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Sample records for nature limits filarial

  1. Vector competence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes for filarial nematodes is affected by age and nutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Ariani, Cristina V; Juneja, Punita; Smith, Sophia; Tinsley, Matthew C; Jiggins, Francis M

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are one of the most important vectors of human disease. The ability of mosquitoes to transmit disease is dependent on the age structure of the population, as mosquitoes must survive long enough for the parasites to complete their development and infect another human. Age could have additional effects due to mortality rates and vector competence changing as mosquitoes senesce, but these are comparatively poorly understood. We have investigated these factors using the mosquito Aedes aegypti and the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. Rather than observing any effects of immune senescence, we found that older mosquitoes were more resistant, but this only occurred if they had previously been maintained on a nutrient-poor diet of fructose. Constant blood feeding reversed this decline in vector competence, meaning that the number of parasites remained relatively unchanged as mosquitoes aged. Old females that had been maintained on fructose also experienced a sharp spike in mortality after an infected blood meal ("refeeding syndrome") and few survived long enough for the parasite to develop. Again, this effect was prevented by frequent blood meals. Our results indicate that old mosquitoes may be inefficient vectors due to low vector competence and high mortality, but that frequent blood meals can prevent these effects of age.

  2. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites.

    PubMed

    Devoe, Neil C; Corbett, Ian J; Barker, Linsey; Chang, Robert; Gudis, Polyxeni; Mullen, Nathan; Perez, Kailey; Raposo, Hugo; Scholz, John; May, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    .01) deviations from a normal distribution for both W. bancrofti and L. loa. The relationship between evolvability and selection in L. loa followed a second order polynomial distribution (R2 = 0.89), indicating that the two factors relate to one another in accordance with an additional unknown factor. Taken together, these findings indicate discrete evolutionary drivers acting on ALT-2 of the four organisms examined, and the described variation has implications for design of novel vaccines and diagnostic reagents. Additionally, this represents the first mathematical description of evolvability in a naturally occurring setting.

  3. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Devoe, Neil C.; Corbett, Ian J.; Barker, Linsey; Chang, Robert; Gudis, Polyxeni; Mullen, Nathan; Perez, Kailey; Raposo, Hugo; Scholz, John; May, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    .01) deviations from a normal distribution for both W. bancrofti and L. loa. The relationship between evolvability and selection in L. loa followed a second order polynomial distribution (R2 = 0.89), indicating that the two factors relate to one another in accordance with an additional unknown factor. Taken together, these findings indicate discrete evolutionary drivers acting on ALT-2 of the four organisms examined, and the described variation has implications for design of novel vaccines and diagnostic reagents. Additionally, this represents the first mathematical description of evolvability in a naturally occurring setting. PMID:26890364

  4. Lymphangiosarcoma after filarial infection

    SciTech Connect

    Sordillo, E.M.; Sordillo, P.P.; Hajdu, S.I.; Good, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    A case of lymphangiosarcoma of a lower extremity is described in a patient with chronic lymphedema of that leg from a filarial infection in childhood. Histologically, the neoplasm resembled lymphangiosarcomas that arise in arms that become lymphedematous after mastectomies, but was different in that it also contained areas of calcification consistent with prior filarial infection. Calcifications were also present in muscle uninvolved by the lymphangiosarcoma of this case. The prolonged survival of this patient is unlike that of most patients with lymphangiosarcoma, which is generally shorter. Although lymphedema after filariasis is common, this is the first case of a lymphangiosarcoma arising in chronic lymphedema of filarial origin.

  5. Filarial and Wolbachia genomics

    PubMed Central

    SCOTT, A. L.; GHEDIN, E.; NUTMAN, T. B.; McREYNOLDS, L. A.; POOLE, C. B.; SLATKO, B. E.; FOSTER, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Filarial nematode parasites, the causative agents for a spectrum of acute and chronic diseases including lymphatic filariasis and river blindness, threaten the well-being and livelihood of hundreds of millions of people in the developing regions of the world. The 2007 publication on a draft assembly of the 95-Mb genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi – representing the first helminth parasite genome to be sequenced – has been followed in rapid succession by projects that have resulted in the genome sequencing of six additional filarial species, seven nonfilarial nematode parasites of animals and nearly 30 plant parasitic and free-living species. Parallel to the genomic sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic projects have facilitated genome annotation, expanded our understanding of stage-associated gene expression and provided a first look at the role of epigenetic regulation of filarial genomes through microRNAs. The expansion in filarial genomics will also provide a significant enrichment in our knowledge of the diversity and variability in the genomes of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia leading to a better understanding of the genetic principles that govern filarial–Wolbachia mutualism. The goal here is to provide an overview of the trends and advances in filarial and Wolbachia genomics. PMID:22098559

  6. Filarial Worms Reduce Plasmodium Infectivity in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Aliota, Matthew T.; Chen, Cheng-Chen; Dagoro, Henry; Fuchs, Jeremy F.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Co-occurrence of malaria and filarial worm parasites has been reported, but little is known about the interaction between filarial worm and malaria parasites with the same Anopheles vector. Herein, we present data evaluating the interaction between Wuchereria bancrofti and Anopheles punctulatus in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Our field studies in PNG demonstrated that An. punctulatus utilizes the melanization immune response as a natural mechanism of filarial worm resistance against invading W. bancrofti microfilariae. We then conducted laboratory studies utilizing the mosquitoes Armigeres subalbatus and Aedes aegypti and the parasites Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, Dirofilaria immitis, and Plasmodium gallinaceum to evaluate the hypothesis that immune activation and/or development by filarial worms negatively impact Plasmodium development in co-infected mosquitoes. Ar. subalbatus used in this study are natural vectors of P. gallinaceum and B. pahangi and they are naturally refractory to B. malayi (melanization-based refractoriness). Methodology/Principal Findings Mosquitoes were dissected and Plasmodium development was analyzed six days after blood feeding on either P. gallinaceum alone or after taking a bloodmeal containing both P. gallinaceum and B. malayi or a bloodmeal containing both P. gallinaceum and B. pahangi. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence and mean intensity of Plasmodium infections in two species of mosquito that had dual infections as compared to those mosquitoes that were infected with Plasmodium alone, and was independent of whether the mosquito had a melanization immune response to the filarial worm or not. However, there was no reduction in Plasmodium development when filarial worms were present in the bloodmeal (D. immitis) but midgut penetration was absent, suggesting that factors associated with penetration of the midgut by filarial worms likely are responsible for the observed reduction in malaria parasite infections

  7. Filarial hydropneumothorax: a strange journey.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arkaprabha; Mukherjee, Anindya; Talukdar, Payel; Talukdar, Arunansu

    2015-11-24

    Filarial infection can have varied manifestations, but hydropneumothorax at presentation has not yet been reported. A 28-year-old man presented to our hospital with heaviness of the left chest for the past 10 days, which was preceded by a sudden, short stabbing pain in the left chest after straining. Chest X-ray revealed left-sided hydropneumothorax. A peripheral blood picture revealed significant eosinophilia. A pleural fluid report also showed eosinophilia and a few motile microfilaria of Wuchereria bancrofti. Microfilaria was also documented in peripheral blood. There was no evidence of other organ system involvement. The patient was diagnosed with 'Filarial Hydropneumothorax'. After treatment with a temporary chest drain and oral diethylcarbamazine citrate, there was dramatic relief of symptoms and radiological improvement. The patient has been symptom free with no features of recurrence through 8 months of follow-up. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Immunopathogenesis of lymphatic filarial disease.

    PubMed

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B

    2012-11-01

    Although two thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ~40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce changes that result in dilatation of lymphatics and thickening of the lymphatic vessel walls. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results from the summation of the effect of tissue alterations induced by both living and nonliving adult parasites, the host inflammatory response to the parasites and their secreted antigens, the host inflammatory response to the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and those seen as a consequence of secondary bacterial or fungal infections. Inflammatory damage induced by filarial parasites appears to be multifactorial, with endogenous parasite products, Wolbachia, and host immunity all playing important roles. This review will initially examine the prototypical immune responses engendered by the parasite and delineate the regulatory mechanisms elicited to prevent immune-mediated pathology. This will be followed by a discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, with the central theme being that pathogenesis is a two-step process-the first initiated by the parasite and host innate immune system and the second propagated mainly by the host's adaptive immune system and by other factors (including secondary infections).

  9. The Wolbachia endosymbiont as an anti-filarial nematode target

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark J.; Foster, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Human disease caused by parasitic filarial nematodes is a major cause of global morbidity. The parasites are transmitted by arthropod intermediate hosts and are responsible for lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) or onchocerciasis (river blindness). Within these filarial parasites are intracellular alpha-proteobacteria, Wolbachia, that were first observed almost 30 years ago. The obligate endosymbiont has been recognized as a target for anti-filarial nematode chemotherapy as evidenced by the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatment in an extensive series of human trials. While current treatments with doxycycline and rifampicin are not practical for widespread use due to the length of required treatments and contraindications, anti-Wolbachia targeting nevertheless appears a promising alternative for filariasis control in situations where current programmatic strategies fail or are unable to be delivered and it provides a superior efficacy for individual therapy. The mechanisms that underlie the symbiotic relationship between Wolbachia and its nematode hosts remain elusive. Comparative genomics, bioinfomatic and experimental analyses have identified a number of potential interactions, which may be drug targets. One candidate is de novo heme biosynthesis, due to its absence in the genome sequence of the host nematode, Brugia malayi, but presence in Wolbachia and its potential roles in worm biology. We describe this and several additional candidate targets, as well as our approaches for understanding the nature of the host-symbiont relationship. PMID:20730111

  10. Zoonotic aspects of filarial infections in man

    PubMed Central

    Dissanaike, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    This article gives an account of the filarial parasites found in man and their potential transmissibility to and from other vertebrate animals under natural and experimental conditions. Those species that are regarded as being primarily parasites of other vertebrates, but which also infect man, are then dealt with in greater detail. These include the subperiodic strain of Brugia malayi and perhaps also B. pahangi, both of which are found in wild and domestic carnivores and monkeys, and Dirofilaria species of dogs and racoons. The Brugia parasites develop to maturity with the production of microfilaraemia and clinical manifestations in man similar to those caused by periodic B. malayi in man. Human dirofilariasis, on the other hand, represents a transmission cul-de-sac for the parasite. Clinical manifestations are mild or absent and generally the worms do not mature and, even if they do, they rarely give rise to microfilaraemia. D. immitis causes pulmonary dirofilariasis, and D. repens and D. tenuis give rise to subcutaneous nodules in man. The diagnosis of dirofilariasis depends on an awareness of the infection in the animal reservoirs and of the possibility of man being exposed to bites of infected vectors. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:314349

  11. Zoonotic aspects of filarial infections in man.

    PubMed

    Dissanaike, A S

    1979-01-01

    This article gives an account of the filarial parasites found in man and their potential transmissibility to and from other vertebrate animals under natural and experimental conditions.Those species that are regarded as being primarily parasites of other vertebrates, but which also infect man, are then dealt with in greater detail. These include the subperiodic strain of Brugia malayi and perhaps also B. pahangi, both of which are found in wild and domestic carnivores and monkeys, and Dirofilaria species of dogs and racoons.The Brugia parasites develop to maturity with the production of microfilaraemia and clinical manifestations in man similar to those caused by periodic B. malayi in man. Human dirofilariasis, on the other hand, represents a transmission cul-de-sac for the parasite. Clinical manifestations are mild or absent and generally the worms do not mature and, even if they do, they rarely give rise to microfilaraemia. D. immitis causes pulmonary dirofilariasis, and D. repens and D. tenuis give rise to subcutaneous nodules in man. The diagnosis of dirofilariasis depends on an awareness of the infection in the animal reservoirs and of the possibility of man being exposed to bites of infected vectors.

  12. Toward molecular parasitologic diagnosis: enhanced diagnostic sensitivity for filarial infections in mobile populations.

    PubMed

    Fink, Doran L; Fahle, Gary A; Fischer, Steven; Fedorko, Daniel F; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of filarial infections among individuals residing in areas where the disease is not endemic requires both strong clinical suspicion and expert training in infrequently practiced parasitological methods. Recently developed filarial molecular diagnostic assays are highly sensitive and specific but have limited availability and have not been closely evaluated for clinical use outside populations residing in areas of endemicity. In this study, we assessed the performance of a panel of real-time PCR assays for the four most common human filarial pathogens among blood and tissue samples collected from a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for suspected filarial infections. Compared to blood filtration, real-time PCR was equally sensitive for the detection of microfilaremia due to Wuchereria bancrofti (2 of 46 samples positive by both blood filtration and PCR with no discordant results) and Loa loa (24 of 208 samples positive by both blood filtration and PCR, 4 samples positive by PCR only, and 3 samples positive by blood filtration only). Real-time PCR of skin snip samples was significantly more sensitive than microscopic examination for the detection of Onchocerca volvulus microfiladermia (2 of 218 samples positive by both microscopy and PCR and 12 samples positive by PCR only). The molecular assays required smaller amounts of blood and tissue than conventional methods and could be performed by laboratory personnel without specialized parasitology training. Taken together, these data demonstrate the utility of the molecular diagnosis of filarial infections in mobile populations.

  13. Toward Molecular Parasitologic Diagnosis: Enhanced Diagnostic Sensitivity for Filarial Infections in Mobile Populations▿

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Doran L.; Fahle, Gary A.; Fischer, Steven; Fedorko, Daniel F.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of filarial infections among individuals residing in areas where the disease is not endemic requires both strong clinical suspicion and expert training in infrequently practiced parasitological methods. Recently developed filarial molecular diagnostic assays are highly sensitive and specific but have limited availability and have not been closely evaluated for clinical use outside populations residing in areas of endemicity. In this study, we assessed the performance of a panel of real-time PCR assays for the four most common human filarial pathogens among blood and tissue samples collected from a cohort of patients undergoing evaluation for suspected filarial infections. Compared to blood filtration, real-time PCR was equally sensitive for the detection of microfilaremia due to Wuchereria bancrofti (2 of 46 samples positive by both blood filtration and PCR with no discordant results) and Loa loa (24 of 208 samples positive by both blood filtration and PCR, 4 samples positive by PCR only, and 3 samples positive by blood filtration only). Real-time PCR of skin snip samples was significantly more sensitive than microscopic examination for the detection of Onchocerca volvulus microfiladermia (2 of 218 samples positive by both microscopy and PCR and 12 samples positive by PCR only). The molecular assays required smaller amounts of blood and tissue than conventional methods and could be performed by laboratory personnel without specialized parasitology training. Taken together, these data demonstrate the utility of the molecular diagnosis of filarial infections in mobile populations. PMID:20980560

  14. "Filarial dance sign" real-time ultrasound diagnosis of filarial oophoritis.

    PubMed

    Panditi, Surekha; Shelke, Ashwini G; Thummalakunta, Laxmi Narasimha Praveen

    2016-10-01

    Filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by Filarial nematodes (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia timori) that commonly causes lymphatic obstruction resulting in edema and increase in the size of the affected organ. Filariasis is diagnosed by identifying microfilariae on Giemsa stain. The immunochromatographic card test is diagnostic. Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for detecting adult filarial worms/microfilaria in the lymphatic system, which are responsible for the classic "filarial dance sign" caused by twirling movements of the microfilariae. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:500-501, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Estimating limits for natural human embryo mortality.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Gavin E

    2016-01-01

    Natural human embryonic mortality is generally considered to be high. Values of 70% and higher are widely cited. However, it is difficult to determine accurately owing to an absence of direct data quantifying embryo loss between fertilisation and implantation. The best available data for quantifying pregnancy loss come from three published prospective studies (Wilcox, Zinaman and Wang) with daily cycle by cycle monitoring of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) in women attempting to conceive. Declining conception rates cycle by cycle in these studies indicate that a proportion of the study participants were sub-fertile. Hence, estimates of fecundability and pre-implantation embryo mortality obtained from the whole study cohort will inevitably be biased. This new re-analysis of aggregate data from these studies confirms the impression that discrete fertile and sub-fertile sub-cohorts were present. The proportion of sub-fertile women in the three studies was estimated as 28.1% (Wilcox), 22.8% (Zinaman) and 6.0% (Wang). The probability of conceiving an hCG pregnancy (indicating embryo implantation) was, respectively, 43.2%, 38.1% and 46.2% among normally fertile women, and 7.6%, 2.5% and 4.7% among sub-fertile women. Pre-implantation loss is impossible to calculate directly from available data although plausible limits can be estimated. Based on this new analysis and a model for evaluating reproductive success and failure it is proposed that a plausible range for normal human embryo and fetal mortality from fertilisation to birth is 40-60%.

  16. Parasitological, serological, and clinical evidence for high prevalence of podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis) in Midakegn district, central Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Oli, Geleta Geshere; Ayele, Fasil Tekola; Petros, Beyene

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Both podoconiosis (a geochemical non-filarial disease) and chronic filarial disease result in lower limb elephantiasis. The aims of the present study were to determine whether the elephantiasis in Midakegn district, central Ethiopia is filarial or non-filarial (podoconiosis) using serological, parasitological, and clinical examinations, and to estimate its prevalence. METHODS House-to-house visits were made in 330 randomly selected households. All household members that had elephantiasis were interviewed and clinically examined at the nearby health center to confirm presence of elephantiasis, check presence of scrotal swelling, and rule out other causes of lymphoedema. Midnight blood sample was obtained from each participant with elephantiasis for microscopic examination of W. bancrofti microfilaria. Day time blood sample was obtained from half of the participants for serological confirmation using the immuno-chromatographic test card. RESULTS Consistent with features of podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis), none of the elephantiasis cases had consistently worn shoes since childhood; 94.3% had bilateral swelling limited below the level of the knees; no individual had thigh or scrotal elephantiasis; parasitological test for microfilariae and serological tests for W. bancrofti antigen turned negative in all samples. The prevalence of the disease was 7.4%. Prevalence peaked in the third decade of life, which also includes the most economically active age groups. CONCLUSIONS This study has shown high prevalence of podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis) and absence of filarial elephantiasis in Midakegn district. Prevention, treatment, and control of podoconiosis must be among the top priorities of public health programs in the district. PMID:22487446

  17. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  18. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott T; Tisch, Daniel J; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) is the most widely distributed of the three nematodes known to cause lymphatic filariasis (LF), the other two being Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. Current tools available to monitor LF are limited to diagnostic tests targeting DNA repeats, filarial antigens, and anti-filarial antibodies. While these tools are useful for detection and surveillance, elimination programs have yet to take full advantage of molecular typing for inferring infection history, strain fingerprinting, and evolution. To date, molecular typing approaches have included whole mitochondrial genomes, genotyping, targeted sequencing, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs). These studies have revealed much about Wb biology. For example, in one study in Papua New Guinea researchers identified 5 major strains that were widespread and many minor strains some of which exhibit geographic stratification. Genome data, while rare, has been utilized to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among taxa of the Onchocercidae (the clade of filarial nematodes) and identify gene synteny. Their phylogeny reveals that speciation from the common ancestor of both B. malayi and Wb occurred around 5-6 millions years ago with shared ancestry to other filarial nematodes as recent as 15 million years ago. These discoveries hold promise for gene discovery and identifying drug targets in species that are more amenable to in vivo experiments. Continued technological developments in whole genome sequencing and data analysis will likely replace many other forms of molecular typing, multiplying the amount of data available on population structure, genetic diversity, and phylogenetics. Once widely available, the addition of population genetic data from genomic studies should hasten the elimination of LF parasites like Wb. Infectious disease control programs have benefited greatly from population genetics data and recently from population genomics data. However, while there is currently a surplus

  19. Chemotherapeutic reactions of Chandlerella hawkingi, the filarial parasite of the Indian jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos (Agler).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, R J; Sen, A B

    1969-02-01

    1. A high percentage of Indian jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler), found in and around Lucknow, harbour a natural filarial infection Chandlerella hawkingi. The microfilariae of this species are sheathed and show nocturnal periodicity.2. Fourteen compounds active against other kinds of filariae, especially against Litomosoides carinii, were tested against Ch. hawkingi in jungle crows to find whether this infection would be suitable for routine filarial chemotherapy. This is apparently the first report of systematic screening of antifilarial compounds against an avian filariasis.3. Tartar emetic (10 mg/kg intravenously, daily for 6 days) and arsenamide (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, daily for 6 days) proved to be effective in killing adult worms. Trivalent tryparsamide, though effective, was toxic in the doses tried. Diethylcarbamazine and other compounds tested were ineffective.4. The chemotherapeutic susceptibilities of Ch. hawkingi differ considerably from those of L. carinii and Wuchereria bancrofti.

  20. Chemotherapeutic reactions of Chandlerella hawkingi, the filarial parasite of the Indian jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos (Wagler)

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, R. K.; Sen, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    1. A high percentage of Indian jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler), found in and around Lucknow, harbour a natural filarial infection Chandlerella hawkingi. The microfilariae of this species are sheathed and show nocturnal periodicity. 2. Fourteen compounds active against other kinds of filariae, especially against Litomosoides carinii, were tested against Ch. hawkingi in jungle crows to find whether this infection would be suitable for routine filarial chemotherapy. This is apparently the first report of systematic screening of antifilarial compounds against an avian filariasis. 3. Tartar emetic (10 mg/kg intravenously, daily for 6 days) and arsenamide (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, daily for 6 days) proved to be effective in killing adult worms. Trivalent tryparsamide, though effective, was toxic in the doses tried. Diethylcarbamazine and other compounds tested were ineffective. 4. The chemotherapeutic susceptibilities of Ch. hawkingi differ considerably from those of L. carinii and Wuchereria bancrofti. PMID:5774047

  1. Within city limits: nature and children's books about nature in the city

    Treesearch

    Leonard S. Marcus

    1977-01-01

    Many children's books give the impression that we must leave the city to be "in nature.'' This is a review of children's books about nature found within city limits. The books include a natural history of New York City; a guide to city wildflowers and other weeds; a book about city trees; a delightful inquiry into the true nature of the roach;...

  2. Telomeres and the natural lifespan limit in humans.

    PubMed

    Steenstrup, Troels; Kark, Jeremy D; Verhulst, Simon; Thinggaard, Mikael; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Dalgård, Christine; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Christiansen, Lene; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Timothy D; Petersen, Inge; Kimura, Masayuki; Benetos, Athanase; Labat, Carlos; Sinnreich, Ronit; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Levy, Daniel; Hunt, Steven C; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Chen, Wei; Berenson, Gerald S; Barbieri, Michelangela; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Savage, Sharon A; Christensen, Kaare; Yashin, Anatoliy I; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Aviv, Abraham

    2017-04-01

    An ongoing debate in demography has focused on whether the human lifespan has a maximal natural limit. Taking a mechanistic perspective, and knowing that short telomeres are associated with diminished longevity, we examined whether telomere length dynamics during adult life could set a maximal natural lifespan limit. We define leukocyte telomere length of 5 kb as the 'telomeric brink', which denotes a high risk of imminent death. We show that a subset of adults may reach the telomeric brink within the current life expectancy and more so for a 100-year life expectancy. Thus, secular trends in life expectancy should confront a biological limit due to crossing the telomeric brink.

  3. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti

    PubMed Central

    Small, Scott T.; Tisch, Daniel J.; Zimmerman, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) is the most widely distributed of the three nematodes known to cause lymphatic filariasis (LF), the other two being Brugia malayi and B. timori. Current tools available to monitor LF are limited to diagnostic tests targeting DNA repeats, filarial antigens, and anti-filarial antibodies. While these tools are useful for detection and surveillance, elimination programs have yet to take full advantage of molecular typing for inferring infection history, strain fingerprinting, and evolution. To date, molecular typing approaches have included whole mitochondrial genomes, genotyping, targeted sequencing, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs). These studies have revealed much about Wb biology. For example, in one study in Papua New Guinea researchers identified 5 major strains that were widespread and many minor strains some of which exhibit geographic stratification. Genome data, while rare, has been utilized to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among taxa of the Onchocercidae (the clade of filarial nematodes) and identify gene synteny. Their phylogeny reveals that speciation from the common ancestor of both B. malayi and Wb occurred around 5–6 millions years ago with shared ancestry to other filarial nematodes as recent as 15 million years ago. These discoveries hold promise for gene discovery and identifying drug targets in species that are more amenable to in vivo experiments. Continued technological developments in whole genome sequencing and data analysis will likely replace many other forms of molecular typing, multiplying the amount of data available on population structure, genetic diversity, and phylogenetics. Once widely available, the addition of population genetic data from genomic studies should hasten the elimination of LF parasites like Wb. PMID:25176600

  4. Filarial infection influences mosquito behaviour and fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, Katherine; Cook, Darren; Taylor, Mark J.; Reimer, Lisa J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding vector-parasite interactions is increasingly important as we move towards the endpoint goals set by the Global Programme for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF), as interaction dynamics may change with reduced transmission pressure. Elimination models used to predict programmatic endpoints include parameters for vector-specific transmission dynamics, despite the fact that our knowledge of the host-seeking behaviour of filariasis infected mosquitoes is lacking. We observed a dynamic, stage-specific and density dependent change in Aedes aegypti behaviour towards host cues when exposed to Brugia malayi filarial parasites. Infected mosquitoes exhibited reduced activation and flight towards a host during the period of larval development (L1/L2), transitioning to a 5 fold increase in activation and flight towards a host when infective stage larvae (L3) were present (p < 0.001). In uninfected control mosquitoes, we observed a reduction in convergence towards a host during the same period. Furthermore, this behaviour was density dependent with non-activated mosquitoes harbouring a greater burden of L1 and L2 larvae while activated mosquitoes harboured a greater number of L3 (p < 0.001). Reductions in fecundity were also density-dependent, and extended to mosquitoes that were exposed to microfilariae but did not support larval development. PMID:27796352

  5. Human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Bonne-Année, S; Nutman, T B

    2017-05-15

    Filarial infections are characteristically chronic and can cause debilitating diseases governed by parasite-induced innate and adaptive immune responses. Filarial parasites traverse or establish niches in the skin (migrating infective larvae), in nonmucosal tissues (adult parasite niche) and in the blood or skin (circulating microfilariae) where they intersect with the host immune response. While several studies have demonstrated that filarial parasites and their antigens can modulate myeloid cells (monocyte, macrophage and dendritic cell subsets), T- and B-lymphocytes and skin resident cell populations, the role of innate lymphoid cells during filarial infections has only recently emerged. Despite the identification and characterization of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in murine helminth infections, little is actually known about the role of human ILCs during parasitic infections. The focus of this review will be to highlight the composition of ILCs in the skin, lymphatics and blood; where the host-parasite interaction is well-defined and to examine the role of ILCs during filarial infections. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Molecular identification of Wolbachia from the filarial nematode Mansonella perstans

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Paul B.; Coulibaly, Yaya; Kubofcik, Joseph; Diallo, Abdallah A.; Klion, Amy D.; Traoré, Sekou F.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Wolbachiae are bacterial endosymbionts of insects and many filarial nematodes whose products trigger inflammation in filarial infections. The dependence of the parasites on their endosymbionts has also led to the use of antibiotics directed against the Wolbachiae, therapy that has been demonstrated to have a profound salutary effect on filarial infections. The identification of Wolbachiae in Mansonella species has been conclusively shown for Mansonella ozzardi (Mo), but not for Mansonella perstans (Mp) Using primers known to amplify the 16S ribosomal DNA of other filarial Wolbachiae, an identical 1393 bp band was found in all samples tested. Sequence analysis of these samples demonstrated a single consensus sequence for Mp Wolbachia 16S rDNA that was most similar to Wolbachia sequences from other filarial nematodes. When aligned with the only other Mansonella Wolbachia sequence (Mo) there were only 8 nucleotide differences in the 1369 bp overlapping sequence. Phylogenetic dendrograms, showing the relationship of the Mp Wolbachia to other Wolbachia 16S rDNA, tracked almost identically to the 5S rRNA of their parasite host. Wolbachia surface protein (WSP) was also demonstrated in protein extracted from Mp-containing whole blood. In advance of a treatment trial of Mp, a method for the quantitation of Mp Wolbachia was developed and used to demonstrate not only a relationship between microfilarial numbers and Wolbachia copy numbers, but also to demonstrate the effect of antibiotic on ridding Mp of Wolbachia. PMID:18538871

  7. How do the macrocyclic lactones kill filarial nematode larvae?

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Maclean, Mary J.; Coates, Ruby; McCoy, Ciaran J.; Reaves, Barbara J.

    2017-01-01

    The macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are one of the few classes of drug used in the control of the human filarial infections, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, and the only one used to prevent heartworm disease in dogs and cats. Despite their importance in preventing filarial diseases, the way in which the MLs work against these parasites is unclear. In vitro measurements of nematode motility have revealed a large discrepancy between the maximum plasma concentrations achieved after drug administration and the amounts required to paralyze worms. Recent evidence has shed new light on the likely functions of the ML target, glutamate-gated chloride channels, in filarial nematodes and supports the hypothesis that the rapid clearance of microfilariae that follows treatment involves the host immune system. PMID:27279086

  8. How do the macrocyclic lactones kill filarial nematode larvae?

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Maclean, Mary J; Coates, Ruby; McCoy, Ciaran J; Reaves, Barbara J

    2016-09-01

    The macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are one of the few classes of drug used in the control of the human filarial infections, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, and the only one used to prevent heartworm disease in dogs and cats. Despite their importance in preventing filarial diseases, the way in which the MLs work against these parasites is unclear. In vitro measurements of nematode motility have revealed a large discrepancy between the maximum plasma concentrations achieved after drug administration and the amounts required to paralyze worms. Recent evidence has shed new light on the likely functions of the ML target, glutamate-gated chloride channels, in filarial nematodes and supports the hypothesis that the rapid clearance of microfilariae that follows treatment involves the host immune system.

  9. Factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Singh, Vishwajeet; Ali, Wahid; Natu, S M; Singh, Bhupendra Pal; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Dalela, Divakar

    2014-01-01

    Filarial chyluria is a common problem in filarial endemic countries. Its management begins with medical therapy but some patients progress to require surgery. The present study aimed to determine factors affecting response to medical management in patients of filarial chyluria. This prospective study conducted between August 2008 and November 2012, included conservatively managed patients of chyluria. Demographic profile, clinical presentation, treatment history and urinary triglycerides (TGs) and cholesterol levels at baseline were compared between the responders and non-responders. Apart from the clinical grade of chyluria, hematuria was evaluated as an independent risk factor. Out of the 222 patients (mean age, 37.99 ± 13.29 years, 129 males), 31 patients failed to respond while 35 had a recurrence after initial response; the overall success rate being 70.3% at a mean follow-up of 25 months. No difference was observed in demographics, clinical presentation, presence of hematuria, disease duration and mean urinary TGs loss between responders and non-responders. On multivariate analysis, patients with treatment failure were found to have a higher-grade disease (14.3% Grade-I, 36.6% Grades-II and 60% Grade-III), higher number of pretreatment courses (1.59 ± 1.08 vs. 1.02 ± 0.79) and heavier cholesterol (26.54 ± 23.46 vs. 8.81 ± 8.55 mg/dl) loss at baseline compared with responders (P < 0.05). Conservative management has a success rate in excess of 70%, not affected by the disease chronicity, previous episodes and recurrent nature. However, higher-grade disease, extensive pre-treatment with drugs and higher urinary cholesterol loss at baseline are the predictors of poor response. Hematuria is not an independent poor risk factor for conservative management.

  10. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Binnebose, Andrea M.; Haughney, Shannon L.; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H.

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  11. Hidden evolution: progress and limitations in detecting multifarious natural selection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman A; Kliman, Richard M

    2002-04-01

    From illustrative examples of research on the best-studied group of species to date, Drosophila melanogaster and its closest relatives, we argue that selection is multifarious, but often hidden. Selective fixation of new, highly advantageous alleles is the most parsimonious explanation for a typical pattern of molecular variation observed in genomic regions characterized by very low recombination: drastically reduced DNA sequence variation within species and typical levels of sequence divergence among species. At the same time, the identity of the gene (or genes) influenced by selection is not just difficult to discern; it may be impossible. Studies of the genetic basis of reproductive isolation demonstrate that, although the D. melanogaster complex species appear virtually identical, dozens of currently unidentified genes contribute to hybrid sterility. We argue that these findings are best explained by selectively-driven functional divergence and demonstrate the multifarious nature of selection. Although multifarious selection certainly occurs, the exact characters responsible for differences in survival and reproductive success are unknown. We do not see these inherent limits as a cause for despair or a problem for evolutionary biology. Instead, we hope to raise awareness of these complexities of evolution by highlighting both the progress and the limitations of characterizing multifarious natural selection.

  12. In Vitro, In Silico and In Vivo Studies of Ursolic Acid as an Anti-Filarial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Komal; Kushwaha, Vikas; Sharma, Pooja; Verma, Richa; Srivastava, Mukesh; Khan, Feroz; Murthy, P. K.; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    As part of our drug discovery program for anti-filarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, leaves of Eucalyptus tereticornis were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of an anti-filarial agent, ursolic acid (UA) as a major constituent. Antifilarial activity of UA against the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi using in vitro and in vivo assays, and in silico docking search on glutathione-s-transferase (GST) parasitic enzyme were carried out. The UA was lethal to microfilariae (mf; LC100: 50; IC50: 8.84 µM) and female adult worms (LC100: 100; IC50: 35.36 µM) as observed by motility assay; it exerted 86% inhibition in MTT reduction potential of the adult parasites. The selectivity index (SI) of UA for the parasites was found safe. This was supported by the molecular docking studies, which showed adequate docking (LibDock) scores for UA (−8.6) with respect to the standard antifilarial drugs, ivermectin (IVM −8.4) and diethylcarbamazine (DEC-C −4.6) on glutathione-s-transferase enzyme. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that UA possesses drug-like properties. Furthermore, UA was evaluated in vivo in B. malayi-M. coucha model (natural infection), which showed 54% macrofilaricidal activity, 56% female worm sterility and almost unchanged microfilaraemia maintained throughout observation period with no adverse effect on the host. Thus, in conclusion in vitro, in silico and in vivo results indicate that UA is a promising, inexpensive, widely available natural lead, which can be designed and developed into a macrofilaricidal drug. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-filarial potential of UA from E. tereticornis, which is in full agreement with the Thomson Reuter's ‘Metadrug’ tool screening predictions. PMID:25375886

  13. Imperfect mimicry and the limits of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, David W; Pfennig, David W

    2013-12-01

    Mimicry--when one organism (the mimic) evolves a phenotypic resemblance to another (the model) due to selective benefits--is widely used to illustrate natural selection's power to generate adaptations. However, many putative mimics resemble their models imprecisely, and such imperfect mimicry represents a specific challenge to mimicry theory and a general one to evolutionary theory. Here, we discuss 11 nonmutually exclusive hypotheses for imperfect mimicry. We group these hypotheses according to whether imperfect mimicry reflects: an artifact of human perception, which is not shared by any naturally occurring predators and therefore is not truly an instance of imperfect mimicry; genetic, developmental or time-lag constraints, which (temporarily) prevent a response to selection for perfect mimicry; relaxed selection, where imperfect mimicry is as adaptive as perfect mimicry; or tradeoffs, where imperfect mimicry is (locally) more adaptive than perfect mimicry. We find that the relaxed selection hypothesis has garnered the most support. However, because only a few study systems have thus far been comprehensively evaluated, the relative contributions of the various hypotheses toward explaining the evolution of imperfect mimicry remain unclear. Ultimately, clarifying why imperfect mimicry exists should provide critical insights into the limits of natural selection in producing complex adaptations.

  14. Filarial parasites develop faster and reproduce earlier in response to host immune effectors that determine filarial life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Babayan, Simon A; Read, Andrew F; Lawrence, Rachel A; Bain, Odile; Allen, Judith E

    2010-10-19

    Humans and other mammals mount vigorous immune assaults against helminth parasites, yet there are intriguing reports that the immune response can enhance rather than impair parasite development. It has been hypothesized that helminths, like many free-living organisms, should optimize their development and reproduction in response to cues predicting future life expectancy. However, immune-dependent development by helminth parasites has so far eluded such evolutionary explanation. By manipulating various arms of the immune response of experimental hosts, we show that filarial nematodes, the parasites responsible for debilitating diseases in humans like river blindness and elephantiasis, accelerate their development in response to the IL-5 driven eosinophilia they encounter when infecting a host. Consequently they produce microfilariae, their transmission stages, earlier and in greater numbers. Eosinophilia is a primary host determinant of filarial life expectancy, operating both at larval and at late adult stages in anatomically and temporally separate locations, and is implicated in vaccine-mediated protection. Filarial nematodes are therefore able to adjust their reproductive schedules in response to an environmental predictor of their probability of survival, as proposed by evolutionary theory, thereby mitigating the effects of the immune attack to which helminths are most susceptible. Enhancing protective immunity against filarial nematodes, for example through vaccination, may be less effective at reducing transmission than would be expected and may, at worst, lead to increased transmission and, hence, pathology.

  15. Maternal filarial infection: association of anti-sheath antibody responses with plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Achary, K G; Mandal, N N; Mishra, S; Sarangi, S S; Kar, S K; Satapathy, A K; Bal, M S

    2013-04-01

    Maternal filarial infection influences the risk of acquiring infection and development of immunity in children. Here we have analysed the blood samples of 60 mothers (24 infected and 36 uninfected) and their corresponding cord bloods to assess the impact of maternal infection on the anti-sheath antibodies and cytokine production in neonates born from them. About 69·4% of non-infected mothers and their cord bloods showed the presence of anti-sheath antibodies, while only 16·6% of the cord bloods from infected mothers were positive for it. The IL-10 level was significantly high in cord bloods of infected mothers compared with non-infected mothers. At the same time the IL-10 level was also observed to be remarkably high in cord bloods of both infected and non-infected mothers negative for anti-sheath antibody. In contrast, IFN-γ levels were significantly high in cord bloods of non-infected mothers compared with infected mothers and the increment was prominent in cord bloods of both infected and non-infected mothers positive for anti-sheath antibody. The study reveals that the presence or absence of anti-sheath antibodies in association with cytokines skews the filarial specific immunity to either Th1 or Th2 responses in neonates. This may affect the natural history of filarial infection in early childhood.

  16. Absence of the Filarial Endosymbiont Wolbachia in Seal Heartworm (Acanthocheilonema spirocauda) but Evidence of Ancient Lateral Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Keroack, Caroline D; Wurster, Jenna I; Decker, Caroline G; Williams, Kalani M; Slatko, Barton E; Foster, Jeremy M; Williams, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    The symbiotic relationship of Wolbachia spp. was first observed in insects and subsequently in many parasitic filarial nematodes. This bacterium is believed to provide metabolic and developmental assistance to filarial parasitic nematodes, although the exact nature of this relationship remains to be fully elucidated. While Wolbachia is present in most filarial nematodes in the family Onchocercidae, it is absent in several disparate species such as the human parasite Loa loa . All tested members of the genus Acanthocheilonema, such as Acanthocheilonema viteae, have been shown to lack Wolbachia. Consistent with this, we show that Wolbachia is absent from the seal heartworm (Acanthocheilonema spirocauda), but lateral gene transfer (LGT) of DNA sequences between Wolbachia and A. spirocauda has occurred, indicating a past evolutionary association. Seal heartworm is an important pathogen of phocid seals and understanding its basic biology is essential for conservation of the host. The findings presented here may allow for the development of future treatments or diagnostics for the disease and also aid in clarification of the complicated nematode-Wolbachia relationship.

  17. Microbial phosphorous mobilization strategies across a natural nutrient limitation gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R.; Wang, S.; Nico, P. S.; Fox, P. M.; Hao, Z.; Karaoz, U.; Torok, T.; Brodie, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Hao, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a critical nutrient and frequently limits primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. Microorganisms have evolved an array of strategies to mobilize occluded and insoluble P and may be important regulators of P availability to vegetation. Understanding the mechanisms of P mobilization, the breadth of microorganisms responsible, and the impact of these organisms on vegetation growth remains an important knowledge gap for both predicting ecosystem productivity and harnessing microbial functions to improve vegetation growth. To determine the relationship between soil development, phosphorus availability and P mobilizing microorganisms and their strategies we are studying a marine terrace chronosequence (Ecological Staircase, Mendocino County, CA) representing a fertility gradient culminating in P-limited pygmy forests that provide an ideal natural observatory to investigate how plant-microbe interactions co-evolve in response to P stress. Soil mineralogical analysis identified acidic soils bearing iron and aluminum phosphates and phytate as the dominant forms of occluded inorganic and organic P, respectively. Several diverse bacterial and fungal strains were isolated on media with AlPO4, FePO4, or phytate as the sole P source. Most microorganisms were able to utilize AlPO4 as a sole P source, with fewer subsisting on FePO4 or phytate. Terraces with a higher fraction of occluded and organic P harbored the greatest abundance of P-mobilizing microorganisms, with a significant proportion coming from the Burkholderia. Isolates that exhibited significant excess P mobilization were inoculated with Arabidopsis and Switchgrass plants grown with insoluble P forms had a positive impact on growth. These results indicate that rhizosphere microorganisms that have evolved under extreme nutrient limitation have an extended capacity for P solubilization, and could potentially be harnessed to alleviate P stress for plants. The detailed mechanisms for P

  18. Parasitological, serological and clinical evidence for high prevalence of podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis) in Midakegn district, central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Geshere Oli, Geleta; Tekola Ayele, Fasil; Petros, Beyene

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether the elephantiasis in Midakegn district, central Ethiopia, is filarial or non-filarial (podoconiosis) using serological, parasitological and clinical examinations, and to estimate its prevalence. At house-to-house visits in 330 randomly selected households, all household members who had elephantiasis were interviewed and clinically examined at the nearby health centre to confirm the presence of elephantiasis, check the presence of scrotal swelling and rule out the other causes of lymphoedema. A midnight blood sample was obtained from each participant with elephantiasis for microscopic examination of Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria. A daytime blood sample was obtained from half of the participants for serological confirmation using the immuno-chromatographic test card. Consistent with the features of podoconiosis, none of the elephantiasis cases had consistently worn shoes since childhood; 94.3% had bilateral swelling limited below the level of the knees; no individual had thigh or scrotal elephantiasis; parasitological test for microfilariae and serological tests for W. bancrofti antigen were negative in all samples. The prevalence of the disease was 7.4% and it peaked in the third decade of life, the most economically active age. Midakegn District has a high prevalence of podoconiosis and no filarial elephantiasis. Prevention, treatment and control of podoconiosis must be among the top priorities of public health programmes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Spectral and landscape characterization of filarious and non-filarious villages in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sowilem, Mohamed M; Bahgat, Iman M; el-Kady, Gamal A; el-Sawaf, Bahira M

    2006-08-01

    Filarial disease is endemic in Egypt in some villages of Nile Delta governorates where it is transmitted by Culex pipiens female. GIS functions are used to identify environmental indicators of high-risk village as indicated by mosquito density, human infection rate, vector species composition, mean life expectancy "e(o)" & environmental variables (geology, hydrology, soil types, etc) as well as meteorological factors (temperature, RH and rainfall) in relation to filaria transmission risk. Remote-sensing technology was used to distinguish between the two studied villages as high and non-infected, as defined by microfilarial prevalence. The results indicate that filaria transmission risk is higher at an area characterized by highly productive aquifers, silt clay soil, receiving little amount of rain with low relative humidity (RH). The results indicate that the most important landscape elements associated with prevalence are water and different vegetation. This work showed that the integration between GIS and remote sensing technologies to analyze and identify the environmental factors, associated with the disease, did not only allow mapping icurrent spatial patterns, but also predicting its distribution under expected future developmental and environmental changes.

  20. The identification of infective filarial larvae in Simuliidae*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, G. S.; Pester, F. R. N.

    1962-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the presence of animal filariae can lead to confusion in the interpretation of infection rates in mosquito vectors of filariasis, the filariae found in man-biting simuliids are usually assumed to be Onchocerca volvulus. The authors of this paper emphasize that it is unwise to calculate transmission indices from infection rates in man-biting simuliids unless there is confidence in the identification of the filarial larvae. In this respect they cite their observations on Mount Elgon in Uganda which show that the majority of the filarial larvae in Simulium neavei—the local vector of onchocerciasis—are of species that do not affect man. To assist in the correct interpretation of infection rates in the vectors the authors made a detailed study of the morphological character of O. volvulus infective larvae and established criteria for distinguishing O. volvulus from other filariae known to be transmitted by simuliids. PMID:13938041

  1. The burden of non-filarial elephantiasis in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Animut, Abebe

    2007-12-01

    Although known for many years, non-filarial elephantiasis remains a public health problem in tropical Africa, including the farming community of Ethiopia. The problem may be exacerbated in women who shoulder most of the burden of agricultural labour in the countryside. The intention of this brief review is to emphasise the burden of the disease and to alert researchers and organisations concerned with health care and prevention.

  2. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-01-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  3. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. © 2014 The Authors. Parasite Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Resources, environment, and population: the nature of future limits.

    PubMed

    Ridker, R G; Cecelski, E W

    1979-08-01

    The balance between world supplies of resources and the demands presented by population growth in the recent past, during the period to 2025, and for the long term is examined. Focus is on the issues, the past in terms of socioeconomic indicators, past trends in market places, and specific evidence of depletion; future demands in terms of population projections and growth in per capita demand; resource supplies to 2025; ultimate resource production possibilities; environmental constraints and risks (problems capable of control at reasonable cost, other domestic environmental problems, and potentially severe global problems); and implications. Improvement in socioeconomic indicators, relatively stable resource market prices, along with evidence of resource and environmental changes suggest that thus far the world as a whole has been able to win the race between demand and supply. For the next 50 years, during which a slowdown is projected in population growth rates and resource consumption, the most important problems to be faced are associated with the unequal distribution of resources and the transition problems of moving from 1 resource regime to another in an orderly fashion. For the long term, a projected equilibrium population of 10-12 billion can probably be sustained at a decent standard of living by more equitable distribution of food and shifts from less to more abundant resources. Ultimately, environmental and security problems associated with growing energy production and use such as increasing atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and nuclear proliferation may be the most difficult to resolve. Although cessation of population growth would help, it does not by itself constitute a solution to the world's resource problems. Both the causes and the symptoms need to be worked on simultaneously. Understanding the true nature of the world's resource and environmental limitations is a 1st step in that direction.

  5. Generalizing a limit description of the natural logarithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, David E.

    2010-07-01

    If f is a continuous positive-valued function defined on the closed interval from a to x and if k 0 > 0, then ? . This generalizes a result of Finlayson describing ln(x) as a certain limit. Applications include new descriptions of arcsin(x) and arctan(x) as limits. This note could find use as an enrichment material in an introductory calculus course in the unit(s) introducing the Riemann integral and its applications.

  6. Access to nature in lithuania: Limits, perceptions and design issues

    Treesearch

    Aida Macerinskiene

    2015-01-01

    One of the factors in local tourism could be nature tourism promotion for disabled people in protected areas. This social group is more sensitive to long-distance travel; therefore, it is likely that local tourism is especially attractive. The disabled population may possibly have more free time, which also makes local travel particularly attractive. The main focus...

  7. Natural Limits for Currents in Charge Separated Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessner, A.; Lesch, H.; Kunzl, T.

    Rough estimates and upper limits on current and particle densities form the basis of most of the canonical pulsar models. Whereas the surface of the rotating neutron star is capable of supplying sufficient charges to provide a current that, given the polar cap potential, could easily fuel the observed energy loss processes, observational and theoretical constraints provide strict upper limits to the charge densities. The space charge of a current consisting solely of particles having only one sign creates a compensating potential that will make the maximum current dependent on potential and distance. In the non-relativistic case this fact is expressed in the familiar Child-Langmuir law. Its relativistic generalization and subsequent application to the inner pulsar magnetosphere provides clear limits on the strength and radial extension of charged currents originating on the polar cap. Violent Pierce-type oscillations set in, if one attempts to inject more current than the space charge limit into a given volume. These considerations apply wherever there is a significant amount of charged current flow, in particular in the gap regions. There they can be used to derive limits on the size of such gaps and their stability.

  8. Interleukin 1 (IL-1)- and IL-23-mediated expansion of filarial antigen-specific Th17 and Th22 cells in filarial lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, R; George, P Jovvian; Chandrasekaran, V; Kumaran, P Paul; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2014-07-01

    Lymphatic filarial disease is known to be associated with elevated Th1 responses and normal or diminished Th2 responses to parasite-specific antigens. The roles of Th17 cells and the recently described Th22 cells have not been examined in detail in either filarial infection itself or in filarial disease (e.g., lymphedema and elephantiasis). To explore the roles of Th17 and Th22 cells and their subsets, we examined the frequencies of these cells in individuals with filarial lymphedema (chronic pathology [CP]), in clinically asymptomatic infected (INF) individuals, and in uninfected (UN) individuals ex vivo and in response to parasite and nonparasite antigens. Those with disease (CP) had significantly expanded frequencies of Th17 and Th22 cells, compared with either INF or UN individuals, at baseline (ex vivo) and in response to parasite antigens. This antigen-driven expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was dependent on interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-23, and, to lesser extent, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), as blockade of any of these cytokines resulted in significantly diminished frequencies of Th17 and Th22 cells. Our findings, therefore, suggest that filarial parasite-driven expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells is associated with the pathogenesis of filarial infections and disease. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Interleukin 1 (IL-1)- and IL-23-Mediated Expansion of Filarial Antigen-Specific Th17 and Th22 Cells in Filarial Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Chandrasekaran, V.; Kumaran, P. Paul; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial disease is known to be associated with elevated Th1 responses and normal or diminished Th2 responses to parasite-specific antigens. The roles of Th17 cells and the recently described Th22 cells have not been examined in detail in either filarial infection itself or in filarial disease (e.g., lymphedema and elephantiasis). To explore the roles of Th17 and Th22 cells and their subsets, we examined the frequencies of these cells in individuals with filarial lymphedema (chronic pathology [CP]), in clinically asymptomatic infected (INF) individuals, and in uninfected (UN) individuals ex vivo and in response to parasite and nonparasite antigens. Those with disease (CP) had significantly expanded frequencies of Th17 and Th22 cells, compared with either INF or UN individuals, at baseline (ex vivo) and in response to parasite antigens. This antigen-driven expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells was dependent on interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-23, and, to lesser extent, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), as blockade of any of these cytokines resulted in significantly diminished frequencies of Th17 and Th22 cells. Our findings, therefore, suggest that filarial parasite-driven expansion of Th17 and Th22 cells is associated with the pathogenesis of filarial infections and disease. PMID:24807054

  10. The Limitation of Human Population: A Natural History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumond, Don E.

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that overproduction of offspring by early human populations would have tended to work to the selective disadvantage of the entire society. Decisions regarding population limitations have been highly personal ones based on the amount of short run effort that individuals were able and willing to invest in each child. (GS)

  11. Does species diversity limit productivity in natural grassland communities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, J.B.; Anderson, T.M.; Smith, M.D.; Seabloom, E.; Andelman, S.J.; Meche, G.; Weiher, E.; Allain, L.K.; Jutila, H.; Sankaran, M.; Knops, J.; Ritchie, M.; Willig, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and experimental studies of synthesized assemblages indicate that under particular circumstances species diversity can enhance community productivity through niche complementarity. It remains unclear whether this process has important effects in mature natural ecosystems where competitive feedbacks and complex environmental influences affect diversity-productivity relationships. In this study, we evaluated diversity-productivity relationships while statistically controlling for environmental influences in 12 natural grassland ecosystems. Because diversity-productivity relationships are conspicuously nonlinear, we developed a nonlinear structural equation modeling (SEM) methodology to separate the effects of diversity on productivity from the effects of productivity on diversity. Meta-analysis was used to summarize the SEM findings across studies. While competitive effects were readily detected, enhancement of production by diversity was not. These results suggest that the influence of small-scale diversity on productivity in mature natural systems is a weak force, both in absolute terms and relative to the effects of other controls on productivity. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  12. 75 FR 8245 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 157 Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits...) computes and publishes the project cost and annual limits for natural gas pipelines blanket construction... limits applicable from January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  13. 77 FR 8724 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 157 Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits... (OEP) computes and publishes the project cost and annual limits for natural gas pipelines blanket... establishes cost limits applicable from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  14. 78 FR 8389 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 157 Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits AGENCY... publishes the project cost and annual limits for natural gas pipelines blanket construction certificates for each calendar year. DATES: This final rule is effective February 6, 2013 and establishes cost limits...

  15. 76 FR 8293 - Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 157 Natural Gas Pipelines; Project Cost and Annual Limits...) computes and publishes the project cost and annual limits for natural gas pipelines blanket construction.... Applicability date: This final rule establishes cost limits applicable from January 1, 2011 through December 31...

  16. Heme acquisition in the parasitic filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Ashley N.; Yuan, Xiaojing; Voronin, Denis; Slatko, Barton E.; Hamza, Iqbal; Foster, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Nematodes lack a heme biosynthetic pathway and must acquire heme from exogenous sources. Given the indispensable role of heme, this auxotrophy may be exploited to develop drugs that interfere with heme uptake in parasites. Although multiple heme-responsive genes (HRGs) have been characterized within the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we have undertaken the first study of heme transport in Brugia malayi, a causative agent of lymphatic filariasis. Through functional assays in yeast, as well as heme analog, RNAi, and transcriptomic experiments, we have shown that the heme transporter B. malayi HRG-1 (BmHRG-1) is indeed functional in B. malayi. In addition, BmHRG-1 localizes both to the endocytic compartments and cell membrane when expressed in yeast cells. Transcriptomic sequencing revealed that BmHRG-1, BmHRG-2, and BmMRP-5 (all orthologs of HRGs in C. elegans) are down-regulated in heme-treated B. malayi, as compared to non–heme-treated control worms. Likely because of short gene lengths, multiple exons, other HRGs in B. malayi (BmHRG-3–6) remain unidentified. Although the precise mechanisms of heme homeostasis in a nematode with the ability to acquire heme remains unknown, this study clearly demonstrates that the filarial nematode B. malayi is capable of transporting exogenous heme.—Luck, A. N., Yuan, X., Voronin, D., Slatko, B. E., Hamza, I., Foster, J. M. Heme acquisition in the parasitic filarial nematode Brugia malayi. PMID:27363426

  17. New Limits on the Nature of Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Tyrone; Gilfanov, Marat

    2012-09-01

    To date, the question of which progenitor channel can reproduce the observed rate of type Ia supernovae (Sn Ia) remains unresolved. The single degenerate scenario posits that a white dwarf accretes stably from a companion star until reaching the Chandrasekhar mass. This requires that nuclear burning process at least 0.3 solar masses of hydrogen, the resulting energy release from which easily dominates the total luminosity of the WD (while nuclear burning is steady). In elliptical galaxies, measurements of the total observed soft X-ray emission have already placed strong upper limits on how much of this luminosity may be radiated in X-rays, limiting the possible contribution of "supersoft sources" to the Sn Ia rate. However, a population of single degenerate progenitors large enough to reproduce the Sn Ia rate would also easily provide among the dominant sources of ionizing photons, dramatically hardening the local ionizing UV background. This opens a new avenue for constraining the progenitors of Sn Ia, through consideration of the nebular emission now found in many early-type galaxies by large spectroscopic surveys such as SAURON. Modeling the predicted line ratios using the photoionization code MAPPINGS III, and demanding that they be consistent with those observed, allows us to place new constraints on the total contribution of the single degenerate channel to the Sn Ia rate in elliptical galaxies.

  18. Limitations and prospects of natural photosynthesis for bioenergy production.

    PubMed

    Larkum, A W D

    2010-06-01

    Solar energy is clearly a major future source of energy for humans. While solar photovoltaic and thermal harvesting are attractive there will be a need for biofuels to replace fossil fuels. Natural photosynthesis offers a means to do this, but photosynthesis is inherently inefficient. Terrestrial plants have already been used as a source of biofuels and this use will increase in the future, despite a number of attendant problems. Microalgae as a source of biofuels have to be technically proven and artificial photosynthesis/biohydrogen production lies further into the future. Consideration of these approaches must be weighed against (i) crop production in a hungry, as well as a fuel-hungry, world and (ii) the need to sustain biodiversity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does genetic diversity limit disease spread in natural host populations?

    PubMed Central

    King, K C; Lively, C M

    2012-01-01

    It is a commonly held view that genetically homogenous host populations are more vulnerable to infection than genetically diverse populations. The underlying idea, known as the ‘monoculture effect,' is well documented in agricultural studies. Low genetic diversity in the wild can result from bottlenecks (that is, founder effects), biparental inbreeding or self-fertilization, any of which might increase the risk of epidemics. Host genetic diversity could buffer populations against epidemics in nature, but it is not clear how much diversity is required to prevent disease spread. Recent theoretical and empirical studies, particularly in Daphnia populations, have helped to establish that genetic diversity can reduce parasite transmission. Here, we review the present theoretical work and empirical evidence, and we suggest a new focus on finding ‘diversity thresholds.' PMID:22713998

  20. Physical, psychological, and social aspects of quality of life in filarial lymphedema patients in Colombo, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Rushika S; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R

    2015-03-01

    Quality of life (QOL) was assessed in 141 filarial lymphedema patients and 128 healthy people in the Colombo district, Sri Lanka, by administering modified, translated, and validated (in Sri Lanka) versions of the Short Form 36 health survey questionnaire (SF-36) and the 30-item General Health questionnaire (GHQ-30). The GHQ-30 assesses the current mental health status. The SF-36 measures health on 8 multi-item dimensions covering functional state, well-being, and overall evaluation of health (physical functioning, role limitations resulting from physical health problems, role limitations resulting from emotional problems, energy/fatigue, emotional well-being, social functioning, pain and general health). By SF-36, patients experienced poorer physical functioning, more role limitations resulting from physical health conditions, less emotional well-being, poorer social functioning, and more pain than healthy individuals. By GHQ-30, mental well-being of healthy controls was significantly better than that of patients. The significant difference in the QOL as perceived by filarial lymphedema patients and healthy individuals reiterates the importance of morbidity control in patients affected by this disease.

  1. STUDIES ON THE METABOLISM OF THE FILARIAL WORM, LITOMOSOIDES CARINII

    PubMed Central

    Bueding, Ernest

    1949-01-01

    The filarial worm, Litomosoides carinii, has a high rate of aerobic and anaerobic glucose metabolism. Aerobically 30 to 45 per cent of the glucose utilized was converted to lactic acid, 25 to 35 per cent to acetic acid, and 10 to 20 per cent to a polysaccharide. Anaerobically over 80 per cent of the total carbohydrate removed by the filariae was metabolized to lactic acid, the remainder was accounted for by the production of acetic acid. The high rates of aerobic and anaerobic lactic acid production and of aerobic polysaccharide synthesis, as well as the absence of a postanaerobic increase of the oxygen uptake, differentiate the filarial worm, L. carinii, from the known metabolic characteristics of all other helminths and of most other invertebrates. The rate of aerobic lactate and pyruvate utilization by the filariae appears to be much slower than that of glucose. Anaerobically, dismutation of two moles of pyruvate to one mole of lactate, one mole of acetate, and one mole of CO2, occurred. Aerobically, acetate production from pyruvate exceeded that of lactate. A significant proportion of the pyruvate metabolized aerobically by the filariae was not oxidized to acetate. In the presence of fluoroacetate, aerobic incubation of the filariae in a glucose-containing medium produced a marked decrease in the respiration of the organisms, an accumulation of pyruvate, a decreased formation of acetate, and an increase in aerobic glycolysis. Low concentrations of fluoroacetate (1 x 10–3 M) inhibited the oxidative metabolism of pyruvate which did not result in the conversion of pyruvate to acetate; higher concentrations of this inhibitor produced also a decreased oxidation of pyruvate to acetate. No evidence has been obtained that fluoroacetate inhibits the respiration of the filariae because of a competitive inhibition of acetate oxidation. Respiration and glycolysis of filariae were markedly decreased by low concentrations of p-chloromercuric benzoate. This inhibition could

  2. Immunosenescence: limitations of natural killer cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, Raquel; Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Casas-Avilés, Ignacio; Campos, Carmen; Pera, Alejandra; Morgado, Sara; López-Sejas, Nelson; Hassouneh, Fakhri; Bergua, Juan M; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bañas, Helena; Casado, Javier G; Durán, Esther; Labella, Fernando; Solana, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Cancer is primarily considered a disease of old age. Immunosenescence refers to the age-associated changes in the immune system, and its contribution to the increased risk of cancer in old individuals has been discussed for many years. Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic innate immune cells specialized in defence against tumour and virus-infected cells. NK cell cytotoxicity is the result of a fine balance between activating and inhibitory receptors. Several activating receptors have been identified that recognize different ligands frequently found over-expressed on tumour cells or virus-infected cells. The most important NK cell inhibitory receptors interact with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules expressed on almost all nucleated cells preventing NK cell-mediated lysis of healthy cells. NK cell immunosenescence is characterized by a redistribution of NK cell subsets, a diminished expression of several activating receptors and lower per-cell cytotoxicity. Altered expression of activating receptors has also been described in young and elderly cancer patients probably due to chronic exposure to ligands on tumour cells. Thus, the effect of both age and cancer may act synergistically to diminish NK cell-mediated tumour immunosurveillance. Different strategies harnessing the power of NK cells to target tumour cells have been designed including adoptive therapy with autologous or allogeneic expanded NK cells. In addition, checkpoint blockade of inhibitory receptors and the use of agonist antibodies to stimulate activating receptors are emerging areas of research. In this context, the effect of immunosenescence should be considered to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Discovery of filarial nematode DNA in Amblyomma americanum in Northern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tyler C; Orr, John M; Smith, Joshua D; Arias, Jorge R; Rasgon, Jason L; Norris, Douglas E

    2016-03-01

    Ticks collected in 2011 were screened for the presence of filarial nematode genetic material, and positive samples were sequenced for analysis. Monanema-like filarial nematode DNA was recently discovered in Amblyomma americanum in northern Virginia, marking the first time genetic material from this parasite has been discovered in ticks in the state. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this material was directly related to a previously discovered filarial nematode in A. americanum populations in Maryland as well as recently identified parasites in Ixodes scapularis from southern Connecticut. Further study is warranted to visually confirm the presence of these nematodes, characterize their distribution, and determine if these ticks are intermediate hosts.

