Science.gov

Sample records for naval research laboratory cyclotron

  1. Naval Research Laboratory Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Res Ctr Blossom Point Pomonkey KEY WEST Marine Corrosion Facility MOBILE , AL Ex-USS Shadwell BAY ST. LOUIS, MS John C. Stennis Space Center...decision support, and autonomous systems. Mobile Networks / Personal Secure Phone The Navy and Marine Corps Corporate Laboratory NRL Personnel FY 11...laser 1980 1990 2000 2010 1970 SHARP Reconnaissance 2001 QuadGard 2005 IPsec, IPv6 , NKDS ANDE-2 Spacecraft Blood Surrogate Significant and

  2. Naval Research Laboratory Arctic Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Initiatives • Naval Arctic Environmental Research – Improved Physical Understanding – Integrated Arctic Modeling and Prediction – Developing New ...of the Arctic environment and important coupled processes operating in the Arctic region • Development of a new , dynamic, fully-integrated Arctic...longer lead times, including the use of satellite SAR data for assimilation into integrated models • Generation of new technologies (platforms

  3. 1982 Naval Research Laboratory Review,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    1949-’:-"’.𔃻 evelopment of the real-tine ballistic m e ct predictor (for test range safety). 1949 te n of fission products in fallout from th rst...inductive storage system developed, 1975-Technique deve’oped for the production of isotope’ nitrogen and hydrogen for medical and nuclear power purposes...which requires that all * Material science and component technology costs, including overhead costs, be charged to production units, viz., research job

  4. Naval Research Laboratory 1983 Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    8217% . ,,New as-lowtechiqus icrese yeld ofultrfin poder ,a._%. % ". .... .. . ,. 180 Mechanical Response of LaserIrraiate Panels...Jarvis, Optics Letters 8:54-56 Poranski, D.C. Weber , Materials Research Role of the Through-Space 2p-3p Overlap Effect Society Symposia Proceedings...Media, by R.J. Nowak, C.L. J.E. Wieselthier and A. Ephremides,* in Joyal, and D.C. Weber , Journal of Elec- IEEE Global Telecommunications Confer

  5. Naval Research Laboratory 1986 Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    effect transistor " oscillator amplitude and frequency. The noise (MESFET) in the United States . The MESFET reduction caused by phase locking is...research insti- built in this country. They also performed basic re- tution created iihin the United States Navy, began search, participating, for...heard along the east coast of the United States . And met \\v artime demands but had left NRL improperly. stuctredeadessb letmNavy e y in 1983. NRL helped

  6. Optics at the naval research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, J A

    1967-12-01

    Edward O. Hulburt initiated optical research at The Naval Research Laboratory in June 1924, choosing, fields of investigation such as the upper atmosphere of the earth, especially the ionosphere, gas discharges, the optical properties of the atmosphere and of the sea, visibility, ultraviolet and infrared physics, photoelasticity, and similar subjects. Ultraviolet and x-ray experiments from rockets were an outgrowth from continuing interest in the upper atmosphere, ultimately leading to the establishment of the E. O. Hulburt Center for Space Research in February 1963. Several divisions of the NRL conduct optical research in chemical spectroscopy, the properties of solids, and plasma physics, in addition to broad programs in the Optical Physics Division.

  7. US Naval Research Laboratory focus issue: introduction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Rather than concentrate on a single topic, this feature issue presents the wide variety of research in optics that takes place at a single institution, the United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and is analogous to an NRL feature issue published in Applied Optics in 1967. NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps. It conducts a broadly based multidisciplinary program of scientific research and advanced technological development in the physical, engineering, space, and environmental sciences related to maritime, atmospheric, and space domains. NRL's research is directed toward new and improved materials, techniques, equipment, and systems in response to identified and anticipated Navy needs. A number of articles in this issue review progress in broader research areas while other articles present the latest results on specific topics.

  8. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    SciTech Connect

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes four types of PET facilities: Clinical PET with no radionuclide production; clinical PET with a small accelerator; clinical PET with research support; and research PET facilities. General facility considerations are also discussed.

  9. Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory Bibliography, 1981-1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    n Ltd.. 6 pp., 1981. Olsen, R.G., Microwave-induced Developmental Defects in the Common Mealworm Tenerio mlit-ýr_--A Decade o’ Re-seaFch-, NAMRL-1283...Tri-service Aeromedical Research Panel Fall Technical Meeting , NAMRL Monograph 33, Naval Aerospace A Medical Research Laboratory, Pensacola, FL

  10. Naval Research Laboratory Major Facilities 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Simulation Chamber • Gamble II Facility • Hawk Facility • Mercury Facility • High-Frequency Microwave Processing of Materials Laboratory • T- Cubed ...robotic teams for use in indoor or outdoor environments. Proprioceptive sensors on the robots include odometry, a pitch/ roll /yaw sensor, compass...elevation mount. Further degrees of freedom (DOF) are allowed with the mounting point being on a roll axis and the entire positioner on a slide axis

  11. Naval Research Laboratory Fact Book 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Perception hardware and algorithms High- level reasoning algorithms Machine learning and adaptive algorithms Sensors for autonomous systems Power...Flight- level meteorological sensors Visible/near infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging systems Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) indium antimonide (InSb...research on basic physical phenomena of importance to radar and related sensors , investigates new engineering techniques applicable to radar

  12. The Naval Health Research Center Respiratory Disease Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M; Gray, G; Hawksworth, A; Malasig, M; Hudspeth, M; Poddar, S

    2000-07-01

    Concern about emerging and reemerging respiratory pathogens prompted the development of a respiratory disease reference laboratory at the Naval Health Research Center. Professionals working in this laboratory have instituted population-based surveillance for pathogens that affect military trainees and responded to threats of increased respiratory disease among high-risk military groups. Capabilities of this laboratory that are unique within the Department of Defense include adenovirus testing by viral shell culture and microneutralization serotyping, influenza culture and hemagglutination inhibition serotyping, and other special testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycoplasma pneumonia, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Projected capabilities of this laboratory include more advanced testing for these pathogens and testing for other emerging pathogens, including Bordetella pertussis, Legionella pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae type B. Such capabilities make the laboratory a valuable resource for military public health.

  13. CSI flight experiment projects of the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Shalom

    1993-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is involved in an active program of CSI flight experiments. The first CSI flight experiment of the Naval Research Laboratory, the Low Power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) dynamics experiment, has successfully measured vibrations of an orbiting satellite with a ground-based laser radar. The observations, made on January 7, 8 and 10, 1991, represent the first ever measurements of this type. In the tests, a narrowband heterodyne CO2 laser radar, operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, detected vibration induced differential-Doppler signatures of the LACE satellite. Power spectral densities of forced oscillations and modal frequencies and damping rates of free-damped vibrations were obtained and compared with finite element structural models of the LACE system. Another manifested flight experiment is the Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX) designed to demonstrate active and passive damping with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors and actuators. This experiment was developed under the management of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory with integration of the experiment at NRL. It is to ride as a secondary, or 'piggyback,' experiment on a future Navy satellite.

  14. CSI flight experiment projects of the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Shalom

    1993-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is involved in an active program of CSI flight experiments. The first CSI flight experiment of the Naval Research Laboratory, the Low Power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) dynamics experiment, has successfully measured vibrations of an orbiting satellite with a ground-based laser radar. The observations, made on January 7, 8 and 10, 1991, represent the first ever measurements of this type. In the tests, a narrowband heterodyne CO2 laser radar, operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, detected vibration induced differential-Doppler signatures of the LACE satellite. Power spectral densities of forced oscillations and modal frequencies and damping rates of free-damped vibrations were obtained and compared with finite element structural models of the LACE system. Another manifested flight experiment is the Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX) designed to demonstrate active and passive damping with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors and actuators. This experiment was developed under the management of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory with integration of the experiment at NRL. It is to ride as a secondary, or 'piggyback,' experiment on a future Navy satellite.

  15. US Naval Research Laboratory's Current Space Photovoltaic Experiemtns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Walters, Robert; Messenger, Scott; Krasowski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has a rich history conducting space photovoltaic (PV) experiments starting with Vanguard I, the first solar powered satellite in 1958. Today, NRL in collaboration with the NASA Glenn Research Center, is engaged in three flight experiments demonstrating a wide range of PV technologies in both LEO and HEO orbits. The Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE)[1], part of the 5th Materials on the International Space Station Experiment (MISSE-5), flew for 13 months on the International Space Station in 2005-2006. The FTSCE provided in-situ I-V monitoring of advanced III-V multi-junction cells and laboratory prototypes of thin film and other next generation technologies. Two experiments under development will provide more opportunities to demonstrate advanced solar cells and characterization electronics that are easily integrated on a wide variety of spacecraft bus architectures.

  16. GPS Monitor Station Upgrade Program at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galysh, Ivan J.; Craig, Dwin M.

    1996-01-01

    One of the measurements made by the Global Positioning System (GPS) monitor stations is to measure the continuous pseudo-range of all the passing GPS satellites. The pseudo-range contains GPS and monitor station clock errors as well as GPS satellite navigation errors. Currently the time at the GPS monitor station is obtained from the GPS constellation and has an inherent inaccuracy as a result. Improved timing accuracy at the GPS monitoring stations will improve GPS performance. The US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is developing hardware and software for the GPS monitor station upgrade program to improve the monitor station clock accuracy. This upgrade will allow a method independent of the GPS satellite constellation of measuring and correcting monitor station time to US Naval Observatory (USNO) time. THe hardware consists of a high performance atomic cesium frequency standard (CFS) and a computer which is used to ensemble the CFS with the two CFS's currently located at the monitor station by use of a dual-mixer system. The dual-mixer system achieves phase measurements between the high-performance CFS and the existing monitor station CFS's to within 400 femtoseconds. Time transfer between USNO and a given monitor station is achieved via a two way satellite time transfer modem. The computer at the monitor station disciplines the CFS based on a comparison of one pulse per second sent from the master site at USNO. The monitor station computer is also used to perform housekeeping functions, as well as recording the health status of all three CFS's. This information is sent to the USNO through the time transfer modem. Laboratory time synchronization results in the sub nanosecond range have been observed and the ability to maintain the monitor station CFS frequency to within 3.0 x 10 (sup minus 14) of the master site at USNO.

  17. Naval Air Systems Command-Naval Research Laboratory Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Synthetic Hydrocarbon Jet Aircraft Fuels Held at Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC on June 15 and 16, 1978

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    LEVEV -_ NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND- i NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY WORKSHOPf ON BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS FORO S SYNTHETIC J:YDROCARBON JET AIRCRAFT FUELS...M. R. Cines , "Solid-Liquid Equilibria of Hydrocarbons," Chapter 8, Physical Chemistry of Hydrocarbons, A. Farkas Editor, Vol. I, Academic Press, New

  18. Naval Health Research Center 1985 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Partial contents: Environmental Physiology; Environmental Medicine; Behavioral Psychopharmacology; Health Psychology ; Research Supports. Keywords: Naval Health Research; Naval laboratories; Abstracts.

  19. New Atomic Ion SIMS Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, K. S.; Fazel, K. C.; Fahey, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry of particulates and few micrometer regions of samples by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a very useful analytical tool. However, there are limitations caused by interferences from molecular species, such as hydrides, oxides, and carbides. Above mass 90 u, these interferences (> 104 M/ΔM) can exceed the resolving power of SIMS. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is capable of eliminating such molecular ion interferences, but lacks spatial information and generally requires use of negative ions. This requirement limits its sensitivity, since actinide and lanthanide elements preferentially generate positive atomic ions (~104 : 1). The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has installed a hybrid SIMS-AMS system, using a Single Stage AMS as a replacement for the normal Cameca IMS 4f SIMS electron multiplier detector. The NRL design enables analysis of either positive or negative ions. Thus, this system offers the potential to provide SIMS-like particle and micro-scale analysis without a forest of signals from molecular species, and is capable of measuring important positive atomic ions. This should improve measurement sensitivity and precision to determine isotopic distributions of actinides, lanthanides, and transition metals; and elemental abundances of trace species in particles or small features. Initial measurements show that molecule intensities can be reduced by seven orders of magnitude while atomic ion intensities are only diminished ~50%. We have chosen to call this instrument an atomic ion SIMS, or ai-SIMS, for short. The effect of basic operational parameters such as ion energy, charge state, molecule destruction gas and its pressure will be described, and examples of the benefits and capabilities of ai-SIMS will be presented.

  20. Cyclotron laboratory of the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Georgiev, L. S.

    2016-06-01

    An accelerator laboratory is presently under construction in Sofia at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The laboratory will use a TR24 type of cyclotron, which provides a possibility to accelerate a proton beam with an energy of 15 to 24 MeV and current of up to 0.4 mA. An accelerator with such parameters allows to produce a large variety of radioisotopes for development of radiopharmaceuticals. The most common radioisotopes that could be produced with such a cyclotron are PET isotopes like: 11C, 13N, 15O, 18F, 124I, 64Cu, 68Ge/68Ga, and SPECT isotopes like: 123I, 111In, 67Ga, 57Co, 99m Tc. Our aim is to use the cyclotron facility for research in the fields of radiopharmacy, radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics, applied research, new materials and for education in all these fields including nuclear energy. The building of the laboratory will be constructed nearby the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and the cyclotron together with all the equipment needed will be installed there.

  1. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation..., Naval Research Laboratory. (a) The danger zone—(1) Area A. A roughly rectangular area bounded on the... established fishing structure limit line; and on the west by the shore of Chesapeake Bay. (b) The regulations...

  2. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation..., Naval Research Laboratory. (a) The danger zone—(1) Area A. A roughly rectangular area bounded on the... established fishing structure limit line; and on the west by the shore of Chesapeake Bay. (b) The regulations...

  3. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation..., Naval Research Laboratory. (a) The danger zone—(1) Area A. A roughly rectangular area bounded on the... established fishing structure limit line; and on the west by the shore of Chesapeake Bay. (b) The regulations...

  4. A History of Computer-Assisted Medical Diagnosis at Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    user documenta- tion 7 . The conversion was essentially ’line- Dental Pain Program for-line" to keep the knowledge representation (the "brains" of the...the 19. Caras, B. G., Fisherkeller, K. D., and management of acute dental pain - User’s Southerland D. G. (1989). MEDIC - Manual (NSMRL Report 1143...for "classic" presentations of dental pain marine Medical Research Laboratory. (NSMRL Report 1136). Groton, CT: Naval Submarine Medical Research 37

  5. Free space optical communications research at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, W. S.; Moore, C. I.; Burris, H. R.; Murphy, J. L.; Suite, M. R.; Mahon, R.; Ferraro, M. S.; Goetz, P. G.; Thomas, L. M.; Font, C.; Gilbreath, G. C.; Xu, B.; Binari, S.; Hacker, K.; Reese, S.; Freeman, W. T.; Frawley, S.; Saint-Georges, E.; Uecke, S.; Sender, J.

