetraethyl lead (TEL), developed as an anti-knock agent for use in vehicle fuel, thereby making highway traffic flow a toxic substance delivery system in cities. Further study in Minneapolis and St. Paul confirmed the clustering of inner-city soil metals, especially Pb. Based on the evidence, the Minnesota State Legislature petitioned Congress to curtail Pb additives resulting in the rapid phasedown of TEL on January 1, 1986, 10 years ahead of the EPA scheduled ban. Further research in New Orleans, Louisiana (NOLA), verified the link between soil Pb, blood Pb, morbidity, and societal health. Although Pb is a known cause of clinical impairment, there is no known effective medical intervention for reducing children's blood Pb exposure. Ingestion and inhalation are routes of exposure requiring prevention, and soil is a reservoir of Pb. Children's blood Pb exposure observed in pre-Hurricane Katrina (August 29, 2005) NOLA underwent substantial decreases 10 years post-Katrina due to many factors including input of low Pb sediment residues by the storm surge and the introduction of low Pb landscaping materials from outside of the city. Investigation on the topic is ongoing.

  13. Natural attenuation of chlorinated-hydrocarbon contamination at Fort Wainwright, Alaska; a hydrogeochemical and microbiological investigation workplan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Lilly, Michael R.; Braddock, Joan F.; Hinzman, Larry D.

    1998-01-01

    Natural attenuation processes include biological degradation, by which microorganisms break down contaminants into simpler product compounds; adsorption of contaminants to soil particles, which decreases the mass of contaminants dissolved in ground water; and dispersion, which decreases dissolved contaminant concentrations through dilution. The primary objectives of this study are to (1) assess the degree to which such natural processes are attenuating chlorinated-hydrocarbon contamination in ground water, and (2) evaluate the effects of ground-water/surface-water interactions on natural-attenuation processes in the area of the former East and West Quartermasters Fueling Systems for Fort Wainwright, Alaska. The study will include investigations of the hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological processes occurring at this site that influence the transport and fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in ground water. To accomplish these objectives, a data-collection program has been initiated that includes measurements of water-table elevations and the stage of the Chena River; measurements of vertical temperature profiles within the subsurface; characterization of moisture distribution and movement in the unsaturated zone; collection of ground-water samples for determination of both organic and inorganic chemical constituents; and collection of ground-water samples for enumeration of microorganisms and determination of their potential to mineralize contaminants. We will use results from the data-collection program described above to refine our conceptual model of hydrology and contaminant attenuation at this site. Measurements of water-table elevations and river stage will help us to understand the magnitude and direction of ground-water flow and how changes in the stage of the Chena River affect ground-water flow. Because ambient ground water and surface water typically have different temperature characteristics, temperature monitoring will likely provide further insight

  14. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in the sediments from the Yellow River Wetland National Nature Reserve (the Sanmenxia section), China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qingli; Wang, Ruiling; Huang, Wenhai; Wang, Wenlin; Li, Xudong

    2015-06-01

    The Yellow River Wetland National Nature Reserve (the Sanmenxia section) is an important area of the Yellow River for two important hydrologic gauging stations: the Sanmenxia reservoir and the Xiaolangdi reservoir. Seven sites along the section were selected: Jiziling, Dinghuwan, Houdi, Canglonghu, Shangcun, Wangguan, and Nancun. After the microwave digestion with aqua regia, concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn, and Mn in the sediments were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry with air-acetylene flame. The results showed that all the concentrations of Cr detected were from the lithogenic source, and 63 % Mn, 48 % Pb, 41 % Cu, 20 % Cd, and 12 % Zn were from the anthropogenic source. The values of the index of geo-accumulation pointed out that there was moderate contamination of Mn at the Dinghuwan (1.04) and Houdi (1.00) sites (class 2), while the modified degree of contamination denoted that the contamination at the Houdi site (2.02) was moderate, nil to very low at the Nancun and Shangcun sites and low at the other sites, consisting with the tendency of pollution load index. For metal toxicity, the sediment pollution index indicated that the sediments of the Canglonghu site were low polluted, that of the Houdi site is nearly slightly contaminated, and those of others were natural and uncontaminated. It was vital to evaluate the degree of contamination with individual and overall elements and even with the metal toxicity. Cu, Pb, and Mn contaminations were aggravated in the Sanmenxia section, and there maybe was one of the main anthropogenic sources of these metals along the Yellow River. The findings were expected to update the current status of the heavy metal pollution in the Sanmenxia section as well as to create awareness concerning the sound condition of the whole reaches of the Yellow River.

  15. Effects of two different blends of naturally mycotoxin-contaminated maize meal on growth and metabolic profile in replacement heifers.

    PubMed

    Abeni, F; Migliorati, L; Terzano, G M; Capelletti, M; Gallo, A; Masoero, F; Pirlo, G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this trial was to assess the effects of the administration of different combinations of mycotoxins in naturally contaminated maize grains on dairy heifer growth, blood measurements and puberty onset. A total of 35 Friesian female heifers were randomly allotted to three experimental groups from 18-21 to 42-45 weeks of age. During the 24-week experimental period (EP), heifers were fed the same diet, but with maize meal derived from three differently contaminated lots: very low contamination, as control (C); medium-low aflatoxin-contaminated (A); and mixed aflatoxin-fumonisin contaminated (A-F). At the end of the EP, they returned to a common diet without contaminated maize, and they were monitored for an additional period of 12 weeks (post-experimental period, PEP). BW, wither height, hip height, body length and heart girth were measured every 4 weeks from the beginning of EP to the end of PEP. At the same time, body condition score was evaluated and blood samples were taken from the jugular vein to be analysed for haematological, serum protein and metabolic profiles. Age at puberty was assessed by measuring weekly plasma progesterone levels from 40 to 52 weeks of age. Body growth measurements were processed both by ANOVA of average daily gain of EP and PEP separately, and by the analysis of growth curve parameters. Haematological, serum protein and metabolic profile were evaluated using a mixed model, taking into account the repeated measurements in time on each animal. Heifers' growth was delayed both in A and A-F groups during EP, as evidenced by the different linear coefficients of the BW growth curve in the three groups. Differently contaminated diets did not affect the haematological profile, so that it can be concluded that these levels of mycotoxin contamination do not determine any specific effect on haematopoiesis and immunity in growing heifers. The main blood marker of mycotoxin chronic toxicity was the γ-glutamyl transferase activity level in

  16. [Natural contamination with mycotoxins in forage maize and green coffee in Nayarit State (Mexico)].

    PubMed

    Robledo, M de L; Marin, S; Ramos, A J

    2001-09-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in forage maize (zearalenone, fumonisin B1, T-2 toxin and diacetoxyscirpenol) and green coffee (ochratoxin A) from Nayarit State (Mexico) has been studied. All maize samples analyzed showed fumonisin B1 contamination, with an average concentration of 2,541 microg/kg. Fifteen percent of the samples contained zearalenone, with an average concentration of 1,610 microg/kg. Only one sample showed T-2 toxin contamination (7 microg/kg), and no diacetoxyscirpenol was detected. Sixty-seven per cent of green coffee samples were contaminated with ochratoxin A, with an average concentration of 30.1 microg/kg. This is the first study about mycotoxins developed in Nayarit and it has shown that mycotoxin contamination is a real problem in both foodstuffs studied.

  17. COPPER COMPLEXATION BY NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER IN CONTAMINATED AND UNCOMTAINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground-water samples were collected from an uncontaminated and a contaminated site. Copper complexation was characterized by ion-selective electrode (ISE), fluorescence quenching (FQ), and cathodic stripping voltammetric (CSV) titrations. All of the samples were titrated at their...

  18. Fingerprinting sedimentary and soil units by their natural metal contents: a new approach to assess metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Guermandi, Marina; Marchi, Nazaria; Sammartino, Irene

    2014-12-01

    One of the major issues when assessing soil contamination by inorganic substances is reliable determination of natural metal concentrations. Through integrated sedimentological, pedological and geochemical analyses of 1414 (topsoil/subsoil) samples from 707 sampling stations in the southern Po Plain (Italy), we document that the natural distribution of five potentially toxic metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) can be spatially predicted as a function of three major factors: source-rock composition, grain size variability and degree of soil weathering. Thirteen genetic and functional soil units (GFUs), each reflecting a unique combination of these three variables, are fingerprinted by distinctive geochemical signatures. Where sediment is supplied by ultramafic (ophiolite-rich) sources, the natural contents of Cr and Ni in soils almost invariably exceed the Italian threshold limits designated for contaminated lands (150 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively), with median values around twice the maximum permissible levels (345 mg/kg for Cr and 207 mg/kg for Ni in GFU B5). The original provenance signal is commonly confounded by soil texture, with general tendency toward higher metal concentrations in the finest-grained fractions. Once reliable natural metal concentrations in soils are established, the anthropogenic contribution can be promptly assessed by calculating metal enrichments in topsoil samples. The use of combined sedimentological and pedological criteria to fingerprint GFU geochemical composition is presented here as a new approach to enhance predictability of natural metal contents, with obvious positive feedbacks for legislative purposes and environmental protection. Particularly, natural metal concentrations inferred directly from a new type of pedogeochemical map, built according to the international guideline ISO 19258, are proposed as an efficient alternative to the pre-determined threshold values for soil contamination commonly established by the national

  19. Effect of jenny milk addition on the inhibition of late blowing in semihard cheese.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, C; Paolino, R; Valentini, V; Musto, M; Ricciardi, A; Adduci, F; D'Adamo, C; Pecora, G; Freschi, P

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of late blowing defects in cheese produces negative effects on the quality and commercial value of the product. In this work, we verified whether the addition of raw jenny milk to bulk cow milk reduced the late blowing defects in semihard cheeses. During cheesemaking, different aliquots of jenny milk were poured into 2 groups of 4 vats, each containing a fixed amount of cow milk. A group of cheeses was created by deliberately contaminating the 4 vats with approximately 3 log10 cfu/mL milk of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CLST01. The other 4 vats, which were not contaminated, were used for a second group of cheeses. After 120 d of ripening, some physical, chemical, and microbiological parameters were evaluated on the obtained semihard cheeses. Differences in sensory properties among cheeses belonging to the uncontaminated group were evaluated by 80 regular consumers of cheese. Our results showed that the increasing addition of jenny milk to cow milk led to a reduction of pH and total bacterial count in both cheese groups, as well as C. tyrobutyricum spores that either grew naturally or artificially inoculated. We observed a progressive reduction of the occurrence of late blowing defects in cheese as consequence of the increasing addition of jenny milk during cheese making. Moreover, the addition of jenny milk did not affect the acceptability of the product, as consumers found no difference among cheeses concerning sensorial aspects. In conclusion, the important antimicrobial activity of lysozyme contained in jenny milk has been confirmed in the current research. It is recommend for use as a possible and viable alternative to egg lysozyme for controlling late blowing defects in cheese.

  20. Assessment of soil contamination by (210)Po and (210)Pb around heavy oil and natural gas fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Haddad, Kh; Doubal, A W; Awad, I; Al-Khatib, Y

    2014-06-01

    Soil contamination by (210)Pb and (210)Po around heavy oil and natural gas power plants has been investigated; fly and bottom ash containing enhanced levels of (210)Pb and (210)Po were found to be the main source of surface soil contamination. The results showed that (210)Pb and (210)Po in fly-ash (economizer, superheater) is highly enriched with (210)Pb and (210)Po, while bottom-ash (boiler) is depleted. The highest (210)Pb and (210)Po activity concentrations were found to be in economizer ash, whereas the lowest activity concentration was in the recirculator ash. On the other hand, (210)Pb and (210)Po activity concentrations in soil samples were found to be higher inside the plant site area than those samples collected from surrounding areas. The highest levels were found in the vicinity of Mhardeh and Tishreen power plants; both plants are operated by heavy oil and natural fuels, while the lowest values were found to be in those samples collected from Nasrieh power plant, which is only operated by one type of fuel, viz. natural gas. In addition, the levels of surface soil contamination have decreased as the distance from the power plant site center increased.

  1. The effects of arsenic contaminated drinking water of livestock on its total levels in milk samples of different cattle: Risk assessment in children.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Talpur, Farah Naz; Akhtar, Asma

    2016-12-01

    This work was carried out to evaluate the arsenic (As) levels in milk samples of different milch animals, sheep, goats, cows, buffaloes and camels in Tharparkar, Pakistan. The concentration of As in the milk samples of cows, buffalos, sheep, goats and camels were observed in the range of 15.1-18.4, 2.6-7.7, 25.7-33.2, 10.5-37.3 and 6.6-13.7 μg/L, respectively. The levels of As in livestock drinking water of each farms/flocks was found in the range of 238-2000 μg L(-1). A positive correlation with Pearson correlation coefficients, ranged as, 0.926-0.974 (p = 0.001-0.011) was observed between the As concentration in milk samples of cattle and in corresponding drinking water of farms/flocks. The high bio-transfer factor of As was occurred in the milk samples of sheep. The content of As in scalp hair of children was observed to be elevated, who consumed milk of lower cattle (sheep and goat) than cow and camel. The As content in scalp hair directly proportional to the age of children. The hazardous quotient value of As due to consumption of milk was observed in decreasing order as, sheep > goats > camels > cows. The total hazardous quotient or noncarcinogenic risk values for children consuming the milk of sheep, goat, cow and camels were found >1 of reference dose for As, creates adverse effects on health in childhood stage. The children of all three age group have higher carcinogenic risk factor who are consuming milk of goat and sheep than larger cattle.

  2. Pre-clinical safety evaluation of the synthetic human milk, nature-identical, oligosaccharide 2'-O-Fucosyllactose (2'FL).

    PubMed

    Coulet, Myriam; Phothirath, Phoukham; Allais, Linda; Schilter, Benoit

    2014-02-01

    In order to match the composition of human breast milk more closely, it is now possible to supplement commercial infant formula (IF) with synthesised oligosaccharides that are chemically identical to human milk oligosaccharides. The safety data generated on a new human-identical milk oligosaccharide (HiMO), 2'-O-Fucosyllactose (2'FL), are presented. Standard in vitro genotoxicity tests were performed. To investigate the toxicological profile in a model representative of the intended target population, 2'FL was administered via gavage in a juvenile adapted sub-chronic rat study at dose levels of 0, 2000, 5000 and 6000 mg/kgbw/day. Fructooligosaccharide (FOS), currently acknowledged as safe and approved for use in IF, was used as a reference high-dose control at 6000 mg/kgbw/day. 2'FL was non-mutagenic in the in vitro assays. Oral administration up to 5000 mg/kgbw/day to rats over 90 days was not associated with any adverse effects based on clinical observations, body weight gain, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, clinical pathology, organ weights and histopathology findings. Based on this 90-day study, a No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 5000 mg/kgbw/day for both male and female rats was established for 2'FL. These findings support the safety of synthetic 2'FL for possible use in infant food.

  3. Arsenic and other heavy metal accumulation in plants and algae growing naturally in contaminated area of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Raghubanshi, A S; Upadhyay, A K; Rai, U N

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to quantify the arsenic (As) and other heavy metal concentrations in the plants and algae growing naturally in As contaminated blocks of North-24-Pargana and Nandia district, West Bengal, India to assess their bioaccumulation potential. The plant species included five macrophytes and five algae were collected from the nine selected sites for estimation of As and other heavy metals accumulated therein by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS). Results revealed that maximum As concentration (117mgkg(-1)) was recorded in the agricultural soil at the Barasat followed by Beliaghat (111mgkg(-1)) sites of North-24-Pargana. Similarly, concentration of selenium (Si, 249mgkg(-1)), lead (Pb, 79.4mgkg(-1)), chromium (Cr, 138mgkg(-1)) was also found maximum in the soil at Barasat and cadmium (Cd, 163mgkg(-1)) nickel (Ni, 36.5mgkg(-1)) at Vijaynagar site. Among the macrophytes, Eichhornia crassipes found more dominating species in As contaminated area and accumulate As (597mgkg(-1)) in the shoot at kanchrapara site. The Lemna minor found to accumulate maximum As (735mgkg(-1)) in the leaves at Sonadanga and Pistia stratiotes accumulated minimum As (24.5mgkg(-1)) in the fronds from Ranaghat site. In case of diatoms, maximum As (760mgkg(-1)) was accumulated at Kanchrapara site followed by Hydrodictiyon reticulatum (403mgkg(-1)) at the Ranaghat site. High concentration of As and other heavy metal in soil indicates long term effects of irrigation with contaminated ground water, however, high concentration of heavy metals in naturally growing plants and algae revealed their mobilization through leaching and possible food chain contamination. Therefore, efficient heavy metal accumulator macrophytes Eichhornia crassipes, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza may be exploited in removing metals from contaminated water by developing a plant based treatment system. However, As accumulator algal species may be used as a bioresource for

  4. Distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human breast milk from various locations in Tunisia: Levels of contamination, influencing factors, and infant risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ennaceur, S. Gandoura, N.; Driss, M.R.

    2008-09-15

    The concentrations of dichlorodiphenytrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), dieldrin, and 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in 237 human breast milk samples collected from 12 locations in Tunisia. Gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to identify and quantify residue levels on a lipid basis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). The predominant OCs in human breast milk were PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, HCHs, and HCB. Concentrations of DDTs in human breast milk from rural areas were significantly higher than those from urban locations (p<0.05). With regard to PCBs, we observed the predominance of mid-chlorinated congeners due to the presence of PCBs with high K{sub ow} such as PCB 153, 138, and 180. Positive correlations were found between concentrations of OCs in human breast milk and age of mothers and number of parities, suggesting the influence of such factors on OC burdens in lactating mothers. The comparison of daily intakes of PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, and HCB to infants through human breast milk with guidelines proposed by WHO and Health Canada shows that some individuals accumulated OCs in breast milk close to or higher than these guidelines.

  5. Effects of linseed oil and natural or synthetic vitamin E supplementation in lactating ewes' diets on meat fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation from their milk fed lambs.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, B; Manca, M G; Mantecón, A R; Nudda, A; Manso, T

    2015-04-01

    Forty-eight Churra ewes with their new-born lambs were separated into four dietary treatments: Control (without added fat), LO (with 3% linseed oil), LO-Syn E (LO plus 400 mg/kg TMR of synthetic vitamin E) and LO-Nat E (LO plus 400 g/kg TMR of natural vitamin E). Linseed oil caused an increase in trans-11 C18:1 (VA), trans-10 C18:1, cis-9, trans-11 C18:2 (RA), trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 and C18:3 n-3 (ALA) in milk fat compared to the Control. The addition of vitamin E to the LO diets did not influence significantly the majority of milk fatty acids compared with the LO diet alone. Trans-10 C18:1, VA, RA, trans-10, cis-12 C18:2 and LA levels were higher in intramuscular lamb fat from treatments with linseed oil. No statistically significant differences were observed in these FA due to vitamin E supplementation or the type of vitamin E (synthetic vs. natural). Vitamin supplementation resulted in lipid oxidation levels below the threshold values for detection of rancidity in lamb meat.

  6. Diversity and dynamic of lactic acid bacteria strains during aging of a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter.

    PubMed

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Mancini, Andrea; Santarelli, Marcela; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore diversity and dynamic of indigenous LAB strains associated with a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter such as PDO Grana Padano cheese. Samples of milk, curd, natural whey culture and cheeses (2nd, 6th, 9th and 13th months of ripening) were collected from 6 cheese factories in northern Italy. DNA was extracted from each sample and from 194 LAB isolates. tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP was applied to identify isolates. Strain diversity was assessed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR and RAPD(P1)-PCR. Finally, culture-independent LH-PCR (V1-V2 16S-rDNA), was considered to explore structure and dynamic of the microbiota. Grana Padano LAB were represented mainly by Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus helveticus and Pediococcus acidilactici, while the structure and dynamic of microbiota at different localities was specific. The strength of this work is to have focused the study on isolates coming from more than one cheese factories rather than a high number of isolates from one unique production. We provided a valuable insight into inter and intraspecies diversity of typical LAB strains during ripening of traditional PDO Grana Padano, contributing to the understanding of specific microbial ecosystem of this cheese.

  7. Rapid detection of norovirus in naturally contaminated food: foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak on a cruise ship in Brazil, 2010.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; do Carmo Sampaio Tavares Timenetsky, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a prevalent pathogen of foodborne diseases; however, its detection in foods other than shellfish is often time consuming and unsuccessful. In 2010, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred on a cruise ship in Brazil, and NoV was the etiologic agent suspected. The objectives of this study were to report that a handy in-house methodology was suitable for NoV detection in naturally contaminated food, and perform the molecular characterization of food strains. Food samples (blue cheese, Indian sauce, herbal butter, soup, and white sauce) were analyzed by ELISA, two methods of RNA extraction, TRIzol(®) and QIAamp(®), following conventional RT-PCR. The qPCR was used in order to confirm the NoV genogroups. GI and GII NoV genogroups were identified by conventional RT-PCR after RNA extraction by means of the TRIzol(®) method. Two GII NoV samples were successfully sequenced, classified as GII.4; and they displayed a genetic relationship with strains from the Asian continent also isolated in 2010. GII and GI NoV were identified in distinct food matrices suggesting that it was not a common source of contamination. TRIzol(®) extraction followed by conventional RT-PCR was a suitable methodology in order to identify NoV in naturally contaminated food. Moreover, food samples could be processed within 8 h indicating the value of the method used for NoV detection, and its potential to identify foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in food products other than shellfish. This is the first description in Brazil of NoV detection in naturally contaminated food other than shellfish involved in a foodborne outbreak.

  8. Characterization of the frequency and nature of bleed air contamination events in commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Shehadi, M; Jones, B; Hosni, M

    2016-06-01

    Contamination of the bleed air used to pressurize and ventilate aircraft cabins is of concern due to the potential health and safety hazards for passengers and crew. Databases from the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, and other sources were examined in detail to determine the frequency of bleed air contamination incidents. The frequency was examined on an aircraft model basis with the intent of identifying aircraft make and models with elevated frequencies of contamination events. The reported results herein may help investigators to focus future studies of bleed air contamination incidents on smaller number of aircrafts. Incident frequency was normalized by the number of aircraft, number of flights, and flight hours for each model to account for the large variations in the number of aircraft of different models. The focus of the study was on aircraft models that are currently in service and are used by major airlines in the United States. Incidents examined in this study include those related to smoke, oil odors, fumes, and any symptom that might be related to exposure to such contamination, reported by crew members, between 2007 and 2012, for US-based carriers for domestic flights and all international flights that either originated or terminated in the US. In addition to the reported frequency of incidents for different aircraft models, the analysis attempted to identify propulsion engines and auxiliary power units associated with aircrafts that had higher frequencies of incidents. While substantial variations were found in frequency of incidents, it was found that the contamination events were widely distributed across nearly all common models of aircraft.

  9. In Situ Remediation of {sup 137}Cs Contaminated Wetlands Using Naturally Occurring Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    1999-08-11

    Cesium-137 has contaminated a large area of the wetlands on the Savannah River Site. Remediation of the contaminated wetlands is problematic because current techniques destroy the sensitive ecosystem and generate a higher dose to workers. To address this problem, we proposed a non-trusive, in situ technology to sequester 137Cs in sediments. One intention of this study was to provide information regarding a go/no go decision for future work. Since the proof-of-concept was successful and several minerals were identified as potential candidates for this technology, a go decision was made.

  10. A novel real-time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk with the inherent possibility of differentiation between viable and dead cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in ruminants and is suggested to be one of the etiologic factors in Crohn's disease in humans. Contaminated milk might expose humans to that pathogen. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel real-time PCR assay providing the additional possibility to detect viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) based on the MAP-specific Mptb52.16 target. The design included an internal amplification control to identify false negative results. Findings Inclusivity and exclusivity tested on 10 MAP strains, 22 non-MAP mycobacteria, and 16 raw milk microflora strains achieved 100%. The detection limit in artificially contaminated raw milk was 2.42 × 101 MAP cells/ml milk. In a survey of naturally contaminated samples obtained from dairy herds with a known history of paratuberculosis, 47.8% pre-milk and 51.9% main milk samples tested positive. Real-time PCR-derived MAP-specific bacterial cell equivalents (bce) ranged from 1 × 100 to 5.1 × 102 bce/51 ml; the majority of samples had less than one bce per ml milk. Expression of the chosen target was detected in artificially contaminated raw milk as well as inoculated Dubos broth, thus confirming the real-time PCR assay's potential to detect viable MAP cells. Conclusions Concentrating the DNA of a large sample volume in combination with the newly developed real-time PCR assay permitted quantification of low levels of MAP cells in raw milk and pasteurized milk. The selected target - Mptb52.16 - is promising with regard to the detection of viable MAP. Future studies integrating quantitative DNA- and RNA-based data might provide important information for risk assessment concerning the presence of MAP in raw milk and pasteurized milk. PMID:20925922

  11. Milk Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink anything calcium-enriched, make sure it's also dairy-free. Milk and milk products can lurk in ... margarine, baked goods, artificial butter flavor, and non-dairy products. Chocolate is another product that may contain ...

  12. Estimation of biologic gasification potential of arsenic from contaminated natural soil by enumeration of arsenic methylating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Islam, S M A; Fukushi, K; Yamamoto, K; Saha, G C

    2007-04-01

    Volatile arsenic species are found in gases released from natural environments as a result of natural ambient-temperature biomethylation of arsenic conducted by yeast, fungi, and bacteria. This process is part of arsenic transport in the arsenic geocycle. It is important to determine the flux of gasified arsenic released by microorganisms to determine the quantitative flux of arsenic cycle clearly and also to understand the effect of microorganisms on the transport and distribution of arsenic in the contaminated environment. In this study, biologic gasification potential of natural soil was determined by enumeration of arsenic methylating bacteria (AsMB). Enumeration of AsMB was conducted for 10 contaminated sites in Bangladesh where AsMB concentration varies from 0.2 x 10(4) to 7.8 x 10(4) most probable number (MPN) kg(-1) dry soil. The specific gasification rate of arsenic by microorganisms was estimated as 1.8 x 10(-7) microg As MPN(-1) d(-1) by incubation of soil in a laboratory soil column setup. Natural biologic gasification potential of arsenic was then calculated by multiplying the specific rate by the number of AsMB in different soils. The attempt of this study is a fundamental step in determining the volatilization flux of arsenic from land surface contributed by microorganisms.

  13. Natural Oxidant Demand Variability, Potential Controls, and Implications for in Situ, Oxidation-Based Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, A.; Cruz, S.; Dungan, B.; Holguin, F. O.; Ulery, A. L.; Hunter, B.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring reduced species associated with subsurface materials can impose a significant natural oxidant demand (NOD), which is the bulk consumption of oxidants by soil water, minerals, and organic matter. Although injection of oxidants has been used for chemical transformation of organic contaminants, NOD represents a challenge for the in-situ delivery of oxidants as a remediation alternative. Co-injection of complexation agents with oxidants has been proposed to facilitate the delivery of oxidants for in situ chemical oxidation remediation of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates variability of NOD for different oxidants and sediments. The effect of the addition of various complexation agents, including EDTA, tween 80, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD), humic acid, and four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, on the NOD was also examined. NOD was measured for a clay loam (collected from Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, AZ). Varying amounts of biosolids were mixed with subsamples of the clay loam to create three additional reference soils in order to study the effect of organic matter and other soil characteristics on the NOD. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the NOD for various oxidants, using the four soils, and replicated with and without various delivery agents. Measured NOD showed variability for each soil and oxidant composition. Additionally, significant differences were observed in NOD with the addition of delivery agents. The results support the elucidation of potential controls over NOD and have implications for in situ, oxidation-based remediation of contaminated groundwater.

  14. Natural weathering of oil in marine sediments: tissue contamination and growth of the clam, Protothaca staminea

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Riley, R.G.; Kiesser, S.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Fellingham, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    Three groups (80 per group) of small (<30 mm) clams, Protothaca staminea, were placed in the intertidal environment of Sequim Bay, Washington for one year to measure the effects of oiled sediment on growth and tissue contamination. Detailed glass capillary gas chromatographic analysis of initial and final sediment samples and tissues were used to describe the fate of specific oil components in the sediment, with depth, and the uptake by the clams. Concentrations of sediment receiving a top layer (3 cm) of highly contaminated sediment reached background levels after one year, while sediment mixed to depth (10 cm) with oil still contained measurable contamination at the 5 to 10 cm depth. The pattern of specific hydrocarbon loss is in agreement with results of spill studies, molecular weight relationships and biodegradation data. The ratios for tissue concentrations to final sediment concentrations for phenanthrenes, alkylnaphthalenes and dibenzothiophenes were all between 0.16 and 0.18. This would indicate that the sulfur-containing compounds were not preferentially retained in tissues. Statistical analyses of 31 to 48 individually measured and marked clams (per group) showed that growth in oil-treated sediment was significantly (0.001 level) slower than in clean sediment. In addition, oil mixed into sediment (10 cm) produced greater tissue contamination and more reduction in growth (0.01 level) than a layer (3 cm) of oiled sediment.

  15. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 1 – Technical Basis for Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document represents the first volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with non-radionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contaminants. Vo...

  16. DETERMINATION OF RATES AND EXTENT OF DECHLORINATION IN PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS DURING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This "Sediment Issue" summarizes investigations carried out by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) of U.S. EPA to evaluate the long-term recovery of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediments via reductive dechlorination. The magnitude, extent, an...

  17. FRAMEWORK APPROACH FOR MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF RADIONUCLIDE AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA is leading an effort to develop technical documentation that provides the policy, scientific and technical framework for assessing the viability of MNA for inorganic contaminants in ground water (hereafter referred to as the Framework Document). Initial guidance on the...

  18. DON modification in naturally-contaminated wheat samples using microorganisms isolated from the environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium graminearum produces the toxic compound deoxynivalenol (DON) that contaminates wheat, barley, and maize. New strategies are needed to mitigate DON in the United States. Microbes were isolated from different soil types, and cultured in a mineral salt media using 100 ppm DON as the...

  19. Preterm milk.

    PubMed

    Baum, J D

    1980-03-01

    This editorial addresses the question of how best to feed the low birth weight infant. A study by Atkinson et al. on the composition of preterm mothers' milk found the nitrogen concentration in preterm milk to be considerably higher than in term milk. Preterm milk may be uniquely suited to the growth requirements of preterm infants. With the exception of calcium and phosphorus, preterm milk fits the requirements for preterm infant growth. Because of the difficulties of sustaining lactation without the infant sucking at the breast, partly due to the mother's motivation in the face of all the difficulties of having a baby in a Special Care Baby Unit, and partly due to the associated socioeconomic disadvantages, it is not possible for all mothers who deliver preterm babies to sustain their lactation. The composition of preterm milk should be used as a guide for the preparation of a human milk formula built from human milk products from a milk bank. The development of a human milk formula must take into account variations in the absorption of nutrients in low birth weight infants which may be affected by the processing of the milk, and variations in fat absorption in preterm infants which occur even when they are fed their mothers' fresh unprocessed milk.

  20. MICROBIAL PROCESSES AFFECTING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural attenuation, also know as natural assimilation, intrinsic remediation, and passive remediation, along with other appellations, is defined according to the processes of biotic and abiotic transformations while stressing that bioremediation is the major cause for contaminan...

  1. Use of 222Rn as a natural tracer to evaluate the efficiency of flushing test at DNAPL contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Joun, W.; Kim, H.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    Flushing test was applied to remediate the depth-discrete residual dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sources in an unsaturated zone at an industrial complex in Wonju, Korea. Remediation efficiency for flushing test was evaluated by comparing the natural tracer 222Rn concentration data in groundwater and the mass discharges of trichloroethylene (TCE) through a cross section before and during the test period. In the previous research performed at the study site, the location of residual DNAPL sources in the unsaturated zone was identified using the natural tracer 222Rn and contaminant concentrations based on the information for characteristics of radon which was partitioning into TCE. The natural injection method and pressurized injection method were applied for water injection. Uncontaminated groundwater around main source area was used as injection water. Temporal and spatial monitoring results show that a combined water injection (conducting both natural injection and pressurization injection) is an effective operation method. The 222Rn activities and TCE concentrations in groundwater fluctuated irregularly with water level increase at the main source area. The natural tracer 222Rn in groundwater originating from the underlying crystalline biotite granite, had a wide range from 15,000 to 183,000 Bq/m3 and total concentrations of TCE ranged from 0.03 to 1.79 mg/l. These temporal variations in 222Rn activities might be caused by not only the unknown quantities of residual TCE in the unsaturated zone but also the characteristics of radon partitioning into residual TCE with water level increase. From these results, the 222Rn activities could not be used directly as a natural tracer to evaluate the remediation efficiency due to the irregular production. Therefore, for more precise efficiency evaluation, the comparative analysis between 222Rn activities and relative contaminant concentrations data is required.