  4. Diminished IL-17A levels may protect filarial-infected individuals from development of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Panda, A K; Das, B K

    2017-04-01

    Nematode infections have been observed to inversely correlate with autoimmune disorders. Recently, we have shown the absence of filarial infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who live in filarial-endemic areas. The mechanism(s) by which filarial-infected individuals are protected against the development of RA or SLE are unknown. In mice CIA, an experimental model for RA, ES-62, an execratory product of rodent filarial nematode , has been shown to improve arthritis through suppression of the IL-17 pathway. A total of 160 individuals, 40 each of endemic normal, filarial-infected cases, SLE and RA patients, from filarial-endemic areas, were enrolled in the study. Plasma levels of IL17-A, IFN-α and TNF-α were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RA and SLE patients displayed significantly higher plasma IL-17A, IFN-α and TNF-α levels compared to endemic normal and infected individuals. Furthermore, IL-17A levels were significantly low in participants with filarial infection compared to endemic controls ( p < 0.05). Interestingly, plasma IL-17A levels correlated inversely with circulating filarial antigen (CFA) ( p = 0.004, Spearman r = -0.51). Filarial infection was associated with low plasma IL-17A levels, a mechanism by which it possibly protects individuals in filarial-endemic areas from the development of autoimmune disorders like RA and SLE.

  5. Genomics of Loa loa, a Wolbachia-free filarial parasite of humans

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Hotopp, Julie C. Dunning; Haas, Brian J.; Zucker, Jeremy; Ribeiro, Jose’ M.C.; Saif, Sakina; Levin, Joshua Z.; Fan, Lin; Zeng, Qiandong; Russ, Carsten; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Fink, Doran L.; Birren, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    Loa loa, the African eyeworm, is a major filarial pathogen of humans. Unlike most filariae, Loa loa does not contain the obligate intracellular Wolbachia endosymbiont. We describe the 91.4 Mb genome of Loa loa, and the genome of the related filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and predict 14,907 Loa loa genes based on microfilarial RNA sequencing. By comparing these genomes to that of another filarial parasite, Brugia malayi, and to several other nematode genomes, we demonstrate synteny among filariae but not with non-parasitic nematodes. The Loa loa genome encodes many immunologically relevant genes, as well as protein kinases targeted by drugs currently approved for humans. Despite lacking Wolbachia, Loa loa shows no new metabolic synthesis or transport capabilities compared to other filariae. These results suggest that the role played by Wolbachia in filarial biology is more subtle than previously thought and reveal marked differences between parasitic and non-parasitic nematodes. PMID:23525074

  6. Draft genome of the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Wang, Shiliang; Spiro, David; Caler, Elisabet; Zhao, Qi; Crabtree, Jonathan; Allen, Jonathan E; Delcher, Arthur L; Guiliano, David B; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Creasy, Todd; Amedeo, Paolo; Haas, Brian; El-Sayed, Najib M; Wortman, Jennifer R; Feldblyum, Tamara; Tallon, Luke; Schatz, Michael; Shumway, Martin; Koo, Hean; Salzberg, Steven L; Schobel, Seth; Pertea, Mihaela; Pop, Mihai; White, Owen; Barton, Geoffrey J; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Crawford, Michael J; Daub, Jennifer; Dimmic, Matthew W; Estes, Chris F; Foster, Jeremy M; Ganatra, Mehul; Gregory, William F; Johnson, Nicholas M; Jin, Jinming; Komuniecki, Richard; Korf, Ian; Kumar, Sanjay; Laney, Sandra; Li, Ben-Wen; Li, Wen; Lindblom, Tim H; Lustigman, Sara; Ma, Dong; Maina, Claude V; Martin, David M A; McCarter, James P; McReynolds, Larry; Mitreva, Makedonka; Nutman, Thomas B; Parkinson, John; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Poole, Catherine; Ren, Qinghu; Saunders, Lori; Sluder, Ann E; Smith, Katherine; Stanke, Mario; Unnasch, Thomas R; Ware, Jenna; Wei, Aguan D; Weil, Gary; Williams, Deryck J; Zhang, Yinhua; Williams, Steven A; Fraser-Liggett, Claire; Slatko, Barton; Blaxter, Mark L; Scott, Alan L

    2007-09-21

    Parasitic nematodes that cause elephantiasis and river blindness threaten hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. We have sequenced the approximately 90 megabase (Mb) genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and predict approximately 11,500 protein coding genes in 71 Mb of robustly assembled sequence. Comparative analysis with the free-living, model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that, despite these genes having maintained little conservation of local synteny during approximately 350 million years of evolution, they largely remain in linkage on chromosomal units. More than 100 conserved operons were identified. Analysis of the predicted proteome provides evidence for adaptations of B. malayi to niches in its human and vector hosts and insights into the molecular basis of a mutualistic relationship with its Wolbachia endosymbiont. These findings offer a foundation for rational drug design.

  7. Podoconiosis - non-filarial geochemical elephantiasis - a neglected tropical disease?

    PubMed

    Nenoff, Pietro; Simon, Jan Christoph; Muylowa, Grace K; Davey, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Podoconiosis or mossy foot is a form of non-filarial lymphedema. This geochemical elephantiasis is a disabling condition caused by the passage of microparticles of silica and aluminum silicates through the skin of people walking barefoot in areas with a high content of soil of volcanic origin. Podoconiosis is widespread in tropical Africa, Central America and North India, yet it remains a neglected and under-researched condition. The disabling effects of podoconiosis cause great hardship to patients. It adversely affects the economic (reduced productivity and absenteeism), social (marriage, education, etc.) and psychological (social stigma) well-being of those affected. Podoconiosis can be prevented; the main primary preventive measure is protective footwear. Secondary measures include a strict hygiene regimen and compression therapy, which can reverse initial lesions. Tertiary approaches include surgical management, such as shaving operations to reduce hyperplastic and verrucous elephantiasis.

  8. Distribution and molecular characterization of Wolbachia endosymbionts and filarial nematodes in Maryland populations of the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Norris, Douglas E; Rasgon, Jason L

    2011-07-01

    The lone star tick Amblyomma americanum is host to a wide diversity of endosymbiotic bacteria. We identified a novel Wolbachia symbiont infecting A. americanum. Multilocus sequence typing phylogenetically placed the endosymbiont in the increasingly diverse F supergroup. We assayed a total of 1031 ticks (119 females, 78 males and 834 nymphs in 89 pools) from 16 Maryland populations for infection. Infection frequencies in the natural populations were approximately 5% in females and <2% (minimum infection rate) in nymphs; infection was not detected in males. Infected populations were only observed in southern Maryland, suggesting the possibility that Wolbachia is currently invading Maryland A. americanum populations. Because F supergroup Wolbachia have been detected previously in filarial nematodes, tick samples were assayed for nematodes by PCR. Filarial nematodes were detected in 70% and 9% of Wolbachia-positive and Wolbachia-negative tick samples, respectively. While nematodes were more common in Wolbachia-positive tick samples, the lack of a strict infection concordance (Wolbachia-positive, nematode-negative and Wolbachia-negative, nematode-positive ticks) suggests that Wolbachia prevalence in ticks is not due to nematode infection. Supporting this hypothesis, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the nematodes were likely a novel species within the genus Acanthocheilonema, which has been previously shown to be Wolbachia-free. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 28 CFR 16.92 - Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemption of Environment and Natural....92 Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems—limited access. (a)(1) The...) Environment and Natural Resources Division Case and Related Files System, JUSTICE/ENRD-003. (ii) (2) These...

  10. 28 CFR 16.92 - Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemption of Environment and Natural....92 Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems—limited access. (a)(1) The...) Environment and Natural Resources Division Case and Related Files System, JUSTICE/ENRD-003. (ii) (2) These...

  11. 28 CFR 16.92 - Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemption of Environment and Natural....92 Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems—limited access. (a)(1) The...) Environment and Natural Resources Division Case and Related Files System, JUSTICE/ENRD-003. (ii) (2) These...

  12. 28 CFR 16.92 - Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemption of Environment and Natural....92 Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems—limited access. (a)(1) The...) Environment and Natural Resources Division Case and Related Files System, JUSTICE/ENRD-003. (ii) (2) These...

  13. 28 CFR 16.92 - Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption of Environment and Natural....92 Exemption of Environment and Natural Resources Division Systems—limited access. (a)(1) The...) Environment and Natural Resources Division Case and Related Files System, JUSTICE/ENRD-003. (ii) [Reserved] (2...

  14. Attempts to Image the Early Inflammatory Response during Infection with the Lymphatic Filarial Nematode Brugia pahangi in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Ryan; Goundry, Amy; O’Neill, Kerry; Marchesi, Francesco; Devaney, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites remain a major constraint upon human health and well-being in many parts of the world. Treatment of these infections relies upon a very small number of therapeutics, most of which were originally developed for use in animal health. A lack of high throughput screening systems, together with limitations of available animal models, has restricted the development of novel chemotherapeutics. This is particularly so for filarial nematodes, which are long-lived parasites with a complex cycle of development. In this paper, we describe attempts to visualise the immune response elicited by filarial parasites in infected mice using a non-invasive bioluminescence imaging reagent, luminol, our aim being to determine whether such a model could be developed to discriminate between live and dead worms for in vivo compound screening. We show that while imaging can detect the immune response elicited by early stages of infection with L3, it was unable to detect the presence of adult worms or, indeed, later stages of infection with L3, despite the presence of worms within the lymphatic system of infected animals. In the future, more specific reagents that detect secreted products of adult worms may be required for developing screens based upon live imaging of infected animals. PMID:27992545

  15. Prevalence and pathogenesis of some filarial nematodes infecting donkeys in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, A. M.; Ahmed, N. E.; Elakabawy, L. M.; Ramadan, M. Y.; Elmadawy, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The primary objective of the present study is to determine the commonness of filarial parasites in donkeys in Egypt, identification of the filarial species tainting them and the delivered pathogenic impact connected with the infestation. Materials and Methods: A total of 188 donkeys were examined for filarial infection. The blood samples and scraping of the cutaneous bleeding lesions were collected, stained, and inspected for microfilariae all through the period from March 2011 to October 2013. The adult worms were perceived in tissue samples acquired from skin scraping, testes, eyes, tendons, peritoneal and pleural cavities, and the ligamentum nuchae. Results: On the basis of morphological identification, 163 of 188 donkeys (86.70%) were infected with Onchocerca cervicalis (82.98%), Setaria equina (31.11%), Parafilaria multipapillosa (5.32%), and Onchocerca reticulata (4.26%). There was no significant effect of the sex on the incidence of all the encounteredfilarial worms except for S. equina, where the infection rate prevailed in males versus females (40.82% vs. 35.90%). In addition, age group of 5-15 years old exhibited a fundamentally higher predominance (p< 0.05) of the recognized filarial worms versus those of < 5 years old and >15 years old. Conclusion: The preliminary results add to our comprehension of filarial species infecting donkeys in Egypt, their impact on animal execution and production. Accentuation must be taken for avoidance, control of filarial disease, and improvement of the management system of donkeys. PMID:27651679

  16. Molecular evidence of curcumin-induced apoptosis in the filarial worm Setaria cervi.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ananya; Gayen, Prajna; Saini, Prasanta; Mukherjee, Niladri; Babu, Santi P Sinha

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane) is a major curcuminoid from Curcuma longa that exhibits various pharmacological effects and has shown multiple beneficial activities. Our understanding of its anticarcinogenic and other activities occurring through curcumin-induced apoptosis in several cancer cells has greatly expanded in recent years. Lymphatic filariasis is a worldwide health problem causing global disability in humans and is caused by filarial nematodes. Development of efficient strategies to promote programmed cell death in filarial worms remains a key challenge for anti-filarial drug developing research and a crucial unmet medical need. In this study, we have taken molecular and biochemical approaches toward understanding the molecular basis for curcumin-mediated anti-filarial activity in the filarial nematode Setaria cervi. Results of MTT assay showed that curcumin causes a significant reduction in viability of Mf and adults and thus acts as a potent macro- and micro-filaricidal agent. Hoechst staining, TUNEL staining, showed several apoptotic nuclei in different parts of curcumin-treated adults. At 25 μM concentration it showed chromosomal DNA fragmentation in adult worms. Our results indicate that curcumin decreases protein and mRNA expression levels of anti-apoptotic gene ced-9 and enhances both the levels of pro-apoptotic genes ced-3 and ced-4 in a dose-dependent manner. All these observations ascertained the apoptogenicity of curcumin at a minimum concentration of 50 μM in this filarial worm. Furthermore, we showed that curcumin causes depletion of parasitic glutathione level, enhances the activities of glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase and stimulates rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we present molecular evidence on curcumin-induced apoptosis in the filarial nematode S. cervi with probable involvement of ROS in a caspase-dependent manner.

  17. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemption of the Immigration and....99 Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access. (a) The following systems of records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service are exempt from 5 U.S.C. 552a (c) (3)...

  18. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemption of the Immigration and....99 Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access. (a) The following systems of records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service are exempt from 5 U.S.C. 552a (c) (3)...

  19. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemption of the Immigration and....99 Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access. (a) The following systems of records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service are exempt from 5 U.S.C. 552a (c) (3)...

  20. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemption of the Immigration and....99 Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access. (a) The following systems of records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service are exempt from 5 U.S.C. 552a (c) (3)...

  1. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption of the Immigration and....99 Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access. (a) The following systems of records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service are exempt from 5 U.S.C. 552a (c) (3)...

  2. Effect of ferulic acid from Hibiscus mutabilis on filarial parasite Setaria cervi: molecular and biochemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Saini, Prasanta; Gayen, Prajna; Nayak, Ananya; Kumar, Deepak; Mukherjee, Niladri; Pal, Bikas C; Sinha Babu, Santi P

    2012-12-01

    In the reported work the in vitro activity of a methanolic extract of leaves of Hibiscus mutabilis (Malvaceae) against bovine Setaria cervi worms has been investigated. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to isolation of ferulic acid from ethyl acetate fraction. The crude extract and ferulic acid, the active molecule, showed significant microfilaricidal as well as macrofilaricidal activities against the microfilaria (L(1)) and adult of S. cervi by both a worm motility and MTT reduction assay. The findings thus provide a new lead for development of a filaricidal drug from natural products. To examine the possible mechanism of action of ferulic acid, the involvement of apoptosis in adult worms of S. cervi was investigated. We found extreme cellular disturbances in ferulic acid-treated adult worms characterized by chromatin condensation, in situ DNA fragmentation and nucleosomal DNA laddering. In this work we are reporting for the first time that ferulic acid exerts its antifilarial effect through induction of apoptosis and by downregulating and altering the level of some key antioxidants (GSH, GST and SOD) of the filarial nematode S. cervi. Our results have provided experimental evidence supporting that ferulic acid causes an increased proapoptotic gene expression and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic genes simultaneously with an elevated level of ROS and gradual dose dependent decline of parasitic GSH level. We also observed a gradual dose dependent elevation of GST and SOD activity in the ferulic acid treated worms.

  3. Mansonella ozzardi: a neglected New World filarial nematode

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nathália F.; Veggiani Aybar, Cecilia A.; Dantur Juri, María J.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.

    2016-01-01

    Mansonella ozzardi (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) is an understudied filarial nematode, originally described by Patrick Manson in 1897, that can be transmitted by two families of dipteran vectors, biting midges (most of them members of the genus Culicoides) and black flies (genus Simulium). With a patchy geographic distribution from southern Mexico to northwestern Argentina, human infection with M. ozzardi is highly prevalent in some of the Caribbean islands, along riverine communities in the Amazon Basin, and on both sides of the border between Bolivia and Argentina. There is no clinical entity unequivocally associated with M. ozzardi infection, although fever, arthralgia, headache, cold lower extremities, and itchy cutaneous rashes are occasionally mentioned in case report series. More recently, ocular manifestations (especially keratitis) have been associated with mansonelliasis, opening an important area of investigation. Here, we briefly review the biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical aspects of M. ozzardi infection and point to some existing knowledge gaps, aiming to stimulate a research agenda to help filling them. PMID:27376501

  4. Use of fractionated urinary filarial antigen in the diagnosis of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, P; Harinath, B C

    1995-02-01

    Fractionated urinary filarial antigen UFA C2 has shown high antigenic activity after absorption of urinary albumin present in the fraction. As little as 500 ag (10(-18) g) of albumin absorbed UFA C2, labelled as UFA C2-A, was found to be sufficient to detect filarial antibody. Stick enzyme immunoassay to assess the immunodiagnostic potential of UFA C2-A indicated filarial IgG antibody in 89% of microfilaraemic (mf) cases, 84% of clinical filariasis and 7% of endemic normals. UFA C2-A was found to be present in circulation in active as well as clinical infections as observed by inhibition assay using UFA C2-A penicillinase conjugate. Eighty-six per cent of mf, 50% of clinical cases and 6% of endemic normal subjects revealed parasite antigen to UFA C2-A on further serological analysis. None of the non-endemic normal sera showed the presence of filarial antibody/antigen to UFA C2-A. Furthermore, the test to determine phosphorylcholine (PC) bearing epitopes in UFA C2-A indicated no immunological reaction with anti-PC monoclonal antibody by avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The highly sensitive and more easily obtainable non-PC urinary filarial antigen, UFA C2-A, is of great immunodiagnostic interest for lymphatic filariasis.

  5. Finding Wolbachia in Filarial larvae and Culicidae Mosquitoes in Upper Egypt Governorate.

    PubMed

    Dyab, Ahmed K; Galal, Lamia A; Mahmoud, Abeer E; Mokhtar, Yasser

    2016-06-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium, present in over 20% of all insects altering insect reproductive capabilities and in a wide range of filarial worms which is essential for worm survival and reproduction. In Egypt, no available data were found about Wolbachia searching for it in either mosquitoes or filarial worms. Thus, we aimed to identify the possible concurrent presence of Wolbachia within different mosquitoes and filarial parasites, in Assiut Governorate, Egypt using multiplex PCR. Initially, 6 pools were detected positive for Wolbachia by single PCR. The simultaneous detection of Wolbachia and filarial parasites (Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) by multiplex PCR was spotted in 5 out of 6 pools, with an overall estimated rate of infection (ERI) of 0.24%. Unexpectedly, the highest ERI (0.53%) was for Anopheles pharoensis with related Wolbachia and W. bancrofti, followed by Aedes (0.42%) and Culex (0.26%). We also observed that Wolbachia altered Culex spp. as a primary vector for W. bancrofti to be replaced by Anopheles sp. Wolbachia within filaria-infected mosquitoes in our locality gives a hope to use bacteria as a new control trend simultaneously targeting the vector and filarial parasites.

  6. Finding Wolbachia in Filarial larvae and Culicidae Mosquitoes in Upper Egypt Governorate

    PubMed Central

    Dyab, Ahmed K.; Galal, Lamia A.; Mahmoud, Abeer E.; Mokhtar, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium, present in over 20% of all insects altering insect reproductive capabilities and in a wide range of filarial worms which is essential for worm survival and reproduction. In Egypt, no available data were found about Wolbachia searching for it in either mosquitoes or filarial worms. Thus, we aimed to identify the possible concurrent presence of Wolbachia within different mosquitoes and filarial parasites, in Assiut Governorate, Egypt using multiplex PCR. Initially, 6 pools were detected positive for Wolbachia by single PCR. The simultaneous detection of Wolbachia and filarial parasites (Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) by multiplex PCR was spotted in 5 out of 6 pools, with an overall estimated rate of infection (ERI) of 0.24%. Unexpectedly, the highest ERI (0.53%) was for Anopheles pharoensis with related Wolbachia and W. bancrofti, followed by Aedes (0.42%) and Culex (0.26%). We also observed that Wolbachia altered Culex spp. as a primary vector for W. bancrofti to be replaced by Anopheles sp. Wolbachia within filaria-infected mosquitoes in our locality gives a hope to use bacteria as a new control trend simultaneously targeting the vector and filarial parasites. PMID:27417080

  7. The "filarial dance" is not characteristic of filariasis: observations of "dancing megasperm" on high-resolution sonography in patients from nonendemic areas mimicking the filarial dance and a proposed mechanism for this phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Adejolu, Margaret; Sidhu, Paul S

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this series was to show that the sonographic appearance described as the "filarial dance" is not characteristic of filariasis but occurs in nonendemic areas as a manifestation of epididymal obstruction. An experienced observer documented cases after initial observation of the filarial dance in routine clinical practice using high-frequency linear array transducers. The filarial dance was described as excessive to-and-fro movement of echogenic particles within a prominent epididymis and graded 1 to 4 according to the extent and distribution of the abnormality. The country of birth, exposure to filarial infection or travel to a filarial-endemic area, previous scrotal surgery including vasectomy, any previous or current scrotal inflammatory disease, and any congenital testicular abnormalities were recorded. Over a 10-year period, sonographic appearances consistent with the filarial dance were observed in 18 patients (bilateral in 6). The mean patient age was 47.7 (range, 28-91) years. The abnormality was graded in the 24 affected testes as follows: grade 1, n = 3; grade 2, n = 8; grade 3, n = 8; and grade 4, n = 5. No patient had a history of filariasis or travel to an endemic area. Six of 18 patients (33.3%) had bilateral vasectomies; 5 (27.8%) had a history of epididymo-orchitis in the ipsilateral testis; 3 (16.7%) had previous scrotal surgery; and 4 (22.2%) had no relevant urologic history. We have described a sonographic appearance identical to the filarial dance in men with no history of filarial infection. Most had previous scrotal surgery or infection, suggesting that the filarial dance may not always be due to movement of filarial worms. The unifying condition in patients with filariasis and our patients is lymphatic obstruction, likely the underlying cause of the appearance in both groups.

  8. C-cinnamoyl glycosides as a new class of anti-filarial agents.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priya; Dhara, Debashis; Parida, Pravat Kumar; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Jana, Kuladip; Sinha Babu, Santi P; Misra, Anup Kumar

    2016-05-23

    A series of C-cinnamoyl glycosides has been synthesized in good yield by the BF3·OEt2 catalyzed aldol condensation of C-glycosylated acetone derivative with a variety of aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their potential as anti-filarial agents against bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi and human filariid Wuchereria bancrofti using a number of biological assays such as relative movability (RM) assessment and MTT reduction assay. Among twenty seven test compounds six compounds were found active in terms of MIC, IC50 and LC50 values. Further biological studies were carried out using three lead compounds because of their significantly low MIC values and IC50 values compared to the standard anti-filarial drug Ivermectin. In addition, structure activity relationship study of the test compounds has been carried out using 3D-QSAR analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats

    PubMed Central

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Lagadec, Erwan; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Goodman, Steven M.; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae); a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae) embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae), Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae), and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae). We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors. PMID:26751792

  10. Natural experiments to study the effects of early experience: progress and limitations.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas G

    2003-01-01

    Questions concerning the long-term effects of early experience on psychological development in humans continue to stir up controversy. There are, at present, great diversity and contradictions among extant conceptual models and inadequate data to resolve these differences. Limited opportunities to use experimental approaches and the inherent restrictions of observational approaches in research on humans implies that alternative research designs are needed. This article examines the use of "natural experiments" as a method for testing hypotheses concerning the effects of early experience on psychological development. The benefits and limitations of using natural experiments are reviewed and several case illustrations are considered.

  11. Novel retinoid-binding proteins from filarial parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, B P; Vaid, A; Comley, J C; Montgomery, J A

    1985-01-01

    The present study deals with the discovery and partial characterization of specific binding proteins for retinol and retinoic acid from filarial parasites (worms of the superfamily Filarioidea), including those from two species of Onchocerca. These binding proteins, which are distinct in their physicochemical properties and in the mode of ligand interactions from the host-tissue retinoid-binding proteins, may be involved in the mediation of the putative biological roles of retinoids in the control of parasitic growth, differentiation and reproduction. Parasite retinol-binding protein and retinoic acid-binding protein exhibited specificity for binding retinol and retinoic acid respectively. Both the binding proteins showed an s20,w value of 2.0 S. On gel filtration, both proteins were retarded to a position corresponding to the same molecular size (19.0 kDa). On preparative columns, the parasite binding proteins exhibited isoelectric points at pH 5.7 and 5.75. Unlike the retinoid-binding proteins of mammalian and avian origin, the parasite retinoid-binding proteins showed a lack of mercurial sensitivity in ligand binding. The comparative amounts of retinoic acid-binding protein in five parasites, Onchocerca volvulus, Onchocerca gibsoni, Dipetalonema viteae, Brugia pahangi and Dirofilaria immitis, were between 2.7 and 3.1 pmol of retinoic acid bound/mg of extractable protein. However, the levels of parasite retinol-binding protein were between 4.8 and 5.8 pmol/mg, which is considerably higher than the corresponding levels of cellular retinol-binding protein of mammalian and avian origin. Both retinol- and retinoic acid-binding-protein levels in O. volvulus-infected human nodules and O. gibsoni-infected bovine nodules were similar to their levels in mammalian tissues. Also, these nodular binding proteins, like the host-binding proteins, exhibited mercurial sensitivity to ligand interactions. PMID:3004410

  12. Comparative results of non-operative multi-modal therapy for filarial lymphoedema

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, S. B.; Appavoo, N. C.; Mohan, A.; Kumar, M. Burney

    2009-01-01

    A comparative analysis of different conservative modes of therapy for lymphoedema, largely of Filarial origin, was conducted in a trial therapy unit in Chengalpattu, a Filarial endemic district in Tamil Nadu. Results were compared using a single chambered intermittent pneumatic compression pump, heat therapy, and interferential therapy machines. The results showed improvement of limb size between 20% and 60% of possible reduction (where 100% would mean return of limb circumference to the same as that of the normal side). Pneumatic compression therapy, when used alone, showed the best results, which were significantly better than all others whether alone or in combination. PMID:19881016

  13. Filarial abscess: Aspiration of adult gravid female worm from submandibular region, an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Afrose, Ruquiya; Alam, Mohammad Feroz; Ahmad, Syed Shamshad; Naim, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Microfilaria is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries and is an endemic problem in India. Wuchereria bancrofti is the most common filarial infection. In some cases, microfilariae and adult filarial worm have been incidentally detected in fine-needle aspirates of various lesions; detection of microfilaria from subcutaneous site or from abscess site is even rarer. We here report an unusual case of Bancroftian microfilariasis in a 68-year-old female coming from endemic area presenting with right submandibular abscess. Our aim is to highlight the chances of finding microfilaria and adult worm in cytology of an unsuspected case at an unusual site.

  14. Filarial abscess: Aspiration of adult gravid female worm from submandibular region, an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Afrose, Ruquiya; Alam, Mohammad Feroz; Ahmad, Syed Shamshad; Naim, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Microfilaria is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries and is an endemic problem in India. Wuchereria bancrofti is the most common filarial infection. In some cases, microfilariae and adult filarial worm have been incidentally detected in fine-needle aspirates of various lesions; detection of microfilaria from subcutaneous site or from abscess site is even rarer. We here report an unusual case of Bancroftian microfilariasis in a 68-year-old female coming from endemic area presenting with right submandibular abscess. Our aim is to highlight the chances of finding microfilaria and adult worm in cytology of an unsuspected case at an unusual site. PMID:28182103

  15. Transform-limited-pulse representation of excitation with natural incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Chenu, Aurélia Brumer, Paul

    2016-01-28

    The excitation of molecular systems by natural incoherent light relevant, for example, to photosynthetic light-harvesting is examined. We show that the result of linear excitation with natural incoherent light can be obtained using incident light described in terms of transform limited pulses, as opposed to conventional classical representations with explicit random character. The derived expressions allow for computations to be done directly for any thermal light spectrum using a simple wave function formalism and provide a route to the experimental determination of natural incoherent excitation using pulsed laser techniques. Pulses associated with solar and cosmic microwave background radiation are provided as examples.

  16. Release of Small RNA-containing Exosome-like Vesicles from the Human Filarial Parasite Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Agbedanu, Prince N; Harischandra, Hiruni; Moorhead, Andrew R; Day, Tim A; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Kimber, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a socio-economically devastating mosquito-borne Neglected Tropical Disease caused by parasitic filarial nematodes. The interaction between the parasite and host, both mosquito and human, during infection, development and persistence is dynamic and delicately balanced. Manipulation of this interface to the detriment of the parasite is a promising potential avenue to develop disease therapies but is prevented by our very limited understanding of the host-parasite relationship. Exosomes are bioactive small vesicles (30–120 nm) secreted by a wide range of cell types and involved in a wide range of physiological processes. Here, we report the identification and partial characterization of exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) released from the infective L3 stage of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. Exosome-like vesicles were isolated from parasites in culture media and electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to confirm that vesicles produced by juvenile B. malayi are exosome-like based on size and morphology. We show that loss of parasite viability correlates with a time-dependent decay in vesicle size specificity and rate of release. The protein cargo of these vesicles is shown to include common exosomal protein markers and putative effector proteins. These Brugia-derived vesicles contain small RNA species that include microRNAs with host homology, suggesting a potential role in host manipulation. Confocal microscopy shows J774A.1, a murine macrophage cell line, internalize purified ELVs, and we demonstrate that these ELVs effectively stimulate a classically activated macrophage phenotype in J774A.1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of exosome-like vesicle release by a human parasitic nematode and our data suggest a novel mechanism by which human parasitic nematodes may actively direct the host responses to infection. Further interrogation of the makeup and function of these bioactive vesicles could seed

  17. Natural Conception May Be an Acceptable Option in HIV-Serodiscordant Couples in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Wang, Fang; Liu, An; Xin, Ruolei; Zhu, Yunxia; Li, Jianwei; Shao, Ying; Ye, Jiangzhu; Chen, Danqing; Li, Zaicun

    2015-01-01

    Many HIV serodiscordant couples have a strong desire to have their own biological children. Natural conception may be the only choice in some resource limited settings but data about natural conception is limited. Here, we reported our findings of natural conception in HIV serodiscordant couples. Between January 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively collected data on 91 HIV serodiscordant couples presenting to Beijing Youan Hospital with childbearing desires. HIV counseling, effective ART on HIV infected partners, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in negative female partners and timed intercourse were used to maximally reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Of the 91 HIV serodiscordant couples, 43 were positive in male partners and 48 were positive in female partners. There were 196 unprotected vaginal intercourses, 100 natural conception and 97 newborns. There were no cases of HIV seroconversion in uninfected sexual partners. Natural conception may be an acceptable option in HIV-serodiscordant couples in resource limited settings if HIV-positive individuals have undetectable viremia on HAART, combined with HIV counseling, PrEP, PEP and timed intercourse.

  18. Neutropenic Mice Provide Insight into the Role of Skin-Infiltrating Neutrophils in the Host Protective Immunity against Filarial Infective Larvae.

    PubMed

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Brotin, Emilie; Karadjian, Gregory; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin-Nomé, Françoise; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Fercoq, Frédéric; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Bachelerie, Françoise; Martin, Coralie

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge and control of the pathogenesis induced by the filariae remain limited due to experimental obstacles presented by parasitic nematode biology and the lack of selective prophylactic or curative drugs. Here we thought to investigate the role of neutrophils in the host innate immune response to the infection caused by the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of human filariasis using mice harboring a gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and characterized by a profound blood neutropenia (Cxcr4(+/1013)). We provided manifold evidence emphasizing the major role of neutrophils in the control of the early stages of infection occurring in the skin. Firstly, we uncovered that the filarial parasitic success was dramatically decreased in Cxcr4(+/1013) mice upon subcutaneous delivery of the infective stages of filariae (infective larvae, L3). This protection was linked to a larger number of neutrophils constitutively present in the skin of the mutant mice herein characterized as compared to wild type (wt) mice. Indeed, the parasitic success in Cxcr4(+/1013) mice was normalized either upon depleting neutrophils, including the pool in the skin, or bypassing the skin via the intravenous infection of L3. Second, extending these observations to wt mice we found that subcutaneous delivery of L3 elicited an increase of neutrophils in the skin. Finally, living L3 larvae were able to promote in both wt and mutant mice, an oxidative burst response and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). This response of neutrophils, which is adapted to the large size of the L3 infective stages, likely directly contributes to the anti-parasitic strategies implemented by the host. Collectively, our results are demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils in early anti-filarial host responses through their capacity to undertake different anti-filarial strategies such as oxidative burst, degranulation and NETosis.

  19. Neutropenic Mice Provide Insight into the Role of Skin-Infiltrating Neutrophils in the Host Protective Immunity against Filarial Infective Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Brotin, Emilie; Karadjian, Gregory; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin-Nomé, Françoise; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Fercoq, Frédéric; Aknin, Marie-Laure; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge and control of the pathogenesis induced by the filariae remain limited due to experimental obstacles presented by parasitic nematode biology and the lack of selective prophylactic or curative drugs. Here we thought to investigate the role of neutrophils in the host innate immune response to the infection caused by the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of human filariasis using mice harboring a gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and characterized by a profound blood neutropenia (Cxcr4+/1013). We provided manifold evidence emphasizing the major role of neutrophils in the control of the early stages of infection occurring in the skin. Firstly, we uncovered that the filarial parasitic success was dramatically decreased in Cxcr4+/1013 mice upon subcutaneous delivery of the infective stages of filariae (infective larvae, L3). This protection was linked to a larger number of neutrophils constitutively present in the skin of the mutant mice herein characterized as compared to wild type (wt) mice. Indeed, the parasitic success in Cxcr4+/1013 mice was normalized either upon depleting neutrophils, including the pool in the skin, or bypassing the skin via the intravenous infection of L3. Second, extending these observations to wt mice we found that subcutaneous delivery of L3 elicited an increase of neutrophils in the skin. Finally, living L3 larvae were able to promote in both wt and mutant mice, an oxidative burst response and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). This response of neutrophils, which is adapted to the large size of the L3 infective stages, likely directly contributes to the anti-parasitic strategies implemented by the host. Collectively, our results are demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils in early anti-filarial host responses through their capacity to undertake different anti-filarial strategies such as oxidative burst, degranulation and NETosis. PMID:27111140

  20. Elephantiasis of non-filarial origin (podoconiosis) in the highlands of north-western Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Wanji, S; Tendongfor, N; Esum, M; Che, J N; Mand, S; Tanga Mbi, C; Enyong, P; Hoerauf, A

    2008-09-01

    Lymphoedema, a condition of localized fluid retention, results from a compromised lymphatic system. Although one common cause in the tropics is infection with filarial worms, non-filarial lymphoedema, also known as podoconiosis, has been reported among barefoot farmers in volcanic highland zones of Africa, Central and South America and north-western India. There are conflicting reports on the causes of lymphoedema in the highland regions of Cameroon, where the condition is of great public-health importance. To characterise the focus of lymphoedema in the highlands of the North West province of Cameroon and investigate its real causes, a cross-sectional study was carried out on the adults (aged > or =15 years) living in the communities that fall within the Ndop and Tubah health districts. The subjects, who had to have lived in the study area for at least 10 years, were interviewed, examined clinically, and, when possible, checked for microfilaraemia. The cases of lymphoedema confirmed by ultrasonography and a random sample of the other subjects were also tested for filarial antigenaemia. The interviews, which explored knowledge, attitudes and perceptions (KAP) relating to lymphoedema, revealed that the condition was well known, with each study community having a local name for it. Of the 834 individuals examined clinically, 66 (8.1%) had lymphoedema of the lower limb, with all the clinical stages of this condition represented. None of the 792 individuals examined parasitologically, however, had microfilariae of W. bancrofti (or any other filarial parasite) in their peripheral blood, and only one (0.25%) of the 399 individuals tested for the circulating antigens of W. bancrofti gave a positive result. In addition, none of the 504 mosquitoes caught landing on human bait in the study area and dissected was found to harbour any stage of W. bancrofti. These findings indicate that the elephantiasis seen in the North West province of Cameroon is of non-filarial origin.

  1. Inhibition of Cathepsin B by E-64 Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Filarial Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Mohit; Singh, Neetu; Rathaur, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Background Current available antifilarial drug strategies only eliminate the larval stages of filarial parasites. Therefore, there is an urgent need of drugs which are macrofilaricidals. Identification of molecular targets crucial for survival of parasite is a prerequisite for drug designing. Cathepsin B, a cysteine protease family member is known to play crucial role in the normal growth, digestion of nutrients, exsheathment of the helminth parasites. Therefore, we targeted this enzyme in the filarial parasite using its specific inhibitor, E-64. Methods and Findings We have exposed the parasites to E-64 and observed their motility and viability at various time intervals. It caused marked decrease in the motility and viability of the parasites ultimately leading to their death after 8 hours. It is well known that E-64 protects the cell from apoptosis, however, it causes apoptotic effect in carcinoma cell lines. To understand the mechanism of action of E-64 on parasite survival, we have measured levels of different apoptotic markers in the treated parasites. E-64 significantly reduced the level of ced-9 and activity of tyrosine phosphatases, cytochrome c oxidase. It also activated ced-3, homolog of mammalian caspase 3 suggesting initiation of an apoptotic like event in the filarial parasites. Different antioxidant enzymes were also evaluated to further explore the mechanism behind the death of the parasites. There was marked decrease in the level of GSH and activity of Glutathione reductase and glutathione-s-transferase leading to increased generation of reactive oxygen species. This led to the induced oxidation of fatty acids and protein which might alter the mitochondrial membrane permeability. Conclusion This study suggests that inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 generates oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial mediated apoptotic like event in filarial parasites leading to their death. Hence, suggesting filarial cathepsin B as a potential chemotherapeutic

  2. Detection of anti-filarial antibody among hydrocele patients living in an endemic area for filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Agarwal, Loveleena; Lakhmani, Krishna; Sengupta, Chandrim; Singh, Ravinder Pal

    2016-01-01

    Background: The knowledge of the current prevalence of lymphatic filariasis and its transmission will be helpful in its elimination. Thus, the present study is aimed to determine its prevalence among hydrocele patients which is a common presentation in chronically infected cases. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients suffering from hydrocele admitted to the surgical ward were included in the study. Blood samples were collected from the patients during the day hours for the detection of anti-filarial antibody and during night hours to detect the presence of microfilaria by smear examination. Blood samples were also collected from the family member attending the ward along with the patients to determine the presence of anti-filarial antibodies. Serum IgE level and eosinophil count were also determined in the patients showing a positive result for the anti-filarial antibody test. Results: Out of 100 hydrocele patients, 21% patients showed anti-filarial antibody card test positive with maximum patients belonging to age group of 20–40 years. Microfilaria was detected in 5% of the hydrocele patients, whereas none of the family members showed positive anti-filarial antibody test. Serum IgE level and eosinophil count were more than 1000 ng/ml and 500/mm3, respectively. Conclusions: The study has found a high prevalence of filariasis among hydrocele patients. It is suggested that more studies are needed to know the real time prevalence of the cases showing manifestations of the filariasis in the acute stage which will help the eradication program to formulate new strategies. PMID:28217582

  3. Xenomonitoring of Different Filarial Nematodes Using Single and Multiplex PCR in Mosquitoes from Assiut Governorate, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Dyab, Ahmed Kamal; Galal, Lamia Ahmed; Mahmoud, Abeer El-Sayed; Mokhtar, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens are filarial nematodes transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to Culex, Aedes, and Anopheles genera. Screening by vector dissection is a tiresome technique. We aimed to screen filarial parasites in their vectors by single and multiplex PCR and evaluate the usefulness of multiplex PCR as a rapid xenomonitoring and simultaneous differentiation tool, in area where 3 filarial parasites are coexisting. Female mosquitoes were collected from 7 localities in Assiut Governorate, were microscopically identified and divided into pools according to their species and collection site. Detection of W. bancrofti, D. immitis, and D. repens using single PCR was reached followed by multiplex PCR. Usefulness of multiplex PCR was evaluated by testing mosquito pools to know which genera and species are used by filarial parasites as a vector. An overall estimated rate of infection (ERI) in mosquitoes was 0.6%; the highest was Culex spp. (0.47%). W. bancrofti, D. immitis, and D. repens could be simultaneously and differentially detected in infected vectors by using multiplex PCR. Out of 100 mosquito pools, 8 were positive for W. bancrofti (ERI of 0.33%) and 3 pools each were positive for D. immitis and D. repens (ERI 0.12%). The technique showed 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity. El-Nikhila, El-Matiaa villages, and Sahel Seleem district in Assiut Governorate, Egypt are still endemic foci for filarial parasites. Multiplex PCR offers a reliable procedure for molecular xenomonitoring of filariasis within their respective vectors in endemic areas. Therefore, it is recommended for evaluation of mosquito infection after lymphatic filariasis eradication programs. PMID:25748712

  4. Pollen limitation and its influence on natural selection through seed set.

    PubMed

    Bartkowska, M P; Johnston, M O

    2015-11-01

    Stronger pollen limitation should increase competition among plants, leading to stronger selection on traits important for pollen receipt. The few explicit tests of this hypothesis, however, have provided conflicting support. Using the arithmetic relationship between these two quantities, we show that increased pollen limitation will automatically result in stronger selection (all else equal) although other factors can alter selection independently of pollen limitation. We then tested the hypothesis using two approaches. First, we analysed the published studies containing information on both pollen limitation and selection. Second, we explored how natural selection measured in one Ontario population of Lobelia cardinalis over 3 years and two Michigan populations in 1 year relates to pollen limitation. For the Ontario population, we also explored whether pollinator-mediated selection is related to pollen limitation. Consistent with the hypothesis, we found an overall positive relationship between selection strength and pollen limitation both among species and within L. cardinalis. Unexpectedly, this relationship was found even for vegetative traits among species, and was not found in L. cardinalis for pollinator-mediated selection on nearly all trait types.

  5. Exceeding natural resonance frequency limit of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles via superparamagnetic relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ning-Ning; Yang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Hao-Liang; Ren, Xiao; Ding, Hao-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Cheng, Zhao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted much research interest in the past decades due to their potential applications in microwave devices. Here, we adopted a novel technique to tune cut-off frequency exceeding the natural resonance frequency limit of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles via superparamagnetic relaxation. We observed that the cut-off frequency can be enhanced from 5.3 GHz for Fe3O4 to 6.9 GHz forFe3O4@SiO2 core-shell structure superparamagnetic nanoparticles, which are much higher than the natural resonance frequency of 1.3 GHz for Fe3O4 bulk material. This finding not only provides us a new approach to enhance the resonance frequency beyond the Snoek's limit, but also extend the application for superparamagnetic nanoparticles to microwave devices. PMID:24196377

  6. Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-vegetation systems. I - Theory and hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The solution space of an approximate statistical-dynamic model of the average annual water balance is explored with respect to the hydrologic parameters of both soil and vegetation. Within the accuracy of this model it is shown that water-limited natural vegetation systems are in stable equilibrium with their climatic and pedologic environments when the canopy density and species act to minimize average water demand stress. Theory shows a climatic limit to this equilibrium above which it is hypothesized that ecological pressure is toward maximization of biomass productivity. It is further hypothesized that natural soil-vegetation systems will develop gradually and synergistically, through vegetation-induced changes in soil structure, toward a set of hydraulic soil properties for which the minimum stress canopy density of a given species is maximum in a given climate. Using these hypotheses, only the soil effective porosity need be known to determine the optimum soil and vegetation parameters in a given climate.

  7. Mechanical explanation of nature and its limits in Kant's Critique of judgment.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, Angela

    2006-12-01

    In this paper I discuss two questions. What does Kant understand by mechanical explanation in the Critique of judgment? And why does he think that mechanical explanation is the only type of the explanation of nature available to us? According to the interpretation proposed, mechanical explanations in the Critique of judgment refer to a particular species of empirical causal laws. Mechanical laws aim to explain nature by reference to the causal interaction between the forces of the parts of matter and the way in which they form into complex material wholes. Just like any other empirical causal law, however, mechanical laws can never be known with full certainty. The conception according to which we can explain all of nature by means of mechanical laws, it turns out, is based on what Kant calls 'regulative' or 'reflective' considerations about nature. Nothing in Kant's Critique of judgment suggests that these considerations can ever be justified by reference to how the natural world really is. I suggest that what, upon first consideration, appears to be a thoroughly mechanistic conception of nature in Kant is much more limited than one might have expected.

  8. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  9. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  10. Pollen limitation and natural selection on floral characters in the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Lila; Willis, John H

    2008-01-01

    In flowering plants, pollen limitation has been proposed to intensify selection on floral characters important in pollinator attraction, but may also select for traits that increase seed set through autonomous selfing. Here, a factorial design (+/- pollen addition, +/- pollinator removal) was used to investigate how the pollination environment affects selection on floral morphology via female fitness in a mixed-mating population of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus (Phrymaceae). Female fitness was strongly pollen-limited, with supplementally pollinated plants setting 37% more seeds than open-pollinated individuals. Strong positive selection was found on flower length, weak positive selection on flower width : length ratio and no selection on stigma-anther distance in both open-pollinated and supplementally pollinated treatments. By contrast, flowers with relatively narrow corollas and low stigma-anther distances were favored in the pollinator exclusion treatment. These results provide mixed support for the idea that pollen limitation intensifies selection on floral characters. Despite strong phenotypic selection, natural pollen limitation did not mediate selection on characters associated with either pollinator attraction or self-fertilization. However, the novel pattern of selection on severely pollen-limited plants suggests that reproductive assurance against pollinator loss may have been directly involved in the floral evolution of closely related selfing taxa.

  11. Effect and acceptance of bluegill length limits in Nebraska natural lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.; Gabelhouse, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus populations in 18 Nebraska Sandhill lakes were evaluated to determine if a 200-mm minimum length limit would increase population size structure. Bluegills were trap-netted in May and June 1998 and 1999, and a creel survey was conducted during winter 1998-2001 on one or two lakes where bluegills had been tagged to determine angler exploitation. Thirty-three percent of anglers on one creeled lake were trophy anglers (i.e., fishing for large [???250 mm] bluegills), whereas 67% were there to harvest fish to eat. Exploitation was always less than 10% and the total annual mortality averaged 40% across all 18 lakes. The time to reach 200 mm ranged from 4.3 to 8.3 years. The relative stock density of preferred-length fish increased an average of 2.2 units in all 18 lakes with a 10% exploitation rate. However, yield declined 39% and the number harvested declined 62%. Bluegills would need to reach 200 mm in 4.2 years to ensure no reduction in yield at 10% exploitation. Both yield and size structure were higher with a 200-mm minimum length limit (relative to having no length limit) only in populations with the lowest natural mortality and at exploitation of 30% or more. Although 100% (N = 39) of anglers surveyed said they would favor a 200-mm minimum length limit to improve bluegill size structure, anglers would have to sacrifice harvest to achieve this goal. While a 200-mm minimum length limit did minimally increase size structure at current levels of exploitation across all 18 bluegill populations, the populations with the lowest natural mortality and fastest growth provided the highest increase in size structure with the lowest reduction in yield and number harvested.

  12. Non-stationarity of "Nature's Limit" - Implications for Agriculture in Semi-arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer, C.; Kiem, A.; Verdon-Kidd, D.

    2014-12-01

    "Rain follows the plow" was a theory that encouraged agricultural settlement in dryland areas in both the United States of America and Australia during the mid-1800s. Supporters of the theory believed that humans could master nature and alter the climate through cultivation of the soil. An opponent of this theory was George W. Goyder, who used vegetation in South Australia as an indicator to mark out the extent of the area's severe 1865 drought, effectively establishing "nature's limit" to reliable agriculture in South Australia. This limit became known as Goyder's Line and demarked the boundary between land suitable for agricultural pursuits (i.e. cropping) to the south and land only suitable for grazing in the State's arid north. Current cropping areas however extend north beyond this line, suggesting that either a) the line is not well defined, b) cropping is occurring on land considered 'non-viable' according to Goyder's Line or c) the line distinguishing where cropping is and is not viable varies on interannual to multidecadal timescales. In this study, the 220 mm growing season (April to October) rainfall isohyet is used as a proxy for Goyder's Line in order to assess its temporal and spatial variability. Using indices of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean variability, Southern Annular Mode and the Subtropical Ridge, it is shown that climate state significantly influences the location of the 220 mm growing season rainfall isohyet. This implies that the boundary between viable and non-viable cropping areas (i.e. Goyder's Line or "nature's limit") is non-stationary. These results also indicate the key influences on South Australia's climate and have important implications globally for agricultural practices operating in or bordering semi-arid environments.

  13. Natural Divertor Spherical Tokamak Plasmas with bean shape and ergodic limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso; Herrera, Julio; Chavez, Esteban; Tritz, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    The former spherical tokamak (ST) MEDUSA (Madison EDUcation Small Aspect.ratio tokamak, R < 0.14 m, a < 0.10 m, BT < 0.5T, Ip < 40 kA, 3 ms pulse) is being recommissioned in Costa Rica Institute of Technology. The main objectives of the MEDUSA-CR project are training and to clarify several issues in relevant physics for conventional and mainly STs, including beta studies in bean-shaped ST plasmas, transport, heating and current drive via Alfvén wave, and natural divertor STs with ergodic magnetic limiter. We report here improvements in the self-consistency of these equilibrium comparisons and a preliminary study of their MHD stability beta limits. VIE-ITCR, IAEA-CRP contract 17592, National Instruments of Costa Rica.

  14. Corallopyronin A Specifically Targets and Depletes Essential Obligate Wolbachia Endobacteria From Filarial Nematodes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Andrea; Schmitz, Alexander; Schäberle, Till F.; Specht, Sabine; Lämmer, Christine; Johnston, Kelly L.; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; König, Gabriele M.; Hoerauf, Achim; Pfarr, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Doxycycline and rifampicin deplete essential Wolbachia from filarial nematodes that cause lymphatic filariasis or onchocerciasis, resulting in blocked worm development and death. However, doxycycline is contraindicated for children and pregnant/breastfeeding women, as is rifampicin in the latter group with the additional specter of possible resistance development in Mycobacterium spp. Novel antibiotics with a narrower spectrum would aid in eliminating filarial diseases. Corallococcus coralloides synthesizes corallopyronin A, a noncompetitive inhibitor of RNA polymerase ineffective against Mycobacterium spp. Corallopyronin A depleted Wolbachia from infected insect cells (1.89 Thus the antibiotic is effective against intracellular bacteria despite the many intervening surfaces (blood vessels, pleura, worm cuticle) and membranes (worm cell, vesicle, Wolbachia inner and outer membranes). Corallopyronin A is an antibiotic to develop further for filariasis elimination without concern for cross-resistance development in tuberculosis. PMID:22586066

  15. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  16. Energy efficiency and color quality limits in artificial light sources emulating natural illumination.

    PubMed

    Hertog, Wim; Llenas, Aleix; Quintero, Jesús M; Hunt, Charles E; Carreras, Josep

    2014-12-15

    We present in this work a calculation of the theoretical limits attainable for natural light emulation with regard to the joint optimization of the Luminous Efficacy of Radiation and color fidelity by using multiple reflectance spectra datasets, along with an implementation of a physical device that approaches these limits. A reduced visible spectrum of blackbody radiators is introduced and demonstrated which allows lamps designed to emulate natural light to operate with excellent color fidelity and higher efficiency as compared to full visible spectrum sources. It is shown that even though 3,000K and 5,500K blackbody sources have maximum efficacies of 21 lm/W and 89 lm/W, respectively, reduced-spectrum artificial light sources can exceed those values up to 363 lm/W and 313 lm/W, respectively, while retaining excellent color fidelity. Experimental demonstration approaching these values is accomplished through the design and implementation of a 12-channel light engine which emits arbitrarily-tunable spectra. The color fidelity of the designed spectra is assessed through Color Rendering Maps, showing that color fidelity is preserved uniformly over a large spectral reflectance dataset, unlike other approaches to generate white light.

  17. Limiting similarity and Darwin's naturalization hypothesis: understanding the drivers of biotic resistance against invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Yannelli, F A; Koch, C; Jeschke, J M; Kollmann, J

    2017-03-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain biotic resistance of a recipient plant community based on reduced niche opportunities for invasive alien plant species. The limiting similarity hypothesis predicts that invasive species are less likely to establish in communities of species holding similar functional traits. Likewise, Darwin's naturalization hypothesis states that invasive species closely related to the native community would be less successful. We tested both using the invasive alien Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. and Solidago gigantea Aiton, and grassland species used for ecological restoration in central Europe. We classified all plant species into groups based on functional traits obtained from trait databases and calculated the phylogenetic distance among them. In a greenhouse experiment, we submitted the two invasive species at two propagule pressures to competition with communities of ten native species from the same functional group. In another experiment, they were submitted to pairwise competition with native species selected from each functional group. At the community level, highest suppression for both invasive species was observed at low propagule pressure and not explained by similarity in functional traits. Moreover, suppression decreased asymptotically with increasing phylogenetic distance to species of the native community. When submitted to pairwise competition, suppression for both invasive species was also better explained by phylogenetic distance. Overall, our results support Darwin's naturalization hypothesis but not the limiting similarity hypothesis based on the selected traits. Biotic resistance of native communities against invasive species at an early stage of establishment is enhanced by competitive traits and phylogenetic relatedness.

  18. 40 CFR 60.5402 - What are the alternative emission limitations for equipment leaks from onshore natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... limitations for equipment leaks from onshore natural gas processing plants? 60.5402 Section 60.5402 Protection... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production... onshore natural gas processing plants? (a) If, in the Administrator's judgment, an alternative means of...

  19. 40 CFR 60.5402 - What are the alternative emission limitations for equipment leaks from onshore natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... limitations for equipment leaks from onshore natural gas processing plants? 60.5402 Section 60.5402 Protection... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production... onshore natural gas processing plants? (a) If, in the Administrator's judgment, an alternative means of...

  20. Colorless top partners, a 125 GeV Higgs boson, and the limits on naturalness

    SciTech Connect

    Burdman, Gustavo; Chacko, Zackaria; Harnik, Roni; de Lima, Leonardo; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2015-03-01

    Theories of physics beyond the Standard Model that address the hierarchy problem generally involve top partners, new particles that cancel the quadratic divergences associated with the Yukawa coupling of the Higgs to the top quark. With extensions of the Standard Model that involve new colored particles coming under strain from collider searches, scenarios in which the top partners carry no charge under the strong interactions have become increasingly compelling. Although elusive for direct searches, these theories predict modified couplings of the Higgs boson to the Standard Model particles. This results in corrections to the Higgs production and decay rates that can be detected at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provided the top partners are sufficiently light, and the theory correspondingly natural. In this paper we consider three theories that address the little hierarchy problem and involve colorless top partners, specifically the Mirror Twin Higgs, Folded Supersymmetry, and the Quirky Little Higgs. For each model we investigate the current and future bounds on the top partners, and the corresponding limits on naturalness, that can be obtained from the Higgs program at the LHC. We conclude that the LHC will not be able to strongly disfavor naturalness, with mild tuning at the level of about one part in ten remaining allowed even with 3000 fb$^{-1}$ of data at 14 TeV.

  1. Is there a risk of filarial infection during long-term missions in Haiti?

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Thomas; Rosas, Reinaldo; Fica, Alberto; Dabanch, Jeannette; Polanco, Myriam; Egaña, Alicia; Triantafilo, Vjera; Pfarr, Kenneth; Hoerauf, Achim; Reiter-Owona, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Haiti has the highest prevalence of lymphatic filariasis (Wuchereria bancrofti) in the Western Hemisphere. Still, the risk of filarial infection for long-term visitors such as humanitarian aid workers or military personnel is uncertain. The presented study analyzed the exposure to W. bancrofti in Chilean participants of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) in 2011. Blood samples collected from 531 participants were screened for antifilarial antibodies by IgG ELISA, and, if positive, analyzed by immunofluorescence assay (IFA), IgG4 ELISA, Real-Time PCR, and circulating filarial antigen (CFA) card test. ELISA screening was positive in 10 cases. Seroconversion occurred in only two cases (0.38%) based on ELISA values determined in samples taken before and after deployment. Positive IgG ELISA values could not be confirmed by IFA and IgG4 ELISA. Real-Time PCR and CFA testing did not reveal the presence of filaria. Our data indicate that in the examined cohort of MINUSTAH participants in 2011, the risk of filarial exposure or infection was low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Certain Antibiotics Against Filarial Parasite Brugia malayi In Vitro: Possible Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Rachna Sabharwal; Veerpathran, Anandharaman; Dakshinamoorthy, Gajalakshmi; Sharma, Richa Dwarkaprasad; Reddy, Maryada Venkatarami

    2010-01-01

    WHO-Tropical Disease Research scheme highlighted the need for development of new anti-filarial drugs. Certain antibiotics have recently been found effective against Wolbachia, co-existing symbiotically with filarial parasites. Inflammatory response entails oxidative mechanism to educe direct anti-microbial effect. In the present study microfilariae were maintained in vitro in medium supplemented with varying concentrations of tetracycline, doxycycline (20–100 μg/ml) or ciprofloxacin (50–250 μg/ml) separately to find out any involvement of oxidative mechanism in the anti-filarial effect of these antibiotics. Loss of motility of the microfilariae was measured after 48 h and correlated with the levels of MDA, nitric oxide and protein-carbonylation. Significant loss of microfilarial motility was recorded with increasing concentration of tetracycline and doxycycline but with ciprofloxacin the effect was not marked. Agents with high antifilarial activity revealed significant association with oxidative parameters in a dose dependent manner. The result suggests that oxidative effect might be exploited to design novel antifilarial drug candidate. PMID:21966105

  3. Supergroup C Wolbachia, mutualist symbionts of filarial nematodes, have a distinct genome structure

    PubMed Central

    Comandatore, Francesco; Cordaux, Richard; Bandi, Claudio; Blaxter, Mark; Darby, Alistair; Makepeace, Benjamin L.; Montagna, Matteo; Sassera, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is possibly the most widespread endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. While all Wolbachia strains have historically been defined as a single species, 16 monophyletic clusters of diversity (called supergroups) have been described. Different supergroups have distinct host ranges and symbiotic relationships, ranging from mutualism to reproductive manipulation. In filarial nematodes, which include parasites responsible for major diseases of humans (such as Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness) and companion animals (Dirofilaria immitis, the dog heartworm), Wolbachia has an obligate mutualist role and is the target of new treatment regimens. Here, we compare the genomes of eight Wolbachia strains, spanning the diversity of the major supergroups (A–F), analysing synteny, transposable element content, GC skew and gene loss or gain. We detected genomic features that differ between Wolbachia supergroups, most notably in the C and D clades from filarial nematodes. In particular, strains from supergroup C (symbionts of O. volvulus and D. immitis) present a pattern of GC skew, conserved synteny and lack of transposable elements, unique in the Wolbachia genus. These features could be the consequence of a distinct symbiotic relationship between C Wolbachia strains and their hosts, highlighting underappreciated differences between the mutualistic supergroups found within filarial nematodes. PMID:26631376

  4. Circulating Microbial Products and Acute Phase Proteins as Markers of Pathogenesis in Lymphatic Filarial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, N.; Fay, Michael P.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+) or without (CP Ag−) active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF); and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]). Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF) and those without active infection (CP Ag− compared to EN) were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein), acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α) are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins. PMID:22685406

  5. Filarial chyluria: long-term experience of a university hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Vipul; Singh, Harbans; Dwivedi, U S; Mahmood, Mufti; Singh, P B

    2004-04-01

    Filariasis is an endemic problem in various Indian states. We evaluated the results of long-term follow up (10-20 years) of patients with filarial chyluria. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 160 patients treated for filarial chyluria who presented to the Banaras Hindu University Hospital from 1982 to 1992. Eighty-four patients (52.5%) were treated using diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and a fat restricted diet and 76 patients (47.5%) underwent surgery. To examine the long-term effects of filarial chyluria we analysed data on post-treatment recurrence, weight gain, dietary freedom, chyluria free period and a number of other associated factors. Previous history of filariasis or its complication was documented in 19% of patients. In 71% of cases, cystoscopy showed that chylous efflux was predominant in the left ureteric orifice. The long-term remission rate was 62% in the conservatively managed group (DEC + fat restricted diet), whereas 90% of patients in the operated group were cured. Postoperative recurrence rate was 10%. There was more weight gain and dietary freedom along with a longer chyluria free period in the operated group relative to the conservatively managed group. Definitive surgical ablation of lymphatic urinary fistula is better than conservative medical management because it has a higher success rate, more dietary freedom and, therefore, better patient acceptability.

  6. Supergroup C Wolbachia, mutualist symbionts of filarial nematodes, have a distinct genome structure.

    PubMed

    Comandatore, Francesco; Cordaux, Richard; Bandi, Claudio; Blaxter, Mark; Darby, Alistair; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Montagna, Matteo; Sassera, Davide

    2015-12-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is possibly the most widespread endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. While all Wolbachia strains have historically been defined as a single species, 16 monophyletic clusters of diversity (called supergroups) have been described. Different supergroups have distinct host ranges and symbiotic relationships, ranging from mutualism to reproductive manipulation. In filarial nematodes, which include parasites responsible for major diseases of humans (such as Onchocerca volvulus, agent of river blindness) and companion animals (Dirofilaria immitis, the dog heartworm), Wolbachia has an obligate mutualist role and is the target of new treatment regimens. Here, we compare the genomes of eight Wolbachia strains, spanning the diversity of the major supergroups (A-F), analysing synteny, transposable element content, GC skew and gene loss or gain. We detected genomic features that differ between Wolbachia supergroups, most notably in the C and D clades from filarial nematodes. In particular, strains from supergroup C (symbionts of O. volvulus and D. immitis) present a pattern of GC skew, conserved synteny and lack of transposable elements, unique in the Wolbachia genus. These features could be the consequence of a distinct symbiotic relationship between C Wolbachia strains and their hosts, highlighting underappreciated differences between the mutualistic supergroups found within filarial nematodes. © 2015 The Authors.