    2010-02-01

    Free space optical (FSO) communication has enjoyed a renewal of interest in the past decade driven by increasing data rate requirements and decreasing amounts of radio frequency spectrum. These needs exist in both the commercial and military sectors. However military communications requirements differ in other ways. At the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) we have been conducting research on FSO communications for over ten years with an emphasis on tactical applications. NRL's FSO research has covered propagation studies in the maritime domain, new component development, and systems demonstrations. In addition NRL has developed both conventional, direct, laser communications systems and retro-reflecting systems. In this paper we review some of this work and discuss possible future applications of FSO communications.

  6. Progress in Laser Propagation in a Maritime Environment at the Naval Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    maritime propagation 1. INTRODUCTION The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) investigations into free space optical communications ( FSO ) span a number...and telescope -based receivers at each end of the link. Links from kbps to 100 Mbps are investigated using asymmetric architectures where one end of...modulators, and in advanced telescope concepts. We also design, develop and test advanced techniques in coding and system architectures which are required

  7. Evaluating High Performance Computing Systems at the Naval Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Dr. Alex MacKerell and Deva The XD 1 has proven to be a popular resource among Priyakumar use CHARMM to study the interaction of the researchers that...solver. Dr. Seikat Dey is using the ARMS 1,350,000 code to study wideband acoustic radiation and scattering NOZZLE 800,000 from submerged elastic...authentication in a Lustre® environment. 6. Dey , S. and Dibyendu K. Datta, "A parallel hp-FEM infrastructure for three-dimensional structural acoustics

  8. Materials Science and Engineering-1989 Publications (Naval Research Laboratory)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-29

    Antamanide J.H. Konnert, P. D’Antonio, J.M. Cowley, and Analog. Crystal Structure of A. Higgs , H-J. Ou Perhydrosymmetric antamanide, Ultramicroscopy, 30, 371...Paired Boson Superconductor" Molecular Beam Epitaxy" W. Jin, S.D. Mahanti, A.K. Rajagopal A. Christou, N. Flevaris, A. Georgakilas, Solid State...33(3), 347-358 Si(100)" "Neutron Scattering from Fermion and S.M. Prokes, W.F. Tseng, A- Christou Boson Superconductors" Materials Research Society

  9. Human Factors Assessment of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Limb Protection Program (QuadGard Phase 3 Pre-Pilot Production Design)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL- HRM Aberdeen Proving...team: • Peter Matic, Ph.D., and Graham Hubler, Ph.D., U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, program managers • Richard S. Bruno, Human Research and...Bethesda National Naval Center, the Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, the Naval Health Research Center, and other military hospitals in January 2004, the

  10. The NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Phase-Locked Gyrotron Oscillator Program for SDIO/IST

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-11

    Corporation Defense Systems Division 600 Hicks Rd. Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008 Attn: Dr. Gunter Dohler 1 copy Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box Y ...Mail Stop 3 Building 9201 -2 Oak Ridge , Tennessee 37830 Attn: Dr. A. England 1 copy Office of Naval Research 800 N. Quincy Street Arlington, Va. 22217...polarized TE mode are readily deduced from previous steady-state analyses 12 ,2 1 and are given by: dut Y [ u. dh A4l = - - f J’(k Re [h +i- - )e (14a) dz Uz

  11. Ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of the solar corona at the Naval Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Moses, J D; Ko, Y-K; Laming, J M; Provornikova, E A; Strachan, L; Beltran, S Tun

    2015-11-01

    We review the history of ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy with a specific focus on such activities at the Naval Research Laboratory and on studies of the extended solar corona and solar-wind source regions. We describe the problem of forecasting solar energetic particle events and discuss an observational technique designed to solve this problem by detecting supra-thermal seed particles as extended wings on spectral lines. Such seed particles are believed to be a necessary prerequisite for particle acceleration by heliospheric shock waves driven by a coronal mass ejection.

  12. NACA Researcher Examines the Cyclotron

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1951-02-21

    Researcher James Blue examines the new cyclotron at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. Researchers at NACA Lewis began postulating about the use of atomic power for propulsion immediately after World War II. The NACA concentrated its efforts on the study of high temperature materials and heat transfer since it did not have access to the top secret fission information. The military studied the plausibility of nuclear propulsion for aircraft in the late 1940s. The military program was cancelled after four years without any breakthroughs, but the Atomic Energy Commission took on the effort in 1951. The NACA Lewis laboratory was expanding its nuclear-related research during this period. In 1948, Lewis engineers were assigned to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to obtain expertise in high temperature heat transfer and advanced materials technology. The following year a new 80-person Nuclear Reactor Division was created, and an in-house nuclear school was established to train these researchers. The cyclotron was built behind the Materials and Structures Laboratory to support thermodynamic and materials research for both nuclear aircraft and nuclear rockets. The original NACA Lewis cyclotron was used to accelerate two kinds of particles. To better match the space radiation environment, the cyclotron was later modified to accelerate particles of the newly-discovered Van Allen radiation belts.

  13. Whistler wave propagation in the antenna near and far fields in the Naval Research Laboratory Space Physics Simulation Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Amatucci, William E.

    2010-01-15

    In previous papers, early whistler propagation measurements were presented [W. E. Amatucci et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 637 (2005)] as well as antenna impedance measurements [D. D. Blackwell et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 092106 (2007)] performed in the Naval Research Laboratory Space Physics Simulation Chamber (SPSC). Since that time there have been major upgrades in the experimental capabilities of the laboratory in the form of improvement of both the plasma source and antennas. This has allowed access to plasma parameter space that was previously unattainable, and has resulted in measurements that provide a significantly clearer picture of whistler propagation in the laboratory environment. This paper presents some of the first whistler experimental results from the upgraded SPSC. Whereas previously measurements were limited to measuring the cyclotron resonance cutoff and elliptical polarization indicative of the whistler mode, now it is possible to experimentally plot the dispersion relation itself. The waves are driven and detected using balanced dipole and loop antennas connected to a network analyzer, which measures the amplitude and phase of the wave in two dimensions (r and z). In addition the frequency of the signals is also swept over a range of several hundreds of megahertz, providing a comprehensive picture of the near and far field antenna radiation patterns over a variety of plasma conditions. The magnetic field is varied from a few gauss to 200 G, with the density variable over at least 3 decades from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. The waves are shown to lie on the dispersion surface for whistler waves, with observation of resonance cones in agreement with theoretical predictions. The waves are also observed to propagate without loss of amplitude at higher power, a result in agreement with previous experiments and the notion of ducted whistlers.

  14. MEMS- and LC-adaptive optics at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restaino, S. R.; Wilcox, C. C.; Martinez, T.; Andrews, J. R.; Santiago, F.; Payne, D. M.

    2012-06-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is an ensemble of techniques that aims at the remedial of the deleterious effects that the Earth's turbulent atmosphere induces on both imagery and signal gathering in real time. It has been over four decades since the first AO system was developed and tested. During this time important technological advances have changed profoundly the way that we think and develop AO systems. The use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) devices and Liquid Crystal Devices (LCD) has revolutionized these technologies making possible to go from very expensive, very large and power consuming systems to very compact and inexpensive systems. These changes have rendered AO systems useful and applicable in other fields ranging from medical imaging to industry. In this paper we will review the research efforts at the Naval research Laboratory (NRL) to develop AO systems based on both MEMs and LCD in order to produce more compact and light weight AO systems.

  15. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by an...

  16. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by an...

  17. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1996-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been involved in the development of solar cells for space applications since the 1960s. It quickly became apparent in this work that radiation damage caused to solar cells by electrons and protons trapped by the earth's magnetic field would seriously degrade the power output of photovoltaic arrays in extended missions. Techniques were therefore developed to harden the cells by shielding them with coverglass, etc. Ultimately, however, there is a limit to such approaches, which is determined by the radiation response of the semiconductor material employed. A desire for high efficiency and radiation resistance led to the development of alternative cell technologies such as GaAs, which has since become the technology of choice for many applications. InP cells are currently the most radiation resistant, high efficiency, planar cells known. NRL first sponsored InP solar cell technology in 1986, when Arizona State University was contracted to grow p/n cells by liquid phase epitaxy. NRL's interest in InP cells was generated by the results presented by Yamaguchi and his co-workers in the early 1980s on the remarkable radiation resistance of cells grown by diffusion of S into Zn doped p-type InP substrates. These cells also had beginning of life (BOL) efficiencies approximately 16%(AM0). Related to the radiation resistance of the cells was the fact that radiation-induced damage could be optically annealed by sunlight. Relatively large quantities of 1 x 2 cm(exp 2) diffused junction cells were made and were used on the MUSES-A and the EXOS-D satellites. These cells were also available in the U.S. through NIMCO, and were studied at NRL and elsewhere. Workers at NASA Lewis became involved in research in InP cells about the same time as NRL.

  18. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1996-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been involved in the development of solar cells for space applications since the 1960s. It quickly became apparent in this work that radiation damage caused to solar cells by electrons and protons trapped by the earth's magnetic field would seriously degrade the power output of photovoltaic arrays in extended missions. Techniques were therefore developed to harden the cells by shielding them with coverglass, etc. Ultimately, however, there is a limit to such approaches, which is determined by the radiation response of the semiconductor material employed. A desire for high efficiency and radiation resistance led to the development of alternative cell technologies such as GaAs, which has since become the technology of choice for many applications. InP cells are currently the most radiation resistant, high efficiency, planar cells known. NRL first sponsored InP solar cell technology in 1986, when Arizona State University was contracted to grow p/n cells by liquid phase epitaxy. NRL's interest in InP cells was generated by the results presented by Yamaguchi and his co-workers in the early 1980s on the remarkable radiation resistance of cells grown by diffusion of S into Zn doped p-type InP substrates. These cells also had beginning of life (BOL) efficiencies approximately 16%(AM0). Related to the radiation resistance of the cells was the fact that radiation-induced damage could be optically annealed by sunlight. Relatively large quantities of 1 x 2 cm(exp 2) diffused junction cells were made and were used on the MUSES-A and the EXOS-D satellites. These cells were also available in the U.S. through NIMCO, and were studied at NRL and elsewhere. Workers at NASA Lewis became involved in research in InP cells about the same time as NRL.

  19. An Overview of the Naval Research Laboratory Ocean Surface Flux (NFLUX) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. C.; Rowley, C. D.; Barron, C. N.

    2016-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) ocean surface flux (NFLUX) system is an end-to-end data processing and assimilation system used to provide near-real time satellite-based surface heat flux fields over the global ocean. Swath-level air temperature (TA), specific humidity (QA), and wind speed (WS) estimates are produced using multiple polynomial regression algorithms with inputs from satellite sensor data records from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A, the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 sensors. Swath-level WS estimates are also retrieved from satellite environmental data records from WindSat, the MetOp scatterometers, and the Oceansat scatterometer. Swath-level solar and longwave radiative flux estimates are produced utilizing the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Global Circulation Models (RRTMG). Primary inputs to the RRTMG include temperature and moisture profiles and cloud liquid and ice water paths from the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System. All swath-level satellite estimates undergo an automated quality control process and are then assimilated with atmospheric model forecasts to produce 3-hourly gridded analysis fields. The turbulent heat flux fields, latent and sensible heat flux, are determined from the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) 3.0 bulk algorithms using inputs of TA, QA, WS, and a sea surface temperature model field. Quality-controlled in situ observations over a one-year time period from May 2013 through April 2014 form the reference for validating ocean surface state parameter and heat flux fields. The NFLUX fields are evaluated alongside the Navy's operational global atmospheric model, the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM). NFLUX is shown to have smaller biases and lower or similar root mean square errors compared to NAVGEM.

  20. Demonstrating S-NPP VIIRS Products with the Naval Research Laboratory R&D Websites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuciauskas, A. P.; Hawkins, J.; Solbrig, J.; Bankert, R.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division in Monterey, CA (NRL-MRY) has been developing and providing the global community with VIIRS-derived state of the art image products on three operational websites: · NexSat: www.nrlmry.navy.mil/NEXSAT.html · VIIRS Page: www.nrlmry.navy.mil/VIIRS.html · Tropical Cyclone Page: www.nrlmry.navy.mil/TC.html These user-friendly websites are accessed by the global public with a daily average of 250,000 and 310,000 web hits for NexSat and Tropical Cyclone websites, respectively. Users consist of operational, research, scientific field campaigns, academia, and weather enthusiasts. The websites also contain ancillary products from 5 geostationary and 27 low earth orbiting sensors, ranging from visible through microwave channels. NRL-MRY also leverages the NRL global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) models for assessing cloud top measurements and synoptic overlays. With collaborations at CIMSS' Direct Readout site along with the AFWA IDPS-FNMOC and NOAA IDPS portals, a robust component to our websites are product latencies that typically satisfy operational time constraints necessary for planning purposes. Given these resources, NRL-MRY acquires ~2TBytes of data and produces 100,000 image products on a daily basis. In partnership with the COMET program, our product tutorials contain simple and graphically enhanced descriptions that accommodate users ranging from basic to advanced understanding of satellite meteorology. This presentation will provide an overview of our website functionality: animations, co-registered formats, and Google Earth viewing. Through imagery, we will also demonstrate the superiority of VIIRS against its heritage sensor counterparts. A focal aspect will be the demonstration of the VIIRS Day Night Band (DNB) in detecting nighttime features such as wildfires, volcanic ash, Arctic sea ice, and tropical cyclones. We also plan to illustrate how NexSat and VIIRS websites demonstrate