  2. Gravity separation of fat, somatic cells, and bacteria in raw and pasteurized milks.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Z; Melilli, C; Barbano, D M

    2013-04-01

    The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the extent of gravity separation of milk fat, bacteria, and somatic cells is influenced by the time and temperature of gravity separation or the level of contaminating bacteria present in the raw milk. The objective of experiment 2 was to determine if different temperatures of milk heat treatment affected the gravity separation of milk fat, bacteria, and somatic cells. In raw milk, fat, bacteria, and somatic cells rose to the top of columns during gravity separation. About 50 to 80% of the fat and bacteria were present in the top 8% of the milk after gravity separation of raw milk. Gravity separation for 7h at 12°C or for 22h at 4°C produced equivalent separation of fat, bacteria, and somatic cells. The completeness of gravity separation of fat was influenced by the level of bacteria in the milk before separation. Milk with a high bacterial count had less (about 50 to 55%) gravity separation of fat than milk with low bacteria count (about 80%) in 22h at 4°C. Gravity separation caused fat, bacteria, and somatic cells to rise to the top of columns for raw whole milk and high temperature, short-time pasteurized (72.6°C, 25s) whole milk. Pasteurization at ≥76.9°C for 25s prevented all 3 components from rising, possibly due to denaturation of native bovine immunoglobulins that normally associate with fat, bacteria, and somatic cells during gravity separation. Gravity separation can be used to produce reduced-fat milk with decreased bacterial and somatic cell counts, and may be a critical factor in the history of safe and unique traditional Italian hard cheeses produced from gravity-separated raw milk. A better understanding of the mechanism of this natural process could lead to the development of new nonthermal thermal technology (that does not involve heating the milk to high temperatures) to remove bacteria and spores from milk or other liquids.

  3. Validation Testing a Contaminant Transport and Natural Attenuation Simulation Model Using Field Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    biomass production. The redox potential of an electron acceptor affects the order in which the electron acceptors are involved in the biodegradation...would occur. Chemically, there are a number of likely pathways for the biological degradation of BTEX. The Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Bacillus ...gasoline contamination site near Empire , Michigan, revealed dissolved oxygen levels in the surrounding area 18 ground water so low as to be

  4. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote contaminants in natural and simulated ground-water ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald; Grbic-Galic, Dunja

    1992-01-01

    Wastes from a wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near-surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. Contamination resulted from the discharge of plant waste waters to and subsequent seepage from unlined surface impoundments that were in direct hydraulic contact with the ground water. Two distinct phases resulted when the creosote and water mixed: a denser than water hydrocarbon phase that moved vertically downward, and an organic-rich aqueous phase that moved laterally with the ground-water flow. The aqueous phase is enriched in organic acids, phenolic compounds, single- and double-ring nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen containing compounds, and single- and double-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The ground water is devoid of dissolved O2, is 60-70% saturated with CH4 and contains H2S. Field analyses document a greater decrease in concentration of organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, and 2(1H)-isoquinolinone during downgradient movement in the aquifer than could be explained by dilution and/or dispersion. Laboratory microcosm studies have shown that within the study region, this effect can be attributed to microbial degradation to CH4 and CO2. A small but active methanogenic population was found on sediment materials taken from highly contaminated parts of the aquifer.

  5. Pre-clinical safety assessment of the synthetic human milk, nature-identical, oligosaccharide Lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT).

    PubMed

    Coulet, Myriam; Phothirath, Phoukham; Constable, Anne; Marsden, Edward; Schilter, Benoit

    2013-12-01

    Lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) is a tetrasaccharide naturally occurring in human breast milk, but not in cow's milk. The safety data generated on a potential new LNnT ingredient produced by chemical synthesis is presented. Standard in vitro genotoxicity tests were performed. LNnT was also administered via gavage in 14-, 28- and 90-day studies at levels corresponding to 0 (control), 1000, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg bw/day in juvenile rats. Fructooligosaccharide (FOS) currently approved for use in infant formulae was used as a reference control at one dose level of 5000 mg/kg bw/day. LNnT was non-mutagenic in in vitro assays. Oral administration up to 5000 mg/kg bw/day to rats over 90 days was not associated with any adverse effects, based on clinical observations, body weight gain, feed consumption, clinical pathology, organ weights and histopathology findings. Regarding gastrointestinal effects, LNnT was better tolerated than FOS during the first 2 weeks of treatment. A No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 5000 mg/kg bw/day for both male and female rats was identified for LNnT when administered by gavage for 90 days. These findings in the juvenile rat support the safety of LNnT for possible use in infant foods and allow further investigation in clinical studies.

  6. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  7. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  8. Ten-Year Monitored Natural Recovery of Lead-Contaminated Mine Tailing in Klity Creek, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Otwong, Ashijya; Chantharit, Aphichart; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Klity Creek has become Thailand’s first official remediation ordered by the court in 2013, 15 years after the spill of lead (Pb)-contaminated mine tailing into the creek. The Pollution Control Department (PCD) decided to restore the creek through monitored natural recovery (MNR) since 2006 but has not been successful. Interestingly, the most recent remediation plan in 2015 will still apply MNR to five out of the seven portions of the creek, despite no scientific feasibility evaluation of using MNR to restore the creek. Objective: This study qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the feasibility of using MNR to clean up the creek in order to protect the Klity children from excess Pb exposure. Methods: We analyzed the physical and chemical transformation of Pb contaminated sediment in the creek and developed a remedial action goal and cleanup level using the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model (IEUBK). We empirically determined the natural recovery (NR) potentials and rates using 10 years of data monitoring the water and sediment samples from eight monitoring stations (KC1 to KC8). Results: Klity Creek has NR potential for water except at KC2, which is closest to the spill and the other improperly managed Pb sources. However, the creek has no NR potential for sediment except at the KC8 location (NR rate = 11.1 ± 3.0 × 10–3 month–1) farthest from the spill. Conclusion: The MNR method is not suitable to use as the sole remedial approach for Klity Creek (KC2 to KC7). Although MNR is applicable at KC8, it may require up to 377 ± 76 years to restore the sediment to the background Pb concentration. Citation: Phenrat T, Otwong A, Chantharit A, Lowry GV. 2016. Ten-year monitored natural recovery of lead-contaminated mine tailing in Klity Creek, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand. Environ Health Perspect 124:1511–1520; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP215 PMID:27157823

  9. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Oil and Natural Gas Operations: Potential Environmental Contamination and Recommendations to Assess Complex Environmental Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. Although these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals that are used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Objectives We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and antihormonal activities for chemicals used. Methods We discuss the literature on a) surface and groundwater contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and b) potential human exposure, particularly in the context of the total hormonal and antihormonal activities present in surface and groundwater from natural and anthropogenic sources; we also discuss initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps. Discussion In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures. Conclusions We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide information supporting the idea that using such a component will help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs. Citation Kassotis CD, Tillitt DE, Lin CH, McElroy JA, Nagel SC. 2016. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and oil and natural gas operations: potential environmental contamination and recommendations to assess complex environmental mixtures. Environ Health Perspect 124:256–264; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409535 PMID:26311476

  10. Cow's milk and goat's milk.

    PubMed

    Turck, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Cow's milk is increasingly suggested to play a role in the development of chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders whereas goat's milk is advocated as having several health benefits. Cow's milk is a rich and cheap source of protein and calcium, and a valuable food for bone health. Despite their high content in saturated fats, consumption of full-fat dairy products does not seem to cause significant changes in cardiovascular disease risk variables. Early introduction of cow's milk is a strong negative determinant of iron status. Unmodified cow's milk does not meet nutritional requirements of infants although it is acceptable to add small volumes of cow's milk to complementary foods. Cow's milk protein allergy has a prevalence ranging from 2 to 7%, and the age of recovery is usually around 2-3 years. The evidence linking cow's milk intake to a later risk of type 1 diabetes or chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension) is not convincing. Milk probably protects against colorectal cancer, diets high in calcium are a probable cause of prostate cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that high consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk for prostate cancer. There is no evidence to support the use of a cow's milk-free diet as a primary treatment for individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. Unmodified goat's milk is not suitable for infants because of the high protein and minerals content and of a low folate content. Goat's milk has no clear nutritional advantage over cow's milk and is not less allergenic. The European Food Safety Authority recently stated that proteins from goat's milk can be suitable as a protein source for infant and follow-on formula, provided the final product complies with the compositional criteria laid down in Directive 2006/141/EC.

  11. The minerals of milk.

    PubMed

    Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    The salt of milk constitutes a small part of milk (8-9 g.L(-1)); this fraction contains calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium for the main cations and inorganic phosphate, citrate and chloride for the main anions. In milk, these ions are more or less associated between themselves and with proteins. Depending on the type of ion, they are diffusible (cases of sodium, potassium and chloride) or partially associated with casein molecules (cases of calcium, magnesium, phosphate and citrate), to form large colloidal particles called casein micelles. Today, our knowledge and understanding concerning this fraction is relatively complete. In this review, the different models explaining (i) the nature and distribution of these minerals (especially calcium phosphate) in both fractions of milk and (ii) their behaviour in different physico-chemical conditions, are discussed.

  12. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquife

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K M; K Kukkadapu, R K; Qafoku, N P; Peacock, A D; Lesher, E; Williams, K H; Bargar, J R; Wilkins, M J; Figueroa, L; Ranville, J; Davis, J A; Long, P E

    2012-05-23

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology and redox processes that occur in these zones, several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a U-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) were examined. Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for U and Fe content, oxidation state, and mineralogy; reduced S phases; and solid-phase organic C content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase U concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the U present as U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced S phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and SO4 reduction has occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentrations of solid-phase organic C and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic C concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic C for maintaining reducing conditions and U immobilization.

  13. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Kate M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Peacock, Aaron D.; Lesher, E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Ranville, James; Davis, James; Long, Philip E.

    2012-05-23

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology, and redox processes that occur in these zones, we examined several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO). Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for uranium and iron content, oxidation state, and mineralogy, reduced sulfur phases, and solid phase organic carbon content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase uranium concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the uranium present as reduced U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced sulfur phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentration of solid phase organic carbon and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic carbon concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic carbon for maintaining reducing conditions and uranium immobilization.

  14. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K. M.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Qafoku, N. P.; Peacock, A. D.; Lesher, E.; Williams, K. H.; Bargar, J. R.; Wilkins, M. J.; Figueroa, L.; Ranville, J.; Davis, J. A.; Long, P. E.

    2012-08-01

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology and redox processes that occur in these zones, several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a U-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) were examined. Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for U and Fe content, oxidation state, and mineralogy; reduced S phases; and solid-phase organic C content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase U concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the U present as U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced S phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and SO4 reduction has occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentrations of solid-phase organic C and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic C concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic C for maintaining reducing conditions and U immobilization.

  15. Use of 222Rn as natural tracer for LNAPL quantification and recovery efficiency in a crude-oil contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsin, Violaine; Chablais, Amélie; Dumont, Julien; Cardetti, Marc; Radakovitch, Olivier; Höhener, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    In august 2009, five hectares of the pristine gravel aquifer of Crau in southern France were contaminated by 5,100 m3 of crude oil due to the sudden break of a pipeline. The remediation of this site is still ongoing and consists in replacement and off-site disposal of contaminated topsoils, plume management by hydraulic groundwater barriers with re-injection of activated charcoal-treated waters, and dual-phase LNAPL extraction in the source zone. It is anticipated to stop these remediation actions when the rate of hydrocarbon extraction becomes inefficient. The volume of LNAPL is estimated between 100 and 1000 m3. A more accurate estimation is needed for the implementation of natural attenuation once physical treatment is discontinued. 222Rn has been introduced as a natural tracer for the quantification of LNAPL saturation in porous media under natural gradient conditions (Hunkeler et al., 1997; Semprini et al., 2000; Schubert et al., 2007). The objective of this study was to investigate whether 222Rn in groundwater can be used as a tracer for LNAPL quantification at a field site treated by LNAPL removal. To this end, groundwater samples were obtained in pristine monitoring wells from upgradient the contamination using submersible electric pumps, and in LNAPL recovery wells. There, samples were obtained from the tap on the hard PVC tubing used for pumping groundwater to the treatment facility. For 222Rn analysis, flasks of 250 mL were gently filled and were capped thereafter without permitting air bubbles. The flasks were analysed within 6 to 24 hours. The 222Rn activity of groundwater was measured by a Rn detector (RAD7-Durridge, Co. Inc.). The measurements were spaced over more than 15 months in order to account for seasonal changes. Each well was sampled at least 3 times. In pristine groundwater, the radon activity was relatively constant and remained always > 14 Bq/L. The radon activities in the groundwater of source zone wells were also relatively constant and

  16. Microbial respiration and natural attenuation of benzene contaminated soils investigated by cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Michalzik, Beate; Bachmann, Anne; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-05-07

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damage. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and are known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Innovative cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of the soil micro-flora to sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. (13)C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving (12)CO2 and O2- from the natural attenuation process of benzene degradation to ultimately form (13)CO2. The respiratory quotient (RQ) decreased from a value 0.98 to 0.46 directly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with the maximum (13)CO2 concentration rate (0.63 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), indicating the highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into (13)CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore. The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration.

  17. Dynamics of natural contamination by aluminium and iron rich colloids in the volcanic aquifers of Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Viaroli, Stefano; Cuoco, Emilio; Mazza, Roberto; Tedesco, Dario

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of natural contamination by Al and Fe colloids in volcanic aquifers of central-southern Italy were investigated. Localized perched aquifers, and their relative discharges, are strongly affected by the presence of massive suspended solids, which confer a white-lacteous coloration to the water. This phenomenon occasionally caused the interruption of water distribution due to the exceeding of Al and Fe concentrations in aquifers exploited for human supply. The cause was ascribed to water seepage from perched aquifers. Water discharges affected by such contamination was investigated for the Rocca Ripesena area (north-eastern sector of Vulsini Volcanic District) and for the Rianale Stream Valley (Roccamonfina Volcanic Complex). Hydrogeological survey of both areas confirmed the presence of perched aquifers not previously considered due to their low productivity. Pluviometric data and chemical parameters were periodically monitored. Water mineralization decreased with increasing rainfall, conversely Al and Fe concentrations increased. Statistical analysis confirmed the dependence of all the chemical variables on rock leaching, with the sole exception of Al and Fe which were imputed to colloids mobilization from local, strongly pedogenized pyroclastic material. The similarities in hydrogeological settings and mobilization dynamics in both areas suggest that the Al and Fe colloidal contamination should be more abundant than currently known in quaternary volcanic areas.

  18. Contaminants in water, sediment and fish biomonitor species from natural and artificial estuarine habitats along the urbanized Gold Coast, Queensland.

    PubMed

    Waltham, Nathan J; Teasdale, Peter R; Connolly, Rod M

    2011-12-01

    Metal and pesticide contaminants were measured in water, sediment and fish species in various Gold Coast waterways, Queensland. With the exception of Cu, metal concentrations in water, measured using the diffuse gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique, complied with relevant Australian guidelines. Cu concentrations in these waterways have been related to recreational vessel activities previously. All sediment metal concentrations measured were below the national guidelines, although Cu, Zn and Pb were found to vary significantly between habitat types. Evidence of spikes in sediment pesticide concentrations (some banned over 50 years ago) was observed in some artificial residential waterways. Heavy metals and pesticides were measured in the tissue (muscle, gills and liver) of three economically important species of fish, with different feeding strategies (partly herbivore Arrhamphus sclerolepis, carnivore Acanthopagrus australis, detritivore Mugil cephalus). We tested the hypothesis that fish accumulate different amounts of contaminants from wetland habitats affected by different intensities of anthropogenic activities (i.e., marinas, artificial residential canals, artificial residential lakes, estuaries and natural, vegetated waterways). Significantly higher concentrations of Cu were found in the gills of each fish species from marinas compared to fish caught in other waterways. Furthermore, fish caught in canals had the second highest Cu and natural waterways the lowest. These results support the stated hypothesis for Cu and furthermore indicate that these fish species are suitable as biomonitors in estuarine waterways. Metal and pesticide concentrations in the edible muscle tissue of all fish complied with the Australian Food Standard Code recommended limits for human consumption, apart from As which is likely to be due to bioconcentration of lower toxicity organo-As species. These results indicate a low health risk for humans consuming fish, in terms of

  19. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote-derived contaminants in natural and simulated ground water ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Godsy, E.M.

    1993-12-31

    Wastes from an abandoned wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. The contaminated ground water is enriched in organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, indole, oxindole, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, 2(1H)-isoquinolinone, benzothiophene, benzofuran, naphthalene, and indene. Evidence is presented that the methanogenic degradation of the compounds listed above and concomitant microbial growth in batch microcosms derived from contaminated aquifer material can be described using Monod kinetics. The K{sub s} values obtained for the biodegradation of the phenolic compounds in this study are much lower than published values, indicating that the aquifer microorganisms may have developed enzyme systems and transport mechanisms that are adapted to low nutrient conditions. The values for k{sub d} are much less than {mu}{sub max}, and can be neglected in the microcosm studies. The low Y values, approximately an order of magnitude lower than theoretical values, and the low numbers of microorganisms in the aquifer derived microcosms suggest that these organisms may use some unique strategies to survive in the subsurface environment. Studies of the degradation pathways of the homocyclic and heterocyclic aromatic compounds on the basis of intermediate compounds have revealed that the process consists of both a major and a minor pathway. The first transformation step of the major pathway consists of oxidation and cleavage of the heterocyclic ring. After cleavage of this ring, the substituent side chains and the remaining homocyclic ring are subjected to various reactions including oxidation, decarboxylation, desulfurylation or ammonification, and O-methylation. These reactions are followed by the reduction of the homocyclic ring, cleavage of this ring, {beta}-oxidation, and mineralization.

  20. Evidence of Chlorobenzene Natural Attenuation in Contaminated Sediments Using Compound Specific Isotope Analysis and High Resolution Pore Water Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeport, E.; Landis, R.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Lutz, E. J.; Mack, E. E.; West, K.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2014-12-01

    Contaminated sediments can represent a significant risk for ecosystems and hinder drinking water production if contaminants discharge to surface and ground water. Understanding of contaminant fate and the potential for natural attenuation can help protect aquatic resources. In this study, the fate of chlorobenzene (MCB) and benzene was investigated in a contaminated canal sediment field site located in New Jersey, USA. Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) was applied to sediment pore water samples collected with a peeper at high spatial resolution (3 cm) across the sediment - surface water interface (SWI). Samples were collected at three locations in canal sediments, all of which exhibited reducing redox conditions. The largest concentrations were observed in the bottommost portions of the sediment profile, with concentrations ranging from 300 to 2000 µg/L for MCB, and 16 to 180 µg/L for benzene. Conversely, concentrations were below detection limit in the surface water and in the top 6 cm of the sediment. In the zones of highest MCB concentrations, the δ13C values were -26.4 (location C) and -21.9 ‰ (location F), and became progressively more enriched in 13C while concentrations decreased, reaching -23.9 (at 12 cm below the SWI, location C) and -18.4 ‰ (at 16.5 cm below SWI, location F). Benzene was only detected in the bottom 6 cm of the sediment profiles. Benzene δ13C values were -27 (bottommost, i.e., 24 cm deep) to -29.7 ‰ (18 cm deep), in location C. Such significant isotopic enrichments in 13C (2.5 to 3.5 ‰) correlated with MCB and benzene concentration decrease are suggestive of in situ biodegradation. In addition, benzene δ13C values were systematically more depleted in 13C than MCB, suggesting that benzene found in these zones was likely produced from MCB via reductive dechlorination. This study combined for the first time CSIA with high spatial sampling resolution in surface water sediments. This setup enabled not only detection of

  1. Using the Melamine Contamination of Foods to Enhance the Chemistry Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Doris Renate; Jensen, Anna Chick

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the chemistry of the triazine compound, melamine, is presented as well as a brief discussion of the health impacts on humans and pets when melamine contaminates milk products and pet food. Melamine has repeatedly been in the news, and its topical nature provides an excellent springboard for applications of a variety of chemical…

  2. Genotoxicity and contamination of natural and anthropogenically transformed soils of the city of Rostov-on-Don with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbov, S. N.; Bezuglova, O. S.; Varduni, T. V.; Gorovtsov, A. V.; Tagiverdiev, S. S.; Hildebrant, Yu. A.

    2015-12-01

    The integrated characteristics of urban soils included the assessment of heavy metal pollution linked to the determination of soil genotoxicity, which characterizes the soil capacity to affect the structural and functional state of the genetic apparatus of soil biota. Increased concentration of chromium caused by the high background level was found in soils of the city of Rostov-on-Don. A weak contamination of surface horizons with lead and arsenic was also noted. Maximum permissible concentration of zinc was locally exceeded, including deep soil horizons. It was found that there is no definite correlation between the total content of heavy metals, their mobile compounds, and the parameters of genotoxicity in the natural and anthropogenically transformed soils. It was concluded that soil genotoxicity characterizes the total mutagenic activity associated with the presence of a set of genotoxicants of different nature.

  3. Modeling fish biological responses to contaminants and natural variability in estuaries.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, V F; Vasconcelos, R P; França, S; Serafim, A; Lopes, B; Company, R; Bebianno, M J; Costa, M J; Cabral, H N

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that influence biological responses to contaminants has long been a major goal in marine environmental research. Seven estuarine sites along the Portuguese coast were sampled over a year, and different biological responses of Pomatoschistus microps and Atherina presbyter were determined: superoxide dismutase, catalase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, metallothioneins, lipid peroxidation, RNA:DNA ratio and condition factor K. Generalized linear models (GLM) were developed for each biological variable per species in relation to sediment chemical characterization (metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentration) and environmental conditions (month, site, water temperature, salinity, depth and mud percentage in the sediment). GLM varied in explanatory power and in the set of predictor variables included in the models. Environmental factors were frequently selected as predictor variables. Individual metals concentration and sediment quality guidelines (integrating all metals) were the major contaminants explaining biological variability. Accordingly, models for metallothioneins and lipid peroxidation had highest explanatory power. Species-specific responses and dataset size were the basis of observed differences between GLM for the two species.

  4. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum, and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except S. canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene, or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants. PMID:27252685

  5. Environmental management: Integrating ecological evaluation, remediation, restoration, natural resource damage assessment and long-term stewardship on contaminated lands

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Ecological evaluation is essential for remediation, restoration, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and forms the basis for many management practices. These include determining status and trends of biological, physical, or chemical/radiological conditions, conducting environmental impact assessments, performing remedial actions should remediation fail, managing ecosystems and wildlife, and assessing the efficacy of remediation, restoration, and long-term stewardship. The objective of this paper is to explore the meanings of these assessments, examine the relationships among them, and suggest methods of integration that will move environmental management forward. While remediation, restoration, and NRDA, among others, are often conducted separately, it is important to integrate them for contaminated land where the risks to ecoreceptors (including humans) can be high, and the potential damage to functioning ecosystems great. Ecological evaluations can range from inventories of local plants and animals, determinations of reproductive success of particular species, levels of contaminants in organisms, kinds and levels of effects, and environmental impact assessments, to very formal ecological risk assessments for a chemical or other stressor. Such evaluations can range from the individual species to populations, communities, ecosystems or the landscape scale. Ecological evaluations serve as the basis for making decisions about the levels and kinds of remediation, the levels and kinds of restoration possible, and the degree and kinds of natural resource injuries that have occurred because of contamination. Many different disciplines are involved in ecological evaluation, including biologists, conservationists, foresters, restoration ecologists, ecological engineers, economists, hydrologist, and geologists. Since ecological evaluation forms the basis for so many different types of environmental management, it seems reasonable to integrate management options

  6. Environmental management: integrating ecological evaluation, remediation, restoration, natural resource damage assessment and long-term stewardship on contaminated lands.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2008-08-01

    Ecological evaluation is essential for remediation, restoration, and Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), and forms the basis for many management practices. These include determining status and trends of biological, physical, or chemical/radiological conditions, conducting environmental impact assessments, performing remedial actions should remediation fail, managing ecosystems and wildlife, and assessing the efficacy of remediation, restoration, and long-term stewardship. The objective of this paper is to explore the meanings of these assessments, examine the relationships among them, and suggest methods of integration that will move environmental management forward. While remediation, restoration, and NRDA, among others, are often conducted separately, it is important to integrate them for contaminated land where the risks to ecoreceptors (including humans) can be high, and the potential damage to functioning ecosystems great. Ecological evaluations can range from inventories of local plants and animals, determinations of reproductive success of particular species, levels of contaminants in organisms, kinds and levels of effects, and environmental impact assessments, to very formal ecological risk assessments for a chemical or other stressor. Such evaluations can range from the individual species to populations, communities, ecosystems or the landscape scale. Ecological evaluations serve as the basis for making decisions about the levels and kinds of remediation, the levels and kinds of restoration possible, and the degree and kinds of natural resource injuries that have occurred because of contamination. Many different disciplines are involved in ecological evaluation, including biologists, conservationists, foresters, restoration ecologists, ecological engineers, economists, hydrologist, and geologists. Since ecological evaluation forms the basis for so many different types of environmental management, it seems reasonable to integrate management options

  7. Development and validation of a stochastic model for potential growth of Listeria monocytogenes in naturally contaminated lightly preserved seafood.

    PubMed

    Mejlholm, Ole; Bøknæs, Niels; Dalgaard, Paw

    2015-02-01

    A new stochastic model for the simultaneous growth of Listeria monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was developed and validated on data from naturally contaminated samples of cold-smoked Greenland halibut (CSGH) and cold-smoked salmon (CSS). During industrial processing these samples were added acetic and/or lactic acids. The stochastic model was developed from an existing deterministic model including the effect of 12 environmental parameters and microbial interaction (O. Mejlholm and P. Dalgaard, Food Microbiology, submitted for publication). Observed maximum population density (MPD) values of L. monocytogenes in naturally contaminated samples of CSGH and CSS were accurately predicted by the stochastic model based on measured variability in product characteristics and storage conditions. Results comparable to those from the stochastic model were obtained, when product characteristics of the least and most preserved sample of CSGH and CSS were used as input for the existing deterministic model. For both modelling approaches, it was shown that lag time and the effect of microbial interaction needs to be included to accurately predict MPD values of L. monocytogenes. Addition of organic acids to CSGH and CSS was confirmed as a suitable mitigation strategy against the risk of growth by L. monocytogenes as both types of products were in compliance with the EU regulation on ready-to-eat foods.

  8. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and oil and natural gas operations: Potential environmental contamination and recommendations to assess complex environmental mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Lin, Chung-Ho; McElroy, Jane A.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hydraulic fracturing technologies, developed over the last 65 years, have only recently been combined with horizontal drilling to unlock oil and gas reserves previously deemed inaccessible. While these technologies have dramatically increased domestic oil and natural gas production, they have also raised concerns for the potential contamination of local water supplies with the approximately 1,000 chemicals used throughout the process, including many known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals.Objectives: We discuss the need for an endocrine component to health assessments for drilling-dense regions in the context of hormonal and anti-hormonal activities for chemicals used.Methods: We discuss the literature on 1) surface and ground water contamination by oil and gas extraction operations, and 2) potential human exposure, particularly in context of the total hormonal and anti-hormonal activities present in surface and ground water from natural and anthropogenic sources, with initial analytical results and critical knowledge gaps discussed.Discussion: In light of the potential for environmental release of oil and gas chemicals that can disrupt hormone receptor systems, we recommend methods for assessing complex hormonally active environmental mixtures.Conclusions: We describe a need for an endocrine-centric component for overall health assessments and provide supporting information that using this may help explain reported adverse health trends as well as help develop recommendations for environmental impact assessments and monitoring programs.

  9. Effect of boiling, frying, and baking on recovery of aflatoxin from naturally contaminated corn grits or cornmeal.

    PubMed

    Stoloff, L; Trucksess, M W

    1981-05-01

    Corn grits naturally contaminated with aflatoxins were used for making boiled grits, and portions of the boiled grits were used for making pan-fried grits; cornmeal naturally contaminated with aflatoxins was used for making corn muffins. Procedures and recipes were derived from cookbook and market package recommendations. From analyses of the products for aflatoxins before and after preparation of the table-ready products, it was determined that 72 +/- 9% (n = 15) of the aflatoxin found in the original grits could be recovered after the grits were boiled. The recovery of aflatoxin B1 after the grits were fried was either 66 +/- 10% (n = 6) or 47 +/- 8% (n = 9), depending on whether 3 cups of water or 4 cups of water per cup of grits, respectively, were used for preparing the boiled grits before frying. Similarly, it was determined that 87 +/- 4% (n = 9) of the aflatoxin B1 found in the original cornmeal could be recovered from the baked muffins. No detectable aflatoxin B2 a was present in the extracts from any of the table-ready products.

  10. DECIPHERING NATURALLY-OCCURRING PB CONTAMINATION IMPACTING DRINKING WATER WELLS: SHAKER VILLAGE CATCHMENT, MAINE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace Pb concentrations in groundwater within glacial deposits across Maine fluctuate considerably. Deciphering the distribution and sources of naturally occurring Pb in groundwater with only the use of conventional anomaly identification techniques presents a challenge. In a rep...

  11. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS ON GENETIC DIVERSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BIOMONITORING AND ECOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conservation of genetic diversity has emerged as one of the central issues in conservation biology. Although researchers in the areas of evolutionary biology, population management, and conservation biology routinely investigate genetic variability in natural populations, onl...

  12. Antimicrobial effects of ionizing radiation on artificially and naturally contaminated cacao beans. [Aspergillus flavus; Penicillium citrinum

    SciTech Connect

    Restaino, L.; Myron, J.J.J.; Lenovich, L.M.; Bills, S.; Tscherneff, K.

    1984-04-01

    With an initial microbial level of ca. 10/sup 7/ microorganisms per g of Ivory Coast cacao beans, 5 kGy of gamma radiation from a Co/sup 60/ source under an atmosphere of air reduced the microflora per g by 2.49 and 3.03 logs at temperatures of 35 and 50/sup 0/C, respectively. Bahia cacao beans were artificially contaminated with dried spores of Aspergillus flavus and Penicillium citrinum, giving initial fungal levels of 1.9 x 10/sup 4/ and 1.4 x 10/sup 3/ spores per g of whole Bahia cacao beans, respectively. The average D/sub 10/ values for A. flavus and P. citrinum spores on Bahia cacao beans were 0.66 and 0.88 kGy, respectively. 12 references.

  13. Fate and transport of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in a sewage- contaminated aquifer: A comparison of natural-gradient pulsed tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Barber, L.B.; Metge, D.W.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Two natural-gradient tracer tests were conducted to determine the transport and biodegradation behavior of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant under in situ conditions in a sewage-contaminated aquifer. The tests were conducted in two biogeochemically distinct zones of the aquifer: (1) an aerobic uncontaminated zone (oxic zone) and (2) a moderately aerobic, sewage-contaminated zone (transition zone). Chromatographic separation of the surfactant mixture was observed in both zones and attributed to the retardation of the longer alkyl chain homologues during transport. No significant loss of IAS mass was observed for the oxic zone while 20% of the LAS mass injected into the transition zone was removed due to biodegradation. Biodegradation preferentially removed the longer alkyl chain homologues and the external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). The removal of LAS mass coincided with a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentrations, the appearance of LAS metabolites, and an increase in the number of free-living bacteria with a concomitant change in bacteria morphology. The formation of LAS metabolites accounted for 86% of the LAS mass removed in the transition zone. Over the duration of the test, sorption and biodegradation enriched the LAS mixture in the more water-soluble and biologically resistant components.Two natural-gradient tracer tests were conducted to determine the transport and biodegradation behavior of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant under in situ conditions in a sewage-contaminated aquifer. The tests were conducted in two biogeochemically distinct zones of the aquifer: (1) an aerobic uncontaminated zone (oxic zone) and (2) a moderately aerobic, sewage-contaminated zone (transition zone). Chromatographic separation of the surfactant mixture was observed in both zones and attributed to the retardation of the longer alkyl chain homologues during transport. No significant loss of LAS mass was observed for the oxic zone while 20% of the LAS

  14. EVALUATION OF DIOXIN IN U.S. COW'S MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Milk fat is likely to be among the highest dietary sources of exposure to persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) contaminants, thus it is important to understand PBT levels in milk. Schaum had previously reported on concentrations of 21 PBTs in the United States milk suppl...

  15. Spatiotemporal variability and differentiation between anthropogenic and natural contamination of heavy metals of surface water: a case study in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittard, A.; Baraer, M.; McKenzie, J. M.; Mark, B. G.; Fernandez, A.; Walsh, E.; Santos Perez, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Santa, Peru, drains the western slopes of the glacierized Cordillera Blanca and provides water resources at almost all levels of the watershed. As it flows away from the valleys of the Cordillera Blanca, the Rio Santa takes out pollution from numerous sources, including acid mine drainage and natural sulfide oxidation by-products. The Rio Santa dry season discharge decline that is projected to be a consequence of glaciers retreat will probably have implications for the evolution of water pollution. This threat makes the characterization of the actual contamination mechanisms of primary importance. The present study focuses, first, on the spatiotemporal variability of heavy metal contamination across the entire Rio Santa Watershed and secondly on differentiating anthropogenic and natural contaminated sites. First, a macroscale sampling has been done during the summer 2013 to provide an overview of the contamination by trace metal, in water, suspended sediments and riverbed sediments. In addition, 30 water samples were taken from a point next to the city of Huaraz at a frequency of once every 2 weeks and analyzed for trace metals. Secondly, in order to identify hydrochemical contaminant origin dependant signatures in the Rio Santa watershed, 5 areas of known contamination origins were sampled during the summer 2014.Spatially speaking, we observed that most pollution is located in the south of the watershed, and that a large part of the arsenic that reaches the Santa in an aqueous phase does not make it to the outlet but remains trapped in the riverbed. Annual variation in water shows a very unusual fluctuation in Mn compare to other trace metal which are relatively stable. By differencing anthropogenic and natural sites and by considering glaciers melt and decrease water in future what would be the impact of the part of natural contaminated sites versus anthropogenic, mining and cities, on the water quality? Preliminary results show that anthropogenic sites

  16. Determination of trace elements in goat and ovine milk from Calabria (Italy) by ICP-AES.

    PubMed

    Licata, P; Di Bella, G; Potortì, A G; Lo Turco, V; Salvo, A; Dugo, G Mo

    2012-01-01

    There are many sources of contamination to which milk could be exposed: grazing animals can ingest contaminants present in nature, such as lead in soil, or that have been deposited on grass, resulting from industrial emissions. Another possible route of contamination is represented by feed for animals, which may contain heavy and essential metals. The potential of high-resolution inductively coupled plasma spectrometry was evaluated to quantify reliably various toxic and essential elements (Fe, Zn, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Se, Cd) in 47 samples of goat and ovine milk from various farms in Calabria (southern Italy). The results showed that concentrations of cadmium were below the limit of detection. Lead levels were below the maximum limits as set by the EC in almost all samples tested. The highest values were those of Zn followed by Fe, Cu and Se.