  7. Subcutaneously Administered Ultrafine PLGA Nanoparticles Containing Doxycycline Hydrochloride Target Lymphatic Filarial Parasites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yuvraj; Srinivas, Adepu; Gangwar, Mamta; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja; Chourasia, Manish K

    2016-06-06

    Systemic chemotherapeutic targeting of filarial parasites is unfocused due to their deep seated location in lymphatic vessels. This warrants a prolonged dosing regimen in high doses for an anthelmintic like doxycycline hydrochloride (DOX). In order to provide an alternative, we have constructed ultrafine PLGA nanoparticles of DOX (DPNPs), so as to exploit the peculiarity of lymphatic vasculature underneath the subcutaneous layer of skin, which preferentially allows entry of only 10-100 nm sized particles. DPNPs were constructed using a novel solvent diffusion method aided by probe sonication, which resulted in an average size 95.43 ± 0.8 nm as per DLS, PDI 0.168 ± 0.03, zeta potential -7.38 ± 0.32, entrapment efficiency 75.58 ± 1.94%, and refrigerator stability of 7 days with respect to size in the optimized batch. TEM further substantiated the spherical shape of DPNPs along with their actual nonhydrated size as being well below 100 nm. FTIR analysis of DOX, dummy nanoparticles, and freeze-dried DPNPs revealed that the formulation step did not induce prominent changes in the chemical nature of DOX. The drug release was significantly altered (p < 0.05) with 64.6 ± 1.67% release in 48 h from DPNPs and was dictated by Fickian diffusion. Pharmacokinetic studies in Wistar rats further revealed that DPNPs caused a 16-fold prolongation in attainment of plasma Tmax and a 2-fold extension of elimination half-life (28.569 ± 1.27 h) at a dose of 5 mg/kg when compared to native drug (DOX solution) of the same strength. Contrastingly the trend was reversed in regional lymph nodes where Cmax for DPNPs (820 ± 84 ng/mg) was 4-fold greater, and lymphatic Tmax was attained in one-fourth of what was required for DOX solution. This size based preferential lymphatic targeting resulted in significantly greater in vivo antifilarial activity of DPNPs when compared to DOX solution as gauged by several parameters in Brugia malayi infected Mastomys coucha. Interestingly, the

  8. Limited impact on decadal-scale climate change from increased use of natural gas.

    PubMed

    McJeon, Haewon; Edmonds, Jae; Bauer, Nico; Clarke, Leon; Fisher, Brian; Flannery, Brian P; Hilaire, Jérôme; Krey, Volker; Marangoni, Giacomo; Mi, Raymond; Riahi, Keywan; Rogner, Holger; Tavoni, Massimo

    2014-10-23

    The most important energy development of the past decade has been the wide deployment of hydraulic fracturing technologies that enable the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. If these advanced gas production technologies were to be deployed globally, the energy market could see a large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources. The climate implications of such abundant natural gas have been hotly debated. Some researchers have observed that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Others have reported that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. Assessment of the full impact of abundant gas on climate change requires an integrated approach to the global energy-economy-climate systems, but the literature has been limited in either its geographic scope or its coverage of greenhouse gases. Here we show that market-driven increases in global supplies of unconventional natural gas do not discernibly reduce the trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions or climate forcing. Our results, based on simulations from five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models of energy-economy-climate systems independently forced by an abundant gas scenario, project large additional natural gas consumption of up to +170 per cent by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2 per cent to +11 per cent), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3 per cent to +7 per cent) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that although market penetration of globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy system, it is not necessarily an effective substitute for climate change mitigation policy.

  9. Predation Limits Spread of Didemnum vexillum into Natural Habitats from Refuges on Anthropogenic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Barrie M.; Fletcher, Lauren M.; Atalah, Javier; Piola, Richard F.; Hopkins, Grant A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-indigenous species can dominate fouling assemblages on artificial structures in marine environments; however, the extent to which infected structures act as reservoirs for subsequent spread to natural habitats is poorly understood. Didemnum vexillum is one of few colonial ascidian species that is widely reported to be highly invasive in natural ecosystems, but which in New Zealand proliferates only on suspended structures. Experimental work revealed that D. vexillum established equally well on suspended artificial and natural substrata, and was able to overgrow suspended settlement plates that were completely covered in other cosmopolitan fouling species. Fragmentation led to a level of D. vexillum cover that was significantly greater than was achieved as a result of ambient larval recruitment. The species failed to establish following fragment transplants onto seabed cobbles and into beds of macroalgae. The establishment success of D. vexillum was greatest in summer compared with autumn, and on the underside of experimental settlement plates that were suspended off the seabed to avoid benthic predators. Where benthic predation pressure was reduced by caging, D. vexillum establishment success was broadly comparable to suspended treatments; by contrast, the species did not establish on the face-up aspect of uncaged plates. This study provides compelling evidence that benthic predation was a key mechanism that prevented D. vexillum’s establishment in the cobble habitats of the study region. The widespread occurrence of D. vexillum on suspended anthropogenic structures is consistent with evidence for other sessile invertebrates that such habitats provide a refuge from benthic predation. For invasive species generally, anthropogenic structures are likely to be most important as propagule reservoirs for spread to natural habitats in situations where predation and other mechanisms do not limit their subsequent proliferation. PMID:24349228

  10. Predation limits spread of Didemnum vexillum into natural habitats from refuges on anthropogenic structures.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Barrie M; Fletcher, Lauren M; Atalah, Javier; Piola, Richard F; Hopkins, Grant A

    2013-01-01

    Non-indigenous species can dominate fouling assemblages on artificial structures in marine environments; however, the extent to which infected structures act as reservoirs for subsequent spread to natural habitats is poorly understood. Didemnum vexillum is one of few colonial ascidian species that is widely reported to be highly invasive in natural ecosystems, but which in New Zealand proliferates only on suspended structures. Experimental work revealed that D. vexillum established equally well on suspended artificial and natural substrata, and was able to overgrow suspended settlement plates that were completely covered in other cosmopolitan fouling species. Fragmentation led to a level of D. vexillum cover that was significantly greater than was achieved as a result of ambient larval recruitment. The species failed to establish following fragment transplants onto seabed cobbles and into beds of macroalgae. The establishment success of D. vexillum was greatest in summer compared with autumn, and on the underside of experimental settlement plates that were suspended off the seabed to avoid benthic predators. Where benthic predation pressure was reduced by caging, D. vexillum establishment success was broadly comparable to suspended treatments; by contrast, the species did not establish on the face-up aspect of uncaged plates. This study provides compelling evidence that benthic predation was a key mechanism that prevented D. vexillum's establishment in the cobble habitats of the study region. The widespread occurrence of D. vexillum on suspended anthropogenic structures is consistent with evidence for other sessile invertebrates that such habitats provide a refuge from benthic predation. For invasive species generally, anthropogenic structures are likely to be most important as propagule reservoirs for spread to natural habitats in situations where predation and other mechanisms do not limit their subsequent proliferation.

  11. Diagnosing phosphorus limitations in natural terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Peng, Shushi; Goll, Daniel S.; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Hinsinger, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.; Peñuelas, Josep; Piao, Shilong; Poulter, Benjamin; Violette, Aurélie; Yang, Xiaojuan; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Most of the Earth System Models (ESMs) project increases in net primary productivity (NPP) and terrestrial carbon (C) storage during the 21st century. Despite empirical evidence that limited availability of phosphorus (P) may limit the response of NPP to increasing atmospheric CO2, none of the ESMs used in the previous Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment accounted for P limitation. We diagnosed from ESM simulations the amount of P need to support increases in carbon uptake by natural ecosystems using two approaches: the demand derived from (1) changes in C stocks and (2) changes in NPP. The C stock-based additional P demand was estimated to range between -31 and 193 Tg P and between -89 and 262 Tg P for Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively, with negative values indicating a P surplus. The NPP-based demand, which takes ecosystem P recycling into account, results in a significantly higher P demand of 648-1606 Tg P for RCP2.6 and 924-2110 Tg P for RCP8.5. We found that the P demand is sensitive to the turnover of P in decomposing plant material, explaining the large differences between the NPP-based demand and C stock-based demand. The discrepancy between diagnosed P demand and actual P availability (potential P deficit) depends mainly on the assumptions about availability of the different soil P forms. Overall, future P limitation strongly depends on both soil P availability and P recycling on ecosystem scale.

  12. What limits photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency in nature? Lessons from the oceans.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Paul G; Lin, Hanzhi; Gorbunov, Maxim Y

    2017-09-26

    Constraining photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency in nature is challenging. In principle, two yield measurements must be made simultaneously: photochemistry, fluorescence and/or thermal dissipation. We constructed two different, extremely sensitive and precise active fluorometers: one measures the quantum yield of photochemistry from changes in variable fluorescence, the other measures fluorescence lifetimes in the picosecond time domain. By deploying the pair of instruments on eight transoceanic cruises over six years, we obtained over 200 000 measurements of fluorescence yields and lifetimes from surface waters in five ocean basins. Our results revealed that the average quantum yield of photochemistry was approximately 0.35 while the average quantum yield of fluorescence was approximately 0.07. Thus, closure on the energy budget suggests that, on average, approximately 58% of the photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the world oceans are dissipated as heat. This extraordinary inefficiency is associated with the paucity of nutrients in the upper ocean, especially dissolved inorganic nitrogen and iron. Our results strongly suggest that, in nature, most of the time, most of the phytoplankton community operates at approximately half of its maximal photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency because nutrients limit the synthesis or function of essential components in the photosynthetic apparatus.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Visualizing the limits of low vision in detecting natural image features.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Maarten A; van Damme, Wim J M

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to develop a tool to visualize the limitations posed by visual impairments in detecting small and low-contrast elements in natural images. This visualization tool incorporates existing models of several aspects of visual perception, such as the band-limited contrast model of Peli (J Opt Soc Am A 1996;13:1131-8). The models underlying the visualization tool were elaborated and tested in experiments with human subjects with various visual impairments such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and subjects with normal vision but under various degraded viewing conditions (including reduced contrast, eccentric viewing). The experiments were designed to determine in three successive steps the contrast sensitivity function that produces a degraded image that can just be discriminated from its original. In the first step, the just detectable blur was determined, while in the next two steps contrast threshold levels were determined for removing high and medium spatial frequencies from the image. Threshold parameters were determined for three image-types (face, stairs, forest) and the relationship with acuity and contrast thresholds (of Landolt-C symbols) was examined. The blur threshold is inversely related to acuity, and this relationship is largely independent of the cause of reduced acuity (visual impairment, contrast reduction or eccentric viewing). We developed a validated visualization tool based on these results that provides a reliable impression of detectability of image features by visual impaired people.

  14. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Rebekah L; Cridland, Julie M; Shao, Ling; Hu, Tina T; Andolfatto, Peter; Thornton, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10-9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10-10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes.

  15. Tandem Duplications and the Limits of Natural Selection in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Rebekah L.; Cridland, Julie M.; Shao, Ling; Hu, Tina T.; Andolfatto, Peter; Thornton, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem duplications are an essential source of genetic novelty, and their variation in natural populations is expected to influence adaptive walks. Here, we describe evolutionary impacts of recently-derived, segregating tandem duplications in Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila simulans. We observe an excess of duplicated genes involved in defense against pathogens, insecticide resistance, chorion development, cuticular peptides, and lipases or endopeptidases associated with the accessory glands across both species. The observed agreement is greater than expectations on chance alone, suggesting large amounts of convergence across functional categories. We document evidence of widespread selection on the D. simulans X, suggesting adaptation through duplication is common on the X. Despite the evidence for positive selection, duplicates display an excess of low frequency variants consistent with largely detrimental impacts, limiting the variation that can effectively facilitate adaptation. Standing variation for tandem duplications spans less than 25% of the genome in D. yakuba and D. simulans, indicating that evolution will be strictly limited by mutation, even in organisms with large population sizes. Effective whole gene duplication rates are low at 1.17 × 10−9 per gene per generation in D. yakuba and 6.03 × 10−10 per gene per generation in D. simulans, suggesting long wait times for new mutations on the order of thousands of years for the establishment of sweeps. Hence, in cases where adaptation depends on individual tandem duplications, evolution will be severely limited by mutation. We observe low levels of parallel recruitment of the same duplicated gene in different species, suggesting that the span of standing variation will define evolutionary outcomes in spite of convergence across gene ontologies consistent with rapidly evolving phenotypes. PMID:26176952

  16. Molecular systematics of filarial parasites, with an emphasis on groups of medical and veterinary importance, and its relevance for epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Morales-Hojas, Ramiro

    2009-09-01

    Filarial parasites are members of the Phylum Nemata that comprise several species of medical and veterinary importance. Among the human diseases caused by members of this group of nematodes are river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, which afflict millions of people in the tropics. These diseases not only have an impact on the health of the people affected but also bear a great socioeconomic burden. Despite their relevance, the systematics of the filarial parasites is not well understood yet, and additional molecular phylogenetic studies are required to comprehend the evolution of these parasites. Identifying the patterns of evolution of these parasites will be of relevance in preventing emerging zoonoses. The present review examines the information about the molecular systematics of filarial parasites available in the literature and evaluates the relevance of the different directions of future research. Furthermore, it is also intended to highlight the relevance of molecular systematic studies in the molecular epidemiology research area.

  17. Modulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Function by Interleukin 19 and Interleukin 24 During Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 19 (IL-19) and interleukin 24 (IL-24) are cytokines that are highly expressed in filarial infections. To study the role of IL-19 and IL-24 in regulating T-cell responses, we examined the frequency of T-helper type 1 (Th1)/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th9/Tc9, Th17/Tc17, Th22/Tc22, and Tr1 cells in 26 filariae-infected individuals stimulated with filarial antigen following IL-19 or IL-24 neutralization. IL-19 or IL-24 neutralization resulted in significantly enhanced frequencies of Th1/Tc1 and/or Th17/Tc17 cells and significantly reduced frequencies of Th2/Tc2, Tr1, and/or Th9/Tc9 cells. Thus, we demonstrate that IL-19 and IL-24 are associated with the modulation of T-cell responses in filarial infections. PMID:26486636

  18. Variation in resource limitation of plant reproduction influences natural selection on floral traits of Asclepias syriaca.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Christina M; Remington, Davin L D; Ostergren, Kate E

    2005-11-01

    The availability of both pollen and resources can influence natural selection on floral traits, but their relative importance in shaping floral evolution is unclear. We experimentally manipulated pollinator and resource (fertilizer and water) availability in the perennial wildflower Asclepias syriaca L. Nine floral traits, one male fitness component (number of pollinia removed), and two female fitness components (number of pollinia inserted and number of fruits initiated) were measured for plants in each of three treatments (unmanipulated control, decreased pollinator access, and resource supplementation). Although decreasing pollinators' access to flowers did result in fewer pollinia inserted and removed, fruit set and phenotypic selection on floral traits via female and male fitness did not differ from the control. In contrast, resource supplementation increased fruit set, and phenotypic selection on seven out of nine floral traits was stronger via female than male fitness, consistent with the prediction that selection via female fitness would be greater when reproduction was less resource-limited. Our results support the hypothesis that abiotic resource availability can influence floral evolution by altering gender-specific selection.

  19. Crystal chemistry of natural and synthetic trioctahedral micas: Exploring the limits of geometric crystal chemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Patrick H. J.

    of lattice parameter b versus average-octahedral-bond-length allowed the following distinction to be made: Unoxidized divalent synthetic solid solution series tend to evolve along constant flattening-angle lines whereas trivalent octahedral cation and vacancy bearing natural single-crystals and synthetic powders follow trends with varying flattening angles. We found that the bond length of a given interlayer cationic species monotonously increases as the tetrahedral rotation angle alpha decreases in trioctahedral-1 M single-crystals. An upper limit of tetrahedral rotation of alpha = 9.5° was demonstrated to occur in trioctahedral-1M K-rich micas having an sheet, for both synthetic powders and natural single-crystals. Other attempts at applying geometric crystal chemical models and at identifying structure-chemical relationships from structural refinement data will benefit from the perspective of our more complete and systematic approach based on pursuing simple geometrical models using 'regular' coordination polyhedrons and characteristic cation-specific bond lengths up to the limit beyond which such models are shown to necessarily breakdown because of unavoidable 'non-regular' polyhedral distortions. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  20. Hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis and immune response imbalance during chronic filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Mavoungou, Donatien; Poaty-Mavoungou, Virginie; Ongali, Brice; Akoume, Marie Yvonne; Maka, Gontran; Mavoungou, Elie

    2005-11-01

    Bi-directional relationships operate between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the immune system. Cytokines, peptide hormones and their shared receptors/ligands are used as a common biological language for communication within and between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Such communication suggests an immunoregulatory role for the brain and a sensory function for the immune system. We used a radioimmunoassay to measure the concentrations of steroid hormones (cortisol, testosterone, estradiol and progesterone) and pituitary hormones [follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and prolactin] in peripheral blood plasma from 78 young Gabonese women with chronic filarial infections. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the concentrations of four proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6] in the same plasma samples. Progesterone was unchanged and all other steroid hormone plasma concentrations were lower in microfilaremic women than in amicrofilaremic women. The concentration of LH was higher in amicrofilaremic women, whereas the prolactin concentration was higher in microfilaremics. The plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-1 and IL-6 were higher in microfilaremic women. A strong negative correlation was found between the steroid and pituitary hormones and the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conversely, a strong positive correlation was found between prolactin and the same cytokines. These data provide first evidence of immune system and hormonal system disturbance during chronic filarial infections and suggest that the observed imbalance should be taken into account in the diagnosis and treatment of filarial infections.

  1. A survey of canine filarial diseases of veterinary and public health significance in India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dirofilaria spp., Acanthocheilonema spp. and Brugia spp. have all been reported in Indian dogs. In previous studies, diagnosis was made by morphological identification only. This is the first geographically stratified cross-sectional study in India to determine the prevalence and geographical distribution of canine filarial species of veterinary and public health importance, using a combination of conventional and molecular diagnostic techniques. Results A total of 139 from 525 dogs (26.5%; 95% CI 22.7, 30.3) were positive for microfilariae. The most common species of canine filaria identified in this study was A. reconditum (9.3%) followed by D. repens (6.7%) and D. immitis (1.5%). Three out of 525 dogs were found to have mixed infections on PCR. The morphological and molecular evidence on the sequence of the 18S gene and phylogenetic analysis of the ITS-2 region provided strong evidence that the canine microfilariae discovered in the Himalayan city of Ladakh belong to a novel species of Acanthocheilonema. Two dogs in Ladakh were also found to have mixed infections of the novel species described above and a unique microfilaria which morphologically resembled Microfilaria auquieri Foley, 1921. Conclusions At least six species of filarial nematode are now known to infect dogs in India, two of which were reported for the first time in this study. The study also confirms and extends the geographical distribution of canine heartworm (D. immitis) which overlaps with D. repens, emphasising the importance for veterinary clinicians and diagnostic laboratories to utilise immunodiagnostic tests that will not cross-react between those two filarial species. From a public health viewpoint, the distribution and prevalences of these nematodes warrant an appropriate prophylaxis to be administered to dogs. PMID:20377864

  2. Evaluation of immune response elicited by inulin as an adjuvant with filarial antigens in mice model.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, N; Aparnaa, R; Kaliraj, P

    2014-10-01

    Filariasis caused by infectious parasitic nematodes has been identified as the second leading source of permanent and long-term disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America. Several vaccine candidates were identified from infective third-stage larvae (L3) which involves in the critical transition from arthropod to human. Hitherto studies of these antigens in combination with alum adjuvant have shown to elicit its characteristic Th2 responses. Inulin is a safe, non-toxic adjuvant that principally stimulates the innate immune response through the alternative complement pathway. In the present study, the immune response elicited by inulin and alum as adjuvants were compared with filarial antigens from different aetiological agents: secreted larval acidic protein 1 (SLAP1) from Onchocerca volvulus and venom allergen homologue (VAH) from Brugia malayi as single or as cocktail vaccines in mice model. The study revealed that inulin can induce better humoral response against these antigens than alum adjuvant. Antibody isotyping disclosed inulin's ability to elevate the levels of IgG2a and IgG3 antibodies which mediates in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), respectively, in mice. Splenocyte analysis showed that T cells prestimulated with inulin have higher stimulation index (P < 0.05) than alum except for BmVAH antigen. In vitro ADCC assay showed that inulin formulation had induced higher cytotoxicity with filarial antigens (as single P < 0.01 and as cocktail P < 0.05, respectively) than alum. The results had confirmed the capability of inulin to deplete the levels of Treg and brought a balance in Th1/Th2 arms against filarial antigens in mice.

  3. Amelanotic Melanoma Arising in Filarial Leg: A Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Mamita; Meher, Susanta; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Amelanotic melanoma arising on chronic lymphoedema has not been reported earlier. We reported a case of amelanotic melanoma of right leg developing in a background of chronic lymphoedema of filarial origin in an elderly male of 60 years, who underwent wide local excision of the lesion followed by skin grafting for the same. A histopathological diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma was made. The patient was on follow up when he developed brain metastasis within a period of nine months for which he was operated and is on regular follow up now. We believe this as the first case report of this unusual combination. PMID:28273977

  4. Speed Limits: Orientation and Semantic Context Interactions Constrain Natural Scene Discrimination Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieger, Jochem W.; Kochy, Nick; Schalk, Franziska; Gruschow, Marcus; Heinze, Hans-Jochen

    2008-01-01

    The visual system rapidly extracts information about objects from the cluttered natural environment. In 5 experiments, the authors quantified the influence of orientation and semantics on the classification speed of objects in natural scenes, particularly with regard to object-context interactions. Natural scene photographs were presented in an…

  5. Herd immunity to filarial infection is a function of vector biting rate.

    PubMed Central

    Michael, E; Bundy, D A

    1998-01-01

    Despite the existence of an impressive body of work on human immune responses against filarial infections, the occurrence of a protective response to infection remains unclear. Here, we use a combined modelling and comparative data analysis framework to address this issue for human infections with the filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti. By analogy with previous work, the analysis involves the comparison of observed field patterns of infection with epidemiological patterns predicted by a mathematical model of parasite immunity. Unlike most other human helminths, which are transmitted by ingestion or dermal penetration, exposure to infection with lymphatic filariasis can be measured explicitly in terms of vector mosquito biting rates, thereby also allowing, probably for the first time, examination of the suggested role of exposure in generating herd immunity to macroparasites. Observed field patterns in this study were derived from 19 different published studies, which gave parallel estimates of community exposure rates and the corresponding age--prevalence patterns of infection, while predictions of the epidemiological impact of herd immunity were obtained using a catalytic model framework. The results provide the first conclusive evidence to date that variations in the observed age--prevalence patterns of infection in filariasis can be effectively explained by the occurrence of an exposure-driven acquisition of herd immunity. We discuss this result in terms of implications for the new World Health Organization-led initiative for the global control of this parasitic disease. PMID:9633111

  6. Immunization with L. sigmodontis Microfilariae Reduces Peripheral Microfilaraemia after Challenge Infection by Inhibition of Filarial Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ziewer, Sebastian; Hübner, Marc P.; Dubben, Bettina; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H.; Bain, Odile; Martin, Coralie; Hoerauf, Achim; Specht, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are two chronic diseases mediated by parasitic filarial worms causing long term disability and massive socioeconomic problems. Filariae are transmitted by blood-feeding mosquitoes that take up the first stage larvae from an infected host and deliver it after maturation into infective stage to a new host. After closure of vector control programs, disease control relies mainly on mass drug administration with drugs that are primarily effective against first stage larvae and require many years of annual/biannual administration. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative treatment ways, i.e. other effective drugs or vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the Litomosoides sigmodontis murine model of filariasis we demonstrate that immunization with microfilariae together with the adjuvant alum prevents mice from developing high microfilaraemia after challenge infection. Immunization achieved 70% to 100% protection in the peripheral blood and in the pleural space and furthermore strongly reduced the microfilarial load in mice that remained microfilaraemic. Protection was associated with the impairment of intrauterine filarial embryogenesis and with local and systemic microfilarial-specific host IgG, as well as IFN-γ secretion by host cells from the site of infection. Furthermore immunization significantly reduced adult worm burden. Conclusions/Significance Our results present a tool to understand the immunological basis of vaccine induced protection in order to develop a microfilariae-based vaccine that reduces adult worm burden and prevents microfilaraemia, a powerful weapon to stop transmission of filariasis. PMID:22413031

  7. Small RNAs and extracellular vesicles in filarial nematodes: From nematode development to diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Quintana, J F; Babayan, S A; Buck, A H

    2017-02-01

    Parasitic nematodes have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to communicate with their hosts in order to survive and successfully establish an infection. The transfer of RNA within extracellular vesicles (EVs) has recently been described as a mechanism that could contribute to this communication in filarial nematodes. It has been shown that these EVs are loaded with several types of RNAs, including microRNAs, leading to the hypothesis that parasites could actively use these molecules to manipulate host gene expression and to the exciting prospect that these pathways could result in new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the literature on the diverse RNAi pathways that operate in nematodes and more specifically our current knowledge of extracellular RNA (exRNA) and EVs derived from filarial nematodes in vitro and within their hosts. We further detail some of the issues and questions related to the capacity of RNA-mediated communication to function in parasite-host interactions and the ability of exRNA to enable us to distinguish and detect different nematode parasites in their hosts. © 2016 The Authors. Parasite Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Identification of Ecdysone Hormone Receptor Agonists as a Therapeutic Approach for Treating Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mhashilkar, Amruta S.; Vankayala, Sai L.; Liu, Canhui; Kearns, Fiona; Mehrotra, Priyanka; Tzertzinis, George; Palli, Subba R.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background A homologue of the ecdysone receptor has previously been identified in human filarial parasites. As the ecdysone receptor is not found in vertebrates, it and the regulatory pathways it controls represent attractive potential chemotherapeutic targets. Methodology/ Principal Findings Administration of 20-hydroxyecdysone to gerbils infected with B. malayi infective larvae disrupted their development to adult stage parasites. A stable mammalian cell line was created incorporating the B. malayi ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain, its heterodimer partner and a secreted luciferase reporter in HEK293 cells. This was employed to screen a series of ecdysone agonist, identifying seven agonists active at sub-micromolar concentrations. A B. malayi ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain was developed and used to study the ligand-receptor interactions of these agonists. An excellent correlation between the virtual screening results and the screening assay was observed. Based on both of these approaches, steroidal ecdysone agonists and the diacylhydrazine family of compounds were identified as a fruitful source of potential receptor agonists. In further confirmation of the modeling and screening results, Ponasterone A and Muristerone A, two compounds predicted to be strong ecdysone agonists stimulated expulsion of microfilaria and immature stages from adult parasites. Conclusions The studies validate the potential of the B. malayi ecdysone receptor as a drug target and provide a means to rapidly evaluate compounds for development of a new class of drugs against the human filarial parasites. PMID:27300294

  9. High poloidal beta equilibria in TFTR limited by a natural inboard poloidal field null

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Gross, R.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A. . Dept. of Applied Physics); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chance, M.S.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Hatcher, R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hirshman, S.P.; Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Manickam, J.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Ow

    1991-07-01

    Recent operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor TFTR, has produced plasma equilibria with values of {Lambda} {triple bond} {beta}{sub p eq} + l{sub i}/2 as large as 7, {epsilon}{beta}{sub p dia} {triple bond} 2{mu}{sub 0}{epsilon}/{much lt}B{sub p}{much gt}{sup 2} as large as 1.6, and Troyon normalized diamagnetic beta, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple bond} 10{sup 8}<{beta}{sub t}{perpendicular}>aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} as large as 4.7. When {epsilon}{beta}{sub p dia} {approx gt} 1.25, a separatrix entered the vacuum chamber, producing a naturally diverted discharge which was sustained for many energy confinement times, {tau}{sub E}. The largest values of {epsilon}{beta}{sub p} and plasma stored energy were obtained when the plasma current was ramped down prior to neutral beam injection. The measured peak ion and electron temperatures were as large as 24 keV and 8.5 keV, respectively. Plasma stored energy in excess of 2.5 MJ and {tau}{sub E} greater than 130 msec were obtained. Confinement times of greater than 3 times that expected from L-mode predictions have been achieved. The fusion power gain. Q{sub DD}, reached a values of 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} in a discharge with I{sub p} = 1 MA and {epsilon}{beta}{sub p dia} = 0.85. A large, sustained negative loop voltage during the steady state portion of the discharge indicates that a substantial non-inductive component of I{sub p} exists in these plasmas. Transport code analysis indicates that the bootstrap current constitutes up to 65% of I{sup p}. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability analysis shows that while these plasmas are near, or at the {beta}{sub p} limit, the pressure gradient in the plasma core is in the first region of stability to high-n modes. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Natural history of upper extremity musculoskeletal symptoms and resulting work limitations over 3 years in a newly hired working population

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Bethany T.; Dale, Ann Marie; Descatha, Alexis; Evanoff, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the proportions of workers with upper extremity (UE) symptoms and work limitations due to symptoms in a newly hired working population over a 3-year study period and to describe transitions between various outcome states. Methods 827 subjects completed repeat self-reported questionnaires including demographics, medical and work history, symptoms and work status. Outcomes of interest were UE symptoms and work limitations due to symptoms. Results 72% of workers reported symptoms at least once during the study, with 12% reporting persistent symptoms and 27% reporting fluctuating symptoms. 31% reported work limitations at least once, with 3% reporting consistent work limitations and 8% reporting fluctuating limitations. Conclusions UE symptoms and work limitations are common among workers and dynamic in their course. A better understanding of the natural course of symptoms is necessary for targeted interventions. PMID:24854251

  11. Tunga penetrans: molecular identification of Wolbachia endobacteria and their recognition by antibodies against proteins of endobacteria from filarial parasites.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Schmetz, Christel; Bandi, Claudio; Bonow, Insa; Mand, Sabine; Fischer, Kerstin; Büttner, Dietrich W

    2002-01-01

    In search of Wolbachia in human parasites, Wolbachia were identified in the sand flea Tunga penetrans. PCR and DNA sequencing of the bacterial 16S rDNA, the ftsZ cell division protein, the Wolbachia surface protein (wsp) and the Wolbachia aspartate aminotransferase genes revealed a high similarity to the respective sequences of endosymbionts of filarial nematodes. Using these sequences a phylogenetic tree was generated, that indicates a close relationship between Wolbachia from T. penetrans and from filarial parasites, but possibly as a member of a new supergroup. Ultrastructural studies showed that Wolbachia are abundant in the ovaries of neosomic fleas, whereas other, smaller and morphologically distinct, bacteria were observed in the lumen of the intestine. Wolbachia were labeled by immunohistology and immunogold electron microscopy using polyclonal antibodies against wsp of Drosophila, of the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis, or against hsp 60 from Yersinia enterocolitica. These results show that as in filariasis, humans with tungiasis are exposed to Wolbachia. Furthermore, antisera raised against proteins of Wolbachia from arthropods or from filarial parasites can be immunologically cross-reactive.

  12. Co-infection restrains Litomosoides sigmodontis filarial load and plasmodial P. yoelii but not P. chabaudi parasitaemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Karadjian, Gregory; Berrebi, Dominique; Dogna, Nathalie; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Bain, Odile; Landau, Irène; Martin, Coralie

    2014-01-01

    Infection with multiple parasite species is clearly the norm rather than the exception, in animals as well as in humans. Filarial nematodes and Plasmodium spp. are important parasites in human public health and they are often co-endemic. Interactions between these parasites are complex. The mechanisms underlying the modulation of both the course of malaria and the outcome of filarial infection are poorly understood. Despite increasing activity in recent years, studies comparing co- and mono-infections are very much in their infancy and results are contradictory at first sight. In this study we performed controlled and simultaneous co-infections of BALB/c mice with Litomosoides sigmodontis filaria and with Plasmodium spp. (Plasmodium yoelii 17 XNL or Plasmodium chabaudi 864VD). An analysis of pathological lesions in the kidneys and lungs and a parasitological study were conducted at different times of infection. Whatever the plasmodial species, the filarial recovery rate was strongly decreased. The peak of parasitaemia in the plasmodial infection was decreased in the course of P. yoelii infection but not in that of P. chabaudi. Regarding pathological lesions, L. sigmodontis can reverse lesions in the kidneys due to the presence of both Plasmodium species but does not modify the course of pulmonary lesions. The filarial infection induces granulomas in the lungs. PMID:24717449

  13. Detection and differentiation of filarial parasites by universal primers and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Nuchprayoon, Surang; Junpee, Alisa; Poovorawan, Yong; Scott, Alan L

    2005-11-01

    Filarial nematode parasites are a serious cause of morbidity in humans and animals. Identification of filarial infection using traditional morphologic criteria can be difficult and lead to misdiagnosis. We report on a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based method to detect and differentiate a broad range of filarial species in a single PCR. The first internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) along with the flanking 18S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were isolated and cloned from Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia pahangi. Sequence analysis identified conserved sites in the 18S and 5.8S rDNA sequence that could be used as universal priming sites to generate ITS1-distinctive PCR products that were useful for distinguishing filariae at the genus level. The addition of a digestion of the ITS1 PCR product with the restriction endonuclease Ase I generated a fragment profile that allowed differentiation down to the species level for W. bancrofti, B. malayi, B. pahangi, Dirofilaria immitis, and D. repens. The PCR-RFLP of ITS1 rDNA will be useful in diagnosing and differentiating filarial parasites in human, animal reservoir hosts, and mosquito vectors in disease-endemic areas.

  14. 40 CFR 60.4325 - What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? 60... Combustion Turbines Emission Limits § 60.4325 What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns... percent natural gas, you must meet the corresponding limit for a natural gas-fired turbine when you are...

  15. 40 CFR 60.4325 - What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? 60... Combustion Turbines Emission Limits § 60.4325 What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns... percent natural gas, you must meet the corresponding limit for a natural gas-fired turbine when you are...

  16. Development of an In Vivo RNAi Protocol to Investigate Gene Function in the Filarial Nematode, Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chuanzhe; Gallup, Jack M.; Day, Tim A.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to control diseases caused by parasitic nematodes is constrained by a limited portfolio of effective drugs and a paucity of robust tools to investigate parasitic nematode biology. RNA interference (RNAi) is a reverse-genetics tool with great potential to identify novel drug targets and interrogate parasite gene function, but present RNAi protocols for parasitic nematodes, which remove the parasite from the host and execute RNAi in vitro, are unreliable and inconsistent. We have established an alternative in vivo RNAi protocol targeting the filarial nematode Brugia malayi as it develops in an intermediate host, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Injection of worm-derived short interfering RNA (siRNA) and double stranded RNA (dsRNA) into parasitized mosquitoes elicits suppression of B. malayi target gene transcript abundance in a concentration-dependent fashion. The suppression of this gene, a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease (Bm-cpl-1) is specific and profound, both injection of siRNA and dsRNA reduce transcript abundance by 83%. In vivo Bm-cpl-1 suppression results in multiple aberrant phenotypes; worm motility is inhibited by up to 69% and parasites exhibit slow-moving, kinked and partial-paralysis postures. Bm-cpl-1 suppression also retards worm growth by 48%. Bm-cpl-1 suppression ultimately prevents parasite development within the mosquito and effectively abolishes transmission potential because parasites do not migrate to the head and proboscis. Finally, Bm-cpl-1 suppression decreases parasite burden and increases mosquito survival. This is the first demonstration of in vivo RNAi in animal parasitic nematodes and results indicate this protocol is more effective than existing in vitro RNAi methods. The potential of this new protocol to investigate parasitic nematode biology and to identify and validate novel anthelmintic drug targets is discussed. PMID:21203489

  17. DoD Response to Natural Disasters - Why the National Guard is Off Limits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-15

    to “natural disasters, epidemics, serious health emergencies, terrorists attacks, or other conditions when the authorities of the state are...epidemic, serious health emergency, terrorist attack, or other conditions when the President determines that the authorities of the 17 state are...enforce the laws of the United States when, as a result of a natural disaster, epidemic, or other serious public health emergency, terrorist

  18. Altered Circulating Levels of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Inhibitors Associated with Elevated Type 2 Cytokines in Lymphatic Filarial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; George, Jovvian P.; Pavankumar, Nathella; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Background Infection with Wuchereria bancrofti can cause severe disease characterized by subcutaneous fibrosis and extracellular matrix remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes governing extracellular remodeling by regulating cellular homeostasis, inflammation, and tissue reorganization, while tissue-inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are endogenous regulators of MMPs. Homeostatic as well as inflammation-induced balance between MMPs and TIMPs is considered critical in mediating tissue pathology. Methods To elucidate the role of MMPs and TIMPs in filarial pathology, we compared the plasma levels of a panel of MMPs, TIMPs, other pro-fibrotic factors, and cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+) or without (CP Ag−) active infection to those with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF) and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]). Markers of pathogenesis were delineated based on comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF) and those without active infection (CP Ag− compared to EN). Results and Conclusion Our data reveal that an increase in circulating levels of MMPs and TIMPs is characteristic of the filarial disease process per se and not of active infection; however, filarial disease with active infection is specifically associated with increased ratios of MMP1/TIMP4 and MMP8/TIMP4 as well as with pro-fibrotic cytokines (IL-5, IL-13 and TGF-β). Our data therefore suggest that while filarial lymphatic disease is characterized by a non-specific increase in plasma MMPs and TIMPs, the balance between MMPs and TIMPs is an important factor in regulating tissue pathology during active infection. PMID:22679524

  19. Nitrogen limitation in natural populations of cyanobacteria (Spirulina and Oscillatoria spp. ) and its effect on macromolecular synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    van Rijn, J.; Shilo, M.

    1986-08-01

    Natural populations of the cyanobacteria Spirulina species and Oscillatoria species obtained from Israeli fish ponds were limited in growth by nitrogen availability in summer. Physiological indicators for nitrogen limitation, such as phycocyanin, chlorophyll a, and carbohydrate content, did not show clear evidence for nitrogen limited growth, since these organisms are capable of vertical migration from and to the nitrogen-rich bottom. By means of /sup 14/C labeling of the cells under simulated pond conditions followed by cell fractionation into macromolecular compounds, it was found that carbohydrates synthesized at the lighted surface were partially utilized for dark protein synthesis at the bottom of these ponds.

  20. A Handbook on the MLA Foreign Language Proficiency Tests for Teachers and Advanced Students: Their Nature, Uses and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, F. Andre; Tollinger, Suzanne

    This handbook describes the nature, uses, and limitations of the Modern Language Association of America (MLA) language proficiency tests for teachers and advanced students. The proficiency tests are examined in seven areas of language teaching competence: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, applied linguistics, civilization and…

  1. Patterns and Limitations of Urban Human Mobility Resilience under the Influence of Multiple Types of Natural Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters pose serious threats to large urban areas, therefore understanding and predicting human movements is critical for evaluating a population’s vulnerability and resilience and developing plans for disaster evacuation, response and relief. However, only limited research has been conducted into the effect of natural disasters on human mobility. This study examines how natural disasters influence human mobility patterns in urban populations using individuals’ movement data collected from Twitter. We selected fifteen destructive cases across five types of natural disaster and analyzed the human movement data before, during, and after each event, comparing the perturbed and steady state movement data. The results suggest that the power-law can describe human mobility in most cases and that human mobility patterns observed in steady states are often correlated with those in perturbed states, highlighting their inherent resilience. However, the quantitative analysis shows that this resilience has its limits and can fail in more powerful natural disasters. The findings from this study will deepen our understanding of the interaction between urban dwellers and civil infrastructure, improve our ability to predict human movement patterns during natural disasters, and facilitate contingency planning by policymakers. PMID:26820404

  2. Patterns and Limitations of Urban Human Mobility Resilience under the Influence of Multiple Types of Natural Disaster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters pose serious threats to large urban areas, therefore understanding and predicting human movements is critical for evaluating a population's vulnerability and resilience and developing plans for disaster evacuation, response and relief. However, only limited research has been conducted into the effect of natural disasters on human mobility. This study examines how natural disasters influence human mobility patterns in urban populations using individuals' movement data collected from Twitter. We selected fifteen destructive cases across five types of natural disaster and analyzed the human movement data before, during, and after each event, comparing the perturbed and steady state movement data. The results suggest that the power-law can describe human mobility in most cases and that human mobility patterns observed in steady states are often correlated with those in perturbed states, highlighting their inherent resilience. However, the quantitative analysis shows that this resilience has its limits and can fail in more powerful natural disasters. The findings from this study will deepen our understanding of the interaction between urban dwellers and civil infrastructure, improve our ability to predict human movement patterns during natural disasters, and facilitate contingency planning by policymakers.

  3. (Un)Healthy Immigrant Citizens: Naturalization and Activity Limitations in Older Age*

    PubMed Central

    Gubernskaya, Zoya; Bean, Frank D.; Van hook, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This research argues that immigrants’ political, social and economic incorporation experiences, which are embedded in individual life-course trajectories and heavily influenced by governmental policies, play an important role in producing diverse health outcomes among older U.S. foreign-born persons. Using data from the 2008–2010 American Community Surveys and 1998–2010 Integrated Health Interview Surveys, we demonstrate how naturalization, a key indicator of social and political inclusion, is related to functional health in midlife and older age. Consistent with the theoretical framework, we find that among those foreign-born who immigrated as children and young adults, naturalized citizens show better health at older ages compared to non-citizens, although this relationship is partly mediated by education. But among those older foreign-born who immigrated at middle and older ages, naturalized citizens report worse health compared to non-citizens. Moreover, this negative health selection into naturalization becomes stronger for those naturalizing after the 1996 Welfare Reform Act. PMID:24311754

  4. Treatment of filarial lymphoedema and elephantiasis with 5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone (coumarin).

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J R; Wang, C T; Casley-Smith, J R; Zi-hai, C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study efficacy of treatment of filarial lymphoedema and elephantiasis with 5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone. DESIGN--Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study with matching for grade and duration of disease, age, and sex. Treatment was given for 367 days, and subjects were followed up for another year. SETTING--A town in Shandong Province, China. SUBJECTS--104 men and women with chronic unilateral filarial lymphoedema or elephantiasis of the leg: 64 were randomised to benzopyrone and 40 to placebo. By the end of the study 19 patients had dropped out of the treatment group and two out of the placebo group. INTERVENTIONS--Two 200 mg tablets of 5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone or two placebo tablets given daily. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Volumes of the affected and normal legs estimated every three months, and daily listing of any side effects. RESULTS--Benzopyrone reduced oedema for all grades of lymphoedema during the year of treatment (pW0.001) and the follow up year (p = 0.026). During treatment the mean monthly reductions in leg volume were 0.62% (95% confidence intervals 0.4% to 0.85%), 1.1% (0.71% to 1.6%), and 1.6% (0.89% to 2.3%) of the volume of the normal leg for grades 1, 2, and 3-5 (elephantiasis) of lymphoedema respectively. During follow up the mean monthly reductions were 0.18% (0.01% to 0.35%), 0.54% (0.27% to 0.82%), and 0.87% (0.51% to 1.2%). At the end of the trial the total reduction in oedema was 100%, 95%, and 45% for grades 1, 2, and 3-5. Symptoms and complications were considerably reduced, including attacks of secondary acute inflammation, while side effects were minor and disappeared after one month. In the placebo group there were no changes in the severity of lymphoedema. CONCLUSIONS--5,6-benzo-alpha-pyrone reduces the oedema and many symptoms of filarial lymphoedema and elephantiasis. It has few side effects, and its relatively slow action makes it ideal for use without compression garments. PMID:8251778

  5. Plant natural products: history, limitations and the potential of cambial meristematic cells.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ung-Wook; Yan, Zejun; Amir, Rabia; Hong, Sunmi; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Eun-Kyong; Loake, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    Humans have utilised plant derived natural products as medicines for millenia. Moreover, many contemporary pharmaceuticals are also natural products or derivatives thereof. However, the full potential of these compounds remains to be exploited because often they are: complex and difficult to synthesise; found in low quantities; produced by undomesticated and sometimes rare plants; and, their synthesis is routinely influenced by weather conditions. Potentially, the in vitro culture of cells from the corresponding plant species could circumvent some of these problems but the growth of plant cells on an industrial scale is also problematic. The recent isolation and culture of cambial meristematic cells (CMCs), stem cells which ordinarily generate the plant vasculature, may now provide a key platform technology to help realise the full potential of plant natural products.

  6. Beyond the limits of traditional science: bioregional assessments and natural resource management.

    Treesearch

    Sally. Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Bioregional assessments to deal with critical, even crisis, natural resource issues have emerged as important meeting grounds of science, management, and policy across the United States. They are placing heavy demands on science, scientists, and science organizations to compile, synthesize, and produce data, for policy decisions. There is no blueprint for their conduct...

  7. Limited transport of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in two natural soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Column experiments were conducted in undisturbed and in repacked soil columns at water contents close to saturation (85–96%) to investigate the transport and retention of functionalized 14C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in two natural soils. Additionally, a field lysimeter experiment...

  8. Non-Human Nature and the Ecosystem Approach: The Limits of Anthropocentrism in Great Lakes Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Anne

    1994-01-01

    The ecosystem approach is a management philosophy in which humans participate in the natural world, not dominate it. Discusses this concept with respect to the Great Lakes context, the anthropocentric argument, sustainable development, and integrating economy and environment. (Contains 52 references.) (MDH)

  9. Stoichiometry, Metabolism and Nutrient Limitation Across the Periodic Table in Natural Flowing-Water Chemostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.; Kurz, M. J.; Cropper, W. P.; Martin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Relative supplies of macro and micronutrients (C,N,P, various metals), along with light and water, controls ecosystem metabolism, trophic energy transfer and community structure. Here we test the hypothesis, using measurements from 41 spring-fed rivers in Florida, that tissue stoichiometry indicates autotroph nutrient limitation status. Low variation in discharge, temperature and chemical composition within springs, but large variation across springs creates an ideal setting to assess the relationship between limitation and resource supply. Molar N:P ranges from 0.4 to 90, subjecting autotrophs to dramatically different nutrient supply. Over this gradient, species-specific autotroph tissue C:N:P ratios are strictly homeostatic, and with no evidence that nutrient supply affects species composition. Expanding to include 19 metals and micronutrients revealed autotrophs are more plastic in response to micronutrient variation, particularly for iron and manganese whose supply fluxes are small compared to biotic demand. Using a Droop model modified to reflect springs conditions (benthic production, light limitation, high hydraulic turnover), we show that tissue stoichiometry transitions from homeostatic to plastic with the onset of nutrient limitation, providing a potentially powerful new tool for predicting nutrient limitation and thus eutrophication in flowing waters.

  10. Natural Products in Caries Research: Current (Limited) Knowledge, Challenges and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, J.-G; Rosalen, P.L.; Falsetta, M.L.; Koo, H.

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent and costly oral infectious disease worldwide. Virulent biofilms firmly attached to tooth surfaces are prime biological factors associated with this disease. The formation of an exopolysaccharide-rich biofilm matrix, acidification of the milieu and persistent low pH at the tooth-biofilm interface are major controlling virulence factors that modulate dental caries pathogenesis. Each one offers a selective therapeutic target for prevention. Although fluoride, delivered in various modalities, remains the mainstay for the prevention of caries, additional approaches are required to enhance its effectiveness. Available antiplaque approaches are based on the use of broad-spectrum microbicidal agents, e.g. chlorhexidine. Natural products offer a rich source of structurally diverse substances with a wide range of biological activities, which could be useful for the development of alternative or adjunctive anticaries therapies. However, it is a challenging approach owing to complex chemistry and isolation procedures to derive active compounds from natural products. Furthermore, most of the studies have been focused on the general inhibitory effects on glucan synthesis as well as on bacterial metabolism and growth, often employing methods that do not address the pathophysiological aspects of the disease (e.g. bacteria in biofilms) and the length of exposure/retention in the mouth. Thus, the true value of natural products in caries prevention and/or their exact mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, natural substances potentially active against virulent properties of cariogenic organisms have been identified. This review focuses on gaps in the current knowledge and presents a model for investigating the use of natural products in anticaries chemotherapy. PMID:21576957

  11. Natural variations in expression of regulatory and detoxification related genes under limiting phosphate and arsenate stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Tapsi; Kumar, Smita; Khare, Ria; Tripathi, Rudra D.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stress including nutrient deficiency and heavy metal toxicity severely affects plant growth, development, and productivity. Genetic variations within and in between species are one of the important factors in establishing interactions and responses of plants with the environment. In the recent past, natural variations in Arabidopsis thaliana have been used to understand plant development and response toward different stresses at genetic level. Phosphorus deficiency negatively affects plant growth and metabolism and modulates expression of the genes involved in Pi homeostasis. Arsenate, As(V), a chemical analog of Pi, is taken up by the plants via phosphate transport system. Studies suggest that during Pi deficiency, enhanced As(V) uptake leads to increased toxicity in plants. Here, the natural variations in Arabidopsis have been utilized to study the As(V) stress response under limiting Pi condition. The primary root length was compared to identify differential response of three Arabidopsis accessions (Col-0, Sij-1, and Slavi-1) under limiting Pi and As(V) stress. To study the molecular mechanisms responsible for the differential response, comprehensive expression profiling of the genes involved in uptake, detoxification, and regulatory mechanisms was carried out. Analysis suggests genetic variation-dependent regulatory mechanisms may affect differential response of Arabidopsis natural variants toward As(V) stress under limiting Pi condition. Therefore, it is hypothesized that detailed analysis of the natural variations under multiple stress conditions might help in the better understanding of the biological processes involved in stress tolerance and adaptation. PMID:26557133

  12. Colorado River sediment transport 1. Natural sediment supply limitation and the influence of Glen Canyon Dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, D.J.; Rubin, D.M.; Vierra, L.E.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of flow, sediment-transport, bed-topographic, and sedimentologic data suggest that before the closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons was annually supply-limited with respect to fine sediment (i.e., sand and finer material). Furthermore, these analyses suggest that the predam river in Glen Canyon was not supply-limited to the same degree and that the degree of annual supply limitation increased near the head of Marble Canyon. The predam Colorado River in Grand Canyon displays evidence of four effects of supply limitation: (1) seasonal hysteresis in sediment concentration, (2) seasonal hysteresis in sediment grain size coupled to the seasonal hysteresis in sediment concentration, (3) production of inversely graded flood deposits, and (4) development or modification of a lag between the time of a flood peak and the time of either maximum or minimum (depending on reach geometry) bed elevation. Analyses of sediment budgets provide additional support for the interpretation that the predam river was annually supply-limited with respect to fine sediment, but it was not supply-limited with respect to fine sediment during all seasons. In the average predam year, sand would accumulate and be stored in Marble Canyon and upper Grand Canyon for 9 months of the year (from July through March) when flows were dominantly below 200-300 m3/s; this stored sand was then eroded during April through June when flows were typically higher. After closure of Glen Canyon Dam, because of the large magnitudes of the uncertainties in the sediment budget, no season of substantial sand accumulation is evident. Because most flows in the postdam river exceed 200-300 m3/s, substantial sand accumulation in the postdam river is unlikely.

  13. Diversity and Expression of MicroRNAs in the Filarial Parasite, Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Catherine B.; Gu, Weifeng; Kumar, Sanjay; Jin, Jingmin; Davis, Paul J.; Bauche, David; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Human filarial parasites infect an estimated 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide causing blindness and the gross disfigurement of limbs and genitals. An understanding of RNA-mediated regulatory pathways in these parasites may open new avenues for treatment. Toward this goal, small RNAs from Brugia malayi adult females, males and microfilariae were cloned for deep-sequencing. From ∼30 million sequencing reads, 145 miRNAs were identified in the B. malayi genome. Some microRNAs were validated using the p19 RNA binding protein and qPCR. B. malayi miRNAs segregate into 99 families each defined by a unique seed sequence. Sixty-one of the miRNA families are highly conserved with homologues in arthropods, vertebrates and helminths. Of those miRNAs not highly conserved, homologues of 20 B. malayi miRNA families were found in vertebrates. Nine B. malayi miRNA families appear to be filarial-specific as orthologues were not found in other organisms. The miR-2 family is the largest in B. malayi with 11 members. Analysis of the sequences shows that six members result from a recent expansion of the family. Library comparisons found that 1/3 of the B. malayi miRNAs are differentially expressed. For example, miR-71 is 5–7X more highly expressed in microfilariae than adults. Studies suggest that in C.elegans, miR-71 may enhance longevity by targeting the DAF-2 pathway. Characterization of B. malayi miRNAs and their targets will enhance our understanding of their regulatory pathways in filariads and aid in the search for novel therapeutics. PMID:24824352

  14. The larval specific lymphatic filarial ALT-2: induction of protection using protein or DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sabarinathan; Kumar, Mishra Pankaj; Rami, Reddy Maryada Venkata; Chinnaiah, Harinath Basker; Nutman, Thomas; Kaliraj, Perumal; McCarthy, James

    2004-01-01

    Genes from the infective stage of lymphatic filarial parasites expressed at the time of host invasion have been identified as potential vaccine candidates. By screening an L3 cDNA library with sera from uninfected longstanding residents of an area endemic for onchocerciasis, so-called "endemic normals" (EN), we have cloned and characterized one such gene termed the abundant larval transcript two (ALT-2). The stage specificity of ALT-2 gene transcription and protein synthesis was confirmed by PCR using genespecific primers, and by western blot analysis of protein extracts from various stages of the parasite life cycle using specific antisera. Significant differences in antibody response to the recombinant ALT-2 were observed in endemic populations with differing clinical manifestations of lymphatic filariasis with an antibody response present in sera from 18 of 25 (72%) EN subjects compared to 9 of 25 (36%) with subclinical microfilaracmia (MF) and 14 of 25 (52%) of those with chronic lymphatic obstruction (CP) (P=0.01 for comparison of EN to CP or to MF). This differential responsiveness suggests that the protective immunity postulated to account for their uninfected status might be associated with a response to this protein. When the utility of ALT-2 as a vaccine candidate was tested in a murine model using either recombinant protein or a DNA vaccine construct, statistically significant protection was observed when compared to a control filarial gene product expressed across all stages of the parasite lifecycle (SXP-1; P=0.02 for protein and P=0.01 for the DNA vaccine) or compared to adjuvant alone. This level of protection indicates that this vaccine is a promising candidate for further development.

  15. Molecular detection of Setaria tundra (Nematoda: Filarioidea) and an unidentified filarial species in mosquitoes in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the potential vector role of Culicidae mosquitoes in Germany is very scanty, and until recently it was generally assumed that they are not involved in the transmission of anthroponotic or zoonotic pathogens in this country. However, anticipated changes in the course of global warming and globalization may alter their status. Methods We conducted a molecular mass screening of mosquitoes for filarial parasites using mitochondrial 12S rRNA-based real-time PCR. Results No parasites causing disease in humans such as Dirofilaria spp. were detected in about 83,000 mosquitoes tested, which had been collected in 2009 and 2010 in 16 locations throughout Germany. However, minimum infection rates of up to 24 per 1000 mosquitoes were revealed, which could be attributed to mosquito infection with Setaria tundra and a yet unidentified second parasite. Setaria tundra was found to be widespread in southern Germany in various mosquito species, except Culex spp. In contrast, the unidentified filarial species was exclusively found in Culex spp. in northern Baden-Württemberg, and is likely to be a bird parasite. Conclusions Although dirofilariasis appears to be emerging and spreading in Europe, the absence of Dirofilaria spp. or other zoonotic filariae in our sample allows the conclusion that the risk of autochthonous infection in Germany is still very low. Potential vectors of S. tundra in Germany are Ochlerotatus sticticus, Oc. cantans, Aedes vexans and Anopheles claviger. Technically, the synergism between entomologists, virologists and parasitologists, combined with state-of-the-art methods allows a very efficient near-real-time monitoring of a wide spectrum of both human and veterinary pathogens, including new distribution records of parasite species and the incrimination of their potential vectors. PMID:22236560

  16. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine citrate plus filarial excretory-secretory product on rat hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud; Sakran, Thabet; El-Shahawi, Gamal; El-Fayoumi, Hoda; El-Mallah, Al-Mahy

    2015-02-01

    Diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) had a significance in anti-filarial chemotherapy, while excretory-secretory product (ES) is released from adult filarial females. The target of the current study was to examine the immunomodulatory effect of DEC, Setaria equina ES or a combination of them on rat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN). In vitro effect of combined DEC and ES or ES alone on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was tested through IFN-γ assay in culture supernatants. In addition, single or repeated doses of DEC, ES or DEC+ES have been applied in white albino rats to test the effect on HCC. Levels of IFN-γ and anti-ES IgG antibodies in rat serum were assayed using ELISA. Hemolytic complement activity (CH50) was determined in serum while the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) was assayed in liver tissue. The infiltration of NK cells as well as the expression of MHC Iproliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), Bcl2 and p53 were determined using immunohistochemistry. There was a dose-dependent increase in IFN-γ after in vitro exposure to DEC+ES. Repeated ES doses increased NO concentration (p<0.05) and expression of iNOS but reduced CH50 (p<0.001), while repeated DEC+ES doses could increase anti-ES IgG (p<0.01), IFN-γ level (p<0.05) and NK cell infiltration. The same treatments could also reduce the expression of MHC I expression, PCNA, Bcl2 and p53. This study has shown immunomodulatory and protective effects of DEC+ES repeated doses on rat HCC.

  17. Breakdown of coevolution between symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia and their filarial hosts.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bain, Odile; Makepeace, Benjamin L; d'Haese, Cyrille; Uni, Shigehiko; Martin, Coralie; Gavotte, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an alpha-proteobacterial symbiont widely distributed in arthropods. Since the identification of Wolbachia in certain animal-parasitic nematodes (the Onchocercidae or filariae), the relationship between arthropod and nematode Wolbachia has attracted great interest. The obligate symbiosis in filariae, which renders infected species susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, was held to be distinct from the Wolbachia-arthropod relationship, typified by reproductive parasitism. While co-evolutionary signatures in Wolbachia-arthropod symbioses are generally weak, reflecting horizontal transmission events, strict co-evolution between filariae and Wolbachia has been reported previously. However, the absence of close outgroups for phylogenetic studies prevented the determination of which host group originally acquired Wolbachia. Here, we present the largest co-phylogenetic analysis of Wolbachia in filariae performed to date including: (i) a screening and an updated phylogeny of Wolbachia; (ii) a co-phylogenetic analysis; and (iii) a hypothesis on the acquisition of Wolbachia infection. First, our results show a general overestimation of Wolbachia occurrence and support the hypothesis of an ancestral absence of infection in the nematode phylum. The accuracy of supergroup J is also underlined. Second, although a global pattern of coevolution remains, the signal is derived predominantly from filarial clades associated with Wolbachia in supergroups C and J. In other filarial clades, harbouring Wolbachia supergroups D and F, horizontal acquisitions and secondary losses are common. Finally, our results suggest that supergroup C is the basal Wolbachia clade within the Ecdysozoa. This hypothesis on the origin of Wolbachia would change drastically our understanding of Wolbachia evolution.

  18. Detection of Circulating Parasite-Derived MicroRNAs in Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tritten, Lucienne; Burkman, Erica; Moorhead, Andrew; Satti, Mohammed; Geary, James; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species) from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream. PMID:25033073

  19. Diversity and expression of microRNAs in the filarial parasite, Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Gu, Weifeng; Kumar, Sanjay; Jin, Jingmin; Davis, Paul J; Bauche, David; McReynolds, Larry A

    2014-01-01

    Human filarial parasites infect an estimated 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide causing blindness and the gross disfigurement of limbs and genitals. An understanding of RNA-mediated regulatory pathways in these parasites may open new avenues for treatment. Toward this goal, small RNAs from Brugia malayi adult females, males and microfilariae were cloned for deep-sequencing. From ∼ 30 million sequencing reads, 145 miRNAs were identified in the B. malayi genome. Some microRNAs were validated using the p19 RNA binding protein and qPCR. B. malayi miRNAs segregate into 99 families each defined by a unique seed sequence. Sixty-one of the miRNA families are highly conserved with homologues in arthropods, vertebrates and helminths. Of those miRNAs not highly conserved, homologues of 20 B. malayi miRNA families were found in vertebrates. Nine B. malayi miRNA families appear to be filarial-specific as orthologues were not found in other organisms. The miR-2 family is the largest in B. malayi with 11 members. Analysis of the sequences shows that six members result from a recent expansion of the family. Library comparisons found that 1/3 of the B. malayi miRNAs are differentially expressed. For example, miR-71 is 5-7X more highly expressed in microfilariae than adults. Studies suggest that in C.elegans, miR-71 may enhance longevity by targeting the DAF-2 pathway. Characterization of B. malayi miRNAs and their targets will enhance our understanding of their regulatory pathways in filariads and aid in the search for novel therapeutics.