  1. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been involved in developing InP solar cell technology since 1988. The purpose of these programs was to produce advanced cells for use in very high radiation environments, either as a result of operating satellites in the Van Allen belts or for very long duration missions in other orbits. Richard Statler was technical representative on the first program, with Spire Corporation as the contractor, which eventually produced several hundred, high efficiency 2 x 2 sq cm single crystal InP cells. The shallow homojunction technology which was developed in this program enabled cells to be made with AMO, one sun efficiencies greater than 19%. Many of these cells have been flown on space experiments, including PASP Plus, which have confirmed the high radiation resistance of InP cells. NRL has also published widely on the radiation response of these cells and also on radiation-induced defect levels detected by DLTS, especially the work of Rob Walters and Scott Messenger. In 1990 NRL began another Navy-sponsored program with Tim Coutts and Mark Wanlass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), to develop a one sun, two terminal space version of the InP-InGaAs tandem junction cell being investigated at NREL for terrestrial applications. These cells were grown on InP substrates. Several cells with AM0, one sun efficiencies greater than 22% were produced. Two 2 x 2 sq cm cells were incorporated on the STRV lA/B solar cell experiment. These were the only two junction, tandem cells on the STRV experiment. The high cost and relative brittleness of InP wafers meant that if InP cell technology were to become a viable space power source, the superior radiation resistance of InP would have to be combined with a cheaper and more robust substrate. The main technical challenge was to overcome the effect of the dislocations produced by the lattice mismatch at the interface of the two materials. Over the last few years, NRL and Steve Wojtczuk at

  2. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been involved in developing InP solar cell technology since 1988. The purpose of these programs was to produce advanced cells for use in very high radiation environments, either as a result of operating satellites in the Van Allen belts or for very long duration missions in other orbits. Richard Statler was technical representative on the first program, with Spire Corporation as the contractor, which eventually produced several hundred, high efficiency 2 x 2 sq cm single crystal InP cells. The shallow homojunction technology which was developed in this program enabled cells to be made with AMO, one sun efficiencies greater than 19%. Many of these cells have been flown on space experiments, including PASP Plus, which have confirmed the high radiation resistance of InP cells. NRL has also published widely on the radiation response of these cells and also on radiation-induced defect levels detected by DLTS, especially the work of Rob Walters and Scott Messenger. In 1990 NRL began another Navy-sponsored program with Tim Coutts and Mark Wanlass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), to develop a one sun, two terminal space version of the InP-InGaAs tandem junction cell being investigated at NREL for terrestrial applications. These cells were grown on InP substrates. Several cells with AM0, one sun efficiencies greater than 22% were produced. Two 2 x 2 sq cm cells were incorporated on the STRV lA/B solar cell experiment. These were the only two junction, tandem cells on the STRV experiment. The high cost and relative brittleness of InP wafers meant that if InP cell technology were to become a viable space power source, the superior radiation resistance of InP would have to be combined with a cheaper and more robust substrate. The main technical challenge was to overcome the effect of the dislocations produced by the lattice mismatch at the interface of the two materials. Over the last few years, NRL and Steve Wojtczuk at

  3. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-10-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been involved in developing InP solar cell technology since 1988. The purpose of these programs was to produce advanced cells for use in very high radiation environments, either as a result of operating satellites in the Van Allen belts or for very long duration missions in other orbits. Richard Statler was technical representative on the first program, with Spire Corporation as the contractor, which eventually produced several hundred, high efficiency 2 x 2 sq cm single crystal InP cells. The shallow homojunction technology which was developed in this program enabled cells to be made with AMO, one sun efficiencies greater than 19%. Many of these cells have been flown on space experiments, including PASP Plus, which have confirmed the high radiation resistance of InP cells. NRL has also published widely on the radiation response of these cells and also on radiation-induced defect levels detected by DLTS, especially the work of Rob Walters and Scott Messenger. In 1990 NRL began another Navy-sponsored program with Tim Coutts and Mark Wanlass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), to develop a one sun, two terminal space version of the InP-InGaAs tandem junction cell being investigated at NREL for terrestrial applications. These cells were grown on InP substrates. Several cells with AM0, one sun efficiencies greater than 22% were produced. Two 2 x 2 sq cm cells were incorporated on the STRV lA/B solar cell experiment. These were the only two junction, tandem cells on the STRV experiment. The high cost and relative brittleness of InP wafers meant that if InP cell technology were to become a viable space power source, the superior radiation resistance of InP would have to be combined with a cheaper and more robust substrate. The main technical challenge was to overcome the effect of the dislocations produced by the lattice mismatch at the interface of the two materials. Over the last few years, NRL and Steve Wojtczuk at

  4. A new LabVIEW-based control system for the Naval Research Laboratory Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J. Jr.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Knoll, C.; Kennedy, C. A.; Hubler, G. K.

    1999-06-10

    A new LabVIEW-based control system for the existing tandem accelerator and new AMS components has been implemented at the Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Through the use of Device Interfaces (DIs) distributed along a fiber optic network, virtually every component of the accelerator system can be controlled from any networked computer terminal as well as remotely via modem or the internet. This paper discusses the LabVIEW-based control software, including remote operation, automatic calculation of ion optical component parameters, beam optimization, and data logging and retrieval.

  5. East Asia Dust Source Location Using the Naval Research Laboratory's 1-km Dust Enhancement Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Miller, S. D.; Richardson, K.; Westphal, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    In the effort to predict dust storms and their effects on local, regional and global scales an often cited uncertainty is the precise location of dust sources. Many approaches have been used to identify major dust source regions in East Asia. These approaches include analysis of station data for frequency of dust storms, drifting dust, dusty day, wind speed, and PM10 total suspended particulates. Some approaches emphasize the location of land surface type (Gobi, sandy desert, and loess) and geomorphological setting/features (basins, plateaus, alluvial fans, dry rivers, or oases). Other approaches use remote sensing to locate areas of high dust activity using the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Aerosol Index (TOMS AI) data, to correlate Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) vegetation cover with dust storm frequency, or to track dust storm event origination by analyzing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images. It is also customary for researchers to combine two or more of these approaches to identify dust source regions. In this paper we use a novel approach to locate dust sources in East Asia. Utilizing the Naval Research Laboratory's satellite derived 1-km Dust Enhancement Product (DEP) imagery we can readily distinguish elevated dust over land from other components of the scene and individual dust plumes are readily seen. The high resolution of the DEP allows the many small, eroding point sources (measuring 1-10s km across) that form individual plumes to be located. Five years (2007 - 2011) of East Asia DEP imagery have been analyzed. Dust source frequency plots will be shown highlighting the most active dust source areas in East Asia. Our results show the most active point sources are located along the slopes and around the rim of large basins. Within basins, on plateaus and in valleys point sources are concentrated in smaller depressions relative to the surrounding topography. Point sources are also associated with the action of

  6. Cyclotron Research and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, Rostislav

    2010-01-05

    The twenty years old cyclotron U-120M was upgraded for R and D and Production of Radiopharmaceuticals. R and D on short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals production is done at this accelerator. These Radiopharmaceuticals are eventually delivered to nearby hospitals. Development of new diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals is also pursued at the facility. your paper.

  7. Cyclotron Maser Emission - Stars, Planets and Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorgul, Irena

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and radio observations of active stars over many years have shown that they frequently generate X-ray bursts that are quickly followed by radio bursts. In many cases the radio bursts are highly polarised. More recently, the star CU Virginis has been found to exhibit pulsar-like behaviour. In both these situations we believe that the radio emission can be best explained by a cyclotron maser type instability initiated by electron beams funnelling down converging magnetic field configurations typical of a dipole magnetic topology. Just such a geometry also exists in the Earth's auroral zone and so our model can explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Via a similar process, all the gas giant/magnetised planets in the solar system also emit radio emission. We have established a laboratory-based facility that has verified many of the details of our original theoretical description. The experiment has demonstrated, for example, that an electron beam entering a strongly converging magnetic field geometry does indeed produce a ``horse-shoe'' (or crescent-shaped) distribution in velocity space. It is the generation of this horse-shoe distribution, also observed in the Earth's auroral zone, which is vital for our theoretical model. It leads to a population inversion in the perpendicular velocity distribution and generation of electromagnetic waves close to the cyclotron frequency. We will discuss recent developments in the theory and simulation of the instability and relate these to the laboratory, space and astrophysical observations. The research was supported by UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The input of R.A. Cairns, R. Bingham, B.J. Kellett and the experimental and computer modelling team at Strathclyde University, Glasgow is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) data base of oblique-incidence soundings of the ionosphere. Interim report, February 1986-March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.M.; Daehler, M.

    1988-09-20

    The Naval Research Laboratory has participated in a number of field exercises in support of HF communications, HF Direction Finding (HFDF), and HF Single-Site-Location (HF-SSL) systems development since 1980. During these exercises, the NRL support has included the documentation of ionospheric channel information through collection of Oblique-Incidence-Sounding (OIS) data. Data was obtained over two distinct epochs of solar activity. The first group, obtained between 1980 and 1982, was obtained for a period of high solar activity. The second group of data obtained between 1986 and the present, corresponds to relatively low or moderate activity. This report describes a collection of approximately 167,000 ionograms in terms of the environmental conditions under which they were obtained. It is planned to make these data sets available as a resource to qualified researchers.

  9. Incorporation of a radiation parameterization scheme into the Naval Research Laboratory limited area dynamical weather prediction model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.C.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of the Harshvardhan et al. (1987) radiation parameterization into the Naval Research Laboratory Limited Area Dynamical Weather Prediction Model. A comparison between model runs with the radiation scheme and runs without the scheme was made to examine three mesoscale phenomena along the west coast of the United States during the period 0000 UTC 02 May 1990 - 1200 UTC 03 %lay 1990: the land and sea breeze, the southerly surge and the Catalina eddy. In general the updated model with the radiation parameterization yielded a more accurate simulation of the layer temperatures, geopotential heights, cloud cover, and radiative processes as verified from synoptic, mesoscale: and satellite observations. Subsequently, the updated model also forecast a more realistic diurnal evolution of the sea and land breeze, the southerly surge and the Catalina eddy.

  10. New Eye for the Navy: The Origin of Radar at the Naval Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-29

    letin, July-Aug 1977, pp 433-450; Harold Passer, op. cit. (note 2), and Robert Conot, A Streak of Luck. The Ltfe and Legend of Thomas Alva Edison ...World War II (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1951). Conot, Robert, A Streak of Luck: The Life and Legend of Thomas Alva Edison (New York...parts. a dis- cussion of the early history of industrial research, with special attention to the laboratories of Thomas Edison , and a general

  11. Naval Research Lab Review 1999

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Chubb, T.F. Donato, F. Askari, A.L. Cooper, and S.A. Mango 164 Autonomous Survey System B.S. Bourgeois and A.B. Martinez SIMULATION, COMPUTING, AND... Products , Inc. Schlumberger has licensed NRL’s interferometric The Naval Research Laboratory 6 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ receiver system...and, in conjunction with NRL, is developing sensor arrays for land and offshore oil ex- ploration. With Optical Products , NRL is developing towed

  12. Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments and Diagnostics at NRL (Naval Research Laboratory).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-11

    Hooker, and S. Knight in Rutherford Laboratory Report RL-82-039 (1982). 38. J. Grun, M.l. Emery, M.J. Herbst, E.A. McLean, S.P. Obenschain, B.H. Ripin...HUNTSVILLE RESEARCH & ENGR. CTR. OICY ATTN ERNEST BAUER 4800 BRADFORD DRIVE OICY ATTN HANS WOLFARD HUNTSVILLE, AL 35807 OICY ATTN JOEL BENGSTON ATTN... BARON OICY ATTN RAY L. LEADABRAND OICY ATTN G. CARPENTER 0ICY ATTN G. PRICE OICY ATTN J. PETERSON OICY ATTN R. HAKE, JR. OICY ATTN V. GONZALES OICY

  13. Naval stores research at the Forest Products Laboratory, past and present

    Treesearch

    Duane F. Zinkel

    1987-01-01

    As many of you may not be familiar with Forest Products Laboratory, allow me to introduce it to you. The Forest Products Laboratory is a Federal government laboratory of the United States Department of Agriculture and, more specifically, of the Forest Service. The Laboratory was built in Madison, Wisconsin in close cooperation with the University of Wisconsin to serve...

  14. Naval Biodynamics Laboratory 1993 Command History

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Institute for Perception, TNO Soesterberg, The Netherlands LCDR Jeff Blevins Navy Foreign Liaison Office, Washington, D.C. Mr. James Bost NAVSEA 05D7...Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C. Captain T. Jones Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, CA Dr. Jeff Keuhn University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK...National Defence Research Establishment firsoirden, Sweden Mr. Roland Palmer Coastal Systems Station, Panama City, FL Mr. Bill Patten University of Oklahoma

  15. Numerical Simulation of the Laser-Target Interaction and Blast Wave Formation in the DNA/NRL (Defense Nuclear Agency/Naval Research Laboratory) Laser Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-09

    Blast Wave Formation in the DNA/NRL Laser Experiment JOHN L. GIULIANI, JR. AND MARGARET MULBRANDON Geophysical and Plasma Dynamics Branch Plasma ...title " Plasma Structure Evolution." DTIC ELL7 TE N MAY I : 1986 LLJ NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Washington, D.C. *Appro~ed for public releasec...the Defense Nuclear Agency under Subtask W99QMXVA, work unit 00010 and work unit title " Plasma Structure Evolution." 17 COSATI CODES 18s SUBJECT TERMS

  16. Naval Research Laboratory Multiscale Targeting Guidance for T-PARC and TCS-08

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Observing Laboratory (EOL) TPARC catalogue Web site (http://catalog.eol.ucar.edu/tparc_2008/). 526 W E A T H E R A N D F O R E C A S T I N G VOLUME 25...T H E R A N D F O R E C A S T I N G VOLUME 25 covered by at least one of these regions. The lead times and optimization times for all the fixed...associated 530 W E A T H E R A N D F O R E C A S T I N G VOLUME 25 FIG. 3. Vertically integrated SV sensitivity (shaded, values in J kg21 given in color bar

  17. History of Military Psychology at the U. S. Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-23

    Test and sonarman performance on combat patrols (1. 1*). In a recent (1979) tete-1-tete with Captain Shilling, still active as editor of the...between scientists and the operations types. A select few of the psychologists involved most actively In submarine research during the war years and...the possibilities of using peripheral indices of autonomic function (e. g., electrodermal conductance) as a measure of individual differencea in

  18. The Scientific Program of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-07-01

    wettability , and electrode potentials at solid/liquid, solid/air, liquid/liquid, and liquid/air interfaces are being pursued. Mechanisms involved in the surface...guide field and making use of electro- magnetic quadrupole lenses to concentrate the beam. Research and development work is being carried out to...plasmas. Semiconductor devices under study are improved point- contact diodes, multicontact diodes, multistable transistors, and transistors

  19. Combustion/particle sizing experiments at the Naval Postgraduate School Combustion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, John; Netzer, David

    1987-01-01

    Particle behavior in combustion processes is an active research area at NPS. Currently, four research efforts are being conducted: (1) There is a long standing need to better understand the soot production and combustion processes in gas turbine combustors, both from a concern for improved engine life and to minimize exhaust particulates. Soot emissions are strongly effected by fuel composition and additives; (2) A more recent need for particle sizing/behavior measurements is in the combustor of a solid fuel ramjet which uses a metallized fuel. High speed motion pictures are being used to study rather large burning particles; (3) In solid propellant rocket motors, metals are used to improve specific impulse and/or to provide damping for combustion pressure oscillations. Particle sizing experiments are being conducted using diode arrays to measure the light intensity as a function of scattering angle; (4) Once a good quality hologram is attained, a need exists for obtaining the particle distributions from hologram in a short period of time. A Quantimet 720 Image Analyzer is being used to reconstruct images.