  17. Vegetation: A natural capacitor for contaminant metals input into the Critical Zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S. L.; Herndon, E.; Jin, L.; Eissenstat, D.; Raymond, P.

    2010-12-01

    Industrial pollution from atmospheric deposition has contaminated surface soils with metals such as Pb and Hg across broad geographic regions. Other metals have also been emitted and deposited to the land surface but these are less well known. To evaluate impacts of heavy metals on the health of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, it is important that we understand their residence time, transport, and behavior in soils. Vegetation can increase metal solubility in the soil through rhizosphere acidification and exudation of organic chelators. Soluble metals can then be more quickly transported into stream waters. Conversely, vegetation may increase the residence time of industrial pollution through biotic uptake. Often, metals taken up from pore fluids are eventually returned to the soil as leaves or woody material. During this biotic cycling, vegetation acts as a capacitor, storing contaminant metals and then releasing it slowly to the environment over time. For example, interdisciplinary studies at the Susquehanna Shale Hills Observatory, a Critical Zone Observatory in central Pennsylvania U.S.A., have enabled us to identify that significant Mn has accumulated in the watershed from atmospheric deposition. Using available geochemical databases, we have shown that Mn addition to surface soils is common in industrialized regions. We demonstrate with soil and leaf chemistry that vegetation actively recycles the Mn, potentially increasing its residence time in the soil. Soluble Mn is transferred from soil to vegetation through soil pore fluids, and we use soil pore fluid chemistry to evaluate these fluxes. Eventually, Mn is released from vegetation and transported into stream waters, and we show that dissolved metal loads in rivers have decreased over time, reflecting changes in atmospheric inputs over the past century. To elucidate the role of trees in release of nutrients and toxic Mn, we carried out controlled greenhouse experiments. The effluent solutions were

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica isolates from bulk tank milk and milk filters in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoid Salmonella is frequently associated with dairy cattle and their environment. Despite well-developed milking hygiene protocols, fecal contamination can occur and Salmonella has often been isolated from bulk milk. Salmonella isolates were recovered from US bulk tank milk as part of the NAH...

  19. Use of alternate compliance points/natural attenuation for management of contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D.F.; Gustafson, J.

    1994-12-31

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as codified and expanded by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1996 gives preference to the implementation of remedial alternatives which are capable of providing protection of human health and the environment. To ensure that alternatives are capable of meeting these objectives, remedial alternatives are supposed to comply with Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) including cleanup goals like MCLs. Alternatives must also reduce long term residual risk to an acceptable level (generally 10{sup {minus}4} to 10{sup {minus}6} for carcinogenic contaminants). The establishment of MCLs or more restrictive health risk based cleanup levels was rooted in the idea that technology would be able to achieve these goals. For this reason, it was believed that the operation of continuous pump and treat systems would be finite. However, in the last few years, EPA has reported that less than 8 percent of sites on the National Priorities List (NPL) which are addressed under CERCLA and SARA successfully restored aquifers to MCLs.

  20. Natural attenuation of arsenic in soils near a highly contaminated historical mine waste dump.

    PubMed

    Drahota, Petr; Filippi, Michal; Ettler, Vojtěch; Rohovec, Jan; Mihaljevič, Martin; Sebek, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic-contaminated soils near historical As-rich mine waste in Jáchymov (Czech Rep.), resulting from the smelting and seepage of the mine waste pore water, were studied to examine As partitioning between solid phases and pore waters. Mineralogical and geochemical analyses showed that As is exclusively associated with unidentified amorphous Fe oxyhydroxides, poorly crystalline goethite and hematite as adsorbed and coprecipitated species (with up to 3.2 wt.% As). Adsorption of As by Fe oxyhydroxides is likely to be a major control on the migration of As in the soil pore water containing only up to 15 μg L(-1) As(V). The slight variations in the dissolved As(V) concentrations do not follow the total contents of As in the soil or adsorbed As, but appeared to be a function of pH-dependent sorption onto Fe oxyhydroxides. The geochemical modelling using PHREEQC-2 supported the efficiency of As(V) adsorption by Fe oxyhydroxides in the soil affected by As-rich waste solution seepage. It also suggested that active Fe oxyhydroxides has a strong attenuation capacity in soil that could effectively trap the aqueous As(V) from the unremitting waste seepage for the next approx. 11600 years.

  1. Effect of refrigeration and frozen storage on the Campylobacter jejuni recovery from naturally contaminated broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Maziero, Maike T; de Oliveira, Tereza Cristina R M

    2010-04-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common thermophilic Campylobacter associated with human enteritis in many countries. Broilers and their by-products are the main sources for human enteritis. Refrigeration and freezing are used to control bacterial growth in foods. The effect of these interventions on survival of Campylobacter jejuni is yet not quite understood. This study evaluated the effect of storage temperature on the survival of C. jejuni in chicken meat stored for seven days at 4°C and for 28 days at -20°C. The influence of selective enrichment on recovery of Campylobacter was also evaluated. Thirty fresh chicken meat samples were analyzed and 93.3% was contaminated with termotolerant Campylobacter spp. with average count of 3.08 Log10 CFU/g on direct plating. After refrigeration, 53.3% of the analyzed samples tested positive for Campylobacter and the average count was 1.19 Log10 CFU/g. After storage at -20°C, 36.6% of the samples were positive with a verage count of 0.75 Log10 CFU/g. C. jejuni was detected after enrichment, respectively, in 50% of the fresh, 36.7% of the refrigerated and 33.3% of the frozen meat samples analyzed. No difference was detected for the recovery of C. jejuni from fresh, refrigerated or frozen samples after selective enrichment, showing that this microorganism can survive under the tested storage conditions.

  2. Arsenic resistance and accumulation by two bacteria isolated from a natural arsenic contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Neha; Bhatt, Renu

    2015-11-01

    Forty-three indigenous arsenic resistant bacteria were isolated from arsenic rich soil of Rajnandgaon district in the state of Chhattisgarh, India by enrichment culture technique. Among the isolates, two of the bacteria (As-9 and As-14) exhibited high resistance to As(V) [MIC ≥ 700 mM] and As(III) [MIC ≥ 10 mM] and were selected for further studies. Both these bacteria grew well in the presence of arsenic [20 mM As(V) and 5 mM As(III)], but the isolate As-14 strictly required arsenic for its survival and growth and was characterized as a novel arsenic dependent bacterium. The isolates contributed to 99% removal of arsenic from the growth medium which was efficiently accumulated in the cell. Quantitative estimation of arsenic through Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer revealed that there was >60% accumulation of both As(V) and As(III) by the two isolates. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis showed a fourfold increase in bacterial cell volume when grown in the presence of arsenic and the results of Transmission Electron Microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy proved that such an alteration was due to arsenic accumulation. Such arsenic resistant bacteria with efficient accumulating property could be effectively applied in the treatment of arsenic contaminated water.

  3. Decontamination of Mesquite Pod Flour Naturally Contaminated with Bacillus cereus and Formation of Furan by Ionizing Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Felker, Peter; Sokorai, Kimberly J

    2015-05-01

    Mesquite pod flour produced from nitrogen-fixing trees of the Prosopis species has a unique aroma and flavor that is preferred by some consumers. Due to the presence of wildlife, grazing domestic animals, and insects, the pods have a high potential of being contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus. Nonthermal processing technologies are helpful to reduce the population of microorganisms in the flour because heating deteriorates the characteristic flavor. A study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of ionizing radiation in decontaminating two types of mesquite pod flours (Prosopis alba and Prosopis pallida) naturally contaminated with B. cereus and the effects of irradiation on the formation of furan, a possible human carcinogen. Results showed that the populations of B. cereus were 3.8 and 5.4 log CFU/g in nonirradiated P. alba and P. pallida flours, respectively, and populations of microflora, mesophilic spores, B. cereus, and B. cereus spores decreased with increasing radiation doses. At 6 kGy, the populations fell below 1 log CFU/g. Irradiation at 6 kGy had no significant effect on the fructose, glucose, or sucrose content of the flour. Nonirradiated P. alba and P. pallida flours contained 13.0 and 3.1 ng/g of furan, respectively. Furan levels increased with irradiation doses at rates of 2.3 and 2.4 ng/g/kGy in the two flours. The level of 3-methylbutanal was reduced or not affected by irradiation, while the hexanal level was increased. Our results suggested that irradiation was effective in decontaminating contaminated mesquite flour. The significance of furan formation and possible changes in flavor due to irradiation may need to be further examined.

  4. Influence of enrichment and isolation media on the detection of Campylobacter spp. in naturally contaminated chicken samples.

    PubMed

    Repérant, E; Laisney, M J; Nagard, B; Quesne, S; Rouxel, S; Le Gall, F; Chemaly, M; Denis, M

    2016-09-01

    Investigating Campylobacter epidemiology requires adequate technique and media to ensure optimal culturing and accurate detection and isolation of Campylobacter strains. In the present study, we investigated the performances of three enrichment durations in Bolton broth (0, 24 and 48h) and compared four isolation media (mCCDA, Karmali, Butzler no. 2 and CampyFood agar (CFA)) for the detection of Campylobacter positive samples and the identification of Campylobacter species, from naturally contaminated broiler chicken samples (caeca, neck skin from carcasses, and skin from thighs). We compared our local results to those we obtained with samples from a European survey (caeca and neck skin) and a national survey (neck skin, thigh skin, and breast). Direct plating favored the detection of positive samples highly contaminated by Campylobacter (caeca and neck skin from carcasses) whatever the media. A longer enrichment reduced the rates of Campylobacter recovery except when using Butzler no. 2, more particularly for neck skin which background microflora was less important than in caeca. As a matter of fact, enrichment allowed a higher detection rate of positive samples with low Campylobacter contamination levels (breast, thigh skin), this detection being enhanced when using Butzler no. 2. When comparing the 3 other selective media, CFA was the 2nd most efficient media prior to mCCDA and Karmali. Interestingly, enrichment promoted the growth of Campylobacter coli but this promotion was least with Butzler no. 2 agar. Our study has confirmed the need to adapt the method to the types of samples for improving the detection of Campylobacter and that the method may affect the prevalence of the species.

  5. Designer milk.

    PubMed

    Sabikhi, Latha

    2007-01-01

    Dairy biotechnology is fast gaining ground in the area of altering milk composition for processing and/or animal and human health by employing nutritional and genetic approaches. Modification of the primary structure of casein, alteration in the lipid profile, increased protein recovery, milk containing nutraceuticals, and replacement for infant formula offer several advantages in the area of processing. Less fat in milk, altered fatty acid profiles to include more healthy fatty acids such as CLA and omega-fats, improved amino acid profiles, more protein, less lactose, and absence of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) are some opportunities of "designing" milk for human health benefits. Transgenic technology has also produced farm animals that secrete in their milk, human lactoferrin, lysozyme, and lipase so as to simulate human milk in terms of quality and quantity of these elements that are protective to infants. Cow milk allergenicity in children could be reduced by eliminating the beta-LG gene from bovines. Animals that produce milk containing therapeutic agents such as insulin, plasma proteins, drugs, and vaccines for human health have been genetically engineered. In order to cater to animal health, transgenic animals that express in their mammary glands, various components that work against mastitis have been generated. The ultimate acceptability of the "designer" products will depend on ethical issues such as animal welfare and safety, besides better health benefits and increased profitability of products manufactured by the novel techniques.

  6. Fungal and bacterial metabolites associated with natural contamination of locally processed rice (Oryza sativa L.) in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Rofiat, Abdus-Salaam; Fanelli, Francesca; Atanda, Olusegun; Sulyok, Michael; Cozzi, Giuseppe; Bavaro, Simona; Krska, Rudolf; Logrieco, Antonio F; Ezekiel, Chibundu N

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the fungal and bacterial metabolites associated with natural contamination of 38 composite samples of locally processed rice from five agro-ecological zones of Nigeria (AEZs). The samples were evaluated for the presence of microbial metabolites by LC-MS/MS. Among the identified metabolites, 63 fungal and 5 bacterial metabolites were measured at varying concentrations and occurrence levels. Fusarium toxins had the highest incidence of 79%, but occurred in low amounts with fumonisin B1 (FB1) having the highest percentage incidence of 39.5% and a mean of 18.5 µg/kg. Among the Aspergillus toxins, aflatoxins (AFs) occurred in 36.9% of the rice samples, with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) having the highest occurrence level of 18.4% and a mean value of 5 µg/kg. About 12 metabolites had incidence levels > 50%, including beauvericin (BEA) and tryptophol, which had occurrence levels of 100%. Among the emerging toxins under evaluation by international organisations such as the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), citrinin, sterigmatocystin (STER) and beauvericin were detected with maximum values of 207, 125 and 131 μg/kg, respectively. This paper also reports the first documented evidence of the contamination of Nigerian rice by bacterial and Alternaria metabolites, nivalenol, kojic acid, STER, moniliformin, fusaric acid, fumonisin B3, citrinin, 3-nitropropionic acid, andrastin A, cytochalasins, emodin and physicon.

  7. Recovery of contaminated wetland soils at the Savannah River Site by natural rainfall: An experimental, toxicological study

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1990-08-01

    This study was conducted at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Seepage basins at the SRS F-Area received liquid effluent from the 1950s to 1988. This effluent was typically acidic, containing high amounts of total dissolved ions, low levels of tritium and other radioactive elements, and trace levels of various heavy metals. Sodium (from NaOH), and aluminum (from soil matrix reduction due to acid leachate) were at particularly high levels in the outcropping water. The effluent gradually seeped down to the water table and subsequently outcropped along the edge of a forested wetland bordering Four Mile Creek. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential for natural remediation of contaminated wetland soils by rainfall. Contaminated soils were collected and leached repeatedly with rainwater. After 6 leachings the leachate was observed to be non-toxic to lettuce seedlings, whereas the initial leachate was very toxic. These results suggest that more detailed studies on leaching as a remediation technique would be beneficial. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Milk, milk products, and disease free health: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, R; Behare, P V; Kumar, M; Mohania, D; Yadav, M; Jain, S; Menon, S; Parkash, O; Marotta, F; Minelli, E; Henry, C J K; Yadav, H

    2012-01-01

    The cow and its milk have been held sacred in the world since the dawn of human civilization. Indian ancient Vedic texts describe the virtues of milk and dairy products, as is authenticated by modern scientific principles and proofs. Therefore, milk has been considered as one of the most natural and highly nutritive part of a daily balanced diet. Currently, the integration of advanced scientific knowledge with traditional information is gaining incredible momentum toward developing the concept of potential therapeutic foods. Furthermore, new advances toward understanding the therapeutic roles of milk and milk products have also given a new impetus for unraveling the age old secrets of milk. At present, the best-known examples of therapeutic foods are fermented milk products containing health promoting probiotic bacteria. In the present article, we have tried to review the various aspects of the therapeutic nature of milk and fermented dairy products in a highly up-dated manner, and offer an in-depth insight into the development of targeted therapeutic future foods as per the requirements of consumers.

  9. Visual scoring of milk mixed with blood.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten D; Bjerring, Martin

    2005-08-01

    Sorting of normal and abnormal milk at time of milking is done visually for conventional milking systems, but more concrete standards are needed when milking is done in automatic milking systems (AMS). Several panel tests were carried out to find out how different consumer groups, milkers and advisors look at and respond to the visual appearance of milk mixed with blood, in order to set a limit for what they think is acceptable. It is concluded from the test panel results that milk samples with 0.4% or more of blood all will be scored as pink and samples with 0.1% blood (about 6 microM-haemoglobin or 100 mg/l) can be visually detected if they are compared with milk samples without blood. The consumer group scored fewer of the samples with 0-1% blood as normal than did the professional groups. The test panel scored 65% of the samples with 1% blood as normal when milk was presented in a black strip cup, which is the reference method when foremilking takes place in a conventional parlour. Only 2% of the milk samples with 2% blood (about 120 microM-haemoglobin or 2000 mg/l) were scored as normal in a black strip cup and should consequently be detected by conventional as well as automatic systems. One model of AMS was tested for its ability to detect and separate milk coloured by blood. The model separated milk with > or = 6 microM-haemoglobin. Milk mixed with blood injected into the milk stream for a short time at the beginning of milking was not separated. We lack data on how blood is naturally expelled into milk and in what amount. We propose that cow composite milk with > 6 microM-haemoglobin should be separated because at this level milk will have a red tinge.

  10. A remediation strategy based on active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation in a soil contaminated by pyrite waste.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Rafael; Almela, Concepción; Bernal, M Pilar

    2006-10-01

    Phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils can be promoted by the proper use of soil amendments and agricultural practices. A 4-year phytoremediation programme was applied to a site affected by the toxic spill of pyrite residue at Aznalcóllar (Spain) in 1998, contaminated with heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) and arsenic. This consisted of active phytoremediation, using organic amendments (cow manure and compost) and lime and growing two successive crops of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern., followed by natural attenuation without further intervention. Changes in soil pH, extractable metal and As concentrations, organic carbon content and microbial biomass was evaluated. The initial oxidation of metal sulphides from pyrite residues released soluble metals and reduced soil pH to extremely acidic values (mean 4.1, range 2.0-7.0). The addition of lime (up to 64 t ha(-1)) increased soil pH to adequate values for plant growth, resulting in a significant decrease in DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in all plots. The natural attenuation phase showed also a decrease in extractable metals. Organic treatments increased the soil total organic carbon, which led to higher values of microbial biomass (11.6, 15.2 and 14.9 g kg(-1) TOC and 123, 170 and 275 microg g(-1) biomass-C in control, compost and manure plots, respectively). Active phytoremediation followed by natural attenuation, was effective for remediation of this pyrite-polluted soil.

  11. The CD markers of camel (Camelus dromedarius) milk cells during mastitis: the LPAM-1 expression is an indication of possible mucosal nature of the cellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashqar, Roqaya A; Al-Mohammad Salem, Khadim M; Al Herz, Abdul Kareem M; Al-Haroon, Amal I; Alluwaimi, Ahmed M

    2015-04-01

    Studying the cellular populations of the camel mammary glands through the expression pattern of the CD markers and adhesion molecules is a mean to define whether the cellular trafficking pathway is peripheral or mucosal nature. Camel milk cells from 8 Gram-positive and 5 Gram-negative infected camels were examined with flow cytometry using cross-reacting antibodies like, anti-CD4(+), CD8(+), WC+1(+)γδ, CD62L, CD11a(+)/CD18, LPAM-1, CXCR2. The overall results indicated high flow cytometry output of most of the CD makers. The statistical analysis of the mean percentage of the expressed CD markers has shown that CD62L, CXCR-2, LPAM-1, CD11a/CD18, CD8(+), IL-6R and CD20(+) were expressed in significant differences in either type of the infection. The LPAM-1 expression has provided further support to the notion that the lymphocyte trafficking is of the mucosal nature. The mucosal origin of cellular trafficking has important implications on the vaccine design and therapeutical approaches to mastitis.

  12. THE ANTISTREPTOCOCCAL PROPERTY OF MILK

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Armine T.; Rosenblum, Herman

    1952-01-01

    The ability of lactenin to prevent the multiplication of group A streptococci when milk becomes contaminated with that organism accounts in part at least, for the infrequency of milk-borne streptococcal epidemics. From epidemiological studies it has been shown that most such epidemics arise from the consumption of raw milk in which streptococci occur as a result of bovine mastitis due to group A streptococcus. Lactenin fails to prevent the establishment of mastitis due to the group A streptococcus because the milk in the cow's udder is at a low oxidation-reduction potential and the lactenin is inactive. Lactenin, being destroyed by temperatures of 80°C. or above, is absent from canned and powdered milk. When the latter have been diluted or reconstituted, they can serve as excellent growth media for group A streptococci, and epidemics have occurred as a result of contamination of milk supplies of those types. The administration of lactenin by mouth or intraperitoneal injection failed to protect mice from peritonitis or subcutaneous infection due to group A streptococcus. PMID:14907960

  13. The combined influence of two agricultural contaminants on natural communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Baker, Leanne F; Mudge, Joseph F; Thompson, Dean G; Houlahan, Jeff E; Kidd, Karen A

    2016-07-01

    Concentrations of glyphosate observed in the environment are generally lower than those found to exert toxicity on aquatic organisms in the laboratory. Toxicity is often tested in the absence of other expected co-occurring contaminants. By examining changes in the phytoplankton and zooplankton communities of shallow, partitioned wetlands over a 5 month period, we assessed the potential for direct and indirect effects of the glyphosate-based herbicide, Roundup WeatherMax(©) applied at the maximum label rate, both in isolation and in a mixture with nutrients (from fertilizers). The co-application of herbicide and nutrients resulted in an immediate but transient decline in dietary quality of phytoplankton (8.3 % decline in edible carbon content/L) and zooplankton community similarity (27 % decline in similarity and loss of three taxa), whereas these effects were not evident in wetlands treated only with the herbicide. Thus, even at a worst-case exposure, this herbicide in isolation, did not produce the acutely toxic effects on plankton communities suggested by laboratory or mesocosm studies. Indirect effects of the herbicide-nutrient mixture were evident in mid-summer, when glyphosate residues were no longer detectable in surface water. Zooplankton abundance tripled, and zooplankton taxa richness increased by an average of four taxa in the herbicide and nutrient treated wetlands. The lack of significant toxicity of Roundup WeatherMax alone, as well as the observation of delayed interactive or indirect effects of the mixture of herbicide and nutrients attest to the value of manipulative field experiments as part of a comprehensive, tiered approach to risk assessments in ecotoxicology.

  14. Sensitive enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in various naturally contaminated matrices using a membrane filtration method.

    PubMed

    Barre, Léna; Brasseur, Emilie; Doux, Camille; Lombard, Bertrand; Besse, Nathalie Gnanou

    2015-06-01

    For the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) in food, a sensitive enumeration method has been recently developed. This method is based on a membrane filtration of the food suspension followed by transfer of the filter on a selective medium to enumerate L. monocytogenes. An evaluation of this method was performed with several categories of foods naturally contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The results obtained with this technique were compared with those obtained from the modified reference EN ISO 11290-2 method for the enumeration of L. monocytogenes in food, and are found to provide more precise results. In most cases, the filtration method enabled to examine a greater quantity of food thus greatly improving the sensitivity of the enumeration. However, it was hardly applicable to some food categories because of filtration problems and background microbiota interference.

  15. Competitive adsorption of toxic heavy metal contaminants by gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium): a natural hydrocolloid.

    PubMed

    Vinod, V T P; Sashidhar, R B; Sukumar, A A

    2010-02-01

    Gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium), a naturally occurring tree biopolymer, is exploited as a biosorbent to remove metal ions from aqueous solutions. The removal efficiency of toxic metals by gum kondagogu was determined quantitatively in the order Cd2+ > Cu2+ > Fe2+ > Se2+ > Pb2+ > total Cr > Ni2+ > Zn2+ > Co2+ > As2+ at pH 5.0+/-0.1 and temperature 25+/-2 degrees C by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The biosorption (%) of various metal ions tested was found to be in the range of 97.3-16.7%, at pH 5.0. The morphological and mechanisms of interaction of toxic metal ions with gum kondagogu were assessed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The analysis indicated that biosorption process included morphological changes, precipitation, complexation and ion exchange mechanism for the removal of metal ions by the gum. XRD analysis indicated the amorphous nature of gum kondagogu, which facilitate metal biosorption. The metal ions adsorption leads to its deposition on the gum kondagogu matrix in a crystalline state.

  16. Heavy metals removal from contaminated sewage sludge by naturally fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes.

    PubMed

    Dacera, Dominica Del Mundo; Babel, Sandhya

    2007-01-01

    The large amount of unutilised pineapple wastes produced every year in tropical countries, particularly in Thailand, adds to the existing environmental pollution problems of the country. This study investigated the utilisation of pineapple wastes to treat another form of waste (sludge) from wastewater treatment facilities in Thailand. Laboratory scale studies were carried out to determine the potential of using naturally fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes as a source of citric acid in the extraction of Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn from anaerobically digested sewage sludge. Results of the leaching study revealed its effectiveness in extracting Zn (at 92%) at pH 3.67 and a short leaching time of only 2 h, and Ni at almost 60% removal at the same leaching time. Chromium removal was also high at almost 75% at a longer leaching time of 11 days. Variation in metal removal efficiencies may also be attributed to the forms of metals in sludge, with metals predominantly in the exchangeable and oxidisable phases showing ease of leachability (such as Zn). Compared to citric acid, at pH approaching 4.0, naturally fermented raw liquid seemed to be more effective in the removal of Zn and Cu at the same leaching time of 2 h, and Cr at a longer leaching time of 11 days. The pineapple pulp, which is a by-product of the process, can still be used as animal feed because of its high protein content.

  17. Food safety hazards associated with consumption of raw milk.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stephen P; Boor, Kathryn J; Murphy, Steven C; Murinda, Shelton E

    2009-09-01

    An increasing number of people are consuming raw unpasteurized milk. Enhanced nutritional qualities, taste, and health benefits have all been advocated as reasons for increased interest in raw milk consumption. However, science-based data to substantiate these claims are limited. People continue to consume raw milk even though numerous epidemiological studies have shown clearly that raw milk can be contaminated by a variety of pathogens, some of which are associated with human illness and disease. Several documented milkborne disease outbreaks occurred from 2000-2008 and were traced back to consumption of raw unpasteurized milk. Numerous people were found to have infections, some were hospitalized, and a few died. In the majority of these outbreaks, the organism associated with the milkborne outbreak was isolated from the implicated product(s) or from subsequent products made at the suspected dairy or source. In contrast, fewer milkborne disease outbreaks were associated with consumption of pasteurized milk during this same time period. Twenty nine states allow the sale of raw milk by some means. Direct purchase, cow-share or leasing programs, and the sale of raw milk as pet food have been used as means for consumers to obtain raw milk. Where raw milk is offered for sale, strategies to reduce risks associated with raw milk and products made from raw milk are needed. Developing uniform regulations including microbial standards for raw milk to be sold for human consumption, labeling of raw milk, improving sanitation during milking, and enhancing and targeting educational efforts are potential approaches to this issue. Development of pre- and postharvest control measures to effectively reduce contamination is critical to the control of pathogens in raw milk. One sure way to prevent raw milk-associated foodborne illness is for consumers to refrain from drinking raw milk and from consuming dairy products manufactured using raw milk.

  18. Methylene blue removal from contaminated waters using O3, natural zeolite, and O3/zeolite.

    PubMed

    Valdés, H; Tardón, R F; Zaror, C A

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares experimental results on methylene blue (MB) removal systems based on ozone oxidation, zeolite adsorption, and simultaneous adsorption-oxidation using ozone in the presence of natural zeolite. The effect of pH (2-8), and the presence of radical scavengers (sodium acetate) on process rates and removal efficiencies are assessed at laboratory scale. The experimental system consisted of a 1 L differential circular flow reactor and an ozone generator rated at 5 g O3/h. Results show that ozone oxidation combined with zeolite adsorption increases the overall MB oxidation rate with respect to ozonation process and zeolite adsorption. In presence of free radical scavenger, only a 25% of reduction on MB removal rate are observed in the simultaneous treatment, as compared with 70% when ozonation treatment is used, suggesting that MB oxidation reactions take mainly place on the zeolite surface.

  19. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of free and conjugated natural estrogens in cow milk without deconjugation.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Ventura, Salvatore; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    A sensitive liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of free and conjugated estrogens in cow milk is described. Milk samples were diluted with water and then extracted and cleaned up by solid-phase extraction using graphitized carbon black as adsorbent material, without any enzymatic cleavage, derivatization, and/or protein precipitation step. Two fractions were collected (free and conjugated estrogens) and analyzed separately. Mass spectrometry analysis was performed in negative ion mode using selected reaction monitoring acquisition mode. For all compounds, the coefficients of determination (R(2)) ranged between 0.9892 and 0.9997. Analytical recoveries were in the range of 86-109% for free estrogens and 85-118% for conjugates, with relative standard deviations below 10%, and the method detection limit ranged between 3 and 80 ng L(-1). Finally, the developed method was used to determine the presence of free and conjugated estrogens in six retail milk samples (five cow milk samples and one goat milk sample) and one goat milk sample provided by a local shepherd. Estrone was found to be the major free estrogen present in commercial milk samples, and estrone 3-sulfate showed the highest concentration among the target conjugated estrogens. Estriol was also observed in some analyzed milk samples, but the concentrations were always below the limit of quantification.

  20. [Chemical pollution and breast milk: Taking positions].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gómez, N M; Ares, S; Hernández-Aguilar, M T; Ortega-García, J A; Paricio-Talayero, J M; Landa-Rivera, L

    2013-12-01

    Chemical pollution affects all ecosystems of our planet. Human milk has been used as a biomarker of environmental pollution as, due to bioaccumulation processes in fat tissue, many chemical compounds reach measurable concentrations that can be readily tested in breast milk. Quite frequently information about the presence of contaminants in breast milk appears in the media, leading to misunderstanding among parents and health professionals, and in some cases breastfeeding the child is stopped. In this article, the Breastfeeding Committee of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics stresses the importance of promoting breastfeeding as the healthiest option, because its benefits clearly outweigh any health risks associated with chemical contaminants in breast milk. Breast milk contains protective factors that counteract the potential effects related to prenatal exposure to environmental pollutants. This article summarises the key recommendations to reduce the level of chemical contaminants in breast milk. It also highlights the importance of government involvement in the development of programs to eliminate or reduce chemical contamination of food and the environment. In this way, the negative effects on child health resulting from exposure to these toxic compounds through the placenta and breast milk may be prevented.

  1. Endophytic root bacteria associated with the natural vegetation growing at the hydrocarbon contaminated Bitumount Provincial Historic site.

    PubMed

    Blain, Natalie Pierrette; Helgason, Bobbi; Germida, James J

    2017-02-24

    The Bitumount Provincial Historic site is the location of two of the world's first oil extracting and refining operations. Despite hydrocarbons levels ranging from 330 to 24 700 mg kg-1 soil, plants have been able to recolonize the site through means of natural revegetation. This study was designed to achieve a better understanding of the plant root-associated bacterial partnerships occurring within naturally revegetated hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Root endophytic bacterial communities were characterized from representative plant species throughout the site using both high-throughput sequencing and culturing techniques. Population abundance of rhizosphere and root endosphere bacteria was significantly influenced (p<0.05) by plant species and sampling location. In general, members of the Actinomycetales, Rhizobiales, Pseudomonadales, Burkholderiales, and Sphingomonadales orders were the most commonly identified orders. Community structure of root-associated bacteria was influenced by both plant species and sampling location. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the potential functional diversity of the root endophytic bacteria. The gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA and two hydrocarbon degrading genes (CYP153 and alkB) were significantly affected (p<0.05) by the interaction of plant species and sampling location. Our findings suggest that some of the bacterial communities detected are known to exhibit plant growth promotion characteristics.

  2. Natural attenuation of pesticide water contamination by using ecological adsorbents: Application for chlorinated pesticides included in European Water Framework Directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bakouri, Hicham; Morillo, José; Usero, José; Ouassini, Abdelhamid

    2009-01-01

    SummaryIn this work, a series of experiments were performed to demonstrate the potential use of natural organic substances (NOS) as an ecological technique to prevent pesticide contamination of ground water resources. A preliminary test has been carried out for determining the potentialities of ten NOS in the elimination of alachlor, aldrin, atrazine, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinphos, dieldrin, alpha-endosulfan, endrin, hexachlorobenzene, beta-HCH, gamma-HCH (lindane), simazine and trifluralin. The best adsorbents that present higher removal efficiency were date and olives stones, and in minor measurement Raphanus raphanistrum and Cistus ladaniferus. Experimental results showed that the pH and temperature of pesticide solutions negatively affect the adsorption process. According to adsorption kinetic data, 8 h were considered as the equilibrium time for realizing adsorption isotherms. Adsorption data were fit with Freundlich isotherm model which describes better the adsorption process. The K f values depended mainly on the nature of each adsorbent and ranged from 4.53 for Eucalyptus gomphocephala to 13.54 for date stones.

  3. CELLULAR BIOAVAILABILITY OF NATURAL HORMONES AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS AS A FUNCTION OF SERUM AND CYTOSOLIC BINDING FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants have been reported to function as hormone mimics in various wildlife species. To investigate a potential mechanism for the interaction of contaminants with the endocrine system, we evaluated the cellular bioavailability of numerous chemicals. Hormone bi...

  4. Natural and bioremediated selective degradation of polycyclic aromatic alkyl isomers in oil-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, T.C.; McCarthy, K.; Uhler, A.; Porta, A.