  20. Prevalence of filarial parasites in domestic and stray cats in Selangor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Nazeh M; Nor, Zurainee Mohamed; Kassim, Mustafa; Mansor, Marzida; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Ngui, Romano; Sivanandam, Sinnadurai

    2015-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of the filarial parasites,ie.,Brugia malayi, Brugia, Brugia pahangi(B. pahangi), Dirofilaria immitisandDirofilaria repens (D. repens) in domestic and stray cats. A total of 170 blood sample were collected from domestic and stray cats and examined for filarial worm parasites in two localities, Pulau Carey and Bukit Gasing, Selangor State, Malaysia. The overall prevalence of infection was 23.5% (40/170; 95% CI = 17.4-30.6). Of this, 35% (14/40; 95% CI = 22.1-50.5) and 50% (20/40; 95% CI = 35.2-64.8) were positive for single B. pahangi nd D. repens, respectively. The remaining of 15% (6/40; 95% CI = 7.1-29.1) were positive for mixed B. pahangi and D. repens. In addition, 75% of the infected cats were domestic, and 25% were strays. No Brugia malayi and Dirofilaria immitis was detected. Eighty-four cats were captured at Pulau Carey, of which 35.7% (30/84) were infected. Among the cats determined to be infected, 93% (28/30; 95% CI = 78.7-98.2) were domestic, and only 6.7% (2/30; 95% CI = 19.0-21.3) were strays. Conversely, the number of infected cats was three times lower in Bukit Gasing than in Pulau Carey, and most of the cats were stray. B. pahangi and D. repens could be the major parasites underlying filariasis in the study area. Adequate prophylactic plans should be administrated in the cat population in study area. Copyright © 2015 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cloning of a cuticular antigen that contains multiple tandem repeats from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C B; Grandea, A G; Maina, C V; Jenkins, R E; Selkirk, M E; McReynolds, L A

    1992-01-01

    An unusual antigen composed of tandemly repeated protein units was cloned from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. The antigen was initially identified by screening a lambda gt11 cDNA library with serum from dogs immunized with irradiated D. immitis third-stage larvae. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA clone, Di5, revealed a continuous open reading frame composed of two 399-base-pair repeats arranged in tandem. Southern blot analysis of genomic D. immitis DNA showed that the gene coding for Di5 is composed of a tandem array of 25-50 copies of this same 399-base-pair repeat. Antiserum raised against recombinant Di5 protein detected a protein "ladder," from about 14 to greater than 200 kDa with steps approximately 15 kDa apart, on immunoblots of D. immitis extract. Metabolic labeling of adult parasites with [35S]methionine showed that Di5 is synthesized as a large precursor that is subsequently cleaved to produce the ladder-like array. These results suggest that the characteristic ladder is created by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor at the same site in each monomer. The Di5 antigen was localized to the cuticle and hypodermis of adult D. immitis by immunoelectron microscopy. Both male and female parasites were found to release Di5 when cultured in vitro. DNA hybridization analysis demonstrated that Di5 is a member of a gene family present in many filarial parasites that infect both animal and human populations. Images PMID:1631084

  2. Breakdown of coevolution between symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia and their filarial hosts

    PubMed Central

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Makepeace, Benjamin L.; d’Haese, Cyrille; Uni, Shigehiko; Gavotte, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Wolbachia is an alpha-proteobacterial symbiont widely distributed in arthropods. Since the identification of Wolbachia in certain animal-parasitic nematodes (the Onchocercidae or filariae), the relationship between arthropod and nematode Wolbachia has attracted great interest. The obligate symbiosis in filariae, which renders infected species susceptible to antibiotic chemotherapy, was held to be distinct from the Wolbachia-arthropod relationship, typified by reproductive parasitism. While co-evolutionary signatures in Wolbachia-arthropod symbioses are generally weak, reflecting horizontal transmission events, strict co-evolution between filariae and Wolbachia has been reported previously. However, the absence of close outgroups for phylogenetic studies prevented the determination of which host group originally acquired Wolbachia. Here, we present the largest co-phylogenetic analysis of Wolbachia in filariae performed to date including: (i) a screening and an updated phylogeny of Wolbachia; (ii) a co-phylogenetic analysis; and (iii) a hypothesis on the acquisition of Wolbachia infection. First, our results show a general overestimation of Wolbachia occurrence and support the hypothesis of an ancestral absence of infection in the nematode phylum. The accuracy of supergroup J is also underlined. Second, although a global pattern of coevolution remains, the signal is derived predominantly from filarial clades associated with Wolbachia in supergroups C and J. In other filarial clades, harbouring Wolbachia supergroups D and F, horizontal acquisitions and secondary losses are common. Finally, our results suggest that supergroup C is the basal Wolbachia clade within the Ecdysozoa. This hypothesis on the origin of Wolbachia would change drastically our understanding of Wolbachia evolution. PMID:27069790

  3. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Novelli, Jacopo; Foster, Jeremy; Vaisvila, Romualdas; Conway, Leslie; Ingram, Jessica; Ganatra, Mehul; Rao, Anita U; Hamza, Iqbal; Slatko, Barton

    2009-07-14

    Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti) are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole) can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf) larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP), which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step). Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA) between Wolbachia and human 5'-aminolevulinic acid

  4. Maternal Filarial Infection Influences the Development of Regulatory T Cells in Children from Infancy to Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Madhusmita; Ranjit, Manoranjan; Achary, K. Gopinath; Satapathy, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children born from filarial infected mothers are comparatively more susceptible to filarial infection than the children born to uninfected mothers. But the mechanism of such increased susceptibility to infection in early childhood is not exactly known. Several studies have shown the association of active filarial infection with T cell hypo-responsiveness which is mediated by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Since the Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ CD25hi thymocytes at an early stage of the human fetus, it can be hypothesized that the maternal infection during pregnancy affects the development of Tregs in children at birth as well as early childhood. Hence the present study was designed to test the hypothesis by selecting a cohort of pregnant mothers and children born to them subsequently in a filarial endemic area of Odisha, India. Methodology and Principal finding A total number of 49 pregnant mothers and children born to them subsequently have been followed up (mean duration 4.4 years) in an area where the microfilariae (Mf) rate has come down to <1% after institution of 10 rounds of annual mass drug administration (MDA). The infection status of mother, cord and children were assessed through detection of microfilariae (Mf) and circulating filarial antigen (CFA). Expression of Tregs cells were measured by flow cytometry. The levels of IL-10 were evaluated by using commercially available ELISA kit. A significantly high level of IL-10 and Tregs have been observed in children born to infected mother compared to children of uninfected mother at the time of birth as well as during early childhood. Moreover a positive correlation between Tregs and IL-10 has been observed among the children born to infected mother. Significance From these observations we predict that early priming of the fetal immune system by filarial antigens modulate the development of Tregs, which ultimately scale up the production of IL-10 in neonates and creates a milieu for high rate

  5. Maternal Filarial Infection Influences the Development of Regulatory T Cells in Children from Infancy to Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Bal, Madhusmita; Ranjit, Manoranjan; Achary, K Gopinath; Satapathy, Ashok K

    2016-11-01

    Children born from filarial infected mothers are comparatively more susceptible to filarial infection than the children born to uninfected mothers. But the mechanism of such increased susceptibility to infection in early childhood is not exactly known. Several studies have shown the association of active filarial infection with T cell hypo-responsiveness which is mediated by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Since the Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ CD25hi thymocytes at an early stage of the human fetus, it can be hypothesized that the maternal infection during pregnancy affects the development of Tregs in children at birth as well as early childhood. Hence the present study was designed to test the hypothesis by selecting a cohort of pregnant mothers and children born to them subsequently in a filarial endemic area of Odisha, India. A total number of 49 pregnant mothers and children born to them subsequently have been followed up (mean duration 4.4 years) in an area where the microfilariae (Mf) rate has come down to <1% after institution of 10 rounds of annual mass drug administration (MDA). The infection status of mother, cord and children were assessed through detection of microfilariae (Mf) and circulating filarial antigen (CFA). Expression of Tregs cells were measured by flow cytometry. The levels of IL-10 were evaluated by using commercially available ELISA kit. A significantly high level of IL-10 and Tregs have been observed in children born to infected mother compared to children of uninfected mother at the time of birth as well as during early childhood. Moreover a positive correlation between Tregs and IL-10 has been observed among the children born to infected mother. From these observations we predict that early priming of the fetal immune system by filarial antigens modulate the development of Tregs, which ultimately scale up the production of IL-10 in neonates and creates a milieu for high rate of acquisition of infection in children born to infected

  6. Random matrix model of QCD at finite density and the nature of the quenched limit

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanov, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    We use a random matrix model to study chiral symmetry breaking in QCD at finite chemical potential {mu}. We solve the model and compute the eigenvalue density of the Dirac matrix on a complex plane. A naive {open_quote}{open_quote}replica trick{close_quote}{close_quote} fails for {mu}{ne}0; we find that quenched QCD is not a simple {ital n}{r_arrow}0 limit of QCD with {ital n} quarks. It is the limit of a theory with 2{ital n} quarks: {ital n} quarks with original action and {ital n} quarks with conjugate action. The results agree with earlier studies of lattice QCD at {mu}{ne}0 and provide a simple analytical explanation of a long-standing puzzle. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. The effect of HIV on filarial-specific antibody response before and after treatment with diethylcarbamazine in Wuchereria bancrofti infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Nielsen, Nina O; Monrad, Jesper; Magesa, Stephen M; Simonsen, Paul E

    2009-06-01

    The effect of HIV on filarial-specific antibody response before and after treatment with diethylcarbamazine (DEC) was analysed by comparing two groups of Wuchereria bancrofti-infected adult individuals (positive for circulating filarial antigen) who were positive (n=15) or negative (n=21) for HIV co-infection. Prior to DEC treatment there was no significant difference in filarial-specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG4 and IgE antibody response between the HIV negative and the HIV positive group, while a five times (statistically significant) higher filarial-specific IgG3 response was observed in the HIV positive than in the HIV negative group. At 12 weeks after treatment with DEC, a significant decrease in filarial-specific IgG4 was observed in the HIV positive but not in the HIV negative group, indicating that DEC treatment had a stronger antifilarial effect in individuals co-infected with HIV. DEC treatment had no significant effect on the other classes of filarial specific antibodies, neither in the HIV negative or the HIV positive group.

  8. The need to respect nature and its limits challenges society and conservation science.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Maris, Virginie; Simberloff, Daniel S

    2016-05-31

    Increasing human population interacts with local and global environments to deplete biodiversity and resources humans depend on, thus challenging societal values centered on growth and relying on technology to mitigate environmental stress. Although the need to address the environmental crisis, central to conservation science, generated greener versions of the growth paradigm, we need fundamental shifts in values that ensure transition from a growth-centered society to one acknowledging biophysical limits and centered on human well-being and biodiversity conservation. We discuss the role conservation science can play in this transformation, which poses ethical challenges and obstacles. We analyze how conservation and economics can achieve better consonance, the extent to which technology should be part of the solution, and difficulties the "new conservation science" has generated. An expanded ambition for conservation science should reconcile day-to-day action within the current context with uncompromising, explicit advocacy for radical transitions in core attitudes and processes that govern our interactions with the biosphere. A widening of its focus to understand better the interconnectedness between human well-being and acknowledgment of the limits of an ecologically functional and diverse planet will need to integrate ecological and social sciences better. Although ecology can highlight limits to growth and consequences of ignoring them, social sciences are necessary to diagnose societal mechanisms at work, how to correct them, and potential drivers of social change.

  9. The need to respect nature and its limits challenges society and conservation science

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Maris, Virginie; Simberloff, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing human population interacts with local and global environments to deplete biodiversity and resources humans depend on, thus challenging societal values centered on growth and relying on technology to mitigate environmental stress. Although the need to address the environmental crisis, central to conservation science, generated greener versions of the growth paradigm, we need fundamental shifts in values that ensure transition from a growth-centered society to one acknowledging biophysical limits and centered on human well-being and biodiversity conservation. We discuss the role conservation science can play in this transformation, which poses ethical challenges and obstacles. We analyze how conservation and economics can achieve better consonance, the extent to which technology should be part of the solution, and difficulties the “new conservation science” has generated. An expanded ambition for conservation science should reconcile day-to-day action within the current context with uncompromising, explicit advocacy for radical transitions in core attitudes and processes that govern our interactions with the biosphere. A widening of its focus to understand better the interconnectedness between human well-being and acknowledgment of the limits of an ecologically functional and diverse planet will need to integrate ecological and social sciences better. Although ecology can highlight limits to growth and consequences of ignoring them, social sciences are necessary to diagnose societal mechanisms at work, how to correct them, and potential drivers of social change. PMID:27185943

  10. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the limit of subfemtosecond natural lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Marin, T.; Guillemin, R.; Carniato, S.; Simon, M.; Zitnik, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Hoszowska, J.; Cao, W.

    2011-04-14

    We present measurements of the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of the CH{sub 3}I molecule in the hard-x-ray region near the iodine L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. We show that dispersive RIXS spectral features that were recognized as a fingerprint of dissociative molecular states can be interpreted in terms of ultrashort natural lifetime of {approx}200 attoseconds in the case of the iodine L-shell core-hole. Our results demonstrate the capacity of the RIXS technique to reveal subtle dynamical effects in molecules with sensitivity to nuclear rearrangement on a subfemtosecond time scale.

  11. [Factors limiting distribution of the rare lichen species Lobaria pulmonaria (in forests of the Kologriv Forest Nature Reserve)].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The distribution patterns and coenotic confines ofthe epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria have been studied. The factors limiting the habitat of this rare lichen species in the Kologriv Forest Nature Reserve (southern taiga subzone) have been revealed. It has been shown that L. pulmonaria is attracted to forest areas, which are less affected by humans and characterized by better light conditions than other communities. It has been found that L. pulmonaria is able to colonize trees at various ontogenetic states, beginning from virginal ones.

  12. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  13. Alaska, Naturally Occurring Asbestos: Experiences, Policy and 2012 Limitation of Liability Legislation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargesheimer, J.; Perkins, R.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in mineral deposits in Alaska. There are many regions in Alaska that have minerals in surface rocks that may contain asbestos and asbestos has been discovered in many locations in Alaska. Gravel is constantly in demand for heavy construction projects, but some remote localities in Alaska do not have gravel sources that are NOA-free. Determining if NOA can be safely used in heavy construction materials and what can or should be done with NOA materials that are already in place are complex questions. Answers will depend on the amount and type of asbestos mineral, how it is handled in processing, and how it is maintained - all subject to regulation and control of operations. The State of Alaska recently enacted legislation (HB 258) providing, among other things, "… immunity for the state and for landowners, extractors, suppliers, transporters, and contractors for certain actions or claims arising in connection with the use of gravel or aggregate material containing naturally occurring asbestos in certain areas." Implementation of the law and interim regulations and guidance should enable use of NOA for heavy construction materials in Alaska, but as with any new law, it will take some time to understand its full scope and effect.

  14. Evidence of limited polyandry in a natural population of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Joshua B; Jameson, Samuel B; Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Wesson, Dawn M; Powell, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a vector of yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya. Control of the insect is crucial to stop the spread of dengue and chikungunya, so it is critically important to understand its mating behavior. Primarily, based on laboratory behavior, it has long been assumed that Ae. aegypti females mate once in their lifetime. However, multiple inseminations have been observed in semi-field and laboratory settings, and in closely related species. Here, we report the first evidence of polyandry in a natural population of Ae. aegypti. Female Ae. aegypti were captured around the New Orleans, LA, metropolitan area. They were offered a blood meal and allowed to lay eggs, which were reared to the third-instar larval stage. A parentage analysis using four microsatellite loci was performed. Out of 48 families, 3 showed evidence of multiple paternity. An expanded analysis of these three families found that one family group included offspring contributed by three fathers, and the other two included offspring from two fathers. This result establishes that polyandry can occur in a small proportion of Ae. aegypti females in a natural setting. This could complicate future genetic control efforts and has implications for sampling for population genetics.

  15. Evidence of Limited Polyandry in a Natural Population of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joshua B.; Jameson, Samuel B.; Gloria-Soria, Andrea; Wesson, Dawn M.; Powell, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a vector of yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya. Control of the insect is crucial to stop the spread of dengue and chikungunya, so it is critically important to understand its mating behavior. Primarily, based on laboratory behavior, it has long been assumed that Ae. aegypti females mate once in their lifetime. However, multiple inseminations have been observed in semi-field and laboratory settings, and in closely related species. Here, we report the first evidence of polyandry in a natural population of Ae. aegypti. Female Ae. aegypti were captured around the New Orleans, LA, metropolitan area. They were offered a blood meal and allowed to lay eggs, which were reared to the third-instar larval stage. A parentage analysis using four microsatellite loci was performed. Out of 48 families, 3 showed evidence of multiple paternity. An expanded analysis of these three families found that one family group included offspring contributed by three fathers, and the other two included offspring from two fathers. This result establishes that polyandry can occur in a small proportion of Ae. aegypti females in a natural setting. This could complicate future genetic control efforts and has implications for sampling for population genetics. PMID:25870424

  16. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  17. Limits to the host range of the highly polyphagous tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha ludens in its natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Birke, A; Acosta, E; Aluja, M

    2015-12-01

    Anastepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a highly polyphagous fruit fly that is able to develop in a wide range of hosts. Understanding the limits of this pest's host range could provide valuable information for pest management and plant breeding for pest resistance. Previous studies have shown that guavas (Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) L.), are not attacked under natural conditions by A. ludens. To understand this phenomenon, guavas were exposed to natural infestation by A. ludens and to other fruit fly species that infest guavas in nature (Anastrepha striata Schiner, Anastepha fraterculus (Wiedemann), Anastepha obliqua (Macquart)). Once the susceptible phenological stage of guavas was determined, fruit infestation levels were compared between A. ludens and A. striata. Choice and non-choice tests were performed under field-cage conditions. Under field conditions, guavas were susceptible to A. striata and A. fraterculus attack all the way from when fruit was undeveloped to when fruit began to ripen. No infestation by A. ludens was recorded under natural conditions. Similar results were obtained when forced exposures were performed, indicating that unripe guavas were preferred by A. striata over ripe fruit, and that infestation rates were higher at early fruit maturity stages. Under forced oviposition conditions, A. ludens larvae were unable to develop in unripe guavas but did so in fully ripe fruit. However, A. ludens fitness parameters were dramatically affected, exhibiting reduced survival and reduced pupal weight compared to conspecifics that developed in a natural host, grapefruit. We confirm that P. guajava should not be treated as a natural host of this pestiferous species, and suggest that both behavioral aspects and the fact that larvae are unable to adequately develop in this fruit, indeed represent clear limits to A. ludens's broad host range.

  18. Limit sets for natural extensions of Schelling’s segregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhinav; Vainchtein, Dmitri; Weiss, Howard

    2011-07-01

    Thomas Schelling developed an influential demographic model that illustrated how, even with relatively mild assumptions on each individual's nearest neighbor preferences, an integrated city would likely unravel to a segregated city, even if all individuals prefer integration. Individuals in Schelling's model cities are divided into two groups of equal number and each individual is "happy" or "unhappy" when the number of similar neighbors cross a simple threshold. In this manuscript we consider natural extensions of Schelling's original model to allow the two groups have different sizes and to allow different notions of happiness of an individual. We observe that differences in aggregation patterns of majority and minority groups are highly sensitive to the happiness threshold; for low threshold, the differences are small, and when the threshold is raised, striking new patterns emerge. We also observe that when individuals strongly prefer to live in integrated neighborhoods, the final states exhibit a new tessellated-like structure.

  19. 40 CFR 60.4325 - What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? 60... both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? You must meet the emission... percent natural gas, you must meet the corresponding limit for a natural gas-fired turbine when you...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4325 - What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? 60... both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? You must meet the emission... percent natural gas, you must meet the corresponding limit for a natural gas-fired turbine when you...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4325 - What emission limits must I meet for NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NOX if my turbine burns both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? 60... both natural gas and distillate oil (or some other combination of fuels)? You must meet the emission... percent natural gas, you must meet the corresponding limit for a natural gas-fired turbine when you...

  2. Investigation of strategies with potential for producing a phosphorylcholine-free version of the filarial nematode immunomodulator, ES-62.

    PubMed

    Houston, K M; Egan, C A; García, P; Harnett, W

    2006-09-01

    Phosphorylcholine (PC) is found attached to N-type glycans of proteins secreted by filarial nematodes, where it appears to act as an immunomodulator. Based on information on the structure and biosynthesis of the PC-glycan of a major secreted protein, ES-62, strategies were designed with potential for preparing PC-free material to better understand the importance of PC in filarial nematode immunomodulation. The strategies involve either enzymatic removal of PC or inhibition of its attachment during ES-62 synthesis. No method tested was found to be 100% effective although approximately 70% removal was obtained by culturing worms in Et18OCH3. Reasons for failure to obtain complete absence of PC moieties are discussed in relation to the structure and synthesis of PC-glycans and in addition PC-glycan biosynthesis is briefly commented on as a target for chemotherapy.

  3. Cytokine production in BALB/c mice immunized with radiation attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode, Brugia pahangi

    SciTech Connect

    Bancroft, A.J.; Devaney, E. ); Grencis, R.K.; Else, K.J. )

    1993-02-15

    BALB/c mice immunized with radiation-attenuated third stage larvae of the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi are strongly immune to challenge infection. Investigation of the profile of cytokines secreted by spleen cells from immune mice stimulated in vitro with either parasite Ag or with Con A revealed high levels of IL-5 and IL-9 and moderate levels of IL-4. In contrast, secretion of IFN-[gamma] by spleen cells from immune animals was negligible. Spleen cells from control mice secreted low levels of all cytokines assayed. Levels of parasite-specific IgE were significantly elevated in immune animals and a peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed, which exhibited a biphasic distribution. Our results are consistent with the preferential expansion of Th2 cells in immune animals and provide the basis for dissecting the means by which radiation-attenuated larvae of filarial nematodes stimulate immunity. 5l refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Impact of single dose of diethylcarbamazine and other antifilarial drug combinations on bancroftian filarial infection variables: assessment after 2 years.

    PubMed

    Sunish, I P; Rajendran, R; Mani, T R; Munirathinam, A; Reuben, R; Dash, A P

    2006-09-01

    The impact of single dose mass drug administration of diethylcarbamazine (DEC), DEC with albendazole (ALB), and ivermectin (IVR) with albendazole, was examined on the human bancroftian filarial infections in village scale trials in south India, from a follow-up study after 2 years. The treatment arms administered with DEC alone and DEC+ALB demonstrated long-term benefits in reducing microfilaraemia significantly (P<0.05), while antigenaemia reduction was negligible. The arm with ALB+IVR did not show such reductions. Among the antigenaemic and microfilaraemic individuals, 87% became amicrofilaraemic in DEC+ALB arm, which were higher than that observed in the other 2 treatment arms. Among amicrofilaraemics (but Ag+), nearly 35% cleared of infection in DEC+ALB, while 26% and 6% in DEC alone and IVR+ALB arms, respectively. The drug combination DEC+ALB was observed to demonstrate a significant impact in reducing filarial infection even after 2 years post treatment.

  5. Surface Reactions Limiting Chromium(VI) Generation from Naturally Derived Chromium(III) Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausladen, D.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Chromium(III)-bearing minerals, commonly found in serpentinite and ultramaphic rocks, are ubiquitous in California soils and along convergent plate boundaries worldwide. Elevated concentrations of carcinogenic Cr(VI) have been measured in groundwater throughout the state, even in aquifers untouched by anthropogenic contamination. In most natural systems, manganese oxides are the only known, kinetically viable, oxidant of Cr(III). Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated a finite capacity of Mn-oxides to generate Cr(VI) before surface alterations inhibit further Cr-oxidation. The extent to which these processes dictate the inhibition, and subsequent regeneration, of Mn-oxidation capacity within structured soils and sediments is not well understood. Here we use artificial soil aggregates made of Fe(III),Cr(III)-hydroxide-coated quartz sand and surrounded by aerated solute flow (pH 8, 30mM HEPES, 10mM HCO3-) to investigate C(VI) generation within ultramafic rock derived sediment and processes inhibiting manganese reactivity. We found that while Cr(VI)-production scaled with Cr-mineral solubility; Cr(VI) effluent concentrations from aggregates of both lower and higher solubility Cr(III)-minerals peaked very soon after reaction with birnessite (within 2 days and 4 days, respectively). Once Cr(VI) production plateaued (t=22 days) aggregate influent was acidified (pH 5, 30mM C2H3O2-). Despite increasing Cr(III) solubility at lower pH, aqueous Cr(VI) production further decreased. A secondary pulse of Cr(VI) generation was seen only after the surrounding solute returned to initial conditions (pH 8). As with the initial pulse, Cr(VI) concentration scaled with mineral solubility. Collectively, our results demonstrate the extent that natural fluctuations in groundwater composition, both as a result of irrigation or precipitation events, have the potential to both regenerate and inhibit Mn-oxide surfaces. These synthetic soil aggregates provide insight into how fluctuating

  6. Opportunities and limitations of natural killer cells as adoptive therapy for malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Davies, James O J; Stringaris, Kate; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-11-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells can be readily generated for adoptive therapy with current techniques, their optimal application to treat malignant diseases requires an appreciation of the dynamic balance between signals that either synergize with or antagonize each other. Individuals display wide differences in NK function that determine their therapeutic efficacy. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. The selection of NK cells with a predominant activating profile is critical for delivering successful anti-tumor activity. This can be achieved through selection of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-mismatched NK donors and by use of blocking molecules against inhibitory pathways. Optimum NK cytotoxicity may require licensing or priming with tumor cells. Recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of NK cells inform in the design of new strategies, including adjuvant therapies, to maximize the cytotoxic potential of NK cells for adoptive transfer to treat human malignancies.

  7. Can short-term and small-scale experiments reflect nutrient limitation on phytoplankton in natural lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijun; Li, Yan; Feng, Weisong; Yu, Qing; Xiao, Xucheng; Liang, Xiaomin; Shao, Jianchun; Ma, Shuonan; Wang, Hongzhu

    2017-05-01

    Whether it is necessary to reduce nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) input to mitigate lake eutrophication is controversial. The controversy stems mainly from differences in time and space in previous studies that support the contrasting ideas. To test the response of phytoplankton to various combinations of nutrient control strategies in mesocosms and the possibility of reflecting the conditions in natural ecosystems with short-term experiments, a 9-month experiment was carried out in eight 800-L tanks with four nutrient level combinations (+N+P, -N+P, +N-P, and -N-P), with an 18-month whole-ecosystem experiment in eight 800-m 2 ponds as the reference. Phytoplankton abundance was determined by P not N, regardless of the initial TN/TP level, which was in contrast to the nutrient limitation predicted by the N/P theory. Net natural N inputs were calculated to be 4.9, 6.8, 1.5, and 3.0 g in treatments +N+P, -N+P, +N-P, and -N-P, respectively, suggesting that N deficiency and P addition may promote natural N inputs to support phytoplankton development. However, the compensation process was slow, as suggested by an observed increase in TN after 3 weeks in -N+P and 2 months in -N-P in the tank experiment, and after 3 months in -N +P and 3 months in -N-P in our pond experiment. Obviously, such a slow process cannot be simulated in short-term experiments. The natural N inputs cannot be explained by planktonic N-fixation because N-fixing cyanobacteria were scarce, which was probably because there was a limited pool of species in the tanks. Therefore, based on our results we argue that extrapolating short-term, small-scale experiments to large natural ecosystems does not give reliable, accurate results.

  8. Can short-term and small-scale experiments reflect nutrient limitation on phytoplankton in natural lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijun; Li, Yan; Feng, Weisong; Yu, Qing; Xiao, Xucheng; Liang, Xiaomin; Shao, Jianchun; Ma, Shuonan; Wang, Hongzhu

    2016-07-01

    Whether it is necessary to reduce nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) input to mitigate lake eutrophication is controversial. The controversy stems mainly from differences in time and space in previous studies that support the contrasting ideas. To test the response of phytoplankton to various combinations of nutrient control strategies in mesocosms and the possibility of reflecting the conditions in natural ecosystems with short-term experiments, a 9-month experiment was carried out in eight 800-L tanks with four nutrient level combinations (+N+P, -N+P, +N-P, and -N-P), with an 18-month whole-ecosystem experiment in eight ~800-m 2 ponds as the reference. Phytoplankton abundance was determined by P not N, regardless of the initial TN/TP level, which was in contrast to the nutrient limitation predicted by the N/P theory. Net natural N inputs were calculated to be 4.9, 6.8, 1.5, and 3.0 g in treatments +N+P, -N+P, +N-P, and -N-P, respectively, suggesting that N deficiency and P addition may promote natural N inputs to support phytoplankton development. However, the compensation process was slow, as suggested by an observed increase in TN after 3 weeks in -N+P and 2 months in -N-P in the tank experiment, and after 3 months in -N +P and ~3 months in -N-P in our pond experiment. Obviously, such a slow process cannot be simulated in short-term experiments. The natural N inputs cannot be explained by planktonic N-fixation because N-fixing cyanobacteria were scarce, which was probably because there was a limited pool of species in the tanks. Therefore, based on our results we argue that extrapolating short-term, small-scale experiments to large natural ecosystems does not give reliable, accurate results.

  9. Modulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Function by Interleukin 19 and Interleukin 24 During Filarial Infections.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin 19 (IL-19) and interleukin 24 (IL-24) are cytokines that are highly expressed in filarial infections. To study the role of IL-19 and IL-24 in regulating T-cell responses, we examined the frequency of T-helper type 1 (Th1)/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th9/Tc9, Th17/Tc17, Th22/Tc22, and Tr1 cells in 26 filariae-infected individuals stimulated with filarial antigen following IL-19 or IL-24 neutralization. IL-19 or IL-24 neutralization resulted in significantly enhanced frequencies of Th1/Tc1 and/or Th17/Tc17 cells and significantly reduced frequencies of Th2/Tc2, Tr1, and/or Th9/Tc9 cells. Thus, we demonstrate that IL-19 and IL-24 are associated with the modulation of T-cell responses in filarial infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Benefits and Limitations of Online Instruction in Natural Science Undergraduate Liberal Arts Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Roberts, Godfrey; Liddicoat, Kendra; Porzecanski, Ana Luz; Mendez, Martin; McMullen, David

    2013-04-01

    Online courses in the Natural Sciences are taught three ways at New York University to undergraduate students majoring in the liberal arts and professional programs - synchronous courses in which students communicate online with the instructor and classmates in real time, asynchronous courses when faculty present course material for students to access and learn at their leisure, and hybrid or blended courses when part is taught asynchronously and part is taught face-to-face in a classroom with all students present. We have done online courses each way - Global Ecology (synchronous); Stars, Planets, and Life (synchronous and asynchronous); Darwin to DNA: An Overview of Evolution (asynchronous); Biodiversity Conservation (asynchronous); and Biology of Hunger and Population (blended). We will present the advantages and challenges we experienced teaching courses online in this fashion. Besides the advantages listed in the description for this session, another can be programmed learning that allows a set of sequential steps or a more complex branching of steps that allows students to repeat lessons multiple times to master the material. And from an academic standpoint, course content and assessment can be standardized, making it possible for each student to learn the same material. Challenges include resistance to online learning by a host of stakeholders who might be educators, students, parents, and the community. Equally challenging might be the readiness of instructors and students to teach and learn online. Student integrity issues such as plagiarism and cheating are a concern in a course taught online (Thormann and Zimmerman, 2012), so we will discuss our strategies to mitigate them.

  11. Limited Presence of IL-22 Binding Protein, a Natural IL-22 Inhibitor, Strengthens Psoriatic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jérôme C; Wolk, Kerstin; Bériou, Gaëlle; Abidi, Ahmed; Witte-Händel, Ellen; Louvet, Cédric; Kokolakis, Georgios; Drujont, Lucile; Dumoutier, Laure; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Sabat, Robert; Josien, Régis

    2017-05-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting from dysregulated immune activation associated with a large local secretion of cytokines. Among them, IL-22 largely contributes to epithelial remodeling and inflammation through inhibiting the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and inducing antimicrobial peptides and selected chemokines. The activity of IL-22 is regulated by IL-22 binding protein (IL-22BP); however, the expression and role of IL-22BP in psoriatic skin has remained unknown so far. Here we showed that nonaffected skin of psoriasis patients displayed lower expression of IL-22BP than skin of healthy controls. Furthermore, the strong IL-22 increase in lesional psoriatic skin was accompanied by a moderate induction of IL-22BP. To investigate the role of IL-22BP in controlling IL-22 during skin inflammation, we used imiquimod-induced skin disease in rodents and showed that rats with genetic IL-22BP deficiency (Il22ra2(-/-)) displayed exacerbated disease that associated with enhanced expression of IL-22-inducible antimicrobial peptides. We further recapitulated these findings in mice injected with an anti-IL-22BP neutralizing Ab. Hypothesizing that the IL-22/IL-22BP expression ratio reflects the level of bioactive IL-22 in psoriasis skin, we found positive correlations with the expression of IL-22-inducible molecules (IL-20, IL-24, IL-36γ, CXCL1, and BD2) in keratinocytes. Finally, we observed that serum IL-22/IL-22BP protein ratio strongly correlated with psoriasis severity. In conclusion, we propose that although IL-22BP can control deleterious actions of IL-22 in the skin, its limited production prevents a sufficient neutralization of IL-22 and contributes to the development and maintenance of epidermal alterations in psoriasis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Reappraisal of the limit on the variation in α implied by the Oklo natural fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Edward D.; Hamdan, Leila

    2015-07-01

    Background: A signature of many dynamical models of dark energy is that they admit variation in the fine structure constant α over cosmological time scales. Purpose: We reconsider the analysis of the sensitivity of neutron resonance energies Ei to changes in α with a view to resolving uncertainties that plague earlier treatments. Methods: We point out that with more appropriate choices of nuclear parameters, the standard estimate (from Damour and Dyson) of the sensitivity for resonances in Sm is increased by a factor of 2.5. We go on to identify and compute excitation, Coulomb, and deformation corrections. To this end, we use deformed Fermi density distributions fitted to the output of Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS calculations (with both the SLy4 and SkM* Skyrme functionals), the energetics of the surface diffuseness of nuclei, and thermal properties of their deformation. We also invoke the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, performing the requisite microcanonical averages with two phenomenological level densities which, via the leptodermous expansion of the level density parameter, include the effect of increased surface diffuseness. Theoretical uncertainties are assessed with the inter-model prescription of Dobaczewski et al. [J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 41, 074001 (2014), 10.1088/0954-3899/41/7/074001]. Results: The corrections diminish the revised Sm sensitivity but not by more than 25%. Subject to a weak and testable restriction on the change in mq/Λ (relative to the change in α ) since the time when the Oklo reactors were active (mq is the average of the u and d current quark masses, and Λ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics), we deduce that | αOklo-αnow|<1.1 × 10-8αnow (95% confidence level). The corresponding bound on the present-day time variation of α is tighter than the best limit to date from atomic clock experiments. Conclusions: The order of magnitude of our Oklo bound on changes in α is reliable. It is one order of magnitude lower

  13. Laboratory and Natural Constraints on the Temperature Limit for Preservation of the Dolomite Clumped Isotope Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, M. K.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic barriers generally inhibit intercrystalline equilibration of cations and isotopic compositions at temperatures below ~350˚C, greatly limiting the geothermometers available to study the upper 10-15 km of the crust. Calcite 'clumped' isotopes commonly appear to record homogeneous equilibrium during crystallization at surface temperatures, but kinetic models predict that reordering due to solid-state exchange among nearby carbonate groups modifies primary compositions at temperatures above ~115˚C on timescales of 10^6 - 10^8 years and fully re-equilibrates above 200˚C in most geological environments1. Slowly cooled dolomitic marbles commonly preserve apparent temperatures of ~300˚C, indicating that dolomite may have slower reordering kinetics and thus greater preservation of primary crystallization temperatures. If so, dolomite clumped isotope thermometry may be a useful geothermometer in much of the the shallow crust. We measured the kinetics of clumped isotope reordering in dolomite with heating experiments at 400-800˚C in a TZM cold seal apparatus pressurized with CO2. Results predict that no detectable reordering occurs in dolomite held at temperatures less than ~250˚C over timescales of up to 10^8 years, demonstrating the viability of the system as a shallow crustal geothermometer. The non-first order behavior observed in calcite1,2,3is exhibited by dolomite as well, albeit at higher temperatures. To test these predictions, we measured the clumped isotopic compositions of coexisting calcite and dolomite in marbles from the Notch Peak aureole, UT. Dolomite clumped isotope temperatures in the outer aureole match peak conditions predicted by thermal models up to ~275˚C, indicating that the system resisted reordering below this grade. Calcite clumped isotope temperatures are never greater than ~150˚C at all grades in the aureole; this is consistent with the ambient burial temperature in the section and indicates that all metamorphic calcite was fully

  14. A Mechanism for Chronic Filarial Hydrocele with Implications for Its Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Norões, Joaquim; Dreyer, Gerusa

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic hydrocele is the most common manifestation of bancroftian filariasis, an endemic disease in 80 countries. In a prospective study, we evaluated the occurrence of intrascrotal lymphangiectasia, gross appearance/consistency of the testis, and the efficacy of complete excision of hydrocele sac in patients living in a bancroftian filariasis endemic area who underwent hydrocelectomy at the Center for Teaching, Research and Tertiary Referral for Bancroftian Filariasis (NEPAF). Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 968 patients with uni- or bilateral filarial hydrocele (Group-1) and a Comparison Group (CG) of 218 patients from the same area who already had undergone hydrocele-sac-sparing hydrocelectomy elsewhere were enrolled at NEPAF. Twenty-eight patients from the Comparison Group with hydrocele recurrence were re-operated on at NEPAF and constitute Group-2. In Group-1 a total of 1,128 hydrocelectomies were performed (mean patient age of 30.3yr and mean follow-up of 8.6yr [range 5.3–12]). The hydrocele recurrence rates in Group-1 and in the Comparison Group (mean age of 31.5 yr) were 0.3%, and 19.3%, respectively (p<0,001). There was no hydrocele recurrence in Group-2 (mean patient age of 25.1yr and mean follow-up of 6yr [range 5–6.9]). Per surgically leaking or leak-prone dilated lymphatic vessels were seen in the inner or outer surface of the hydrocele sac wall or in surrounding tissue, particularly in the retrotesticular area, in 30.9% and in 46.3% of patients in Group-1 and Group-2, respectively (p = 0.081). The testicles were abnormal in shape, volume, and consistency in 203/1,128 (18%) and 10/28 (35.7%) of patients from Group-1 and Group-2, respectively (p = 0,025). Conclusions/Significance Lymph fluid from ruptured dilated lymphatic vessels is an important component of chronic filarial hydrocele fluid that threatens the integrity of the testis in an adult population living in bancroftian filariasis endemic areas. To avoid

  15. Thermal stability of hydrocarbons in nature: Limits, evidence, characteristics, and possible controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous petroleum-geochemical analyses of deeply buried, high-rank, fine-grained rocks from ultra-deep wellbores by different investigators demonstrate that C15+ hydrocarbons (HCs) persist in moderate to high concentrations at vitrinite reflectance (R0) values of 2.0-5.0% and persist in measurable concentrations up to R0 = 7.0-8.0%, at which point the thermal deadline for C15+ HC's is finally approached. Qualitative analyses have been carried out on 1. (1) high-rank gas condensates which have been exposed to the HC-thermal-destructive phase, 2. (2) bitumens from high-temperature aqueous-pyrolysis experiments in the HC-thermal-destructive phase, and 3. (3) bitumens from high-rank, fine-grained rocks near the HC-thermal-destructive phase. These analyses clearly demonstrate that well-defined compositional suites are established in the saturated, aromatic, and sulfur-bearing aromatic HCs in and near the HC-thermal-destructive phase. On the other hand, accepted petroleum-geochemical paradigms place rigid limits on HC thermal stability: C15+ HCs begin thermal cracking at R0 values of 0.9% and are completely thermally destroyed by R0 = 1.35%; C2-C4 HC gases are thermally destroyed by R0 = 2.0% and methane is thermally destroyed by R0 = 4.0%. Furthermore, published data and observations in many HC basins worldwide support these models; for example, 1. (1) sharp basinal zonations of gas and oil deposits vs. maturation rank in HC basins and 2. (2) decreasing C15+ HC concentrations in some fine-grained rocks at ranks of R0 ??? 0.9%. The fact that observed data (C15+ HCs thermally stable to R0 = 7.0-8.0%) is so far removed from predicted behavior (C15+) HCs expected to be thermally destroyed by R0 = 1.35%) may be due to 1. (1) a lack of recognition of some important possible controlling parameters of organic matter (OM) metamorphism and too much importance given to other assumed controlling parameters; and 2. (2) assigning HC distribution patterns in petroleum basins to HC

  16. Fe and C co-limitation of heterotrophic bacteria in the naturally fertilized region off the Kerguelen Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obernosterer, I.; Fourquez, M.; Blain, S.

    2015-03-01

    It has been univocally shown that iron (Fe) is the primary limiting nutrient for phytoplankton metabolism in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters, yet the question of how this trace metal affects heterotrophic microbial activity is far less understood. We investigated the role of Fe for bacterial heterotrophic production and growth at three contrasting sites in the naturally Fe-fertilized region east of the Kerguelen Islands and at one site in HNLC waters during the KEOPS2 (Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau Compared Study 2) cruise in spring 2011. We performed dark incubations of natural microbial communities amended either with iron (Fe, as FeCl3) or carbon (C, as trace-metal clean glucose), or a combination of both, and followed bacterial abundance and heterotrophic production for up to 7 days. Our results show that single and combined additions of Fe and C stimulated bulk and cell-specific bacterial production at the Fe-fertilized sites, while in HNLC waters only combined additions resulted in significant increases in these parameters. Bacterial abundance was enhanced in two out of the three experiments performed in Fe-fertilized waters but did not respond to Fe or C additions in HNLC waters. Our results provide evidence that both Fe and C are present at limiting concentrations for bacterial heterotrophic activity in the naturally fertilized region off the Kerguelen Islands in spring, while bacteria were co-limited by these elements in HNLC waters. These results shed new light on the role of Fe in bacterial heterotrophic metabolism in regions of the Southern Ocean that receive variable Fe inputs.

  17. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-03-15

    Exaggerated CD4(+) T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper 1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To assess the dynamics of Ag-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection, we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial-infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial Ag (BmA) or with the M. tuberculosis-specific Ag culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10). Our data demonstrated that the Inf group had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells (median net frequency compared with baseline [Fo] = 0.09% versus 0.01%; p = 0.038) but also to CFP-10 (Fo = 0.16% versus 0.007%; p = 0.04) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (Fo = 0.49% versus 0.26%; p = 0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4(+)CD45RO(+)IL-4(+) producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO(+)CCR7(+)CD27(+); Fo = 1.1% versus 0.5%; p = 0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM, CD45RO(+)CCR7(-)CD27(-); Fo = 1.5% versus 0.2%; p = 0.03) with a similar but nonsignificant response to CFP-10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4(+)IL-4(+)CD45RA(+)CCR7(+)CD27(+) (naive-like) in Inf individuals compared with Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis, there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4-producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared with the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces Ag-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to M. tuberculosis-specific Ags, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to M. tuberculosis.

  18. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E.; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated CD4+T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). To assess the dynamics of antigen (Ag)-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial -infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial (BmA) or with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific Ag CFP10. Our data demonstrated that the Inf group not only had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4+IL-4+ cells (Median net frequency compared to baseline (Fo)=0.09% vs. 0.01%, p=0.038) but also to CFP10 (Fo =0.16% vs. 0.007%, p=0.04) and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) (Fo =0.49% vs. 0.26%, p=0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4+CD45RO+IL-4+ producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO+CCR7+CD27+) (Fo =1.1% vs. 0.5%, p=0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM CD45RO+CCR7-CD27-) (Fo =1.5% vs. 0.2%, p=0.03) with a similar but non-significant response to CFP10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4+ IL-4+ CD45RA+ CCR7+CD27+ (naïve-like) in Inf individuals compared to Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis , there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4 producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared to the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces antigen-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to Mtb-specific antigens, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to Mtb. PMID:25667413

  19. [Genetic variability of juniper tall (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) in the northern and southern limits of the natural distribution].

    PubMed

    Korshikov, I I; Nikolaeva, A V

    2013-01-01

    Genetic structure, subdivision and differentiation of six populations of juniper tall (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) of the Crimean Mountains and of one population in Lebanon were investigated using 18 polymorphic allozyme loci as genetic markers. The high level of genetic variability of J. excelsa was established in the northern and the southern limits of its natural habitat. The mean values of the main indicators of genetic polymorphism were: P99 = 1,000, A = 3,167, H(E) = 0,370, H(o) = 0,405. Subdivision and differentiation of populations were low (F(ST) = 0,032, D(N) = 0,026) indicating similarity of their gene pools.

  20. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  1. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  2. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  3. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited... trial by jury or civil discovery, or to waive immunity for money damages, attorneys fees, or fines. (b...

  4. 42 CFR 137.311 - Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited immunity waiver required under section 509(a)(2) of the Act ? 137... Process § 137.311 Are Self-Governance Tribes entitled to determine the nature and scope of the limited...

  5. Toxin variability in natural populations of Alexandrium fundyense in Casco Bay, Maine—evidence of nitrogen limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulton, N. J.; Keafer, B. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    2005-09-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense is a common, recurring harmful algal bloom (HAB) species in the Gulf of Maine. To date, most physiological measurements of phytoplankton in the field provide data on the entire community, yet efforts to obtain species-specific data are particularly important for understanding the ecological and physiological dynamics of HAB species, such as, Alexandrium. Alexandrium spp., do not usually dominate the planktonic community in the Gulf of Maine, but are of great interest due to the potent toxins produced. In order to determine the nutritional status of Alexandrium spp. in natural populations, indicators of nutrient deprivation need to be identified that are specific to that one species. To date, the saxitoxin content of A. fundyense is known to vary under different environmental conditions such as nitrogen and phosphorous limitation. However, in batch culture the composition of the toxin (the relative amounts of each saxitoxin derivative per cell) appears to be a stable quantity and thus is sometimes viewed as a biochemical marker of individual strains. In more recent studies, toxin composition has been shown to vary during progressive N- and P- limitation, once the cells are given time to achieve steady state in semi-continuous, nutrient-limited cultures. Using both the absolute toxin concentrations and relative proportion (mole % total toxin) of each toxin derivative, N- and P-limitation can be distinguished based on the observed trends in the different saxitoxin derivatives. In this study, we examine the toxin content and composition in natural A. fundyense populations during a spring bloom in Casco Bay, ME from April-June of 1998. This allows us to examine whether A. fundyense populations in the western Gulf of Maine are sufficiently homogenous to permit the detection of toxin composition and toxin content differences through time and space, and if so, to determine whether those changes are indicative of a particular

  6. Shaking the Tree: Multi-locus Sequence Typing Usurps Current Onchocercid (Filarial Nematode) Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bain, Odile; Bourret, Jérôme; Junker, Kerstin; Guerrero, Ricardo; Cañizales, Israel; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Satoto, Tri Baskoro T; Cardenas-Callirgos, Jorge Manuel; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Raccurt, Christian; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Gavotte, Laurent; Martin, Coralie

    2015-11-01

    During the past twenty years, a number of molecular analyses have been performed to determine the evolutionary relationships of Onchocercidae, a family of filarial nematodes encompassing several species of medical or veterinary importance. However, opportunities for broad taxonomic sampling have been scarce, and analyses were based mainly on 12S rDNA and coxI gene sequences. While being suitable for species differentiation, these mitochondrial genes cannot be used to infer phylogenetic hypotheses at higher taxonomic levels. In the present study, 48 species, representing seven of eight subfamilies within the Onchocercidae, were sampled and sequences of seven gene loci (nuclear and mitochondrial) analysed, resulting in the hitherto largest molecular phylogenetic investigation into this family. Although our data support the current hypothesis that the Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Icosiellinae subfamilies separated early from the remaining onchocercids, Setariinae was recovered as a well separated clade. Dirofilaria, Loxodontofilaria and Onchocerca constituted a strongly supported clade despite belonging to different subfamilies (Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae). Finally, the separation between Splendidofilariinae, Dirofilariinae and Onchocercinae will have to be reconsidered.

  7. Quantifying the physical and socio-economic burden of filarial lymphoedema in Chikwawa District, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Sarah; Mkwanda, Square Z; Smith, Emma; Molyneux, David; Stanton, Michelle C; Kelly-Hope, Louise A

    2014-12-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a disfiguring parasitic disease and one of the leading causes of disability in the world. This study aimed to assess the severity of lymphoedema, the physical restrictions and socio-economic impact on affected individuals living in an endemic community in Malawi. In a single health centre catchment area, a follow-up survey was conducted to assess 69 lymphoedema cases, and the impact of their condition in eight different areas of their lives. Differences were examined by sex, age and severity of disease. The overall level of disability was quantified and the impact of acute dermatolymphangioadenitis (ADLA) attacks was examined. Lymphoedema cases were most affected by pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression, which also had an economic impact. Male and older (>60 years) individuals reported more problems. Higher disability levels based on a quantified score were significantly associated with decreased walking distance and working hours. ADLA significantly increased pain/discomfort and reduced cognition, and also affected the individuals' self-care, social participation and ability to work. Filarial lymphoedema causes significant hardship, particularly in relation to ADLAs, and the scale of the problem needs to be better defined with new specific tools so that the best support and care can be provided to those in greatest need. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A Repurposing Strategy for Hsp90 Inhibitors Demonstrates Their Potency against Filarial Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Victoria; O'Neill, Kerry; Maitland, Kirsty; Sverdrup, Francis M.; Devaney, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Novel drugs are required for the elimination of infections caused by filarial worms, as most commonly used drugs largely target the microfilariae or first stage larvae of these infections. Previous studies, conducted in vitro, have shown that inhibition of Hsp90 kills adult Brugia pahangi. As numerous small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 have been developed for use in cancer chemotherapy, we tested the activity of several novel Hsp90 inhibitors in a fluorescence polarization assay and against microfilariae and adult worms of Brugia in vitro. The results from all three assays correlated reasonably well and one particular compound, NVP-AUY922, was shown to be particularly active, inhibiting Mf output from female worms at concentrations as low as 5.0 nanomolar after 6 days exposure to drug. NVP-AUY922 was also active on adult worms after a short 24 h exposure to drug. Based on these in vitro data, NVP-AUY922 was tested in vivo in a mouse model and was shown to significantly reduce the recovery of both adult worms and microfilariae. These studies provide proof of principle that the repurposing of currently available Hsp90 inhibitors may have potential for the development of novel agents with macrofilaricidal properties. PMID:24551261

  9. Shaking the Tree: Multi-locus Sequence Typing Usurps Current Onchocercid (Filarial Nematode) Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Lefoulon, Emilie; Bourret, Jérôme; Junker, Kerstin; Guerrero, Ricardo; Cañizales, Israel; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Satoto, Tri Baskoro T.; Cardenas-Callirgos, Jorge Manuel; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Raccurt, Christian; Mutafchiev, Yasen; Gavotte, Laurent; Martin, Coralie

    2015-01-01

    During the past twenty years, a number of molecular analyses have been performed to determine the evolutionary relationships of Onchocercidae, a family of filarial nematodes encompassing several species of medical or veterinary importance. However, opportunities for broad taxonomic sampling have been scarce, and analyses were based mainly on 12S rDNA and coxI gene sequences. While being suitable for species differentiation, these mitochondrial genes cannot be used to infer phylogenetic hypotheses at higher taxonomic levels. In the present study, 48 species, representing seven of eight subfamilies within the Onchocercidae, were sampled and sequences of seven gene loci (nuclear and mitochondrial) analysed, resulting in the hitherto largest molecular phylogenetic investigation into this family. Although our data support the current hypothesis that the Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Icosiellinae subfamilies separated early from the remaining onchocercids, Setariinae was recovered as a well separated clade. Dirofilaria, Loxodontofilaria and Onchocerca constituted a strongly supported clade despite belonging to different subfamilies (Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae). Finally, the separation between Splendidofilariinae, Dirofilariinae and Onchocercinae will have to be reconsidered. PMID:26588229

  10. Oxidative activities in mitochondria-like particles from Setaria digitata, a filarial parasite.

    PubMed Central

    Raj, R K; Puranam, R S; Kurup, C K; Ramasarma, T

    1988-01-01

    The oxidative metabolic potential of Setaria digitata, a filarial parasite found in the intraperitoneal cavity of cattle, was investigated. These worms showed active wriggling movements which were not affected by respiratory poisons such as cyanide, rotenone and malonate. They also possessed cyanide-insensitive and glucose-independent oxygen consumption pathways. By differential centrifugation of sucrose homogenates, a fraction containing mitochondria-like particles was obtained in which the activity of the marker enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase, was recovered. This fraction catalysed succinate- and NADH-dependent reduction of both cytochrome c and dyes. Oxygen uptake found with succinate, NADH and ascorbate as substrates was not sensitive to cyanide. Cytochromes could not be detected in either this fraction or homogenates of the worms. H2O2 generation with a number of substrates and lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde formed as well as by accompanying oxygen uptake were demonstrated in the mitochondria-like particles. A lipid quinone, possibly with a short side chain and related to ubiquinone, was detected in the worms. The results suggested the existence of two cyanide-insensitive oxygen-consuming reactions in Setaria: one respiratory substrate-independent lipid peroxidation, and a second substrate-dependent reaction that requires an auto-oxidizable quinone but not a cytochrome system. PMID:3223930

  11. Oxidative activities in mitochondria-like particles from Setaria digitata, a filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Raj, R K; Puranam, R S; Kurup, C K; Ramasarma, T

    1988-12-01

    The oxidative metabolic potential of Setaria digitata, a filarial parasite found in the intraperitoneal cavity of cattle, was investigated. These worms showed active wriggling movements which were not affected by respiratory poisons such as cyanide, rotenone and malonate. They also possessed cyanide-insensitive and glucose-independent oxygen consumption pathways. By differential centrifugation of sucrose homogenates, a fraction containing mitochondria-like particles was obtained in which the activity of the marker enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase, was recovered. This fraction catalysed succinate- and NADH-dependent reduction of both cytochrome c and dyes. Oxygen uptake found with succinate, NADH and ascorbate as substrates was not sensitive to cyanide. Cytochromes could not be detected in either this fraction or homogenates of the worms. H2O2 generation with a number of substrates and lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde formed as well as by accompanying oxygen uptake were demonstrated in the mitochondria-like particles. A lipid quinone, possibly with a short side chain and related to ubiquinone, was detected in the worms. The results suggested the existence of two cyanide-insensitive oxygen-consuming reactions in Setaria: one respiratory substrate-independent lipid peroxidation, and a second substrate-dependent reaction that requires an auto-oxidizable quinone but not a cytochrome system.

  12. Economic costs of endemic non-filarial elephantiasis in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tekola, Fasil; Mariam, Damen H; Davey, Gail

    2006-07-01

    Endemic non-filarial elephantiasis or podoconiosis is a chronic and debilitating geochemical disease occurring in individuals exposed to red clay soil derived from alkalic volcanic rock. It is a major public health problem in countries in tropical Africa, Central America and North India. To estimate the direct and the average productivity cost attributable to podoconiosis, and to compare the average productivity time of podoconiosis patients with non-patients. Matched comparative cross sectional survey involving 702 study subjects (patients and non-patients) supplemented by interviews with key informants in Wolaita Zone, southern Ethiopia. Total direct costs of podoconiosis amounted to the equivalent of US$ 143 per patient per year. The total productivity loss for a patient amounted to 45% of the total working days per year, causing a monetary loss equivalent to US$ 63. In Wolaita zone, the overall cost of podoconiosis exceeds US$ 16 million per year. Podoconiosis has enormous economic impact in affected areas. Simple preventive measures (such as use of robust footwear) must be promoted by health policy makers.

  13. Heat shock and developmental expression of hsp83 in the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Thompson, F J; Cockroft, A C; Wheatley, I; Britton, C; Devaney, E

    2001-11-01

    hsp83 was cloned from the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi. The mRNA was constitutively expressed at 37 degrees C in life cycle stages that live in the mammalian host (microfilariae and adult worms). Heat shock resulted in only a minimal increase in levels of transcription. A genomic copy of hsp83 was isolated and was shown to contain 11 introns while sequencing of the 5' upstream region revealed several heat shock elements. Using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene construct the expression of hsp83 from B. pahangi (Bp-hsp83) was studied by transfection of COS-7 cells. Similar to the expression pattern in the parasite, CAT activity was detected at 37 degrees C and was not influenced by heat shock. When the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was transfected with the same construct, CAT activity was not observed at normal growth temperatures (21 degrees C) or under moderate heat shock conditions (28 degrees C). However exposure to more severe heat shock (35 degrees C) resulted in an increase in CAT activity. These results suggest that Bp-hsp83 has a temperature threshold > or = 35 degrees C for expression.

  14. Removal of regulatory T cell activity reverses hyporesponsiveness and leads to filarial parasite clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew D; LeGoff, Laetitia; Harris, Anjanette; Malone, Eva; Allen, Judith E; Maizels, Rick M

    2005-04-15

    Human filarial parasites cause chronic infection associated with long-term down-regulation of the host's immune response. We show here that CD4+ T cell regulation is the main determinant of parasite survival. In a laboratory model of infection, using Litomosoides sigmodontis in BALB/c mice, parasites establish for >60 days in the thoracic cavity. During infection, CD4+ T cells at this site express increasing levels of CD25, CTLA-4, and glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor family-related gene (GITR), and by day 60, up to 70% are CTLA-4(+)GITR(high), with a lesser fraction coexpressing CD25. Upon Ag stimulation, CD4(+)CTLA-4(+)GITR(high) cells are hyporesponsive for proliferation and cytokine production. To test the hypothesis that regulatory T cell activity maintains hyporesponsiveness and prolongs infection, we treated mice with Abs to CD25 and GITR. Combined Ab treatment was able to overcome an established infection, resulting in a 73% reduction in parasite numbers (p < 0.01). Parasite killing was accompanied by increased Ag-specific immune responses and markedly reduced levels of CTLA-4 expression. The action of the CD25(+)GITR+ cells was IL-10 independent as in vivo neutralization of IL-10R did not restore the ability of the immune system to kill parasites. These data suggest that regulatory T cells act, in an IL-10-independent manner, to suppress host immunity to filariasis.

  15. The therapeutic potential of the filarial nematode-derived immunodulator, ES-62 in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Harnett, M M; Melendez, A J; Harnett, W

    2010-03-01

    The dramatic recent rise in the incidence of allergic or autoimmune inflammatory diseases in the West has been proposed to reflect the lack of appropriate priming of the immune response by infectious agents such as parasitic worms during childhood. Consistent with this, there is increasing evidence supporting an inverse relationship between worm infection and T helper type 1/17 (Th1/17)-based inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Perhaps more surprisingly, given that such worms often induce strong Th2-type immune responses, there also appears to be an inverse correlation between parasite load and atopy. These findings therefore suggest that the co-evolution of helminths with hosts, which has resulted in the ability of worms to modulate inflammatory responses to promote parasite survival, has also produced the benefit of protecting the host from pathological lesions arising from aggressive proinflammatory responses to infection or, indeed, aberrant inflammatory responses underlying autoimmune and allergic disorders. By focusing upon the properties of the filarial nematode-derived immunomodulatory molecule, ES-62, in this review we shall discuss the potential of exploiting the immunomodulatory products of parasitic worms to identify and develop novel therapeutics for inflammation.

  16. Potential of a soluble tetrazolium/formazan assay for the evaluation of filarial viability.

    PubMed

    Comley, J C; Turner, C H

    1990-04-01

    Using female Acanthocheilonema viteae we have investigated the bioreduction of the tetrazolium reagent XTT (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-sulphonyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide). Unlike the formazan formed by other tetrazolium salts, that derived from XTT readily diffuses out of A. viteae in vitro. Formazan formation can therefore be quantified by direct absorbance reading of the incubation medium, eliminating the need for a DMSO solubilization step. Optimum assay conditions involved a 4 h incubation, in the presence of the electron coupling agent phenazine methosulphate (PMS). Repeat 4 h incubations with XTT-PMS were well tolerated by worms for 5 consecutive days. This confirmed the low toxicity of XTT formazan and its usefulness in the semi-continuous assessment of filarial viability. In comparison to our previously reported MTT (3-(4, 5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide)-reduction assay XTT-PMS reduction showed comparable drug sensitivity and accuracy, however XTT-PMS appears to be at least 10-15 times less efficiently reduced by A. viteae females. A possible application of the XTT assay using female Onchocerca volvulus is discussed.

  17. Characterization of the allergen filarial tropomyosin with an invertebrate specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Sereda, Michal J; Hartmann, Susanne; Büttner, Dietrich W; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hovestädt, Marc; Brattig, Norbert; Lucius, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Tropomyosins of invertebrates are pan-allergens responsible for wide spread allergic reactions against seafood and arthropods. As invertebrate tropomyosins are highly conserved, helminth tropomyosins are likely to show properties similar to these medically important allergens. Studies with a monoclonal antibody, NR1, raised against tropomyosin of the rodent filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae revealed a B cell epitope common to helminths and marine mollusks, which does not occur in vertebrate tropomyosin. This antibody detected tropomyosin of A. viteae, other filariids, nematodes, trematodes and a cestode, and recognized as well tropomyosin of oyster, squid and octopus, but not of arthropods and vertebrates. Immunohistological analyses of A. viteae, Onchocerca volvulus and other nematodes using NR1 showed that tropomyosin is located in the fibrillar part of the body wall muscles and the uterus, and is also conspicuous in muscles of the pharynx, the vagina and other organs of the nematodes. The abundance of a pan-allergen like tropomyosin in parasitic worms and the counterintuitive, but well documented protection against allergic reactivity by some chronic helminth infections is discussed.

  18. Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster Reveal Features of an Uncharacterized Circadian Property: The Lower Temperature Limit of Rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Sarah E; Schmidt, Paul S; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-06-01

    Most cyclic biological processes are under control of a circadian molecular timing system that synchronizes these phenomena to the 24-h day. One generic property of circadian-controlled processes is that they operate within a specific temperature range, below which the manifestation of rhythm ceases. Little is known about the evolutionary relevance of the lower temperature limit of rhythmicity or about the mechanism underlying the loss of overt circadian behavior below this lower limit, especially in one model organism of chronobiology, Drosophila melanogaster. Natural populations of Drosophila are evolving under divergent selection pressures and so provide a source of diversity necessary to address these issues. Using lines derived from African populations, we find that there is natural variation in the expression of rhythmic behavior under low-temperature conditions. We found evidence that this variability is evolutionarily relevant at extremely low temperature (12 °C) because high-altitude populations exhibit selection for locally adapted genomes that contribute to rhythmic behavior. Lines resistant to 15 °C show an additional layer of diversity in their response to temperature extremes because some lines are resistant to low temperature (15 °C) only, whereas others are cross-resistant to high and low temperature (15 °C and 30 °C). Genetic analysis of one cold-resistant circadian line at 15 °C reveals that the phenotype maps to the X-chromosome but not to the core clock genes, per and sgg. Analysis of the central clock cells of this line reveals that maintenance of rhythm is associated with robust clock function, which is compromised in a standard laboratory strain. These data indicate that the cold-resistant circadian phenotype is clock based. This study highlights the importance of using natural populations to inform us of the basic features of circadian traits, especially those that might be under temperature-based selection.

  19. Natural killer cell activation enhances immune pathology and promotes chronic infection by limiting CD8+ T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S; Xu, Haifeng C; Grusdat, Melanie; Parish, Ian A; Recher, Mike; Elford, Alisha R; Dhanji, Salim; Shaabani, Namir; Tran, Charles W; Dissanayake, Dilan; Rahbar, Ramtin; Ghazarian, Magar; Brüstle, Anne; Fine, Jason; Chen, Peter; Weaver, Casey T; Klose, Christoph; Diefenbach, Andreas; Häussinger, Dieter; Carlyle, James R; Kaech, Susan M; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2012-01-24

    Infections with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus can turn into chronic infections, which currently affect more than 500 million patients worldwide. It is generally thought that virus-mediated T-cell exhaustion limits T-cell function, thus promoting chronic disease. Here we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells have a negative impact on the development of T-cell immunity by using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. NK cell-deficient (Nfil3(-/-), E4BP4(-/-)) mice exhibited a higher virus-specific T-cell response. In addition, NK cell depletion caused enhanced T-cell immunity in WT mice, which led to rapid virus control and prevented chronic infection in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13- and reduced viral load in DOCILE-infected animals. Further experiments showed that NKG2D triggered regulatory NK cell functions, which were mediated by perforin, and limited T-cell responses. Therefore, we identified an important role of regulatory NK cells in limiting T-cell immunity during virus infection.