  20. The Michigan State University Cyclotron Laboratory: Its Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Sam M.

    2016-01-01

    The Michigan State University Cyclotron Laboratory was founded in 1958 and over the years grew in stature, becoming the highest-ranked university-based program in nuclear science. Its K50 cyclotron had unmatched capability as a light-ion accelerator and helped to define what a modern cyclotron could do to advance our understanding of nuclei. This paper describes the first twenty years of the Cyclotron Laboratory's evolution and gives some insight into the cultural characteristics of the laboratory, and of its early members, that led it to thrive.

  1. The Naval Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    clubs are also ac- tive. NRL has a Recreation Club that provides bas- ketball and softball leagues and swim, sauna , whirl- pool bath, gymnasium...temperature infrared glass technology. There is also a Focal-Plane Evaluation Facility to measure the optical and electrical characteristics of... infrared focal- plane arrays being developed for advanced Navy sen- sors. The IR Missile-Seeker Evaluation Facility per- forms open-loop measurements of

  2. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M.; Scampoli, P.; Bremen, K. von

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  3. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Scampoli, P.; von Bremen, K.; Weber, M.

    2013-07-01

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  4. The future of naval ocean science research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, John A.; Brink, Kenneth

    The Ocean Studies Board (OSB) of the National Research Council reviewed the changing role of basic ocean science research in the Navy at a recent board meeting. The OSB was joined by Gerald Cann, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition; Geoffrey Chesbrough, oceanographer of the Navy; Arthur Bisson, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for antisubmarine warfare; Robert Winokur, technical director of the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy; Bruce Robinson, director of the new science directorate at the Office of Naval Research (ONR); and Paul Gaffney, commanding officer of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The past 2-3 years have brought great changes to the Navy's mission with the dissolution of the former Soviet Union and challenges presented by conflicts in newly independent states and developing nations. The new mission was recently enunciated in a white paper, “From the Sea: A New Direction for the Naval Service,” which is signed by the secretary of the Navy, the chief of naval operations, and the commandant of the Marine Corps. It departs from previous plans by proposing a heavier emphasis on amphibious operations and makes few statements about the traditional Navy mission of sea-lane control.

  5. Naval Research Reviews, Volume 46, February 1994

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    RADMMarc Pelaez , USN 24 inbI.IT, mE ) DEPUTY CHIEF OF NAVAL RESEARCH TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Profiles in Science Dr. Fred Saalfeld CHIEF WRITER/EDITOR...Left to right: Dr. Fred Saalfeld, Deputy Chief of Naval Research; RADM Marc Pelaez , Chief of Naval Research; the Honorable Nora Slatkin, Assistant

  6. Naval Medical Research Institute Summaries of Research for 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE BETHESDA, MARYLAND 0 SUMMARIES OF RESEARCH ~TC 1985 _ _ __ _ __ _ _ ) K. SORENSEN, CAPT. MC, USN * Commanding...Officer Naval Medical Research Institute NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND ~ ~mod KEY TO CITATiOIS NMRI 83-0006 HOMER LD SHELTON JB WILLIAMS...OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Naval Medical Research Naval Medical Command Institute N 6rc ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIPCodoe) 7b

  7. 32 CFR 700.333 - The Chief of Naval Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Naval Research, the Office of Naval Technology and assigned shore activities. (b) The Office of Naval... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Chief of Naval Research. 700.333 Section 700... The Office of the Secretary of the Navy/the Staff Assistants § 700.333 The Chief of Naval Research....

  8. 32 CFR 700.333 - The Chief of Naval Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Naval Research, the Office of Naval Technology and assigned shore activities. (b) The Office of Naval... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Chief of Naval Research. 700.333 Section 700... The Office of the Secretary of the Navy/the Staff Assistants § 700.333 The Chief of Naval Research....

  9. 75 FR 48939 - National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University; Notice of Decision on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... International Trade Administration National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University... pursuant to Section 6(c) of the Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Materials Importation Act of 1966...., NW., Washington, DC. Docket Number: 10-043. Applicant: National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory...

  10. NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    144 Stephen A. Mango High-Speed, Long-Range, Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Communications Link 149 James G. Eskinzes and John R. Bashista ELECTRONICS...to study the production of megampere electron beams and for producing very hot, high-density plasmas. Other generators are used to produce particle...of D heavy structures; design and fabrication of original "..,. , ,, electronic devices and instruments; the com- puterized production of dense

  11. 1980 Naval Research Laboratory Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    the get symbols, and a visual display of target history data, are then transmitted to the main-display and velocity for any number of operator...coast of North America, Third, Navy ships have recently been around the British Isles, and along the coast of instructed to report visual observations of...cm in diam) 30 20 _) 0- 000 0 0 o E NOISE SOUN "DOU0C -10 - 0 0 E3 00 -20 1 1 1 1 50 (b) 40-30 20- B20o- C3, 󈧏 0- 0 10 o - 013,F C󈧈 000 166 -uOI

  12. Naval Research Laboratory 1984 Review.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-16

    we’re A involved in. Although I would like to claim that it has been manage- ment that has led to this success, I think in reality it is due to cir...fluctuations of channel parameters. These measurements are essential for spread-spectrum communication. The use of information theory has led to the...sun into the interplanetary medium are observed by the NRL Solwind Coronagraph. Analysis of these events has led to fundamental understanding that

  13. Naval Research Reviews. Volume 35, Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    AD-AI40 555 NAVAL RESEARCH REVIEWS VOLUME 35 NUMBER 3 (U) OFFICE OF I/-NAVAL RESEARCH ARLINOTON VA W I LESCURE 1983 UNCL ASSIFIED F/G 5/ 2 NL m...oscillations. 14 ( 2 ) identification of acoustic modes that can making instability a frequent problem in the design of propul- be excited,0 and ( 3 ) the response...curtail its availability and endanger the high shock and spin forces. 2 Many of these advantages result production of thermal batteries that use it as an

  14. Naval Research Reviews, Volume 32, Number 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    and the Naval Ocean physical , engineering, environmental, biological. Research and DevOcpnent Activity (NORDA), Bay medical, and behavioral-social...Navy needs. The objec- as a valuable Navy asset, adding the reality of ap - tive of this funding is to stimulate the timely progress plication to the...require a high level of pie, basic research in atomic and molecular physics scientific stature and experience. To augment the has this character

  15. Naval Research Reviews. Volume XXXIV. Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    polyethoxy- Packard Co., USA ethanol 20 NR Reviews Examining the eve of a hammerhead shark respiration permit substances to be introduced via sodium dodecyl...UNCLASSIFIEO EEHESI~MIEi-- E!!EIlE8 i laval R wscarcf Office of Naval Research~Two/1982 viewsVol XXXIV ɜ SE 1982 A Bioassay of Surfactants as Shark ...18 Bioassay of Surfactants DEPARTM ENTS Y as Shark Repellents 17 Profiles in Science, by Samuel H. Gruber by Allen Newell and Efiahu Zlotkin b

  16. Cyclotrons for clinical and biomedical research with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present some background material on cyclotrons and other particle accelerators particularly with a view toward the considerations behind acquiring and installing such a machine for purely clinical and/or biomedical research use.

  17. Environmental Assessment: UCLA biomedical research CS-22 cyclotron replacement, University of California at Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    DOE proposes to participate in the joint funding, along with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and private donors, of a new biomedical cyclotron research instrument for UCLA. DOE proposes to provide funding in the amount of $500,000 to UCLA for removal and disposal of the existing 19 year old CS-22 cyclotron and refitting of the existing room, plus $900,000 (of the $1.5 million total cost) for installation of a new generation Cyclone 18/9 biomedical isotope compact cyclotron. The remaining $600,000 for the new instrument would be provided by NIH and private donors. The total cost for the entire project is $2,0000,000. Operation and use of the instrument would be entirely by UCLA. The Biomedical Cyclotron Facility is a line item included on UCLA`s Broad Scope A License. The CS-22 cyclotron was turned over to UCLA`s jurisdiction by DOE in 1989 when the Laboratory of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences General Contract with DOE was changed to a Cooperative Agreement, and ``Clause B`` involving safety responsibility was terminated. In support of this, a large closeout survey was performed, licensing actions were completed, and it was agreed that environmental, health and safety compliance would be UCLA`s responsibility. Since the CS022 cyclotron was DOE property prior to the above changes, DOE proposes to provide this entire funding for its removal and disposal, and to provide partial funding for its replacement. This report describes the removal of the existing cyclotron, and the operation and installation of a new cyclotron as well as any associated environmental impacts.

  18. Environmental Assessment: UCLA biomedical research CS-22 cyclotron replacement, University of California at Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    DOE proposes to participate in the joint funding, along with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and private donors, of a new biomedical cyclotron research instrument for UCLA. DOE proposes to provide funding in the amount of $500,000 to UCLA for removal and disposal of the existing 19 year old CS-22 cyclotron and refitting of the existing room, plus $900,000 (of the $1.5 million total cost) for installation of a new generation Cyclone 18/9 biomedical isotope compact cyclotron. The remaining $600,000 for the new instrument would be provided by NIH and private donors. The total cost for the entire project is $2,0000,000. Operation and use of the instrument would be entirely by UCLA. The Biomedical Cyclotron Facility is a line item included on UCLA's Broad Scope A License. The CS-22 cyclotron was turned over to UCLA's jurisdiction by DOE in 1989 when the Laboratory of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences General Contract with DOE was changed to a Cooperative Agreement, and Clause B'' involving safety responsibility was terminated. In support of this, a large closeout survey was performed, licensing actions were completed, and it was agreed that environmental, health and safety compliance would be UCLA's responsibility. Since the CS022 cyclotron was DOE property prior to the above changes, DOE proposes to provide this entire funding for its removal and disposal, and to provide partial funding for its replacement. This report describes the removal of the existing cyclotron, and the operation and installation of a new cyclotron as well as any associated environmental impacts.

  19. Naval War College Research Guide, 1984-1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    99 991 THE RESEARCH PAPER: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY Research Process Adler , Mortimer J. and Van Doren, Charles. How to Read a Book. rev. ed. New York...the Navy. Signature: 24 June 1984 (Date of graduation at the Naval War College) Paper directed by CAPT Jerome F. Watson Chairman, Department of Naval

  20. Bibliography of Scientific Publications of the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory: 1980-1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    AD-A268 886 NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY NBDL-93R001 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY: 1980-1992 NAVAL...LA, November 1980. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS Dixon, D. J., Copeland, M. O., and Halcomb, C. G., Psychomotor Battery Approaches to...Factors Society, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, October 1980. 3 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS McCauley, M. E., Kennedy, R. S., and Bittner, A. C., Jr

  1. Bibliography of Scientific Publications of the Naval Biodynamics Laboratory: 1980-1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-04

    NBDL-90R005 r-’ -- nt AD-A229 030 111ILur BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY: 1980-1990 [ELECT A D NAVAL...AND DATES COVERED 74 Sept 1990 interim: I Jan 1980 - 31 Aug 1990 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Bibliography of Scientific Publications of...CALL Captain, Medical Service Corps -w"O U.S. Navy 6 Commanding Officer. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS OF THE NAVAL BIODYNAMICS LABORATORY

  2. Thermal Evaporation in Blast Waves: A Model for Aneurism Formation in the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) LASER-HANE Simulation Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-11

    temperature near the aneurism using spectroscopy. Acknowledgments I gratefully thank fruitful discussions with Joe Huba, Barry Ripin, John Stamper, Ed... Verdon , Physical Review Letters, 47, 247, "Self-Consistent Reduction of the Spitzer- S Harm Electron Thermal Heat Flux in Steep Temperature Gradients in...S.W. CHAMPION COMMANDER 01CY ATTN OPR ALVA T. STAIR NAVAL SEA SYSTEMS COMMAND 01CY ATTN PHD JURGEN BUCHAU WASHINGTON, D.C. 20362 01CY ATTN PRO JOHN P

  3. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  4. Use of cyclotrons in medical research: Past, present, future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smathers, James B.; Myers, Lee T.

    1985-05-01

    The use of cyclotrons in medical research started in the late 1930s with the most prominent use being neutron irradiation in cancer therapy. Due to a lack of understanding of the biological effect of neutrons, the results were less than encouraging. In the 1940s and 1950s, small cyclotrons were used for isotope production and in the mid 60s, the biological effect of neutrons was more thoroughly studied, with the result that a second trial of neutron therapy was initiated at Hammersmith Hospital, England. Concurrent with this, work on the use of high energy charged particles, initially protons and alphas, was initiated in Sweden and Russia and at Harvard and Berkeley. The English success in neutron therapy led to some pilot studies in the USA using physics cyclotrons of various energies and targets. These results in turn lead to the present series of machines presently being installed at M.D. Anderson Hospital (42 MeV), Seattle (50 MeV) and UCLA (46 MeV). The future probably bodes well for cyclotrons at the two extremes of the energy range. For nuclear medicine the shift is away from the use of multiple isotopes, which requires a large range of particles and energies to 11C, 13N, 15O, and 18F, which can be incorporated in metabolic specific compounds and be made with small 8-10 MeV p+ "table top" cyclotrons. For tumor therapy machines of 60 MeV or so will probably be the choice for the future, as they allow the treatment of deep seated tumors with neutrons and the charged particles have sufficient range to allow the treatment of ocular tumors.