    1995-12-31

    In studies where 2- to 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are determined as part of characterizing released oil constituents in environmental samples, the changes in composition of PAHs from weathering (e.g., evaporation, dissolution) and biodegradation are most often represented by PAH alkyl homologue distributions. Concentrations of PAH alkyl groups are the sum of individual PAH isomers of similar carbon number; such as for C2-naphthalenes, the C2 alkyl group consists of dimethyl and ethyl substitutions on the parent naphthalene. In weathering and degradation studies, the changes in relative concentration of the individual isomers within an alkyl group are rarely reported. In a field study of oiled soils, the authors looked at the selective losses, for a period of a year, of individual PAH alkyl isomers that occur both naturally by weathering processes and through the use of bioremediation technology. Results showed that decreases in alkyl group concentrations were not always represented by similar losses of each isomer in the alkyl group, but were often due to the preferential or selective loss of certain isomers in the group.

  5. Amiata Donkey Milk Chain: Animal Health Evaluation and Milk Quality

    PubMed Central

    Ragona, Giuseppe; Corrias, Franco; Benedetti, Martina; Paladini, Maria; Salari, Federica; Altomonte, lolanda; Martini, Mina

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an investigation of Amiata donkey health and quality of milk for human consumption. Thirty-one lactating dairy jennies were examined. The following samples were collected: faecal samples from the rectum of animals for parasitological examination; cervical swabs for the detection of bacteria causing reproductive disorders; and blood samples for serological diagnosis of main zoonotic (Brucella spp., Leptospira spp.) and donkey abortion agents (Brucella spp., Leptospira spp., Salmonella abortus equi, Equine viral arterithis virus, Equine herpesvirus type 1). In addition, individual milk samples were collected and analysed for mastitis-causing pathogens and milk quality. Regarding animal health, we detected a high prevalence of strongyle parasites in donkeys. It is very important to tackle parasitic diseases correctly. Selective control programmes are preferable in order to reduce anthelmintic drug use. For dairy donkeys, withdrawal periods from anthelmintic drugs need to be carefully managed, in accordance with EU and national regulations. The isolation of Staphylococcus aureus in milk highlights the importance of preventing contamination during milking, by adopting appropriate hygiene and safety practices at a farm level. Lysozyme activity was high compared to cow’s milk, contributing to the inhibitory activity against certain bacteria. Donkey milk was characterised by high lactose content, low caseins, low fat, higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids compared to ruminant milks. Unsaturated fatty acids and omega 3 fatty acids in particular have become known for their beneficial health effect, which is favourable for human diet. These characteristics make it suitable for infants and children affected by food intolerance/allergies to bovine milk proteins and multiple food allergies as well as for adults with dyslipidemias. It is also recommended to prevent cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27853717

  6. Milk Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as processed lunchmeats, margarine, baked goods, artificial butter flavor, and non-dairy products. Chocolate is another ... yogurt, milk, pudding, sour cream, and cottage cheese butter, butter flavoring (such as diacetyl), butter fat, butter ...

  7. Kinetics of scheelite dissolution in groundwater: defining the release rate of tungsten contamination from a natural source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, S. D.; Mckibben, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Tungsten, an emerging contaminant, has no EPA standard for its permissible levels in drinking water. At sites in California, Nevada, and Arizona there may be a correlation between elevated levels of tungsten in drinking water and clusters of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Developing a better understanding of how tungsten is released from rocks into surface and groundwaters is therefore of growing environmental interest. Knowledge of tungstate ore mineral weathering processes, particularly the rates of dissolution of scheelite (CaWO4) in groundwater, could improve models of how tungsten is released and transported in natural waters. Our research is focusing on experimental determination of the rates and products of tungstate mineral dissolution in synthetic groundwater, as a function of temperature, pH and mineral surface area. The initial rate method is being used to develop rate laws. Batch reactor experiments are conducted within constant temperature circulation baths over a pH range of 2-9. Cleaned scheelite powder with grain diameters of 106-150um is placed between two screens in a sample platform and then placed inside a two liter Teflon vessel filled with synthetic groundwater. Ports on the vessel allow sample extraction, temperature and pH measurement, gas inflow, and water circulation. Aliquots of solution are taken periodically for product analysis by ICP -MS. Changes in mineral surface characteristics are monitored using SEM and EDS methods. Results so far reveal that the dissolution of scheelite is incongruent at both neutral and low pH. Solid tungstic acid forms on scheelite mineral surfaces under acidic conditions, implying that this phase controls the dissolution rate in acidic environments. The influence of dissolved CO2 and resultant calcium carbonate precipitation on the dissolution of scheelite at higher pH is also being investigated. The rate law being developed for scheelite dissolution will be useful in reactive-transport computer

  8. Hot Topic: Brown marmorated stink bug odor compounds do not transfer into milk by feeding bug-contaminated corn silage to lactating dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is an emerging invasive species of grave concern to agriculture as a polyphagous plant pest with potential negative impact on the dairy industry. We sought to determine the risk of including BMSB contaminated silage in lactating dairy cow ratio...

  9. Brown marmorated stink bug odor compounds do not transfer into milk in lactating dairy cattle by feeding bug contaminated corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the northeastern United States, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is an emerging invasive species of grave concern to agriculture. BMSB is a highly polyphagous plant pest but also has potentially negative impact to dairy industry through contamination of silage and potent...

  10. Groundwater contamination in coastal urban areas: Anthropogenic pressure and natural attenuation processes. Example of Recife (PE State, NE Brazil).

    PubMed

    Bertrand, G; Hirata, R; Pauwels, H; Cary, L; Petelet-Giraud, E; Chatton, E; Aquilina, L; Labasque, T; Martins, V; Montenegro, S; Batista, J; Aurouet, A; Santos, J; Bertolo, R; Picot, G; Franzen, M; Hochreutener, R; Braibant, G

    2016-09-01

    In a context of increasing land use pressure (over-exploitation, surface-water contamination) and repeated droughts, identifying the processes affecting groundwater quality in coastal megacities of the tropical and arid countries will condition their long-term social and environmental sustainability. The present study focuses on the Brazilian Recife Metropolitan Region (RMR), which is a highly urbanized area (3,743,854 inhabitants in 2010) on the Atlantic coast located next to an estuarial zone and overlying a multi-layered sedimentary system featured by a variable sediment texture and organic content. It investigates the contamination and redox status patterns conditioning potential attenuation within the shallow aquifers that constitute the interface between the city and the strategic deeper semi-confined aquifers. These latter are increasingly exploited, leading to high drawdown in potenciometric levels of 20-30m and up to 70m in some high well density places, and potentially connected to the surface through leakage. From a multi-tracer approach (major ions, major gases, δ(11)B, δ(18)O-SO4, δ(34)S-SO4) carried out during two field campaigns in September 2012 and March 2013 (sampling of 19 wells and 3 surface waters), it has been possible to assess the contamination sources and the redox processes. The increasing trend for mineralization from inland to coastal and estuarial wells (from 119 to around 10,000μS/cm) is at first attributed to water-rock interactions combined with natural and human-induced potentiometric gradients. Secondly, along with this trend, one finds an environmental pressure gradient related to sewage and/or surface-channel network impacts (typically depleted δ(11)B within the range of 10-15‰) that are purveyors of chloride, nitrate, ammonium and sulfate. Nitrate, ammonium and sulfate (ranging from 0 to 1.70mmol/L, from 0 to 0,65mmol/L, from 0.03 to 3.91mmol/L respectively are also potentially produced or consumed through various redox

  11. Groundwater contamination in coastal urban areas: Anthropogenic pressure and natural attenuation processes. Example of Recife (PE State, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Hirata, R.; Pauwels, H.; Cary, L.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Chatton, E.; Aquilina, L.; Labasque, T.; Martins, V.; Montenegro, S.; Batista, J.; Aurouet, A.; Santos, J.; Bertolo, R.; Picot, G.; Franzen, M.; Hochreutener, R.; Braibant, G.

    2016-09-01

    In a context of increasing land use pressure (over-exploitation, surface-water contamination) and repeated droughts, identifying the processes affecting groundwater quality in coastal megacities of the tropical and arid countries will condition their long-term social and environmental sustainability. The present study focuses on the Brazilian Recife Metropolitan Region (RMR), which is a highly urbanized area (3,743,854 inhabitants in 2010) on the Atlantic coast located next to an estuarial zone and overlying a multi-layered sedimentary system featured by a variable sediment texture and organic content. It investigates the contamination and redox status patterns conditioning potential attenuation within the shallow aquifers that constitute the interface between the city and the strategic deeper semi-confined aquifers. These latter are increasingly exploited, leading to high drawdown in potenciometric levels of 20-30 m and up to 70 m in some high well density places, and potentially connected to the surface through leakage. From a multi-tracer approach (major ions, major gases, δ11B, δ18O-SO4, δ34S-SO4) carried out during two field campaigns in September 2012 and March 2013 (sampling of 19 wells and 3 surface waters), it has been possible to assess the contamination sources and the redox processes. The increasing trend for mineralization from inland to coastal and estuarial wells (from 119 to around 10,000 μS/cm) is at first attributed to water-rock interactions combined with natural and human-induced potentiometric gradients. Secondly, along with this trend, one finds an environmental pressure gradient related to sewage and/or surface-channel network impacts (typically depleted δ11B within the range of 10-15‰) that are purveyors of chloride, nitrate, ammonium and sulfate. Nitrate, ammonium and sulfate (ranging from 0 to 1.70 mmol/L, from 0 to 0,65 mmol/L, from 0.03 to 3.91 mmol/L respectively are also potentially produced or consumed through various redox

  12. Toxicity of sediments potentially contaminated by coal mining and natural gas extraction to unionid mussels and commonly tested benthic invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kane, Cindy M.; Evans, R. Brian; Alexander, Steven; Walker, Craig; Bakaletz, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted to assess potential effects of contaminants associated with coal mining or natural gas extraction activities in the upper Tennessee River basin and eastern Cumberland River basin in the United States. Test species included two unionid mussels (rainbow mussel, Villosa iris, and wavy-rayed lampmussel, Lampsilis fasciola, 28-d exposures), and the commonly tested amphipod, Hyalella azteca (28-d exposure) and midge, Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposure). Sediments were collected from seven test sites with mussel communities classified as impacted and in proximity to coal mining or gas extraction activities, and from five reference sites with mussel communities classified as not impacted and no or limited coal mining or gas extraction activities. Additional samples were collected from six test sites potentially with high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and from a test site contaminated by a coal ash spill. Mean survival, length, or biomass of one or more test species was reduced in 10 of 14 test samples (71%) from impacted areas relative to the response of organisms in the five reference samples. A higher proportion of samples was classified as toxic to mussels (63% for rainbow mussels, 50% for wavy-rayed lampmussels) compared with amphipods (38%) or midge (38%). Concentrations of total recoverable metals and total PAHs in sediments did not exceed effects-based probable effect concentrations (PECs). However, the survival, length, or biomasses of the mussels were reduced significantly with increasing PEC quotients for metals and for total PAHs, or with increasing sum equilibrium-partitioning sediment benchmark toxic units for PAHs. The growth of the rainbow mussel also significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of a major anion (chloride) and major cations (calcium and magnesium) in sediment pore water. Results of the present study indicated that (1) the findings from laboratory tests were generally

  13. Got milk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    While celebrities wear white “milk moustaches” in a popular U.S. advertising campaign to promote the drinking of milk, they should also be concerned about the decreased amount of calcium available to many trees.Calcium levels in forest soils have decreased at locations in 10 states in the eastern United States, according to a new report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released in time for National Arbor Day on April 30.

  14. Role of natural attenuation, phytoremediation and hybrid technologies in the remediation of a refinery soil with old/recent petroleum hydrocarbons contamination.

    PubMed

    Couto, Maria Nazaré P F S; Pinto, Dorabela; Basto, M Clara P; Vasconcelos, Teresa S D

    2012-09-01

    Within a search for a biological remediation technology to remove petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) from a contaminated soil from a refinery, the potential of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) was compared with the use of transplants of Cortaderia selloana both in the absence and in the presence of soil amendments. After 31 months of experiments, MNA was effective in removing most of the recent PHC contamination (50% of the initial total contamination) at 5-20 cm depth. The presence of weathered contamination explains the existence of an established community of PHC degraders, as can be inferred by the most probable number technique. C. selloana, in its turn, showed capacity to mobilize the most recalcitrant fraction of PHC to its roots, nevertheless masking its remediation capacity. The use of a hybrid technology (C. selloana together with treatments with a surfactant and a bioaugmentation product) improved the removal of PHC at 15-20 cm depth, the presence of C. selloana facilitating the migration of additives into the deeper layers of soil, which can be considered a secondary but positive role of the plant. In the surface soil layer, which was exposed to both microorganisms and the atmosphere, a further 20% of weathered PHC contamination disappeared (70% total removal) as a result of photo- and chemical degradation. Periodic revolving of the soil, like tillage, to expose all the contaminated soil to the atmosphere will therefore be a reliable option for reducing the contamination of the refinery soil if conditions (space and equipment) permit this operation.

  15. Butyric acid released during milk lipolysis triggers biofilm formation of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Pasvolsky, Ronit; Zakin, Varda; Ostrova, Ievgeniia; Shemesh, Moshe

    2014-07-02

    Bacillus species form biofilms within milking pipelines and on surfaces of equipment in the dairy industry which represent a continuous hygiene problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Although much is known about the mechanism by which the model organism Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in laboratory mediums in vitro, little is known of how these biofilms are formed in natural environments such as milk. Besides, little is known of the signaling pathways leading to biofilm formation in other Bacillus species, such as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis, both of which are known to contaminate milk. In this study, we report that milk triggers the formation of biofilm-related structures, termed bundles. We show this to be a conserved phenomenon among all Bacillus members tested. Moreover, we demonstrate that the tasA gene, which encodes a major portion of the matrix which holds the biofilm together, is vital for this process. Furthermore, we show that the free fatty acid (FFA) - butyric acid (BA), which is released during lipolysis of milk fat and demonstrates antimicrobial activity, is the potent trigger for biofilm bundle formation. We finally show that BA-triggered biofilm bundle formation is mediated by the histidine kinase, KinD. Taken together, these observations indicate that BA, which is a major FFA within milk triggers biofilm formation in a conserved mechanism among members of the Bacillus genus.

  16. Persistent organochlorine pesticides residues in cow and goat milks collected from different regions of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Deti, Habtewold; Hymete, Ariaya; Bekhit, Adnan A; Mohamed, Abdel Maaboud I; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigated the bioaccumulation of organochlorines in two milk-producing animals (goats and cows) grazed on the same feed to explore the extent of organochlorines availability in milk and any species effect on the bioaccumulation pattern. Six organochlorine pesticides: aldrin, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT were determined in samples collected from four regions in Ethiopia. Aldrin (11.6μgkg(-1)) was detected only in one cow milk sample and α-endosulfan was detected in one goat milk sample at a level of 142.1μgkg(-1), and in one cow milk sample (47.8μgkg(-1)) from the same region. p,p'-DDE was detected in 40% of the milk samples analyzed while o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT were found in high amounts in almost all samples. The average total DDT (excluding DDD) in the samples was 328.5μgkg(-1). Regions known for their malaria epidemics were the most contaminated with DDT residue. The accumulation pattern in both species was not clear under natural sampling.

  17. Lead levels in human milk and children's health risk: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Koyashiki, Gina Ayumi Kobayashi; Paoliello, Monica Maria Bastos; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a naturally-occurring element and industrially-produced metal, is highly toxic to children, causing intellectual and behavioral deficits, hyperactivity, fine motor function deficits, decreased intelligence quotient, alteration of hand-eye coordination, and problems in reaction time. Children's exposure to Pb occurs mainly through ingestion of contaminated food, water and soil. Few discussions have been held on the magnitude and potential risk associated with exposure from the consumption of breast milk. Hence, this research was designed to systematically review the scientific literature on published epidemiologic studies, with an emphasis on the study designs and analytical procedures used for Pb assessment in breast milk. From a total of 112 selected articles published since the 1980s, 11 met the inclusion criteria. A review of the data indicated that Pb levels varied from 0.15 to 6.1 microg L(-1) in mature milk samples, from 0.48 to 14.6 microg L(-1) in colostrum samples, and were non-detectable in some samples. The milk/blood ratio, which estimates the mean efficiency transfer of lead from blood to milk, varied between 0.01 and 0.48. The heterogeneity of methods revealed by our assessment of published studies underscores the need for harmonization of study designs and sample collection and analysis protocols to reflect specific exposure scenarios. Human milk seems to be one of the relevant biological matrices for use as a biomarker for assessing children's health risk to Pb poisoning.

  18. Assessment of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at sites FT03, LF13, and WP14/LF15, Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality, aquifer-sediment, and hydro-logic data were used to assess the effectiveness of natural attenuation of ground-water contamination at Fire Training Area Three, the Rubble Area Landfill, the Liquid Waste Disposal Landfill, and the Receiver Station Landfill in the East Management Unit of Dover Air Force Base, Delaware. These sites, which are contaminated with chlorinated solvents and fuel hydrocarbons, are under-going long-term monitoring to determine if natural attenuation continues to sufficiently reduce contaminant concentrations to meet regulatory requirements. This report is the first assessment of the effectiveness of natural attenuation at these sites since long-term monitoring began in 1999, and follows a preliminary investigation done in 1995?96. This assessment was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force.Since 1995?96, additional information has been collected and used in the current assessment. The conclusions in this report are based primarily on ground-water samples collected from January through March 2000. Previous analytical results from selected wells, available geologic and geo-physical well logs, and newly acquired information such as sediment organic-carbon measurements, hydraulic-conductivity measurements determined from slug tests on wells in the natural attenuation study area, and water-level measurements from surficial-aquifer wells also were used in this assessment. This information was used to: (1) calculate retardation factors and estimate contaminant migration velocities, (2) improve estimates of ground-water flow directions and inferred contaminant migration pathways, (3) better define the areal extent of contamination and the proximity of contaminants to discharge areas and the Base boundary, (4) develop a better under-standing of the vertical variability of contaminant concentrations and redox conditions, (5) evaluate the effects of temporal changes on concentrations in the plumes and

  19. [Effects of enhanced solar UV-B radiation on the effective photosynthetic leaf area and milking phase of oat under natural field condition in Qing Tibetan plateau].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-yao; Wang, Kun; Zhao, Yong-lai; Xin, You-jun

    2009-05-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion occurs mainly over polar regions during the spring when the solar ultraviolet B-band (280-315 nm, UV-B) radiation is most intense in a year, but over the Qing Tibetan Plateau region, the intensity is highest from June to September when the amount of UV-B radiation reaching the regions is more than that in the adjacent areas lying in the same latitude by 10%. From June to September is just the time of plant's germination, development, and reproduction in the alpine region. The enhanced UV-B radiation may alter the rate of senescence in the forage plant, oats (Avena sativa), which plays the vital role in developing indigenous herdsman's animal husbandry industry. In the trial the authors enhanced the UV-B radiation by using lamp bank of florescent lights to increase the ambient levels of UV-B radiation in the field, we treated 3 groups under nature solar radiation, solar+0.50 W x m2, and solar+1.00 W x m2 respectively, and surveyed the rate of senescence by measuring the rate of lessening in the effective photosynthetic leaf area, the concentration of the chlorophyll, and the milking phase of oat phenology. The results proved that the effect of the enhanced UV-B radiation on the rate of senescence of oats is caused by reducing the effective photosynthetic leaf area per plant by 21.5%, accelerating the rate of the loss of the chlorophyll compared with that of the controlled by an average of 7.6% and shortening the milking phase by an average of 2 days in the treated groups compared with the rate in the controlled, but there were not statistically significant differences from those of the nontreated group in these index of oat's senescence. All the results evidenced that the enhanced solar UV-B radiation has no significantly ominous consequence on the oat ecological characteristics concerning annual plant reproduction in Qing Tibetan plateau.

  20. New approach to the determination of contaminants of emerging concern in natural water: study of alprazolam employing adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Chalder Nogueira; Pauluk, Lucas Ely; Dos Anjos, Vanessa Egéa; Lopes, Mauro Chierici; Quináia, Sueli Pércio

    2015-08-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are chemicals, including pharmaceutical and personal care products, not commonly monitored in the aquatic environment. Pharmaceuticals are nowadays considered as an important environmental contaminant. Chromatography methods which require expensive equipment and complicated sample pretreatment are used for detection of CECs in natural water. Thus, in this study we proposed a simple, fast, and low-cost voltammetric method as a screening tool for the determination of CECs in natural water prior to chromatography. A case study was conducted with alprazolam (benzodiazepine). The method was optimized and validated in-house. The limit of quantification was 0.4 μg L(-1) for a 120 s preconcentration time. The recoveries ranged from 93 to 120 % for accuracy tests. A further proposal aim was to determine for the first time the occurrence of alprazolam in Brazilian river water and to evaluate its potential use as a marker of contamination by wastewater.

  1. Arsenic contamination of natural waters in San Juan and La Pampa, Argentina.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, J; Watts, M J; Shaw, R A; Marcilla, A L; Ward, N I

    2010-12-01

    (III) and As(V) concentrations in San Juan ranged from 4-138 μg l(-1) to <0.02-22 μg l(-1) for surface waters (in the San José de Jáchal region) and 23-346 μg l(-1) and 0.04-76 μg l(-1) for groundwater, respectively. This translates to a relative As(III) abundance of 69-100% of the total arsenic in surface waters and 32-100% in groundwater. This is unexpected because it is typically thought that in oxidising conditions (surface waters), the dominant arsenic species is As(V). However, data from the SPE methodology suggests that As(III) is the prevalent species in San Juan, indicating a greater influence from reductive processes. La Pampa groundwater had As(III) and As(V) concentrations of 5-1,332 μg l(-1) and 0.09-592 μg l(-1) for EC and 32-242 μg l(-1) and 30-277 μg l(-1) As for LU, respectively. Detectable levels of MA(V) were reported in both provinces up to a concentration of 79 μg l(-1) (equating to up to 33% of the total arsenic). Previously published literature has focused primarily on the inorganic arsenic species, however this study highlights the potentially significant concentrations of organoarsenicals present in natural waters. The potential for separating and preserving individual arsenic species in the field to avoid transformation during transport to the laboratory, enabling an accurate assessment of in situ arsenic speciation in water supplies is discussed.

  2. Effects of Varying RedoxConditions on Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D

    2004-05-30

    The objective of this study was to provide geochemical parameters to characterize the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) sediment as a potential source term. It is anticipated that the measured values will be used in risk calculations and will provide additional technical support for imposing Monitored Natural Attenuation at D-Area. This study provides a detailed evaluation of the DCPRB sediment and is part of another study that quantified the Monitored Natural Attenuation of inorganic contaminants more broadly at the D-Area Expanded Operable Unit, which includes the DCPRB (Powell et al. 2004). Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values; a solid to liquid contaminant concentration ratio) and the Potentially Leachable Fraction (the percent of the total contaminant concentration in the sediment that can likely contribute to a contaminant plume) were measured in a DCPRB sediment as a function of redox conditions. Redox conditions at the DCPRB are expected to vary greatly as the system undergoes varying drying and flooding conditions. Conservative values; K{sub d} values that err on the side of being too low and Potentially Leachable Fraction values that err on the side of being too high, are presented. The K{sub d} values are high compared to conservative literature values, and underscores the importance of measuring site-specific values to provide estimates of sediments natural attenuation/sorption capacities. The Potentially Leachable Fraction indicates that as little as 27% of the As, but all of the Cu and Tl will be part of the source term. In the case of the As, the remaining 83% will likely never leach out of the sediment, thereby providing a form of natural attenuation. Importantly, Be, Cr, Cu, Ni, and V concentrations in the sediment were less-than twice background levels, indicating this sediment was not a potential source for these contaminants. K{sub d} values generally increased significantly (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Se, and Tl) when the sediment was

  3. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; Hur, Minji; Sheth, Ishani; Laasri, Anna; Hammack, Thomas S.; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initial contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study. PMID:27242775

  4. Recovery and Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes in Temperature Abused Milkshakes Prepared from Naturally Contaminated Ice Cream Linked to a Listeriosis Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Allard, Emma; Wooten, Anna; Hur, Minji; Sheth, Ishani; Laasri, Anna; Hammack, Thomas S; Macarisin, Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The recovery and growth potential of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated in three flavors of milkshakes (vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate) that were prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to a listeriosis outbreak in the U.S. in 2015, and were subsequently held at room temperature for 14 h. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes was 9.05 h; the average generation time was 1.67 h; and the average population level increase per sample at 14 h was 1.14 log CFU/g. Milkshake flavors did not significantly affect these parameters. The average lag phase duration of L. monocytogenes in milkshakes with initial contamination levels ≤ 3 CFU/g (9.50 h) was significantly longer (P < 0.01) than that with initial contamination levels > 3 CFU/g (8.60 h). The results highlight the value of using samples that are contaminated with very low levels of L. monocytogenes for recovery and growth evaluations. The behavior of L. monocytogenes populations in milkshakes prepared from naturally contaminated ice cream linked to the listeriosis outbreak should be taken into account when performing risk based analysis using this outbreak as a case study.

  5. Geophysical and flow-weighted natural-contaminant characterization of three water-supply wells in New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, Thomas J.; Belaval, Marcel; Degnan, James R.; Roy, Stephen J.; Ayotte, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    The water-supply systems investigated were typical of small community water systems in New Hampshire where a water system may serve 100 connections or less. Each water system consisted of two wells, approximately 300 to 400 feet deep, in generally low-yielding (about 10 gallons per minute or less) crystalline bedrock. The wells were typically operated a few hours per day to fill a storage tank and had tens of feet of drawdown caused by the low well yields. The systems selected had contaminant concentrations slightly above MCL, or a low-level contamination. One of the water systems investigated had low-level (10 to 24 micrograms per liter) arsenic contamination, and two of the water systems had low-level uranium (30 to 40 micrograms per liter) contamination. The contaminant values were blended-water concentrations from the two wells in a system. Each water system had differences in contaminant concentrations between the two wells. In each case, the well with the greater concentration of the two was selected for investigation. In two of the three systems investigated, there was either not enough variation in the borehole contaminant concentration or not enough water-yielding fractures for borehole modifications to be a viable potential remedy to elevated contamination. However, borehole and contaminant conditions in one of the bedrock supply-well systems may be favorable to potential improvement of supplied water by borehole modification where selected fracture zones are sealed off from supplying water to the well.

  6. Effects of natural and human factors on groundwater quality of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States-conceptual models for selected contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Thiros, Susan A.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the factors that affect water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States. The SWPA study area includes four principal aquifers of the United States: the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; and the California Coastal Basin and Central Valley aquifer systems in California. Similarities in the hydrogeology, land- and water-use practices, and water-quality issues for alluvial basins within the study area allow for regional analysis through synthesis of the baseline knowledge of groundwater-quality conditions in basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. Resulting improvements in the understanding of the sources, movement, and fate of contaminants are assisting in the development of tools used to assess aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability. This report synthesizes previously published information about the groundwater systems and water quality of 15 information-rich basin-fill aquifers (SWPA case-study basins) into conceptual models of the primary natural and human factors commonly affecting groundwater quality with respect to selected contaminants, thereby helping to build a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to those contaminants. Four relatively common contaminants (dissolved solids, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium) and two contaminant classes (volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticide compounds) were investigated for sources and controls affecting their occurrence and distribution above specified levels of concern in groundwater of the case-study basins. Conceptual models of factors that are important to aquifer vulnerability with respect to those contaminants and contaminant classes were subsequently formed. The

  7. Use of Carbon Nanotubes as a Solid Support To Establish Quantitative (Centrifugation) and Qualitative (Filtration) Immunoassays To Detect Gentamicin Contamination in Commercial Milk.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kun; Wei, Wei; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Fang; Du, Daolin

    2016-10-11

    Current methods to detect gentamicin (GEN), a broad-spectrum antibiotic that causes ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity when present in excess, have several limitations. Hence, we have developed two methods using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a solid support to detect GEN. Hybridoma cells (2D12) producing high-sensitivity antibodies against GEN were established. The goat anti-mouse antibody was immobilized on MWCNTs directly or using bifunctional polyethylene glycol as a linker. On the basis of the physical characteristics of MWCNTs, a quantitative method involving centrifugation separation and a qualitative method involving filtration separation were established. Various experimental parameters were optimized for GEN detection, and recovery tests were performed. For the quantitative method, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.048 ng/mL, whereas for the qualitative method, a LOD of 0.1 ng/mL was observed by the naked eye. The proposed immunoassays were applied to commercial milk samples. Thus, these methods show potential application for the detection of GEN.

  8. Of the necessity of knowledge of the natural pedo-geochemical background content in the evaluation of the contamination of soils by trace elements.

    PubMed

    Baize, D; Sterckeman, T

    2001-01-08

    In order to evaluate the contamination of the Dornach (Switzerland) site within the framework of the CEEM-Soil project, each participating team was allowed to take a maximum of 15 samples. The French team's sampling was organized in such a way as to answer the following questions: (i) what is the natural concentration of the soils at this site (local pedo-geochemical background content)?; (ii) what are the levels of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn contamination of the soil?; (iii) what is the depth reached by the surface contamination that is derived from atmospheric fallout?; (iv) how is the contamination spread along the longest axis of the area under study? The relationships between total Fe and the trace metals have allowed local variations in the natural pedo-geochemical background content to be detected and thus permitted the anthropogenic contamination to be estimated. There would appear to be a low level of Pb contamination over all the site investigated (an increase of the order of 5-10 mg kg(-1) on the background level), limited to the surface humus-bearing layers. There is also a significant contamination by Cu over all of the site (an increase of the order of 30-40 mg kg(-1)). This contamination has remained in the surface horizons (0-20 cm). Very high Zn and Cd concentrations have been found in the four surface (0-4 cm) and deep horizons (15-70 cm) taken under the forest and very much lower values in the samples taken from cultivated soils. The most likely explanation is an unequal inheritance between the upper part of the site (wooded with thinner very clayey soils) and the lower cultivated part of the site (with thicker less clayey soils developed in a loamy material). For various reasons, it seems unlikely that a contamination of the wooded part should be so much higher than the cultivated part due to the interception of atmospheric dust by the trees. The local pedo-geochemical background Cd and Zn content of the upper wooded part proved to be clearly higher than

  9. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Natural Soils and the Impact on Mobility of Inorganic Contaminants (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Kosson, David S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Young, Lily Y.; Hatcherl, Eric L.; Scala, David J.

    2005-08-02

    Inorganic contaminants, such as heavy metals and radionuclides, can adhere to insoluble Fe(III) minerals resulting in decreased mobility of these contaminants through subsurface environments. Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (DIRB), by reducing insoluble Fe(III) to soluble Fe(II), may enhance contaminant mobility. The Savannah River Site, South Carolina (SRS), has been subjected to both heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The overall objective of this project is to investigate the release of inorganic contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides that are bound to solid phase soil Fe complexes and to elucidate the mechanisms for mobilization of these contaminants that can be associated with microbial Fe(III) reduction. This is being accomplished by (i) using uncontaminated and contaminated soils from SRS as prototype systems, (ii) evaluating the diversity of DIRBs within the samples and isolating cultures for further study, (iii) using batch microcosms to evaluate the bioavailability of Fe(III) from pure minerals and SRS soils, (iv) developing kinetic and mass transfer models that reflect the system dynamics, and (v) carrying out soil column studies to elucidate the dynamics and interactions amongst Fe(III) reduction, remineralization and contaminant mobility.

  10. Drying Milk With Boiler Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Considerable energy saved in powdered-milk industry. Only special requirement boiler fired with natural gas or other clean fuel. Boiler flue gas fed to spray drier where it directly contacts product to be dried. Additional heat supplied by auxillary combustor when boiler output is low. Approach adaptable to existing plants with minimal investment because most already equipped with natural-gas-fired boilers.

  11. Chemical speciation and mobilization of copper and zinc in naturally contaminated mine soils with citric and tartaric acids.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Moliner, Ana; Masaguer, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    A one-step extraction procedure and a leaching column experiment were performed to assess the effects of citric and tartaric acids on Cu and Zn mobilization in naturally contaminated mine soils to facilitate assisted phytoextraction. A speciation modeling of the soil solution and the metal fractionation of soils were performed to elucidate the chemical processes that affected metal desorption by organic acids. Different extracting solutions were prepared, all of which contained 0.01 M KNO(3) and different concentrations of organic acids: control without organic acids, 0.5 mM citric, 0.5 mM tartaric, 10 mM citric, 10 mM tartaric, and 5 mM citric +5 mM tartaric. The results of the extraction procedure showed that higher concentrations of organic acids increased metal desorption, and citric acid was more effective at facilitating metal desorption than tartaric acid. Metal desorption was mainly influenced by the decreasing pH and the dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides, not by the formation of soluble metal-organic complexes as was predicted by the speciation modeling. The results of the column study reported that low concentrations of organic acids did not significantly increase metal mobilization and that higher doses were also not able to mobilize Zn. However, 5-10 mM citric acid significantly promoted Cu mobilization (from 1 mg kg(-1) in the control to 42 mg kg(-1) with 10 mM citric acid) and reduced the exchangeable (from 21 to 3 mg kg(-1)) and the Fe and Mn oxides (from 443 to 277 mg kg(-1)) fractions. Citric acid could efficiently facilitate assisted phytoextraction techniques.