  20. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Fox, Stephen B; Dabbs, David J; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew H S; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are classified traditionally into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey zone between benign and malignant, as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorization of such lesions is challenging, and for some entities is recognized to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over- or undertreatment. The rarity of these lesions makes the acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision-making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification and behaviour, and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential, such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions of uncertain malignant nature remain, such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of (1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and (2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed.

  1. Breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and limited metastatic potential: Proposals to improve their recognition and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Rakha, Emad A.; Badve, Sunil; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Fox, Stephen B.; Dabbs, David J.; Decker, Thomas; Hodi, Zsolt; Ichihara, Shu; Lee, Andrew HS.; Palacios, José; Richardson, Andrea L.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Schmitt, Fernando C.; Tan, Puay-Hoon; Tse, Gary M.; Ellis, Ian O.

    2016-01-01

    Breast lesions comprise a family of heterogeneous entities with variable patterns of presentation, morphology and clinical behaviour. The majority of breast lesions are traditionally classified into benign and malignant conditions and their behaviour can, in the vast majority of cases, be predicted with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, there remain lesions which show borderline features and lie in a grey-zone between benign and malignant as their behaviour cannot be predicted reliably. Defined pathological categorisation of such lesions is challenging and for some entities is recognised to be subjective and include a range of diagnoses, and forms of terminology, which may trigger over-treatment or under-treatment. The rarity of these lesions makes acquisition of clinical evidence problematic and limits the development of a sufficient evidence base to support informed decision making by clinicians and patients. Emerging molecular evidence is providing a greater understanding of the biology of these lesions, but this may or may not be reflected in their clinical behaviour. Herein we discuss some breast lesions that are associated with uncertainty regarding classification, behaviour and hence management. These include biologically invasive malignant lesions associated with uncertain metastatic potential such as low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, low-grade fibromatosis-like spindle cell carcinoma and encapsulated papillary carcinoma. Other lesions remain of uncertain malignant nature such as mammary cylindroma, atypical microglandular adenosis, mammary pleomorphic adenoma and infiltrating epitheliosis. The concept of categories of 1) breast lesions of uncertain malignant nature and 2) breast lesions of limited metastatic potential, are proposed with details of which histological entities could be included in each category, and their management implications are discussed. PMID:26348644

  2. Fe and C co-limitation of heterotrophic bacteria in the naturally fertilized region off Kerguelen Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obernosterer, I.; Fourquez, M.; Blain, S.

    2014-11-01

    It has univocally been shown that iron (Fe) is the primary limiting nutrient for phytoplankton metabolism in High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) oceans, yet, the question of how this trace metal affects heterotrophic microbial activity is far less understood. We investigated the role of Fe for bacterial heterotrophic production and growth at three contrasting sites in the naturally Fe-fertilized region east of Kerguelen Islands and at one site in HNLC waters during the KEOPS2 (Kerguelen Ocean and Plateau Compared Study 2) cruise in spring 2011. We performed dark incubations of natural microbial communities amended either with iron (Fe, as FeCl3), or carbon (C, as trace-metal clean glucose), or a combination of both, and followed bacterial abundance and heterotrophic production for up to 7 days. Our results show that single and combined additions of Fe and C stimulated bulk and cell-specific bacterial production at all sites, while bacterial growth was enhanced only in two out of four occasions. The extent of stimulation of bulk bacterial heterotrophic production by single Fe or C additions increased with increasing in situ bacterial Fe uptake rates in the surface mixed layer. Our results provide evidence that both Fe and C are present at limiting concentrations for bacterial heterotrophic activity, in HNLC and fertilized regions, in spring. The observation that the extent of stimulation by both elements was related to Fe-uptake rates highlights the tight interaction between the C- and Fe-cycles through bacterial heterotrophic metabolism in the Southern Ocean.

  3. Nest quality limits the number of hole-nesting passerines in their natural cavity-rich habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lõhmus, Asko; Remm, Jaanus

    2005-03-01

    We experimentally tested whether the lack of high-quality nest holes may limit the number of secondary cavity-nesters in cavity-rich habitats. We mapped and measured natural tree-holes in 10 mature aspen forests in Estonia. In five experimental plots, we provided nest-boxes on trees having suitable cavities for hole-nesting passerines. This improved the quality of available cavities but retained their total number (due to territoriality, sites in the same tree could not be occupied simultaneously) and location on the landscape. In the next breeding season, the density of hole-nesting passerines increased in experimental plots but remained at the same level in control plots. The increase was due to the species that used boxes: Parus major that preferred these over natural cavities, and Ficedula hypoleuca that used both nest types more opportunistically. We concluded that the quality of cavities can influence the numbers of hole-nesting birds in old cavity-rich forests, also; probably, adaptive habitat selection is the proximate mechanism in this case.

  4. Trade-offs for food production, nature conservation and climate limit the terrestrial carbon dioxide removal potential.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Lena R; Lucht, Wolfgang; Gerten, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    Large-scale biomass plantations (BPs) are a common factor in climate mitigation scenarios as they promise double benefits: extracting carbon from the atmosphere and providing a renewable energy source. However, their terrestrial carbon dioxide removal (tCDR) potentials depend on important factors such as land availability, efficiency of capturing biomass-derived carbon and the timing of operation. Land availability is restricted by the demands of future food production depending on yield increases and population growth, by requirements for nature conservation and, with respect to climate mitigation, avoiding unfavourable albedo changes. We integrate these factors in one spatially explicit biogeochemical simulation framework to explore the tCDR opportunity space on land available after these constraints are taken into account, starting either in 2020 or 2050, and lasting until 2100. We find that assumed future needs for nature protection and food production strongly limit tCDR potentials. BPs on abandoned crop and pasture areas (~1,300 Mha in scenarios of either 8.0 billion people and yield gap reductions of 25% until 2020 or 9.5 billion people and yield gap reductions of 50% until 2050) could, theoretically, sequester ~100 GtC in land carbon stocks and biomass harvest by 2100. However, this potential would be ~80% lower if only cropland was available or ~50% lower if albedo decreases were considered as a factor restricting land availability. Converting instead natural forest, shrubland or grassland into BPs could result in much larger tCDR potentials ̶ but at high environmental costs (e.g. biodiversity loss). The most promising avenue for effective tCDR seems to be improvement of efficient carbon utilization pathways, changes in dietary trends or the restoration of marginal lands for the implementation of tCDR. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Immunodiagnostic Properties of Wucheraria bancrofti SXP-1, a Potential Filarial Diagnostic Candidate Expressed in Tobacco Plant, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Mathangi; Chakravarthi, M; Charles, S Jason; Harunipriya, P; Jaiganesh, S; Subramonian, N; Kaliraj, P

    2015-08-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants were developed expressing WbSXP-1, a diagnostic antigen isolated from the cDNA library of L3 stage larvae of Wucheraria bancrofti. This antigen produced by recombinant Escherichia coli has been demonstrated by to be successful as potential diagnostic candidate against lymphatic filariasis. A rapid format simple and qualitative flow through immune-filtration diagnostic kit has been developed for the identification of IgG antibodies to the recombinant WbSXP-1 and is being marketed by M/S Span Diagnostics Ltd in India and Africa. Here, we present the results of experiments on the transformation and expression of the same filarial antigen, WbSXP-1, in tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum, to produce plant-based diagnostic antigen. It was possible to successfully transform the tobacco plant with WbSXP-1, the integration of the parasite-specific gene in plants was confirmed by PCR amplification and the expression of the filarial protein by Western blotting. The immunoreactivity of the plant-produced WbSXP-1 was assessed based on its reaction with the monoclonal antibodies developed against the E. coli-produced protein. Immunological screening using clinical sera from patients indicates that the plant-produced protein is comparable to E. coli-produced diagnostic antigen. The result demonstrated that plants can be used as suitable expression systems for the production of diagnostic proteins against lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical infectious disease which has a negative impact on socioeconomic development. This is the first report of the integration, expression and efficacy of a diagnostic candidate of lymphatic filariasis in plants.Key MessageTransgenic tobacco plants with WbSXP-1, a filarial diagnostic candidate, were developed. The plant-produced protein showed immunoreactivity on par with the E. coli product.

  6. High Pressure Freezing/Freeze Substitution Fixation Improves the Ultrastructural Assessment of Wolbachia Endosymbiont – Filarial Nematode Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kerstin; Beatty, Wandy L.; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wolbachia α-proteobacteria are essential for growth, reproduction and survival for many filarial nematode parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Endobacteria were discovered in filarial parasites by transmission electron microscopy in the 1970’s using chemically fixed specimens. Despite improvements of fixation and electron microscopy techniques during the last decades, methods to study the Wolbachia/filaria interaction on the ultrastructural level remained unchanged and the mechanisms for exchange of materials and for motility of endobacteria are not known. Methodology/Principal Finding We used high pressure freezing/freeze substitution to improve fixation of Brugia malayi and its endosymbiont, and this led to improved visualization of different morphological forms of Wolbachia. The three concentric, bilayer membranes that surround the endobacterial cytoplasm were well preserved. Vesicles with identical membrane structures were identified close to the endobacteria, and multiple bacteria were sometimes enclosed within a single outer membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy using a monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein-1 labeled the membranes that enclose Wolbachia and Wolbachia-associated vesicles. High densities of Wolbachia were observed in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, immature, and mature adult worms. Extracellular Wolbachia were sometimes present in the pseudocoelomic cavity near the developing female reproductive organs. Wolbachia-associated actin tails were not observed. Wolbachia motility may be explained by their residence within vacuoles, as they may co-opt the host cell’s secretory pathway to move within and between cells. Conclusions/Significance High pressure freezing/freeze substitution significantly improved the preservation of filarial tissues for electron microscopy to reveal membranes and sub cellular structures that could be crucial for exchange of materials between Wolbachia and its host. PMID

  7. Localization of a filarial phosphate permease that is up-regulated in response to depletion of essential Wolbachia endobacteria.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Hoerauf, Achim; Pfarr, Kenneth M

    2014-03-01

    Wolbachia of filarial nematodes are essential, obligate endobacteria. When depleted by doxycycline worm embryogenesis, larval development and worm survival are inhibited. The molecular basis governing the endosymbiosis between Wolbachia and their filarial host is still being deciphered. In rodent filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis, a nematode encoded phosphate permease gene (Ls-ppe-1) was up-regulated at the mRNA level in response to Wolbachia depletion and this gene promises to have an important role in Wolbachia-nematode endosymbiosis. To further characterize this gene, the regulation of phosphate permease during Wolbachia depletion was studied at the protein level in L. sigmodontis and in the human filaria Onchocerca volvulus. And the localization of phosphate permease (PPE) and Wolbachia in L. sigmodontis and O. volvulus was investigated in untreated and antibiotic treated worms. Depletion of Wolbachia by tetracycline (Tet) resulted in up-regulation of Ls-ppe-1 in L. sigmodontis. On day 36 of Tet treatment, compared to controls (Con), >98% of Wolbachia were depleted with a 3-fold increase in mRNA levels of Ls-ppe-1. Anti-Ls-PPE serum used in Western blots showed up-regulation of Ls-PPE at the protein level in Tet worms on day 15 and 36 of treatment. Immunohistology revealed the localization of Wolbachia and Ls-PPE in the embryos, microfilariae and hypodermis of L. sigmodontis female worms and up-regulation of Ls-PPE in response to Wolbachia depletion. Expression of O. volvulus phosphate permease (Ov-PPE) studied using anti-Ov-PPE serum, showed up-regulation of Ov-PPE at the protein level in doxycycline treated Wolbachia depleted O. volvulus worms and immunohistology revealed localization of Ov-PPE and Wolbachia and up-regulation of Ov-PPE in the hypodermis and embryos of doxycycline treated worms. Ls-PPE and Ov-PPE are upregulated upon Wolbachia depletion in same tissues and regions where Wolbachia are located in untreated worms, reinforcing a link

  8. Comparative analysis of the secretome from a model filarial nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) reveals maximal diversity in gravid female parasites.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Stuart D; Babayan, Simon A; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W; Blaxter, Mark L; Wastling, Jonathan M; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2014-10-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Secretome from a Model Filarial Nematode (Litomosoides sigmodontis) Reveals Maximal Diversity in Gravid Female Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Stuart D.; Babayan, Simon A.; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Gray, Nick; Xia, Dong; Martin, Coralie; Kumar, Sujai; Taylor, David W.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Filarial nematodes (superfamily Filarioidea) are responsible for an annual global health burden of ∼6.3 million disability-adjusted life-years, which represents the greatest single component of morbidity attributable to helminths affecting humans. No vaccine exists for the major filarial diseases, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis; in part because research on protective immunity against filariae has been constrained by the inability of the human-parasitic species to complete their lifecycles in laboratory mice. However, the rodent filaria Litomosoides sigmodontis has become a popular experimental model, as BALB/c mice are fully permissive for its development and reproduction. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of excretory-secretory products from L. sigmodontis across five lifecycle stages and identifications of host proteins associated with first-stage larvae (microfilariae) in the blood. Applying intensity-based quantification, we determined the abundance of 302 unique excretory-secretory proteins, of which 64.6% were present in quantifiable amounts only from gravid adult female nematodes. This lifecycle stage, together with immature microfilariae, released four proteins that have not previously been evaluated as vaccine candidates: a predicted 28.5 kDa filaria-specific protein, a zonadhesin and SCO-spondin-like protein, a vitellogenin, and a protein containing six metridin-like ShK toxin domains. Female nematodes also released two proteins derived from the obligate Wolbachia symbiont. Notably, excretory-secretory products from all parasite stages contained several uncharacterized members of the transthyretin-like protein family. Furthermore, biotin labeling revealed that redox proteins and enzymes involved in purinergic signaling were enriched on the adult nematode cuticle. Comparison of the L. sigmodontis adult secretome with that of the human-infective filarial nematode Brugia malayi (reported previously in three independent published studies

  10. Defining the target and the effect of imatinib on the filarial c-Abl homologue

    PubMed Central

    Kamenyeva, Olena; Lustigman, Sara; Bell, Aaron; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Previously we demonstrated the micro- and macrofilaricidal properties of imatinib in vitro. Here we use electron and multiphoton microscopy to define the target of imatinib in the adult and microfilarial stages of Brugia malayi and assess the effects of pharmacologically relevant levels of imatinib on the adult parasites. Methods After fixation of adult B. malayi males and females, sections were stained with polyclonal rabbit anti-c-Abl antibody (or isotype control) and imaged with multiphoton fluorescent microscopy. Microfilariae were fixed and labeled with rabbit anti-c-Abl IgG primary antibody followed by anti-rabbit gold conjugated secondary antibody and imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM; immunoEM). In addition, adult B. malayi males and females were exposed to 0 or 10μM of imatinib for 7 days following which they were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to assess the drug’s effect on filarial ultrastructure. Results Fluorescent localization of anti-c-Abl antibody demonstrated widespread uptake in the adult filariae, but the most intense signal was seen in the reproductive organs, muscle, and intestine of both male and female worms. Fluorescence was significantly more intense in the early microfilarial stage (i.e. early morula) compared with later development stages (i.e. pretzel). Anti-c-Abl antibody in the microfilariae localized to the nuclei. Based on TEM assessment following imatinib exposure, imatinib appeared to be detrimental to embryogenesis in the adult female B. malayi. Conclusions At pharmacologically achievable concentrations of imatinib, embryogenesis is impaired and possibly halted in adult filariae. Imatinib is likely a slow microfilaricide due to interference in intra-nuclear processes, which are slowly detrimental to the parasite and not immediately lethal, and thus may be used to lower the levels of L. loa microfilariae before they are treated within the context of conventional mass drug

  11. In silico characterization of a RNA binding protein of cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Karunanayake, Eric Hamilton; Tennekoon, Kamani Hemamala; Samarakoon, Sameera Ranganath; Mayan, Karthika

    2014-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (HLF) is a neglected tropical disease which threatens nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti is the major causative agent of HLF and it closely resembles cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata. Due to difficulties in procuring W. bancrofti parasite material, S. digitata cDNA library has been constructed to identify novel drug targets against HLF and many of the cDNA sequences are yet to be assigned structure and function. In this study, a 549 bp long cDNA (sdrbp) has been sequenced and characterized in silico. The shortest ORF of 249 bp from the isolated cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 82 amino acids and shows an amino acid identity of 54% with the RRM domain of human cleavage stimulation factor-64 kDa subunit (CstF-64). Structure of the protein (sdRBP) obtained by homology modelling using RRM of CstF-64 as template adopts classical RRM topology (β1α1β2β3α2β4). sdRBP model built was validated by superimposition tools and Ramachandran plot analysis. CstF-64 plays an important role in pre-mRNA polyadenylation by interacting with specific GU-rich downstream sequence element. Molecular docking studies of sdRBP with different RNA molecules revealed that sdRBP has greater binding affinity to GU-rich RNA and comparable results were obtained upon similar docking of RRM of CstF-64 with the same RNA molecules. Therefore, sdRBP is likely to perform homologous function in S. digitata. This study brings new dimensions to the functional analysis of RNA binding proteins of S. digitata and their evaluation as new drug targets against HLF.

  12. Moxidectin causes adult worm mortality of human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Verma, Meenakshi; Pathak, Manisha; Shahab, Mohd; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2014-12-01

    Moxidectin is a macrocyclic lactone belonging to milbemycin family closely related to ivermectin and is currently progressing towards Phase III clinical trial against human infection with the filaria Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1894). There is a single report on the microfilaricidal and embryostatic activity of moxidectin in case of the human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi (Brug, 1927) in Mastomys coucha (Smith) but without any adulticidal action. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo antifilarial efficacy of moxidectin was evaluated on, B. malayi. In vitro moxidectin showed 100% reduction in adult female worm motility at 0.6 μM concentration within 7 days with 68% inhibition in the reduction of MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide dye) (which is used to detect viability of worms). A 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of moxidectin for adult female parasite was 0.242 μM, for male worm 0.186 μM and for microfilaria IC50 was 0.813 μM. In adult B. malayi-transplanted primary screening model (Meriones unguiculatus Milne-Edwards), moxidectin at a single optimal dose of 20 mg/kg by oral and subcutaneous route was found effective on both adult parasites and microfilariae. In secondary screening (M coucha, subcutaneously inoculated with infective larvae), moxidectin at the same dose by subcutaneous route brought about death of 49% of adult worms besides causing sterilisation in 54% of the recovered live female worms. The treated animals exhibited a continuous and sustained reduction in peripheral blood microfilaraemia throughout the observation period of 90 days. The mechanism of action of moxidectin is suggested to be similar to avermectins. The in silico studies were also designed to explore the interaction of moxidectin with glutamate-gated chloride channels of B. malayi. The docking results revealed a close interaction of moxidectin with various GluCl ligand sites of B. malayi.

  13. In silico characterization of a RNA binding protein of cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata

    PubMed Central

    Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Karunanayake, Eric Hamilton; Tennekoon, Kamani Hemamala; Samarakoon, Sameera Ranganath; Mayan, Karthika

    2014-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (HLF) is a neglected tropical disease which threatens nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti is the major causative agent of HLF and it closely resembles cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata. Due to difficulties in procuring W. bancrofti parasite material, S. digitata cDNA library has been constructed to identify novel drug targets against HLF and many of the cDNA sequences are yet to be assigned structure and function. In this study, a 549 bp long cDNA (sdrbp) has been sequenced and characterized in silico. The shortest ORF of 249 bp from the isolated cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 82 amino acids and shows an amino acid identity of 54% with the RRM domain of human cleavage stimulation factor-64 kDa subunit (CstF-64). Structure of the protein (sdRBP) obtained by homology modelling using RRM of CstF-64 as template adopts classical RRM topology (β1α1β2β3α2β4). sdRBP model built was validated by superimposition tools and Ramachandran plot analysis. CstF-64 plays an important role in pre-mRNA polyadenylation by interacting with specific GU-rich downstream sequence element. Molecular docking studies of sdRBP with different RNA molecules revealed that sdRBP has greater binding affinity to GU-rich RNA and comparable results were obtained upon similar docking of RRM of CstF-64 with the same RNA molecules. Therefore, sdRBP is likely to perform homologous function in S. digitata. This study brings new dimensions to the functional analysis of RNA binding proteins of S. digitata and their evaluation as new drug targets against HLF. PMID:25258487

  14. Point-of-care quantification of blood-borne filarial parasites with a mobile phone microscope.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Bakalar, Matthew; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Reber, Clay; Skandarajah, Arunan; Nilsson, Lina; Switz, Neil; Kamgno, Joseph; Pion, Sébastien; Boussinesq, Michel; Nutman, Thomas B; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2015-05-06

    Parasitic helminths cause debilitating diseases that affect millions of people in primarily low-resource settings. Efforts to eliminate onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa through mass drug administration have been suspended because of ivermectin-associated serious adverse events, including death, in patients infected with the filarial parasite Loa loa. To safely administer ivermectin for onchocerciasis or lymphatic filariasis in regions co-endemic with L. loa, a strategy termed "test and (not) treat" has been proposed whereby those with high levels of L. loa microfilariae (>30,000/ml) that put them at risk for life-threatening serious adverse events are identified and excluded from mass drug administration. To enable this, we developed a mobile phone-based video microscope that automatically quantifies L. loa microfilariae in whole blood loaded directly into a small glass capillary from a fingerprick without the need for conventional sample preparation or staining. This point-of-care device automatically captures and analyzes videos of microfilarial motion in whole blood using motorized sample scanning and onboard motion detection, minimizing input from health care workers and providing a quantification of microfilariae per milliliter of whole blood in under 2 min. To validate performance and usability of the mobile phone microscope, we tested 33 potentially Loa-infected patients in Cameroon and confirmed that automated counts correlated with manual thick smear counts (94% specificity; 100% sensitivity). Use of this technology to exclude patients from ivermectin-based treatment at the point of care in Loa-endemic regions would allow resumption/expansion of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Thioredoxin peroxidase from Onchocerca volvulus: a major hydrogen peroxide detoxifying enzyme in filarial parasites.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Egerton, G L; Bianco, A E; Williams, S A

    1998-03-15

    Random screening of an Onchocerca volvulus third-stage (L3) cDNA library identified a highly abundant cDNA encoding a newly discovered antioxidant enzyme, thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), a member of the peroxidoxin superfamily. This TPx cDNA (Ov-tpx-2) encodes a polypeptide of 199 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 21,890 Da. The Ov-tpx-2 cDNA represents roughly 2.5% of the total cDNAs from the L3 cDNA library. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein product was shown to have antioxidant activity. Antiserum raised against Ov-TPX-2 recognized a native protein from extracts of both the L3 and adult-stages with a molecular weight of 22 kD. The localization and stage-specificity of Ov-TPX-2 protein was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy using monospecific antibodies. Expression was detected in late first-stage larvae during development in the vector and increased in intensity during differentiation to the infective L3-stage. The antigen was also detected in post-infective larvae and adult worms. In larvae, Ov-TPX-2 protein was predominantly localized to the hypodermis and cuticle, with additional sites in the hypodermal chords and multivesicular bodies. In adult worms, the primary sites of expression were the uterine epithelium and intestine, with additional labeling of the body wall and cuticle. Developing embryos and microfilariae in utero were bathed in Ov-TPX-2 protein discharged from epithelial cells. These results suggest that Ov-TPX-2 may protect the parasites from being damaged by host-generated oxidative stress and that Ov-TPX-2 protein provides the H2O2-detoxifying activity predicted but not previously identified in filarial parasites. Its highly upregulated expression in infective larvae may aid in parasite establishment following transmission to the definitive host.

  16. Multiple filarial species microfilaraemia: a comparative study of areas with endemic and sporadic onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Uttah, Emmanuel; Ibeh, Dominic C

    2011-12-01

    The study was aimed at determining the pattern of co-occurrence of species of microfilaraemia between onchocerciasis endemic and sporadic populations. From every consenting person of one year and above, 50 μl of day and night blood samples were collected and processed respectively with Haemotoxylin and Giemsa as vital stains. Two skin snips (one each from the waist and the shoulder) were also taken from these individuals and processed. Results showed single species microfilaraemia (86.4 and 82.3%), double species microfilaraemia (12.2 and 16.9%) and triple species microfilaraemia (1.4 and 0.7%) for endemic and sporadic populations respectively. All the species had single species microfilaraemia mostly, but Mansonella perstans and Loa loa showed greatest tendency towards double and triple species microfilaraemia. The prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaraemia among those positive for Onchocerca volvulus was significantly lower than the overall prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti. Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaraemia was most common among those who had L. loa microfilaraemia. Wuchereria bancrofti microfilarial intensity was higher among those with M. perstans microfilaraemia than among those positive for any of the other filarial species. Similarly, the intensity of M. perstans microfilaraemia among those positive for W. bancrofti exceeded the overall intensity of M. perstans. It is concluded that there was no definite pattern in mf densities discernible from co- occurrence infections either in the onchocerciasis endemic or sporadic population. There could be varied outcomes of onchocerciasis infection attributable to positive or negative regulatory effects of other pathogens harbored by the victims.

  17. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gondorf, Fabian; Berbudi, Afiat; Buerfent, Benedikt C; Ajendra, Jesuthas; Bloemker, Dominique; Specht, Sabine; Schmidt, David; Neumann, Anna-Lena; Layland, Laura E; Hoerauf, Achim; Hübner, Marc P

    2015-01-01

    Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s.) and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases, but may also

  18. The further application of MTT-formazan colorimetry to studies on filarial worm viability.

    PubMed

    Comley, J C; Townson, S; Rees, M J; Dobinson, A

    1989-09-01

    Experiments have confirmed that MTT-formazan colorimetry in its simplest form (incubation of intact worms with MTT and direct visualisation of any formazan formed) can be readily applied to several species of filariae including Onchocerca volvulus. Data is presented which will assist the development of quantitative MTT reduction viability tests for a selection of the smaller filarial species. Assays of pieces of Onchocerca gutturosa and O. volvulus females have led us to tentatively conclude that the tips of filariae, particularly the anterior ends, may well be metabolically the most active part of the worm. Selective sampling of these regions for Onchocerca might therefore be a useful indicator for the viability of the parasite. An example of how MTT-formazan colorimetry has been applied to yield additional data to support motility observations on the in vitro survival of male O. gutturosa is also given. The in vitro timecourse of worm death caused by 10 microM CGP 20376 on Acanthocheilonema viteae females has been examined by MTT reduction and compared with 6 other non-subjective parameters. The results suggests that the parameters examined could be divided into two groups according to the time taken for CGP 20376 to cause 50% inhibition (t50) of the parameter. Fast response parameters had t50's between 1 and 6 h (motility indices, 14CO2 evolution, adenine uptake and leucine uptake), they are more sensitive measures of viability and indicate possible worm damage which may or may not be reversible. Slow response parameters had t50's between 34 and 48.5 h (lactate output, MTT reduction and adenine leakage), and are probably linked with severe degenerative changes and are indicative of worm death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Molecular phylogenetic studies on filarial parasites based on 5S ribosomal spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Bain, O; Williams, S A

    1994-06-01

    This paper is the first large-scale molecular phylogenetic study on filarial parasites (family Onchocercidae) which includes 16 species of 6 genera: Brugia beaveri Ash et Little, 1962, B. buckleyi Dissanaike et Paramananthan, 1961; B. malayi (Brug, 1927) Buckley, 1960; B. pahangi (Buckley et Edeson, 1956) Buckley, 1960; B. patei (Buckley, Nelson et Heisch, 1958) Buckley, 1960; B. timori Partono et al, 1977; Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold, 1877) Seurat, 1921: W. kalimantani Palmieri. Purnomo, Dennis and Marwoto, 1980: Mansonella perstans (Manson, 1891) Eberhard et Orihel, 1984; loa loc, Stiles, 1905; Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1983) Railliet er Henry, 1910; O. ochengi Bwangamoi, 1969; O. gutturosa Neumann, 1910; Dirofilaria immitis (Leidy, 1856) Railliet e Henry, 1911; Acanthocheilonema viteae (Krepkogorskaya, 1933) Bain, Baker et Chabaud, 1982 and Litomosoides sigmodontis Chandler, 1931. 5S rRNA gene spacer region sequence data were collected by PCR, cloning and dideoxy sequencing. The 5S rRNA gene spacer region sequences were aligned and analyzed by maximum parsimony algorithms, distance methods and maximum likelihood methods to construct phylogenetic trees. Bootstrap analysis was used to test the robustness of the different phylogenetic reconstructions. The data indicated that 5S spacer region sequences are highly conserved within species yet differ significantly between species. Spliced leader sequences were observed in all of the 5S rDNA spacers with no sequence variation, although flanking region sequence and length heterogeneity was observed even within species. All of the various tree-building methods gave very similar results. This study identified four clades which are strongly supported by bootstrap analysis the Brugia clade; the Wuchereria clade; the Brugia-Wuchereria clade and the Onchocerca clade. The analyses indicated that L. sigmodontis and A. viteae may be the most primitive among the 16 species studied. The data did not show any close

  20. Silver nanoparticles: a possibility for malarial and filarial vector control technology.

    PubMed

    Soni, Namita; Prakash, Soam

    2014-11-01

    Green synthesis technology is one of the rapid, reliable and best routes for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). There are bioactive compounds with enormous potential in Azadirachta indica (Neem). The extraordinary mosquitoes warrant nanotechnology to integrate with novel molecules. This will be sustainable technology for future. Here, we synthesized AgNPs using aqueous extracts of leaves and bark of Az. indica (Neem). We tested AgNPs as larvicides, pupicides and adulticides against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The results were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations varying many hours by probit analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were spherical in shape and with varied sizes (10.47-nm leaf and 19.22-nm bark). The larvae, pupae and adults of filariasis vector C. quinquefasciatus were found to be more susceptible to our AgNPs than the malaria vector An. stephensi. The first and the second instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus show a mortality rate of 100% after 30 min of exposure. The results against the pupa of C. quinquefasciatus were recorded as LC₅₀ 4 ppm, LC₉₀ 11 ppm and LC₉₉ 13 ppm after 3 h of exposure. In the case of adult mosquitoes, LC₅₀ 1.06 μL/cm(2), LC₉₀ 2.13 μL/cm(2) and LC₉₉ 2.4 μL/cm(2) were obtained after 4 h of exposure. These results suggest that our AgNPs are environment-friendly for controlling malarial and filarial vectors.

  1. The role of feral mammals on wildlife infectious disease prevalence in two nature reserves within Mexico City limits.

    PubMed

    Suzán, Gerardo; Ceballos, Gerardo

    2005-09-01

    Wild and feral medium-sized mammals were live trapped at two natural protected areas within the Mexico City limits to determine antibody prevalence for the most common infectious diseases (rabies, toxoplasmosis, and canine parvovirus) in dogs and cats. Mammals were trapped during the dry (March-April) and rainy seasons (July-August) of 1996 and 1997. A total of 68 individuals were captured, representing 8 species: opossums (Didelphis virginiana), ringtails (Bassariscus astutus), spotted skunks (Spilogale gracilis), weasels (Mustela frenata), rock squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus), Mexican gray squirrels (Sciurus aureogaster), feral cats (Felis catus), and feral dogs (Canis familiaris). There was marked seroprevalence for parvovirus (86.6%) and lower seroprevalences for both toxoplasma (23.9%) and rabies (17.9%). There were no significant prevalence differences among mammals in both protected areas, which were of contrasting size and isolation (i.e., small and isolated versus large and nonisolated). We suggest that high seroprevalence of these three infectious agents in wild mammals is a result of the high densities of feral dogs and cats in the two areas sampled. Feral dogs are able to maintain the infectious agents in these localities regardless of the protected area size and isolation. However, the native mammals of the small and isolated reserve are more vulnerable to infectious diseases because of small population size and genetic bottlenecks. Our results indicate that natural areas in and around Mexico City are a refugium for latent infectious agents, several of which are zoonotic. These findings suggest that conservation measures, such as eradication of feral mammals and vaccination programs, in the protected areas and surrounding areas could be beneficial.

  2. Aedes albopictus is a natural vector of Dirofilaria immitis in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cancrini, G; Frangipane di Regalbono, A; Ricci, I; Tessarin, C; Gabrielli, S; Pietrobelli, M

    2003-12-30

    Investigations were carried out in Padova town (Veneto region, NE Italy) to define the actual role of Aedes albopictus in the natural transmission of Dirofilaria nematodes, and to assess the risk that its presence might represent for veterinary and medical health. During summer 2000-2002 daytime captures of human-attracted mosquitoes were carried out in three areas of the town. The presence of filarial parasites in mosquitoes was evaluated by PCR, and sequencing confirmed species assessment. DNA extraction was performed separately on pools of the insect abdomen and thorax-head, to discriminate between Dirofilaria infected/infective specimens. A total of 2721 mosquitoes were caught and A. albopictus was the most abundant species (2534). Filarial DNA was found in 27.5% (19/69) of the abdomen pools formed with mosquitoes collected in summer 2000, and in 11.1% (16/144) and 4.9% (6/123) thorax-head pools coming from samplings 2001 and 2002, respectively. Filarial DNA was belonging to D. immitis and all studied areas harboured infective specimens. These results prove A. albopictus as natural vector of D. immitis in Italy. Moreover, they support the hypothesis that the presence of the mosquito could affect the transmission pattern of canine heartworm disease in urban environment and, considering the aggressive anthropophylic behaviour of the species (30-48 bites/h) proven in Padova town, could enhance the circulation of filarial nematodes from animals to humans.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Glycosylated and Nonglycosylated Filarial Homologues of the 20-Kilodalton Retinol Binding Protein from Onchocerca volvulus (Ov20)

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalan, Niroshini; Cordeiro, N. J. V.; Kläger, Sabine L.; Bradley, Janette E.; Allen, Judith E.

    1999-01-01

    Ov20 is a structurally novel 20-kDa retinol binding protein secreted by Onchocerca volvulus. Immunological and biological investigation of this protein has been hampered by the inability to maintain O. volvulus in a laboratory setting. In an effort to find a system more amenable to laboratory investigation, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed cDNA encoding homologues of Ov20 from two closely related filarial species, Brugia malayi (Bm20) and Acanthocheilonema viteae (Av20). Sequence comparisons have highlighted differences in glycosylation of the homologues. We present here an analysis of mouse immune responses to Ov20, Bm20, and Av20. The results suggest a strong genetic restriction in response to native Bm20 that is overcome when recombinant, nonnative material is used. Reactivity of human filarial sera to the three recombinant proteins confirmed previous specificity studies with Ov20 but highlighted important differences in the reactivity patterns of the O. volvulus and B. malayi homologues that may be due to differences in glycosylation patterns. Ov20 is a dominant antigen in infected individuals, while Bm20 is not. The availability of the B. malayi homologue enabled us to use defined murine reagents and inbred strains for genetic analysis of responsiveness in a way that is not possible for Ov20. However, the close sequence similarity between Ov20 and Av20 suggests that the A. viteae model may be more suited to the investigation of the biological functions of Ov20. PMID:10569745

  4. Immunohistological studies on neoplasms of female and male Onchocerca volvulus: filarial origin and absence of Wolbachia from tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Brattig, N W; Hoerauf, A; Fischer, P U; Liebau, E; Bandi, C; Debrah, A; Büttner, M; Büttner, D W

    2010-04-01

    Up to 5% of untreated female Onchocerca volvulus filariae develop potentially fatal pleomorphic neoplasms, whose incidence is increased following ivermectin treatment. We studied the occurrence of 8 filarial proteins and of Wolbachia endobacteria in the tumor cells. Onchocercomas from patients, untreated and treated with antibiotics and anthelminthics, were examined by immunohistology. Neoplasms were diagnosed in 112 of 3587 female and in 2 of 1570 male O. volvulus. The following proteins and other compounds of O. volvulus were expressed in the cells of the neoplasms: glutathione S-transferase 1, lysosomal aspartic protease, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, alpha-enolase, aspartate aminotransferase, ankyrin E1, tropomyosin, heat shock protein 60, transforming growth factor-beta, and prostaglandin E(2). These findings prove the filarial origin of the neoplasms and confirm the pleomorphism of the tumor cells. Signs indicating malignancy of the neoplasms are described. Wolbachia were observed in the hypodermis, oocytes, and embryos of tumor-harbouring filariae using antibodies against Wolbachia surface protein, Wolbachia HtrA-type serine protease, and Wolbachia aspartate aminotransferase. In contrast, Wolbachia were not found in the cells of the neoplasms. Further, neoplasm-containing worms were not observed after more than 10 months after the start of sufficient treatment with doxycycline or doxycycline plus ivermectin.

  5. Immunohistological studies on neoplasms of female and male Onchocerca volvulus: filarial origin and absence of Wolbachia from tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    BRATTIG, N. W.; HOERAUF, A.; FISCHER, P. U.; LIEBAU, E.; BANDI, C.; DEBRAH, A.; BÜTTNER, M.; BÜTTNER, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Up to 5% of untreated female Onchocerca volvulus filariae develop potentially fatal pleomorphic neoplasms, whose incidence is increased following ivermectin treatment. We studied the occurrence of 8 filarial proteins and of Wolbachia endobacteria in the tumor cells. Onchocercomas from patients, untreated and treated with antibiotics and anthelminthics, were examined by immunohistology. Neoplasms were diagnosed in 112 of 3587 female and in 2 of 1570 male O. volvulus. The following proteins and other compounds of O. volvulus were expressed in the cells of the neoplasms: glutathione S-transferase 1, lysosomal aspartic protease, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, alpha-enolase, aspartate aminotransferase, ankyrin E1, tropomyosin, heat shock protein 60, transforming growth factor-beta, and prostaglandin E2. These findings prove the filarial origin of the neoplasms and confirm the pleomorphism of the tumor cells. Signs indicating malignancy of the neoplasms are described. Wolbachia were observed in the hypodermis, oocytes, and embryos of tumor-harbouring filariae using antibodies against Wolbachia surface protein, Wolbachia HtrA-type serine protease, and Wolbachia aspartate aminotransferase. In contrast, Wolbachia were not found in the cells of the neoplasms. Further, neoplasm-containing worms were not observed after more than 10 months after the start of sufficient treatment with doxycycline or doxycycline plus ivermectin. PMID:20199697

  6. Filarial Antigenemia and Loa loa Night Blood Microfilaremia in an Area Without Bancroftian Filariasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Bakajika, Didier K.; Nigo, Maurice M.; Lotsima, Jean Pierre; Masikini, Germain A.; Fischer, Kerstin; Lloyd, Melanie M.; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been delayed in central Africa because of incomplete mapping and coendemic loiasis. We mapped two regions in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo that were suspected to have LF. Night blood samples were collected from 2,724 subjects in 30 villages. Filarial antigenemia rates by card test exceeded 1% in 28 villages (range = 0–14%). Prevalence rates for large sheathed microfilariae (Mf) ranged from 4% to 40%; Mansonella perstans rates ranged from 22% to 98%. Large Mf were exclusively Loa loa by microscopy, and only 1 of 337 samples tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was positive for Wuchereria bancrofti DNA. Filarial antigen positivity was strongly associated with high L. loa Mf counts. Periodicity studies revealed atypical patterns, with no significant diurnal periodicity in some individuals. Thus, methods routinely used for LF mapping may not be reliable in areas in central Africa that are highly endemic for loiasis. PMID:25223938

  7. Filarial antigenemia and Loa loa night blood microfilaremia in an area without bancroftian filariasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Bakajika, Didier K; Nigo, Maurice M; Lotsima, Jean Pierre; Masikini, Germain A; Fischer, Kerstin; Lloyd, Melanie M; Weil, Gary J; Fischer, Peter U

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been delayed in central Africa because of incomplete mapping and coendemic loiasis. We mapped two regions in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo that were suspected to have LF. Night blood samples were collected from 2,724 subjects in 30 villages. Filarial antigenemia rates by card test exceeded 1% in 28 villages (range = 0-14%). Prevalence rates for large sheathed microfilariae (Mf) ranged from 4% to 40%; Mansonella perstans rates ranged from 22% to 98%. Large Mf were exclusively Loa loa by microscopy, and only 1 of 337 samples tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was positive for Wuchereria bancrofti DNA. Filarial antigen positivity was strongly associated with high L. loa Mf counts. Periodicity studies revealed atypical patterns, with no significant diurnal periodicity in some individuals. Thus, methods routinely used for LF mapping may not be reliable in areas in central Africa that are highly endemic for loiasis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Development and testing of a de novo clinical staging system for podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis)

    PubMed Central

    Tekola, Fasil; Ayele, Zewdu; HaileMariam, Dereje; Fuller, Claire; Davey, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis) is a geochemical disease in individuals exposed to red-clay soil. Despite the prevalence and public health importance of podoconiosis, there is as yet no accepted clinical staging system. Objective We aimed to develop and test a robust clinical staging system for podoconiosis. Methods We adapted the Dreyer system for staging filarial lymphoedema and tested it in four re-iterative field tests conducted in an area of high podoconiosis prevalence in Southern Ethiopia. The system finally arrived at has five stages according to proximal spread of disease and presence of dermal nodules, ridges and bands. We measured the one-week repeatability and the inter-observer agreement of the final staging system. Results We have developed a five-stage system that is readily understood by community workers with little health training. Kappa for one-week repeatability was 0.88 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.96), Kappa for agreement between health professionals was 0.71 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.82), while that between health professionals and community podoconiosis agents without formal health training averaged 0.64 (95% CI 0.52 to 0.78). Conclusions A simple staging system with good inter-observer agreement and repeatability has been developed to assist in the management and further study of podoconiosis. PMID:18721188

  9. Persistence of lymphatic filarial infection in the paediatric population of rural community, after six rounds of annual mass drug administrations.

    PubMed

    Sunish, I P; Munirathinam, A; Kalimuthu, M; Ashok Kumar, V; Tyagi, B K

    2014-06-01

    Under the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF), mass drug administration (MDA) is being implemented in Tamil Nadu, south India, by the State health machinery. The impact of six annual rounds of MDA using diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with and without albendazole (ALB) on filarial infection (microfilaraemia prevalence-MFP; antigenaemia prevalence-AGP) in paediatric population of 2-9 years was determined in two revenue blocks, with a population of 321 000. After each MDA, 300-400 children were screened for filarial infection. After six MDAs, an overall MFP reduction of 84.67% and 57.95% was observed in DEC+ALB and DEC alone arms, respectively. Corresponding AGP reductions were 72.88% (p < 0.001) and 41.51% (p = 0.023). Observation of microfilaraemic children after six MDAs (0.32% in DEC+ALB; 0.75% in DEC alone), necessitates the need for supplementary control strategies (viz., vector control), in order to achieve the goal of LF elimination. © The Author [2013]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Naturally secreted immunoglobulins limit B1 and MZ B-cell numbers through a microbiota-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lino, Andreia C; Mohr, Elodie; Demengeot, Jocelyne

    2013-07-11

    B-cell numbers and immunoglobulin (Ig) titers can increase several logs during immune responses. In contrast to this plasticity and despite constant renewal, B-cell numbers are stable in the absence of immunization. We assessed the role of serum Igs in maintaining specific B-cell subset homeostasis at steady state. Using mice genetically deficient in secreted IgM only (secretory μ chain-deficient), in switched Igs and hypermutated IgM (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-deficient), or fully agammaglobulemic (AID(-/-)µS(-/-)), we dissected the contribution of different Ig classes to 4 phenotypes associated with loss of serum Igs: 1) increased splenic B-cell numbers, mostly of the B1 and marginal zone (MZ) B-cell subtypes; 2) enlarged germinal centers (GCs) in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes; 3) enrichment in IRF4(+)CD138(-) plasmablast-like cells; and 4) overexpression of IgM in several cell subsets. Complementation experiments based on either mixed bone marrow reconstitution of chimeras or Ig infusion, and analysis of mice raised in germ-free conditions reveal a negative feedback mechanism in which MZ and B1 cell numbers are under the control of naturally secreted Igs as the result of an intrinsic property of the immune system, whereas GC development is under indirect control of secreted Igs that limit bacterial species triggering GC reactions.

  11. Analysis of gene expression from the Wolbachia genome of a filarial nematode supports both metabolic and defensive roles within the symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Darby, Alistair C.; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Bah, Germanus S.; Kaur, Gaganjot; Hughes, Margaret A.; Kay, Suzanne M.; Koldkjær, Pia; Rainbow, Lucille; Radford, Alan D.; Blaxter, Mark L.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Trees, Alexander J.; Cordaux, Richard; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    The α-proteobacterium Wolbachia is probably the most prevalent, vertically transmitted symbiont on Earth. In contrast with its wide distribution in arthropods, Wolbachia is restricted to one family of animal-parasitic nematodes, the Onchocercidae. This includes filarial pathogens such as Onchocerca volvulus, the cause of human onchocerciasis, or river blindness. The symbiosis between filariae and Wolbachia is obligate, although the basis of this dependency is not fully understood. Previous studies suggested that Wolbachia may provision metabolites (e.g., haem, riboflavin, and nucleotides) and/or contribute to immune defense. Importantly, Wolbachia is restricted to somatic tissues in adult male worms, whereas females also harbor bacteria in the germline. We sought to characterize the nature of the symbiosis between Wolbachia and O. ochengi, a bovine parasite representing the closest relative of O. volvulus. First, we sequenced the complete genome of Wolbachia strain wOo, which revealed an inability to synthesize riboflavin de novo. Using RNA-seq, we also generated endobacterial transcriptomes from male soma and female germline. In the soma, transcripts for membrane transport and respiration were up-regulated, while the gonad exhibited enrichment for DNA replication and translation. The most abundant Wolbachia proteins, as determined by geLC-MS, included ligands for mammalian Toll-like receptors. Enzymes involved in nucleotide synthesis were dominant among metabolism-related proteins, whereas the haem biosynthetic pathway was poorly represented. We conclude that Wolbachia may have a mitochondrion-like function in the soma, generating ATP for its host. Moreover, the abundance of immunogenic proteins in wOo suggests a role in diverting the immune system toward an ineffective antibacterial response. PMID:22919073

  12. Oxidative stress plays major role in mediating apoptosis in filarial nematode Setaria cervi in the presence of trans-stilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Niladri; Parida, Pravat Kumar; Santra, Abhishek; Ghosh, Tamashree; Dutta, Ananya; Jana, Kuladip; Misra, Anup Kumar; Sinha Babu, Santi P

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, affecting around 120 million people in 80 countries worldwide, is an extremely painful disease and caused permanent and long term disability. Owing to its alarming prevalence there is immediate need for development of new therapeutics. A series of trans-stilbene derivatives were synthesized using aqueous reaction condition showing potential as antifilarial agents demonstrated in vitro. MTT reduction assay and dye exclusion test were performed to evaluate the micro and macrofilaricidal potential of these compounds. Amid 20 trans-stilbene derivatives together with Resveratrol (RSV), a multifunctional natural product was screened; nine compounds (28, 29, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 41 and 42) have showed promising micro and macrofilaricidal activities and four of them (28, 39, 41 and 42) showed better effectiveness than RSV. In the treated parasites apoptosis was established by DNA laddering, in situ DNA fragmentation and FACS analysis. The generation of ROS in the treated parasites was indicated by the depletion in the level of GSH, GR and GST activity and elevation of SOD, catalase, GPx activity and superoxide anion and H2O2 level. Along with the ROS generation and oxidative stress, the decreased expression of anti-apoptotic ced-9 gene and increased expression of nematode specific pro-apoptotic genes, egl-1, ced-4 and ced-3 at the level of transcription and translation level; the up-regulation of caspase-3 activity and involvement of caspase-8,9,3, cytochrome-c and PARP were also observed and which denotes the probable existence of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways apoptosis in parasitic nematodes. This observation is reported first time and thus it confirmed the mode of action and effectiveness of the compounds. Further, the comparative bioavailability-pharmacokinetics studies showed that compound 28 possesses comparable properties with Ivermectin. This study will certainly intensify our understanding of the pharmacological importance of trans

  13. Analysis of gene expression from the Wolbachia genome of a filarial nematode supports both metabolic and defensive roles within the symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Darby, Alistair C; Armstrong, Stuart D; Bah, Germanus S; Kaur, Gaganjot; Hughes, Margaret A; Kay, Suzanne M; Koldkjær, Pia; Rainbow, Lucille; Radford, Alan D; Blaxter, Mark L; Tanya, Vincent N; Trees, Alexander J; Cordaux, Richard; Wastling, Jonathan M; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2012-12-01

    The α-proteobacterium Wolbachia is probably the most prevalent, vertically transmitted symbiont on Earth. In contrast with its wide distribution in arthropods, Wolbachia is restricted to one family of animal-parasitic nematodes, the Onchocercidae. This includes filarial pathogens such as Onchocerca volvulus, the cause of human onchocerciasis, or river blindness. The symbiosis between filariae and Wolbachia is obligate, although the basis of this dependency is not fully understood. Previous studies suggested that Wolbachia may provision metabolites (e.g., haem, riboflavin, and nucleotides) and/or contribute to immune defense. Importantly, Wolbachia is restricted to somatic tissues in adult male worms, whereas females also harbor bacteria in the germline. We sought to characterize the nature of the symbiosis between Wolbachia and O. ochengi, a bovine parasite representing the closest relative of O. volvulus. First, we sequenced the complete genome of Wolbachia strain wOo, which revealed an inability to synthesize riboflavin de novo. Using RNA-seq, we also generated endobacterial transcriptomes from male soma and female germline. In the soma, transcripts for membrane transport and respiration were up-regulated, while the gonad exhibited enrichment for DNA replication and translation. The most abundant Wolbachia proteins, as determined by geLC-MS, included ligands for mammalian Toll-like receptors. Enzymes involved in nucleotide synthesis were dominant among metabolism-related proteins, whereas the haem biosynthetic pathway was poorly represented. We conclude that Wolbachia may have a mitochondrion-like function in the soma, generating ATP for its host. Moreover, the abundance of immunogenic proteins in wOo suggests a role in diverting the immune system toward an ineffective antibacterial response.

  14. Fitness cost of Litomosoides sigmodontis filarial infection in mite vectors; implications of infected haematophagous arthropod excretory products in host-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Frutos, Roger; Moulia, Catherine; Lhermitte-Vallarino, Nathaly; Bain, Odile; Gavotte, Laurent; Martin, Coralie

    2013-01-01

    Filariae are a leading cause of infections which are responsible for serious dermatological, ocular, and vascular lesions. Infective third stage larvae (L3) are transmitted through the bite of a haematophagous vector. Litomosoides sigmodontis is a well-established model of filariasis in the mouse, with the vector being the mite Ornithonyssus bacoti. The aim of the study was to analyse the filarial infection in mites to determine the consequences of filarial infection in the blood-feeding and the reproduction of mites as well as in the regulation of vector-induced inflammation in the mouse skin. Firstly, L3 are unevenly distributed throughout the host population and the majority of the population harbours a moderate infection (1 to 6 L3). Filarial infection does not significantly affect the probing delay for blood feeding. The number of released protonymphs is lower in infected mites but is not correlated with the L3 burden. Finally, induced excreted proteins from infected mites but not from uninfected mites stimulate TNF- α and the neutrophil-chemoattractant KC production by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Altogether, these results describe the modification of the mite behavior under filarial infection and suggest that the immunomodulatory capacity of the mite may be modified by the presence of the parasite, hindering its defensive ability towards the vertebrate host.

  15. Modelling environmental factors correlated with podoconiosis: a geospatial study of non-filarial elephantiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The precise trigger of podoconiosis — endemic non-filarial elephantiasis of the lower legs — is unknown. Epidemiological and ecological studies have linked the disease with barefoot exposure to red clay soils of volcanic origin. Histopathology investigations have demonstrated that silicon, aluminium, magnesium and iron are present in the lower limb lymph node macrophages of both patients and non-patients living barefoot on these clays. We studied the spatial variation (variations across an area) in podoconiosis prevalence and the associated environmental factors with a goal to better understanding the pathogenesis of podoconiosis. Methods Fieldwork was conducted from June 2011 to February 2013 in 12 kebeles (administrative units) in northern Ethiopia. Geo-located prevalence data and soil samples were collected and analysed along with secondary geological, topographic, meteorological and elevation data. Soil data were analysed for chemical composition, mineralogy and particle size, and were interpolated to provide spatially continuous information. Exploratory, spatial, univariate and multivariate regression analyses of podoconiosis prevalence were conducted in relation to primary (soil) and secondary (elevation, precipitation, and geology) covariates. Results Podoconiosis distribution showed spatial correlation with variation in elevation and precipitation. Exploratory analysis identified that phyllosilicate minerals, particularly clay (smectite and kaolinite) and mica groups, quartz (crystalline silica), iron oxide, and zirconium were associated with podoconiosis prevalence. The final multivariate model showed that the quantities of smectite (RR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.35, 5.73; p = 0.007), quartz (RR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.26; p = 0.001) and mica (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) in the soil had positive associations with podoconiosis prevalence. Conclusions More quantities of smectite, mica and quartz within the soil

  16. Modelling environmental factors correlated with podoconiosis: a geospatial study of non-filarial elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Molla, Yordanos B; Wardrop, Nicola A; Le Blond, Jennifer S; Baxter, Peter; Newport, Melanie J; Atkinson, Peter M; Davey, Gail

    2014-06-20

    The precise trigger of podoconiosis - endemic non-filarial elephantiasis of the lower legs - is unknown. Epidemiological and ecological studies have linked the disease with barefoot exposure to red clay soils of volcanic origin. Histopathology investigations have demonstrated that silicon, aluminium, magnesium and iron are present in the lower limb lymph node macrophages of both patients and non-patients living barefoot on these clays. We studied the spatial variation (variations across an area) in podoconiosis prevalence and the associated environmental factors with a goal to better understanding the pathogenesis of podoconiosis. Fieldwork was conducted from June 2011 to February 2013 in 12 kebeles (administrative units) in northern Ethiopia. Geo-located prevalence data and soil samples were collected and analysed along with secondary geological, topographic, meteorological and elevation data. Soil data were analysed for chemical composition, mineralogy and particle size, and were interpolated to provide spatially continuous information. Exploratory, spatial, univariate and multivariate regression analyses of podoconiosis prevalence were conducted in relation to primary (soil) and secondary (elevation, precipitation, and geology) covariates. Podoconiosis distribution showed spatial correlation with variation in elevation and precipitation. Exploratory analysis identified that phyllosilicate minerals, particularly clay (smectite and kaolinite) and mica groups, quartz (crystalline silica), iron oxide, and zirconium were associated with podoconiosis prevalence. The final multivariate model showed that the quantities of smectite (RR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.35, 5.73; p = 0.007), quartz (RR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.26; p = 0.001) and mica (RR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13; p < 0.001) in the soil had positive associations with podoconiosis prevalence. More quantities of smectite, mica and quartz within the soil were associated with podoconiosis prevalence. Together with previous

  17. Power and Limitations of Anhydrosugars to Trace Historical Natural and Anthropogenic Inputs of charcoal BC to Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchouarn, P.; Kuo, L.; Brandenberger, J. M.; Andresen, C. S.; Kjaer, K. H.; Dalton, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plant-derived chars are the solid residues from incomplete combustion of plant materials. They are an important constituent in the black carbon (BC) continuum, an array of diverse pyrogenic organic materials ranging from slightly charred biomass (low temperature) to highly condensed refractory soot (high temperature). The characterization and quantification of plant-derived chars in environmental samples is a challenging process due to the heterogeneous nature of these substances. Most of the BC methods using oxidative approaches that seek to remove non-BC materials are limited in their potential to identify and quantify plant-derived chars because of their relative labilities compared to the condensed BC forms such as soot. Anhydrosugars, such as levoglucosan and its isomers (mannosan and galactosan), have generated considerable interest in recent years in BC research because they are exclusive thermal degradation products of cellulose/hemicellulose and are produced in different proportions in chars and smokes from low temperature combustion of different plant species permitting some source discrimination in environmental samples (e.g. softwoods vs. hardwoods; gymnosperms vs. angiosperms). We show here a synthesis of several years of work using levoglucosan in diverse environments to reconstruct local to large-scale environmental change from climate-driven wildfires to human and accidental fires. For example, in the Hood Canal (WA), the striking consistency between the fluxes of levoglucosan, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) Index, and the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), suggests that climate oscillations may play a role in the historical wildfire activities and thus influence the inputs of char-BC to the Puget Sound. Similarly, peaks in anhydrosugars in a sediment core from Lake Copenhagen record large-scale accidental fires in the city of Copenhagen during the early and late 18th Century, and help constrain the geochronology of the core beyond the

  18. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents

    PubMed Central

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D.; Stewart, Lucy C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Butterfield, David A.; Huber, Julie A.; Holden, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7–40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4+ generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments. PMID:27547206

  19. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D; Stewart, Lucy C; Morrison, Hilary G; Butterfield, David A; Huber, Julie A; Holden, James F

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7-40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4 (+) generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  20. Natural IgM Blockade Limits Infarct Expansion and Left Ventricular Dysfunction in a Swine Myocardial Infarct Model

    PubMed Central

    Sihag, Smita; Haas, Michael S.; Kim, Karen M.; Guerrero, J. Luis; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Alicot, Elisabeth M.; Schuerpf, Franziska; Gottschall, James D.; Puro, Robyn J.; Madsen, Joren C.; Sachs, David H.; Newman, Walter; Carroll, Michael C.; Allan, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, treatment of acute coronary occlusion inevitably results in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Circulating natural IgM has been shown to play a significant role in mouse models of I/R injury. A highly conserved self-antigen, non-muscle myosin heavy chain II (NMHC-II), has been identified as a target of pathogenic IgM. We hypothesized that a monoclonal antibody (m21G6) directed against NMHC-II may inhibit IgM binding and reduce injury in a pre-clinical model of myocardial infarction (MI). Thus, our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous m21G6 treatment in limiting infarct expansion, troponin release, and left ventricular dysfunction in a swine MI model. Methods and Results MGH miniature swine underwent occlusion of the mid left anterior descending coronary artery for 60min, followed by 1h, 5d, or 21d reperfusion. Specificity and localization of m21G6 to injured myocardium were confirmed using fluorescently labeled m21G6. Treatment with m21G6 prior to reperfusion resulted in a 49% reduction in infarct size (p<0.005) and a 61% reduction in troponin-T levels (p<0.05) in comparison to saline controls at 5d reperfusion. Furthermore, m21G6 treated animals recovered 85.4% of their baseline left ventricular function as measured by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D TTE) in contrast to 67.1% in controls at 21d reperfusion (p<0.05). Conclusions Treatment with m21G6 significantly reduced infarct size and troponin-T release, and led to marked preservation of cardiac function in our study. Overall, these findings suggest that pathogenic IgM blockade represents a valid therapeutic strategy in mitigating myocardial I/R injury. PMID:26671971

  1. Molecular evidence on the occurrence of co-infection with Pichia guilliermondii and Wuchereria bancrofti in two filarial endemic districts of India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF), a vector-borne parasitic disease, is endemic in several parts of India and mostly affects the poor or those with a low-income. The disease results in huge numbers of morbidities, disabilities, and deaths every year. Association of co-infection with other pathogens makes the condition more severe. Although co-infection is becoming a growing area of research, it is yet to emerge as a frontier research topic in filarial research specifically. This study reports the occurrence of a fungal infection in a large number of patients suffering from bancroftian filariasis in two districts of West Bengal, India. Methods Nocturnal blood samples from filarial patients containing parasites and fungus were initially co-cultured, and further the fungus was isolated and characterized. Molecular identification of the isolate was carried out by PCR-based selective amplification and sequencing of highly-conserved D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA, whereas pathogenicity was determined by amplification of the RPS0 gene. A phylogenetic tree was constructed to study the relationship between the isolate and common pathogenic yeasts. The isolate was studied for antibiotic sensitivity, whereas morphological characterization was performed by microscopic techniques. Results The isolate was identified as Pichia guilliermondii and this fungus was found to exist in co-infection with Wuchereria bancrofti in filarial patients. The fungus showed resistance to azole antifungals, griseofulvin, and, amphotericin B, whereas significant susceptibility was evident in cases of nystatin and cycloheximide. A total of 197 out of 222 patients showed this co-infection. Conclusion This study revealed, for the first time, that P. guilliermondii exists as a co-infection in microfilaraemic individuals living in a filarial endemic zone. The findings are important and have relevance to human health, especially for filarial patients. PMID:24708881

  2. Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon

    1997-01-01

    The fact that two of the original articles by this year's Nobel laureates were published in Nature bears witness to the pivotal role of this journal in documenting pioneering discoveries in all areas of science. The prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded to immunologists Peter C. Doherty (University of Tennessee) and Rolf M. Zinkernagel (University of Zurich, Switzerland), honoring work that, in the 1970s, laid the foundation for our current understanding of the way in which our immune system differentiates between healthy cells and virus-infected ones that are targeted for destruction (p 465 in the October 10 issue of vol. 383). Three researchers share the Chemistry award for their discovery of C60 buckminsterfullerenes. The work by Robert Curl, Richard Smalley (both at Rice University), and Harry Kroto (University of Sussex, UK) has led to a burst of new approaches to materials development and in carbon chemistry (p 561 of the October 17 issue of vol. 383). This year's Nobel prize in physics went to three U.S. researchers, Douglas Osheroff (Stanford University) and David M. Lee and Robert C. Richardson (Cornell University), who were honored for their work on superfluidity, a frictionless liquid state, of supercooled 3He (p 562 of the October 17 issue of vol. 383).