  5. NHRC (Naval Health Research Center) Report 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    is located on Point Loma in San Diego and occupies, in tenant status, six of the Naval Ocean Systems Center’s "barracks" buildings , and spaces at the...9. Public Works Center provides maintenance and public works functions, transportation and building custodial services on a reimbursable basis. % 10...working conditions or materials and advises the CO on command safety matters. f. ADP Committee Reviews requests for ADP hardware and software. Evaluates the

  6. Survey of Atmospheric Radiation Components for the Gamma and Cosmic Ray Astrophysics Branch of the Space Science Division of the Naval Research Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-31

    intergalactic propagation of ultraheavy cosmic rays. Elemental abundances of several rare earth elements can vary by factors of two or three if electron...RadiationComponents at Near- Earth Orbits," Advances in Space Research, 4, 143 (1984) *n * III II III NRL Final Report -9- 31 May 1985 List of Conferences...and elemental source composition has to be inferred from the observed composition near the earth . The uncertainty in the inferred source composition is

  7. NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Plasma Formulary. Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    large gradients in velocity space, the Fokker - Planck collision terms can be approximated according to fe- iee(Fe - fe) + v,(Fe - f) D,. ve( - f,) + 0 (F...I _i - DIMENSIONS AND UNITS To get the value of a quantity in Gaussian units, multiply the value expressed in inks units by the conversion factor...PHYSICAL CONSTANTS (SI)’ Physical Quantity Symbol - Value Units Boltzmann constant k 1.3807 x 10- 23 J K- Elementary charge e 1.6022 x IO-1 9 C Electron

  8. Naval Research Laboratory solar concentrator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolsky, Ilene; Brown, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    NRL has developed a trough-configuration solar concentrator with ultra-light thin film reflectors that are stretched flat using an edge-tensioning support system. With a geometric concentration ratio of 2.5 to 1, the specific power of the photovoltaic array is approximately doubled by the NRL system. A 300 watt experimental demonstration model of the array/reflector system has been successfully built and deployed, and predicted power levels have been reached in solar simulator testing. Work currently underway includes design, construction, and deployment of a 4 kilowatt array, optimization of reflector border shape and reflector attachment method, testing and modeling of thermal cycling and temperature effects, and assessment of space degradation issues.

  9. NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) plasma formulary, revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, D. L.

    Most of the formulas and data in this collection are well known and for all practical purposes are in the public domain. The books and articles cited are intended primarily not for the purpose of giving credit to the original workers, but (1) to guide the reader to sources containing related material and (2) to indicate where derivations, explanations, examples, etc., omitted from this compilation can be found. Additional material can also be found in D.L. Book, NRL Memorandum Report 3332 (1977).

  10. [Israel Naval Medical Institute: 20 years of applied research, and future goals].

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Shupak, A

    2000-05-01

    The Israel Naval Medical Institute (INMI) is unique as a research center located in a naval base and having close inter-relations with naval underwater units. It is ideal for applied research, and for mutual exchange of needs and of ideas and instructions. Factors making this institute so suitable for applied research include: direct personal communication with combat divers, professional naval divers, submariners, civilian recreational divers and professional civilian divers, as well as naval vessel crews prone to seasickness; hyperbaric oxygen therapy is administered in cooperation with a large neighboring hospital. Close spatial and personal relations with an academic institution (the Technion, with its Faculties of Medicine, Biology and Biophysics) provide a basis for cooperative research which expands research capabilities, and allows access to extensive expertise, instrumentation and equipment. Close ties with physicians who served at the INMI in the past also bring them into this research community. During their specialization, physicians may spend up to 6 months working with us on a research project. Undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students may complete their research at our institute with the agreement of their parent academic institutions. Much of the research can be released to the international community. However, some is classified, serves only internal needs or is not of public interest. The number of published papers has stabilized since 1991 at about 16 a year. Studies of gas exchange and oxygen toxicity originate mainly in the Hyperbaric Research Unit, research on motion sickness in the Motion Sickness and Human Performance Laboratory, and work on hyperbaric and diving medicine in the Clinical Section of the INMI.

  11. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-30

    Accrual of Manpower Costs ......................................... 55 Development of a Back-Channel MCCRES Reporting System 6 5 t_ Depot Maintenance... Cost and Production Accounting and Reporting ............................................. 57 Personnel Security Research Program...58 Cost Analysis for Competitive Major Weapon Systems Procurement: Further Refinement and Extensions 60 Influence Behavior and Effectiveness in Naval

  12. Use of a krypton isotope for rapid ion changeover at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-inch cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, George A.; Nichols, Donald K.

    1989-01-01

    An isotope of krypton, Kr86, has been combined with a mix of Ar, Ne, and N ions at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory cyclotron, to provide rapid ion changeover in Single Event Phenomena (SEP) testing. The new technique has been proved out successfully by a recent Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test in which it was found that there was no measurable contamination from other isotopes.

  13. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    DIEGO - Navy Medicine is dedicated to saving lives using medical innovations developed by naval personnel, researchers and medical departments of...and Capt. Stephen Savarino, speak to a new chapter in Navy Medicine research and development on many fronts, both administratively and scientifically...Savarino’s research caught the interest of Sanofi Pasteur, a major vaccine developer . A successful partnership was created to advance a vaccine for

  14. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of cyclotron instability in an ECR heated mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, Dmitry; Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    Despite more than half a century history, the studies of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and particles in magnetoactive plasma under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions still remain topical. One of the most interesting ECR manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Three stages of pulsed ECR discharge offer the opportunity to study wave-particles interactions for essentially different plasma parameters: the initial stage, when the density of hot (relativistic) electrons (Nh) exceeds the density of cold electrons (Nc), the developed discharge (Nh<cyclotron instability of different electromagnetic modes. In cold dense plasma whistlers, propagating nearly parallel to the trap axis, are effectively excited, and in rarefied plasma - slow or fast extraordinary wave (Z- or X- mode), propagating across the external magnetic field. The detailed investigation of spectral and temporal characteristics of non-stationary bursts of electromagnetic emission is presented. The interrelationship between the observed time-frequency spectrograms of electromagnetic emission with similar effects

  15. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-30

    December 1988. "Evaluation of Commercial Activities in the Marine Corps," Michael D . Breneman, Master’s Thesis, December 1988. "Managing the F -14...34 The Naval Postgraduate School provides a unique interface between academic institutions and the U.S. Navy. A substantially larger fraction of the R& D ...the M.S. and Ph. D . levels, by research professionals, and by faculty. All funded research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member

  16. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Gosport, U.K. to exchange research findings and discuss common issues on submarine research hosted, at the Institute of Naval Medicine (INM...exchange ideas and information as well as develop collaborations on common medical issues encountered by the U.S. and Royal Navy submarine communities...collaborations.” A major focus of the meeting was the unique health issues brought about with the The meeting identified many common areas of concern in

  17. National Exposure Research Laboratory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ecosystems Research Division of EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory, conducts research on organic and inorganic chemicals, greenhouse gas biogeochemical cycles, and land use perturbations that create stressor exposures and potentia risk

  18. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 9

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Ryan, Naval Medical Research Center Public Affairs SILVER SPRING, Md.- The outbreak of Ebola that occurred in West Africa presented a number of...infected. At the time, in the countries affected by the Ebola outbreak, there was no lab assay to systematically rapidly diagnose patients, and the...detecting Ebola . NMRC was able to assist, and the prototypes worked." The commercial partner succeeded in developing a rapid Ebola diagnostic test

  19. The Cyclotron Group at the Metallurgical Laboratory, Chicago, 1940-44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, Arthur H.; Bradner, H.; Brolley, J. E.; Camac, M.; Kern, B. D.; Levinger, J. S.; Meiners, E. P.; Mitchell, A. C. G.; Nedzel, V. A.; Rall, W.; Sampson, M. B.; Wilkinson, R. G.

    1980-11-01

    A small supplement to the official history of the Manhattan Project is offered in that some of the activities of the Cyclotron Group in the Metallurgical Laboratory are described. In particular, the work on the delayed neutron activities was essential to the decision to try for the first nuclear chain reaction in the middle of Chicago, and fast-neutron measurements in a 5-ton pile of solid uranium metal led to the assessment of the practicability of a controlled fast-neutron reactor, and also (through necessary and important subsequent developments by others) to the light-water-cooled, thermal-neutron reactors of today.

  20. NHRC (Naval Health Research Center) Report 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Physician and Sports Medicine David Hord, Ph.D. Associate Editor, Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology Laverne C. Johnson, Ph.D. Associate...Editor, Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology Paul Naitoh, Ph.D. Associate Editor for Psychophysiology; Perceptual and Motor Skills...Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology Cheryl L. Spinweber, Ph.D. Reviewer, Sleep 6 Invited Outside Reviewer, Research and Development Committee, VA

  1. United States Naval Academy Polar Science Program; Undergraduate Research and Outreach in Polar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    The United States Naval Academy (USNA) Polar Science Program (PSP), has been very active completing its own field campaign out of Barrow, AK, sent students to the South Pole, participated in STEM activities and educated over 100 future Naval Officers about the Polar Regions. Each activity is uniquely different, but has the similar undertone of sharing the recent rapid changes in the Cryosphere to a wide range of audiences. There is further room for development and growth through future field campaigns and new collaborations. The Naval Academy Ice Experiment (NAICEX) 2013 was based out of the old Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) in Barrow, AK. In joint collaboration with the University of Delaware, University of Washington, and Naval Research Laboratory we successfully took multiple measurements for over a week on the fast ice just offshore. Five undergraduate students from USNA, as well as 3 graduate students from University of Delaware participated, as well as multiple professors and instructors from each institution. Data collected during the experiment will be used in capstone courses and thesis research. There was also an outreach component to the experiment, where local students from Barrow H.S. have been assigned to the USNA ice observations project for their own high school course work. Local students will be analyzing data that will contribute into the larger research effort at USNA through coordinated remote efforts and participation in future field experiments. The USNA STEM office is one of the most robust in the entire country. The USNA PSP is active within this program by developing polar specific modules that are integrated varying length outreach opportunities from a few hours to week long camps. USNA PSP also engages in educator training that is held at the Naval Academy each summer. Through this program of educating the educators, the far reaching levels of awareness are multiplied exponentially. Also, the USNA Oceanography Department has

  2. Naval Research Reviews. Volume XXXIII. Number 2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    aluminum, and copper based bide partitioned out as fine TiC dendrites betweetn alloys by injecting titanium carbide or tungsten car- the injected...of SRI International 3- hydroxymethyl -5,5-dinitrohexanol, and for initiated research to synthesize a new energetic ox- 3,3-bis(azidomethyl)oxetane...etanes. Prior to the breakthrough, Mr. Manser uti- lized the methodology used by Dr. Frankel in his 3-methyl 3-(2-fluoro-2,2- 3- hydroxymethyl -5,5

  3. Research and development of ion surfing RF carpets for the cyclotron gas stopper at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, A. E.; Brodeur, M.; Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D. J.; Schwarz, S.

    2016-06-01

    A model device to transport thermal ions in the cyclotron gas stopper, a next-generation beam thermalization device under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, is presented. Radioactive ions produced by projectile fragmentation will come to rest at distances as large as 45 cm from the extraction orifice of the cyclotron gas stopper. The thermalized ions will be transported to the exit by RF carpets employing the recently developed "ion surfing" method. A quarter-circle prototype RF carpet was tested with potassium ions, and ion transport velocities as high as 60 m/s were observed over distances greater than 10 cm at a helium buffer gas pressure of 80 mbar. The transport of rubidium ions from an RF carpet to an electrode below was also demonstrated. The results of this study formed the basis of the design of the RF carpets for use in the cyclotron gas stopper.

  4. Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Air Force Research Laboratory 8 June 2009 Mr. Leo Marple Ai F R h L b t r orce esearc a ora ory Leo.Marple@wpafb.af.mil DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Wright

  5. Naval Research Logistics Quarterly. Volume 28. Number 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Underlying Dynamic Programming," SIAM Review, 9, 165-177 (1967). 181 Derman, C., "On Sequential Decisions and Markov Chains," Management Science , 9, 1, 16-24...34 Naval Research Logistics Quarterly, 24, 431-441 (1977). [151 Kalymon, B.A., "Machine Replacement With Stochastic Costs," Management Science , 18, 288-298...1972). 1161 Kamien, M.T. and N.L. Schwartz, "Optimal Maintenance and Sale Age for a Machine Sub- ject to Failure," Management Science , 17, B495-504

  6. A Generalized Computer Simulation Language for Naval Systems Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    FORTRAN-based software for statistical methodology and optimization. NAVMAP (Naval Modeling and Analysis Program) is intended to serve as the basis for a consistent simulation modeling approach among naval research laboratories. (Author)

  7. NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  8. NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The grand opening of NASA's new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  9. Laboratory investigation of auroral cyclotron emission in the presence of background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConville, Sandra; Speirs, David C.; Ronald, Kevin; Phelps, Alan; Gillespie, Karen; Cross, Adrian; Bingham, Robert; Robertson, Craig; Whyte, Colin G.; Vorgul, Irena; Cairns, Alan; Kellett, Barry

    2009-11-01

    In the auroral regions of the Earth's magnetosphere, particles are accelerated downwards into an increasing magnetic field. Due to conservation of the magnetic moment, magnetic compression leads to the formation of a horseshoe velocity distribution. This process is associated with the emission of Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR), polarised in the X-mode. A cyclotron maser instability driven by the horseshoe distribution is thought to be the generation mechanism of AKR. To simulate this naturally occurring phenomenon, a scaled laboratory experiment was created. Measurements of radiation conversion efficiency, mode and spectral content previously obtained were seen to be in close agreement with numerical predictions and satellite observations in the magnetosphere. To further replicate the magnetospheric conditions, a Penning trap was constructed and inserted into the interaction region of the experiment to generate a background plasma. The latest results from this modification shall be presented including characteristics of the background plasma.

  10. Green Building Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, David Jean

    2013-12-29

    This project provided support to the Green Building Research Laboratory at Portland State University (PSU) so it could work with researchers and industry to solve technical problems for the benefit of the green building industry. It also helped to facilitate the development of PSU’s undergraduate and graduate-level training in building science across the curriculum.

  11. Research on the high power cyclotron-wave rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoyun; Tuo, Xianguo; Ge, Qing; Peng, Ying

    2017-07-01

    As a key component of a Wireless Power Transmission System, a cyclotron-wave rectifier, a high power microwave to DC converter, has received more attention from scholars. This paper comprehensively analyzes various limiting factors of the output voltage and current. The results show that high frequency breakdown, the external magnetic field, and engineering realization limit the output voltage, and the space charge force limits the beam current. On this basis, by using the equivalent circuit and particle simulation, we design a cyclotron-wave rectifier with high power. The simulation results demonstrate that working at 2.45 GHz, the rectifier can obtain an output voltage of 113 kV and an output power of 791 kW. These conclusions can provide guidance for designing and application of this device.

  12. Naval hyperspectral remote sensing research for the oceans, atmosphere, and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert P.; Cleveland, Joan S.; Ferek, Ronald J.