  12. Natural variations in flow are critical in determining concentrations of point source contaminants in rivers: an estrogen example.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew C

    2010-10-15

    Daily steroid estrogen concentrations as 17β-estradiol equivalents (E2 equiv.) were modeled from 1992 to 2008 for single locations on the well populated Thames and Soar rivers in England. The historic daily mean flow values which were the basis of this exercise came from a selected gauging site on each river. The natural variation in flow from winter to summer typically produced a 20- to 30-fold difference in predicted estrogen concentration over the course of a year. Based on all the predicted values from minimum to maximum over the 1992 to 2008 period there was a 98-fold difference in estrogen concentrations on the basis of flow alone for the Thames (0.1-12.7 ng/L E2 equiv.) and 67-fold for the Soar (0.2-13.3 ng/L E2 equiv.). This compares to a predicted 0.5-fold difference that could arise from differences in sewage treatment and 0.1-fold difference due to differences in in-stream biodegradation. The seasonal variation in flow generated a repeating "roller coaster" in predicted estrogen concentrations. Regularly measured phosphate data for the river Avon over the period 1993 to 1996, where point sources also dominate, was compared against flow and predicted estrogen concentrations. The pattern of predicted estrogen and measured total phosphate concentration were very closely related. This dramatic variation in contaminant concentration over the year due to flow poses questions over what we mean by environmental relevance and the representation of the real environment in aquatic ecotoxicity tests.

  13. Impact of natural and calcined starfish (Asterina pectinifera) on the stabilization of Pb, Zn and As in contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung Eun; Sung, Jwa Kyung; Sarkar, Binoy; Wang, Hailong; Hashimoto, Yohey; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-04-01

    Metal stabilization using soil amendments is an extensively applied, economically viable and environmentally friendly remediation technique. The stabilization of Pb, Zn and As in contaminated soils was evaluated using natural starfish (NSF) and calcined starfish (CSF) wastes at different application rates (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt%). An incubation study was conducted over 14 months, and the efficiency of stabilization for Pb, Zn and As in soil was evaluated by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The TCLP-extractable Pb was reduced by 76.3-100 and 91.2-100 % in soil treated with NSF and CSF, respectively. The TCLP-extractable Zn was also reduced by 89.8-100 and 93.2-100 % in soil treated with NSF and CSF, respectively. These reductions could be associated with the increased metal adsorption and the formation of insoluble metal precipitates due to increased soil pH following application of the amendments. However, the TCLP-extractable As was increased in the soil treated with NSF, possibly due to the competitive adsorption of phosphorous. In contrast, the TCLP-extractable As in the 10 % CSF treatment was not detectable because insoluble Ca-As compounds might be formed at high pH values. Thermodynamic modeling by visual MINTEQ predicted the formation of ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12·26H2O) and portlandite (Ca(OH)2) in the 10 % CSF-treated soil, while SEM-EDS analysis confirmed the needle-like structure of ettringite in which Pb was incorporated and stabilized in the 10 % CSF treatment.

  14. Microbial mineralization of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride as a component of natural attenuation of chloroethene contaminants under conditions identified in the field as anoxic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a key component of remediation at many chloroethene-contaminated sites. In some instances, limited accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products may suggest that natural attenuation is not adequate for site remediation. This conclusion is justified when evidence for parent compound (tetrachloroethene, PCE, or trichloroethene, TCE) degradation is lacking. For many chloroethene-contaminated shallow aquifer systems, however, non-conservative losses of the parent compounds are clear but the mass balance between parent compound attenuation and accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products is incomplete. Incomplete mass balance indicates a failure to account for important contaminant attenuation mechanisms, and is consistent with contaminant degradation to non-diagnostic mineralization products. An ongoing technical debate over the potential for mineralization of dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to CO2 in the complete absence of diatomic oxygen has largely obscured the importance of microbial DCE/VC mineralization at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations below the current field standard (DO < 0.1-0.5 milligrams per liter) for nominally anoxic conditions. This study demonstrates that oxygen-based microbial mineralization of DCE and VC can be substantial under field conditions that are frequently characterized as "anoxic." Because mischaracterization of operant contaminant biodegradation processes can lead to expensive and ineffective remedial actions, a modified framework for assessing the potential importance of oxygen during chloroethene biodegradation was developed.

  15. Effects of chloride, sulfate and natural organic matter (NOM) on the accumulation and release of trace-level inorganic contaminants from corroding iron.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-09-15

    This study examined effects of varying levels of anions (chloride and sulfate) and natural organic matter (NOM) on iron release from and accumulation of inorganic contaminants in corrosion scales formed on iron coupons exposed to drinking water. Changes of concentrations of sulfate and chloride were observed to affect iron release and, in lesser extent, the retention of representative inorganic contaminants (vanadium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, lead and uranium); but, effects of NOM were more pronounced. DOC concentration of 1 mg/L caused iron release to increase, with average soluble and total iron concentrations being four and two times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of NOM. In the presence of NOM, the retention of inorganic contaminants by corrosion scales was reduced. This was especially prominent for lead, vanadium, chromium and copper whose retention by the scales decreased from >80% in the absence of NOM to <30% in its presence. Some of the contaminants, notably copper, chromium, zinc and nickel retained on the surface of iron coupons in the presence of DOC largely retained their mobility and were released readily when ambient water chemistry changed. Vanadium, arsenic, cadmium, lead and uranium retained by the scales were largely unsusceptible to changes of NOM and chloride levels. Modeling indicated that the observed effects were associated with the formation of metal-NOM complexes and effects of NOM on the sorption of the inorganic contaminants on solid phases that are typical for iron corrosion in drinking water.

  16. Effects of Feeding Barley Naturally Contaminated with Fusarium Mycotoxins on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, and Blood Chemistry of Gilts and Growth Recoveries by Feeding a Non-contaminated Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kong, C.; Shin, S. Y.; Park, C. S.; Kim, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of feeding barley naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on growth performance, vulva swelling, and digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein of gilts and the recovery of gilts fed normal diets immediately after the exposure to contaminated diets by measuring growth performance and vulva swelling. In Exp. 1, four diets were prepared to contain 0%, 15%, 30%, or 45% contaminated barley containing 25.7 mg/kg deoxynivalenol and 26.0 μg/kg zearalenone. Sixteen gilts with an initial body weight (BW) of 33.3 kg (standard deviation = 3.0) were individually housed in a metabolism crate and assigned to 4 diets with 4 replicates in a randomized complete block design based on BW. During the 14-d feeding trial, individual BW and feed consumption were measured weekly and the vertical and horizontal lengths of vulva were measured every 3 d. From d 10, feces were collected by the maker-to-marker method for 4 d. Blood samples were collected on d 14. During the overall period, the average daily gain, average daily feed intake, and gain:feed of pigs linearly decreased (p<0.01) as the dietary concentration of contaminated barley increased. However, the digestibility of crude protein was linearly increased (p = 0.011) with the increasing amounts of contaminated barley. Increasing dietary Fusarium mycotoxin concentrations did not influence vulva size, blood characteristic as well as immunoglobulin level of pigs. In the Exp. 2, a corn-soybean meal-based diet was formulated as a recovery diet. Pigs were fed the recovery diet immediately after completion of the Exp. 1. During the 14-d of recovery period, the individual BW and feed consumption were measured weekly and the vertical and horizontal length of vulva were measured every 3 d from d 0. On d 7, the feed intake of pigs previously fed contaminated diets already reached that of pigs fed a diet with 0% contaminated barley and no significant

  17. Milk cow feed intake and milk production and distribution estimates for Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.M.; Darwin, R.F.; Erickson, A.R.; Eckert, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides initial information on milk production and distribution in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project Phase I study area. The Phase I study area consists of eight countries in central Washington and two countries in northern Oregon. The primary objective of the HEDR Project is to develop estimates of the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford operations. The objective of Phase I of the project was to determine the feasibility of reconstructing data, models, and development of preliminary dose estimates received by people living in the ten countries surrounding Hanford from 1944 to 1947. One of the most important contributors to radiation doses from Hanford during the period of interest was radioactive iodine. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated with iodine is likely the dominant pathway of human exposure. To estimate the doses people could have received from this pathway, it is necessary to estimate the amount of milk that the people living in the Phase I area consumed, the source of the milk, and the type of feed that the milk cows ate. The objective of the milk model subtask is to identify the sources of milk supplied to residents of each community in the study area as well as the sources of feeds that were fed to the milk cows. In this report, we focus on Grade A cow's milk (fresh milk used for human consumption).

  18. Radionuclide transfer from feed to camel milk.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Al-Hamwi, A; Amin, Y; Safieh, M B; Zarkawi, M; Soukouti, A; Dayyoub, R; Voigt, G; Fesenko, S

    2014-06-01

    The transfer of (137)Cs, (85)Sr, (131)I, (210)Po, (210)Pb and (238)U from feed to camel's milk was investigated in a pilot experiment with three lactating camels. For a period of 60 days, the animals were fed on spiked feed containing the studied radionuclides. They were subsequently returned to a contamination-free diet and monitored for another 90 days. The activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (85)Sr and (131)I in milk decreased with time and reached background levels after 20 days. Equilibrium transfer coefficients and biological half-lives were estimated and transfer coefficients were calculated as (8.1 ± 3.6) × 10(-4), (4.4 ± 1.6) × 10(-2), (7.8 ± 3.9) × 10(-4), (2.7 ± 3.5) × 10(-4), (1.8 ± 1.5) × 10(-4) and (7.0 ± 3.6) × 10(-3) d L(-1) for (85)Sr, (131)I, (137)Cs, (210)Po, (210)Pb and (238)U, respectively. The biological half-lives were estimated to be 6.4, 4.2, 8.9, and 53.3 days for (85)Sr, (131)I, (137)Cs, and (238)U, respectively. Estimates of the half-lives were based on a one component model: it was found that the half-life values measured for artificial radionuclides were slightly shorter than those for natural radionuclides. The data obtained in the study are the first published experimental data on radionuclide transfer to camel milk.

  19. Ecological Risk Assessment of Metals Contamination in the Sediments of Natural Urban Wetlands in Dry Tropical Climate.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vivek; Maiti, Subodh Kumar; Jagadevan, Sheeja

    2016-09-01

    The pollution load due to metal contamination in the sediments of urban wetlands (Dhanbad, India) due to illegal release of domestic and industrial wastewater was studied by using various geochemical indices, such as contamination factor (Cf), degree of contamination (Cd), modified degree of contamination (mCd), pollution load index (PLI) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) for Cu, Co, Cd, Cr and Mn. Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) of metals present in wetland sediments were carried out to assess their origin and relationship with each other. The Cf values for different metals in the wetlands under investigation indicated low to very high level of pollution (Cf ranged between 0.02 and 14.15) with highest Cf (14.15) for Cd. The wetland receiving both domestic and industrial wastewater had the highest values of Cd, mCd and PLI as 17.48, 3.49 and 1.03 respectively.

  20. POLANYI-BASED MODELS FOR THE COMPETITIVE SORPTION OF LOW-POLARITY ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS ON A NATURAL SORBENT. (R825406)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of appropriate equilibrium sorption relationships for anthropogenic organic contaminants with soils and sediments is essential to predicting the extents and rates of solid-water interactions in the environment. In this context, we previously reported results that ...

  1. The Role of Natural Organic Matter and Mineral Colloids in the Transport of Contaminants through Heterogeneous Vadose-Zone Environments

    SciTech Connect

    James Saiers, Yale University; Joseph Ryan, University of Colorado

    2009-01-31

    Our research was guided by a key objective of the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP), which is to improve conceptual and predictive models for contaminant movement in complex vadose zone environments. In this report, increases in the understanding of colloidcontaminant interactions, colloid mobilization, and colloid deposition within unsaturated soils are cited as requisite needs for predicting contaminant fate and distribution in the vadose zone. We addressed these needs by pursuing three key goals: 1. Identify the mechanisms that govern OM and mineral-colloid reaction and transport in heterogeneous, unsaturated porous media; 2. Quantify the role of OM and mineral colloids in scavenging and facilitating the transport of contaminants of concern to DOE; and 3. Develop and test a mathematical model suitable for simulating the movement of OM- and colloid-associated contaminants through heterogeneous, unsaturated porous media.

  2. Bovine milk in human nutrition--a review.

    PubMed

    Haug, Anna; Høstmark, Arne T; Harstad, Odd M

    2007-09-25

    Milk and milk products are nutritious food items containing numerous essential nutrients, but in the western societies the consumption of milk has decreased partly due to claimed negative health effects. The content of oleic acid, conjugated linoleic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, short- and medium chain fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and bioactive compounds may promote positive health effects. Full-fat milk has been shown to increase the mean gastric emptying time compared to half-skimmed milk, thereby increasing the gastrointestinal transit time. Also the low pH in fermented milk may delay the gastric emptying. Hence, it may be suggested that ingesting full-fat milk or fermented milk might be favourable for glycaemic (and appetite?) regulation. For some persons milk proteins, fat and milk sugar may be of health concern. The interaction between carbohydrates (both natural milk sugar and added sugar) and protein in milk exposed to heat may give products, whose effects on health should be further studied, and the increasing use of sweetened milk products should be questioned. The concentration in milk of several nutrients can be manipulated through feeding regimes. There is no evidence that moderate intake of milk fat gives increased risk of diseases.

  3. Contaminants from Cretaceous Black Shale Part 1: Natural weathering processes controlling contaminant cycling in Mancos Shale, southwestern United States, with emphasis on salinity and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli W.; Elliott, John G.; Grauch, Richard I.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils derived from black shale can accumulate high concentrations of elements of environmental concern, especially in regions with semiarid to arid climates. One such region is the Colorado River basin in the southwestern United States where contaminants pose a threat to agriculture, municipal water supplies, endangered aquatic species, and water-quality commitments to Mexico. Exposures of Cretaceous Mancos Shale (MS) in the upper basin are a major contributor of salinity and selenium in the Colorado River. Here, we examine the roles of geology, climate, and alluviation on contaminant cycling (emphasis on salinity and Se) during weathering of MS in a Colorado River tributary watershed. Stage I (incipient weathering) began perhaps as long ago as 20 ka when lowering of groundwater resulted in oxidation of pyrite and organic matter. This process formed gypsum and soluble organic matter that persist in the unsaturated, weathered shale today. Enrichment of Se observed in laterally persistent ferric oxide layers likely is due to selenite adsorption onto the oxides that formed during fluctuating redox conditions at the water table. Stage II weathering (pedogenesis) is marked by a significant decrease in bulk density and increase in porosity as shale disaggregates to soil. Rainfall dissolves calcite and thenardite (Na2SO4) at the surface, infiltrates to about 1 m, and precipitates gypsum during evaporation. Gypsum formation (estimated 390 kg m−2) enriches soil moisture in Na and residual SO4. Transpiration of this moisture to the surface or exposure of subsurface soil (slumping) produces more thenardite. Most Se remains in the soil as selenite adsorbed to ferric oxides, however, some oxidizes to selenate and, during wetter conditions is transported with soil moisture to depths below 3 m. Coupled with little rainfall, relatively insoluble gypsum, and the translocation of soluble Se downward, MS landscapes will be a significant nonpoint source of salinity and Se to the

  4. Comparison of two methods for detection of E. coli O157H7 in unpasteurized milk

    PubMed Central

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Moori-Bakhtiari, Naghmeh; Gooraninezhad, Saad; Zarei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The most common serotype of enterohaemorrhagic Esherichia coli group or Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli is O157:H7. Domestic and wild ruminants are regarded as the main natural reservoirs. O157:H7 serotype is the major cause of gastrointestinal infections in developed countries. In this study was conducted to survey on the toxigenic E. coli O157: H7 strains in milk of industrial dairy farms. Materials and Methods: A total number of 150 milk samples were collected from dairy industry in Khuzestan, over a period of 6 months and were evaluated by cultivation in selective media (CT-SMAC) and multiplex PCR. Results: Two isolates were identified as E. coli using biochemical tests, none of them were toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 as determined by multiplex PCR. Using direct PCR on milk samples, 45 samples contained at least one gene of the studied genes in this investigation (rfb, flic, stx1, stx2). With direct PCR, 2 milk samples were positive for toxigenic O157:H7. Conclusion: E. coli O157:H7 is present in this region and so the necessity for strict compliance of health standards is recommended. This is the first study on O157: H7 E. coli milk contamination in Khuzestan province. Based on these results, direct PCR is more accurate than indirect PCR. PMID:28149486

  5. Comparative bioremediation of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons co-contaminated soil by natural attenuation, phytoremediation, bioaugmentation and bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Bagard, M; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G; Huguenot, D

    2016-09-01

    Biological remediation technologies are an environmentally friendly approach for the treatment of polluted soils. This study evaluated through a pot experiment four bioremediation strategies: a) natural attenuation, b) phytoremediation with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), c) bioaugmentation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and d) bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation, for the treatment of a co-contaminated soil presenting moderate levels of heavy metals (Cu, Pb and Zn at 87, 100 and 110mgkg(-1) DW, respectively) and petroleum hydrocarbons (3800mgkg(-1) DW). As demonstrated by plant biomass and selected physiological parameters alfalfa plants were able to tolerate and grow in the co-contaminated soil, especially when soil was inoculated with P. aeruginosa, which promoted plant growth (56% and 105% increase for shoots and roots, respectively) and appeared to alleviate plant stress. The content of heavy metals in alfalfa plants was limited and followed the order: Zn>Cu>Pb. Heavy metals were mainly concentrated in plant roots and were poorly translocated, favouring their stabilization in the root zone. Bioaugmentation of planted soil with P. aeruginosa generally led to a decrease of plant metal concentration and translocation. The highest degree of total petroleum hydrocarbon removal was obtained for bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation treatment (68%), followed by bioaugmentation (59%), phytoremediation (47%) and natural attenuation (37%). The results of this study demonstrated that the combined use of plant and bacteria was the most advantageous option for the treatment of the present co-contaminated soil, as compared to natural attenuation, bioaugmentation or phytoremediation applied alone.

  6. Raman spectroscopy and imaging to detect contaminants for food safety applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study presents the use of Raman chemical imaging for the screening of dry milk powder for the presence of chemical contaminants and Raman spectroscopy for quantitative assessment of chemical contaminants in liquid milk. For image-based screening, melamine was mixed into dry milk at concentratio...

  7. Milk Allergy in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... though, they can have symptoms if mom has dairy products in her diet . A milk allergy is not ... milk allergy, it's important for you to avoid dairy products because the milk protein that causes allergic reactions ...

  8. Assessing the effect of natural attenuation on oxygen consumption processes in a sewage-contaminated aquifer by use of a natural-gradient tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathisen, P. P.; Kent, D. B.; Smith, R. L.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Metge, D. W.; Hess, K. M.; Leblanc, D. R.; Koch, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Processes associated with aquifer restoration subsequent to cessation of treated-sewage loading in a sand and gravel aquifer are being investigated at the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Site on Cape Cod, MA. Restoration has been slow because of significant oxygen depletion resulting from biogeochemical processes associated with residual sorbed pools of organic carbon, ammonium, and reduced metals in the aquifer. The in situ interaction of the physical, chemical, and biological processes governing oxygen consumption was examined by using a natural-gradient tracer test in fall 2001, 6 years after sewage disposal had been discontinued. Ground water with a high dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was withdrawn from an uncontaminated zone of the aquifer and re-injected with a conservative tracer, bromide, into an anoxic zone directly below a former sewage-effluent disposal bed where Fe and sulfide concentrations were below detection and the DO was less than 5 uM. An injection with negligible ammonium, a nitrate concentration of 22 uM, and DO of approximately 260 uM was maintained at approximately 15 L/hr for a period of 75 days. An array of multi-level samplers (MLS), placed at distances ranging from 1 to 7 m down-gradient from the injection well, was sampled prior to and throughout the 75-day injection, and during a 25-day period after the injection. Water samples from the MLS were analyzed for DO and a variety of aqueous constituents. The DO decreased from approximately 260 uM to 210 uM over 7 m of transport, indicating the presence of rate-limited oxygen consumption. An increase in nitrate from 22 to approximately 36 uM indicated the presence of rate-limited ammonium oxidation. However, this ammonium oxidation was not sufficient to account for all of the DO consumption. Further characterization of these processes was accomplished by use of PHREEQC, a one-dimensional, geochemical reactive transport model. The 1D model is based on an ion association model for aqueous

  9. Natural attenuation of fluorene and pyrene in contaminated soils and assisted with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Effect of co-contamination.

    PubMed

    Madrid, F; Rubio-Bellido, M; Villaverde, J; Tejada, M; Morillo, E

    2016-11-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the mutual effect of the PAHs fluorene and pyrene on their respective biodegradation and dissipation processes in an agricultural soil, and to determine the effect of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD), used to increase the bioavailability of PAHs, on such processes. Fluorene dissipation was primarily due to abiotic processes, although a small contribution from biodegradation was also observed. Therefore, fluorene dissipation did not increase with HPBCD and its presence did not significantly alter the dehydrogenase activity. In contrast to fluorene, pyrene dissipation depended primarily on biotic factors, with endogenous soil microorganisms capable of degrading pyrene, with large increases in dehydrogenase activity. HPBCD increased biodegradation rate of pyrene. The co-contamination of soil with both PAHs did not affect fluorene evolution, but significantly inhibited pyrene biodegradation. The different abilities of soil bacterial consortia to catabolize these PAHs are discussed. Additionally, the possibility that the abiotic loss of fluorene through volatilization had a significant effect on the microbial community biodegradation of both fluorene and pyrene is examined.

  10. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the beef/milk food-chain pathway.

    PubMed

    Rayno, D R

    1983-12-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the beef/milk food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po in plants and cattle. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. In this paper, data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk from cattle that have fed on forage contaminated with the tailings. The estimated doses from this technologically enhanced source are compared with those resulting from average dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  11. Effects of metal burden and food avoidance on the transfer of metals from naturally contaminated prey to a marine predator Nassarius siquijorensis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Yang, Lulu; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2013-05-15

    Nassarid snails are important opportunistic scavengers widely found in marine intertidal shores and trophic transfer is a predominant source of metal accumulation in these species, thus there is a significant need to understand the controls of metal trophic transfer. In the present study, we took advantage of a severely contaminated estuary and collected two prey organisms (oysters Crassostrea angulata and barnacles Fistulobalanus albicostatus) with different contamination histories. These naturally contaminated prey were fed to a marine neogastropod Nassarius siquijorensis for a period of up to 7 weeks. We then investigated the influences of prey type, metal burden, and subcellular distribution in the prey on the metal accumulation, trophic transfer, and potential toxicity on N. siquijorensis. We demonstrated an obvious negative relationship between the trophic transfer and the metal concentration in prey or the metal dosage. N. siquijorensis exhibited food avoidance behavior to the Cu contaminated food, which effectively reduced the metal ingestion and resulted in a decrease of trophic transfer, as well as a potential toxic effect from dietary exposure. On the other hand, our results also implied the metal-specific impact of subcellular metal distribution in prey on the trophic transfer to N. siquijorensis. Our study suggested that metal burden and feeding avoidance should be considered in studying the trophic transfer of metals in marine benthic food chain.

  12. Modelling milk production from feed intake in dairy cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.L.

    1985-05-01

    Predictive models were developed for both Holstein and Jersey cows. Since Holsteins comprised eighty-five percent of the data, the predictive models developed for Holsteins were used for the development of a user-friendly computer model. Predictive models included: milk production (squared multiple correlation .73), natural log (ln) of milk production (.73), four percent fat-corrected milk (.67), ln four percent fat-corrected milk (.68), fat-free milk (.73), ln fat-free milk (.73), dry matter intake (.61), ln dry matter intake (.60), milk fat (.52), and ln milk fat (.56). The predictive models for ln milk production, ln fat-free milk and ln dry matter intake were incorporated into a computer model. The model was written in standard Fortran for use on mainframe or micro-computers. Daily milk production, fat-free milk production, and dry matter intake were predicted on a daily basis with the previous day's dry matter intake serving as an independent variable in the prediction of the daily milk and fat-free milk production. 21 refs.

  13. Effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, metabolism, and indices of athletic performance of exercised horses.

    PubMed

    Raymond, S L; Smith, T K; Swamy, H V L N

    2005-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of feeding blends of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins to mature, exercised horses, and to test the efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GM polymer) in preventing Fusarium mycotoxicoses. Six mature, mixed-breed mares with an average BW of 530 kg were assigned to one of three dietary treatments for 21 d in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. Feed consumed each day was a combination of up to 3.5 kg of concentrates and 5.0 kg of mixed timothy/alfalfa hay (as-fed basis). The concentrates fed included 1) manage; 2) blend of contaminated grains; and 3) contaminated grains + 0.2% GM polymer (MTB-100, Alltech Inc., Nicholasville, KY). Concentrates containing contaminated grains averaged 11.0 ppm deoxynivalenol, 0.7 ppm 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 0.8 ppm zearalenone (as-fed basis). Feed intake and BW were monitored over a 21-d period. Horses were maintained on a fixed exercise schedule throughout the experiment. At the end of the experiment, each horse completed a time-to-fatigue treadmill step test. Variables measured during pretest, each step of the test, and 5 and 10 min posttest were as follows: 1) time-to-fatigue, 2) heart rate, 3) hematological variables, and 4) serum lactate concentration. Each step consisted of 2 min of fast trot with a 2% increase in incline after each 2 min. Feed intake by horses fed contaminated grains was decreased compared with controls throughout the experiment (P < 0.05). Supplementation of 0.2% GM polymer to the contaminated diet did not alter feed intake by horses compared with those fed the unsupplemented contaminated diet. All hay was consumed regardless of concentrate fed. Weight loss from 0 to 21 d was observed in horses fed contaminated grains compared with controls (P < 0.05). No effect of diet was seen on variables used to measure athletic ability, although the results showed an expected response to exercise for a fit horse. We conclude

  14. Decontamination of mesquite pod flour, naturally contaminated with Bacillus cereus and formation of furan by ionizing irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mesquite pod flour produced from nitrogen-fixing trees of Prosopis species has a unique aroma and flavor which is preferred by some consumers. Due to the presence of wildlife, grazing domestic animals and insects, the pods have a high potential of being contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria su...

  15. A Conceptual Site Model for Nature and Extent of Contamination in a Riparian-Near Shore Area - 12410

    SciTech Connect

    Morgans, Donna; Lowe, John; McCarthy, Chris; Aly, Alaa

    2012-07-01

    The 100-K decision area is located along the Columbia River and includes source Operable Units (OUs), a groundwater OU, and the adjacent surface water, saturated sediment and aquatic biota. A conceptual site model (CSM) has been developed to evaluate concentrations of non-radiological substances and radionuclides detected in soil, water and sediments in a riparian near-shore area along the Columbia River. The CSM is used to determine if potential transport pathways exist to these media from Hanford Site sources by incorporating information from the physical system, surface hydrology, subsurface hydrogeology, analytical results, and ecological evaluation into the model. Six contaminants of ecological concern, mostly metals and non-radiological inorganics, have been identified in riparian and near-shore media. With few exceptions (notably chromium and hexavalent chromium), there are ambient sources for these constituents in soil, sediment and water that are unrelated to the Hanford Site. While the CSM documented analytical and biological conditions, this paper presents results focused on analytical measurements to document the potential for these contaminants to be related to a release from the Hanford Site. The purpose for preparing this CSM was to address, on a reactor decision area basis, the potential for Hanford Site contaminants in soil or groundwater to migrate to riparian or near-shore areas at concentrations that could be of concern for ecological receptors. This CSM supplements the analysis of River Corridor-wide ecological risks presented in the ecological risk assessment of the RCBRA. The RCBRA identified on a site-wide basis some contaminants of ecological concern that warranted further evaluation. Based on the results of the further evaluation contained in this CSM, with the exception of hexavalent chromium, detected concentrations of contaminants in riparian or near-shore media are not reliably detectable at levels of ecological concern, or are not

  16. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  17. Bioanalytical effect-balance model to determine the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments affected by black and natural carbon.

    PubMed

    Bräunig, Jennifer; Tang, Janet Y M; Warne, Michael St J; Escher, Beate I

    2016-08-01

    In sediments several binding phases dictate the fate and bioavailability of organic contaminants. Black carbon (BC) has a high sorptive capacity for organic contaminants and can limit their bioavailability, while the fraction bound to organic carbon (OC) is considered to be readily desorbable and bioavailable. We investigated the bioavailability and mixture toxicity of sediment-associated contaminants by combining different extraction techniques with in vitro bioanalytical tools. Sediments from a harbour with high fraction of BC, and sediments from remote, agricultural and urban areas with lower BC were treated with exhaustive solvent extraction, Tenax extraction and passive sampling to estimate total, bioaccessible and bioavailable fractions, respectively. The extracts were characterized with cell-based bioassays that measure dioxin-like activity (AhR-CAFLUX) and the adaptive stress response to oxidative stress (AREc32). Resulting bioanalytical equivalents, which are effect-scaled concentrations, were applied in an effect-balance model, consistent with a mass balance-partitioning model for single chemicals. Sediments containing BC had most of the bioactivity associated to the BC fraction, while the OC fraction played a role for sediments with lower BC. As effect-based sediment-water distribution ratios demonstrated, most of the bioactivity in the AhR-CAFLUX was attributable to hydrophobic chemicals while more hydrophilic chemicals activated AREc32, even though bioanalytical equivalents in the aqueous phase remained negligible. This approach can be used to understand the fate and effects of mixtures of diverse organic contaminants in sediments that would not be possible if single chemicals were targeted by chemical analysis; and make informed risk-based decisions concerning the management of contaminated sediments.

  18. Rhinovirus contamination of surfaces in homes of adults with natural colds: transfer of virus to fingertips during normal daily activities.

    PubMed

    Winther, B; McCue, K; Ashe, K; Rubino, J; Hendley, J O

    2011-05-01

    Multiple surfaces contaminated with rhinovirus were detected in hotel rooms by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) following occupancy by a cold sufferer. Whether infectious rhinovirus contaminates surfaces in homes and is transferred from surfaces to fingertips through normal activities is not known. Nasal secretions from 30 subjects with new colds were tested for rhinovirus genome by RT-PCR; infectious rhinovirus was sought with tissue cultures. Each subject identified 10 sites in their home touched during the preceding 24 hr. Samples from sites were tested for rhinovirus by RT-PCR and cell culture. Later, each subject's mucus (stored at -70°C) was deposited on surfaces for testing transfer to fingertips through daily life activities such as flipping a light switch, touching the telephone keypad, and holding the telephone handset. Nasal secretions from 16/30 subjects were positive for rhinovirus by RT-PCR; 66 (41%) of 160 surfaces in homes were positive. Contaminated surfaces included doorknobs (6 positive/18 tested), refrigerator door handles (8/14), TV remote controls (5/10), and bathroom faucets (8/10). Five (19%) of 26 RT-PCR positive sites from culture positive subjects were positive in cell culture. Nasal mucus from six culture positive subjects was deposited on objects. Infectious rhinovirus was detected on 22% of fingertips following contact with objects contaminated for 1 hr; transfer dropped to 3% after 24 hr of contamination, and 0% after 48 hr. Infectious rhinovirus found on surfaces in homes of people with colds can be transferred to fingertips, but infectivity of virus in mucus declines by 24 hr after deposition.

  19. Estimation of ionizing radiation impact on natural Vicia cracca populations inhabiting areas contaminated with uranium mill tailings and radium production wastes.

    PubMed

    Evseeva, T; Majstrenko, T; Geras'kin, S; Brown, J E; Belykh, E

    2009-10-01

    Industrial areas in proximity to the Vodny settlement in the Komi Republic, Russia, have been contaminated by uranium mill tailings and radium production wastes. These areas, exhibiting high activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soils, constitute a field laboratory where the effects of combined chronic exposures to alpha-, beta- and gamma-emitting radionuclides on natural plant populations can be studied. The aim of the present work was to determine dose-effect relationships and the range of doses that cause biological effects in natural Vicia cracca L. populations inhabiting the study area. The studied plant species is native to the area and is found ubiquitously. Soil and vegetation samples were taken at a reference location and six contaminated sites characterized by distinct floodplain depositional units with different enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. A large fraction of the dose at the study sites (including the reference location) was attributable to internal irradiation and (226)Ra was found to be an important contributor to this component of dose. The relationship between the frequency of chromosome aberrations in seedlings' root tip cells and the absorbed dose was found to be quadratic. An exponential model provided the best result in describing the empirical dependence between the absorbed dose and both the germination capacity of seeds and the survival rate of sprouts of V. cracca. For V. cracca plants inhabiting areas contaminated with uranium mill tailings and radium production wastes, a weighted absorbed dose of 0.2 Gy (weighting factor for alpha particles=5) during the vegetation period could be considered to be a level below which no increase in genetic variability and decrease in reproductive capacity might be observed above background.

  20. Human Milk Banking.

    PubMed

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.

  1. Characterization of Contaminant Transport using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria - Final Report - 05/01/1997 - 04/30/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, Michael T.; Ku, Teh-Lung

    2001-04-30

    The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydrogeology. Thus, to characterize contaminant transport, it is best to cross-check figures derived from any small-scale laboratory experiments over limited times with that obtained from field-oriented, natural analog studies. We propose such a study using the naturally-occurring U and Th decay-series disequilibria. The work of ours and other researchers have shown that the parent/daughter disequilibrium patterns existing in groundwater systems can be modeled in terms of local nuclide mass balance to arrive at such information as the rock-water contact time (fluid flow) and rates of contaminant transport, taking into account the retardation effect due to nuclide/rock interaction contaminants at INEL by grouping them into three categories, represented by isotopes of (1) Th and Pa, (2) U and (3) Ra. Mass spectrometric measurements of these elements will be emphasized in order to minimize sample size requirements and to maximize precision. Results will form the data base for a model code for computing: (1) Fluid residence time (transport rates) in the basalt aquifers at various locations, (2) The in-situ adsorption and desorption rate constants, as well as the retardation factors, of various radionuclide wastes, and (3) Rock dissolution rate and its relation to preferential flow and contamination transport in the fractured rock.