  3. Does 24bp Duplication of Human CHIT1 Gene (Chitotriosidase1) Predispose to Filarial Chyluria? A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Shriya; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Gangwar, Pravin K; Waseem, Mohammad; Gupta, Prashant; Sankhwar, Satya N; Purkait, Bimalesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chyluria which is endemic in many parts of the world is mainly caused by Wuchereria bancrofti. CHIT1 (chitotriosidase) is produced by macrophages and plays an important role in the defense against chitin containing pathogen such as filarial parasite. Variation in the coding region with 24 bp duplication allele results in reduced CHIT1 activity that enhance the survival of parasite which may play a role in the occurrence of disease. Aim To examine the role of 24bp duplication of CHIT1 gene in patients of filarial chyluria (FC). Materials and Methods A case-control study was carried out where 155 confirmed FC patients and equal number of age-, sex- and residence-matched controls without any symptoms or signs of lymphatic filariasis, confirmed by negative immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and IgG/IgM combo rapid antibody test, from a hospital-based population were enrolled. Filarial aetiology was confirmed on the basis of DEC-provocative test (Giemsa staining), ICT and IgG/IgM- antifiarial antibody test. The patients positive by either of these tests were enrolled as FC cases. 24bp duplication in CHIT1 gene in FC was detected by the product size 99bp of amplified gene using polymerase chain reaction. Results The mean ages of patients and controls were 38.25±12.09 and 35.45±12.53 years, respectively while male: female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean duration of illness in chyluria patients was 62.81±60.83 months and mean number of episodes was 2.54±1.11. Homozygous wild type, heterozygous and homozygous mutant frequencies were 10.3%, 81.3% and 8.4% in FC patients and 18.7%, 75.5%, and 5.8% in controls, respectively. The 24bp duplication in CHIT1 gene showed a significant association in Heterozygous (HT) genotype with Odd Ratio (OR) of 1.95, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) (1.01-3.77); p=0.04. However, the homozygous mutant genotype (TT) was found to be non-significant with OR of 2.61, 95% CI (0.91-7.45); p=0.07. The combination of both HT+TT was also found

  4. Presence and formation of heme and occurrence of certain heme proteins in the filarial parasite Setaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R A; Raj, R K

    1998-12-09

    There is currently renewed interest in the biological significance of heme proteins. The most common heme proteins include hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and redox enzymes such as catalase and peroxidase. Setaria digitata is a cattle filarial parasite, which is devoid of typical cytochrome systems. However, studies showed activities of delta Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), delta Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD), and heme oxygenase in appreciable amounts, suggesting the presence of necessary equipment for the biosynthesis of heme. This is further confirmed by the end product inhibition of ALAS by heme and the observation of the death of the parasite by succinyl acetone, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of heme. Though typical cytochrome systems are absent, microsomal cytochrome P 450 and elevated levels of heme containing enzymes such as catalase and peroxidase are present in the parasite. A unique hemoglobin is also detected which shows a difference in biological functions from the host system and that of the much-studied nematode parasite Ascaris sum.

  5. An unidentified filarial species and its impact on fitness in wild populations of the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes).

    PubMed

    Wisely, Samantha M; Howard, JoGayle; Williams, Steven A; Bain, Odile; Santymire, Rachel M; Bardsley, Katherine D; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2008-01-01

    Disease can threaten the restoration of endangered species directly by substantially decreasing host survival or indirectly via incremental decreases in survival and reproduction. During a biomedical survey of reintroduced populations of the highly endangered black-footed ferret from 2002 to 2005, microfilariae discovered in the blood were putatively identified as Dirofilaria immitis, and widespread screening was initiated using a commercially available antigen-based ELISA test. A subset of animals (n = 16) was screened for D. immitis using a highly sensitive PCR-based assay. Microfilariae were also molecularly and morphologically characterized. Of 198 animals at six reintroduction sites, 12% had positive results using the ELISA test. No antigen-positive animals which were screened via PCR (n = 11) had positive PCR results, and all antigen-positive animals (n = 24) were asymptomatic. No significant differences were found in body mass of antigen-positive (male: 1223 +/- 82 g [mean +/- SD], female: 726 +/- 75 g) vs. antigen-negative (male: 1,198 +/- 119 g, female: 710 +/- 53 g) individuals (P = 0.4). Antigen prevalence was lower in juveniles (3%) than adults (12%; P = 0.03), and higher in in situ, captive-reared individuals (33%) than wild-born individuals (10%; P = 0.005). Morphologic analysis of microfilariae revealed they were neither D. immitis nor any other previously characterized North American species. PCR amplification of the 5S spacer region of rDNA revealed that the filarial sequence shared only 76% identity with D. immitis. This previously unidentified filarial sequence was present in all antigen positive animals (11 of 11 tested). It appears that black-footed ferrets were infected with a previously undescribed species of filaria whose antigen cross-reacted with the ELISA assay, although further analysis is needed to make a conclusive statement. Nonetheless, this previously undescribed filaria does not appear to threaten recovery for this highly

  6. The Cooperative Development of Planning and Management Systems in Higher Education: The Nature, Scope and Limitations of the WICHE Planning and Management Systems Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Ben; Jones, Dennis

    This paper discusses the nature, scope, and limitations of the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education's Planning and Management Systems Program (WICHE-PMS). (1) It summarizes the goals of the program which are the improvement of (a) higher education institutional management, (b) statewide coordination, and (c) decisionmaking processes…

  7. Resources, Environment, and Population: The Nature of Future Limits. Population Bulletin, Vol. 34, No. 3, August 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridker, Ronald G.; Cecelski, Elizabeth W.

    To determine the current status and possible trends in the balance between global population growth and natural resources, the bulletin examines demands presented by population and economic growth at various periods throughout history. Periods examined are the recent past, the present to the year 2025, and the long term. Factors focused upon…

  8. Resources, Environment, and Population: The Nature of Future Limits. Population Bulletin, Vol. 34, No. 3, August 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridker, Ronald G.; Cecelski, Elizabeth W.

    To determine the current status and possible trends in the balance between global population growth and natural resources, the bulletin examines demands presented by population and economic growth at various periods throughout history. Periods examined are the recent past, the present to the year 2025, and the long term. Factors focused upon…

  9. Detection for cross-reactive proteins in filarial worm Setaria equina, MCF-7 human breast cancer, and Huh-7 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mahmoud; Sakran, Thabet

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the cross-reactive proteins in filarial parasite adult worm Setaria equina and two different tumor cell lines (MCF-7 human breast cancer and Huh-7 hepatoma cells). This was performed using rabbit anti-S. equina extract (SeqE) or DEC (Diethylcarbamazine citrate) polyclonal IgG antibodies by indirect ELISA and western blotting. The results indicated cross-reactive bands at 70 and 75 kDa in all extracts by anti-DEC and SeqE antibodies, respectively. In addition, the expression of 70 kDa protein was only reduced in filarial worms and Huh-7 after in vitro DEC treatment compared to the control.

  10. Nature of the self-limiting effect in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Lifshitz, N.

    1987-09-28

    We propose a mechanism for the self-limiting effect which occurs in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten. When W is deposited by silicon reduction of tungsten hexafluoride WF/sub 6/, the deposition suddenly ceases at an early stage. No such effect is observed in the deposition of Mo using analogous chemistry. We believe the self-limiting effect is due to the formation of nonvolatile lower fluorides of tungsten. Our hypothesis is supported by secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies which indicate the presence of fluorine (approx. =3%) in W films, whereas in Mo films the concentration of fluorine is an order of magnitude lower.

  11. Nature of the self-limiting effect in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, N.

    1987-09-01

    We propose a mechanism for the self-limiting effect which occurs in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten. When W is deposited by silicon reduction of tungsten hexafluoride WF6, the deposition suddenly ceases at an early stage. No such effect is observed in the deposition of Mo using analogous chemistry. We believe the self-limiting effect is due to the formation of nonvolatile lower fluorides of tungsten. Our hypothesis is supported by secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies which indicate the presence of fluorine (≊3%) in W films, whereas in Mo films the concentration of fluorine is an order of magnitude lower.

  12. Patent Filarial Infection Modulates Malaria-Specific Type 1 Cytokine Responses in an IL-10-Dependent Manner in a Filaria/Malaria Coinfected Population 1

    PubMed Central

    Metenou, Simon; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Siaka Y.; Coulibaly, Yaya I.; Diallo, Abdallah A.; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Michel E.; Sanogo, Dramane; Doumbia, Salif S.; Wagner, Marissa; Traoré, Sekou F.; Klion, Amy; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of filarial infections on malaria-specific immune responses was investigated in Malian villages co-endemic for filariasis and malaria. Cytokines were measured from plasma and Ag-stimulated whole blood from individuals with Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) and/or Mansonella perstans (Mp) infections (Fil+; n = 19) and those without evidence of filarial infection (Fil−; n = 19). Plasma levels of IL-10 (geometric mean [GM] 22.8 vs. 10.4) were higher in Fil+ compared with Fil−, whereas levels of IP-10 were lower in Fil+ (GM = 66.3 vs. 110.0). Fil+ had higher levels of spontaneously secreted IL-10 (59.3 vs. 6.8 pg/ml) and lower levels of IL-2 (1.0 vs. 1.2 pg/ml) than did Fil−. Although there were no differences in levels of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B-induced cytokines between the two groups, Fil+ mounted a lower IL-12p70 (1.11 vs. 3.83 pg/ml; p = 0.007), IFN-γ (5.44 vs. 23.41 pg/ml; p = 0.009), and IP-10 (29.43 vs. 281.7 pg/ml; p = 0.007) response following malaria Ag (MalAg) stimulation compared with Fil−. In contrast, Fil+ had a higher MalAg-specific IL-10 response (7318 pg/ml vs. 3029 pg/ml; p = 0.006) compared with those without filarial infection. Neutralizing Ab to IL-10 (but not to TGFβ) reversed the downregulated MalAg-specific IFN-γ and IP-10 (p < 0.001) responses in Fil+. Together these data demonstrate that filarial infections modulate the Plasmodium falciparum-specific IL-12p70/IFN-γ secretion pathways known to play a key role in resistance to malaria and thata they do so in an IL-10-dependent manner. PMID:19561105

  13. Community-based study to assess the efficacy of DEC plus ALB against DEC alone on bancroftian filarial infection in endemic areas in Tamil Nadu, south India.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, R; Sunish, I P; Mani, T R; Munirathinam, A; Arunachalam, N; Satyanarayana, K; Dash, A P

    2006-06-01

    As part of the Global Programme for Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF), India is implementing mass drug administration (MDA) with annual single dose of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) with and without albendazole (ALB). The impact of MDAs on filarial infections and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections was assessed during a 3-year period in two communities, one with DEC + ALB and the other with DEC alone. Prior to each MDA (during 2001, 2002 and 2003), filarial indices (microfilaraemia and antigenaemia) were assessed from blood samples of 450-650 persons aged 2-25 years and STH infections in stool samples (Kato-Katz method) from 325 to 500 children aged 9-10 years. Mosquitoes resting indoors were collected to determine the filarial infection status. The microfilaraemia prevalence decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in both arms, with the highest decline in the DEC + ALB arm (72%vs. 51%). Decline in micrefilaria intensity was also higher in the DEC + ALB arm (81.4%vs. 48.5%). In this arm alone, the antigenaemia prevalence was reduced significantly (62%; P < 0.001). The reduction in STH prevalence was lower in the DEC alone arm (6.5%; NS) than in the DEC + ALB arm (70.9%; P < 0.001). Also, the egg reduction in DEC alone arm was only half that of DEC + ALB arm (49%vs. 97%). Our community-based follow-up study showed higher and sustained benefits with regard to filarial and STH infections for the two-drug arm over the DEC alone arm. The trends suggest that at least 10 MDAs may be necessary to achieve the goal of elimination.

  14. Limiting the Temperatures in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in Warm Climates. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 7/74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, P.

    Formulas used in the calculation of cooling loads and indoor temperatures are employed to demonstrate the influence of various building parameters--such as thermal transmittance (U-value), solar absorptivity, and thermal storage--on the indoor thermal environment. The analysis leads to guidance on ways of limiting temperatures in naturally…

  15. Limiting the Temperatures in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in Warm Climates. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 7/74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, P.

    Formulas used in the calculation of cooling loads and indoor temperatures are employed to demonstrate the influence of various building parameters--such as thermal transmittance (U-value), solar absorptivity, and thermal storage--on the indoor thermal environment. The analysis leads to guidance on ways of limiting temperatures in naturally…

  16. Female sperm limitation in natural populations of a sexual/asexual mating complex (Poecilia latipinna, Poecilia formosa).

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Schlupp, Ingo; Plath, Martin

    2008-06-23

    In sperm-dependent sexual/asexual mating systems, male mate choice is critical for understanding the mechanisms behind apparent stability observed in natural populations. The gynogenetic Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa) requires sperm from sexual males (e.g. Poecilia latipinna) to trigger embryogenesis, but inheritance is strictly maternal. Consequently, males should try to avoid or reduce the cost of mating with asexuals. We investigated male mate choice by documenting the presence of sperm in natural populations and found that a higher proportion of sexual females had sperm than asexuals. In addition, among those females that had sperm, sexuals had more sperm than asexuals. Our results hint at a role for male mate choice as a stabilizing factor in such systems.

  17. Pyrosequencing Using SL and 5S rRNA as Molecular Markers for Identifying Zoonotic Filarial Nematodes in Blood Samples and Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Sanpool, Oranuch; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M; Rodpai, Rutchanee; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-05-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is principally caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, and Brugia malayi. The other two filarial nematode species, Brugia pahangi and Dirofilaria immitis, possibly cause human zoonotic diseases. We propose the development of a PCR assay linked with DNA pyrosequencing as a rapid tool to identify W. bancrofti, B. malayi, B. pahangi, and D. immitis in blood samples and mosquitoes. Primers targeting the fragment of the 5S ribosomal RNA and spliced leader sequences were newly designed and developed to identify these four filarial nematodes. Analytical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Pyrosequencing determination of nucleotide variations within 36 nucleotides for B. malayi and B. pahangi, and 32 nucleotides for W. bancrofti and D. immitis is sufficient for differentiation of those filarial nematodes, and for detection of intraspecies genetic variation of B. malayi. This analysis could detect a single B. malayi, B. pahangi, W. bancrofti, and D. immitis microfilaria in blood samples. Overall, the PCR-linked pyrosequencing-based method was faster than direct sequencing and less expensive than real-time PCR or direct sequencing. This is the possibility of choice that can be applied in a high-throughput platform for identification and surveillance of reservoirs and vectors infected with lymphatic filaria in endemic areas.

  18. Solvent effect on the third order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting ability of betanin natural dye extracted from red beet root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thankappan, Aparna; Thomas, Sheenu; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the solvent effect on the third order optical nonlinearity of betanin natural dye extracted from red beet root and their third order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been studied using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. The third order nonlinearity of these samples are dominated by nonlinear absorption, which leads to strong optical limiting and their strength is influenced by the solvent used, suggesting that betanin natural dyes are promising candidate for the development of photonic nonlinear optic devices.

  19. Methods applied to the in vitro primary toxicology testing of natural products: state of the art, strengths, and limits.

    PubMed

    Bunel, Valérian; Ouedraogo, Moustapha; Nguyen, Anh Tho; Stévigny, Caroline; Duez, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The present review attempts to build up a comprehensive picture of the major primary techniques used to screen and assess the cytotoxicity of plant complex mixtures. These can be based on metabolic activity, on membrane integrity, on morphological features, on cell growth; the type of cell death can also be established from more or less specific events (e.g., apoptosis, autophagy, DNA damage detection, reactive oxygen species involvement). This review will discuss the benefits, the difficulties, and the challenges that may occur along cytotoxicity testing of raw extracts and isolated natural compounds. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. On the assessment of the nature of open star clusters and the determination of their basic parameters with limited data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Baume, Gustavo; Seleznev, Anton F.; Costa, Edgardo

    2017-07-01

    Our knowledge of stellar evolution and of the structure and chemical evolution of the Galactic disk largely builds on the study of open star clusters. Because of their crucial role in these relevant topics, large homogeneous catalogues of open cluster parameters are highly desirable. Although efforts have been made to develop automatic tools to analyse large numbers of clusters, the results obtained so far vary from study to study, and sometimes are very contradictory when compared to dedicated studies of individual clusters. In this work we highlight the common causes of these discrepancies for some open clusters, and show that at present dedicated studies yield a much better assessment of the nature of star clusters, even in the absence of ideal data-sets. We make use of deep, wide-field, multi-colour photometry to discuss the nature of six strategically selected open star clusters: Trumpler 22, Lynga 6, Hogg 19, Hogg 21, Pismis 10 and Pismis 14. We have precisely derived their basic parameters by means of a combination of star counts and photometric diagrams. Trumpler 22 and Lynga 6 are included in our study because they are widely known, and thus provided a check of our data and methodology. The remaining four clusters are very poorly known, and their available parameters have been obtained using automatic tools only. Our results are in some cases in severe disagreement with those from automatic surveys.

  1. Thermal preferences and limits of Triatoma brasiliensis in its natural environment--field observations while host searching.

    PubMed

    Catalá, Silvia; Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Diotaiuti, Lileia

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this work was to explore the thermal relationship between foraging Triatoma brasiliensis and its natural habitat during the hottest season in the state of Ceará, Brazil. The thermal profiles were determined using infrared analysis. Although the daily temperature of rock surfaces varied in a wide range, T. brasiliensis selected to walk through areas with temperatures between 31.7-40.5ºC. The temperature of T. brasiliensis body surface ranged from 32.8-34.4ºC, being higher in legs than the abdomen. A strong relationship was found between the temperature of the insect and the temperature of rock crevices where they were hidden (r: 0.96, p < 0.05). The species was active at full sunlight being a clear example of how the light-dark rhythm may be altered, even under predation risk. Our results strongly suggest a thermal borderline for T. brasiliensis foraging activity near 40ºC. The simultaneous determination of insect body and rock temperatures here presented are the only obtained in natural habitats for this or other triatomines.

  2. Smooth ROC curves and surfaces for markers subject to a limit of detection using monotone natural cubic splines.

    PubMed

    Bantis, Leonidas E; Tsimikas, John V; Georgiou, Stelios D

    2013-09-01

    The use of ROC curves in evaluating a continuous or ordinal biomarker for the discrimination of two populations is commonplace. However, in many settings, marker measurements above or below a certain value cannot be obtained. In this paper, we study the construction of a smooth ROC curve (or surface in the case of three populations) when there is a lower or upper limit of detection. We propose the use of spline models that incorporate monotonicity constraints for the cumulative hazard function of the marker distribution. The proposed technique is computationally stable and simulation results showed a satisfactory performance. Other observed covariates can be also accommodated by this spline-based approach. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. CD25+ natural regulatory T cells are critical in limiting innate and adaptive immunity and resolving disease following respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Debbie C P; Harker, James A E; Tregoning, John S; Atabani, Sowsan F; Johansson, Cecilia; Schwarze, Jürgen; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2010-09-01

    Regulatory CD4(+) T cells have been shown to be important in limiting immune responses, but their role in respiratory viral infections has received little attention. Here we observed that following respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, CD4(+) Foxp3(+) CD25(+) natural regulatory T-cell numbers increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung, mediastinal lymph nodes, and spleen. The depletion of CD25(+) natural regulatory T cells prior to RSV infection led to enhanced weight loss with delayed recovery that was surprisingly accompanied by increased numbers of activated natural killer cells in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on day 8 postinfection. Increased numbers of neutrophils were also detected within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and correlated with elevated levels of myeloperoxidase as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). CD25(+) natural regulatory T-cell depletion also led to enhanced numbers of proinflammatory T cells producing IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the lung. Despite these increases in inflammatory responses and disease severity, the viral load was unaltered. This work highlights a critical role for natural regulatory T cells in regulating the adaptive and innate immune responses during the later stages of lung viral infections.

  4. Identification and characterization of novel membrane-bound PRL protein tyrosine phosphatases from Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Yadav, Smita; Rathaur, Sushma

    2015-11-01

    A significant amount of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity was detected in the detergent-soluble membrane-bound fraction of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite. The membrane-bound PTP activity was significantly inhibited when the adult parasites were exposed to compounds having antifilarial activity like aspirin and SK7 as well as phenylarsine oxide, a specific PTP inhibitor suggesting that this activity is stress regulated. Further, this enzyme was purified as a single protein of apparently 21 kDa using two different chromatographic techniques. The MALDI-MS/MS analysis of its peptides showed closest match with protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (Aedes aegypti). This purified enzyme (named as PRL) showed maximum activity at pH 5.5/37 °C and hydrolysed para nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP) at the highest rate followed by O-P-L-tyrosine and O-P-L-threonine. It showed significant inhibition by specific inhibitors of PTP such as sodium orthovanadate, phenylarsine oxide and ammonium molybdate and was activated by dithiothreitol (DTT). The active site modification studies suggested involvement of cysteine, arginine, histidine and aspartic acid in the catalytic activity of PRL. The activity of S. cervi PRL was also found to be resistant towards the external oxidative stress. Thus, S. cervi PRL could be taken as a potential target for the management of human lymphatic filariasis.

  5. Health-Seeking Behaviors and Self-Care Practices of People with Filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Ram Kumar; Sherchand, Jeevan Bahadur; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Ranabhat, Kamal; Pokharel, Amrit; Devkota, Pramila; Mishra, Durga; Ghimire, Yadu Chandra; Gelal, Khageshwor; Paudel, Rajan; Wagle, Rajendra Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lymphatic filariasis is endemic in Nepal. This study aimed to investigate health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of people with filarial Lymphoedema in Nepal. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using qualitative methods in three endemic districts. Twenty-three patients with current Lymphoedema were recruited in the study. Results. Hydrocele was found to be a well-known condition and a major health problem in the studied communities. People with Lymphoedema primarily sought health care from traditional healers, whereas sometimes home-based care was their first treatment. Later Ayurvedic and allopathic hospital-based care were sought. Respondents reported various psychological problems such as difficulty in engaging in sexual intercourse, anxiety, worry and stress, depression, low self-esteem, feeling weak, fear of being abandoned, and fear of transmitting disease to the children. Standard foot care practices except washing were largely absent. Conclusions. Lymphoedema in the limbs and hydrocele were found to be major health problems. The traditional health care providers were the first contact of care for the majority of respondents. Only a few patients had been practicing standard foot care practices. PMID:25694785

  6. Immune recognition of excretory and secretory products of the filarial nematode Onchocerca ochengi in cattle and human sera.

    PubMed

    Djafsia, B; Ndjonka, D; Dikti, J V; van Hoorn, S; Manchang, K; Brattig, N; Liebau, E

    2015-09-11

    Excretory-secretory (ES) products of nematodes and other helminths are the first molecules to interact with cell surfaces and soluble proteins within the host. In the present study, ES products of the filarial nematode Onchocerca ochengi were investigated as a model for Onchocerca volvulus, the causative agent of river blindness. These products were collected from adult and larval stages in vitro over a period of 7 days, to compare their immunological recognition in cattle and human sera, infected with species of Onchocerca. From the 156 sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) ES products or extracts, protein bands showed different patterns between female and male products. A comparison of antibody recognition of the different ES products by sera from infected cattle and humans, when analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), revealed a relatively higher reactivity of the female somatic extract to human and cattle sera compared to ES products of both genders. Nevertheless, similar reactivity of the O. ochengi male and female ES products to human and cattle sera was noticed. As a result, the interaction of ES products with the surface of the host and immune system often led to host responses, including the generation of antibodies. The O. ochengi ES products are therefore good sources of potential immunogenic proteins. The identification of these ES products is in progress, with the aim of developing vaccine candidates against human onchocerciasis.

  7. Modulation of human T cell responses and macrophage functions by onchocystatin, a secreted protein of the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus.

    PubMed

    Schönemeyer, A; Lucius, R; Sonnenburg, B; Brattig, N; Sabat, R; Schilling, K; Bradley, J; Hartmann, S

    2001-09-15

    Immune responses of individuals infected with filarial nematodes are characterized by a marked cellular hyporesponsiveness and a shift of the cytokine balance toward a Th2/Th3 response. This modulation of cellular immune responses is considered as an important mechanism to avoid inflammatory immune responses that could eliminate the parasites. We investigated the immunomodulatory potential of a secreted cysteine protease inhibitor (onchocystatin) of the human pathogenic filaria Onchocerca volvulus. Recombinant onchocystatin (rOv17), a biologically active cysteine protease inhibitor that inhibited among others the human cysteine proteases cathepsins L and S, suppressed the polyclonally stimulated and the Ag-driven proliferation of human PBMC. Stimulated as well as unstimulated PBMC in the presence of rOv17 produced significantly more IL-10, which was paralleled in some situations by a decrease of IL-12p40 and preceded by an increase of TNF-alpha. At the same time, rOv17 reduced the expression of HLA-DR proteins and of the costimulatory molecule CD86 on human monocytes. Neutralization of IL-10 by specific Abs restored the expression of HLA-DR and CD86, whereas the proliferative block remained unaffected. Depletion of monocytes from the PBMC reversed the rOv17-induced cellular hyporeactivity, indicating monocytes to be the target cells of immunomodulation. Therefore, onchocystatin has the potential to contribute to a state of cellular hyporesponsiveness and is a possible pathogenicity factor essential for the persistence of O. volvulus within its human host.

  8. Development and testing of a de novo clinical staging system for podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis).

    PubMed

    Tekola, Fasil; Ayele, Zewdu; Mariam, Dereje Haile; Fuller, Claire; Davey, Gail

    2008-10-01

    To develop and test a robust clinical staging system for podoconiosis, a geochemical disease in individuals exposed to red clay soil. We adapted the Dreyer system for staging filarial lymphoedema and tested it in four re-iterative field tests conducted in an area of high-podoconiosis prevalence in Southern Ethiopia. The system has five stages according to proximal spread of disease and presence of dermal nodules, ridges and bands. We measured the 1-week repeatability and the inter-observer agreement of the final staging system. The five-stage system is readily understood by community workers with little health training. Kappa for 1-week repeatability was 0.88 (95% CI 0.80-0.96), for agreement between health professionals was 0.71 (95% CI 0.60-0.82), while that between health professionals and community podoconiosis agents without formal health training averaged 0.64 (95% CI 0.52-0.78). This simple staging system with good inter-observer agreement and repeatability can assist in the management and further study of podoconiosis.

  9. Bioefficacy of plant-mediated gold nanoparticles and Anthocepholus cadamba on filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus (Insecta: Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Naresh; Jeyalalitha, T; Murugan, K; Madhiyazhagan, P

    2013-03-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases in India, e.g., malaria, dengue, chikungunya, filariasis, and Japanese encephalitis cause thousands of deaths per year. Mosquito control is to enhance the health and quality of life of county residents and visitors through the reduction of mosquito populations. Mosquito control is of serious concern in developing countries like India due to the lack of general awareness, development of resistance, and socioeconomic reasons. Noble metal nanoparticles have been used because of their unique optical properties; especially gold and silver have a broad absorption band in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cymbopogan citratus is an ecofriendly approach for safer environment. C. citratus leaf broth was a good reducing agent that converted chloroauric acid (HAuCl(4)) to metal gold and further heating converted it into nanoparticles. Characterization using UV spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, particle size analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the particles are gold nanoparticles ranging between 10 and 110 nm with an average particles size of 20 nm. Further biosynthesized gold nanoparticles and Anthocephalus cadamba were experimented for the larvicidal effect on the filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus. Results showed that the gold nanoparticles are much toxic than the plant extract. Observed lethal concentrations (LC(50) and LC(90)) were 1.08 and 2.76 ppm for gold nanoparticles and 21.82 and 79.52 ppm for the third instar of C. quinquefasciatus.

  10. Blood parasites of two Costa Rican amphibians with comments on detection and microfilaria density associated with adult filarial worm intensity.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Starks, Hilary A

    2008-08-01

    The 2 objectives of this study were: (1) to compare parasite detectability in blood smears obtained from toe-clips versus the heart from amphibian hosts; and (2) to test whether microfilariae density is correlated with adult filarial worm intensity. We examined blood parasites of 2 species of amphibians, Rana vaillanti (n = 45) and Eleutherodactylus fitzingeri (n = 36), from Costa Rica collected during the summer of 2003. Separate blood smears were obtained from toe-clips and the heart during necrospy. Eight species of blood parasites were identified from R. vaillanti and 1 from E. fitzingeri. Each parasite species was counted in a 2 x 2.2-cm2 area on each blood smear, and the density of host red blood cells (RBCs) was estimated using a sub-sampling approach, allowing parasite infections to be expressed as individuals per RBC. The detection failure rate for toe-cut smears ranged from 71-100% (x = 92.3%) and from 0-9% (x = 2.4%) for heart smears, depending on parasite species. The density of RBCs was significantly higher in smears produced from heart samples and may explain the differences in detectability. Foleyellides striatus microfilariae densities (per RBC) were significantly correlated with adult female worm intensity (R2 = 0.32, P = 0.011).

  11. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the filarial nematode Micipsella numidica from the hare Lepus europaeus in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, S; Galuppi, R; Fraulo, M; Savini, F; Morandi, B; Cancrini, G; Poglayen, G

    2016-07-01

    The genus Micipsella comprises three species of filariae to date identified in lagomorphs only, whereas the other genera belonging to the subfamily Splendidofilariinae are described as parasites of birds, reptiles and mammals. In the present study seven specimens of Micipsella numidica (Seurat, 1917), collected from the hare Lepus europaeus in Italy, were characterized genetically by molecular amplification of the mitochondrial genes (12S rDNA; cox1) and the 5S rDNA gene spacer region. Phylogenetic trees inferred using available sequences from filariae and those identified in this study evidenced a close relationship between M. numidica and Splendidofilariinae of other mammals and reptiles (Rumenfilaria andersoni and Madathamugadia hiepei). The present findings, apart from adding new data about the hosts in Italy, support the taxonomic position of M. numidica and highlight the substantial biological and molecular differences existing between Splendidofilariinae and other Onchocercidae. The study also contributes to our knowledge of the molecular/genetic diagnosis of filarial parasites of veterinary and medical concern in any vertebrate or invertebrate host.

  12. Use of Iodogen and sulfosuccinimidobiotin to identify and isolate cuticular proteins of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R M; Henry, R W; Weil, G J

    1989-03-01

    The cuticle of filarial nematodes is a dynamic structure which may be an important target for protective host immune responses. Prior studies have employed radioiodination of intact parasites to demonstrate that the collagenous cuticle of filariids contains relatively few exposed proteins, some of which are stage and/or species-specific. In the present study, we have used sulfo-NHS-biotin to label and affinity purify cuticular components of living adult Brugia malayi. Results obtained by this method were compared with the widely used Iodogen method of surface radioiodination by SDS-PAGE analysis of detergent-solubilized worms and by ultrastructural analysis. Both labeling methods produced very similar electrophoretic patterns with major doublets at 70 and 100 kDa, a major band at 25 kDa, and minor bands between 60-200 kDa. Ultrastructural analysis showed that both methods labeled components throughout all levels of the parasite cuticle; underlying somatic tissues were not labeled. The biotinylated components were isolated from the total parasite extract by affinity chromatography on an avidin matrix. Further characterization of these surface-associated proteins may lead to improved methods for the control of filariasis.

  13. Larvicidal and pupicidal activity of extracts and fractionates of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms against the filarial vector Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, P; Lalitha, P; Aarthi, N

    2012-11-01

    Petroleum ether, acetone, ethyl acetate, aqueous extract, methanol and ethanol fractionate of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms was tested for their larvicidal efficacy against the different instars (I, II, III and IV) and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of the treatment. The extracts showed a dose-dependent toxicity to larvae. The toxicity of the extracts decreased with increase in larval stage. Ethanol fractionate of E. crassipes showed the highest larvicidal and pupicidal activity against C. quinquefasciatus compared to other solvent extracts and fractionates with LC(50) 71.43, 94.68,120.42, 152.15 and 173.35 ppm for I, II, III, IV and pupae, respectively. Presence of metabolites like flavonoids, alkaloids, anthroquinones and anthocyanins in the tested extracts might be the reason for the larvicidal and pupicidal activity of the plant extracts and fractionates of waterhyacinth. Mosquito-repellent activity was not exhibited by these extracts at the tested concentrations. The results demonstrated the potential of the aquatic plant E. crassipes in the successful control of the filarial vector C. quinquefasciatus.

  14. Detection and molecular characterization of the mosquito-borne filarial nematode Setaria tundra in Danish roe deer (Capreolus capreolus).

    PubMed

    Enemark, Heidi Larsen; Oksanen, Antti; Chriél, Mariann; le Fèvre Harslund, Jakob; Woolsey, Ian David; Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman

    2017-04-01

    Setaria tundra is a mosquito-borne filarial nematode of cervids in Europe. It has recently been associated with an emerging epidemic disease causing severe morbidity and mortality in reindeer and moose in Finland. Here, we present the first report of S. tundra in six roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) collected between October 2010 and March 2014 in Denmark. The deer originated from various localities across the country: the eastern part of the Jutland peninsular and four locations on the island Zealand. With the exception of one deer, with parasites residing in a transparent cyst just under the liver capsule, worms (ranging from 2 to >20/deer) were found free in the peritoneal cavity. The worms were identified as S. tundra by morphological examination and/or molecular typing of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and cox1 genes, which showed 99.1-99.8% identity to previously published S. tundra isolates from Europe. Roe deer are generally considered as asymptomatic carriers and their numbers in Denmark have increased significantly in recent decades. In light of climatic changes which result in warmer, more humid weather in Scandinavia greater numbers of mosquitoes and, especially, improved conditions for development of parasite larvae in the mosquito vectors are expected, which may lead to increasing prevalence of S. tundra. Monitoring of this vector-borne parasite may thus be needed in order to enhance the knowledge of factors promoting its expansion and prevalence as well as predicting disease outbreaks.

  15. Resource limitation in natural populations of phytophagous insects. A long-term study case with the chestnut weevil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debouzie, Domitien; Desouhant, Emmanuel; Oberli, Frantz; Menu, Frédéric

    2002-03-01

    The chestnut weevil, Curculio elephas (Gyll.), is a non-outbreaking species whose populations and food resources, the European chestnut, Castanea sativa, can be precisely defined. Thirteen and 17 generations of this insect were studied in two isolated sites. Field observations and experiments allowed us to estimate the absolute abundance, availability and use of chestnuts for weevil oviposition, and the number of weevil females emerging per site. Unavailable chestnuts were defined as the fruits either infested first by the chestnut moth ( Cydia splendana) larvae (because of competition between the two species) or those avoided by chestnut weevil females when selecting their egg-laying sites, independently of chestnut moth presence. From a third to a half of the chestnuts were not available on the average for weevil infestation. Only one-fourth, on the average, of those available for oviposition were actually used by chestnut weevil females. Regardless of year and site, the number of available chestnuts per weevil female was higher than that of weevil-infested fruits per female, considering global food resources independently of their temporal variation in quality. However, realized fecundity of weevil females was positively correlated with the mean number of available chestnuts per female. We concluded that food resources can be limiting without being fully exploited by females because of temporal variation in chestnut quality.

  16. Natural Risks at the Bottom Side of Ameca River, in the State Limits of Jalisco and Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinedo, K. G.; Maciel, R.; Pena, L. E.; García García, E. X.; Ramos Chavez, C.

    2016-12-01

    At world-wide level, the population centers are exposed to natural risks and more those that are located to borders of the rivers, where hydrometeorological and geologic phenomenon are conjugated, and even increased by the action of the man. From 1911 to 2015, the disasters registered in the world due to flood by river overflowing were 2 701, with 2 545 affected 224 110, of which 60 229 747 lost their homes and 4 449 031 deads, causing therefore an economic loss of approximately $549 052 761 dollars. The case of study is the low part of the Ameca River, the one of the main rivers of the states of Jalisco and Nayarit in the west zone of Mexico. It is interesting, since it have its mouth near the tourist area (with considerable affluence at national level), with infrastructure (airport and bridges) and towns of both referred states; as well because at the pass of the years, this river have had overflows affecting municipalities, bridges and loss of mangrove swamp. In order to determine the feasible impacts to happen with the overflow of the Ameca River, the aerial photographs of area of study and satellite images were analyzed (historical and present), likewise information of the river basin physical environment generated by INEGI with special emphasis in the low part of the river basin and a campaign of work field, to delimit the zones that have shown some affectation. The objective of this investigation is to contribute to the risk analysis of the adjacent localities to the river, with the purpose of diminishing the impact in the population. As preliminary results appear maps with boundaries of paleo-channels, which mark the zone of influence during overflows of the Ameca River, the towns which can be affected and the population exposed.

  17. Unravelling the escape dynamics and the nature of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds in tidally limited star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.; Jung, Christof

    2017-02-01

    The escape mechanism of orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit is investigated. A three degrees of freedom model is used for describing the dynamical properties of the Hamiltonian system. The gravitational field of the star cluster is represented by a smooth and spherically symmetric Plummer potential. We distinguish between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. The Smaller ALignment Index (SALI) method is used for determining the regular or chaotic nature of the orbits. The basins of escape are located and they are also correlated with the corresponding escape time of the orbits. Areas of bounded regular or chaotic motion and basins of escape were found to coexist in the (x, z) plane. The properties of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs), located in the vicinity of the index-1 Lagrange points L1 and L2, are also explored. These manifolds are of paramount importance as they control the flow of stars over the saddle points, while they also trigger the formation of tidal tails observed in star clusters. Bifurcation diagrams of the Lyapunov periodic orbits as well as restrictions of the Poincaré map to the NHIMs are deployed for elucidating the dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle points. The extended tidal tails, or tidal arms, formed by stars with low velocity which escape through the Lagrange points are monitored. The numerical results of this work are also compared with previous related work.

  18. Assessing the transformation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifers with limited potential for natural attenuation: added values of compound-specific carbon isotope analysis and groundwater dating.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Helena I F; Aeppli, Christoph; Kipfer, Rolf; Berg, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The evaluation of biotransformation of chlorinated ethenes (CEs) in contaminated aquifers is challenging when variable redox conditions and groundwater flow regime are limiting factors. By using compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis (C-CSIA) and ³H-³He based groundwater dating, we assessed three CE-contaminated field sites that differed in groundwater flow velocities, redox conditions, and level of contamination. CE isotopic signatures and carbon isotopic mass balances were applied to quantify CE transformation, whereas groundwater dating allowed determining degradation timescales and assessing hydrodynamic regimes. The combination of these techniques enabled at all field sites to indicate zones within the aquifers where CE dechlorination preferably occurred, sometimes even to metabolites of no toxic concern. However, the natural transformation processes were insufficient to mitigate the entire CE contamination at the studied sites. Such situations of limited transformation are worldwide far more common than sites where optimal natural (mainly redox) conditions are enabling complete CEs degradation. Despite such constraints for natural transformation, this study showed that even under non-favorable biogeochemical CEs degradation, the combination of CSIA and groundwater dating provide valuable information to the understanding of the fate of the CEs, thus, being an important contribution in the definition of efficient remediation measures at any given biogeochemical conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancing the limiting sensitivity of optical/infrared interferometry with natural guide star adaptive optics: happy couples or bad bed-fellows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Alexander D.; Haniff, Christopher A.

    2012-07-01

    Enhancing the limiting sensitivity of optical/infrared interferometry is one of the "holy grails" of interferometric research. While the use of adaptive optics is in principle attractive, a number of issues suggest that its ability to enhance the sensitivity of ground-based arrays is less clear. Indeed, the ultimate sensitivity of an array may be limited by any of the multiple active and photon-hungry subsystems that comprise its whole. In this paper we investigate the limiting sensitivity of interferometer arrays using unit telescopes of moderate size (i.e. with D <= 4 m) equipped with natural guide star adaptive optics systems. We focus on how to realise the best limiting sensitivity for observations in the near-infrared. We nd that for Vega-type targets, i.e. those that have similar magnitudes at all wavelengths, the use of an adaptive optics system can provide enchancements in limiting sensitivity of up to 1.5 magnitudes. However, for redder targets this improvement can decrease dramatically, and very similar sensitivity (Δmlimiting <= 0.5) can be obtained with arrays using 1.5m-class apertures and tip-tilt correction alone.

  20. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more

  1. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but thismore » diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of

  2. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    ABSTRACT

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict thatNeis<107. An argument for highNevalues for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimateNecorrectly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution ifNe×sis >1, wheresis the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifsis above 10-7or so.

    IMPORTANCEBecause bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local

  3. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict thatNeis<107. An argument for highNevalues for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be duemore » to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimateNecorrectly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution ifNe×sis >1, wheresis the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifsis above 10-7or so. IMPORTANCEBecause bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of the

  4. Use of a simple DNA extraction method for high-throughput detection of filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti in the vector mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Vasuki, V; Subramanian, S; Hoti, S L; Jambulingam, P

    2012-12-01

    Molecular xenomonitoring of filariasis is the detection of filarial DNA in mosquitoes by PCR and a useful tool for monitoring transmission. DNA extraction coupled with PCR allows rapid detection of the presence or absence of the filarial parasite in vector mosquitoes compared to traditional method of manual dissection of the mosquito and observation for parasite under a microscope. A Tris-EDTA (TE) buffer-based boiling method of DNA extraction developed earlier by us was employed and explored for its suitability in the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in pools of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in real-time PCR assay. In this preliminary study, 1,000 laboratory-reared C. quinquefasciatus were made into 40 pools, each containing 25 mosquitoes spiked with 2mf. DNA from the first 20 pools was extracted using Qiagen DNeasy blood and tissue kit as standard, and the other 20 pools were subjected to TE buffer-based boiling method of DNA extraction. When the results (Ct values) obtained for DNA samples extracted by TE buffer-based boiling method were compared with that of the DNA samples extracted by the standard Qiagen method, they were found to be highly concordant without any significant difference (P = 0.9). Besides being cost- and time-effective, this protocol was found useful in extracting filarial DNA from two other mosquito genus Aedes and Anopheles, species of which have been reported as important vectors of W. bancrofti in other endemic regions of the world. Thus, TE buffer-based boiling method of DNA extraction is useful for the high-throughput detection of W. bancrofti in vector mosquitoes.

  5. Identification of tgh-2, a Filarial Nematode Homolog of Caenorhabditis elegans daf-7 and Human Transforming Growth Factor β, Expressed in Microfilarial and Adult Stages of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Gregory, William F.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2000-01-01

    A novel member of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family has been identified in the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi by searching the recently developed Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database produced by the Filarial Genome Project. Designated tgh-2, this new gene shows most similarity to a key product regulating dauer larva formation in Caenorhabditis elegans (DAF-7) and to the human down-modulatory cytokine TGF-β. Homology to DAF-7 extends throughout the length of the 349-amino-acid (aa) protein, which is divided into an N-terminal 237 aa, including a putative signal sequence, a 4-aa basic cleavage site, and a 108-aa C-terminal active domain. Similarity to human TGF-β is restricted to the C-terminal domain, over which there is a 32% identity between TGH-2 and TGF-β1, including every cysteine residue. Expression of tgh-2 mRNA has been measured over the filarial life cycle. It is maximal in the microfilarial stage, with lower levels of activity around the time of molting within the mammal, but continues to be expressed by mature adult male and female parasites. Expression in both the microfilaria, which is in a state of arrested development, and the adult, which is terminally differentiated, indicates that tgh-2 may play a role other than purely developmental. This is consistent with our observation that TGH-2 is secreted by adult worms in vitro. Recombinant TGH-2 expressed in baculovirus shows a low level of binding to TGF-β-receptor bearing mink lung epithelial cells (MELCs), which is partially inhibited (16 to 39%) with human TGF-β, and activates plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 transcription in MELCs, a marker for TGF-β-mediated transduction. Further tests will be required to establish whether the major role of B. malayi TGH-2 (Bm-TGH-2) is to modulate the host immune response via the TGF-β pathway. PMID:11035752

  6. Identification and biochemical characterization of macrophage migration inhibitory factor-2 (MIF-2) homologue of human lymphatic filarial parasite, Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Sharma, Rohit; Hoti, S L

    2015-02-01

    Homologues of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (hMIF) have been reported from vertebrates, invertebrates and prokaryotes, as well as plants. Filarial parasites produce two homologues of hMIF viz., MIF-1 and MIF-2, which play important role in the host immune modulation. Earlier, we have characterized MIF-1 (Wba-mif-1) from Wuchereria bancrofti, the major causal organism of human lymphatic filariasis. Here, we are reporting the molecular and biochemical characterization of MIF-2 from this parasite (Wba-mif-2). The complete Wba-mif-2 gene and its cDNA were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The size of Wba-mif-2 gene and cDNA were found to be 4.275 kb and 363 bp, respectively. The gene annotation revealed the presence of a large intron of 3.912 kb interspersed with two exons of 183 bp and 180 bp. The alignment of derived amino acid sequences of Wba-MIF-2 with Wba-MIF-1 showed 44% homology. The conserved CXXC oxido-reductase catalytic site present in Wba-mif-1 was found absent in Wba-mif-2 coding sequence. The amplified Wba-mif-2 cDNA was cloned into an expression vector pRSET-B and transformed into salt inducible Escherichia coli strain GJ1158. The expressed recombinant Wba-MIF-2 protein showed tautomerase activity against L-dopachrome methyl ester and the specific activity was determined to be 18.57±0.77 μmol/mg/min. Three known inhibitors of hMIF tautomerase activity significantly inhibited the tautomerase activity of recombinant Wba-MIF-2. Although the conserved CXXC oxido-reductase motif is absent in Wba-mif-2, the recombinant protein showed significant oxido-reductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, possibly because of the presence of vicinal cysteine residues.

  7. Development of lymphatic filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti (Spirurida: Onchocercidae) in mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) fed artificially on microfilaremic blood.

    PubMed

    Paily, K P; Hoti, S L; Balaraman, K

    2006-11-01

    The efficiency of laboratory colonies of mosquitoes such as Anopheles stephensi Liston, Aedes aegypti (L.) Liverpool strain, Ae. aegypti wild type, Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles, Culex sitiens Wiedemann, and Armigeres subalbatus Coquillett in supporting the development of Wuchereria bancrofti (Cobbold) (Spirurida: Onchocercidae) microfilariae to infective larvae was investigated. The mosquitoes were fed on heparinized microfilaremic human blood by using a membrane-feeding unit with Parafilm as membrane. The rate of infection, parasite development, and parasite burden were compared with that in the known vector mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. Cx. quinquefasciatus showed the highest percentage of infection, followed by Ae. aegypti Liverpool strain and An. stephensi. The rate of development of the parasite was more or less similar in all the three species, and infective larvae were found on day 13. When the larvae were harvested on day 17, Cx. quinquefasciatus yielded the highest numbers, followed by Ae. aegypti Liverpool strain and An. stephensi. The percentage of infection was low, and the development was slow in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus compared with the other susceptible species. The parasite developed to second-stage larvae only by day 22 and to infective larvae by day 28. When 2-wk-old Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were fed on microfilaremic blood, they could develop the parasite to infective larvae by day 13 postfeeding. All other species of mosquitoes tested were found to be refractory to parasite development. It is shown that Cx. quinquefasciatus is the most suitable mosquito host for the production of infective larvae. However, Ae. aegypti Liverpool strain, which is commonly used for Brugia malayi filarial parasite, also can be used for generation of W. bancrofti infective larvae to circumvent the problem of maintaining two mosquito species.

  8. Molecular Characterization of NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase from Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Lymphatic Filarial Parasite Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic filarial parasite, Brugia malayi contains Wolbachia endobacteria that are essential for development, viability and fertility of the parasite. Therefore, wolbachial proteins have been currently seen as the potential antifilarial drug targets. NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is characterized as a promising drug target in several organisms due to its crucial, indispensable role in DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. We report here the cloning, expression and purification of NAD+-dependent DNA ligase of Wolbachia endosymbiont of B. malayi (wBm-LigA) for its molecular characterization. wBm-LigA has all the domains that are present in nearly all the eubacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases such as N-terminal adenylation domain, OB fold, helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and BRCT domain except zinc-binding tetracysteine domain. The purified recombinant protein (683-amino acid) was found to be biochemically active and was present in its native form as revealed by the circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra. The purified recombinant enzyme was able to catalyze intramolecular strand joining on a nicked DNA as well as intermolecular joining of the cohesive ends of BstEII restricted lamda DNA in an in vitro assay. The enzyme was localized in the various life-stages of B. malayi parasites by immunoblotting and high enzyme expression was observed in Wolbachia within B. malayi microfilariae and female adult parasites along the hypodermal chords and in the gravid portion as evident by the confocal microscopy. Ours is the first report on this enzyme of Wolbachia and these findings would assist in validating the antifilarial drug target potential of wBm-LigA in future studies. PMID:22815933

  9. New Insights into the Evolution of Wolbachia Infections in Filarial Nematodes Inferred from a Large Range of Screened Species

    PubMed Central

    Barbuto, Michela; Martin, Coralie; Lo, Nathan; Uni, Shigehiko; Landmann, Frederic; Baccei, Sara G.; Guerrero, Ricardo; de Souza Lima, Sueli; Bandi, Claudio; Wanji, Samuel; Diagne, Moustapha; Casiraghi, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Background Wolbachia are intriguing symbiotic endobacteria with a peculiar host range that includes arthropods and a single nematode family, the Onchocercidae encompassing agents of filariases. This raises the question of the origin of infection in filariae. Wolbachia infect the female germline and the hypodermis. Some evidences lead to the theory that Wolbachia act as mutualist and coevolved with filariae from one infection event: their removal sterilizes female filariae; all the specimens of a positive species are infected; Wolbachia are vertically inherited; a few species lost the symbiont. However, most data on Wolbachia and filaria relationships derive from studies on few species of Onchocercinae and Dirofilariinae, from mammals. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the Wolbachia distribution testing 35 filarial species, including 28 species and 7 genera and/or subgenera newly screened, using PCR, immunohistochemical staining, whole mount fluorescent analysis, and cocladogenesis analysis. (i) Among the newly screened Onchocercinae from mammals eight species harbour Wolbachia but for some of them, bacteria are absent in the hypodermis, or in variable density. (ii) Wolbachia are not detected in the pathological model Monanema martini and in 8, upon 9, species of Cercopithifilaria. (iii) Supergroup F Wolbachia is identified in two newly screened Mansonella species and in Cercopithifilaria japonica. (iv) Type F Wolbachia infect the intestinal cells and somatic female genital tract. (v) Among Oswaldofilariinae, Waltonellinae and Splendidofilariinae, from saurian, anuran and bird respectively, Wolbachia are not detected. Conclusions/Significance The absence of Wolbachia in 63% of onchocercids, notably in the ancestral Oswaldofilariinae estimated 140 mya old, the diverse tissues or specimens distribution, and a recent lateral transfer in supergroup F Wolbachia, modify the current view on the role and evolution of the endosymbiont and their hosts. Further

  10. Rapid assessment of the geographical distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Uganda, by screening of schoolchildren for circulating filarial antigens.

    PubMed

    Onapa, A W; Simonsen, P E; Baehr, I; Pedersen, E M

    2005-03-01

    To permit improvements in the targeting of control activities, the geographical distribution of lymphatic filariasis in Uganda was assessed by using a rapid immunochromatographic card test to check school-aged children for Wuchereria bancrofti-specific circulating filarial antigens (CFA). Survey sites were selected to represent the various ecological and topographical diversities in the country. Overall, 17,533 children from 76 sites were examined. CFA-positive cases were detected at 31 of the sites, with prevalences ranging from 0.4% to 30.7%. There appeared to be strikingly more lymphatic filariasis in the north of the country than in the south. The main focus was north of the Victoria Nile, where 27 (66%) of 41 sites had CFA-positive cases, often at high prevalences. Only four (11.4%) of the 35 sites south of the Victoria Nile had CFA-positive cases, and all four were along the western rift valley and had relatively low CFA prevalences. Geostatistical interpolation was used to create a map showing the geographical distribution of CFA prevalences in Uganda (by ordinary kriging), and to assess the population exposed to W. bancrofti transmission. Estimates based on population data from 2002 indicated that approximately 8.7 million people (35.3% of the national population) lived in areas where > 1% of the school-aged children were CFA-positive. CFA prevalences generally decreased with increasing altitude, and no CFA-positive cases were found at sites that were > 1300 m above sea level. Although it gives an under-estimate of the overall community prevalence (a fact that should be taken into account when interpreting the present results and comparing them with the results of other surveys), the screening of schoolchildren for CFA was found to be a simple and useful approach for mapping the geographical distribution of lymphatic filariasis.

  11. A Deep Sequencing Approach to Comparatively Analyze the Transcriptome of Lifecycle Stages of the Filarial Worm, Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Jun; Ghedin, Elodie; Berriman, Matthew; McQuillan, Jacqueline; Holroyd, Nancy; Mayhew, George F.; Christensen, Bruce M.; Michalski, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Developing intervention strategies for the control of parasitic nematodes continues to be a significant challenge. Genomic and post-genomic approaches play an increasingly important role for providing fundamental molecular information about these parasites, thus enhancing basic as well as translational research. Here we report a comprehensive genome-wide survey of the developmental transcriptome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. Methodology/Principal Findings Using deep sequencing, we profiled the transcriptome of eggs and embryos, immature (≤3 days of age) and mature microfilariae (MF), third- and fourth-stage larvae (L3 and L4), and adult male and female worms. Comparative analysis across these stages provided a detailed overview of the molecular repertoires that define and differentiate distinct lifecycle stages of the parasite. Genome-wide assessment of the overall transcriptional variability indicated that the cuticle collagen family and those implicated in molting exhibit noticeably dynamic stage-dependent patterns. Of particular interest was the identification of genes displaying sex-biased or germline-enriched profiles due to their potential involvement in reproductive processes. The study also revealed discrete transcriptional changes during larval development, namely those accompanying the maturation of MF and the L3 to L4 transition that are vital in establishing successful infection in mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Characterization of the transcriptional program of the parasite's lifecycle is an important step toward understanding the developmental processes required for the infectious cycle. We find that the transcriptional program has a number of stage-specific pathways activated during worm development. In addition to advancing our understanding of transcriptome dynamics, these data will aid in the study of genome structure and organization by facilitating the identification of

  12. Occupational and public health considerations for work-hour limitations policy regarding public health workers during response to natural and human-caused disasters.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Murray R

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the occupational health considerations that might impact the health and wellbeing of public health workers during responses to natural (eg, floods and hurricanes) and human-caused (eg, terrorism, war, and shootings) disasters. There are a number of articles in the medical literature that argue the impact of how working long hours by house staff physicians, nurses, and first-responders may pose health and safety concerns regarding the patients being treated. The question examined here is how working long hours may pose health and/or safety concerns for the public health workers themselves, as well as to those in the communities they serve. The health problems related to sleep deprivation are reviewed. Current policies and legislations regarding work-hour limitations are examined. Policy implications are discussed.

  13. Migratory phase of Litomosoides sigmodontis filarial infective larvae is associated with pathology and transient increase of S100A9 expressing neutrophils in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Vallarino-Lhermitte, Nathaly; Lefoulon, Emilie; Nieguitsila, Adélaïde; Specht, Sabine; Carlin, Leo M.; Martin, Coralie

    2017-01-01

    Filarial infections are tropical diseases caused by nematodes of the Onchocercidae family such as Mansonella perstans. The infective larvae (L3) are transmitted into the skin of vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding vectors. Many filarial species settle in the serous cavities including M. perstans in humans and L. sigmodontis, a well-established model of filariasis in mice. L. sigmodontis L3 migrate to the pleural cavity where they moult into L4 around day 9 and into male and female adult worms around day 30. Little is known of the early phase of the parasite life cycle, after the L3 is inoculated in the dermis by the vector and enters the afferent lymphatic vessels and before the moulting processes in the pleural cavity. Here we reveal a pulmonary phase associated with lung damage characterized by haemorrhages and granulomas suggesting L3 reach the lung via pulmonary capillaries and damage the endothelium and parenchyma by crossing them to enter the pleural cavity. This study also provides evidence for a transient inflammation in the lung characterized by a very early recruitment of neutrophils associated with high expression levels of S100A8 and S100A9 proteins. PMID:28486498

  14. Targeting Filarial Abl-like Kinases: Orally Available, Food and Drug Administration–Approved Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Are Microfilaricidal and Macrofilaricidal

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Elise M.; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Steel, Cathy; Dolan, Michael A.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Elimination of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis is targeted for 2020. Given the coincident Loa loa infections in Central Africa and the potential for drug resistance development, the need for new microfilaricides and macrofilaricides has never been greater. With the genomes of L. loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Wuchereria bancrofti, and Brugia malayi available, new drug targets have been identified. Methods. The effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib on B. malayi adult males, adult females, L3 larvae, and microfilariae were assessed using a wide dose range (0–100 µM) in vitro. Results. For microfilariae, median inhibitory concentrations (IC50 values) on day 6 were 6.06 µM for imatinib, 3.72 µM for dasatinib, and 81.35 µM for nilotinib; for L3 larvae, 11.27 µM, 13.64 µM, and 70.98 µM, respectively; for adult males, 41.6 µM, 3.87 µM, and 68.22 µM, respectively; and for adult females, 42.89 µM, 9.8 µM, and >100 µM, respectively. Three-dimensional modeling suggests how these tyrosine kinase inhibitors bind and inhibit filarial protein activity. Conclusions. Given the safety of imatinib in humans, plans are underway for pilot clinical trials to assess its efficacy in patients with filarial infections. PMID:25657255

  15. High level expression of a glutamate-gated chloride channel gene in reproductive tissues of Brugia malayi may explain the sterilizing effect of ivermectin on filarial worms☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ben Wen; Rush, Amy C.; Weil, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCl) are targets for avermectin/milbemycin (A/M) anthelmintics such as ivermectin that cause paralysis of somatic and pharyngeal muscles in gastrointestinal nematodes. Ivermectin is useful for onchocerciasis control programs because of its activity against microfilariae that often cause ocular disease and severe dermatitis. However, mechanisms responsible for reduced microfilaria production by adult worms following ivermectin treatment are poorly understood. We synthesized subunit-specific RNA probes for the Brugia malayi GluCl gene avr-14 (BmAVR-14) to localize expression of this gene in adult filarial worms. Both subunits of BmAVR-14 exhibited very similar expression patterns. In female worms, strong expression signals were detected in the ovary, developing embryos and lateral hypodermal chords, with moderate expression in the uterus wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae. These genes were also highly expressed in adult male worms (in spermatogonia, in the wall of the vas deferens, and in the lateral chords, but not in mature spermatozoa). In addition, avr-14 was highly expressed in somatic muscles adjacent to the terminal end of the vas deferens which contains mature sperm. These results show that avr-14 is highly expressed in B. malayi developing embryos and reproductive tissues, and they provide evidence for the involvement of GluCl in gamete production and embryogenesis in filarial worms. This may explain the observed suppression of microfilaria (Mf) production by female worms following treatment with avermectin/milbemycin anthelmintics. PMID:25057456

  16. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J.; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  17. Duplex Doppler sonographic assessment of the effects of diethylcarbamazine and albendazole therapy on adult filarial worms and adjacent host tissues in Bancroftian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Omar; El Setouhy, Maged; Ahmed, Ehab S; Kandil, Amr M; Ramzy, Reda M R; Helmy, Hanan; Weil, Gary J

    2004-10-01

    We used duplex Doppler sonography to assess effects of diethylcarbamazine and albendazole therapy (DEC/ALB) on adult Wuchereria bancrofti in vivo. The study was performed in clinically normal Egyptian adults with blood microfilaria counts > 80/mL. Motile adult worms were observed before treatment in dilated scrotal lymphatic vessels in 28 of 36 men (78%) and over the proximal extremities in 5 of 22 women (23%). Most worm nests were inactivated in the months following treatment (90% at 12 months). Circulating filarial antigen levels (a marker for living adult worms) also fell dramatically following treatment. Some men had intrascrotal calcifications and/or non-palpable hydroceles detectable by ultrasound before they were treated. New hydroceles and intrascrotal calcifications appeared after treatment in many cases. However, most of these were transient and of no clinical significance. Prevelance rates for hydrocele and intrascrotal calcifications 24 months after treatment were essentially the same as those prior to treatment. These results show that DEC/ALB is highly active against adult W. bancrofti. They also suggest that host responses to dying adult worms are important in the pathogenesis of filarial hydroceles.

  18. Bears in Eden, or, this is not the garden you're looking for: Margaret Cavendish, Robert Hooke and the limits of natural philosophy.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Ian

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates Margaret Cavendish's characterization of experimental philosophers as hybrids of bears and men in her 1666 story The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. By associating experimental philosophers, in particular Robert Hooke and his microscope, with animals familiar to her readers from the sport of bear-baiting, Cavendish constructed an identity for the fellows of the Royal Society of London quite unlike that which they imagined for themselves. Recent scholarship has illustrated well how Cavendish's opposition to experimental philosophy is linked to her different natural-philosophical, political and anthropological ideas. My contribution to this literature is to examine the meanings both of bears in early modern England and of microscopes in experimental rhetoric, in order to illustrate the connection that Cavendish implies between the two. She parodied Hooke's idea that his microscope extended his limited human senses, and mocked his aim that by so doing he could produce useful knowledge. The bear-men reflect inhuman ambition and provide a caution against ignoring both the order of English society and the place of humans in nature.