    2004-10-01

    To meet Naval needs for sensing of the global environment, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) sponsor or carry out a variety of research programs using hyperspectral sensing. For ocean sensing, airborne and space-borne hyperspectral sensors are used to characterize the littoral environment with the aim of providing specification of ocean optical parameters including water clarity, diver visibility, bathymetry, bottom type and beach characterization. For the atmosphere, the Navy has interest in hyperspectral remote sensing from geosynchronous orbit. ONR interests include improved modeling of radiation transport in the atmosphere to infer high resolution profiles of wind, temperature and minor species and cloud characteristics. With sponsorship from Director Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E), ONR is managing a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) to provide new models for use with geosynchronous data. In partnership with NASA, NOAA and the Air Force, ONR is promoting the flight of the Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer-Indian Ocean METOC Imager (GIFTS-IOMI) program to obtain hyperspectral atmospheric imagery with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution. For the space environment, NRL has flown a suite of experimental ultraviolet hyperspectral sensors to determine altitude profiles of the ionospheric electron density and upper atmospheric neutral density. The High Resolution Airglow/Aurora Spectroscopy (HIRAAS) experiment on the ARGOS satellite provided a proof of concept for a future series of hyperspectral ultraviolet space weather sensors the first of which has recently been launch on a DMSP weather satellite. ONR is sponsoring the development of a multispectral ultraviolet imager to take this capability to geosynchronous orbit.

  13. Research Collaborations Between Universities and Department of Defense Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    Council – Resident Research Associateship (USAF/NRC-RRA) Program,5 the Naval Research Sabbatical Leave Program6 for faculty, and the College Qualified...http://www.onr.navy.mil/Education-Outreach/Summer-Faculty- Research-Sabbatical.aspx. 7 See U. S. Army website, “CQL Program – College Qualified... tuition assistance for researchers who are completing advanced degrees and opportunities for graduate students to work temporarily in a laboratory. These

  14. Digital data acquisition system implementation at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; Liddick, S. N.; Abromeit, B. L.; Chemey, A. T.; Larson, N. R.; Suchyta, S.; Tompkins, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    A Digital Data Acquisition System (DDAS) composed of 16-channel FPGA-programmable modules running 12-bit 100 Mega-Samples Per Second (MSPS) ADCs has been implemented on three different experimental arrays at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) encompassing charged particle spectroscopy, high and low energy-resolution photon detection, and neutron time-of-flight measurements. DDAS has increased the experimental capabilities of each array by providing energy and time measurements with nearly zero dead-time, low energy thresholds, and large dynamic range. The performance of the DDAS Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC)s was characterized, and energy and time resolutions were compared with traditional analog systems. We have demonstrated a 14- to 15-bit peak-sensing equivalent resolution when applied to semiconductor detectors and 500 ps time resolution for LaBr3 detectors measuring coincident radiation with signal amplitudes of ≈13% of the input range of the ADC. Details regarding the operation of the system at NSCL including digital filtering, triggering, clock distribution, and event-building are discussed along with applications to selected detector systems.

  15. Proton beam dosimetry for radiosurgery: implementation of the ICRU Report 59 at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Myers, Karla D; Rosenthal, Stanley J; Smith, Alfred R

    2002-04-21

    Recent proton dosimetry intercomparisons have demonstrated that the adoption of a common protocol, e.g. ICRU Report 59, can lead to improved consistency in absorbed dose determinations. We compared absorbed dose values, measured in the 160 MeV proton radiosurgery beamline at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, based on ionization chamber methods with those from a Faraday cup technique. The Faraday cup method is based on a proton fluence determination that allows the estimation of absorbed dose with the CEMA approximation, under which the dose is equal to the fluence times the mean mass stopping power. The ionization chamber technique employs an air-kerma calibration coefficient for 60Co radiation and a calculated correction in order to take into account the differences in response to 60Co and proton beam radiations. The absorbed dose to water, based on a diode measurement calibrated with a Faraday cup technique, is approximately 2% higher than was obtained from an ionization chamber measurement. At the Bragg peak depth, the techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, which are both approximately 4% (1 standard deviation). The ionization chamber technique exhibited superior reproducibility and was adopted in our standard clinical practice for radiosurgery.

  16. Proton beam dosimetry for radiosurgery: implementation of the ICRU Report 59 at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Myers, Karla D.; Rosenthal, Stanley J.; Smith, Alfred R.

    2002-04-01

    Recent proton dosimetry intercomparisons have demonstrated that the adoption of a common protocol, e.g. ICRU Report 59, can lead to improved consistency in absorbed dose determinations. We compared absorbed dose values, measured in the 160 MeV proton radiosurgery beamline at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, based on ionization chamber methods with those from a Faraday cup technique. The Faraday cup method is based on a proton fluence determination that allows the estimation of absorbed dose with the CEMA approximation, under which the dose is equal to the fluence times the mean mass stopping power. The ionization chamber technique employs an air-kerma calibration coefficient for 60Co radiation and a calculated correction in order to take into account the differences in response to 60Co and proton beam radiations. The absorbed dose to water, based on a diode measurement calibrated with a Faraday cup technique, is approximately 2% higher than was obtained from an ionization chamber measurement. At the Bragg peak depth, the techniques agree to within their respective uncertainties, which are both approximately 4% (1 standard deviation). The ionization chamber technique exhibited superior reproducibility and was adopted in our standard clinical practice for radiosurgery.

  17. Observations of odd-half cyclotron harmonic emissions in a shell-Maxwellian laboratory plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    During the last 14 years, the subject of odd-half electron cyclotron harmonic emission from plasma has been given considerable attention. It was apparently first reported to occur in a beam plasma machine. The existence of the emission in space has been well documented through observations made with satellites. Because wavelengths are difficult to observe in space, no wave number spectrum has ever been obtained for the half-odd harmonic emission. Such a spectrum together with a frequency spectrum might provide the basis for a successful modeling of the instability. The present investigation is concerned with the design of a laboratory experiment in which a plasma with an anisotropic velocity distribution is produced and measured. In addition, the dispersion relation is directly measured, and a noise analysis is conducted. The obtained plasma, a mixture of shell and Maxwellian distributions, is found to emit waves within the Bernstein wave branches. By correlation measurements, a mode is found which is essentially an absolute instability in a narrow frequency band.

  18. Naval Medical Research and Development News: Volume 8, Issue 2,February 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    Naval Medical Research Center, 503 Robert Grant Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910. NMR&D News is published monthly by the NMRC Public Affairs Office... researchers at the Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC). “NMRC hopes to have a vaccine ready for testing (in volunteers) in the next three to five years... researcher from NMRC Infectious Diseases Directorate. “We have previously demonstrated the safety of a tetravalent DNA vaccine, and part of our testing

  19. Naval Surface Warfare Center Technical Digest. Research and Technology - Shaping Future Naval Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Estimation and Prediction for Tactical W. D. Blair 72 Weapons Fire Control Innovative Missile Airframe Concepts L. Schindel and S. R. Hardy 84 The Use of...accompanying figure illustrates the basic functional elements of the combat system, namely: "Detect" the target, " Control " the weapon, and "Engage" the target...target state, the better the approach to the development of naval systems. fire control solution and the more likely a Kreider and Nance postulate a

  20. Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahata, A.; Igami, H.; Kawamori, E.; Kogi, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2014-10-15

    We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

  1. Magnetic-field measurements for the Lewis Research Center cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Lewis Center cyclotron was mapped by using a Hall-effect magnetic-field transducer. Main-field Fourier coefficients were determined on a polar mesh of 40 radii for each of seven levels of main-field coil current. Incremental fields for eight sets of trim coils and two sets of harmonic coils were also determined at four of these main-field levels. A stored-program, digital computer was used to perform the measurements. The process was entirely automatic; all data-taking and data-reduction activities were specified by the computer programs. A new method for temperature compensation of a Hall element was used. This method required no temperature control of the element. Measurements of the Hall voltage and Hall-element resistance were sufficient to correct for temperature effects.

  2. A new fission-fragment detector to complement the CACTUS-SiRi setup at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornyi, T. G.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csige, L.

    2014-02-01

    An array of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) for the detection of heavy ions has been developed. The new device, NIFF (Nuclear Instrument for Fission Fragments), consists of four individual detectors and covers 60% of 2π. It was designed to be used in conjunction with the SiRi array of ΔE-E silicon telescopes for light charged particles and fits into the CACTUS array of 28 large-volume NaI scintillation detectors at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The low-pressure gas-filled PPACs are sensitive for the detection of fission fragments, but are insensitive to scattered beam particles of light ions or light-ion ejectiles. The PPAC detectors of NIFF have good time resolution and can be used either to select or to veto fission events in in-beam experiments with light-ion beams and actinide targets. The powerful combination of SiRi, CACTUS, and NIFF provides new research opportunities for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions in the actinide region. The new setup is particularly well suited to study the competition of fission and γ decay as a function of excitation energy.

  3. Experimental Research on the Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator “LACARA”

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T C

    2008-11-11

    The Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonant Accelerator LACARA has successfully operated this year. Results are summarized, an interpretation of operating data is provided in the body of the report, and recommendations are made how the experiment should be carried forward. The Appendix A contains a description of the LACARA apparatus, currently installed at the Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes the project, extending over three grant-years.

  4. Cyclotron in the Materials and Stresses Building

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-11-21

    Researchers check the cyclotron in the Materials and Stresses Building at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. The Materials and Stresses Building, built in 1949, contained a number of laboratories to test the strength, diffusion, and other facets of materials. The materials could be subjected to high temperatures, high stresses, corrosion, irradiation, and hot gasses. The Physics of Solids Laboratory included a cyclotron, cloud chamber, helium cryostat, and metallurgy cave. The cyclotron was built in the early 1950s to test the effects of radiation on different materials so that the proper materials could be used to construct a nuclear aircraft engine and other components. By the late 1950s, the focus had shifted to similar studies for rockets. NASA cancelled its entire nuclear program in January 1973, and the cyclotron was mothballed. In 1975 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation partnered with NASA Lewis to use the cyclotron to treat cancer patients with a new type of radiation therapy. The cyclotron split beryllium atoms which caused neutrons to be released. The neutrons were streamed directly at the patient’s tumor. Over the course of five years, the cyclotron was used to treat 1200 patients. The program was terminated in 1980 as the Clinic shifted its efforts to concentrate on non-radiation treatments. The Lewis cyclotron was mothballed for a number of years before being demolished.

  5. Laboratory Observations of Whistler Wave Resonances*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, W. E.; Blackwell, D. D.; Tejero, E. M.; Cothran, C. D.; Rudakov, L.; Ganguli, G.; Walker, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    Standing whistler wave patterns have been investigated in the Naval Research Laboratory's Space Physics Simulation Chamber. In the original experimental configuration, partial reflection of the antenna-launched whistler waves from the chamber end boundaries occurs, setting up a combination of standing and traveling waves. By controlling the axial magnetic field strength profile, cyclotron absorption of the whistler waves can be induced before reflection occurs, leaving only the forward propagating waves. By comparing standing wave amplitudes to that when the wave is prevented from reflecting, cavity Q's in excess of 30 have been observed. Under uniform axial magnetic field conditions, the addition of planar conducting grids across the vacuum chamber cross-section at the ends of the plasma column provides improved reflecting surfaces and corresponding increases in the value of Q. *Work sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and DARPA.

  6. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  7. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-30

    definitive conclusions can be reached. Publications: "Constituicao: 0 Caso de Portugal," Lua Nova (Sao Paulo), March 1987. Ŕ Papel da Igreja na Transicao...Susceptibility in Ai r-to-Air Cmbat, Naval Air Systems Command, July 1987. Theses Directed: D. D. Antonio , "A Missile Flyout Model for ISEAS," M.S., Dec

  8. Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.; Thompson, I.; Wilson, B.

    2007-07-31

    Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.

  9. β-decay measurements of A simeq 70 - 110 r-process nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J.; Aprahamian, A.; Arndt, O.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Hennrich, S.; Hosmer, P.; Kessler, R.; Kratz, K.-L.; Lorusso, G.; Mantica, P. F.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pfeiffer, B.; Quinn, M.; Santi, P.; Schatz, H.; Schertz, F.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Walters, W. B.; Wöhr, A.

    2011-09-01

    The present paper reports on several r-process motivated β-decay experiments undertaken at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. β-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron-emission probabilities were measured for nuclei around the r-process A = 70-80 and A = 90 - 110 mass regions. The data are discussed on the basis of quasi-random phase approximation calculations. The emphasis is made on the impact of these data upon calculations of r-process abundances.

  10. Alternative Fuels Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Angela D.; Klettlinger, Jennifer L.; Nakley, Leah M.; Yen, Chia H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn has invested over $1.5 million in engineering, and infrastructure upgrades to renovate an existing test facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), which is now being used as an Alternative Fuels Laboratory. Facility systems have demonstrated reliability and consistency for continuous and safe operations in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis and thermal stability testing. This effort is supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonic Fixed Wing project. The purpose of this test facility is to conduct bench scale F-T catalyst screening experiments. These experiments require the use of a synthesis gas feedstock, which will enable the investigation of F-T reaction kinetics, product yields and hydrocarbon distributions. Currently the facility has the capability of performing three simultaneous reactor screening tests, along with a fourth fixed-bed reactor for catalyst activation studies. Product gas composition and performance data can be continuously obtained with an automated gas sampling system, which directly connects the reactors to a micro-gas chromatograph (micro GC). Liquid and molten product samples are collected intermittently and are analyzed by injecting as a diluted sample into designated gas chromatograph units. The test facility also has the capability of performing thermal stability experiments of alternative aviation fuels with the use of a Hot Liquid Process Simulator (HLPS) (Ref. 1) in accordance to ASTM D 3241 "Thermal Oxidation Stability of Aviation Fuels" (JFTOT method) (Ref. 2). An Ellipsometer will be used to study fuel fouling thicknesses on heated tubes from the HLPS experiments. A detailed overview of the test facility systems and capabilities are described in this paper.

  11. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  12. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-01

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few μA for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  13. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-30

    Accumulation and Reporting at the Naval Air Rework Facility, Jacksonville, Florida, Master’s Thesis, June 1984. F . D . Gorris, "Documentation and...4 W W ’(V ~ ~ * ~ . -V’-~ ’ie: F inanci1 Analyst t rrinc~s Forecasts anc P-rcciction of Coriporate Failure Investigator: 0. D . No’ses, !Assi. tant...angular encoder and a two-channel digital encoder. Publications: D . L. Gardner, R. K. Yarber, E. F . Carome, and S. L. Garrett, "A Fiber-Optic

  14. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  15. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi {sup 252}Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 {+-} 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+}.