  2. Effects of feeding diets naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on protein metabolism in late gestation and lactation of first-parity sows.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Llano, G; Smith, T K; Boermans, H J; Caballero-Cortes, C; Friendship, R

    2010-03-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins to sows on the capacity for protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, the protein content per cellular unit, and the efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan adsorbent (GMA) to prevent these effects in late gestation and in lactation. Thirty-two Yorkshire sows were assigned to 4 treatment groups (8 per treatment) from 91 +/- 3 d of gestation up to weaning on d 21 after farrowing. Diets included 1) control, 2) contaminated grains, and 3) contaminated grains + 0.2% GMA. A fourth treatment of feeding sows the control diet at a restricted feed allowance was also included. The variables measured include ADFI, average daily BW change, serum total protein, urea, and ammonia, and skeletal muscle DNA, RNA, and protein. To assess the capacity for protein synthesis, ratios of RNA:DNA, and RNA:protein were compared among dietary treatments. To assess the degree of muscle protein mobilization in gestation and lactation, ratios of protein:DNA were compared among dietary treatments. Muscle samples were obtained from the triceps brachii. Blood and muscle samples were obtained 3 times: the first was obtained 1 d before the sows began to receive the experimental diets (90 +/- 3 d of gestation), a second sample was obtained 14 d later (104 +/- 3 d of gestation), and the third sample was obtained 10 d after farrowing. Serum ammonia concentrations were similar in sows fed the contaminated feed and sows fed the restricted feed compared with controls, but serum ammonia concentrations were greater in sows fed contaminated feed (P = 0.02) and restricted-fed sows (P = 0.008) compared with sows fed the contaminated grains plus GMA on 104 +/- 3 d of gestation. There were no reductions in the capacity for protein synthesis caused by mycotoxins or restricted feeding compared with controls. A reduction in ADFI (P = 0.003) was observed in sows fed the 2 contaminated diets in lactation

  3. Antibiotic residues in milk from small dairy farms in rural Peru.

    PubMed

    Redding, L E; Cubas-Delgado, F; Sammel, M D; Smith, G; Galligan, D T; Levy, M Z; Hennessy, S

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in livestock can pose a public health threat, especially if antibiotic residues remain in the food product. Understanding how often and why farmers sell products with antibiotic residues is critical to improving the quality of these products. To understand how often milk with antibiotic residues is sold on small farms in a major dairy-producing region of Peru and identify factors associated with selling milk with antibiotic residues, we tested milk samples for antibiotic residues from every provider on three routes of commercial milk companies and from bulk tanks of farmers currently treating cows with antibiotics. We also asked farmers if they sold milk from treated cows and examined factors associated with the tendency to do so. The prevalence of milk contamination with antibiotic residues on commercial routes was low (0-4.2%); however, 33/36 farmers treating their animals with antibiotics sold milk that tested positive for antibiotic residues. The self-reported sale of milk from treated cows had a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 75.8%, 100%, 100% and 27.2%, respectively (with testing of milk for residues as the gold standard). Finally, 69/156 randomly selected farmers reported selling milk from treated cows, and farmers' knowledge of antibiotics and the milk purchaser were significantly associated with a farmer's tendency to report doing so. Educating farmers on the risks associated with antibiotics and enforcement of penalties for selling contaminated milk by milk companies are needed to improve milk quality.

  4. Detection of water contamination from hydraulic fracturing wastewater: a μPAD for bromide analysis in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Loh, Leslie J; Bandara, Gayan C; Weber, Genevieve L; Remcho, Vincent T

    2015-08-21

    Due to the rapid expansion in hydraulic fracturing (fracking), there is a need for robust, portable and specific water analysis techniques. Early detection of contamination is crucial for the prevention of lasting environmental damage. Bromide can potentially function as an early indicator of water contamination by fracking waste, because there is a high concentration of bromide ions in fracking wastewaters. To facilitate this, a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) has been developed and optimized for the quantitative colorimetric detection of bromide in water using a smartphone. A paper microfluidic platform offers the advantages of inexpensive fabrication, elimination of unstable wet reagents, portability and high adaptability for widespread distribution. These features make this assay an attractive option for a new field test for on-site determination of bromide.

  5. Milk-borne infections. An analysis of their potential effect on the milk industry

    PubMed Central

    Dhanashekar, Revathi; Akkinepalli, Sindhura; Nellutla, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    In developed countries such as the United States of America, foodborne illnesses account for 48 million infections per year. Developing countries such as India face greater simultaneous challenges particularly since incorrect processing or storage of dairy products can represent a transmission hazard for a large number of pathogens and can be responsible for outbreaks of brucellosis, listeriosis, tuberculosis, etc. It is important to recognize the types of germs which can be transmitted through insufficient thermal preparation of milk or milk products or through post-pasteurization contamination, in order to successfully avoid transmission of milk-borne infections. PMID:24432270

  6. Inhibition of HIV-1 transmission in trans from dendritic cells to CD4+ T lymphocytes by natural antibodies to the CRD domain of DC-SIGN purified from breast milk and intravenous immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Mary; Bouhlal, Hicham; Nasreddine, Nadine; Saidi, Hela; Gody, Jean-Chrysostome; Aubry, Sylvie; Grésenguet, Gérard; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Bélec, Laurent; Hocini, Hakim

    2008-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that human breast milk and normal human polyclonal immunoglobulins purified from plasma [intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg)] contain functional natural immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies directed against the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) domain of the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) molecule, which is involved in the binding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 to dendritic cells (DCs). Antibodies to DC-SIGN CRD were affinity-purified on a matrix to which a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal CRD domain (amino-acid 342–amino-acid 371) had been coupled. The affinity-purified antibodies bound to the DC-SIGN peptide and to the native DC-SIGN molecule expressed by HeLa DC-SIGN+ cells and immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMDDCs), in a specific and dose-dependent manner. At an optimal dose of 200 µg/ml, natural antibodies to DC-SIGN CRD peptide purified from breast milk and IVIg stained 25 and 20% of HeLa DC-SIGN+ cells and 32 and 12% of iMDDCs, respectively. Anti-DC-SIGN CRD peptide antibodies inhibited the attachment of virus to HeLa DC-SIGN by up to 78% and the attachment to iMDDCs by only 20%. Both breast milk- and IVIg-derived natural antibodies to the CRD peptide inhibited 60% of the transmission in trans of HIV-1JRCSF, an R5-tropic strain, from iMDDCs to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, these observations suggest that the attachment of HIV to DCs and transmission in trans to autologous CD4+ T lymphocytes occur through two independent mechanisms. Our data support a role of natural antibodies to DC-SIGN in the modulation of postnatal HIV transmission through breast-feeding and in the natural host defence against HIV-1 in infected individuals. PMID:17999675

  7. Naturally occurring arsenic in terrestrial geothermal systems of western Anatolia, Turkey: potential role in contamination of freshwater resources.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Jochen; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Nath, Bibhash; Baba, Alper; Gunduz, Orhan; Kulp, Thomas R; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Kar, Sandeep; Yang, Huai-Jen; Tseng, Yu-Jung; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination in terrestrial geothermal systems has been identified in many countries worldwide. Concentrations higher than 0.01 mg/L are detrimental to human health. We examined potential consequences for As contamination of freshwater resources based on hydrogeochemical investigations of geothermal waters in deep wells and hot springs collected from western Anatolia, Turkey. We analyzed samples for major ions and trace element concentrations. Temperature of geothermal waters in deep wells showed extreme ranges (40 and 230 °C), while, temperature of hot spring fluids was up to 90 °C. The Piper plot illustrated two dominant water types: Na-HCO3(-) type for geothermal waters in deep wells and Ca-HCO3(-) type for hot spring fluids. Arsenic concentration ranged from 0.03 to 1.5mg/L. Dominance of reduced As species, i.e., As(III), was observed in our samples. The Eh value ranged between -250 and 119 mV, which suggests diverse geochemical conditions. Some of the measured trace elements were found above the World Health Organization guidelines and Turkish national safe drinking water limits. The variation in pH (range: 6.4-9.3) and As in geothermal waters suggest mixing with groundwater. Mixing of geothermal waters is primarily responsible for contamination of freshwater resources and making them unsuitable for drinking or irrigation.

  8. High-Performance, Superparamagnetic, Nanoparticle-Based Heavy Metal Sorbents for Removal of Contaminants from Natural Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Shane; Cinson, Anthony D.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-06-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle based heavy metal sorbents with various surface chemistries that demonstrate an excellent affinity for the separation of heavy metals in contaminated water systems (i.e. spiked Columbia river water). The magnetic nanoparticle sorbents are prepared from an easy to synthesize iron oxide precursor, followed by a simple, one-step ligand exchange technique to introduce the organic surface functionality of interest chosen to target either specific or broader classes of heavy metals. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles are excellent sorbent materials for the extraction of heavy metal contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. These engineered magnetic nanoparticle sorbents have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g), allowing for increased binding capacity. To demonstrate the potential sorbent performance of each of the surface modified magnetic nanoparticles, river water was spiked with Hg, Pb, Cd, Ag, Co, Cu, and Tl and exposed to low concentrations of the functionalized nanoparticles. The samples were analyzed to determine the metal content before and after exposure to the magnetic nanoparticle sorbents. In almost all cases reported here the nanoparticles were found to be superior to commercially available sorbents binding a wide range of different heavy metals with extremely high affinity. Detailed characterization of the functionalized magnetic nanoparticle sorbents including FT-IR, BET surface analysis, TGA, XPS and VSM as well as the heavy metal removal experiments are presented.

  9. SSH gene expression profile of Eisenia andrei exposed in situ to a naturally contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Joana; Pereira, Ruth; Gonçalves, Fernando; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-02-01

    The effects of the exposure of earthworms (Eisenia andrei) to contaminated soil from an abandoned uranium mine, were assessed through gene expression profile evaluation by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH). Organisms were exposed in situ for 56 days, in containers placed both in a contaminated and in a non-contaminated site (reference). Organisms were sampled after 14 and 56 days of exposure. Results showed that the main physiological functions affected by the exposure to metals and radionuclides were: metabolism, oxireductase activity, redox homeostasis and response to chemical stimulus and stress. The relative expression of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and elongation factor 1 alpha was also affected, since the genes encoding these enzymes were significantly up and down-regulated, after 14 and 56 days of exposure, respectively. Also, an EST with homology for SET oncogene was found to be up-regulated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this gene was identified in earthworms and thus, further studies are required, to clarify its involvement in the toxicity of metals and radionuclides. Considering the results herein presented, gene expression profiling proved to be a very useful tool to detect earthworms underlying responses to metals and radionuclides exposure, pointing out for the detection and development of potential new biomarkers.

  10. Natural abundance of Sb and Sc in pristine groundwaters, Springwater Township, Ontario, Canada, and implications for tracing contamination from landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Shotyk, William; Krachler, Michael; Chen, Bin; Zheng, James

    2005-12-01

    Using ICP-SMS and the clean lab methods and procedures developed for determining trace element concentrations in polar snow and ice, a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 30 pg l(-1) for Sb and 5 pg l(-1) for Sc was achieved, allowing the natural abundances of Sb and Sc to be measured in pristine groundwaters. Water samples were collected from natural flows and wells between Elmvale and Wyevale in Springwater Township, Ontario, Canada. The water in this region is derived from chemical reactions between meteoric fluids and the Quaternary sediments which cover the bedrock (dolomitic limestone) to depths of more than 100 m. The chemical composition of these waters (pH 8) is primarily a reflection of reactions between the percolating fluids with calcite and dolomite. The maximum concentration of Sb was 5.0 ng l(-1), and the average of all samples collected was 2.2 +/- 1.2 ng l(-1) (n = 34). The average concentration of Sc was 8.6 +/- 4.7 ng l(-1) (n = 28). The paucity of published Sb concentration data available for comparison is probably because most of the analytical methods commonly used to date, including GFAAS, HG-AAS, HG-AFS, INAA, and ICP-QMS, have lower limits of detection which are inadequate for reliably determining the natural abundance of Sb in many uncontaminated groundwaters. Also, the measurement of extremely low concentrations of Sb requires extra care to avoid possible contamination. Given the extensive use of Sb in plastics, we show that some of the containers used to collect and store samples, and for handling and preparing samples for chemical analyses, may be important sources of contamination in the laboratory. The Sb and Sc concentrations reported here should serve as reference values for this region, against which contamination by various human impacts in future could be compared.

  11. Cow's milk and children

    MedlinePlus

    Milk and children; Cow’s milk allergy - children; Lactose intolerance - children ... You may have heard that cow's milk should not be given to babies younger than 1 year old. This is because cow's milk doesn't provide enough of certain ...

  12. 21 CFR 131.110 - Milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.110 Milk. (a... by adding thereto cream, concentrated milk, dry whole milk, skim milk, concentrated skim milk,...

  13. Release of oxide-bound toxic metals by naturally-occurring and contaminant-derived organic compounds: The role of complexant, reductant, and adsorptive characteristics. Final report, July 1, 1994--June 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, A.T.

    1997-12-31

    Natural organic compounds and contaminant-derived organic compounds can substantially alter the speciation and geochemical behavior of contaminant metals in subsurface environments. The goal, as part of the Co-Contaminant Subprogram, was to: (1) develop analytical methods for identifying and quantifying organic compounds affecting toxic metal speciation; (2) evaluate their reductant, complexant, and adsorptive characteristics of organic compounds with regards to important contaminant metals; (3) determine reaction kinetics, mechanisms, and energetics for metal-organic interactions; and (4) provide the basis for predicting toxic metal oxidation state, speciation, and mobility.

  14. Marine mammal health: Organochlorines in blubber, blood and milk of Tursiops truncatus

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.L.; Ridgway, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    Marine mammals are potentially vulnerable organisms for the effects of hazardous man-made chemicals. Organochlorines (OCs) are suspected of causing reproductive failure and immunosuppression which may result in increased susceptibility to infectious disease. High levels of OCs have been found in victims of mass die offs of cetaceans world-wide. To determine baseline values of these organochlorine contaminants found in healthy reproductive dolphins, the authors collected samples of blood, blubber and milk from a population of Tursiops truncatus maintained by the US Navy. These animals are ideal for study because of the availability of relevant biological data which is often lacking in data from wild animals. The Navy dolphins are trained for medical behaviors like blood and milk collection. These behaviors allow them to collect data under controlled conditions preempting errors that occur when collecting similar data on dead and/or wild animals. Using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) the authors have quantified 10 to 25 PCBs using congener-specific analysis and 19 chlorinated pesticides from microsamples of blubber, blood and milk collected from these animals. The authors also analyzed the fish in the diets of the dolphins. Serial sample collection of milk has allowed us to track the transfer of OCs over the course of lactation. They were also able to correlate OC levels found in blubber, blood and milk. This database should reveal baseline levels relating environmental toxins and marine mammal health to provide a potentially sensitive indicator of pollution and disease in the natural ocean environment and furnish an unparalleled historical pathway toward understanding the effects and consequences of these persistent contaminants and their impact on the marine ecosystem.

  15. Seasonal variation and potential sources of Cryptosporidium contamination in surface waters of Chao Phraya River and Bang Pu Nature Reserve pier, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Koompapong, Khuanchai; Sukthana, Yaowalark

    2012-07-01

    Using molecular techniques, a longitudinal study was conducted with the aims at identifying the seasonal difference of Cryptosporidium contamination in surface water as well as analyzing the potential sources based on species information. One hundred forty-four water samples were collected, 72 samples from the Chao Phraya River, Thailand, collected in the summer, rainy and cool seasons and 72 samples from sea water at Bang Pu Nature Reserve pier, collected before, during and after the presence of migratory seagulls. Total prevalence of Cryptosporidium contamination in river and sea water locations was 11% and 6%, respectively. The highest prevalence was observed at the end of rainy season continuing into the cool season in river water (29%) and in sea water (12%). During the rainy season, prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 4% in river and sea water samples, but none in summer season. All positive samples from the river was C. parvum, while C. meleagridis (1), and C. serpentis (1) were obtained from sea water. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic study in Thailand of Cryptosporidium spp contamination in river and sea water locations and the first report of C. serpentis, suggesting that humans, household pets, farm animals, wildlife and migratory birds may be the potential sources of the parasites. The findings are of use for implementing preventive measures to reduce the transmission of cryptosporidiosis to both humans and animals.

  16. C, Cl and H compound-specific isotope analysis to assess natural versus Fe(0) barrier-induced degradation of chlorinated ethenes at a contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Audí-Miró, Carme; Cretnik, Stefan; Torrentó, Clara; Rosell, Mònica; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Otero, Neus; Palau, Jordi; Elsner, Martin; Soler, Albert

    2015-12-15

    Compound-specific isotopic analysis of multiple elements (C, Cl, H) was tested to better assess the effect of a zero-valent iron-permeable reactive barrier (ZVI-PRB) installation at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The focus was on (1) using (13)C to evaluate natural chlorinated ethene biodegradation and the ZVI-PRB efficiency; (2) using dual element (13)C-(37)Cl isotopic analysis to distinguish biotic from abiotic degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE); and (3) using (13)C-(37)Cl-(2)H isotopic analysis of cis-DCE and TCE to elucidate different contaminant sources. Both biodegradation and degradation by ZVI-PRB were indicated by the metabolites that were detected and the (13)C data, with a quantitative estimate of the ZVI-PRB efficiency of less than 10% for PCE. Dual element (13)C-(37)Cl isotopic plots confirmed that biodegradation was the main process at the site including the ZVI-PRB area. Based on the carbon isotope data, approximately 45% and 71% of PCE and TCE, respectively, were estimated to be removed by biodegradation. (2)H combined with (13)C and (37)Cl seems to have identified two discrete sources contributing to the contaminant plume, indicating the potential of δ(2)H to discriminate whether a compound is of industrial origin, or whether a compound is formed as a daughter product during degradation.

  17. Methodology for applying monitored natural attenuation to petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground-water systems with examples from South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Frank H.; Robertson, John F.; Landmeyer, James E.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2000-01-01

    These two sites illustrate how the efficiency of natural attenuation processes acting on petroleum hydrocarbons can be systematically evaluated using hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiologic methods.  These methods, in turn, can be used to assess the role that the natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons can play in achieving overall site remediation.

  18. LMWOA (low molecular weight organic acid) exudation by salt marsh plants: Natural variation and response to Cu contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2010-06-01

    This work aimed to evaluate, in vitro, the capability of roots of two salt marsh plants to release low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) and to ascertain whether Cu contamination would stimulate or not organic acids exudation. The sea rush Juncus maritimus and the sea-club rush Scirpus maritimus, both from the lower Douro river estuary (NW Portugal), were used. Plants were collected seasonally, four times a year in 2004, during low tide. After sampling, plant roots were washed for removal of adherent particles and immersed for 2 h in a solution that matched salinity (3) and pH (7.5) of the pore water from the same location to obtain plant exudates. In one of the seasons, similar experiments were carried out but spiking the solution with different amounts of Cu in order to embrace the range between 0 and 1600 nM. In the final solutions as well as in sediment pore water LMWOAs were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Plants were able to release, in a short period of time, relatively high amounts of LMWOAs (oxalate, citrate, malate, malonate, and succinate). In the sediment pore water oxalate, succinate and acetate were also detected. Therefore, plant roots probably contributed to the presence of some of these organic compounds in pore water. Exudation differed between the plant species and also showed some seasonally variation, particularly for S. maritimus. The release of oxalate by J. maritimus increased with Cu increase in the media. However, exudation of the other LMWOAs did not seem to be stimulated by Cu contamination in the media. This fact is compatible with the existence of alternative internal mechanisms for Cu detoxification, as denoted by the fact that in media contaminated with Cu both plant species accumulated relatively high amounts (29-83%) of the initially dissolved Cu. This study expands our knowledge on the contribution of globally dominant salt marsh plants to the release of LMWOAs into the environment.

  19. Oxygen Isotopes for Lavas from Kilauea's Ongoing, 30-year old Puu Oo Eruption: Evidence for the Nature of the Mantle Source and Crustal Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. O.; Eiler, J. M.; Pietruszka, A. J.; Lynn, K.

    2013-12-01

    % contamination. This contamination is likely to have occurred in the Puu Oo reservoir and did not have any obvious effect on other geochemical parameters. These results demonstrate the importance of oxygen exchange and/or contamination even during a voluminous (>4 km3), high effusion rate eruption like Puu Oo (0.10-0.25 km3/year; Poland et al., 2012, Nature Geosci.).

  20. Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater remediation with simulated permeable reactive barrier (PRB) filled with natural pyrite as reactive material: Environmental factors and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Mou, Haiyan; Chen, Liqun; Mirza, Zakaria A; Liu, Li

    2015-11-15

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are efficient technologies for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater, the effectiveness of which greatly depends on the reactive media filled. Natural pyrite is an iron sulfide material with a very low content of iron and sulfur, and a mining waste which is a potential material for Cr(VI) immobilization. In this study, we conducted a series of batch tests to research the effects of typical environmental factors on Cr(VI) removal and also simulated PRB filled with natural pyrite to investigate its effectiveness, in order to find a both environmentally and economically fine method for groundwater remediation. Batch tests showed that pH had the significant impact on Cr(VI) removal with an apparently higher efficiency under acidic conditions, and dissolved oxygen (DO) would inhibit Cr(VI) reduction; a relatively high initial Cr(VI) concentration would decrease the rate of Cr(VI) sorption; ionic strength and natural organic matter resulted in no significant effects on Cr(VI) removal. Column tests demonstrated that the simulated PRB with natural pyrite as the reactive media was considerably effective for removing Cr(VI) from groundwater, with a sorption capability of 0.6222 mg Cr per gram of natural pyrite at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 10mg/L at pH 5.5 in an anoxic environment.

  1. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on heavy metal accumulation of maize grown in a naturally contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa Yuan; Lin, Xian Gui; Yin, Rui

    2007-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to study heavy metal (HM) phytoaccumulation from soil contaminated with Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd by maize (Zea mays L.) inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (AMF). Two AM fungal inocula--MI containing only one AM fungal strain (Glomus caledonium 90036) and MII consisting of Gigaspora margarita ZJ37, Gigaspora decipens ZJ38, Scutellospora gilmori ZJ39, Acaulospora spp., and Glomus spp.--were applied to the soil under unsterilized conditions. The control received no mycorrhizal inoculation. The maize plants were harvested after 10 wk of growth. MI-treated plants had higher mycorrhizal colonization than MII-treated plants. Both MI and MII increased P concentrations in roots, but not in shoots. Neither MI nor MII had significant effects on shoot or root dry weight (DW). Compared with the control, shoot Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations were decreased by MI but increased by MII. Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd uptake into shoots and roots all increased in MII-treated plants, while in MI-treated plants Cu, Zn, and Pb uptake into shoots and Cd uptake into roots decreased but Cu, Zn, and Pb uptake into roots and Cd into shoots increased. MII was more effective than MI in promoting HM extraction efficiencies. The results indicate that MII can benefit HMphytoextraction and, therefore, show potential in the phytoremediation of HM-contaminated soils.

  2. Milk processing quality of suckled/milked goats: effects of milk accumulation interval and milking regime.

    PubMed

    Högberg, M; Dahlborn, K; Hydbring-Sandberg, E; Hartmann, E; Andrén, A

    2016-05-01

    Milk with a high concentration of fat and casein is required for cheese production, and these components have a major impact for both quality and yield of the curd. Recent observations have shown that suckling can elevate milk fat concentration in goats and our aim was therefore to check the hypothesis that animal welfare and cheese-processing properties of goat milk could be optimised by appropriate management of suckled/milked goats. Twelve Swedish dairy goats were kept together with one kid each in 4 different mixed management-systems (milking combined with partial suckling) in a cross-over design. Two milk accumulation intervals were tested; Short = dams and kids were together for 16 h (T16) and Long = ; dams and kids were together for 8 h (T8 h). In addition, two milking regimes were used; Suckled Before Milking = S and Milked Before Suckling = M. Milk accumulation interval referred to how long dams and kids were separated. The milk yield available for processing (milk offtake), was weighed and analysed from each milking occasion and the suckled milk yield was estimated by a weigh-suckle-weigh method (WSW) in combination with observing the suckling behaviour during the free suckling periods. Milking managements, such as 'suckling before milking (S)', increased milk fat concentration compared to milking before suckling (M) and 'Short accumulation treatments (T16)' gave higher milk fat, casein concentration and individual curd yield (%) compared to the 'Long accumulation treatment (T8)'. The total individual curd yield (g) was the same despite treatment, but the animal welfare was most likely higher in T16 where dams and kids spent more time together.

  3. Comparative performance of isolation methods using Preston broth, Bolton broth and their modifications for the detection of Campylobacter spp. from naturally contaminated fresh and frozen raw poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Seliwiorstow, T; De Zutter, L; Houf, K; Botteldoorn, N; Baré, J; Van Damme, I

    2016-10-03

    The performance of different isolation methods was evaluated for the detection of Campylobacter from naturally contaminated raw poultry meat. Therefore, fresh and frozen poultry meat samples were analysed using the standard procedure (ISO 10272-1:2006), enrichment in Preston broth, and enrichment in modified Bolton broth (supplemented with (i) potassium clavulanate (C-BB), (ii) triclosan (T-BB), (iii) polymyxin B (P-BB)). The enrichment cultures were streaked onto both modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) and RAPID'Campylobacter agar (RCA). Moreover, direct plating on mCCDA and RCA was performed to quantify Campylobacter. In total, 33 out of 59 fresh retail meat samples (55.9%) were Campylobacter positive. For both fresh and frozen poultry meat samples, enrichment in Bolton broth (ISO 10272-1:2006) resulted in a higher number of positive samples than enrichment in Preston broth. Supplementation of Bolton broth with potassium clavulanate (C-BB) and triclosan (T-BB) enhanced the Campylobacter recovery from fresh poultry meat compared to non-supplemented Bolton broth, although the use of C-BB was less applicable than T-BB for Campylobacter recovery from frozen samples. Additionally, the use of RCA resulted in a higher isolation rate compared to mCCDA. The present study demonstrates the impact of culture medium on the recovery of Campylobacter from fresh and frozen naturally contaminated poultry meat samples and can support laboratories in choosing the most appropriate culturing method to detect Campylobacter.

  4. Aflatoxin M1 Levels in Raw Milk, Pasteurised Milk and Infant Formula

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sharaf S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of contamination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk samples collected from the Jordanian market was investigated by using the competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A total of 175 samples were collected during 2014-2015. All tested samples were contaminated with various levels of AFM1 ranging from 9.71 to 288.68 ng/kg. The concentration of AFM1 in 66% of fresh milk samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union (50 ng/kg) and 23% higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the US (500 ng/kg). Percentages of contaminated raw cow, sheep, goat and camel milk exceeding the European tolerance limit were 60, 85, 75 and 0%, respectively. Of AFM1 contaminated pasteurised cow milk samples, 12% exceeded the European tolerance limit with a range of contamination between 14.60 and 216.78 ng/kg. For infant formula samples, the average concentration of AFM1 was 120.26 ng/kg (range from 16.55 to 288.68 ng/kg), the concentration of AFM1 in 85% of infant formula samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union and the US (25 ng/kg). PMID:27853711

  5. Aflatoxin M1 Levels in Raw Milk, Pasteurised Milk and Infant Formula.

    PubMed

    Omar, Sharaf S

    2016-06-03

    The incidence of contamination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk samples collected from the Jordanian market was investigated by using the competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A total of 175 samples were collected during 2014-2015. All tested samples were contaminated with various levels of AFM1 ranging from 9.71 to 288.68 ng/kg. The concentration of AFM1 in 66% of fresh milk samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union (50 ng/kg) and 23% higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the US (500 ng/kg). Percentages of contaminated raw cow, sheep, goat and camel milk exceeding the European tolerance limit were 60, 85, 75 and 0%, respectively. Of AFM1 contaminated pasteurised cow milk samples, 12% exceeded the European tolerance limit with a range of contamination between 14.60 and 216.78 ng/kg. For infant formula samples, the average concentration of AFM1 was 120.26 ng/kg (range from 16.55 to 288.68 ng/kg), the concentration of AFM1 in 85% of infant formula samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union and the US (25 ng/kg).

  6. Simulations of groundwater flow, transport, and age in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a study of transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Vulnerability to contamination from manmade and natural sources can be characterized by the groundwater-age distribution measured in a supply well and the associated implications for the source depths of the withdrawn water. Coupled groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the transport of the geochemical age-tracers carbon-14, tritium, and three chlorofluorocarbon species to public-supply wells in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A separate, regional-scale simulation of transport of carbon-14 that used the flow-field computed by a previously documented regional groundwater flow model was calibrated and used to specify the initial concentrations of carbon-14 in the local-scale transport model. Observations of the concentrations of each of the five chemical species, in addition to water-level observations and measurements of intra-borehole flow within a public-supply well, were used to calibrate parameters of the local-scale groundwater flow and transport models. The calibrated groundwater flow model simulates the mixing of “young” groundwater, which entered the groundwater flow system after 1950 as recharge at the water table, with older resident groundwater that is more likely associated with natural contaminants. Complexity of the aquifer system in the zone of transport between the water table and public-supply well screens was simulated with a geostatistically generated stratigraphic realization based upon observed lithologic transitions at borehole control locations. Because effective porosity was simulated as spatially uniform, the simulated age tracers are more efficiently transported through the portions of the simulated aquifer with relatively higher simulated hydraulic conductivity. Non-pumping groundwater wells with long screens that connect aquifer intervals having different hydraulic heads can provide alternate pathways for contaminant transport that are faster than the advective transport through the aquifer material. Simulation of

  7. Arsenic in soils and plants of woodland regenerated on an arsenic-contaminated substrate: a sustainable natural remediation?

    PubMed

    Madejón, Paula; Lepp, Nicholas W

    2007-07-01

    Plant As accumulation at three As-polluted sites where spontaneous re-vegetation has taken place is examined. Each site had a different source of soil As (coal fly ash, LeBlanc process waste, canal dredging). Plant analysis indicates that soil-plant As transfer is poor at each site. Any mobile As is retained in root tissues, with little transfer to shoots. Bryophytes, pteridophytes, herbaceous and woody plants sampled at each site predominantly showed As concentrations of <3 mg kg(-1) dry wt, whilst total soil As ranged between 50 and 220 mg kg(-1) dry wt. Risk associated with food chain transfer at these sites is low when compared to other routes such as direct ingestion/inhalation of As-contaminated particulates re-entrained from an unvegetated or unstable substrate.

  8. Effects of milk powders in milk chocolate.

    PubMed

    Liang, B; Hartel, R W

    2004-01-01

    The physical characteristics of milk powders used in chocolate can have significant impact on the processing conditions needed to make that chocolate and the physical and organoleptic properties of the finished product. Four milk powders with different particle characteristics (size, shape, density) and "free" milk fat levels (easily extracted with organic solvent) were evaluated for their effect on the processing conditions and characteristics of chocolates in which they were used. Many aspects of chocolate manufacture and storage (tempering conditions, melt rheology, hardness, bloom stability) were dependent on the level of free milk fat in the milk powder. However, particle characteristics of the milk powder also influenced the physical and sensory properties of the final products.

  9. Estimation of low bacterial concentration: Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Broseta, Stéphanie; Diot, Annabelle; Bastian, Suzanne; Rivière, Jacques; Cerf, Olivier

    2003-01-15

    A time-series bacteriological analysis has been carried out on milk collected on farms from 1997 to 2001 by a plant producing raw milk soft cheese, with the purpose of assessing the time course of the presence/absence of Listeria monocytogenes. A standard data collection procedure was used, in which farms were tested on a monthly or biweekly basis and 2-3 days after the detection of milk tanker contamination. This procedure yielded low figures for contamination frequencies. The average value and the median of the monthly prevalence of farms detected positive for L. monocytogenes were 2.4 and 0%, respectively. A seasonal effect (with peaks in winter) was observed. Between 1997 and 2001, there was no significant decrease of contamination rates, in spite of the efforts on the contaminated farms. Over the last year of the study (from March 2000 to February 2001), a new data collection procedure was implemented that allowed much better detection of sporadic occurrences. Milk samples were collected from the bulk tank of each participating farm just before pick-up, then stored and subsequently analysed whenever the milk tanker was found contaminated. The average value and the median of the monthly prevalence of positive farms were found equal to 7.7 and 0%, respectively (for a mean prevalence of L. monocytogenes in the milk tanker of 3.2%). These results confirm that farm milk contamination is, most often, a sporadic event In addition to this prevalence study, contamination levels were quantified by enumerating L. monocytogenes using direct plating of small volumes of farm milk previously tested positive. Most often, these levels were extremely low. A simple simulation model shows that, when milk tankers were found positive, contamination levels in the corresponding bulk-tank milk are themselves very low (typically, below 3 L. monocytogenes per millilitre with most probable concentration 0.1 Colony Forming Unit (CFU)/ml and median ranging from 5.10(-2) to 0.1 CFU

  10. Maximizing the value of milk through separation technologies.

    PubMed

    Huffman, L M; Harper, W J

    1999-10-01

    Milk is the source of a wide range of proteins that deliver nutrition to the most promising new food products today. Isolated milk proteins are natural, trusted food ingredients with excellent functionality. Separation technologies provide the basis for adding value to milk through the production of proteins that provide the food industry with ingredients to meet specific needs, not possible with milk itself or with other ingredients. The major milk proteins, casein and whey protein, can be isolated by manipulating their compositional and physical properties and then by using various separation technologies to recover the proteins. Additionally, they can be processed in various ways to create a wide range of ingredients with diverse functional characteristics. These ingredients include milk protein concentrate, milk protein isolate, casein, caseinate, whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, hydrolysates, and various milk fractions. Within each of these ingredient categories, there is further differentiation according to the functional and nutritional requirements of the finished food. Adding value to milk by expanding from consumer products to ingredients often requires different technologies, marketing structure and distribution channels. The worldwide market for both consumer products and ingredients from milk continues to grow. Technology often precedes market demand. Methods for the commercial production of individual milk components now exist, and in the future as clinical evidence develops, the opportunity for adding value to dairy products as functional foods with health benefits may be achieved. The research and development of today will be the basis of those value-added milk products for tomorrow.