  19. Midgut Barrier Imparts Selective Resistance to Filarial Worm Infection in Culex pipiens pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Erickson, Sara M.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex thrive in temperate and tropical regions worldwide, and serve as efficient vectors of Bancroftian lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by Wuchereria bancrofti in Asia, Africa, the West Indies, South America, and Micronesia. However, members of this mosquito complex do not act as natural vectors for Brugian LF caused by Brugia malayi, or for the cat parasite B. pahangi, despite their presence in South Asia where these parasites are endemic. Previous work with the Iowa strain of Culex pipiens pipiens demonstrates that it is equally susceptible to W. bancrofti as is the natural Cx. p. pipiens vector in the Nile Delta, however it is refractory to infection with Brugia spp. Here we report that the infectivity barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens is the mosquito midgut, which inflicts internal and lethal damage to ingested microfilariae. Following per os Brugia exposures, the prevalence of infection is significantly lower in Cx. p. pipiens compared to susceptible mosquito controls, and differs between parasite species with <50% and <5% of Cx. p. pipiens becoming infected with B. pahangi and B. malayi, respectively. When Brugia spp. mf were inoculated intrathoracically to bypass the midgut, larvae developed equally well as in controls, indicating that, beyond the midgut, Cx. p. pipiens is physiologically compatible with Brugia spp. Mf isolated from Cx. p. pipiens midguts exhibited compromised motility, and unlike mf derived from blood or isolated from the midguts of Ae. aegypti, failed to develop when inoculated intrathoracically into susceptible mosquitoes. Together these data strongly support the role of the midgut as the primary infection barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens. Examination of parasites recovered from the Cx. p. pipiens midgut by vital staining, and those exsheathed with papain, suggest that the damage inflicted by the midgut is subcuticular and disrupts internal tissues. Microscopic studies of these worms

  20. Limit of detection studies for application to natural product identification using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brkljača, Robert; Urban, Sylvia

    2015-01-02

    In the pursuit of new natural products, the demand to rapidly identify compounds present, in ever decreasing amounts, in complex crude extracts has become a limiting factor. Despite improvements in HPLC-NMR hardware and pulse sequences, no extensive limit of detection (LOD) investigations have been reported for the acquisition of 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments acquired through HPLC-NMR. In this study the LOD for five key 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments have been established, using two reference compounds, including the on-flow (WET 1D proton), stop-flow (WET1D proton), gCOSY, HSQCAD and gHMBCAD NMR experiments. The LOD for all of the NMR experiments were within the range of 700ng to 1mg for the set of fixed experimental parameters implemented. For principle components in a complex multi-component mixture, this would allow for in situ compound identification. HPLC-NMR analysis was employed to investigate the principle components present in a marine brown alga crude extract, Cystophora subfarcinata.

  1. Spatial clustering of filarial transmission before and after a Mass Drug Administration in a setting of low infection prevalence.

    PubMed

    Washington, Charles H; Radday, Jeanne; Streit, Thomas G; Boyd, Heather A; Beach, Michael J; Addiss, David G; Lovince, Rodrigue; Lovegrove, Maribeth C; Lafontant, Jack G; Lammie, Patrick J; Hightower, Allen W

    2004-05-05

    increase in distance from the residence of a person who was antigen-positive in 2000 was associated a 4.68 unit decrease in antifilarial IgG1 level in 2001, controlling for other factors (p = 0.04). DISCUSSION: Antifilarial antibody assays can be used as a measure of filarial exposure. Our results suggest that micro-scale spatial heterogeneity exists in LF exposure and infection. Treatment appeared to be associated with reduced exposure at the sub-community level, suggesting the need to achieve high and homogeneous coverage. Public health messages should note the benefits of having one's neighbors receive treatment with antifilarial drugs.

  2. Spatial clustering of filarial transmission before and after a Mass Drug Administration in a setting of low infection prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Charles H; Radday, Jeanne; Streit, Thomas G; Boyd, Heather A; Beach, Michael J; Addiss, David G; Lovince, Rodrigue; Lovegrove, Maribeth C; Lafontant, Jack G; Lammie, Patrick J; Hightower, Allen W

    2004-01-01

    in distance from the residence of a person who was antigen-positive in 2000 was associated a 4.68 unit decrease in antifilarial IgG1 level in 2001, controlling for other factors (p = 0.04). Discussion Antifilarial antibody assays can be used as a measure of filarial exposure. Our results suggest that micro-scale spatial heterogeneity exists in LF exposure and infection. Treatment appeared to be associated with reduced exposure at the sub-community level, suggesting the need to achieve high and homogeneous coverage. Public health messages should note the benefits of having one's neighbors receive treatment with antifilarial drugs. PMID:15128461

  3. Population genomics of the filarial nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti from mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott T; Reimer, Lisa J; Tisch, Daniel J; King, Christopher L; Christensen, Bruce M; Siba, Peter M; Kazura, James W; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti is a parasitic nematode and the primary cause of lymphatic filariasis--a disease specific to humans. W. bancrofti currently infects over 90 million people throughout the tropics and has been acknowledged by the world health organization as a vulnerable parasite. Current research has focused primarily on the clinical manifestations of disease and little is known about the evolutionary history of W. bancrofti. To improve upon knowledge of the evolutionary history of W. bancrofti, we whole genome sequenced 13 W. bancrofti larvae. We circumvent many of the difficulties of multiple infections by sampling larvae directly from mosquitoes that were experimentally inoculated with infected blood. To begin, we used whole genome data to reconstruct the historical population size. Our results support a history of fluctuating population sizes that can be correlated with human migration and fluctuating mosquito abundances. Next, we reconstructed the putative pedigree of W. bancrofti worms within an infection using the kinship coefficient. We deduced that there are full-sib and half-sib relationships residing within the same larval cohort. Through combined analysis of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes we concluded that this is likely a results of polyandrous mating, the first time reported for W. bancrofti. Lastly, we scanned the genomes for signatures of natural selection. Annotation of putative selected regions identified proteins that may have aided in a parasitic life style or may have evolved to protect against current drug treatments. We discuss our results in the greater context of understanding the biology of an animal with a unique life history and ecology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Identification of a molecular marker for genotyping human lymphatic filarial nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Patra, K P; Ramu, Thangadurai; Hoti, S L; Pragasam, G Siva; Das, P K

    2007-05-01

    In India, Mass Drug Administration is on going towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis in many areas, which might lead to intense selection pressure on the parasite populations and their genetic restructuring. This calls for molecular finger printing of Wuchereria bancrofti parasite populations at national level and monitoring genetic changes in the future. For this purpose a reliable, less expensive, rapid, and reproducible molecular tool is necessary, which is not available for W. bancrofti at this time. We identified robust molecular markers based on the comparison of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles and the genetic data generated from parasite populations collected from areas in Northern (Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh state), Southern (Kozhikode, Kerala State) and Central regions (Jagdalpur, Chattisgarh state) of India, where lymphatic filariasis is endemic for many decades. RAPD profiles for these parasite populations were generated using three different primers and the dendrograms constructed using the profiles were all different. In order to identify appropriate RAPD primer(s), we compared the results of RAPD with the fingerprint profile and genetic data obtained by the more reliable AFLP technique, using the parasite populations from the same areas. RAPD marker (OP8) primer produced phylogenetic data almost similar to that of AFLP analysis. The marker was able to reveal variations between the parasite populations collected from Varanasi, Kozhikode, and Jagdalpur. Most importantly, RAPD primer OP8 produced reproducible results, when tested in three different trials. In view of the limited availability of W. bancrofti parasite DNA, along with a lower cost and ease of performance, RAPD appears to be more suitable compared to AFLP at the present juncture, since complete genome information of this parasite is still not available. Thus, RAPD primer OP8 can be a very useful molecular maker for DNA

  5. Quantification of (226)Ra at environmental relevant levels in natural waters by ICP-MS: Optimization, validation and limitations of an extraction and preconcentration approach.

    PubMed

    Lagacé, François; Foucher, Delphine; Surette, Céline; Clarisse, Olivier

    2017-05-15

    Radium (Ra) at environmental relevant levels in natural waters was determined by ICP-MS after an off-line pre-concentration procedure. The latter consisted of Ra selective elution from potential interfering elements (i.e. other alkaline earth cations: Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) on a series of two different ion exchange resins (AG50W-X8 and Sr-resin). The overall analytical method was optimized according to the instrumental performance, the volume of water sample loaded on resins, and the sample salinity. Longer acquisition time (up to 150 s) was required to ensure stable measurement of Ra by ICP-MS at ultra trace level (1.0pgL(-1)). For a synthetic groundwater spiked with Ra at 10.0pgL(-1), the analytical procedure demonstrated efficient separation of the analyte from its potential interfering elements and a complete recovery, independent of the sample volume tested from 10 up to 100mL. For synthetic seawater spiked at a level of 10.0pgL(-1) of Ra, the total load of salts on the two resins should not exceed 0.35g in order to ensure a complete separation and recovery of Ra. The method was validated on natural waters (i.e. groundwater, freshwater and seawater samples) spiked with Ra at different levels (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0pgL(-1)). Absolute Ra detection limits were determined at 0.020pgL(-1) (0.73mBqL(-1)) and 0.12pgL(-1) (4.4mBqL(-1)) respectively for 60.0mL of freshwater sample and for 10.0mL of seawater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Capabilities and limitations of direct analysis in real time orbitrap mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of synthetic and natural polymers.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Maxime C; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier

    2013-09-30

    Despite the widespread use of direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS), its capabilities in terms of accessible mass range and the types of polymers that can be analysed are not well known. The goal of this work was to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of this ionization technique combined with orbitrap mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry, for the characterization (structural and polydispersity metrics) of various synthetic and natural polymers. The capabilities and limitations of DART-MS (and -MS(2)), using an orbitrap mass spectrometer, for polymer analysis were evaluated using various industrial synthetic polymers and biopolymers. Stainless steel mesh screens secured on a movable rail were used as the sampling surface, onto which 5 μL of various polymers dissolved in tetrahydrofuran were added. Assignment of spectral features and calculation of molecular weight and polydispersity metrics were performed using Polymerix™ software and the results were compared with those obtained by gel-permeation chromatography (GPC). Protonated oligomers and ammonium adducts were instantaneously detected as the major ionisation products in positive ion mode. Only perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs) were ionised in negative mode and detected as [M](-·) ions. Only singly charged molecular species were observed for all oligomers under study, allowing for a rapid determination of the molecular weight and polydispersity metrics of polymers. At elevated DART gas temperatures (400-500°C) the molecular weight and polydispersity metrics compared fairly well with those obtained by GPC, with polymers whose masses ranged from 200 g x mol(-1) to 4000 g x mol(-1). DART-MS allowed the direct and rapid analysis (mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all the polymers were acquired in seconds) based on the exact masses of their [M+H](+) and [M+NH4](+) ions (in the positive mode) or [M](-·) ions (for polymers having a high sensitivity toward electron

  7. Limited World, Limited Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Garrett

    The currently popular issue of natural rights is more complicated than many of its proponents realize. Natural rights, be they of an individual or a nation, do not exist within a social vacuum. When a person or nation asserts a natural right to something, the implication is that someone else is obligated to furnish it. Thus one person's right is a…

  8. Limited World, Limited Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Garrett

    The currently popular issue of natural rights is more complicated than many of its proponents realize. Natural rights, be they of an individual or a nation, do not exist within a social vacuum. When a person or nation asserts a natural right to something, the implication is that someone else is obligated to furnish it. Thus one person's right is a…

  9. Quantifying bid-ask spreads in the Chinese stock market using limit-order book data. Intraday pattern, probability distribution, long memory, and multifractal nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, G.-F.; Chen, W.; Zhou, W.-X.

    2007-05-01

    The statistical properties of the bid-ask spread of a frequently traded Chinese stock listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange are investigated using the limit-order book data. Three different definitions of spread are considered based on the time right before transactions, the time whenever the highest buying price or the lowest selling price changes, and a fixed time interval. The results are qualitatively similar no matter linear prices or logarithmic prices are used. The average spread exhibits evident intraday patterns consisting of a big L-shape in morning transactions and a small L-shape in the afternoon. The distributions of the spread with different definitions decay as power laws. The tail exponents of spreads at transaction level are well within the interval (2,3) and that of average spreads are well in line with the inverse cubic law for different time intervals. Based on the detrended fluctuation analysis, we found the evidence of long memory in the bid-ask spread time series for all three definitions, even after the removal of the intraday pattern. Using the classical box-counting approach for multifractal analysis, we show that the time series of bid-ask spread do not possess multifractal nature.

  10. Limitations and drawbacks of using Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs) as an input to Environmental Licensing in Sao Paulo State: A case study on natural gas pipeline routing

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchhoff, Denis . E-mail: dkirchho@fes.uwaterloo.ca; Montano, Marcelo . E-mail: minduim@sc.usp.br; Ranieri, Victor Eduardo Lima . E-mail: vranieri@sc.usp.br; Dutra de Oliveira, Isabel Silva . E-mail: beldutra@sc.usp.br; Doberstein, Brent . E-mail: bdoberst@fes.uwaterloo.ca; Pereira de Souza, Marcelo . E-mail: mps@sc.usp.br

    2007-05-15

    This article discusses the limitations and implications to environmental management issues posed by the Environmental Licensing approach adopted in Sao Paulo State. In Brazil, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an essential precondition to the Environmental Licensing of activities and, in fact, it has been the most important and required tool for the licensing of projects. However, in 1994 the State of Sao Paulo implemented a simplified instrument called a 'Preliminary Environmental Report' in order to make the environmental licensing process faster. Since then, the Preliminary Environmental Report (PER) has had the role of indicating whether an EIA needs to be elaborated upon or not. The positives and negatives regarding technical, institutional and legal aspects related to the use of Preliminary Environmental Reports (rather than EIA) are discussed using the case study of a high-pressure natural gas pipeline between the cities of Sao Carlos and Porto Ferreira in the State of Sao Paulo. The main conclusion is that the Environmental Licensing process in Sao Paulo should not use PERs as the sole input to decision making about proposed activities, since the PER approach does not guarantee that the proposed activity is environmentally suitable, does not address locational issues or comparison of alternatives, and risk assessment issues are not considered in the earliest stages of assessment.

  11. Nested PCR to detect and distinguish the sympatric filarial species Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonella ozzardi and Mansonella perstans in the Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Tang, Thuy-Huong Ta; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Lanza, Marta; Shelley, Anthony John; Rubio, Jose Miguel; Luz, Sérgio Luiz Bessa

    2010-09-01

    We present filaria-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is based on amplification of first internal transcribed spacer rDNA to distinguish three parasitic filarial species (Onchocerca volvulus, Mansonella ozzardi and Mansonella perstans) that can be found in the Amazon Region. Nested PCR-based identifications yielded the same results as those utilizing morphological characters. Nested PCR is highly sensitive and specific and it detects low-level infections in both humans and vectors. No cross-amplifications were observed with various other blood parasites and no false-positive results were obtained with the nested PCR. The method works efficiently with whole-blood, blood-spot and skin biopsy samples. Our method may thus be suitable for assessing the efficacy of filaria control programmes in Amazonia by recording parasite infections in both the human host and the vector. By specifically differentiating the major sympatric species of filaria, this technique could also enhance epidemiological research in the region.

  12. Stage-specific and species-specific differences in the production of the mRNA and protein for the filarial nematode secreted product, ES-62.

    PubMed

    Stepek, G; Houston, K M; Goodridge, H S; Devaney, E; Harnett, W

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the secreted phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein of filarial nematodes, ES-62, is only present in the post-infective life-cycle stages, but that the mRNA is transcribed throughout the worm's life-cycle. The aim of this current study was to investigate whether the presence or absence of protein expression simply reflects differences in mRNA abundance. To this end, we investigated the relative abundance of ES-62 using TaqMan real time RT-PCR, in different life-cycle stages of 2 model filarial nematode parasites, Acanthocheilonema viteae and Brugia pahangi. For B. pahangi, microfilariae, infective larvae and adult worms were each found to have approximately similar levels of ES-62 mRNA. However, the corresponding stages of A. viteae differed greatly from each other with a pattern of increased mRNA production with maturation. As a rule A. viteae had higher levels of ES-62 mRNA than B. pahangi, and this was particularly noticeable in the adult stage where the difference was approximately 3500-fold higher. However, this significant difference in mRNA abundance was not reflected in the quantity of ES-62 protein secreted by the adult worms of each species, as A. viteae only secreted approximately 3 times as much ES-62 as B. pahangi. Thus, overall, the results obtained from this study indicate that ES-62 protein production does not solely reflect mRNA levels, and also suggest that the 2 nematodes may employ different mechanisms for regulating protein production.

  13. A comparison of two tests for filarial antigenemia in areas in Sri Lanka and Indonesia with low-level persistence of lymphatic filariasis following mass drug administration.

    PubMed

    Yahathugoda, Thishan C; Supali, Taniawati; Rao, Ramakrishna U; Djuardi, Yenny; Stefani, Difa; Pical, Femmy; Fischer, Peter U; Lloyd, Melanie M; Premaratne, Prasad H; Weerasooriya, Mirani V; Weil, Gary J

    2015-07-15

    Filarial antigen tests are key tools for mapping the distribution of bancroftian filariasis and for detecting areas with persistent infections following mass drug administration (MDA). A recent study showed that the new Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) has better analytical sensitivity than the BinaxNOW Filariasis card test (Card Test) for detecting circulating filarial antigen, and the FTS detected more positive results than the Card Test in a field study performed in a highly endemic area in Liberia. The present study compared the performance of the FTS and the Card Test in community surveys that were conducted in southern Sri Lanka and in Indonesia (Central Java) in areas with low-level persistence of LF following multiple rounds of MDA with diethylcarbamazine plus albendazole. The studies were performed in densely populated semi-urban areas where Wuchereria bancrofti is transmitted by Culex quinquefasciatus. Antigenemia rates by FTS were 138% higher in the Sri Lanka study (43/852 vs. 18/852) and 21% higher in the Indonesia study (50/778 vs. 41/778) than antigenemia rates by Card Test. Antigenemia rates were significantly higher in males than in females and higher in adults than in children in both study sites. Although overall antigenemia rates and test scores were significantly higher by FTS than by Card Test in both study areas, rates in young children were similar with both tests in both areas. These results extend the previously reported superior sensitivity of the FTS to areas with low residual infection rates following MDA, and this could affect mapping and post-MDA survey results in adults. However, our findings suggest that results of transmission assessment surveys (TAS) performed in school-aged children are likely to be similar with both tests.

  14. Colorimetric tests for diagnosis of filarial infection and vector surveillance using non-instrumented nucleic acid loop-mediated isothermal amplification (NINA-LAMP)

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Catherine B.; Li, Zhiru; Alhassan, Andy; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Tanner, Nathan A.; Zhang, Yinhua; Evans, Thomas C.; LaBarre, Paul; Wanji, Samuel; Burton, Robert A.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate detection of filarial parasites in humans is essential for the implementation and evaluation of mass drug administration programs to control onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Determining the infection levels in vector populations is also important for assessing transmission, deciding when drug treatments may be terminated and for monitoring recrudescence. Immunological methods to detect infection in humans are available, however, cross-reactivity issues have been reported. Nucleic acid-based molecular assays offer high levels of specificity and sensitivity, and can be used to detect infection in both humans and vectors. In this study we developed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) tests to detect three different filarial DNAs in human and insect samples using pH sensitive dyes for enhanced visual detection of amplification. Furthermore, reactions were performed in a portable, non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification (NINA) device that provides a stable heat source for LAMP. The efficacy of several strand displacing DNA polymerases were evaluated in combination with neutral red or phenol red dyes. Colorimetric NINA-LAMP assays targeting Brugia Hha I repeat, Onchocerca volvulus GST1a and Wuchereria bancrofti LDR each exhibit species-specificity and are also highly sensitive, detecting DNA equivalent to 1/10-1/5000th of one microfilaria. Reaction times varied depending on whether a single copy gene (70 minutes, O. volvulus) or repetitive DNA (40 min, B. malayi and W. bancrofti) was employed as a biomarker. The NINA heater can be used to detect multiple infections simultaneously. The accuracy, simplicity and versatility of the technology suggests that colorimetric NINA-LAMP assays are ideally suited for monitoring the success of filariasis control programs. PMID:28199317

  15. Quartz preferred orientation in naturally deformed mylonitic rocks (Montalto shear zone-Italy): a comparison of results by different techniques, their advantages and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Eugenio; Punturo, Rosalda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Kern, Hartmut; Pezzino, Antonino; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Goswami, Shalini; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-12-01

    In the geologic record, the quartz c-axis patterns are widely adopted in the investigation of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of naturally deformed rocks. To this aim, in the present work, four different methods for measuring quartz c-axis orientations in naturally sheared rocks were applied and compared: the classical universal stage technique, the computer-integrated polarization microscopy method (CIP), the time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction analysis , and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Microstructural analysis and CPO patterns of quartz, together with the ones obtained for feldspars and micas in mylonitic granitoid rocks, have been then considered to solve structural and geological questions related to the Montalto crustal scale shear zone (Calabria, southern Italy). Results obtained by applying the different techniques are discussed, and the advantages as well as limitations of each method are highlighted. Importantly, our findings suggest that patterns obtained by means of different techniques are quite similar. In particular, for such mylonites, a subsimple shear (40% simple shear vs 60% pure shear) by shape analysis of porphyroclasts was inferred. A general tendency of an asymmetric c-maximum near to the Z direction (normal to foliation) suggesting dominant basal slip, consistent with fabric patterns related to dynamically recrystallization under greenschist facies, is recognized. Rhombohedral slip was likely active as documented by pole figures of positive and negative rhombs (TOF), which reveal also potential mechanical Dauphiné twinning. Results showed that the most complete CPO characterization on deformed rocks is given by the TOF (from which also other quartz crystallographic axes can be obtained as well as various mineral phases may be investigated). However, this use is restricted by the fact that (a) there are very few TOF facilities around the world and (b) there is loss of any domainal reference, since TOF is a

  16. Patency of Litomosoides sigmodontis infection depends on Toll-like receptor 4 whereas Toll-like receptor 2 signalling influences filarial-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Maria B; Schulz, Sandy; Krupp, Vanessa; Ritter, Manuel; Wiszniewsky, Katharina; Arndts, Kathrin; Tamadaho, Ruth S E; Endl, Elmar; Hoerauf, Achim; Layland, Laura E

    2016-04-01

    BALB/c mice develop a patent state [release of microfilariae (Mf), the transmission life-stage, into the periphery] when exposed to the rodent filariae Litomosoides sigmodontis. Interestingly, only a portion of the infected mice become patent, which reflects the situation in human individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti. Since those individuals had differing filarial-specific profiles, this study compared differences in immune responses between Mf(+) and Mf(-) infected BALB/c mice. We demonstrate that cultures of total spleen or mediastinal lymph node cells from Mf(+) mice produce significantly more interleukin-5 (IL-5) to filarial antigens but equal levels of IL-10 when compared with Mf(-) mice. However, isolated CD4(+) T cells from Mf(+) mice produced significantly higher amounts of all measured cytokines, including IL-10, when compared with CD4(+) T-cell responses from Mf(-) mice. Since adaptive immune responses are influenced by triggering the innate immune system we further studied the immune profiles and parasitology in infected Toll-like receptor-2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) and TLR4(-/-) BALB/c mice. Ninety-three per cent of L. sigmodontis-exposed TLR4(-/-) BALB/c mice became patent (Mf(+)) although worm numbers remained comparable to those in Mf(+) wild-type controls. Lack of TLR2 had no influence on patency outcome or worm burden but infected Mf(+) mice had significantly lower numbers of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and dampened peripheral immune responses. Interestingly, in vitro culturing of CD4(+) T cells from infected wild-type mice with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived TLR2(-/-) dendritic cells resulted in an overall diminished cytokine profile to filarial antigens. Hence, triggering TLR4 or TLR2 during chronic filarial infection has a significant impact on patency and efficient CD4(+) T-cell responses, respectively. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Bacteriological studies of blood, tissue fluid, lymph and lymph nodes in patients with acute dermatolymphangioadenitis (DLA) in course of 'filarial' lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, W L; Jamal, S; Manokaran, G; Pani, S; Kumaraswami, V; Kubicka, U; Lukomska, B; Tripathi, F M; Swoboda, E; Meisel-Mikolajczyk, F; Stelmach, E; Zaleska, M

    1999-10-15

    Filarial lymphedema is complicated by frequent episodes of dermatolymphangioadenitis (DLA). Severe systemic symptoms during attacks of DLA resemble those of septicemia. The question we asked was whether bacterial isolates can be found in the peripheral blood of patients during the episodes of DLA. Out of 100 patients referred to us with 'filarial' lymphedema 14 displayed acute and five subacute symptoms of DLA. All were on admission blood microfilariae negative but had a positive test in the past. Blood bacterial isolates were found in nine cases, four acute (21%) and five subacute (26%). In 10 acute cases blood cultures were found negative. Six blood isolates belonged to Bacilli, four to Cocci and one was Sarcina. To identify the sites of origin of bacterial dissemination, swabs taken from the calf skin biopsy wounds and tissue fluid, lymph and lymph node specimens were cultured. Swabs from the calf skin biopsy wound contained isolates in nine (47%) cases. They were Bacilli in nine, Cocci in three, Acinetobacter and Erwinia in two cases. Tissue fluid was collected from 10 patients and contained Bacilli in four (40%) and Staphylococci in three (30%). Lymph was drained in four patients and contained isolates in all samples (100%). They were Staphylococcus epidermis, xylosus and aureus, Acinetobacter, Bacillus subtilis and Sarcina. Three lymph nodes were biopsied and contained Staphylococcus chromogenes, xylosus, Enterococcus and Bacillus cereus. In six cases the same phenotypically defined species of bacteria were found in blood and limb tissues or fluids. In the 'control' group of patients with lymphedema without acute or subacute changes all blood cultures were negative. Interestingly, swabs from biopsy wound of these patients contained isolates in 80%, tissue fluid in 68%, lymph in 70% and lymph nodes in 58% of cases. In healthy controls, tissue fluid did not contain bacteria, and lymph isolates were found only in 12% of cases. This study demonstrates that

  18. Humans from Wuchereria bancrofti endemic area elicit substantial immune response to proteins of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi and its endosymbiont Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ruchi; Gangwar, Mamta; Chahar, Dhanvantri; Setty Balakrishnan, Anand; Negi, Mahendra Pal Singh; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2017-01-24

    In the past, immune responses to several Brugia malayi immunodominant antigens have been characterized in filaria-infected populations; however, little is known regarding Wolbachia proteins. We earlier cloned and characterized few B. malayi (trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, Bm-TPP and heavy chain myosin, BmAF-Myo) and Wolbachia (translation initiation factor-1, Wol Tl IF-1 and NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase, wBm-LigA) proteins and investigated the immune responses, which they triggered in animal models. The current study emphasizes on immunological characteristics of these proteins in three major categories of filarial endemic zones: endemic normal (EN, asymptomatic, amicrofilaraemic; putatively immune), microfilariae carriers (MF, asymptomatic but microfilaraemic), and chronic filarial patients (CP, symptomatic and mostly amicrofilaraemic). Immunoblotting and ELISA were carried out to measure IgG and isotype antibodies against these recombinant proteins in various clinical categories. Involvement of serum antibodies in infective larvae killing was assessed by antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity assay. Cellular immune response was investigated by in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in these cells after stimulation. Immune responses of EN and CP displayed almost similar level of IgG to Wol Tl IF-1 while other three proteins had higher serum IgG in EN individuals only. Specific IgA, IgG1, IgG3 and IgM to Bm-TPP were high in EN subjects, while BmAF-Myo additionally showed elevated IgG2. Enhanced IgA and IgG3 were detected in both EN and CP individuals in response to Wol Tl IF-1 antigen, but IgG1 and IgM were high only in EN individuals. wBm-LigA and BmAF-Myo exhibited almost similar pattern of antibody responses. PBMC isolated from EN subjects exhibited higher proliferation and ROS generation when stimulated with all three proteins except for Wol Tl IF-1. Overall, these

  19. Mass Drug Administration Trial to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis in Papua New Guinea: Changes in Microfilaremia, Filarial Antigen, and Bm14 Antibody after Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Tisch, Daniel J.; Bockarie, Moses J.; Dimber, Zachary; Kiniboro, Benson; Tarongka, Nandao; Hazlett, Fred E.; Kastens, Will; Alpers, Michael P.; Kazura, James W.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory tools to monitor infection burden are important to evaluate progress and determine endpoints in programs to eliminate lymphatic filariasis. We evaluated changes in Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria, filarial antigen and Bm14 antibody in individuals who participated in a five-year mass drug administration trial in Papua New Guinea. Comparing values before treatment and one year after four annual treatments, the proportion of microfilaria positive individuals declined to the greatest degree, with less marked change in antibody and antigen rates. Considering children as sentinel groups who reflect recent transmission intensity, children surveyed before the trial were more frequently microfilaria and antibody positive than those examined one year after the trial stopped. In contrast, antigen positive rates were similar in the two groups. All infection indicators continued to decline five years after cessation of mass drug administration; Bm14 antibody persisted in the greatest proportion of individuals. These data suggest that Bm14 antibody may be a sensitive test to monitor continuing transmission during and after mass drug administration aimed at eliminating transmission of lymphatic filariasis. PMID:18256431

  20. Transforming growth factor-beta expression by host cells is elicited locally by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus in hyporeactive patients independently from Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Korten, Simone; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Büttner, Dietrich W; Hoerauf, Achim

    2010-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is a key cytokine in immune regulation, cell differentiation, development, wound healing, and tissue remodelling. It mediates immunosuppression in filarial infections facilitating parasite persistence, while attenuating immunopathology, which is induced by migrating microfilariae. Immunosuppression rises with parasite burden, but it remains unknown whether filariae elicit local release of immunosuppressive cytokines. Therefore, using immunohistology, we investigated the expression of stable, released latent TGF-beta1 in subcutaneous nodules from highly infected, hyporeactive onchocerciasis patients, harbouring adult Onchocerca volvulus. Since many cell types produce TGF-beta, we elucidated the cellular source, distribution and dependency on the worms' sex, productivity and vitality. We found TGF-beta1 to be abundantly expressed by T cells, plasma/B cells, macrophages, mast cells, fibrocytes, and vascular endothelial cells, particularly in onchocercomas with productive or previously productive females, damaged, dead and resorbed adult worms or microfilariae. We conclude TGF-beta to be antigen induced by the filariae since expression was scarce around subcutaneous arthropods or cholesterol crystals in onchocercomas. Enhanced expression after ivermectin or endobacteria-depleting doxycycline treatment indicates induction to depend on filariae and not on Wolbachia endobacteria. TGF-beta(+) cells were reduced in HIV co-infection. This finding of local and sustained TGF-beta induction by vital and dead filariae, untreated and after treatment, adds new aspects to immunomodulation by helminths.

  1. Radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinases limit natural killer cell-mediated anticancer immunity in NCI-H23 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Woong; Lee, Young Shin; Son, Cheol Hun; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You Soo; Bae, Jaeho

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer for >100 years and is required by numerous patients with cancer. Ionizing radiation effectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells by inducing cell death and increasing anticancer immunity, through the induction of natural killer group 2 member D ligands (NKG2DLs); however, adverse effects have also been reported, including the promotion of metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are induced by ionizing radiation and have an important role in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Previously, MMPs were demonstrated to increase the shedding of NKG2DLs, which may reduce the surface expression of NKG2DLs on cancer cells. As a consequence, the cancer cells may escape natural killer (NK)‑mediated anticancer immunity. In the present study, NCI‑H23 human non‑small cell lung cancer cells were used to investigate the combined effects of ionizing radiation and MMP inhibitors on the expression levels of NKG2DLs. Ionizing radiation increased the expression of MMP2 and ADAM metalloproteinase domain 10 protease, as well as NKG2DLs. The combined treatment of ionizing radiation and MMP inhibitors increased the surface expression levels of NKG2DLs and resulted in the increased susceptibility of the cancer cells to NK‑92 natural killer cells. Furthermore, soluble NKG2DLs were increased in the media by ionizing radiation and blocked by MMP inhibitors. The present study suggests that radiotherapy may result in the shedding of soluble NKG2DLs, through the induction of MMP2, and combined treatment with MMP inhibitors may minimize the adverse effects of radiotherapy.

  2. ON THE NATURE OF THE PROTOTYPE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE AG CARINAE. II. WITNESSING A MASSIVE STAR EVOLVING CLOSE TO THE EDDINGTON AND BISTABILITY LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, J. H.; Hillier, D. J.; Damineli, A.

    2011-07-20

    We show that the significantly different effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) achieved by the luminous blue variable AG Carinae during the consecutive visual minima of 1985-1990 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 22,800 K) and 2000-2001 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 17,000 K) place the star on different sides of the bistability limit, which occurs in line-driven stellar winds around T{sub eff} {approx} 21,000 K. Decisive evidence is provided by huge changes in the optical depth of the Lyman continuum in the inner wind as T{sub eff} changes during the S Dor cycle. These changes cause different Fe ionization structures in the inner wind. The bistability mechanism is also related to the different wind parameters during visual minima: the wind terminal velocity was 2-3 times higher and the mass-loss rate roughly two times smaller in 1985-1990 than in 2000-2003. We obtain a projected rotational velocity of 220 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1} during 1985-1990 which, combined with the high luminosity (L{sub *} = 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun}), puts AG Car extremely close to the Eddington limit modified by rotation ({Omega}{Gamma} limit): for an inclination angle of 90{sup 0}, {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} {approx}> 1.0 for M{sub sun} {approx}< 60. Based on evolutionary models and mass budget, we obtain an initial mass of {approx}100 M{sub sun} and a current mass of {approx}60-70 M{sub sun} for AG Car. Therefore, AG Car is close to, if not at, the {Omega}{Gamma} limit during visual minimum. Assuming M = 70 M{sub sun}, we find that {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} decreases from 0.93 to 0.72 as AG Car expands toward visual maximum, suggesting that the star is not above the Eddington limit during maximum phases.

  3. Gas exchange recovery following natural drought is rapid unless limited by loss of leaf hydraulic conductance: evidence from an evergreen woodland.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Robert P; Brodribb, Timothy J; McAdam, Scott A M; Mitchell, Patrick J

    2017-09-01

    Drought can cause major damage to plant communities, but species damage thresholds and postdrought recovery of forest productivity are not yet predictable. We used an El Niño drought event as a natural experiment to test whether postdrought recovery of gas exchange could be predicted by properties of the water transport system, or if metabolism, primarily high abscisic acid concentration, might delay recovery. We monitored detailed physiological responses, including shoot sapflow, leaf gas exchange, leaf water potential and foliar abscisic acid (ABA), during drought and through the subsequent rehydration period for a sample of eight canopy and understory species. Severe drought caused major declines in leaf water potential, elevated foliar ABA concentrations and reduced stomatal conductance and assimilation rates in our eight sample species. Leaf water potential surpassed levels associated with incipient loss of leaf hydraulic conductance in four species. Following heavy rainfall gas exchange in all species, except those trees predicted to have suffered hydraulic impairment, recovered to prestressed rates within 1 d. Recovery of plant gas exchange was rapid and could be predicted by the hydraulic safety margin, providing strong support for leaf vulnerability to water deficit as an index of damage under natural drought conditions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Nature of rate-limiting steps in a compartmentalized enzyme system. Quantitation of dopamine transport and hydroxylation rates in resealed chromaffin granule ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, N.G.; Klinman, J.P.

    1989-07-25

    Using isolated chromaffin granule ghosts from bovine adrenal medullae, we have studied the kinetics of dopamine beta-monooxygenase (D beta M) activity as it is linked to dopamine transport. Measurements of the initial rates of transport and of transport-linked norepinephrine formation suggested that enzyme activity may be partially rate-limiting in the coupled carrier/enzyme system. This was confirmed by (i) measurements of initial rates of norepinephrine formation using deuterated substrate, which gave isotope effects greater than 2.0, and (ii) kinetic measurements using ghosts pulsed with varying concentrations of labeled dopamine, which indicated substantial substrate accumulation in the vesicle interior as a function of time. Initial rates of product formation, when combined with approximations of internal substrate concentrations, allowed estimates of Kcat and Km for intravesicular D beta M. Activation by external reductant was apparent in both initial rate parameters and the measurements of transients. Under conditions of optimal D beta M activity, the enzyme rate parameters (kcat = 0.31 nmol/s.mg and Km = 2 mM) indicated partial rate limitation compared to dopamine transport (kcat = 0.38 nmol/s.mg and Km = 32 microM). Compartmental analysis of the time curves, performed using numerical nonlinear least squares methods, gave least squares estimates of rate constants for a simple carrier mechanism and kcat values for D beta M which were consistent with estimates from initial rates.

  5. Natural orbitals from single and double excitation configuration interaction wave functions: their use in second-order configuration interaction and wave functions incorporating limited triple and quadruple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grev, Roger S.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1992-05-01

    As an alternative to orbitals obtained from a molecular complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) wave function, we have investigated the use of natural orbitals (NOs) obtained from configuration interaction (CI) wave functions including all single and double excitations (CISD) for use in multireference CI (MRCI) studies. The specific MRCI methods investigated are (1) second-order CI (SOCI), which includes all single and double excitations with respect to a full CI in the valence space and (2) a wave function that includes all single and double excitations out of a valence space CISD reference function. The latter wave function can also be described as a single-double-triple-quadruple excitation CI in which only two electrons are allowed to simultaneously reside outside of the valence space, ``which we call CISD[TQ].'' Comparison is made with CASSCF-SOCI and full CI results for NH2 (2B1), CH3 (2A`2), and SiH2 (1B1) at equilibrium bond distances (Re) 1.5 and 2.0Re, and with full CI results for the dissociation energy of N2. The dissociation energies of N2 and C2 are also obtained using large atomic natural orbital basis sets and the results compared to CASSCF-SOCI and internally contracted MRCI results. In all, the MRCI results with CISD NOs are very similar to the CASSCF-MRCI results, and at geometries where the reference wave function is dominant, the relatively compact CISD[TQ] method yields results that are very close to SOCI. In addition to their ease of generation, the CISD NOs offer the added advantage of allowing for truncation of the CI configuration list on an orbital basis by simply deleting high-lying virtual orbitals. The errors introduced by this truncation are almost quantitatively obtained at the CISD level of theory.

  6. AIRUSE-LIFE +: estimation of natural source contributions to urban ambient air PM10 and PM2. 5 concentrations in southern Europe - implications to compliance with limit values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diapouli, Evangelia; Manousakas, Manousos I.; Vratolis, Stergios; Vasilatou, Vasiliki; Pateraki, Stella; Bairachtari, Kyriaki A.; Querol, Xavier; Amato, Fulvio; Alastuey, Andrés; Karanasiou, Angeliki A.; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Calzolai, Giulia; Gianelle, Vorne L.; Colombi, Cristina; Alves, Célia; Custódio, Danilo; Pio, Casimiro; Spyrou, Christos; Kallos, George B.; Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos

    2017-03-01

    The contribution of natural sources to ambient air particulate matter (PM) concentrations is often not considered; however, it may be significant for certain areas and during specific periods of the year. In the framework of the AIRUSE-LIFE+ project, state-of-the-art methods have been employed for assessing the contribution of major natural sources (African dust, sea salt and forest fires) to PM concentrations, in southern European urban areas. 24 h measurements of PM10 and PM2. 5 mass and chemical composition were performed over the course of a year in five cities: Porto, Barcelona, Milan, Florence and Athens. Net African dust and sea-salt concentrations were calculated based on the methodologies proposed by the EC (SEC 2011/208). The contribution of uncontrolled forest fires was calculated through receptor modelling. Sensitivity analysis with respect to the calculation of African dust was also performed, in order to identify major parameters affecting the estimated net dust concentrations. African dust contribution to PM concentrations was more pronounced in the eastern Mediterranean, with the mean annual relative contribution to PM10 decreasing from 21 % in Athens, to 5 % in Florence, and around 2 % in Milan, Barcelona and Porto. The respective contribution to PM2. 5 was calculated equal to 14 % in Athens and from 1.3 to 2.4 % in all other cities. High seasonal variability of contributions was observed, with dust transport events occurring at different periods in the western and eastern Mediterranean basin. Sea salt was mostly related to the coarse mode and also exhibited significant seasonal variability. Sea-salt concentrations were highest in Porto, with average relative contributions equal to 12.3 % for PM10. Contributions from uncontrolled forest fires were quantified only for Porto and were low on an annual basis (1.4 and 1.9 % to PM10 and PM2. 5, respectively); nevertheless, contributions were greatly increased during events, reaching 20 and 22 % of 24 h

  7. Landscape genomics of Populus trichocarpa: the role of hybridization, limited gene flow, and natural selection in shaping patterns of population structure.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, Armando; Farzaneh, Nima; Grassa, Christopher J; McKown, Athena D; Guy, Robert D; Mansfield, Shawn D; Douglas, Carl J; Cronk, Quentin C B

    2014-11-01

    Populus trichocarpa is an ecologically important tree across western North America. We used a large population sample of 498 accessions over a wide geographical area genotyped with a 34K Populus SNP array to quantify geographical patterns of genetic variation in this species (landscape genomics). We present evidence that three processes contribute to the observed patterns: (1) introgression from the sister species P. balsamifera, (2) isolation by distance (IBD), and (3) natural selection. Introgression was detected only at the margins of the species' distribution. IBD was significant across the sampled area as a whole, but no evidence of restricted gene flow was detected in a core of drainages from southern British Columbia (BC). We identified a large number of FST outliers. Gene Ontology analyses revealed that FST outliers are overrepresented in genes involved in circadian rhythm and response to red/far-red light when the entire dataset is considered, whereas in southern BC heat response genes are overrepresented. We also identified strong correlations between geoclimate variables and allele frequencies at FST outlier loci that provide clues regarding the selective pressures acting at these loci.

  8. New natural shapes of non-Gaussianity from high-derivative interactions and their optimal limits from WMAP 9-year data

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M. E-mail: mehrdadm@ias.edu E-mail: kmsmith@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2014-11-01

    Given the fantastic experimental effort, it is important to thoroughly explore the signature space of inflationary models. The fact that higher derivative operators do not renormalize lower derivative ones allows us to find a large class of technically natural single-clock inflationary models where, in the context of the Effective Field Theory of Inflation, the leading interactions have many derivatives. We systematically explore the 3-point function induced by these models and their overlap with the standard equilateral and orthogonal templates. We find that in order to satisfactorily cover the signature space of these models, two new additional templates need to be included. We then perform the optimal analysis of the WMAP 9-year data for the resulting four templates, finding that the overall significance of a non-zero signal is between 2–2.5σ, depending on the choice of parameter space, partially driven by the preference for nonzero f{sub NL}{sup orth} in WMAP9.

  9. Cloning, expression and characterization of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA) from Wolbachia endosymbiont of human lymphatic filarial parasite Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Mohd; Verma, Meenakshi; Pathak, Manisha; Mitra, Kalyan; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia, an endosymbiont of filarial nematode, is considered a promising target for treatment of lymphatic filariasis. Although functional characterization of the Wolbachia peptidoglycan assembly has not been fully explored, the Wolbachia genome provides evidence for coding all of the genes involved in lipid II biosynthesis, a part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA) is one of the lipid II biosynthesis pathway enzymes and it has inevitably been recognized as an antibiotic target. In view of the vital role of MurA in bacterial viability and survival, MurA ortholog from Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi (wBm-MurA) was cloned, expressed and purified for further molecular characterization. The enzyme kinetics and inhibition studies were undertaken using fosfomycin. wBm-MurA was found to be expressed in all the major life stages of B. malayi and was immunolocalized in Wolbachia within the microfilariae and female adults by the confocal microscopy. Sequence analysis suggests that the amino acids crucial for enzymatic activity are conserved. The purified wBm-MurA was shown to possess the EPSP synthase (3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyltransferase) like activity at a broad pH range with optimal activity at pH 7.5 and 37°C temperature. The apparent affinity constant (Km) for the substrate UDP-N-acetylglucosamine was found to be 0.03149 mM and for phosphoenolpyruvate 0.009198 mM. The relative enzymatic activity was inhibited ∼2 fold in presence of fosfomycin. Superimposition of the wBm-MurA homology model with the structural model of Haemophilus influenzae (Hi-MurA) suggests binding of fosfomycin at the same active site. The findings suggest wBm-MurA to be a putative antifilarial drug target for screening of novel compounds.

  10. Synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles using Jasminum nervosum leaf extract and its larvicidal activity against filarial and arboviral vector Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Lallawmawma, H; Sathishkumar, Gnanasekar; Sarathbabu, Subburayan; Ghatak, Souvik; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaperumal; Gurusubramanian, Guruswami; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil

    2015-11-01

    Silver and gold nanoparticles of Jasminum nervosum L. had unique optical properties such as broad absorbance band in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Characterization of the nanoparticles using UV spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the particles were silver (AgNPs) and gold (AuNPs) ranging between 4-22 and 2-20 nm with an average particles size of 9.4 and 10 nm, respectively. AgNPs and AuNPs of J. nervosum had high larvicidal activity on the filarial and arboviral vector, Culex quinquefasciatus, than the leaf aqueous extract. Observed lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC95) against the third instar larvae were 57.40 and 144.36 μg/ml for AgNPs and 82.62 and 254.68 μg/ml for AuNPs after 24 h treatment, respectively. The lethal time to kill 50% of C. quinquefasciatus larvae were 2.24 and 4.51 h at 150 μg/ml of AgNPs and AuNPs, respectively, while in the case of aqueous leaf extract of J. nervosum it was 9.44 h at 500 μg/ml (F 2,14 = 397.51, P < 0.0001). The principal component analysis plot presented differential clustering of the aqueous leaf extract, AgNP and AuNPs in relation to lethal dose and lethal time. It is concluded from the present findings that the biosynthesised AgNPs and AuNPs using leaf aqueous extract of J. nervosum could be an environmentally safer nanobiopesticide, and provided potential larvicidal effect on C. quinquefasciatus larvae which could be used for prevention of several dreadful diseases.

  11. Circulating filarial antigen in the hydrocele fluid from individuals living in a bancroftian filariasis area - Recife, Brazil: detected by the monoclonal antibody Og4C3-assay.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Abraham; Lima, Guilherme; Medeiros, Zulma; Aguiar-Santos, Ana; Alves, Sandra; Montarroyos, Ulisses; Oliveira, Paula; Béliz, Fátima; Netto, Maria José; Furtado, André

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detected by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) Og4C3-ELISA in paired samples of serum and hydrocele fluid from 104 men with hydrocele, living in an endemic area of Wuchereria bancrofti. Nocturnal blood specimens were filtered and examined for microfilariae (MF) and ultrasound was used in order to identify the presence of adult worms (the filaria dance sign - FDS) in the lymphatic vessels of the scrotal area. Four groups were selected according to their parasitological status: group I - 71 MF- and FDS-; group II - 21 MF+ and FDS+; group III - 10 MF- and FDS+ and group IV- 2 MF+ and FDS-. CFA was identified simultaneously (fluid and serum) in 11 (15.5%), 21 (100%), 3 (30%), and 1 (50%) in groups I, II, III, and IV, respectively. In despite of high CFA+ level (antigen Og4C3) units/ml, the Geometrical Mean (GM) = 2696) in the sera of these 36/104 paired samples, when compared to the hydrocele fluid, (GM = 1079), showed a very good correlation between the CFA level in the serum and CFA level in the fluid (r = 0.731). CFA level in the serum of the 23 microfilaremics (groups II and IV) was extremely high (GM = 4189) and was correlated with MF density (r = 0.442). These findings report for the first time the potential alternative use of the hydrocele fluid to investigate CFA using the mAb Og4C3-ELISA.

  12. The determination of resistance of marble to thermal and moisture cycles: relevance and limits of the recent European natural stone standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellopede, Rossana; Castelletto, Eleonora; Marini, Paola; Zichella, Lorena

    2015-04-01

    The recent European standard EN 16306:2013 specifies laboratory methodology on the determination of the resistance to thermal and moisture cycling of marble for cladding of building façades. In particular measurements of bowing and flexural strength should be performed before and at the end of the ageing cycles. Bowing is measured on specimens of dimension 30*100*400mm exposed to moisture from beneath and heating (gradually till 80°C) on the upper face. The flexural strength should be measured both on reference and on exposed specimens in order to assess the variation of mechanical properties. Additional non-destructive tests are foreseen but are not compulsory for the standard. Moreover, the Annex A of the EN 16306, contains a guidance of the limit values that could be useful for the building planner for façade panels dimensioning. Different varieties of marble (two from Italy, one from Greece and three from Portugal) have been tested by means of this laboratory ageing test. Non-destructive tests such as the measurements of Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), porosity, and water absorption have been executed together with the conventional flexural strength test. Image analysis on thin sections soaked with methylene blue have been analysed to further investigate the correlation between porosity and tendency to bowing. Base on the results obtained, some consideration on the decrease of mechanical resistance and the bowing in relation to the variety of marble tested and the limit values indicated the Annex A of EN 16306 can be drawn. Besides, from the data analysed a deepened discussion has been made. It is known that bowing and rapid strength loss occur in some varieties of marble when used as exterior cladding but further considerations can be made: bowing and flexural strength are correlate and in which way? Often the bowing is related to the decrease of flexural strength but it happens that there is a decrease in the mechanical resistance of the stone also

  13. Natural variation, differentiation, and genetic trade-offs of ecophysiological traits in response to water limitation in Brachypodium distachyon and its descendent allotetraploid B. hybridum (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Manzaneda, Antonio J; Rey, Pedro J; Anderson, Jill T; Raskin, Evan; Weiss-Lehman, Christopher; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Differences in tolerance to water stress may underlie ecological divergence of closely related ploidy lineages. However, the mechanistic basis of physiological variation governing ecogeographical cytotype segregation is not well understood. Here, using Brachypodium distachyon and its derived allotetraploid B. hybridum as model, we test the hypothesis that, for heteroploid annuals, ecological divergence of polyploids in drier environments is based on trait differentiation enabling drought escape. We demonstrate that under water limitation allotetraploids maintain higher photosynthesis and stomatal conductance and show earlier flowering than diploids, concordant with a drought-escape strategy to cope with water stress. Increased heterozygosity and greater genetic variability and plasticity of polyploids could confer a superior adaptive capability. Consistent with these predictions, we document (1) greater standing within-population genetic variation in water-use efficiency (WUE) and flowering time in allotetraploids, and (2) the existence of (nonlinear) environmental clines in physiology across allotetraploid populations. Increased gas exchange and diminished WUE occurred at the driest end of the gradient, consistent with a drought-escape strategy. Finally, we found that allotetraploids showed weaker genetic correlations than diploids congruous with the expectation of relaxed pleiotropic constraints in polyploids. Our results suggest evolutionary divergence of ecophysiological traits in each ploidy lineage.

  14. Limited naturally occurring escape in broadly neutralizing antibody epitopes in hepatitis C glycoprotein E2 and constrained sequence usage in acute infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Walker, Melanie R; Leung, Preston; Eltahla, Auda A; Grebely, Jason; Dore, Gregory J; Applegate, Tanya; Page, Kimberly; Dwivedi, Sunita; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan D; Cox, Andrea L; Osburn, William; Kim, Arthur Y; Schinkel, Janke; Shoukry, Naglaa H; Lauer, Georg M; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Prins, Maria; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A

    2017-04-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been associated with spontaneous clearance of the hepatitis C infection as well as viral persistence by immune escape. Further study of neutralizing antibody epitopes is needed to unravel pathways of resistance to virus neutralization, and to identify conserved regions for vaccine design. All reported broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb) epitopes in the HCV Envelope (E2) glycoprotein were identified. The critical contact residues of these epitopes were mapped onto the linear E2 sequence. All publicly available E2 sequences were then downloaded and the contact residues within the BNAb epitopes were assessed for the level of conservation, as well as the frequency of occurrence of experimentally-proven resistance mutations. Epitopes were also compared between two sequence datasets obtained from samples collected at well-defined time points from acute (<180days) and chronic (>180days) infections, to identify any significant differences in residue usage. The contact residues for all BNAbs were contained within 3 linear regions of the E2 protein sequence. An analysis of 1749 full length E2 sequences from public databases showed that only 10 out of 29 experimentally-proven resistance mutations were present at a frequency >5%. Comparison of subtype 1a viral sequences obtained from samples collected during acute or chronic infection revealed significant differences at positions 610 and 655 with changes in residue (p<0.05), and at position 422 (p<0.001) with a significant difference in variability (entropy). The majority of experimentally-described escape variants do not occur frequently in nature. The observed differences between acute and chronically isolated sequences suggest constraints on residue usage early in infection.

  15. Microbes in nature are limited by carbon and energy: the starving-survival lifestyle in soil and consequences for estimating microbial rates

    PubMed Central

    Hobbie, John E.; Hobbie, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding microbial transformations in soils is important for predicting future carbon sequestration and nutrient cycling. This review questions some methods of assessing one key microbial process, the uptake of labile organic compounds. First, soil microbes have a starving-survival life style of dormancy, arrested activity, and low activity. Yet they are very abundant and remain poised to completely take up all substrates that become available. As a result, dilution assays with the addition of labeled substrates cannot be used. When labeled substrates are transformed into 14CO2, the first part of the biphasic release follows metabolic rules and is not affected by the environment. As a consequence, when identical amounts of isotopically substrates are added to soils from different climate zones, the same percentage of the substrate is respired and the same half-life of the respired 14CO2 from the labeled substrate is estimated. Second, when soils are sampled by a variety of methods from taking 10 cm diameter cores to millimeter-scale dialysis chambers, amino acids (and other organic compounds) appear to be released by the severing of fine roots and mycorrhizal networks as well as from pressing or centrifuging treatments. As a result of disturbance as well as of natural root release, concentrations of individual amino acids of ~10 μM are measured. This contrasts with concentrations of a few nanomolar found in aquatic systems and raises questions about possible differences in the bacterial strategy between aquatic and soil ecosystems. The small size of the hyphae (2–10 μm diameter) and of the fine roots (0.2–2 mm diameter), make it very difficult to sample any volume of soil without introducing artifacts. Third, when micromolar amounts of labeled amino acids are added to soil, some of the isotope enters plant roots. This may be an artifact of the high micromolar concentrations applied. PMID:24273534

  16. Determination of δ11B by HR-ICP-MS from mass limited samples: Application to natural carbonates and water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sambuddha; Owen, Robert; Kerr, Joanna; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry

    2014-09-01

    We present an improved method for accurate and precise determination of the boron isotopic composition (11B/10B) of carbonate and water samples using a mineral acid matrix and HR-ICP-MS. Our method for δ11B determination utilizes a micro-distillation based boron purification technique for both carbonate and seawater matrices. The micro-distillation method is characterized by low blank (⩽0.01 ng-B) and 99.8 ± 5.7% boron recovery. We also report a new ICP-MS method, performed in a hydrofluoric acid matrix, using a jet interface fitted Thermo® Element XR that consumes <3.0 ng-B per quintuplicate analyses (±0.5‰, 2σ, n = 5). A comparatively high matrix tolerance limit of ⩽50 ppb Na/K/Mg/Ca characterizes our ICP-MS method. With an extremely low procedural blank (⩽0.05 ± 0.01 ng-B) the present isotope method is optimized for rapid (∼25 samples per session) analysis of small masses of carbonates (foraminifera, corals) with low boron abundance and small volume water samples (seawater, porewater, river water). Our δ11B estimates of seawater (39.8 ± 0.5‰, 2σ, n = 30); SRM AE-120 (-20.2 ± 0.5‰, 2s, n = 33); SRM AE-121 (19.8 ± 0.4‰, 2s, n = 16); SRM AE-122 (39.6 ± 0.5‰, 2s, n = 16) are within analytical uncertainty of published values. We apply this new method to assess the impacts of laboratory handling induced sample contamination and seawater physio-chemical parameters (temperature, pH, and salinity) on marine carbonate bound δ11B by analyzing core-top planktonic foraminifera samples.

  17. What does not kill them makes them stronger: larval environment and infectious dose alter mosquito potential to transmit filarial worms

    PubMed Central

    Breaux, Jennifer A.; Schumacher, Molly K.; Juliano, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    For organisms with complex life cycles, larval environments can modify adult phenotypes. For mosquitoes and other vectors, when physiological impacts of stressors acting on larvae carry over into the adult stage they may interact with infectious dose of a vector-borne pathogen, producing a range of phenotypes for vector potential. Investigation of impacts of a common source of stress, larval crowding and intraspecific competition, on adult vector interactions with pathogens may increase our understanding of the dynamics of pathogen transmission by mosquito vectors. Using Aedes aegypti and the nematode parasite Brugia pahangi, we demonstrate dose dependency of fitness effects of B. pahangi infection on the mosquito, as well as interactions between competitive stress among larvae and infectious dose for resulting adults that affect the physiological and functional ability of mosquitoes to act as vectors. Contrary to results from studies on mosquito–arbovirus interactions, our results suggest that adults from crowded larvae may limit infection better than do adults from uncrowded controls, and that mosquitoes from high-quality larval environments are more physiologically and functionally capable vectors of B. pahangi. Our results provide another example of how the larval environment can have profound effects on vector potential of resulting adults. PMID:24827444

  18. What does not kill them makes them stronger: larval environment and infectious dose alter mosquito potential to transmit filarial worms.

    PubMed

    Breaux, Jennifer A; Schumacher, Molly K; Juliano, Steven A

    2014-07-07

    For organisms with complex life cycles, larval environments can modify adult phenotypes. For mosquitoes and other vectors, when physiological impacts of stressors acting on larvae carry over into the adult stage they may interact with infectious dose of a vector-borne pathogen, producing a range of phenotypes for vector potential. Investigation of impacts of a common source of stress, larval crowding and intraspecific competition, on adult vector interactions with pathogens may increase our understanding of the dynamics of pathogen transmission by mosquito vectors. Using Aedes aegypti and the nematode parasite Brugia pahangi, we demonstrate dose dependency of fitness effects of B. pahangi infection on the mosquito, as well as interactions between competitive stress among larvae and infectious dose for resulting adults that affect the physiological and functional ability of mosquitoes to act as vectors. Contrary to results from studies on mosquito-arbovirus interactions, our results suggest that adults from crowded larvae may limit infection better than do adults from uncrowded controls, and that mosquitoes from high-quality larval environments are more physiologically and functionally capable vectors of B. pahangi. Our results provide another example of how the larval environment can have profound effects on vector potential of resulting adults.

  19. Rhizome extracts of Curcuma zedoaria Rosc induce caspase dependant apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species in filarial parasite Setaria digitata in vitro.

    PubMed

    Senathilake, K S; Karunanayake, E H; Samarakoon, S R; Tennekoon, K H; de Silva, E D

    2016-08-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is mainly caused by filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and is the second leading cause of long term and permanent disability in tropical countries. To date, incapability to eliminate long lived adult parasites by current drugs remains the major challenge in the elimination of LF. Hence, in the current study, the efficacy of rhizome extracts of Curcuma zedoaria (a plant traditionally used in Sri Lanka in the management of LF) was evaluated as an effective filaricide in vitro. Sequential solvent extracts of C. zedoaria rhizomes were screened for in vitro antifilarial activity at 0.01-1 mg/mL concentrations by motility inhibition assay and 3-(4, 5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay using cattle parasite Setaria digitata as a model organism. Exposure of parasites to hexane and chloroform extracts of C. zedoaria caused a dose dependant reduction in motility and viability of microfilariae (IC50 = 72.42 μg/mL for hexane extract, 191.14 μg/mL for chloroform extract) and adult parasites (IC50 = 77.07 μg/mL for hexane extract, 259.87 μg/mL for chloroform extract). Both extracts were less toxic to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells when compared to filariae. A dose dependant increase in caspase 3/CED 3 and a decrease in total protein content, cyclooxygenase (COX) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activities were observed in adult parasites treated with hexane or chloroform extract. A significant degree of chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation were also observed in these worms by Hoechst 33342 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining respectively. Dose dependant chromosomal DNA laddering was observed in treated adult worms but not in microfilariae in response to both extracts. Oxidative stress parameters such as reduction in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and increase in glutathione s transferase (GST

  20. Antibody to the Filarial Antigen Wb123 Reflects Reduced Transmission and Decreased Exposure in Children Born following Single Mass Drug Administration (MDA)

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Cathy; Kubofcik, Joseph; Ottesen, Eric A.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibody (Ab) to the Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) infective larval (L3) antigen Wb123, using a Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) assay, has been shown to be a species-specific, early marker of infection developed for potential use as a surveillance tool following transmission interruption post mass drug administration. To examine its usefulness in a single filarial-endemic island assessed at two time points with markedly different levels of transmission, Ab to Wb123 was measured in sera collected from subjects from Mauke, Cook Islands in 1975 (no previous treatment) and 1992 (5 years after a one time island-wide treatment with diethylcarbamazine [DEC]). Findings Between 1975 and 1992, Wb transmission decreased dramatically as evidenced by reduced prevalences of microfilariae (31% vs. 5%) and circulating Ag (CAg, 49% vs. 16%). Age specific prevalence analysis showed a dramatic reduction in Wb123 Ab positivity from 54% (25/46) in 1975 to 8% (3/38) in 1992 in children 1–5 years (p<0.0001), reflecting the effects of single-dose treatment five years earlier. By 1992, Wb123 Ab prevalence in children 6–10 years had fallen from 75% (42/56) in 1975 to 42% (33/79) consistent with a lower cumulative transmission potential. In the whole population, Wb123 seropositivity decreased from 86% to 60% between 1975 and 1992. In CAg+ subjects the levels of Wb123 Ab were indistinguishable between the 2 time points but differed in those who were CAg− (p<0.0001). In paired sample analysis, individuals who were CAg+ in 1975 but became CAg− in 1992 had significantly lower Ab levels in 1992 (p<0.0001), with 9/40 (23%) becoming seronegative for Wb123. Conclusions The relationship between reduction in Wb123 Ab prevalence and the reduction of transmission, seen most clearly in young children, strongly advocates for the continuing assessment and rapid development of Wb123 as a surveillance tool to detect potential transmission of bancroftian filariasis in treated

  1. Antibody to the filarial antigen Wb123 reflects reduced transmission and decreased exposure in children born following single mass drug administration (MDA).

    PubMed

    Steel, Cathy; Kubofcik, Joseph; Ottesen, Eric A; Nutman, Thomas B

    2012-01-01

    Antibody (Ab) to the Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb) infective larval (L3) antigen Wb123, using a Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) assay, has been shown to be a species-specific, early marker of infection developed for potential use as a surveillance tool following transmission interruption post mass drug administration. To examine its usefulness in a single filarial-endemic island assessed at two time points with markedly different levels of transmission, Ab to Wb123 was measured in sera collected from subjects from Mauke, Cook Islands in 1975 (no previous treatment) and 1992 (5 years after a one time island-wide treatment with diethylcarbamazine [DEC]). Between 1975 and 1992, Wb transmission decreased dramatically as evidenced by reduced prevalences of microfilariae (31% vs. 5%) and circulating Ag (CAg, 49% vs. 16%). Age specific prevalence analysis showed a dramatic reduction in Wb123 Ab positivity from 54% (25/46) in 1975 to 8% (3/38) in 1992 in children 1-5 years (p<0.0001), reflecting the effects of single-dose treatment five years earlier. By 1992, Wb123 Ab prevalence in children 6-10 years had fallen from 75% (42/56) in 1975 to 42% (33/79) consistent with a lower cumulative transmission potential. In the whole population, Wb123 seropositivity decreased from 86% to 60% between 1975 and 1992. In CAg+ subjects the levels of Wb123 Ab were indistinguishable between the 2 time points but differed in those who were CAg- (p<0.0001). In paired sample analysis, individuals who were CAg+ in 1975 but became CAg- in 1992 had significantly lower Ab levels in 1992 (p<0.0001), with 9/40 (23%) becoming seronegative for Wb123. The relationship between reduction in Wb123 Ab prevalence and the reduction of transmission, seen most clearly in young children, strongly advocates for the continuing assessment and rapid development of Wb123 as a surveillance tool to detect potential transmission of bancroftian filariasis in treated endemic areas.