  16. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi 252Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 ± 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of 143Cs27+.

  17. Abstracts of Research Project Reports by National Naval Dental Center First-, Second-, and Third-Year Residents, June 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Dl- iU2 826 ABSTRACTS OF"RESEARCH PROJECT REPORTS BY NATIONAL NAVAL V/i DENTAL CENTER FIR..CU) NATIONAL NAVAL DENTAL CENTER BETHESDA RD G B PELLEU ET...34 lNDC-T-062 1 December 1982 TECHNICAL REPORT S.- ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH PROJECT REPORTS BY NATIONAL NAVAL DENTAL CENTER FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD...YEAR RESIDENTS - JUNE 1982 by G. B. PELLEU, JR. and H. N. HUGHES NATIONAL NAVAL DENTAL CENTER 4BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20814 This document has been

  18. Proceedings of the Workshop on Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of Titanium Alloys (2nd) Held on 2-4 February 1982 at the Naval Research Laboratory, Underwater Sound Reference Detachment, Orlando, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Imam, B.B. Rath, A.C. Ehrilich, and D.J. Gillespie • PART B ACOUSTICAL TECHNIQUES Nonlinear Ultrasonic Characterization of Oxygen Im purities in Titanium...ADMINISTERED BY , Office o/’Vaval Research July 1984 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited, . - . .. ". . .% - II COMPONENT PART NOTICE NOV 2 9...1984 THIS PAPER IS A COMPONENT PART OF THE FOLLOWING COMPILATION REP .-! (TITLE): Proceedings of the Wnrkqhnp .. j,,Aetr,-ti, e Eraluation (NnDF) of

  19. Ultrasonic Research: Summary Report and Literature Guide to the National Bureau of Standards/Office of Naval Research Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    IE R A T W E I D T O E- E TC ( U ) WMCLASSZFIZD MOSIM-8961519M LmD I L Hiii~ M8 It.25 M6 NBSIR 82-2529 Ultrasonic Research Summary Report and...Literature Guide to the National Bureau of Standards/Office of Naval Research Program ~ ~ NW Enmlw o"m LOam - s. RvwMnom. c Ca4u -41 atonamw 0 w NS04-ft-IF...2529 ULTRASONIC RESEARCH SUMMARY REPORT AND LITERATURE GUIDE TO THE NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS/OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH PROGRAM M Greenspan end OG

  20. ARTEMIS-B: A room-temperature test electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University

    SciTech Connect

    Machicoane, G.; Cole, D.; Ottarson, J.; Stetson, J.; Zavodszky, P.

    2006-03-15

    The current scheme for ion-beam injection into the coupled cyclotron accelerator at the NSCL involves the use of two electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The first one is a 6.4 GHz fully superconducting that will be replaced within two years by SUSI, a third generation 18 GHz superconducting ECR ion source. The other source, ARTEMIS, is a room-temperature source based on the AECR-U design and built in collaboration with the University of Jyvaeskylae in 1999. Due to cyclotron operation constraint, very little time can be allowed to ion source development and optics studies of the cyclotron injection beam line. In this context, NSCL has decided to build ARTEMIS-B an exact replica of its room-temperature ECR ion source. The goal of this project is threefold. One is to improve the overall reliability of cyclotron operation through tests and studies of various ion source parameters that could benefit beam stability, tuning reproducibility, and of course overall extracted currents performance. Second is to implement and test modifications or upgrade made to the ion source: extraction geometry, new resistive or rf oven design, dual frequency use, liner, etc. Finally, this test source will be used to study various ion optics schemes such as electrostatic quadrupole doublet or triplet at the source extraction or the use of a correction sextupole and assess their effect on the ion beam through the use of an emittance scanner and imaging viewer that will be incorporated into ARTEMIS-B beam line. This article reviews the design and construction of ARTEMIS-B along with some initial commissioning results.

  1. Virtual robotics laboratory for research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Gerard T.

    1995-09-01

    We report on work currently underway to put a robotics laboratory onto the Internet in support of teaching and research in robotics and artificial intelligence in higher education institutions in the UK. The project is called Netrolab. The robotics laboratory comprises a set of robotics resources including a manipulator, a mobile robot with an on-board monocular active vision head and a set of sonar sensing modules, and a set of laboratory cameras to allow the user to see into the laboratory. The paper will report on key aspect of the project aimed at using multimedia tools and object-oriented techniques to network the robotics resources and to allow them to be configured into complex teaching and experimental modules. The paper will outline both the current developments of Netrolab and provide a perspective on the future development of networked virtual laboratories for research.

  2. Naval Research Laboratory array cable qualifying test program. Contract report

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, R.C.; Howell, T.A.

    1994-08-01

    In 1993, Neptune Technologies designed and fabricated two prototype array cables under NRL`s support. Briefly, these two generic cables consisted of a monolay construction utilizing 18 singles and atwisted pair construction incorporating seven twisted pairs. Each conductor core was strengthened with an overbraid of Kevlar, then one core was jacketed with a braided sleeve of polyester which incorporated a fuzz type fairing, while the monocore incorporated an extruded jacket with a straked strum suppressor. The essence of the new cables are small AWG number 26 conductors insulated with a thin coating of Surlyn. These much smaller conductors are expected to provide a smaller cable with higher reliability. See Neptune Report dated December 32,1993, entitled Prototype Cable Final Technical Report.

  3. Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) Subsurface Containment Berm Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    non-intrusive ground-penetrating-radar (GPR) techniques coupled with ground probing and desktop thermal anal- yses to assess if these methods could... Thermal analysis ........................................................................................................... 14 5 Results... thermal resistance or other means. ERDC/CRREL TR-15-15 3 In the case of the berm, this was accomplished by installing two, 5 cm thick and 3.7 m wide

  4. Five Year Plan for Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-15

    patent foramen ovale , is significantly associated with the incidetx:e of decarpression sickness in u.s. Navy divers, am to cletennine if edlocardi...ventricle am into the pUnaJary circulation where they 40 are filtered rut by the lun;JS. With patent foramen ovale ani other atrial septal defects, hlJ...the right am left atria ( patent foramen avale or other related defects). A cardiologist will re<liew the re=rds to detenni.ne presence or

  5. Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory. 1993 Command History.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Hospital Adak, Alaska; and NSHS, Bethesda, Maryland, He reported to NAMRL in July 90 where he has worked as Head, Operating Management Division and...improve outr financial and material management procedures and processes. Through total quality efforts and improvement, we are striving to attain the...Mateezun, A.J., CAPT MC USN, attended Management of Productivity and Quality , Washington, DC, 30-31 Mar 93, Mateezun, A,J., CAPT MC USN, attended

  6. Naval Research Laboratory Space Science Division Newsletter: 01/2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-20

    corona (COR1 and COR2) and the interplanetary medium between the corona and Earth (HI1 and HI2). Each of the two NASA STEREO spacecraft contains...satellite for a 3-year mission to study the solar corona . OCT: Unprecedented observations of Coronal Mass Ejections as they form at the Sun and...travel through coronal and interplanetary space to the orbit of the Earth are now being provided by the SECCHI experiment, which launched aboard NASA’s

  7. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 11, November 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    DIEGO - Navy Medicine is dedicated to saving lives using medical innovations developed by naval personnel, researchers and medical departments of...Medical Research And Development News.Volume VII, Issue 11 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Stephen Walz and Capt. Stephen Savarino, speak to a new chapter in Navy Medicine research and development on many fronts, both administratively and

  8. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  9. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  10. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    virus surveillance study, military virologists -- scientists who study viruses -- and public health officials will check the serum samples of...Activity The Defense Department is providing $1.76 million in extra funding to military laboratories to expand Zika virus surveillance worldwide and...Department is providing $1.76 million in extra funding to military laboratories to expand Zika virus surveillance worldwide and assess the virus’s impact

  11. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    This Institute annual report for the period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 covers a period which has seen the initial runs of three new spectrometers which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP), the Mass Achromat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. These devices are now available to pursue the studies of Gamow Teller states, reactions of astrophysical interest, and giant resonance studies for which they were constructed, as well as for other experiments. A beam analysis system which will deliver high resolution beams to the MDM spectrometer is currently under construction. With the completion of these spectrometer projects, the facility emphasis is now focused on the development of the full capabilities of the K500 cyclotron and on the research program. During the report period, the ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons, the latter as a probe of the QCD phase transition. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. In atomic physics, new measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported.

  12. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 7, July 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    promoting the use of a virtual, multimedia trainer to improve fitness. The U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit-3 Cairo (NAMRU -3) is using emerging...derived from sewage. Finally, see page 19 to learn more about how a new device capable of multi-axis motion in yaw, pitch, roll, and heave while...at the museum where visitors learned about NAMRU-D’s research devices such as a Reduced Oxygen Breathing Device, vision tests, and a motion

  13. An Assessment of the Computer Science Activities of the Office of Naval Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    A Panel of the Naval Studies Board of the National Research Council met for two days in October 1985 to assess the computer science programs of the...well as their knowledge of the field, the panel offers comments on the computer science research of the Navy and suggestions for further improvement...for example, was encouraged to take further advantage of its entrepreneurial flexibility to improve technology transfer between computer science and

  14. ONR (Office of Naval Research) Far East Scientific Bulletin. Volume 10, Number 2, April to June 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    RO-A162 667 ONR (OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH) FAR EAST SCIENTIFIC 1/ 2 ii BULLETIN VOLUME 10 NUN..(U) OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH LIAISON OFFICE FAR EAST...APO SAN FRAN.. N A BOND ET AL. UNCLASSIFIED JUN 8 F/0 5/’ 2 NL .60. uL% 1.0.0L MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART MYISAL OUM014 CP SANQAMO - f-6 A .. APRLTO...JUNE 19SS6 f VOL. 10, NO. 2 (~ .~ SCIENTIFIC 6 BULLETI N : DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH FAR EAST ~. DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE

  15. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  16. The Cyclotron radionuclide program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupf, Homer B.; Tischer, Stephen D.; Al-Watban, Farouk

    1985-05-01

    The King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre Cyclotron is being used to produce radionuclides for nuclear medicine, short-lived positron emitters for positron emission tomography (PET) studies, neutrons for therapy and biological research. Radiopharmaceuticals for planar imaging at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and other hospitals in Saudi Arabia include thallous-201 chloride, gallium-67 citrate, sodium iodide 123I capsules, 123I orthoiodohippurate and 81mKr generators. Products from short-lived positron emitters such as 18F fluordeoxyglucose, 11C methionine, 15O carbon dioxide and 63Zn hematoporphyrin are prepared and used on site for physiological studies in a PET program. Several patients have been treated with neutron therapy and a program for studying neutron radiation effects on cells is underway. Radiopharmaceutical products under development include 111In-labelled monoclonal antibodies for specific tumor detection, 11C methylglucose for metabolic studies and 11C putrescine for tumor localization.

  17. SESAME/Environmental Research Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Research Laboratories (ERL) have been designated as the basic research group of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ERL performs an integrated program of research and research services directed toward understanding the geophysical environment, protecting the environment, and improving the forecasting ability of NOAA. Twenty-four laboratories located throughout the United States comprise ERL. The Project SESAME (Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment) Planning Office is a project office within ERL. SESAME is conceived as a joint effort involving NOAA, NASA, NSF, and the atmospheric science community to lay the foundation for improved prediction of severe convective storms. The scientific plan for SESAME includes a phased buildup of analysis, modeling, instrumentation development and procurement, and limited-scale observational activities.

  18. Evolution of Naval Radio-Electronics and Contributions of the Naval Research Laboratory. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    elements were dis- equipped ships and aircraft at distances well 316 ELECTRONIC COUNTERMEASURES 28165 ANTENNAT 3171 ELECTRONIC COUNTERMEASURES 6063 (14...RGE 9037. Report No. VIII. Oct. 1949. NRL Document *T.D. Hatisconie. "Investigation of Window Types for S Band 496,-; t5 Use." NRL Report 235 1. Mar 194

  19. Summary of Research Academic Departments, 1984-1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    HARDING SPONSOR: NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY The purpose of this project, directed by transducers used in NDE (nondestructive Professor Antal A. Sarkady ...Monitoring .RESEARCHER: PROFESSOR ANTAL A. SARKADY SPONSOR: DAVID W. TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER, ANNAPOLIS LABORATORY The goal of this... SARKADY , ASSISTANT PROFESSOR DAVID S. HARDING AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (RETIRED) HERBERT NEUSTADT SPONSOR: NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY The aim of this

  20. United States Naval Academy Summary of Research, Academic Departments 1989 - 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    global optimization subproblems required problems in neural networks . The overall objective by many neural network applications. of this work is to design...of the entire ice scale network computed winds, rather than synoptic sheet in the Beaufort Sea and an increase in ice ve- scale winds, accounts for...Based Maintenance Researcher: Professor Russell A. Smith Sponsor: Naval Sea Systems Command The objective was to review state-of-the-art in machinery. A

  1. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+, 17.9% for 39K10+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 12.4% for 133Cs27+. For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times—the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  2. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Clark, J; Levand, A; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for (23)Na(7+), 17.9% for (39)K(10+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 12.4% for (133)Cs(27+). For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times-the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  3. Optimization of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Digital Data Acquisition System for use with fast scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; Liddick, S. N.; Larson, N. R.; Suchyta, S.; Tompkins, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    The Digital Data Acquisition System (DDAS) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) has expanded to instrument arrays composed of fast-scintillator detectors. The expansion has motivated the development of software designed to optimize the time- and energy-resolving capabilities of the system, which is a collection of 16-channel FPGA-programmable modules running 12- and 14-bit ADCs with sampling frequencies of 100 and 250 MSPS, respectively. Using the techniques described herein, the time resolution of the DDAS electronics has been substantially improved. For signal amplitudes occupying < 10 % the full range of the ADC, the time resolution of the DDAS electronics, measured online, has been reduced to < 100 ps and < 40 ps for 100 MSPS and 250 MSPS modules, respectively. A time resolution of ≈ 350 ps, at 511 keV, between two 38 mm×38 mm lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detectors, equipped with Hamamatsu R6231 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), has also been realized. Similar optimization techniques applied to the DDAS energy-extraction algorithms have yielded energy resolutions below 2% at 1.33 MeV for both the 100 and 250 MSPS digitizers using the same LaBr3 detectors. The techniques described in this work are broadly applicable to other digital acquisition systems that are capable of recording the digitized raw detector signals.