  11. 9 CFR 94.16 - Milk and milk products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Milk and milk products. 94.16 Section... RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.16 Milk and milk products. (a) The following milk products are exempt from the... for importation into the United States under this part; (2) Butter; and (3) Butteroil. (b) Milk...

  12. Combined steam-ultrasound treatment of 2 seconds achieves significant high aerobic count and Enterobacteriaceae reduction on naturally contaminated food boxes, crates, conveyor belts, and meat knives.

    PubMed

    Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Larsen, Annette Baltzer; Krebs, Niels

    2015-02-01

    Food contact surfaces require rigorous sanitation procedures for decontamination, although these methods very often fail to efficiently clean and disinfect surfaces that are visibly contaminated with food residues and possible biofilms. In this study, the results of a short treatment (1 to 2 s) of combined steam (95°C) and ultrasound (SonoSteam) of industrial fish and meat transportation boxes and live-chicken transportation crates naturally contaminated with food and fecal residues were investigated. Aerobic counts of 5.0 to 6.0 log CFU/24 cm(2) and an Enterobacteriaceae spp. level of 2.0 CFU/24 cm(2) were found on the surfaces prior to the treatment. After 1 s of treatment, the aerobic counts were significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced, and within 2 s, reductions below the detection limit (<10 CFU) were reached. Enterobacteriaceae spp. were reduced to a level below the detection limit with only 1 s of treatment. Two seconds of steam-ultrasound treatment was also applied on two different types of plastic modular conveyor belts with hinge pins and one type of flat flexible rubber belt, all visibly contaminated with food residues. The aerobic counts of 3.0 to 5.0 CFU/50 cm(2) were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, while Enterobacteriaceae spp. were reduced to a level below the detection limit. Industrial meat knives were contaminated with aerobic counts of 6.0 log CFU/5 cm(2) on the handle and 5.2 log CFU/14 cm(2) on the steel. The level of Enterobacteriaceae spp. contamination was approximately 2.5 log CFU on the handle and steel. Two seconds of steam-ultrasound treatment reduced the aerobic counts and Enterobacteriaceae spp. to levels below the detection limit on both handle and steel. This study shows that the steam-ultrasound treatment may be an effective replacement for disinfection processes and that it can be used for continuous disinfection at fast process lines. However, the treatment may not be able to replace efficient cleaning processes used to remove high

  13. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy.

  14. Selenium content of milk and milk products of Turkey. II.

    PubMed

    Yanardağ, R; Orak, H

    1999-04-01

    Selenium content of 1028 milk and milk products of Turkey are presented in this study. The selenium content of human milk (colostrum, transitional, and mature milk), various kinds of milk [cow, sheep, goat, buffalo, paper boxes (3%, 1.5%, 0.012% fat), bottled milk, condensed milk (10% fat), mineral added milk (1.6%), and banana, strawberry, and chocolate milk] and milk products (kefir, yogurt, Ayran, various cheese, coffee cream, ice cream, butter, margarine, milk powder, and fruit yogurt) in Turkey were determined by a spectrofluorometric method. The selenium levels of cow milks collected from 57 cities in Turkey were also determined. Selenium levels in cow milk varied with geographical location in Turkey and were found to be lowest for Van and highest for Aksaray. The results [milk (cow, sheep, goat, buffalo and human) and milks products] were compared with literature data from different countries.

  15. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Francesco; Gherarducci, Giulia; Marchi, Benedetta; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics. In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed. In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible. PMID:19578503

  16. Milk phospholipids: Organic milk and milk rich in conjugated linoleic acid compared with conventional milk.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, T; Gayoso, L; Rodríguez-Otero, J L

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the phospholipid content of conventional milk with that of organic milk and milk rich in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The membrane enclosing the fat globules of milk is composed, in part, of phospholipids, which have properties of interest for the development of so-called functional foods and technologically novel ingredients. They include phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), and the sphingophospholipid sphingomyelin (SM). Milk from organically managed cows contains higher levels of vitamins, antioxidants, and unsaturated fatty acids than conventionally produced milk, but we know of no study with analogous comparisons of major phospholipid contents. In addition, the use of polyunsaturated-lipid-rich feed supplement (extruded linseed) has been reported to increase the phospholipid content of milk. Because supplementation with linseed and increased unsaturated fatty acid content are the main dietary modifications used for production of CLA-rich milk, we investigated whether these modifications would lead to this milk having higher phospholipid content. We used HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection to determine PE, PI, PC, PS, and SM contents in 16 samples of organic milk and 8 samples of CLA-rich milk, in each case together with matching reference samples of conventionally produced milk taken on the same days and in the same geographical areas as the organic and CLA-rich samples. Compared with conventional milk and milk fat, organic milk and milk fat had significantly higher levels of all the phospholipids studied. This is attributable to the differences between the 2 systems of milk production, among which the most influential are probably differences in diet and physical exercise. The CLA-rich milk fat had significantly higher levels of PI, PS, and PC than conventional milk fat, which is also attributed to dietary differences: rations for

  17. Occurrence of different trichothecenes and deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside in naturally and artificially contaminated Danish cereal grains and whole maize plants.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, P H; Nielsen, K F; Ghorbani, F; Spliid, N H; Nielsen, G C; Jørgensen, L N

    2012-08-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) can occur in cereals conjugated to glucose and probably also to other sugars. These conjugates, which are often referred to as "masked mycotoxins", will not be detected with routine analytical techniques. Furthermore, it is suspected that the parent toxin may again be released after hydrolysis in the digestive tracts of animals and humans. Today, our knowledge of the occurrence of these compounds in cereal grains is limited. In this paper, a LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of DON, deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside (DON-3-glucoside), 3 acetyl-DON, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, diacetoxyscirpenol, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin in naturally (n = 48) and artificially (n = 30) contaminated cereal grains (wheat, barley, oat, rye triticale) is reported. The method has also been applied to whole fresh maize plant intended for production of maize silage (n = 10). The samples were collected from the harvest years 2006-2010, The results show that DON-3-glucoside and DON co-occurred in cereal grains and, especially in several of the highly contaminated samples, the concentration of the glucoside can be relatively high, corresponding to over 37 % of the DON concentration. The DON-3-glucoside levels in both the naturally and in the artificially grain inoculated with Fusarium were second only to DON, and were generally higher than those of the other tested trichothecenes, which were found at low concentrations in most samples, in many cases even below the detection limit of the method. This argues for the importance of taking DON-3-glucoside into account in the ongoing discussion within the European Community concerning exposure re-evaluations for setting changed values for the tolerable intake for DON. Our results indicate that, in the naturally contaminated grains and in the Fusarium infested cereal grains (winter and spring wheat, oat, triticale), the concentration level of DON-3-glucoside is positively

  18. A wireless electronic monitoring system for securing milk from farm to processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip; Hopper, Lindsay; Thompson, Chris; Alexander, Suraj M.; Crist, William; Payne, Fred; Stombaugh, Tim; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan; Luck, Brian; Tabayehnejab, Nasrin

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services have targeted bulk food contamination as a focus for attention. The contamination of bulk food poses a high consequence threat to our society. Milk transport falls into three of the 17 targeted NIPP (National Infrastructure Protection Plan) sectors including agriculture-food, public health, and commercial facilities. Minimal security safeguards have been developed for bulk milk transport. The current manual methods of securing milk are paper intensive and prone to errors. The bulk milk transportation sector requires a security enhancement that will both reduce recording errors and enable normal transport activities to occur while providing security against unauthorized access. Milk transportation companies currently use voluntary seal programs that utilize plastic, numbered seals on milk transport tank openings. Our group has developed a Milk Transport Security System which is an electromechanical access control and communication system that assures the secure transport of milk, milk samples, milk data, and security data between locations and specifically between dairy farms, transfer stations, receiving stations, and milk plants. It includes a security monitoring system installed on the milk transport tank, a hand held device, optional printers, data server, and security evaluation software. The system operates automatically and requires minimal or no attention by the bulk milk hauler/sampler. The system is compatible with existing milk transport infrastructure, and has the support of the milk producers, milk transportation companies, milk marketing agencies, and dairy processors. The security protocol developed is applicable for transport of other bulk foods both nationally and internationally. This system adds significantly to the national security infrastructure for bulk food transport. We are currently demonstrating the system in central Kentucky and will report on the results

  19. Effects of Long-Term Acid-Mine Drainage Contamination on Diversity and Activity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a Natural Salt Marsh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, J. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    Constructed wetlands have been studied as sites or analogs for in situ bioremediation of metal contaminants from acid mine drainage (AMD) or industrial sources (e.g. Webb et al. 1998). Wetlands bioremediation necessarily invokes the ubiquity and robustness of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to sequester dissolved metals into various poorly soluble metal-sulfides (e.g. PbS, CdS). However, few studies of natural wetlands under long-term ecological forcing by AMD or other contaminant sources are available for context. We are investigating the microbial diversity, mineralogy and geochemistry of a highly contaminated salt marsh along the East Central San Francisco Bay. For nearly a half-century, areas within this marsh have received acidic and/or metal-rich groundwaters from near-surface pyrite tailings (transported there from Iron Mountain Mine, near Redding, CA) and local industrial sources (e.g. paint and explosives manufacturers). Sediment cores (30-40 cm long) were taken from six contaminated sites in the marsh with pH range of ˜2 to ˜8. Previous analyses (URS Corp. 2001) reported As, Cd, Cu, Se, Zn, and Pb present in sediments at extremely high concentrations (100s of ppm), yet our ICP-AES analyses of pore waters showed only As present at concentrations of 10-50 ppb. We infer, from high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) studies of biogenic (SRB biofilm) ZnS (Moreau et al. 2003, in review) and marsh sediments, that contaminant metals have been sequestered into aggregates of nanocrystalline metal-sulfides. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS) analyses of pore-water sulfate and sedimentary sulfides allow resolution of contributions to dissolved sulfate and sulfide from tailings oxidation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Sulfate analyses from subsections of three cores (pH 2-3, 6-7, 7-8, respectively) all yield δ 34S values consistent with bacterial sulfate reduction. We note that all three cores also contain very fine

  20. Trace element availability and plant growth in a mine-spill-contaminated soil under assisted natural remediation II. Plants.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Madejón, Engracia; Burgos, Pilar; Cabrera, Francisco

    2006-06-15

    In this second part, we evaluated the effects of different amendments on plant growth (Agrostis stolonifera L.), and trace element accumulation and removal by plants in a trace element (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) contaminated soil. Description of the various treatments is given in Part I of this work. The plants were grown for consecutive periods (2002, 2003, 2004), 5 months each and harvested twice in each period. Results showed that plant growth was enhanced and trace element concentrations in plant were reduced in SL, MWC, BC and LEO treatments in the first period. No significant differences were observed in subsequent periods. This seemed to be related with changes in soil pH. Removal of trace elements was higher in SL, MWC, BC and LEO treatments due to higher biomass production in the first period. In following years no significant differences between treatments were found. Data from Part I of this study were also used to compare trace element bioavailable concentrations extracted with 0.01 M CaCl2 and 0.05 M EDTA with trace elements in plant. We observed that 0.01 M CaCl2 was more suitable for determination of bioavailable concentrations and that extraction with EDTA overestimated biovailability of trace elements in amended treatments, especially in those where composts were added.

  1. Natural Attenuation Of Creosote Contamination In A Tidally Forced Anaerobic Aquifer: A Tracer Study Using C14-naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchin, M.; Lesser, L.; Smith, L.; Barker, J. F.; Butler, B.; Aravena, R.; Beckie, R.

    Historic practices at a wood-preserving facility along a major river in the lower main- land of British Columbia have contaminated the underlying tidally forced anaerobic aquifer. Creosote from the source zone, found mostly as an immobile separate phase, is dissolving and forming an aqueous-phase plume, which is discharging from the aquifer at the river bottom. Previous studies could only explain the plume shape by invoking an attenuation process such as degradation or sorption. A careful study of the on-shore portion of the aquifer using in-situ and laboratory microcosms could not detect any measurable degradation. Similarly, sorption could not explain the plume shape. Here we present the results of a tracer study conducted in the off-shore portion of the aquifer. C14-labeled naphthalene, bromide and deuterated water were intro- duced into the portion of the aquifer beneath the river. Water samples were collected and analyzed for bromide, C-14 naphthalene and C14-labeled CO2, a likely degra- dation product. While C-14 CO2 has been detected, the levels are low, suggesting a very slow degradation process. The study is unique in several respects, including the methodologies used to sample the aquifer beneath the river and the use of a radio- labeled tracer in the field.

  2. Effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, serum chemistry, and hematology of horses, and the efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Raymond, S L; Smith, T K; Swamy, H V L N

    2003-09-01

    The feeding of Fusarium mycotoxin-contaminated grains adversely affects the performance of swine and poultry. Very little information is available, however, on adverse effects associated with feeding these mycotoxin-contaminated grains on the performance of horses. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations, serum chemistry, and hematology of horses. A polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GM polymer) was also tested for efficacy in preventing Fusarium mycotoxicoses. Nine mature, nonexercising, light, mixed-breed mares were assigned randomly to one of three dietary treatments for 21 d. The horses were randomly reassigned and the experiment was subsequently replicated in time following a 14-d washout interval. Feed consumed each day was a combination of up to 2.8 kg of concentrates and 5 kg of mixed timothy/alfalfa hay. The concentrates fed included the following: 1) control, 2) blend of contaminated grains (36% contaminated wheat and 53% contaminated corn), and 3) blend of contaminated grains + 0.2% GM polymer. Diets containing contaminated grains averaged 15.0 ppm of deoxynivalenol, 0.8 ppm of 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 9.7 ppm of fusaric acid, and 2.0 ppm of zearalenone. Feed intake by all horses fed contaminated grains was reduced (P < 0.001) compared with controls throughout the experiment. Supplementation of 0.2% GM polymer to the contaminated diet increased (P = 0.004) feed intake of horses compared with those fed the unsupplemented contaminated diet. Serum activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase were higher (P = 0.047 and 0.027) in horses fed the diet containing contaminated grain compared with those fed the control diet on d 7 and 14, but not on d 21 (P = 0.273). Supplementation of GM polymer to the contaminated diet decreased (P < 0.05) serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activities of horses compared with those

  3. Estrone and estrone sulfate concentrations in milk and milk fractions.

    PubMed

    Macrina, Ann L; Ott, Troy L; Roberts, Robert F; Kensinger, Ronald S

    2012-07-01

    Dairy products naturally contain estrogens, and some consumer groups contend these estrogens cause adverse health effects. The objectives of this research were to characterize estrone (E(1)) and estrone sulfate (E(1)S) concentrations in milk from a large number of individual cows, in skim and fat fractions of milk, and in retail milk to provide food and nutrition practitioners with information to estimate potential consumption. Milk was from Holstein cows. Data are presented as means and standard deviations. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences in E(1) and E(1)S content of whole milk and its skim and fat fractions. Mean E(1) and E(1)S concentrations (n=173 cows) were 7.0±12.7 and 46.7±62.1 pg/mL (25.89±46.96 and 172.74±229.71 pmol/L), respectively. Analysis of milk fractions (n=50 samples) demonstrated that 55% of E(1) and 14% of E(1)S were associated with the fat fraction with the remainder associated with the skim fraction. Concentrations of E(1) and E(1)S in pasteurized-homogenized whole milk (n=8) averaged 10.3±0.6 and 85.9±7.3 pg/mL (38.09±2.22 and 317.74±27.00 pmol/L), respectively. Production rates of E(1) plus estradiol in human beings range from 54,000 to 630,000 ng/day. US Food and Drug administration guidelines state that no physiologic effects occur when consumption is ≤1% of the endogenous quantities produced by the segment of the population with the lowest daily production. This threshold value for intake would be 540 ng/day. Estimated total E(1) intake from three servings of whole milk was 68 ng/day, which represents 0.01% to 0.1% of daily production rates in human beings. These findings support levels below the current guidelines for safe consumption.

  4. Methylene blue removal from contaminated waters using heterogeneous catalytic ozonation promoted by natural zeolite: mechanism and kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Valdés, H; Tardón, R F; Zaror, C A

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents experimental results of a methylene blue removal system based on heterogeneous catalytic ozonation in the presence of natural zeolite. The effect of pH (2-10) and the presence of radical scavengers (acetate ions) on homogeneous and heterogeneous ozonation systems are assessed at laboratory scale. Results show that heterogeneous catalytic ozonation using natural zeolite increases methylene blue removal rate with respect to the single ozonation process at all pH values. The inhibitory effect of free-radical scavengers is impaired by zeolite, suggesting that methylene blue oxidation reactions take place mainly on the zeolite surface. The increase in methylene blue removal rate could be related to ozone interaction with hydroxyl groups present on the zeolite surface (S--OH2(+), S--OH, S--O(-)), which plays a key role in the reaction mechanism.

  5. Milk Allergy in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... which normally fights infections, overreacts to proteins in cow's milk (the basis for most commercial baby formulas). ... days to weeks after they're first given cow milk-based formula. Breastfed infants have a lower ...

  6. Breastfeeding and Breast Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information​ ​​Breastfeeding, also called ...

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  8. Cow's milk - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002448.htm Cow's milk - infants To use the sharing features on this ... old, you should not feed your baby cow's milk, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). ...

  9. Groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Haimes, Y. . Dept. of Systems Engineering)

    1986-01-01

    The subject of these conference proceedings is the groundwater contamination. It is by nature multifarious - dealing with detection and monitoring, prevention, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of contaminated groundwater - it intrinsically encompasses myriad disciplines, and it involves all levels of government. Also, the subject of groundwater contamination is complex because decisions concerning groundwater pollution control that are scientifically sound, technologically within the state of the art, economically feasible, politically tractable, legally sustainable, socially acceptable, morally accountable, and organizationally implementable must be grounded on appropriate information and intelligence bases in their respective areas - science, technology, economics, politics, the law, society, ethics, and management. Indeed, the human health effects (e.g., cancer, damage to the central nervous system, liver and kidney damage) and non-health effects (economic hardship to industry, agriculture, households, and municipalities; environmental impacts; social impacts) necessitate that we, as a society, address in a somber way the following variations of the same question: How safe is safe enough How clean is safe enough The enormous cost - in billions of dollars over the next decade - that various studies project for the prevention, detection and monitoring, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of groundwater contamination make an answer to these questions even more urgent. There are sixteen papers in these proceedings.

  10. Biosynthesis of beauvericin and enniatins in vitro by wheat Fusarium species and natural grain contamination in an area of central Italy.

    PubMed

    Covarelli, L; Beccari, G; Prodi, A; Generotti, S; Etruschi, F; Meca, G; Juan, C; Mañes, J

    2015-04-01

    Contamination of wheat grain by beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENs) is a global emerging mycotoxicological food problem. In this study, strains of Fusarium avenaceum (FA), Fusarium poae (FP), Fusarium equiseti and Fusarium sporotrichioides, all potential BEA and EN producers, isolated from 162 grain samples of durum and soft wheat harvested in 2009 and 2010 collected in an area of central Italy, were preliminarily screened for the presence of the esyn1 gene, encoding the multifunctional enzyme enniatin-synthetase for the detection of potential hexadepsipeptide-producing isolates. All positive isolates were tested for their ability to biosynthesize BEA and ENs in vitro. In addition, all wheat samples were investigated for the natural presence of BEA and ENs (ENA, ENA1, ENB, ENB1). All FA and FP strains resulted to be positive for the presence of the esyn1 gene. All FA strains showed the ability to biosynthesize ENs in vitro but not BEA. Conversely, all FP strains resulted to be BEA producers and some of them co-biosynthesized ENs. A remarkable presence of "emerging" mycotoxins was found in the grains, particularly ENs. Co-contamination by BEA and ENs also occurred. This study gives an important contribution to assess the risk posed by mycotoxigenic fungi and their mycotoxins in food.

  11. Characterization of the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in groundwater contaminated with (60)Co and (137)Cs using ultrafiltration, Solid Phase Extraction and fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Caron, François; Siemann, Stefan; Riopel, Rémi

    2014-12-01

    Spot samples of shallow groundwaters have been taken between the years 2004 and 2010 near a site formerly used for the dispersal of radioactive liquid wastes. Three sampling points, one clean (upstream), and two downstream of the contamination source, were processed by ultrafiltration (5000 Da cut-off) and Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) to determine the association of selected artificial radionuclides ((60)Co, (137)Cs) with Natural Organic Matter (NOM). The last two sampling episodes (2008 and 2010) also benefited from fluorescence analysis to determine the major character of the NOM. The fluorescence signals are reported as humic-like, fulvic-like and protein-like, which are used to characterize the different NOM types. The NOM from the clean site comprised mostly fine material, whereas the colloidal content (retained by ultrafiltration) was higher (e.g., 15-40% of the Total Organic Carbon - TOC). Most of the 137Cs was present in the colloidal fraction, whereas (60)Co was found in the filtered fraction. Fluorescence analysis, on the other hand, indicated a contrasting behavior between the clean and contaminated sites, with a dominance of protein-like material, a feature usually associated with human impacts. Finally, SPE removed almost quantitatively the protein-like material (>90%), whereas it removed a much smaller fraction of the (137)Cs (<28%). This finding indicates that the (137)Cs preferential binding occurs with a fraction other than the protein-like NOM, likely the fulvic-like or humic-like portion.

  12. Mercury in hares organs (Lepus europaeus Pallas) in the vicinity of the mercury-contaminated natural gas treatment plant in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Špirić, Zdravko; Srebočan, Emil; Crnić, Andreja Prevendar

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades (1990-2008), as part of a comprehensive monitoring of the eco-system, hares were collected in the vicinity of the mercury contaminated natural gas production and treatment plant Molve, Croatia. Their organs (muscle, liver, kidney and brain) were analyzed for total mercury concentration by cold vapor AAS. The range of the median mercury concentration values (wet weight) in hares organs were 0.001-0.005, 0.007-0.045, 0.022-0.126 and 0.0006-0.015 μg/g for muscle, liver, kidney and brain, respectively. The results of mercury measurements in hares organs during the period of last twenty years demonstrate a small but constant decline in concentration values. Comparing the results obtained in this study with results published in available data and literature on mercury concentration in hare's tissue it can be concluded that area investigated in this research belongs to low mercury contaminated region. Nevertheless, further eco-monitoring and mercury measurements in various hares organs are valuable and necessary and will be continued.

  13. 21 CFR 131.111 - Acidified milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION MILK AND CREAM Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream § 131.111 Acidified milk. (a... ingredients. Cream, milk, partially skimmed milk, or skim milk, used alone or in combination. (d)...

  14. Phage inhibition of Escherichia coli in ultrahigh-temperature-treated and raw milk.

    PubMed

    McLean, Sarah K; Dunn, Louise A; Palombo, Enzo A

    2013-11-01

    Escherichia coli can contaminate raw milk during the milking process or via environmental contamination in milk-processing facilities. Three bacteriophages, designated EC6, EC9, and EC11, were investigated for their ability to inhibit the growth of three strains of E. coli in ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) treated and raw bovine milk. A cocktail of the three phages completely inhibited E. coli ATCC 25922 and E. coli O127:H6 in UHT milk at 25 °C and under refrigeration temperatures (5-9 °C). The phage cocktail produced similar results in raw milk; however, E. coli ATCC 25922 and O127:H6 in raw milk controls also declined to below the level of detection at both temperatures. This observation indicated that competition by the raw milk microbiota might have contributed to the decline in viable E. coli cells. A cocktail containing EC6 and EC9 completely inhibited E. coli O5:H-, an enterohemorrhagic strain, in UHT milk at both temperatures. In raw milk, the phage cocktail initially inhibited growth of E. coli O5:H- but regrowth occurred following incubation for 9 h at 25 °C and 144 h at 5-9 °C. In contrast to the other E. coli strains, O5:H- was not inhibited in the raw milk controls. This study demonstrates that bacteriophages are effective biocontrol agents against E. coli host strains in UHT and raw bovine milk at various storage temperatures.

  15. Foodborne pathogens in milk and the dairy farm environment: food safety and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Oliver, S P; Jayarao, B M; Almeida, R A

    2005-01-01

    Milk and products derived from milk of dairy cows can harbor a variety of microorganisms and can be important sources of foodborne pathogens. The presence of foodborne pathogens in milk is due to direct contact with contaminated sources in the dairy farm environment and to excretion from the udder of an infected animal. Most milk is pasteurized, so why should the dairy industry be concerned about the microbial quality of bulk tank milk? There are several valid reasons, including (1) outbreaks of disease in humans have been traced to the consumption of unpasteurized milk and have also been traced back to pasteurized milk, (2) unpasteurized milk is consumed directly by dairy producers, farm employees, and their families, neighbors, and raw milk advocates, (3) unpasteurized milk is consumed directly by a large segment of the population via consumption of several types of cheeses manufactured from unpasteurized milk, (4) entry of foodborne pathogens via contaminated raw milk into dairy food processing plants can lead to persistence of these pathogens in biofilms, and subsequent contamination of processed milk products and exposure of consumers to pathogenic bacteria, (5) pasteurization may not destroy all foodborne pathogens in milk, and (6) inadequate or faulty pasteurization will not destroy all foodborne pathogens. Furthermore, pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes can survive and thrive in post-pasteurization processing environments, thus leading to recontamination of dairy products. These pathways pose a risk to the consumer from direct exposure to foodborne pathogens present in unpasteurized dairy products as well as dairy products that become re-contaminated after pasteurization. The purpose of this communication is to review literature published on the prevalence of bacterial foodborne pathogens in milk and in the dairy environment, and to discuss public health and food safety issues associated with foodborne pathogens found in the dairy environment

  16. Molecular Gene Profiling of Clostridium botulinum Group III and Its Detection in Naturally Contaminated Samples Originating from Various European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Woudstra, Cedric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Bano, Luca; Koene, Miriam; Sansonetti, Marie-Hélène; Desoutter, Denise; Hansbauer, Eva-Maria; Dorner, Martin B.; Dorner, Brigitte G.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of real-time PCR assays for genotyping Clostridium botulinum group III targeting the newly defined C. novyi sensu lato group; the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNH)-encoding gene ntnh; the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT)-encoding genes bont/C, bont/C/D, bont/D, and bont/D/C; and the flagellin (fliC) gene. The genetic diversity of fliC among C. botulinum group III strains resulted in the definition of five major subgroups named fliC-I to fliC-V. Investigation of fliC subtypes in 560 samples, with various European origins, showed that fliC-I was predominant and found exclusively in samples contaminated by C. botulinum type C/D, fliC-II was rarely detected, no sample was recorded as fliC-III or fliC-V, and only C. botulinum type D/C samples tested positive for fliC-IV. The lack of genetic diversity of the flagellin gene of C. botulinum type C/D would support a clonal spread of type C/D strains in different geographical areas. fliC-I to fliC-III are genetically related (87% to 92% sequence identity), whereas fliC-IV from C. botulinum type D/C is more genetically distant from the other fliC types (with only 50% sequence identity). These findings suggest fliC-I to fliC-III have evolved in a common environment and support a different genetic evolution for fliC-IV. A combination of the C. novyi sensu lato, ntnh, bont, and fliC PCR assays developed in this study allowed better characterization of C. botulinum group III and showed the group to be less genetically diverse than C. botulinum groups I and II, supporting a slow genetic evolution of the strains belonging to C. botulinum group III. PMID:25636839

  17. Molecular gene profiling of Clostridium botulinum group III and its detection in naturally contaminated samples originating from various European countries.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cedric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Bano, Luca; Koene, Miriam; Sansonetti, Marie-Hélène; Desoutter, Denise; Hansbauer, Eva-Maria; Dorner, Martin B; Dorner, Brigitte G; Fach, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    We report the development of real-time PCR assays for genotyping Clostridium botulinum group III targeting the newly defined C. novyi sensu lato group; the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNH)-encoding gene ntnh; the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT)-encoding genes bont/C, bont/C/D, bont/D, and bont/D/C; and the flagellin (fliC) gene. The genetic diversity of fliC among C. botulinum group III strains resulted in the definition of five major subgroups named fliC-I to fliC-V. Investigation of fliC subtypes in 560 samples, with various European origins, showed that fliC-I was predominant and found exclusively in samples contaminated by C. botulinum type C/D, fliC-II was rarely detected, no sample was recorded as fliC-III or fliC-V, and only C. botulinum type D/C samples tested positive for fliC-IV. The lack of genetic diversity of the flagellin gene of C. botulinum type C/D would support a clonal spread of type C/D strains in different geographical areas. fliC-I to fliC-III are genetically related (87% to 92% sequence identity), whereas fliC-IV from C. botulinum type D/C is more genetically distant from the other fliC types (with only 50% sequence identity). These findings suggest fliC-I to fliC-III have evolved in a common environment and support a different genetic evolution for fliC-IV. A combination of the C. novyi sensu lato, ntnh, bont, and fliC PCR assays developed in this study allowed better characterization of C. botulinum group III and showed the group to be less genetically diverse than C. botulinum groups I and II, supporting a slow genetic evolution of the strains belonging to C. botulinum group III.

  18. Distribution of Mycobacterium avium Complex Isolates in Tissue Samples of Pigs Fed Peat Naturally Contaminated with Mycobacteria as a Supplement

    PubMed Central

    Matlova, Ludmila; Dvorska, Lenka; Ayele, Wuhib Yayo; Bartos, Milan; Amemori, Takashi; Pavlik, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    In early 1999, there was an increased incidence of tuberculous lesions in the lymph nodes of slaughtered pigs in the Czech Republic. In part 1 of this study, tuberculous lesions were detected in 140 (62%) tissue samples collected from pigs coming from 15 farms in 15 districts at routine veterinary meat inspections in abattoirs. Mycobacteria were isolated from 37 (16%) tissue samples: 34 Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolates and three environmentally derived mycobacteria. In search of infection sources, M. avium subsp. hominissuis was isolated from 38 (79%) samples of peat used as a feed supplement. In part 2 of our study, the head, mesenteric, and inguinal lymph nodes of 117 randomly selected slaughtered pigs from one farm with young piglets fed peat as a supplement were investigated for mycobacterial infection. From 65 (56%) pigs, a total of 76 mycobacterial isolates were identified (56 M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates, 5 M. avium subsp. avium isolates, 3 M. intracellulare isolates, and 12 environmentally derived mycobacterial isolates). IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) types with >20 bands of 45 distinct RFLP types were found in 49 M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates from pigs (n = 31) and peat (n = 18). Identical RFLP types were found in only four pig isolates. Five randomly selected isolates from pigs and peat were subcultured to six independent clones or colonies. Among the IS1245 RFLP types of 30 clones, identical RFLP types obtained from pigs and peat were identified, which confirmed the hypothesis that peat contaminated with mycobacteria represents a significant source of mycobacterial infection for pigs. PMID:15750094

  19. [Detection of TDH-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 from naturally contaminated shellfish using an immunomagnetic separation method and chromogenic agar medium].

    PubMed

    Hara-Kudo, Y; Sugiyama, K; Nishina, T; Saitoh, A; Nakagawa, H; Ichihara, T; Konuma, H; Hasegawa, J; Kumagai, S

    2001-11-01

    We attempted to isolate TDH-producing Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 from shellfish. Asari samples were incubated with TSB supplemented with 2% (w/v) NaCl for 6 h, and then the 6-h cultures were incubated with salt polymyxin broth for 18 h. After the two-step enrichment, a 1 ml portion of the culture was treated with magnetic beads coated with K6 antibody for immunoconcentration of V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6. The immunoconcentrated and untreated cultures were plated onto a chromogenic agar and TCBS agar media for isolation of V. parahaemolyticus. TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 was isolated from 3 out of 66 lots (4.5%) of naturally contaminated Asari. Six of 4,265 colonies suspected as V. parahaemolyticus (0.14%) were TDH-producing V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6.

  20. Milk, flavoured milk products and caries.

    PubMed

    Levine, R S

    2001-07-14

    The consumption of flavoured milk increased by 50% between 1992 and 1999 and dental health educators need to know if these and other sugar and fruit juice sweetened milk products, such as fruit yoghurts, are acceptable as snack items. Available evidence suggests that their cariogenicity is negligible to low and consumed in moderation they are a preferable alternative to similarly sweetened soft drinks.