  2. Copper(II) oxide nanoparticles augment antifilarial activity of Albendazole: In vitro synergistic apoptotic impact against filarial parasite Setaria cervi.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Atif; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-03-30

    Mass treatment of lymphatic filariasis with Albendazole (ABZ), a therapeutic benzimidazole, is fraught with serious limitations such as possible drug resistance and poor macrofilaricidal activity. Therefore, we need to develop new ABZ-based formulations to improve its antifilarial effectiveness. CuO nanoparticles were used as an adjuvant with ABZ to form ABZ-CuO nanocomposite, which was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, AFM and SEM. Antifilarial activity of nanocomposite was evaluated using relative motility assay and dye exclusion test in dark and under UV light. ROS generation, antioxidant levels, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation in nanocomposite treated parasites were estimated. Biophysical techniques were employed to ascertain the mode of binding of nanocomposite to parasitic DNA. Nanocomposite increases parasite mortality as compared to ABZ in dark, and its antifilarial effect was increased further under UV light. Elevated ROS production and decline of parasitic-GST and GSH levels were observed in nanocomposite treated worms in dark, and these effects were pronounced further under UV light. Nanocomposite leads to higher DNA fragmentation as compared to ABZ alone. Further, we found that nanocomposite binds parasitic DNA in an intercalative manner where it generates ROS to induce DNA damage. Thus, oxidative stress production due to ROS generation and consequent DNA fragmentation leads to apoptosis in worms. This is the first report supporting CuO nanoparticles as a potential adjuvant with ABZ against filariasis along with enhanced antifilarial activity of nanocomposite under UV light. These findings, thus, indicate that development of ABZ-loaded nanoparticle compounds may serve as promising leads for filariasis treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Linkage and the Limits to Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Barton, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    The probability of fixation of a favorable mutation is reduced if selection at other loci causes inherited variation in fitness. A general method for calculating the fixation probability of an allele that can find itself in a variety of genetic backgrounds is applied to find the effect of substitutions, fluctuating polymorphisms, and deleterious mutations in a large population. With loose linkage, r, the effects depend on the additive genetic variance in relative fitness, var (W), and act by reducing effective population size by (N/N(e)) = 1 + var (W)/2r(2). However, tightly linked loci can have a substantial effect not predictable from N(e). Linked deleterious mutations reduce the fixation probability of weakly favored alleles by exp(-2U/R), where U is the total mutation rate and R is the map length in Morgans. Substitutions can cause a greater reduction: an allele with advantage s < s(crit) = (π(2)/6) log(e) (S/s)[var(W)/R] is very unlikely to be fixed. (S is the advantage of the substitution impeding fixation.) Fluctuating polymorphisms at many (n) linked loci can also have a substantial effect, reducing fixation probability by exp [ &2Kn var(W)/R] [K = -1/E((u - u)(2)/uv) depending on the frequencies (u,v) at the selected polymorphisms]. Hitchhiking due to all three kinds of selection may substantially impede adaptation that depends on weakly favored alleles. PMID:7498757

  4. A Novel Xenomonitoring Technique Using Mosquito Excreta/Feces for the Detection of Filarial Parasites and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Pilotte, Nils; Zaky, Weam I.; Abrams, Brian P.; Chadee, Dave D.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the continued successes of the world’s lymphatic filariasis (LF) elimination programs and the growing successes of many malaria elimination efforts, the necessity of low cost tools and methodologies applicable to long-term disease surveillance is greater than ever before. As many countries reach the end of their LF mass drug administration programs and a growing number of countries realize unprecedented successes in their malaria intervention efforts, the need for practical molecular xenomonitoring (MX), capable of providing surveillance for disease recrudescence in settings of decreased parasite prevalence is increasingly clear. Current protocols, however, require testing of mosquitoes in pools of 25 or fewer, making high-throughput examination a challenge. The new method we present here screens the excreta/feces from hundreds of mosquitoes per pool and provides proof-of-concept for a practical alternative to traditional methodologies resulting in significant cost and labor savings. Methodology/Principal Findings Excreta/feces of laboratory reared Aedes aegypti or Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes provided with a Brugia malayi microfilaria-positive or Plasmodium vivax-positive blood meal respectively were tested for the presence of parasite DNA using real-time PCR. A titration of samples containing various volumes of B. malayi-negative mosquito feces mixed with positive excreta/feces was also tested to determine sensitivity of detection. Real-time PCR amplification of B. malayi and P. vivax DNA from the excreta/feces of infected mosquitoes was demonstrated, and B. malayi DNA in excreta/feces from one to two mf-positive blood meal-receiving mosquitoes was detected when pooled with volumes of feces from as many as 500 uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusions/Significance While the operationalizing of excreta/feces testing may require the development of new strategies for sample collection, the high-throughput nature of this new methodology has the

  5. Measuring the physical and economic impact of filarial lymphoedema in Chikwawa district, Malawi: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Michelle C; Yamauchi, Masato; Mkwanda, Square Z; Ndhlovu, Paul; Matipula, Dorothy Emmie; Mackenzie, Charles; Kelly-Hope, Louise A

    2017-04-03

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is one of the primary causes of lymphoedema in sub-Saharan Africa, and has a significant impact on the quality of life (QoL) of those affected. In this paper we assess the relative impact of lymphoedema on mobility and income in Chikwawa district, Malawi. A random sample of 31 people with lymphoedema and 31 matched controls completed a QoL questionnaire from which both an overall and a mobility-specific score were calculated. Two mobility tests were undertaken, namely the 10 m walking test [10MWT] and timed up and go [TUG] test, and a subset of 10 cases-control pairs wore GPS data loggers for 3 weeks to measure their mobility in a more natural setting. Retrospective economic data was collected from all 31 case-control pairs, and each participant undertaking the GPS activity recorded daily earnings and health expenditure throughout the observation period. Cases had a significantly poorer overall QoL (cases = 32.2, controls = 6.0, P < 0.01) and mobility-specific (cases = 43.1, controls = 7.4, P < 0.01) scores in comparison to controls. Cases were also significantly slower (P < 0.01) at completing the timed mobility tests, e.g. mean 10MWT speed of 0.83 m/s in comparison to 1.10 m/s for controls. An inconsistent relationship was observed between mobility-specific QoL scores and the timed test results for cases (10MWT correlation = -0.06, 95% CI = (-0.41, 0.30)), indicating that their perceived disability differed from their measured disability, whereas the results were consistent for controls (10MWT correlation = -0.61, 95% CI = (-0.79, -0.34)). GPS summaries indicated that cases generally walk shorter distances at slower speeds than control, covering a smaller geographical area (median area by kernel smoothing: cases = 1.25 km(2), controls = 2.10 km(2), P = 0.16). Cases reported earning less than half that earned by controls per week (cases = $0.70, controls = $1.86, P

  6. Optical Limiting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave EPO RT D A TE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Optical Limiting 6. AUTHOR(S) , 1 oS...to nanoseconds and find that, since the excited state absorption is cummulative, that the dyes can limit well for nanosecond pulses but not for...over which the device limits . In addition, we find that the dynamic range of limiting devices can be substantially increased using two elements without

  7. Engaging Nature Aesthetically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupfer, Joseph H.

    2003-01-01

    For the most part, most people appreciate nature as spectators. Some portion of a natural scene is viewed as if it were a painting or photograph. However, thinking of nature solely or chiefly as an aesthetic scene to be observed is unnecessarily limiting. Regarding natural phenomena as material for detached, pictorial observation overlooks the…

  8. Helminth parasites of dogs from two resource-limited communities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Minnaar, W N; Krecek, R C; Rajput, J I

    1999-06-01

    Biological samples were collected from dogs in resource-limited communities in the North-West and Gauteng Provinces of South Africa to assess the prevalence of helminth parasitism. These samples included adhesive tape peri-anal skin swabs and fresh faecal samples for helminth examination, and thick and thin blood films (smears) and whole-blood samples in anticoagulant for examination of filarial nematode microfilariae and haemoprotozoa. The eggs of Ancylostoma caninum, Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, Dipylidium caninum and taeniids were identified. None of the blood samples and smears tested positive for microfilariae of Dirofilaria immitis or Dipetalonema spp. or for haemoprotozoa. The adhesive tape swabs were negative for cestode eggs and segments. Most of the helminth parasites identified in this study are zoonotic and consequently are regarded as a public health hazard.

  9. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  10. Nature's pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven

    1994-10-01

    Although diverse in both form and function, the fluid-forcing devices in organisms have many of the capabilities and limitations of pumps of human design. Nature's pumps certainly look quite different from those of our technology, but all of them perform the same task. The author examines a few of these with an eye toward technological parallels and the two functional classes -- positive-displacement pumps and fluid-dynamic pumps.

  11. Natural aphrodisiacs.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany

    2010-01-01

    The search for a remedy or a prescription that can enhance sexual function and/or treat male erectile dysfunction has been an obsession throughout known history. Whether it was an Eastern civilization or a Western one, religious or atheist, man's aspiration for a better or best "manhood" has been a history-time goal. This review will discuss the current research done on the most popular natural aphrodisiacs and examine the weight of evidence to support or discourage the use of any of these substances to enhance sexual desire and/or function. Review of the current evidence on the use of natural substances as aphrodisiacs. Efficacy of natural aphrodisiacs in enhancing sexual function in men and women. There is little evidence from literature to recommend the usage of natural aphrodisiacs for the enhancement of sexual desire and/or performance. Data on yohimbine's efficacy does not support the wide use of the drug, which has only mild effects in the treatment of psychogenic ED. Although there's a positive trend towards recommending ginseng as an effective aphrodisiac, however, more in depth studies involving large number of subjects and its mechanism of action are needed before definite conclusions could be reached. Data on the use of natural aphrodisiacs in women is limited. The current body of objective evidence does not support the use of any natural aphrodisiac as an effective treatment for male or female sexual dysfunctions. Potent men and men with ED will continue the search for natural aphrodisiacs despite the current disappointing data on their effectiveness. Care should be taken regarding the fraud addition of sildenafil analogues to natural aphrodisiacs.

  12. Evolution: Sex Limits Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nosil, Patrik

    2015-07-20

    Evolution is affected by survival of individuals and by mate choice, but how sexual selection affects adaptation remains unclear. A new study finds that sexual selection can limit adaptation by causing male-induced harm to females and thus opposing natural selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Larvicidal activity of the leaf extracts of Spondias mombin Linn. (Anacardiaceae) from various solvents against malarial, dengue and filarial vector mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Eze, Elijah Ajaegbu; Danga, Simon Pierre Yinyang; Okoye, Festus Basden Chiedu

    2014-12-01

    Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus are vector mosquitoes of dengue, malaria, and filariasis, respectively. Since no vaccine is available to treat these diseases, the control of the main mosquito vectors is essential. As conventional insecticides have limited success, plants may be alternative larvicidal agents, since they contain a rich source of bioactive chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of methanol crude extract, hexane, dichloromethane, acetone, ethyl acetate and methanol fractions of Spondias mombin leaf against IV instar larvae of dengue, malaria, and lymphatic filariasis vector mosquitoes. A total of 25, IV instar larvae of each target mosquito species were exposed to various concentrations (125-1000 ppm) and were assayed in the laboratory by using the protocol of WHO 2005; the LC50 values were determined by Probit analysis. Hexane, dichloromethane and acetone fractions were the most effective against Ae. aegypti with LC50 values of 22.54, 42.13, 45.18 ppm, respectively. Hexane fraction registered the highest activity with LC50 of 92.20 ppm against An. gambiae. It was still hexane fraction that showed better toxicity with LC50 of 326.53 ppm against Cx. quinquefasciatus. The Spondias mombin leaf extracts proved to be a strong candidate for a natural, safe and stable mosquito larvicide to be used in population control of Ae. aegypti, An. gambiae and Cx. quinquefasciatus and so may replace the conventional Diclorvos to control malaria, dengue and filariasis in Nigeria.

  14. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  15. Natural infection of Culex theileri (Diptera: Culicidae) with Dirofilaria immitis (Nematoda: Filarioidea) on Madeira Island, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Santa-Ana, Marta; Khadem, Manhaz; Capela, Ruben

    2006-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were performed to verify whether Culex theileri Theobald functions as a natural vector of Dirofilaria immitis (Leidy) on Madeira Island, Portugal. CO2-baited light traps (EVS traps) were use to sample mosquitoes monthly basis between February 2002 and February 2003 in the area of Quebradas (Funchal). Three mosquito species were captured, including 58 Culex pipiens L., 790 Cx. theileri, and three Culiseta longiareolata (Macquart). Only C. theileri tested positive for D. immitis. The presence of this filarial worm was detected by direct observation, infectivity assay dissection technique, and polymerase chain reaction methods. Infected mosquitoes were recovered in October and December 2002 and January 2003. These data provide evidence that Cx. theileri could be the main vector of D. immitis in Funchal, Madeira.

  16. Detection limit

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.S.; Ward, R.C.; Bell, H.F.

    1988-08-01

    Water quality monitoring data are plagued with levels of chemicals that are too low to be measured precisely. This discussion will focus on the information needs of water quality management and how these needs are best met for monitoring systems that require many trace-level measurements. We propose that the limit of detection (LOD) or the limit of quantitation (LOQ) not be used to censor data. Although LOD and LOQ aid in the interpretation of individual measurements, they hinder statistical analysis of water quality data. More information is gained when a numerical result and an estimate of measurement precision are reported for every measurement, as opposed to reporting not detected or less than. This article is not intended to be a review of the issues pertaining to the LOD and related concepts.

  17. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    Natural gas powers about 150,000 vehicles in the United States and roughly 22 million vehicles worldwide. Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are a good choice for high-mileage fleets -- such as buses, taxis, and refuse vehicles -- that are centrally fueled or operate within a limited area or along a route with natural gas fueling stations. This brochure highlights the advantages of natural gas as an alternative fuel, including its domestic availability, established distribution network, relatively low cost, and emissions benefits.

  18. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-08

    Natural gas powers about 150,000 vehicles in the United States and roughly 22 million vehicles worldwide. Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are a good choice for high-mileage fleets -- such as buses, taxis, and refuse vehicles -- that are centrally fueled or operate within a limited area or along a route with natural gas fueling stations. This brochure highlights the advantages of natural gas as an alternative fuel, including its domestic availability, established distribution network, relatively low cost, and emissions benefits.

  19. Dose limits for astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation exposures to individuals in space can greatly exceed natural radiation exposure on Earth and possibly normal occupational radiation exposures as well. Consequently, procedures limiting exposures would be necessary. Limitations were proposed by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council in 1970. This panel recommended short-term limits to avoid deterministic effects and a single career limit (of 4 Sv) based on a doubling of the cancer risk in men aged 35 to 55. Later, when risk estimates for cancer had increased and were recognized to be age and sex dependent, the NCRP, in Report No. 98 in 1989, recommended a range of career limits based on age and sex from 1 to 4 Sv. NCRP is again in the process of revising recommendations for astronaut exposure, partly because risk estimates have increased further and partly to recognize trends in limiting radiation exposure occupationally on the ground. The result of these considerations is likely to be similar short-term limits for deterministic effects but modified career limits.

  20. Dose limits for astronauts.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, W K

    2000-11-01

    Radiation exposures to individuals in space can greatly exceed natural radiation exposure on Earth and possibly normal occupational radiation exposures as well. Consequently, procedures limiting exposures would be necessary. Limitations were proposed by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council in 1970. This panel recommended short-term limits to avoid deterministic effects and a single career limit (of 4 Sv) based on a doubling of the cancer risk in men aged 35 to 55. Later, when risk estimates for cancer had increased and were recognized to be age and sex dependent, the NCRP, in Report No. 98 in 1989, recommended a range of career limits based on age and sex from 1 to 4 Sv. NCRP is again in the process of revising recommendations for astronaut exposure, partly because risk estimates have increased further and partly to recognize trends in limiting radiation exposure occupationally on the ground. The result of these considerations is likely to be similar short-term limits for deterministic effects but modified career limits.

  1. Goals for limited strategic defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1989-05-01

    This report reviews the nature of near and mid-term accidental, third-country, and limited threats, discusses the technologies available to defend against them, and examines the development programs required. 22 refs.

  2. Limits to Growth - Two Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Comments by two reviewers (Garrett Hardin and Stephen Berry) on the book The Limits to Growth'' by Meadows and others. The nature of the models used, and the reactions of book reviewers are discussed. (AL)

  3. Limits to Growth - Two Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Comments by two reviewers (Garrett Hardin and Stephen Berry) on the book The Limits to Growth'' by Meadows and others. The nature of the models used, and the reactions of book reviewers are discussed. (AL)

  4. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  5. Limits to growth reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Hagen, E E

    1972-01-01

    In their book, ''The Limits of Growth,'' the authors conclude that through pollution, exhaustion of natural resources, and limits to the food supply, the world faces a catastrophic fall in population and in living standards by the middle of the 21st century. The authors fail to state, however, 1 centrally important assumption underlying their results, but which is present through their omission of the contrary assumption. In their model the continuing technical progress that has been a primary feature of the material world for the past 200 years suddenly ceases. The assumptions of the model presented in ''Limits of Growth'' are not the assumptions other analysts make - these are strangely unrealistic. These assumptions require closer examination. The assumption concerning population assumes that the sole determinants of birthrates are the level of industrialization and the food supply. This is not good demography, for demographers have long recognized that it may have been the decrease in death rates, not industrialization or the rise in income, that caused the decrease in birthrates. Furthermore, their theory that many of the natural resources are irreplacable is like the belief that the sun revolves around the earth. It is obvious and false. It neglects that part of technical process which includes invention of new natural resources. Technical advance is needed and the following are some of the problems that technical advance must overcome: 1) a need to discover how to increase food production progressively while preventing the runoff of chemical fertilizers from the soil into waterways, 2) the ''natural'' minerals on which until recently all have depended are ''biodegradable,'' 3) there is a similar problem with radioactive nuclear wastes; 4) energy must dissipate into heat; and 5) there is a need to hasten the decline in birthrates throughout the world. In conclusion, indefinitely continuing growth is not regarded as desirable only as possible.

  6. Immunisation with a Multivalent, Subunit Vaccine Reduces Patent Infection in a Natural Bovine Model of Onchocerciasis during Intense Field Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Makepeace, Benjamin L.; Jensen, Siv Aina; Laney, Sandra J.; Nfon, Charles K.; Njongmeta, Leo M.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Williams, Steven A.; Bianco, Albert E.; Trees, Alexander J.

    2009-01-01

    Human onchocerciasis, caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is controlled almost exclusively by the drug ivermectin, which prevents pathology by targeting the microfilariae. However, this reliance on a single control tool has led to interest in vaccination as a potentially complementary strategy. Here, we describe the results of a trial in West Africa to evaluate a multivalent, subunit vaccine for onchocerciasis in the naturally evolved host-parasite relationship of Onchocerca ochengi in cattle. Naïve calves, reared in fly-proof accommodation, were immunised with eight recombinant antigens of O. ochengi, administered separately with either Freund's adjuvant or alum. The selected antigens were orthologues of O. volvulus recombinant proteins that had previously been shown to confer protection against filarial larvae in rodent models and, in some cases, were recognised by serum antibodies from putatively immune humans. The vaccine was highly immunogenic, eliciting a mixed IgG isotype response. Four weeks after the final immunisation, vaccinated and adjuvant-treated control calves were exposed to natural parasite transmission by the blackfly vectors in an area of Cameroon hyperendemic for O. ochengi. After 22 months, all the control animals had patent infections (i.e., microfilaridermia), compared with only 58% of vaccinated cattle (P = 0.015). This study indicates that vaccination to prevent patent infection may be an achievable goal in onchocerciasis, reducing both the pathology and transmissibility of the infection. The cattle model has also demonstrated its utility for preclinical vaccine discovery, although much research will be required to achieve the requisite target product profile of a clinical candidate. PMID:19901988

  7. Discrimination between Onchocerca volvulus and O. ochengi filarial larvae in Simulium damnosum (s.l.) and their distribution throughout central Ghana using a versatile high-resolution speciation assay.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Stephen R; Armoo, Samuel; Renz, Alfons; Taylor, Mark J; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Yaw; Grant, Warwick N

    2016-10-10

    Genetic surveillance of the human filarial parasite, Onchocerca volvulus, from onchocerciasis endemic regions will ideally focus on genotyping individual infective larval stages collected from their intermediate host, Simuliid blackflies. However, blackflies also transmit other Onchocerca species, including the cattle parasite O. ochengi, which are difficult to distinguish from the human parasite based on morphological characteristics alone. This study describes a versatile approach to discriminate between O. volvulus and O. ochengi that is demonstrated using parasite infective larvae dissected from blackflies. A speciation assay was designed based on genetic differentiation between O. volvulus and O. ochengi mitochondrial genome sequences that can be performed in high-throughput high-resolution melt (HRM)- or lower throughput conventional restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses. This assay was validated on 185 Onchocerca larvae dissected from blackflies captured from 14 communities in Ghana throughout 2011-2013. The frequency of O. ochengi was approximately 67 % of all larvae analysed, which is significantly higher than previously reported in this region. Furthermore, the species distribution was not uniform throughout the study region, with 25 %, 47 % and 93 % of O. volvulus being found in the western-most (Black Volta, Tain and Tombe), the central (Pru) and eastern-most (Daka) river basins, respectively. This tool provides a simple and cost-effective approach to determine the identity and distribution of two Onchocerca species, and will be valuable for future genetic studies that focus on parasites collected from blackflies. The results presented highlight the need to discriminate Onchocerca species in transmission studies, as the frequency of each species varied significantly between the communities studied.

  8. A profiling approach of the natural variability of foliar N remobilization at the rosette stage gives clues to understand the limiting processes involved in the low N use efficiency of winter oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Girondé, Alexandra; Poret, Marine; Etienne, Philippe; Trouverie, Jacques; Bouchereau, Alain; Le Cahérec, Françoise; Leport, Laurent; Orsel, Mathilde; Niogret, Marie-Françoise; Deleu, Carole; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2015-05-01

    Oilseed rape, a crop requiring a high level of nitogen (N) fertilizers, is characterized by low N use efficiency. To identify the limiting factors involved in the N use efficiency of winter oilseed rape, the response to low N supply was investigated at the vegetative stage in 10 genotypes by using long-term pulse-chase (15)N labelling and studying the physiological processes of leaf N remobilization. Analysis of growth and components of N use efficiency allowed four profiles to be defined. Group 1 was characterized by an efficient N remobilization under low and high N conditions but by a decrease of leaf growth under N limitation. Group 2 showed a decrease in leaf growth under low N supply that was associated with a low N remobilization efficiency under both N supplies despite a high remobilization of soluble proteins. In response to N limitation, Group 3 is characterized by an increase in N use efficiency and leaf N remobilization compared with high N that is not sufficient to sustain the leaf biomass production at a similar level to non-limited plants. Genotypes of Group 4 subjected to low nitrate were able to maintain leaf growth to the same level as under high N. The profiling approach indicated that enhancement of amino acid export and soluble protein degradation was crucial for N remobilization improvement. At the whole-plant level, N fluxes revealed that Group 4 showed a high N remobilization in source leaves combined with a better N utilization in young leaves. Consequently, an enhanced N remobilization limits N loss in fallen leaves, but this remobilized N needs to be efficiently utilized in young leaves to improve N use efficiency.

  9. Natural Xanthones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova-Dyatlova, O. A.; Glyzin, V. I.

    1982-10-01

    The available information on the abundance of natural xanthones in nature and the methods for the determination of their structure, biogenesis, and pharmacological properties is surveyed and described systematically. The bibliography includes 151 references.

  10. Limiting technology by negotiated agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Carnesale, A.

    1983-01-01

    The author concentrates on anti-ballistic missile (ABM) systems as an example of a continuing effort to limit technology by negotiated agreement. He first discusses the ABM treaty of 1972, ratified by both the US and the USSR. Afterwards, he briefly treats each of the following: ballistic missile defense (BMD) dilemmas; nature of the BMD choice; technology; economics; deterrence; nuclear warfighting; relations with allies; arms control; Star Wars; and on limiting technology.

  11. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  12. Towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis: social mobilization issues and challenges in mass drug administration with anti-filarial drugs in Tamil Nadu, South India.

    PubMed

    Nandha, B; Krishnamoorthy, K; Jambulingam, P

    2013-08-01

    India is a signatory to World Health Assembly resolution for elimination of lymphatic filariasis (LF) and National Health Policy has set the goal of LF elimination by 2015. Annual mass drug administration (MDA) is ongoing in endemic districts since 1996-97. Compliance rate is a crucial factor in achieving elimination and was assessed in three districts of Tamil Nadu for 10th and 11th treatment rounds (TRs). An in-depth study assessed the impact of social mobilization by drug distributors (DDs) in two areas from each of the three districts. Overall coverage and compliance for assessed TRs were 76.3 and 67.7% which is below the optimum level to achieve LF elimination. Modifiable determinants continue to be the reason for non-consumption even in the 11th TR and 20.8% were systematic non-compliers. In 76.4% of the cases, DDs failed to adhere to three mandatory visits as per the guidelines. Number of visits by DDs in relation to low and high MDA coverage areas showed a significant relationship (P ≤ 0.000). MDA is limited to drug distribution alone and efforts by DDs in preparing the community were inadequate. Probable means to meet the challenges in preparation of the community is discussed.

  13. Firsthand Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gostev, Moses; Weiss, Francesca Michaelides

    2007-01-01

    It's no secret that many school programs don't give children enough opportunity to explore the natural world--i.e., to "mess about" and to have firsthand experience with nature and animals. Not so at the Muscota New School in New York City! This innovative public elementary school actively promotes inquiry-based learning and encourages…

  14. Nature plants.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    We welcome our new sister journal Nature Plants and the increased commitment to the plant science community that it represents. This is an opportunity for Nature Genetics to emphasize the use of genetic and genomic tools and resources in discovering new plant biology and solving major agricultural challenges.

  15. Natural death.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C

    2000-01-01

    The increasing age of every human being is the beginning of the end of life, an obviously natural process, but any attempt to define the term 'natural death' soon encounters difficulties in defining what is meant by 'natural'. In the industrialized countries of the West, for example 'natural death' is thought of as the opposite of non-natural types of death such as accidental death, suicide, and homicide. The aim of our present survey is to discuss the meaning of the term 'natural death' under a clinical, a forensic and a scientific point of view with regard to recent developments especially in molecular biology. If there are 'external' physical influences, a medical-technical manipulation, a therapeutic or molecular biological intervention cannot be definitely ruled out as the cause of death, then use of the term 'natural death' in general is open to question. It will only remain meaningful if it can be applied with a specific meaning in definite practical situations. Current research and medical technology, however, do not allow use of the term 'natural death' in its conventional sense: it can thus be stricken from the medical vocabulary. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Firsthand Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gostev, Moses; Weiss, Francesca Michaelides

    2007-01-01

    It's no secret that many school programs don't give children enough opportunity to explore the natural world--i.e., to "mess about" and to have firsthand experience with nature and animals. Not so at the Muscota New School in New York City! This innovative public elementary school actively promotes inquiry-based learning and encourages…

  17. Nature Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harr, Natalie; Lee, Richard E.; Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Richard Louv's "Last Child in the Woods" (2008) added to a growing consensus to get children outside and experiencing nature. Using ideas from place-based education, the authors present a simple year-long project that brings science, nature, and other curriculum standards to life right in your school yard. With a focus on journaling, this project…

  18. Matematica Natural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Patricia; Medearis, Linda

    Matematica Natural (Natural Mathematics) is a mathematics curriculum for young children based on the assumption that they learn mathematics through concrete, real life, relevant experiences and that educational differences rather than cultural differences influence math achievement. The curriculum uses hands-on materials and activities to teach…

  19. Natural Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her art class students were able to create, in just four class periods, clay relief plaques depicting nature. A lesson on texture speeds up the completion of such a project. Seeing that clay is a natural material with its own unique texture, it seemed fitting that the final product should depict a variety…

  20. Natural Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her art class students were able to create, in just four class periods, clay relief plaques depicting nature. A lesson on texture speeds up the completion of such a project. Seeing that clay is a natural material with its own unique texture, it seemed fitting that the final product should depict a variety…

  1. Matematica Natural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Patricia; Medearis, Linda

    Matematica Natural (Natural Mathematics) is a mathematics curriculum for young children based on the assumption that they learn mathematics through concrete, real life, relevant experiences and that educational differences rather than cultural differences influence math achievement. The curriculum uses hands-on materials and activities to teach…

  2. Nature Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harr, Natalie; Lee, Richard E.; Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Richard Louv's "Last Child in the Woods" (2008) added to a growing consensus to get children outside and experiencing nature. Using ideas from place-based education, the authors present a simple year-long project that brings science, nature, and other curriculum standards to life right in your school yard. With a focus on journaling, this project…

  3. [Natural philosophy in medieval medicine].

    PubMed

    Riha, Ortrun

    2007-01-01

    Medieval medicine is not much interested in natural philosophy. Nevertheless, it is based upon clear methodological and epistemological principles, where the word 'nature' is used in several ways. The natural 'virtues' of things--including magical ones--are most important for therapy. Human health is influenced by stars (planets, zodiac) and seasons, and the physician has to take into account such cosmic effects. The chances of healing depend on the patients' 'nature' in relation to the power of illness. A strong nature makes medicine superfluous, an overwhelming disease cannot be beaten. Thus, medicine is limited to 'neutral' situations when supporting the patient makes his 'nature' win.

  4. Natural convection: Fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakac, S.; Aung, W.; Viskanta, R.

    Among the topics discussed are: stability solutions for laminar external boundary region flows; natural convection in plane layers and cavities with volumetric energy sources; and turbulence modelling equations. Consideration is also given to: natural convection in enclosures containing tube bundles; natural limiting behaviors in porous media cavity flows; numerical solutions in laminar and turbulent natural convection; and heat transfer in the critical region of binary mixtures. Additional topics discussed include: natural convective cooling of electronic equipment; natural convection suppression in solar collectors; and laser induced buoyancy and forced convection in vertical tubes.

  5. The Nature of Natural Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Joe E.

    A variety of types of evidence are examined to help determine the true nature of "deep structure" and what, if any, implications this has for linguistic theory as well as culture theory generally. The evidence accumulated over the past century on the nature of phonetic and phonemic systems is briefly discussed, and the following areas of…

  6. Natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Cullen, J M

    1980-09-01

    This presentation covers the various types of natural disasters which are faced by investigators throughout the world. Each geophysical substance is discussed, including earth, air and water, and secondary effects including fire. Additionally, four myths associated with disasters are reviewed.

  7. Tiling spaces are inverse limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, Lorenzo

    2003-11-01

    Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let Ω be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group Γ) and closed in the natural topology. Then Ω is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group Γ. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin, and Sadun, of Bellissard, Benedetti, and Gambaudo, and of Gähler. In particular, the construction in this paper is a natural generalization of Gähler's.

  8. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of fluorinated natural products.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark C; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-09-21

    Both natural products and synthetic organofluorines play important roles in the discovery and design of pharmaceuticals. The combination of these two classes of molecules has the potential to be useful in the ongoing search for new bioactive compounds but our ability to produce site-selectively fluorinated natural products remains limited by challenges in compatibility between their high structural complexity and current methods for fluorination. Living systems provide an alternative route to chemical fluorination and could enable the production of organofluorine natural products through synthetic biology approaches. While the identification of biogenic organofluorines has been limited, the study of the native organisms and enzymes that utilize these compounds can help to guide efforts to engineer the incorporation of this unusual element into complex pharmacologically active natural products. This review covers recent advances in understanding both natural and engineered production of organofluorine natural products.

  9. Nature's Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Vanessa J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2008-10-01

    We propose that the mathematical structures related to the `universal rewrite system' define a universal process applicable to Nature, which we may describe as `Nature's code'. We draw attention here to such concepts as 4 basic units, 64- and 20-unit structures, symmetry-breaking and 5-fold symmetry, chirality, double 3-dimensionality, the double helix, the Van der Waals force and the harmonic oscillator mechanism, and our explanation of how they necessarily lead to self-aggregation, complexity and emergence in higher-order systems. Biological concepts, such as translation, transcription, replication, the genetic code and the grouping of amino acids appear to be driven by fundamental processes of this kind, and it would seem that the Platonic solids, pentagonal symmetry and Fibonacci numbers have significant roles in organizing `Nature's code'.

  10. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  11. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  12. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  13. Physical limits in information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Robert W.

    Fundamental physical principles limiting improvements in the speed, fabrication and operating costs, and degree of miniaturization of electronic components for information processing are explored. Topics addressed include the representation of information for communication and computation, system architectures, the nature of three- and two-terminal devices, voltage, bipolar transistors, FETs, MESFETs, soft errors; chip wiring, electromigration, and chip interconnects; fabrication methods; energy dissipation; and power-supply cooling. Extensive diagrams and graphs are provided.

  14. Nature's Palette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Brooke B.; Brewer, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Flower petals, acorn hats, exoskeletons of beetles, and lichens are just a few of the objects students may find in a surprising array of vivid colors. These tiny examples from nature's palette can be discovered in a school yard, a park, or even along the edges of a paved sidewalk...it simply takes careful observation! This article describes a…

  15. Natural fibers

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  16. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  17. Natural ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleishman, Erica; Belnap, Jayne; Cobb, Neil; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Ford, Karl; MacDonald, Glen; Pellant, Mike; Schoennagel, Tania; Schmit, Lara M.; Schwartz, Mark; van Drunick, Suzanne; Westerling, Anthony LeRoy; Keyser, Alisa; Lucas, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Natural Ecosystems analyzes the association of observed changes in climate with changes in the geographic distributions and phenology (the timing of blossoms or migrations of birds) for Southwestern ecosystems and their species, portraying ecosystem disturbances—such as wildfires and outbreaks of forest pathogens—and carbon storage and release, in relation to climate change.

  18. Nature Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna R.

    2010-01-01

    Children are naturally curious about the world in which they live. To focus this sense of wonder, have your students investigate their local habitat as it changes over the year. This multiseason study will build connections and add relevance to the habitats that children learn about. This series of activities for grades 4-6 explores the changing…

  19. Uranium, natural

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Uranium , natural ; CASRN 7440 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  20. Nature Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna R.

    2010-01-01

    Children are naturally curious about the world in which they live. To focus this sense of wonder, have your students investigate their local habitat as it changes over the year. This multiseason study will build connections and add relevance to the habitats that children learn about. This series of activities for grades 4-6 explores the changing…

  1. Nature's Palette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Brooke B.; Brewer, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Flower petals, acorn hats, exoskeletons of beetles, and lichens are just a few of the objects students may find in a surprising array of vivid colors. These tiny examples from nature's palette can be discovered in a school yard, a park, or even along the edges of a paved sidewalk...it simply takes careful observation! This article describes a…

  2. Physical limits to magnetogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This is an analysis of how magnetic fields affect biological molecules and cells. It was prompted by a series of prominent reports regarding magnetism in biological systems. The first claims to have identified a protein complex that acts like a compass needle to guide magnetic orientation in animals (Qin et al., 2016). Two other articles report magnetic control of membrane conductance by attaching ferritin to an ion channel protein and then tugging the ferritin or heating it with a magnetic field (Stanley et al., 2015; Wheeler et al., 2016). Here I argue that these claims conflict with basic laws of physics. The discrepancies are large: from 5 to 10 log units. If the reported phenomena do in fact occur, they must have causes entirely different from the ones proposed by the authors. The paramagnetic nature of protein complexes is found to seriously limit their utility for engineering magnetically sensitive cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17210.001 PMID:27529126

  3. Filarial dermatitis in a striped skunk.

    PubMed

    Saito, E K; Little, S E

    1997-10-01

    A striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Kansas (USA) with severe diffuse dermatitis characterized by extensive alopecic areas, thickened skin, and multiple, scattered cutaneous abscesses on the dorsal aspect of the head, neck, and trunk was submitted for diagnostic evaluation. More than 50 nematodes identified as Filaria taxideae were found in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue. Histologic examination of the skin revealed multifocal pyogranulomatous inflammation with intralesional larvated nematode eggs, moderate orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and mild acanthosis. The lesions resemble those reported from badgers (Taxidea taxus) and a lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens) with dermatitis caused by Filaria taxideae. Although F. taxideae has been previously collected from skunks, this is the first report of filarid dermatitis caused by this nematode in a striped skunk.

  4. Podoconiosis, non-filarial elephantiasis, and lymphology.

    PubMed

    Davey, G

    2010-12-01

    Several recent reviews of podoconiosis already exist in journals and on public access websites. After briefly covering the historical and epidemiological background, this narrative review will therefore attempt explicitly to link podoconiosis with lymphology, examining gaps in what is known of pathogenesis and identifying the areas of research in which input from lymphologists is most required. Finally, prevention and treatment will be described and the need for operational research to optimize community-based interventions outlined.

  5. Intraocular live male filarial Loa loa worm.

    PubMed

    Eballe, André Omgbwa; Epée, Emillienne; Koki, Godefroy; Owono, Didier; Mvogo, Côme Ebana; Bella, Assumpta Lucienne

    2008-12-01

    We report a case of Loa loa filariasis in an 8-month-old child who presented with a 3-month history of irritated acute red eye and insomnia. Examination revealed a living and active adult Loa loa worm in the anterior chamber of the left eye. The worm was extracted under general anesthetic.

  6. Nature of Phosphorus Limitation in the Ultraoligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingstad, T. F.; Krom, M. D.; Mantoura, R. F. C.; Flaten, G. A. F.; Groom, S.; Herut, B.; Kress, N.; Law, C. S.; Pasternak, A.; Pitta, P.; Psarra, S.; Rassoulzadegan, F.; Tanaka, T.; Tselepides, A.; Wassmann, P.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Riser, C. Wexels; Zodiatis, G.; Zohary, T.

    2005-08-01

    Phosphate addition to surface waters of the ultraoligotrophic, phosphorus-starved eastern Mediterranean in a Lagrangian experiment caused unexpected ecosystem responses. The system exhibited a decline in chlorophyll and an increase in bacterial production and copepod egg abundance. Although nitrogen and phosphorus colimitation hindered phytoplankton growth, phosphorous may have been transferred through the microbial food web to copepods via two, not mutually exclusive, pathways: (i) bypass of the phytoplankton compartment by phosphorus uptake in heterotrophic bacteria and (ii) tunnelling, whereby phosphate luxury consumption rapidly shifts the stoichiometric composition of copepod prey. Copepods may thus be coupled to lower trophic levels through interactions not usually considered.

  7. Nature of phosphorus limitation in the ultraoligotrophic eastern Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Thingstad, T F; Krom, M D; Mantoura, R F C; Flaten, G A F; Groom, S; Herut, B; Kress, N; Law, C S; Pasternak, A; Pitta, P; Psarra, S; Rassoulzadegan, F; Tanaka, T; Tselepides, A; Wassmann, P; Woodward, E M S; Riser, C Wexels; Zodiatis, G; Zohary, T

    2005-08-12

    Phosphate addition to surface waters of the ultraoligotrophic, phosphorus-starved eastern Mediterranean in a Lagrangian experiment caused unexpected ecosystem responses. The system exhibited a decline in chlorophyll and an increase in bacterial production and copepod egg abundance. Although nitrogen and phosphorus colimitation hindered phytoplankton growth, phosphorous may have been transferred through the microbial food web to copepods via two, not mutually exclusive, pathways: (i) bypass of the phytoplankton compartment by phosphorus uptake in heterotrophic bacteria and (ii) tunnelling, whereby phosphate luxury consumption rapidly shifts the stoichiometric composition of copepod prey. Copepods may thus be coupled to lower trophic levels through interactions not usually considered.

  8. Generalizing a Limit Description of the Natural Logarithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2010-01-01

    If f is a continuous positive-valued function defined on the closed interval from a to x and if k[subscript 0] is greater than 0, then lim[subscript k[right arrow]0[superscript +] [integral][superscript x] [subscript a] f (t)[superscript k-k[subscript 0

  9. Cadaveric & living organ donation. Natural limitations. Possible solutions. Singapore experience.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, K S

    2004-01-01

    Singapore is a country with different cultures and beliefs. Over the last thirty eight years since independance, it has blossomed close to being a developed nation. Having performed the first cadaver donor renal transplantation in 1970, there has been a tremendous amount of health literacy injected into the Singaporeans, with the able support of the National Kidney Foundation. Never ending waiting list for organ donation has facilitated a march of events from Volunatary Organ Pledging under the Medical Therapy, Education and Research Act to passing the Human Organ Transplant Act to extension of the presumed consent law to include Heart, Liver and Cornea and non-accidental brain deaths. In the years to come, Singapore will certainly see an increase in the number of organ transplantations both Cadaveric and Living related.

  10. The adaptive nature of liquidity taking in limit order books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranto, D. E.; Bormetti, G.; Lillo, F.

    2014-06-01

    In financial markets, the order flow, defined as the process assuming value one for buy market orders and minus one for sell market orders, displays a very slowly decaying autocorrelation function. Since orders impact prices, reconciling the persistence of the order flow with market efficiency is a subtle issue. A possible solution is provided by asymmetric liquidity, which states that the impact of a buy or sell order is inversely related to the probability of its occurrence. We empirically find that when the order flow predictability increases in one direction, the liquidity in the opposite side decreases, but the probability that a trade moves the price decreases significantly. While the last mechanism is able to counterbalance the persistence of order flow and restore efficiency and diffusivity, the first acts in the opposite direction. We introduce a statistical order book model where the persistence of the order flow is mitigated by adjusting the market order volume to the predictability of the order flow. The model reproduces the diffusive behaviour of prices at all time scales without fine-tuning the values of parameters, as well as the behaviour of most order book quantities as a function of the local predictability of the order flow.

  11. Generalizing a Limit Description of the Natural Logarithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2010-01-01

    If f is a continuous positive-valued function defined on the closed interval from a to x and if k[subscript 0] is greater than 0, then lim[subscript k[right arrow]0[superscript +] [integral][superscript x] [subscript a] f (t)[superscript k-k[subscript 0

  12. Natural environment analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Qualitative analyses (and quantitatively to the extend possible) of the influence of terrain features on wind loading of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, or during early liftoff, are presented. Initially, the climatology and meteorology producing macroscale wind patterns and characteristics fot he Vandenburg Air Force Base (VAFB) launch site are described. Also, limited field test data are analyzed, and then the nature and characteristic of flow disturbances due to the various terrain features, both natural and man-made, are then reviewed. Following this, the magnitude of these wind loads are estimated. Finally, effects of turbulence are discussed. The study concludes that the influence of complex terrain can create significant wind loading on the vehicle. Because of the limited information, it is not possible to quantify the magnitude of these loads.

  13. Notes on natural inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Kazuya

    2014-10-01

    In the so-called natural inflation, an axion-like inflaton is assumed to have a cosine-type periodic potential. This is not the case in a very simple model in which the axion-like inflaton is coupled to an SU(N) (or other) pure Yang-Mills, at least in the large N limit as pointed out by Witten. It has a multi-valued potential, which is effectively quadratic, i.e., there is only a mass term in the large N limit. Thanks to this property, chaotic inflation can be realized more naturally with the decay constant of the axion-like inflaton less than the Planck scale. We demonstrate these points explicitly by using softly broken Script N=1 Super-Yang-Mills which allows us to treat finite N. This analysis also suggests that moderately large gauge groups such as E8 are good enough with a Planck scale decay constant.

  14. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  15. Natural thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annila, Arto

    2016-02-01

    The principle of increasing entropy is derived from statistical physics of open systems assuming that quanta of actions, as undividable basic build blocks, embody everything. According to this tenet, all systems evolve from one state to another either by acquiring quanta from their surroundings or by discarding quanta to the surroundings in order to attain energetic balance in least time. These natural processes result in ubiquitous scale-free patterns: skewed distributions that accumulate in a sigmoid manner and hence span log-log scales mostly as straight lines. Moreover, the equation for least-time motions reveals that evolution is by nature a non-deterministic process. Although the obtained insight in thermodynamics from the notion of quanta in motion yields nothing new, it accentuates that contemporary comprehension is impaired when modeling evolution as a computable process by imposing conservation of energy and thereby ignoring that quantum of actions are the carriers of energy from the system to its surroundings.

  16. Natural fibers

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and plant-based bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement....

  17. Satellite (Natural)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  18. Nitrogen and nature.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Peter M; Hättenschwiler, Stephan; Olander, Lydia; Allison, Steven

    2002-03-01

    Anthropogenic changes to the global N cycle are important in part because added N alters the composition, productivity, and other properties of many natural ecosystems substantially. Why does added N have such a large impact? Why is N in short supply in so many natural ecosystems? Processes that slow the cycling of N relative to other elements and processes that control ecosystem-level inputs and outputs of N could cause N supply to limit the dynamics of ecosystems. We discuss stoichiometric differences between terrestrial plants and other organisms, the abundance of protein-precipitating plant defenses, and the nature of the C-N bond in soil organic matter as factors that can slow N cycling. For inputs, the energetic costs of N fixation and their consequences, the supply of nutrients other than N, and preferential grazing on N-fixers all could constrain the abundance and/or activity of biological N-fixers. Together these processes drive and sustain N limitation in many natural terrestrial ecosystems.

  19. 7 CFR 624.9 - Time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Time limits. 624.9 Section 624.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.9 Time limits. Funds must be obligated by the...

  20. 7 CFR 624.9 - Time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time limits. 624.9 Section 624.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.9 Time limits. Funds must be obligated by the...

  1. 7 CFR 624.9 - Time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Time limits. 624.9 Section 624.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.9 Time limits. Funds must be obligated by the...

  2. 7 CFR 624.9 - Time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time limits. 624.9 Section 624.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.9 Time limits. Funds must be obligated by the...

  3. 7 CFR 624.9 - Time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time limits. 624.9 Section 624.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATER RESOURCES EMERGENCY WATERSHED PROTECTION § 624.9 Time limits. Funds must be obligated by the...

  4. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003173.htm Limited range of motion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Limited range of motion is a term meaning that a joint or ...

  5. Natural inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    A pseduo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, with a potential of the form V({phi}) = {Lambda}{sup 4}(1 {plus minus} cos({phi}/f)), can naturally give rise to an epoch of inflation in the early universe. Successful inflation can be achieved if f {approximately} m{sub pl} and {Lambda} {approximately} m{sub GUT}. Such mass scales arise in particle physics models with a gauge group that becomes strongly interacting a the GUT scale, e.g., as is expected to happen in the hidden sector of superstring theories. The density fluctuation spectrum is a non-scale-invariant power law, with extra power on large scales. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  7. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  8. [Naturalizing empathy].

    PubMed

    Decety, J

    2002-01-01

    Empathy is the ability to share emotions with others. It is acknowledged to be a powerful means of tacit communication, a key ingredient in any therapeutic relationship as well as in psychotherapy. Empathy is the cornerstone in the humanist perspective (Ego-psychology) in clinical psychology. This approach is often considered as poorly grounded on scientific and objective evidence. It is however acknowledged that empathetic therapists are more effective than less empathetic therapists. I shall argue that this paradox, i.e. it is the least scientific and the less validated psychotherapeutic approach that is the most efficient, can be eliminated if one considers the nature of empathy, its biological foundation, its evolutionary origin and its cognitive architecture. In this paper I will suggest that empathy is based on specific information processing modules which have been designed by natural selection to cope with social regularities in expressing and reading emotional states. This has provided adaptive benefits to individuals living in large groups bestowing them with mechanisms for cooperativity, altruism and more generally various aspects of prosocial behaviour. The capacity to express emotions, and to read and understand emotions of others also ensures implicit communication with others and may be at the root of intersubjectivity. This perspective on empathy is then articulated with two concurrent hypotheses regarding theory of mind (the simulation and the theory-theory) which aim to explain the human capacity to understand that the behaviors of other intelligent agents are caused by intentions, desires and beliefs. In this context, empathy can be considered as a simulation (or analogical) process that is necessary to understand but not sufficient to interpret other people. This last issue is relevant to clinical practice.

  9. LANSCE beam current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, Floyd R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  10. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  11. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Interval Graph Limits

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2015-01-01

    We work out a graph limit theory for dense interval graphs. The theory developed departs from the usual description of a graph limit as a symmetric function W (x, y) on the unit square, with x and y uniform on the interval (0, 1). Instead, we fix a W and change the underlying distribution of the coordinates x and y. We find choices such that our limits are continuous. Connections to random interval graphs are given, including some examples. We also show a continuity result for the chromatic number and clique number of interval graphs. Some results on uniqueness of the limit description are given for general graph limits. PMID:26405368

  13. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  14. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-08-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  15. Limitation and life in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Marvin; Smith, T. Scott

    1986-08-01

    ``The Earth is the very quintescence of the human condition...,'' says Hannah Arendt. Georg Simmel writes: ``The stranger is by nature no `owner of soil'—soil not only in the physical, but also in the figurative sense of a life-substance which is fixed, if not in a point in space, at least in an ideal point of social environment.'' How will no longer being Earthbound affect persons' experience of themselves and of others? Space colonization offers an opportunity for new self-definition by the alteration of existing limits. Thus ``limitation'' is a useful concept for exploring the physical, social and psychological significance of the colonization of space. Will people seek the security of routine, of convention, of hierarchy as in the military model governing our present-day astronauts? or will they seek to maximize the freedom inherent in extraordinary living conditions—as bohemians, deviants, travelers?

  16. Binary optics: Trends and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farn, Michael W.; Veldkamp, Wilfrid B.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the current state of binary optics, addressing both the technology and the industry (i.e., marketplace). With respect to the technology, the two dominant aspects are optical design methods and fabrication capabilities, with the optical design problem being limited by human innovation in the search for new applications and the fabrication issue being limited by the availability of resources required to improve fabrication capabilities. With respect to the industry, the current marketplace does not favor binary optics as a separate product line and so we expect that companies whose primary purpose is the production of binary optics will not represent the bulk of binary optics production. Rather, binary optics' more natural role is as an enabling technology - a technology which will directly result in a competitive advantage in a company's other business areas - and so we expect that the majority of binary optics will be produced for internal use.

  17. Limiting values and general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrohova, U. V.; Golubov, O. A.

    2015-10-01

    From the general theory of relativity it is known that the force of gravitational interaction never exceeds the value Fmax=c2/4G. In this paper we try to make the notion of the force limit intuitively understandable, and illustrate it with thought experiments with such exotic objects as black holes. It was found that maximum limits of force, power, and flow of mass exist in nature. These limits are physically equivalent. All the maximum values could be seen only on a black hole surface. Moreover, maximum limits of force, power, and mass flow are inevitable consequences of properties of the event horizon of a black hole. And vice versa, the existence of black holes could be deduced from the principle of the maximum force. So, these three principles also could be considered as features of a black hole. The role played by the maximum force in general relativity is similar to the role played by speed of light in special relativity.

  18. Principles of Natural Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Retegan, Marius; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-01-01

    Nature relies on a unique and intricate biochemical setup to achieve sunlight-driven water splitting. Combined experimental and computational efforts have produced significant insights into the structural and functional principles governing the operation of the water-oxidizing enzyme Photosystem II in general, and of the oxygen-evolving manganese-calcium cluster at its active site in particular. Here we review the most important aspects of biological water oxidation, emphasizing current knowledge on the organization of the enzyme, the geometric and electronic structure of the catalyst, and the role of calcium and chloride cofactors. The combination of recent experimental work on the identification of possible substrate sites with computational modeling have considerably limited the possible mechanistic pathways for the critical O-O bond formation step. Taken together, the key features and principles of natural photosynthesis may serve as inspiration for the design, development, and implementation of artificial systems.

  19. Optimally combined confidence limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot, P.; Le Diberder, F.

    1998-02-01

    An analytical and optimal procedure to combine statistically independent sets of confidence levels on a quantity is presented. This procedure does not impose any constraint on the methods followed by each analysis to derive its own limit. It incorporates the a priori statistical power of each of the analyses to be combined, in order to optimize the overall sensitivity. It can, in particular, be used to combine the mass limits obtained by several analyses searching for the Higgs boson in different decay channels, with different selection efficiencies, mass resolution and expected background. It can also be used to combine the mass limits obtained by several experiments (e.g. ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at LEP 2) independently of the method followed by each of these experiments to derive their own limit. A method to derive the limit set by one analysis is also presented, along with an unbiased prescription to optimize the expected mass limit in the no-signal-hypothesis.

  20. Systematics and limit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Wade; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    This note discusses the estimation of systematic uncertainties and their incorporation into upper limit calculations. Two different approaches to reducing systematics and their degrading impact on upper limits are introduced. An improved {chi}{sup 2} function is defined which is useful in comparing Poisson distributed data with models marginalized by systematic uncertainties. Also, a technique using profile likelihoods is introduced which provides a means of constraining the degrading impact of systematic uncertainties on limit calculations.

  1. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  2. Computing Confidence Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggs, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Confidence Limits Program (CLP) calculates upper and lower confidence limits associated with observed outcome of N independent trials with M occurrences of event of interest. Calculates probability of event of interest for confidence levels of 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 96, 97, 98, and 99 percent. Provides graphical presentation of all limits and how they relate to maximum-likelihood value. Written in IBM PC BASIC.

  3. Teaching Nature: From Philosophy to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, David

    2003-01-01

    Examines educational resistance to nature study, focusing on the subtle resistance evident in the vicarious approach that limits nature study to books and videos, while ignoring the sensory richness and kinship developed through direct connection with the natural world. Suggests that environmental science, citizen education, inquiry learning,…

  4. Lands and natural resources

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals decided a surprisingly small number of controversies involving lands and natural resources during the time period covered by the Tenth Annual Tenth Circuit Survey. The subject matter of the few land and resource decisions was also limited. Whereas in recent years the court has considered a wide variety of resource and land issues, the past year is distinguished by its lack of variety. Of the eight land and resource decisions published by the court, six concerned public lands, one involved Indian lands, and one resolved an environmental law question. This survey highlights the issues resolved in each of these cases.

  5. Physical Limits on Atomic Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyck, D.; van Aert, S.; den Dekker, A. J.

    2004-02-01

    It is shown that the ultimate resolution is not limited by the bandwidth of the microscope but by the bandwidth (i.e., the scattering power) of the object. In the case of a crystal oriented along a zone axis, the scattering is enhanced by the channeling of the electrons. However, if the object is aperiodic along the beam direction, the bandwidth is much more reduced. A particular challenge are the amorphous objects. For amorphous materials, the natural bandwidth is that of the single atom and of the order of 1 [Angstrom capital A, ring][minus sign]1, which can be reached with the present generation of medium voltage microscopes without aberration correctors. A clear distinction is made between resolving a structure and refining, that is, between resolution and precision. In the case of an amorphous structure, the natural bandwidth also puts a limit on the number of atom coordinates that can be refined quantitatively. As a consequence, amorphous structures cannot be determined from one projection, but only by using atomic resolution tomography. Finally a theory of experiment design is presented that can be used to predict the optimal experimental setting or the best instrumental improvement. Using this approach it is suggested that the study of amorphous objects should be done at low accelerating voltage with correction of both spherical and chromatic aberration.

  6. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  7. Speed limits of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everling, E

    1923-01-01

    This paper is restricted to the question of attainable speed limits and attacks the problem from different angles. Theoretical limits due to air resistance are presented along with design factors which may affect speed such as wing loads, wing areas, wing section shifting, landing speeds, drag-lift ratios, and power coefficients.

  8. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  9. Density limit experiments on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cianfarani, C.; Cocilovo, V.; Dimatteo, L.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Nowak, S.; Ramogida, G.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Zeng, L.; Zuin, M.

    2013-08-01

    One of the main problems in tokamak fusion devices concerns the capability to operate at a high plasma density, which is observed to be limited by the appearance of catastrophic events causing loss of plasma confinement. The commonly used empirical scaling law for the density limit is the Greenwald limit, predicting that the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald density limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Recently, it has been shown on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) that the Greenwald density limit is exceeded in gas-fuelled discharges with a high value of the edge safety factor. In order to understand this behaviour, dedicated density limit experiments were performed on FTU, in which the high density domain was explored in a wide range of values of plasma current (Ip = 500-900 kA) and toroidal magnetic field (BT = 4-8 T). These experiments confirm the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling holds for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord passing at r/a ≃ 4/5. On the other hand, the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord does not depend on the average plasma current density and essentially depends on the toroidal magnetic field only. This behaviour is explained in terms of density profile peaking in the high density domain, with a peaking factor at the disruption depending on the edge safety factor. The possibility that the MARFE (multifaced asymmetric radiation from the edge) phenomenon is the cause of the peaking has been considered, with the MARFE believed to form a channel for the penetration of the neutral particles into deeper layers of the plasma. Finally, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis has shown that also the central line

  10. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  11. The Hugoniot Elastic Limit Decay Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The Hugoniot Elastic Limit(HEL) precursor decay in shock loaded solids has been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical investigation. Comparative evidence is presented to show that the elastic precursor wave particle velocity, UPHEL, for certain materials decays asymptotically with propagation distance to the DeBroglie velocity, V1, level. This is demonstrated for the following materials: iron, aluminum alloy 6061-T6, plexiglas(PMMA), nickel alloy(MAR-M200), and lithium flouride(LiF). The DeBroglie velocity, V1, equals h/2md, where h is Planck's Constant, m is the mass of one atom, and d is the closest distance between atoms. Thus a relationship has been established between a microscopically derived velocity, V1, and a macroscopically observed velocity, UPHEL.

  12. Natural products as photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Saewan, Nisakorn; Jimtaisong, Ampa

    2015-03-01

    The rise in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface has led to a depletion of stratospheric ozone over recent decades, thus accelerating the need to protect human skin against the harmful effects of UV radiation such as erythema, edema, hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and skin cancer. There are many different ways to protect skin against UV radiation's harmful effects. The most popular way to reduce the amount of UV radiation penetrating the skin is topical application of sunscreen products that contain UV absorbing or reflecting active molecules. Based on their protection mechanism, the active molecules in sunscreens are broadly divided into inorganic and organic agents. Inorganic sunscreens reflect and scatter UV and visible radiation, while organic sunscreens absorb UV radiation and then re-emit energy as heat or light. These synthetic molecules have limited concentration according to regulation concern. Several natural compounds with UV absorption property have been used to substitute for or to reduce the quantity of synthetic sunscreen agents. In addition to UV absorption property, most natural compounds were found to act as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory agents, which provide further protection against the damaging effects of UV radiation exposure. Compounds derived from natural sources have gained considerable attention for use in sunscreen products and have bolstered the market trend toward natural cosmetics. This adds to the importance of there being a wide selection of active molecules in sunscreen formulations. This paper summarizes a number of natural products derived from propolis, plants, algae, and lichens that have shown potential photoprotection properties against UV radiation exposure-induced skin damage. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. On the Limitations of Biological Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Edward R; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Scientific knowledge is grounded in a particular epistemology and, owing to the requirements of that epistemology, possesses limitations. Some limitations are intrinsic, in the sense that they depend inherently on the nature of scientific knowledge; others are contingent, depending on the present state of knowledge, including technology. Understanding limitations facilitates scientific research because one can then recognize when one is confronted by a limitation, as opposed to simply being unable to solve a problem within the existing bounds of possibility. In the hope that the role of limiting factors can be brought more clearly into focus and discussed, we consider several sources of limitation as they apply to biological knowledge: mathematical complexity, experimental constraints, validation, knowledge discovery, and human intellectual capacity. PMID:23633917

  14. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  15. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  16. Novel limiter pump topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure.

  17. Optical limiting materials

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.; Mattes, Benjamin R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Heeger, Alan J.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Klimov, Victor I.; Cha, Myoungsik; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  18. Natural Analogue Synthesis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Simmons

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present analogue studies and literature reviews designed to provide qualitative and quantitative information to test and provide added confidence in process models abstracted for performance assessment (PA) and model predictions pertinent to PA. This report provides updates to studies presented in the ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [151945], Section 13) and new examples gleaned from the literature, along with results of quantitative studies conducted specifically for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The intent of the natural analogue studies was to collect corroborative evidence from analogues to demonstrate additional understanding of processes expected to occur during postclosure at a potential Yucca Mountain repository. The report focuses on key processes by providing observations and analyses of natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) systems to improve understanding and confidence in the operation of these processes under conditions similar to those that could occur in a nuclear waste repository. The process models include those that represent both engineered and natural barrier processes. A second purpose of this report is to document the various applications of natural analogues to geologic repository programs, focusing primarily on the way analogues have been used by the YMP. This report is limited to providing support for PA in a confirmatory manner and to providing corroborative inputs for process modeling activities. Section 1.7 discusses additional limitations of this report. Key topics for this report are analogues to emplacement drift degradation, waste form degradation, waste package degradation, degradation of other materials proposed for the engineered barrier, seepage into drifts, radionuclide flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ), analogues to coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical processes, saturated zone (SZ) transport, impact of radionuclide

  19. Filarial huge splenomegaly dramatically regressed by anti-filarial medication: A rare clinical scenario.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ayan; Kumar, Arvind; Manchanda, Smita; Wig, Naveet

    2017-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. Lymphatic filariasis is a spectrum of illness and can manifest as, asymptomatic microfilaraemia, acute lymphatic filariasis (lymphangitis and lymphoedema), chronic lymphoedema, elephantiasis, hydrocele, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia and some systemic manifestations which involves joint, heart, kidney, nerve, etc. We here present a case of huge splenomegaly caused by lymphatic filariasis which is a rare presentation and only few cases had been reported in the world literature so far. After treatment of filariasis spleen size was reduced dramatically and patient is doing well even after 6 months of follow up after therapy.

  20. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.