  1. Milk demystified by chemistry.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2014-09-01

    This article traces the decline of milk from a heavenly elixir to a tradeable food. Early cultures regarded milk not as a simple nutrient, but a living fluid. Heroes and gods were believed to have been nurtured by animals after being abandoned. Character traits were assumed to be transmitted by milk; infantile diseases were attributed to "bad milk", whereas "good milk" was used as a remedy. With chemical methods developed at the end of the 18th century, it became known that human milk was higher in sugar and lower in protein than cow's milk. During the 19th century, "scientific" feeding emerged that meant modifying cow's milk to imitate the proportion of nutrients in human milk. In Boston from 1893, Rotch initiated the "percentage" method, requiring a physician's prescription. In Paris from 1894, Budin sterilized bottled infant milk. In Berlin in 1898, Rubner measured oxygen and energy uptake by calorimetry, prompting feeding by calories, and Czerny introduced regulated feeding by the clock. These activities ignored the emotional dimension of infant nutrition and the anti-infective properties of human milk. They may have also enhanced the decline in breastfeeding, which reached an all-time low in 1971. Milk's demystification made artificial nutrition safer, but paved the way for commercially produced infant formula.

  2. Special Milk Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Special Milk Program provides milk to children in schools, child care institutions and eligible camps that do not participate in other Federal child nutrition meal service programs. The program reimburses schools and institutions for the milk they serve. In 2008, 4,676 schools and residential child care institutions participated, along with…

  3. Aflatoxin M1 in buffalo and cow milk in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kara, Recep; Ince, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Potential hazardous human exposure to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) via consumption of milk and milk products has been demonstrated by many researchers. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of this mycotoxin in buffalo and cow milk samples in the city of Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. For this purpose, 126 buffalo and 124 cow milk samples were collected from dairy farms in Afyonkarahisar province. AFM1 levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection. Although AFM1 was not detected in cow milk samples, AFM1 was found above the limit of detection (<0.008-0.032 µg/L) in 27% (34 out of 126) of the buffalo milk samples. The results of this study indicated the importance of continuous surveillance of commonly consumed milk or milk product samples for AFM1 contamination in Turkey.

  4. Isolation of microbial pathogens of subclinical mastitis from raw sheep's milk of Epirus (Greece) and their role in its hygiene.

    PubMed

    Fotou, K; Tzora, A; Voidarou, Ch; Alexopoulos, A; Plessas, S; Avgeris, I; Bezirtzoglou, E; Akrida-Demertzi, K; Demertzis, P G

    2011-12-01

    The natural raw milk microflora is a factor that expresses its sensorial characteristics. The microbial charge into the mammary gland of healthy animal is low and the application of right and healthy conditions during milking and cheese making procedure, prevents from contaminating as well as maintains the natural microflora in order to lend the particular characteristics of milk. The purpose of the present project was the study of the Total Viable Count (T.V.C.) and the count of total psychrotropic bacteria of raw sheep milk from Boutsiko and Karamaniko breeds, collected from healthy animals, as well as the isolation, identification and enumeration of pathogenic bacteria related with the hygiene and the quality of raw sheep milk (with a particular interest in bacteria that may cause human infection). During the experiment we examined two hundred forty (240) samples of raw sheep milk. In these samples a) Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens (vegetative cells and spores) and Bacillus sp. were isolated and identified b) the Total Viable Count and the total number of psychrotropic bacteria were also specified. The sampling, the preparation of samples and decimal dilutions were based on international methods. The Total viable count was determined using the standard methods of the American Public Health Association, 2002. The total number of psychrotropic bacteria was determined using APHA 1976, 1978 rules. The identification of the bacteria was carried out according to the Bergey's manual. Microscopic examination of Gram stained cells, catalase, oxidase and biochemical tests were performed when necessary to further identify. From the 240 milk samples tested, only 5% were E. coli positive, with mean counts ranged from 2 × 10(3) to 2.4 × 10(4) cfu/ml. S. aureus was isolated from 24% of the samples and the mean count per ml was ranged from <10 to 3.4 × 10(2). Meanwhile, Bacillus spp. was also detected in 29% samples

  5. Formation of brominated phenolic contaminants from natural manganese oxides-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Kunde; Song, Lianghui; Zhou, Shiyang; Chen, Da; Gan, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Brominated phenolic compounds (BPCs) are a class of persistent and potentially toxic compounds ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. However, the origin of BPCs is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the formation of BPCs from natural manganese oxides (MnOx)-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(-). Experiments at ambient temperature clearly demonstrated that BPCs were readily produced via the oxidation of phenol by MnOx in the presence of Br(-). In the reaction of MnOx sand with 0.213 μmol/L phenol and 0.34 mmol/L Br(-) for 10 min, more than 60% of phenol and 56% of Br(-) were consumed to form BPCs. The yield of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of phenol and Br(-). Overall, a total of 14 BPCs including simple bromophenols (4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), and hydroxylated polybrominated biphenyls (OH-PBBs) were identified. The production of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of Br(-) or phenol. It was deduced that Br(-) was first oxidized to form active bromine, leading to the subsequent bromination of phenol to form bromophenols. The further oxidation of bromophenols by MnOx resulted in the formation of OH-PBDEs and OH-PBBs. In view of the ubiquity of phenol, Br(-), and MnOx in the environment, MnOx-mediated oxidation may play a role on the natural production of BPCs.

  6. Strategy for the reduction of Trichloromethane residue levels in farm bulk milk.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Siobhan; Gleeson, David; Jordan, Kieran; Furey, Ambrose; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; O'Brien, Bernadette

    2013-05-01

    High fat dairy products, such as butter and margarine can be contaminated during the milk production process with a residue called Trichloromethane (TCM), which results from the use of chlorine based detergent solutions. Although, TCM concentrations in Irish products are not at levels that are a public health issue, such contamination can cause marketing difficulties in countries to which Irish products are being exported. In an attempt to reduce such milk residues, a template procedure was developed, tried and tested on 43 farms (from 3 processing companies). This involved identifying farms with high TCM milk, applying corrective action in the form of advice and recommendations to reduce TCM and re-measuring milks from these farms. Trichloromethane in milk was measured by head-space gas chromatography with electron capture detector. The TCM reduction strategy proved successful in significantly reducing the levels in milk in the farms tested, e.g. TCM was reduced from 0.006 to the target of 0.002 mg/kg (P < 0.05). The strategy was then applied to farms who supplied milk to six Irish dairy processors with the objective of reducing TCM in those milks to a level of ≤ 0.002 mg/kg. Initially, milk tankers containing milks from approximately 10-15 individual farms were sampled and analysed and tankers with high TCM (>0.002 mg/kg) identified. Individual herd milks contributing to these tankers were subsequently sampled and analysed and farms supplying high TCM identified. Guidance and advice was provided to the high TCM milk suppliers and levels of TCM of these milk supplies were monitored subsequently. A significant reduction (minimum P < 0.05) in milk TCM was observed in 5 of the 6 dairy processor milks, while a numerical reduction in TCM was observed in the remaining processor milk.

  7. Glycobiology of human milk.

    PubMed

    Newburg, D S

    2013-07-01

    Glycans are characteristic components of milk, and each species has unique patterns of specific carbohydrates. Human milk is unusually rich in glycans, with the major components being lactose and oligosaccharides, representing approximately 6.8 and 1% of the milk, respectively. Other sources of glycans in human milk include monosaccharides, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. In human milk, the presence and patterns of these glycans vary depending upon the stage of lactation and the maternal genes and their genetic polymorphisms that control glycosyl transferases. The synthesis of milk glycans utilizes a significant portion of the metabolic energy that the mother expends when producing her milk, but other than lactose, these glycans contribute little to the nutritional needs of the infant. The data herein support several functions. 1) Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogens from binding to the intestinal mucosa. 2) Human milk glycans attenuate inflammation. 3) Glycans also directly stimulate the growth of beneficial (mutualist) bacteria of the microbiota (formerly considered commensal microflora of the intestine); these mutualists and their fermentation products can, in turn, (a) inhibit pathogens, (b) modulate signaling and inflammation, and (c) the fermentation products can be absorbed and utilized as a source of dietary calories. These functions can help direct and support intestinal postnatal growth, development, and ontogeny of colonization. The many functions of the milk glycans may synergistically protect infants from disease. Hence, human milk glycans and their homologs may serve as novel prophylactic or therapeutic agents for a diverse range of deleterious conditions.

  8. Naturally occurring contaminants in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge crystalline-rock aquifers and Piedmont Early Mesozoic basin siliciclastic-rock aquifers, eastern United States, 1994–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Szabo, Zoltan; Lindsay, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality and aquifer lithologies in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces in the eastern United States vary widely as a result of complex geologic history. Bedrock composition (mineralogy) and geochemical conditions in the aquifer directly affect the occurrence (presence in rock and groundwater) and distribution (concentration and mobility) of potential naturally occurring contaminants, such as arsenic and radionuclides, in drinking water. To evaluate potential relations between aquifer lithology and the spatial distribution of naturally occurring contaminants, the crystalline-rock aquifers of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces and the siliciclastic-rock aquifers of the Early Mesozoic basin of the Piedmont Physiographic Province were divided into 14 lithologic groups, each having from 1 to 16 lithochemical subgroups, based on primary rock type, mineralogy, and weathering potential. Groundwater-quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program from 1994 through 2008 from 346 wells and springs in various hydrogeologic and land-use settings from Georgia through New Jersey were compiled and analyzed for this study. Analyses for most constituents were for filtered samples, and, thus, the compiled data consist largely of dissolved concentrations. Concentrations were compared to criteria for protection of human health, such as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking water maximum contaminant levels and secondary maximum contaminant levels or health-based screening levels developed by the USGS NAWQA Program in cooperation with the USEPA, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and Oregon Health & Science University. Correlations among constituent concentrations, pH, and oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions were used to infer geochemical controls on constituent mobility within the aquifers. Of the 23 trace-element constituents evaluated

  9. Analysis of the Impact of Subsurface Contaminant Plumes on Stream Water Quality Under Natural and Managed Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, J. P.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2001-12-01

    The Integrated Hydrology Model (InHM) is a fully-integrated 3D control-volume finite element model which can simulate water flow and solute transport on the two-dimensional land surface and in the three-dimensional dual-continua subsurface under variably-saturated conditions. Full coupling of the surface and subsurface flow regimes is accomplished by simultaneously solving one system of nonlinear discrete equations for overland flow rates and water depths, stream flow rates, subsurface pressure heads, saturations and velocities, as well as water fluxes between continua. The numerical solution of the coupled advection-dispersion equations describing solute transport in the surface and subsurface flow domains is achieved in an analogous manner. High-resolution 3D numerical experiments performed with the model evaluate the downstream surface-water and stream-bottom sediment quality arising from a subsurface solute plume discharging into a stream under natural conditions. These simulations are compared with cases where the plume is intercepted by pumping wells near point of discharge. Comparisons are made for low (baseflow) and high (precipitation-event driven) stream flow rates for each case. A sensitivity analysis involving different surface-subsurface and transport parameters and plume capture scenarios will also be presented.

  10. Milk production, raw milk quality and fertility of dromedary camels (Camelus Dromedarius) under intensive management.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Péter; Thomas, Sonia; Markó, Orsolya; Juhász, Jutka

    2013-03-01

    In many arid countries, dromedaries play an important role as a milk source in rural areas. However, the milk and meat production potential of this species is not well understood and documented. A large-scale camel dairy farm was established in 2006 in the United Arab Emirates. This study summarises the most important data on milk production, raw milk quality and reproductive efficiency collected on this farm during the first three years of operation. The average daily milk production, the mean length of lactation and the mean total milk production per lactation of 174 dromedaries were 6.0 ± 0.12 kg (± SEM), 586 ± 11.0 days (± SEM) and 3314 ± 98.5 kg (± SEM), respectively. The lactation curve reached its peak during the 4th month after parturition (mean ± SEM, 8.9 ± 0.04 kg), then it declined gradually, falling to 50% of the maximum by the 16th month postpartum (mean ± SEM, 4.3 ± 0.06 kg). Milking three times a day did not increase daily milk production compared to two times milking. Mean total viable bacterial count (TVC) and mean somatic cell count (SCC, ± SEM) of bulk raw camel milk were 4,403 ± 94 CFU/cm3 and 392,602 ± 5,999 cells/cm3 for a one-year period, respectively. There was a significant difference among months (P < 0.001). Coliform count was < 10 CFU/cm3 in most cases (96.5%). The average (± SEM) fat, protein, lactose, total solids (TS) and solid-non-fat (SNF) concentrations of individual milk samples were 2.51 ± 0.03%, 2.60 ± 0.01%, 4.03 ± 0.03%, 9.98 ± 0.03% and 7.56 ± 0.03%, respectively. Lactation period, average daily milk production and morning vs. evening milking significantly influenced milk chemical composition. For the 470 camels in the breeding programme, end-of-season pregnancy rate and birth rate were 87.0% and 82.6%, respectively, after natural mating. We have demonstrated that sustainable milk production is possible from a traditional species, the dromedary camel, under an intensive management system.

  11. Developing milk industry estimates for dose reconstruction projects

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.M.; Darwin, R.F. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important contributors to radiation doses from hanford during the 1944-1947 period was radioactive iodine. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated with iodine is likely the dominant pathway of human exposure. To estimate the doses people could have received from this pathway, it is necessary to reconstruct the amount of milk consumed by people living near Hanford, the source of the milk, and the type of feed that the milk cows ate. This task is challenging because the dairy industry has undergone radical changes since the end of World War 2, and records that document the impact of these changes on the study area are scarce. Similar problems are faced by researchers on most dose reconstruction efforts. The purpose of this work is to document and evaluate the methods used on the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to reconstruct the milk industry and to present preliminary results.

  12. Human milk: a source of more life than we imagine.

    PubMed

    Jeurink, P V; van Bergenhenegouwen, J; Jiménez, E; Knippels, L M J; Fernández, L; Garssen, J; Knol, J; Rodríguez, J M; Martín, R

    2013-03-01

    The presence of bacteria in human milk has been acknowledged since the seventies. For a long time, microbiological analysis of human milk was only performed in case of infections and therefore the presence of non-pathogenic bacteria was yet unknown. During the last decades, the use of more sophisticated culture-dependent and -independent techniques, and the steady development of the -omic approaches are opening up the new concept of the 'milk microbiome', a complex ecosystem with a greater diversity than previously anticipated. In this review, possible mechanisms by which bacteria can reach the mammary gland (contamination versus active migration) are discussed. In addition, the potential roles of human milk for both infant and maternal health are summarised. A better understanding of the link between the milk microbiome and health benefit, the potential factors influencing this relationship and whether or not it can be influenced by nutrition is required to open new avenues in the field of pregnancy and lactation.

  13. [Antimicrobial resistance of coliform isolates from expressed human milk].

    PubMed

    Novak, F R; Almeida, J A; Asensi, M D; Moraes, B A; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, D

    2001-01-01

    The dispersion of potentially pathogenic, antibiotic-resistant microorganisms via expressed human milk can be considered a risk factor. The aim of this study was to contribute to a better understanding of coliform isolates from expressed human milk and their antimicrobial resistance profiles. The sampling scheme followed a totally randomized design, using 837 samples of expressed human milk. Of these, 71 (8.48%) were identified as contaminated with total coliforms, although in none of the samples did the population exceed 1.0x10(3) MPN/ml. Most of the microorganisms isolated (91.6%) belonged to only two species, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which when subjected to antibiograms, revealed that several strains showed prior resistance to some of the antimicrobials tested. Coliforms may grow in expressed human milk if it is improperly stored, depleting protection factors and reducing the milk's nutritional value.

  14. 9 CFR 94.16 - Milk and milk products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Milk and milk products. 94.16 Section... VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.16 Milk and milk products. (a) The following milk products are exempt from the provisions of this part:...

  15. 9 CFR 94.16 - Milk and milk products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Milk and milk products. 94.16 Section... VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.16 Milk and milk products. (a) The following milk products are exempt from the provisions of this part:...

  16. 9 CFR 94.16 - Milk and milk products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Milk and milk products. 94.16 Section... VESICULAR DISEASE, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS § 94.16 Milk and milk products. (a) The following milk products are exempt from the provisions of this part:...

  17. Evaluating soil contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.

    1990-07-01

    The compilation was designed to help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contaminant specialists evaluate the degree of contamination of a soil, based on chemical analyses. Included are regulatory criteria, opinions, brief descriptions of scientific articles, and miscellaneous information that might be useful in making risk assessments. The intent was to make hard-to-obtain material readily available to contaminant specialists, but not to critique the material or develop new criteria. The compilation is to be used with its index, which includes about 200 contaminants. Entries include soil contaminant criteria from other countries, contaminant guidelines for applying sewage sludge to soil, guidelines for evaluating sediments, background soil concentrations for various elements, citations to scientific articles that may help estimate the potential movement of soil contaminants into wildlife food chains, and a few odds and ends. Articles on earthworms were emphasized because they are a natural bridge between soil and many species of wildlife.

  18. Design of a sensitive fluorescent polarization immunoassay for rapid screening of milk for cephalexin.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, Natalia V; Eremin, Sergei A

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a sensitive, fast, and easily performed fluorescence polarization immunoassay for determination of cephalexin in milk. The experimental work was performed to increase sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, the structures of the tracers were varied by synthesis of both cephalexin (CEX) and cephalotin (CET) conjugates with a variety of fluorescent labels. Two rabbit antisera containing antibodies against cephalexin and cephalotin were tested in homologous and heterologous combinations with the tracers. For every working antibody-tracer combination, the analytical conditions and cross-reactivity for structural analogues-cephalosporins and other antibiotics that could also be present in milk-were determined. It was found that the highest sensitivity was achieved by use of the homologous pair CET-EDF-anti-CET antibody (limit of detection (LOD) 0.4 μg kg(-1) for standard solutions prepared in buffer), but this combination was not appropriate because of high cross-reactivity with CET. For subsequent experiments, therefore, CEX- EDF-anti-CEX antibody were chosen (LOD 0.8 μg kg(-1) for standard solutions prepared in buffer). Part of this manuscript is devoted to the variation of precipitation agents for pretreatment of milk before analysis; milk is an extremely complicated matrix. The optimum protein precipitation agent was methanol. This technique for cephalexin determination was characterized by a limit of detection of 1 μg kg(-1). The method was validated by using naturally contaminated and spiked milk samples. The results obtained corresponded very well with those obtained by HPLC, which was used as confirmation method.

  19. Rapid detection of economic adulterants in fresh milk by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Grant; Higgs, Kerianne

    2013-05-03

    A method to aid in the detection of the economically driven adulteration of fresh milk with a range of small, nitrogen containing compounds, including melamine, ammeline, ammelide, cyanuric acid, allantoin, thiourea, urea, biuret, triuret, semicarbazide, aminotriazine, 3- and 4-aminotriazole, cyanamide, dicyandiamide, guanidine, choline, hydroxyproline, nitrate, and a range of amino acids, has been developed. (15)N2-Urea is used as an internal standard. The adulteration of milk with exogenous urea has previously been difficult to detect because of the variation in the naturally occurring levels of urea in milk. However, by monitoring the contaminants biuret and triuret, which comprise up to 1% of synthetic urea, the adulteration of milk with urea-based fertilizer can be detected. We estimate that to be economically viable, adulteration of the order of 90-4000ppm of the above adulterants would need to be added to fresh milk. For most of the compounds, an arbitrary detection threshold of 2ppm is therefore more than sufficient. For biuret, a lower detection threshold, better than 0.5ppm, is desirable and the sensitivity for biuret and triuret can be improved by the post-column addition of lithium to create lithium adducts under electrospray ionisation. Sample handling involves a two-step solvent precipitation method that is deployed in a 96-well plate format, and the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography uses a rapid gradient (1.2min). Three separate injections, to detect the positively charged compounds, the negatively charged compounds and amino acids and finally the lithium adducts, are used. This rapid and qualitative survey method may be deployed as a second tier screening method to quickly reduce sample numbers indicated as irregular by an FTIR based screening system, and to direct analysis to appropriate quantification methods.

  20. The features of element concentration in natural waters of the Kola North in conditions of environmental contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazova, Mariya; Moiseenko, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    The intensive use of fossil fuels and industrial development in last century led to the formation of acid rain and water acidification. The problem of water acidification greatly was denoted in the middle of last century in North America and in Europe as a result of air emissions of acid gases, primarily sulfur dioxide. The process of water acidification due to the interaction of two factors: 1) the high deposition of acidifying substances, taking into account the duration of exposure; 2) the sensitivity of the natural catchment area of geological, landscape, geographic and climatic characteristics (Moiseenko, 2005). The effects of acid rains on metal migration and cycling were discussed in a number of previous studies (Jeffries, 1997; Moiseenko, 1999; Manio, 2001; Moiseenko, Gashkina, 2007). The distribution of elements in water lakes has been mixed and due to the change of geochemical cycles of elements occurring in the catchment area and in water. On the Kola Peninsula as a result of long-term operation of the copper-nickel smelter was the anthropogenic acidification and water pollution metals. Increased contents of elements due to the combined effect of three factors: 1) landscape-geochemical characteristics of watersheds; 2) dispersion with flue emissions; 3) leaching elements and bonding of metals with organic matter, especially in forested watersheds and wetlands. This region is subject to long-term effects of mining and smelting industries, and therefore difficult to find of water bodies, which can serve as a background lakes. It is proved that manmade acid rain lead to leach into the water of a large group of elements entering the water as a result of man-made streams, as well as the elements that consist of the rocks forming the watersheds. In order to identify the relationships between the components of the elemental composition of the water in the lake was made a factor analysis using a computer program «STATISTICA 10". Factor analysis revealed the

  1. Fungi: A major source of radiocesium contamination of grazing ruminants in Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Hove, K.; Pedersen, O.; Garmo, T.H.; Hansen, H.S.; Staaland, H.

    1990-08-01

    Transfer of radiocesium from vegetation to milk was studied in dairy goats grazing heavily contaminated mountain pasture in southern Norway in the years following the Chernobyl accident. Radiocesium activity in milk and green vegetation remained stable throughout 1986 and 1987. In 1988, a sudden three- to fivefold increase in milk radioactivity occurred during the second half of the summer. Whole-body content of radioactivity in sheep and reindeer also increased rapidly. This coincided with an abundant growth of fungal fruit bodies with radiocesium levels up to 100 times higher than green vegetation. Fungal radiocesium was found to be highly available in a digestibility study with goats. Milk radioactivity levels in the field could be accounted for by consumption of as little as 20-100 g d-1 of fungal dry matter (DM). The importance of fungal fruit bodies in transferring radiocesium to ruminants was further substantiated by comparing meat activities in grazing ruminants in 1988 and 1989. Fungal fruit bodies were present in minor quantities in 1989, and radioactivity levels in sheep and reindeer in August-September were only 28-35% of those in 1988. This ability of fungi to mobilize radiocesium from natural soils and transfer the isotopes into the human food chain greatly enhances the vulnerability of food production in natural ecosystems to radiocesium pollution.

  2. Interactions between Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles (SONPs) and U(VI) Contaminations: Effects of pH, Temperature and Natural Organic Matters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hanyu; Li, Ping; Pan, Duoqiang; Yin, Zhuoxin; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between contaminations of U(VI) and silicon oxide nanoparticles (SONPs), both of which have been widely used in modern industry and induced serious environmental challenge due to their high mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity, were studied under different environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and natural organic matters (NOMs) by using both batch and spectroscopic approaches. The results showed that the accumulation process, i.e., sorption, of U(VI) on SONPs was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, demonstrating that possible outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes were controlling the sorption process of U(VI) on SONPs in the observed pH range. Humic acid (HA), one dominated component of NOMs, bounded SONPs can enhance U(VI) sorption below pH~4.5, whereas restrain at high pH range. The reversible sorption of U(VI) on SONPs possibly indicated that the outer-sphere complexes were prevalent at pH 5. However, an irreversible interaction of U(VI) was observed in the presence of HA (Fig 1). It was mainly due to the ternary SONPs-HA-U(VI) complexes (Type A Complexes). After SONPs adsorbed U(VI), the particle size in suspension was apparently increased from ~240 nm to ~350 nm. These results showed that toxicity of both SONPs and U(VI) will decrease to some extent after the interaction in the environment. These findings are key for providing useful information on the possible mutual interactions among different contaminants in the environment. PMID:26930197

  3. Interactions between Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles (SONPs) and U(VI) Contaminations: Effects of pH, Temperature and Natural Organic Matters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanyu; Li, Ping; Pan, Duoqiang; Yin, Zhuoxin; Fan, Qiaohui; Wu, Wangsuo

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between contaminations of U(VI) and silicon oxide nanoparticles (SONPs), both of which have been widely used in modern industry and induced serious environmental challenge due to their high mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity, were studied under different environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and natural organic matters (NOMs) by using both batch and spectroscopic approaches. The results showed that the accumulation process, i.e., sorption, of U(VI) on SONPs was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, demonstrating that possible outer- and/or inner-sphere complexes were controlling the sorption process of U(VI) on SONPs in the observed pH range. Humic acid (HA), one dominated component of NOMs, bounded SONPs can enhance U(VI) sorption below pH~4.5, whereas restrain at high pH range. The reversible sorption of U(VI) on SONPs possibly indicated that the outer-sphere complexes were prevalent at pH 5. However, an irreversible interaction of U(VI) was observed in the presence of HA (Fig 1). It was mainly due to the ternary SONPs-HA-U(VI) complexes (Type A Complexes). After SONPs adsorbed U(VI), the particle size in suspension was apparently increased from ~240 nm to ~350 nm. These results showed that toxicity of both SONPs and U(VI) will decrease to some extent after the interaction in the environment. These findings are key for providing useful information on the possible mutual interactions among different contaminants in the environment.

  4. Hydrogeologic settings and groundwater-flow simulations for regional investigations of the transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants to public-supply wells—Investigations begun in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the Transport of Anthropogenic and Natural Contaminants to public-supply wells (TANC study) was begun in 2001 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The study was designed to shed light on factors that affect the vulnerability of groundwater and, more specifically, water from public-supply wells to contamination to provide a context for the NAWQA Program's earlier finding of mixtures of contaminants at low concentrations in groundwater near the water table in urban areas across the Nation. The TANC study has included investigations at both the regional (tens to thousands of square kilometers) and local (generally less than 25 square kilometers) scales. At the regional scale, the approach to investigation involves refining conceptual models of groundwater flow in hydrologically distinct settings and then constructing or updating a groundwater-flow model with particle tracking for each setting to help quantify regional water budgets, public-supply well contributing areas (areas contributing recharge to wells and zones of contribution for wells), and traveltimes from recharge areas to selected wells. A great deal of information about each contributing area is captured from the model output, including values for 170 variables that describe physical and (or) geochemical characteristics of the contributing areas. The information is subsequently stored in a relational database. Retrospective water-quality data from monitoring, domestic, and many of the public-supply wells, as well as data from newly collected samples at selected public-supply wells, also are stored in the database and are used with the model output to help discern the more important factors affecting vulnerability in many, if not most, settings. The study began with investigations in seven regional areas, and it benefits from being conducted as part of the NAWQA Program, in which consistent methods are used so that meaningful comparisons can be

  5. Bacterial spores in silage and raw milk.

    PubMed

    te Giffel, M C; Wagendorp, A; Herrewegh, A; Driehuis, F

    2002-08-01

    Spore-forming bacteria can survive food-processing treatments. In the dairy industry, Bacillus and Clostridium species determine the shelf-life of a variety of heat-treated milk products, mainly if the level of post-process contamination is low. In order to minimize problems caused by bacterial spores in foods and food production processes a chain management approach, from raw materials, ingredients and environmental sources to final product storage conditions, is most effective. Silage is considered to be a significant source of contamination of raw milk with spores. PCR-RAPD fingerprinting and heat resistance studies of populations of aerobic spore-formers isolated from grass and maize silage and from raw milk confirmed this assumption. Prevention of outgrowth of aerobic spores in silage will contribute to reduction of the total spore load of raw milk. Therefore, it is important that the silage fermentation process is controlled. Application of cultures of lactic acid bacteria or chemical additives can aid silage fermentation and improve aerobic stability.

  6. Sources of Clostridia in Raw Milk on Farms▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Marie-Claude; Dion, Patrice; Lafrenière, Carole; Antoun, Hani; Drouin, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    A PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to examine on-farm sources of Clostridium cluster I strains in four dairy farms over 2 years. Conventional microbiological analysis was used in parallel to monitor size of clostridial populations present in various components of the milk production chain (soil, forage, grass silage, maize silage, dry hay, and raw milk). PCR amplification with Clostridium cluster I-specific 16S rRNA gene primers followed by DGGE separation yielded a total of 47 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), which varied greatly with respect to frequency of occurrence. Some OTUs were found only in forage, and forage profiles differed according to farm location (southern or northern Québec). More clostridial contamination was found in maize silage than in grass silage. Milk represented a potential environment for certain OTUs. No OTU was milk specific, indicating that OTUs originated from other environments. Most (83%) of the OTUs detected in raw milk were also found in grass or maize silage. Milk DGGE profiles differed according to farm and sampling year and fit into two distinct categories. One milk profile category was characterized by the presence of a few dominant OTUs, the presence of which appeared to be more related to farm management than to feed contamination. OTUs were more varied in the second profile category. The identities of certain OTUs frequently found in milk were resolved by cloning and sequencing. Clostridium disporicum was identified as an important member of clostridial populations transmitted to milk. Clostridium tyrobutyricum was consistently found in milk and was widespread in the other farm environments examined. PMID:18757576

  7. Relationship of goat milk flow emission variables with milking routine, milking parameters, milking machine characteristics and goat physiology.

    PubMed

    Romero, G; Panzalis, R; Ruegg, P

    2017-04-10

    The aim of this paper was to study the relationship between milk flow emission variables recorded during milking of dairy goats with variables related to milking routine, goat physiology, milking parameters and milking machine characteristics, to determine the variables affecting milking performance and help the goat industry pinpoint farm and milking practices that improve milking performance. In total, 19 farms were visited once during the evening milking. Milking parameters (vacuum level (VL), pulsation ratio and pulsation rate, vacuum drop), milk emission flow variables (milking time, milk yield, maximum milk flow (MMF), average milk flow (AVMF), time until 500 g/min milk flow is established (TS500)), doe characteristics of 8 to 10 goats/farm (breed, days in milk and parity), milking practices (overmilking, overstripping, pre-lag time) and milking machine characteristics (line height, presence of claw) were recorded on every farm. The relationships between recorded variables and farm were analysed by a one-way ANOVA analysis. The relationships of milk yield, MMF, milking time and TS500 with goat physiology, milking routine, milking parameters and milking machine design were analysed using a linear mixed model, considering the farm as the random effect. Farm was significant (P<0.05) in all the studied variables. Milk emission flow variables were similar to those recommended in scientific studies. Milking parameters were adequate in most of the farms, being similar to those recommended in scientific studies. Few milking parameters and milking machine characteristics affected the tested variables: average vacuum level only showed tendency on MMF, and milk pipeline height on TS500. Milk yield (MY) was mainly affected by parity, as the interaction of days in milk with parity was also significant. Milking time was mainly affected by milk yield and breed. Also significant were parity, the interaction of days in milk with parity and overstripping, whereas overmilking

  8. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  9. Mycotoxins in Bovine Milk and Dairy Products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Becker-Algeri, Tania Aparecida; Castagnaro, Denise; de Bortoli, Kennidy; de Souza, Camila; Drunkler, Deisy Alessandra; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a literature review of the occurrence of several mycotoxins in bovine milk and dairy products, because it is the main type of milk produced and marketed worldwide. Mycotoxins are produced by different genera of filamentous fungi and present serious health hazards such as carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. Under favorable growth conditions, toxigenic fungi produce mycotoxins which contaminate the lactating cow's feedstuff. During metabolism, these mycotoxins undergo biotransformation and are secreted in milk. Data show that there is a seasonal trend in the levels of mycotoxins in milk, with these being higher in the cold months probably due to the prolonged storage required for the cattle feeds providing favorable conditions for fungal growth. Good agricultural and storage practices are therefore of fundamental importance in the control of toxigenic species and mycotoxins. Although aflatoxins (especially aflatoxin M1 ) are the mycotoxins of greater incidence in milk and dairy products, this review shows that other mycotoxins, such as fumonisin, ochratoxin A, trichothecenes, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and deoxynivalenol, can also be found in these products. Given that milk is widely consumed and is a source of nutrients, especially in childhood, a thorough investigation of the occurrence of mycotoxins as well the adoption of measures to minimize their contamination of milk is essential.

  10. Donor Human Milk for the High-Risk Infant: Preparation, Safety, and Usage Options in the United States.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    The use of donor human milk is increasing for high-risk infants, primarily for infants born weighing <1500 g or those who have severe intestinal disorders. Pasteurized donor milk may be considered in situations in which the supply of maternal milk is insufficient. The use of pasteurized donor milk is safe when appropriate measures are used to screen donors and collect, store, and pasteurize the milk and then distribute it through established human milk banks. The use of nonpasteurized donor milk and other forms of direct, Internet-based, or informal human milk sharing does not involve this level of safety and is not recommended. It is important that health care providers counsel families considering milk sharing about the risks of bacterial or viral contamination of nonpasteurized human milk and about the possibilities of exposure to medications, drugs, or herbs in human milk. Currently, the use of pasteurized donor milk is limited by its availability and affordability. The development of public policy to improve and expand access to pasteurized donor milk, including policies that support improved governmental and private financial support for donor milk banks and the use of donor milk, is important.

  11. Characterization of calculation of in-situ retardation factors of contaminant transport using naturally-radionuclides and rock/water interaction occurring U-Series disequilibria timescales. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roback, R.; Murrel, M.; Goldstein, S.; Ku, T.L.; Luo, S.

    1997-01-01

    'The research is directed toward a quantitative assessment of contaminant transport rates in fracture-rock systems using uranium-series radionuclides. Naturally occurring uranium-and thorium-series radioactive disequilibria will provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of radioactive contaminants as well as on fluid transport and