  4. Laboratory study of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Izotov, Ivan; Gospodchikov, Egor; Shalashov, Alexander; Demekhov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the use of a mirror-confined plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge for modeling of burst processes in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth associated with the implementation of the plasma cyclotron maser. Heating under the electron cyclotron resonance conditions allows to create two component plasma which is typical for the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. We investigate several regimes of cyclotron maser which are realized in dense and rarefied plasma, in the presence and absence of a permanent powerful gyrotron microwave radiation as a source of nonequilibrium particles in the plasma. Using the new technique for detection of microwave radiation we studied the dynamical spectrum and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic radiation from the plasma in a wide frequency band covering all types of cyclotron instabilities. Also possible applications for astrophysical plasma are discussed.

  5. Progress in research, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-01

    Reports on research activities, facility operation, and facility development of the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute for the period 1 April 1991--31 March 1992 are presented in this document. During the report period, the ECR-K500 Cyclotron Combination operated 4,377 hours. Of this time, 832 hours was used for beam development, 942 hours was used for tuning and optics, and the beam was available for experiments 2,603 hours. This time was used in a variety of studies including elastic and inelastic scattering, projectile break-up, the production and decay of giant resonances, fusion and fission dynamics, intermediate mass fragment emission, e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} production and molecular dissociation. In addition, studies of surfaces and metastable states in highly charged ions were carried out using the ECR source. Completion of two 19-element BaF{sub 2} arrays, of the focal plane detector for the proton spectrometer and installation of the HiLi multidetector have provided significant new experimental capabilities which have been further enhanced by major additions to the computer network. Progress on the Mass Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS) is such that first operation of that device should occur this summer. Funding for installation of the MDM spectrometer was obtained at the beginning of this year. As this report is being completed, the Enge Split Pole Spectrometer is being disassembled and removed to make room for the MDM spectrometer. The split-pole will be shipped to CEBAF for use in experiments there. Installation of the MDM should be completed within the next year. Also expected in the next year is a 92 element plastic-CsI ball.

  6. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

  7. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Wits: Synthesizing and Extrapolating from NPS Research on Strategic Military Deception ----------------- 117 Cry Wolf Effects ...the Stimulated Cerenkov Radiation Using 30-100 MeV Electrons------------------------ 140 Performance of Electro-Optical Systems in the Compass Hammer...142 Measurement of the Effects of Turbulence on Airborne Optical Projectors --------------------------------- 143 Classical Trajectory Studies of

  8. Naval Postgraduate School Research. Volume 14, Number 1, February 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    Malaysia , Pakistan, and other locations in Eastern and Central Asia. METEOROLOGY RESEARCH WEATHER IN ‘SEA BASING’ AND DOMINANT MANEUVER, continued...Tactical Databases and Digi - tal Terrain for Operational Planning, presented by Capt David Lowery, USMC, NPS Computer Science Masters stu- dent and LCDR

  9. Naval Postgraduate School Research. Volume 10, Number 1, February 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    Astronautics is the 1999 recipient of the Carl E. and Jessie W. Menneken Annual Faculty Award for Excel- lence in Scientific Research. Dr. Kaminer has...2000. D. Grove, D. Hansen, G. Hobson, and D. Schnorenberg, “Effect of Reynolds Number on Separa- tion Bubbles on Controlled-Diffusion Compressor

  10. Naval Postgraduate School Research. Volume 10, Number 2, June 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    failure. In September 1999, NPS faculty member LTC Joel Parker, USA and CPT Moore attended a Ranger training exercise where they observed a Ranger... Therrien , Director Cryptologic Research Center Vicente Garcia, National Security Agency Cryptologic Chair and Director Decision and Information Systems

  11. Naval Postgraduate School Research. Volume 8, Number 2, June 1998

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    ground force engagements at Yuma Proving Grounds this Fall. Hurricane Linda NPS Research June 1998 TENANTS MODULAR SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE OF THE JANUS...CPT Robert Payne, USA LT Lanny Rasnick, USN LCDR Markham Rich, USN CAPT Robert Rowsey, USMC Daniel Sakoda (DoD Civ) LT Fred Severson, USN LT Irma

  12. Naval Research Logistics Quarterly. Volume 27, Number 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    results when demands are Erlang, see [8]. The motivation for this approach is that the full impact of outdating is taken into account at the time the order...it is possible to graph the decision regions and observe the economic substitution and the impact of perishability on the ordering policy. The optimal...Research Logistics Quarterly 14, 147-162 (1967). [61 Ritter, K., Uber Probleme Parameterabhdngiger Planungsrechnung (DVL-Bericht Nr. 238)," Vereinigte

  13. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 10

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Through Research and Development 4 NAMRU-D Reduced Oxygen Breathing Enviroment 6 NHRC Diversity Enriches Science Women in...settings on land, sea and air to protect America’s finest young men and women who are stationed in the U.S. or deployed around the world with boots on... RAP ) was initiated in 2001 to assess baseline, pre-service psychological health data to better understand the health outcomes of military service

  14. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-30

    of the survey training manual and the survey form. Most of the data has been received and put on a computer tape. Analysis procedures have been...Sponsor: NPS Foundation Research Program Objective: To develop theory, design procedure and applications of sampled analog recursive and nonrecursive...Carrick, M. G. Sovereign, K. T. Marshall, P. R. Milch, R. C. Grinold and Robert E. Stanford) 85 Statistical Procedures for the Joint Analysis O Program

  15. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    provide further insight into processes that effect the sea surface temperature during the early phase of an ENSO event. Finally a comment was made on a...13 Synthesis of an Information Processing Support System for Advanced Applications ......... 17 The Effects of Real-Time... Effects of Offering Interest Measure- ment with the ASYAB in the DoD Student Testing Program ..................... 62 Research on Cash Management

  16. NHRC (Naval Health Research Center) Report for 1979

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    significances of adatation are mentioned. 79-27 Spinweber, CL; R Ursin & RL Hilderbrand fMROOOO.0-6018] L-Tryptophn as a Hypnotic in Daytime Sleep The effects...sleep research will continue to focus on the iden- knowledge of effects of noise on hearing, the develop- tification of an effective hypnotic with...over the non-auditory effects of noise on body tissue, phan) as a hypnotic . In an initial study of noncomplain- sensory receptors, mood and behavior

  17. Cyclotron Provides Neutron Therapy for Cancer Patients

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-01-21

    A cancer patient undergoes treatment in the Neutron Therapy Treatment Facility, or Cylotron, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. After World War II Lewis researchers became interested in nuclear energy for propulsion. The focused their efforts on thermodynamics and strength of materials after radiation. In 1950 an 80-person Nuclear Reactor Division was created, and a cyclotron was built behind the Materials and Structures Laboratory. An in-house nuclear school was established to train these researchers in their new field. NASA cancelled its entire nuclear program in January 1973, just as the cyclotron was about to resume operations after a major upgrade. In 1975 the Cleveland Clinic Foundation partnered with NASA Lewis to use the cyclotron for a new type of radiation treatment for cancer patients. The cyclotron split beryllium atoms which caused neutrons to be released. The neutrons were streamed directly at the patient’s tumor. The facility had a dual-beam system that could target the tumor both vertically and horizontally. Over the course of five years, the cyclotron was used to treat 1200 patients. It was found to be particularly effective on salivary gland, prostrate, and other tumors. It was not as successful with tumors of the central nervous system. The program was terminated in 1980 as the Clinic began concentrating on non-radiation treatments.

  18. Harvesting (67)Cu from the Collection of a Secondary Beam Cocktail at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mastren, Tara; Pen, Aranh; Loveless, Shaun; Marquez, Bernadette V; Bollinger, Elizabeth; Marois, Boone; Hubley, Nicholas; Brown, Kyle; Morrissey, David J; Peaslee, Graham F; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-10-20

    Isotope harvesting is a promising new method to obtain isotopes for which there is no reliable continuous supply at present. To determine the possibility of obtaining radiochemically pure radioisotopes from an aqueous beam dump at a heavy-ion fragmentation facility, preliminary experiments were performed to chemically extract a copper isotope from a large mixture of projectile fragmentation products in an aqueous medium. In this work a 93 MeV/u secondary beam cocktail was collected in an aqueous beam stop at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) located on the Michigan State University (MSU) campus. The beam cocktail consisted of ∼2.9% (67)Cu in a large mixture of co-produced isotopes ranging in atomic number from ∼19 to 34. The chemical extraction of (67)Cu was achieved via a two-step process: primary extraction using a divalent metal chelation disk followed by anion-exchange chromatography. A significant fraction (74 ± 4%) of the (67)Cu collected in the aqueous beam stop was recovered with >99% radiochemical purity. To illustrate the utility of this product, the purified (67)Cu material was then used to radiolabel an anti-EGFR antibody, Panitumumab, and injected into mice bearing colon cancer xenografts. The tumor uptake at 5 days postinjection was found to be 12.5 ± 0.7% which was in very good agreement with previously reported studies with this radiolabeled antibody. The present results demonstrate that harvesting isotopes from a heavy-ion fragmentation facility could be a promising new method for obtaining high-quality isotopes that are not currently available by traditional methods.

  19. 88-Inch Cyclotron newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.

    1987-02-01

    Activities at the 88-Inch Cyclotron are discussed. Increased beam time demand and operation of the ECR source and cyclotron are reported. Experimental facility improvements are reported, including improvements to the High Energy Resolution Array and to the Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer, a new capture beamline, development of a low background counting facility. Other general improvements are reported that relate to the facility computer network and electronics pool. Approved heavy nuclei research is briefly highlighted. Also listed are the beams accelerated by the cyclotron. (LEW)

  20. Office of Naval Research Fundamental Research Initiatives, 1 October 1989 - 31 May 94.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    720 (1993). 2. Papers submitted to refereed journals K. Attenborough , S. Taherzadeh. H.E. Bass. R. Raspet. G.R. Becker, A. Gudesen. A. Chrestman. G.A...turbulence computed using random Fourier modes. 22 I•i -! Active Dynamic Measurement of Material Fatigue David C. Swanson, PhD The Applied Research...Measurement of Material Fatigue David C. Swanson, PhD The Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University "P.O. Box 30, State College, PA 16804

  1. Investigation of relativistic runaway electrons in electron cyclotron resonance heating discharges on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C. S.; Lee, S. G.

    2014-07-15

    The behavior of relativistic runaway electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) discharges is investigated in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research device. The effect of the ECRH on the runaway electron population is discussed. Observations on the generation of superthermal electrons during ECRH will be reported, which will be shown to be consistent with existing theory for the development of a superthermal electron avalanche during ECRH [A. Lazaros, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1263 (2001)].

  2. Naval Aviation Attrition 1950-1976: Implications for the Development of Future Research and Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    threat. NAMI-1077, Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, Fla.: 1969. 67. Creelman , J. A., An analysis of the physical fitness index in relation...to training criteria in naval air trining. NSAM-180, Naval School of Aviation Medicine, Pensacola, Fla.: 1954. 68. Creelman , J. A., Evaluation of

  3. Photobiology Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Photobiology Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL. The photobiology group's research is in four main areas: (1) Comprehensive studies of fuel-producing photosynthetic, fermentative, and chemolithotrophic model microorganisms; (2) Characterization and engineering of redox enzymes and proteins for fuel production; (3) Genetic and pathway engineering of model organisms to improve production of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels; and (4) Studies of nanosystems using biological and non-biological materials in hybrid generation. NREL's photobiology research capabilities include: (1) Controlled and automated photobioreactors and fermenters for growing microorganisms under a variety of environmental conditions; (2) High-and medium-throughput screening of H{sub 2}-producing organisms; (3) Homologous and heterologous expression, purification, and biochemical/biophysical characterization of redox enzymes and proteins; (4) Qualitative and quantitative analyses of gases, metabolites, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; (5) Genetic and pathway engineering and development of novel genetic toolboxes; and (6) Design and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-based biofuel cells and energy conversion nanodevices.

  4. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  5. A quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser for fusion reactor heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1990-12-31

    High power microwave and millimeter sources, such as the quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser (QOECM) are important in fusion research as well as in high-energy physics and in other applications. The interaction between the electromagnetic modes of a Fabry-Perot resonator and an electron beam gyrating through a magnetic field has been studied for both the cases of beams parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. The parallel case was theoretically first studied by Kurin for forward and backward wave interaction, and experimentally by Komlev and Kurin. Kreischer and Temkin reviewed the general case of the linear small signal interaction parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. Sprangle, et al discussed the perpendicular case in a self-consistent linear and nonlinear theoretical study using the Gaussian transverse profile of an open resonator with a single longitudinal mode. Experimental verification of the devices operation was first mentioned in work at the Naval Research Laboratory. Theoretical studies using a time-dependent analysis of a large number of longitudinal modes with similar transverse mode profiles have demonstrated that single longitudinal-mode operation can be achieved at equilibrium and that performance can be enhanced by prebunching the electron beam and tapering the magnetic field. The use of output coupling apertures in the mirrors has been studied theoretically in relation to the structure of the modes for both confocal and nonconfocal resonators by Permnoud; use of an open resonator with stepped mirrors has been studied in order to choose a particular longitudinal mode. Studies at the Naval Research Laboratory mirror used configurations that diffraction couple the energy from around the mirror edges, so that the transverse profile inside the resonator can be selective to the fundamental mode.

  6. A quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser for fusion reactor heating

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1990-01-01

    High power microwave and millimeter sources, such as the quasi-optical electron cyclotron maser (QOECM) are important in fusion research as well as in high-energy physics and in other applications. The interaction between the electromagnetic modes of a Fabry-Perot resonator and an electron beam gyrating through a magnetic field has been studied for both the cases of beams parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. The parallel case was theoretically first studied by Kurin for forward and backward wave interaction, and experimentally by Komlev and Kurin. Kreischer and Temkin reviewed the general case of the linear small signal interaction parallel and perpendicular to the resonator. Sprangle, et al discussed the perpendicular case in a self-consistent linear and nonlinear theoretical study using the Gaussian transverse profile of an open resonator with a single longitudinal mode. Experimental verification of the devices operation was first mentioned in work at the Naval Research Laboratory. Theoretical studies using a time-dependent analysis of a large number of longitudinal modes with similar transverse mode profiles have demonstrated that single longitudinal-mode operation can be achieved at equilibrium and that performance can be enhanced by prebunching the electron beam and tapering the magnetic field. The use of output coupling apertures in the mirrors has been studied theoretically in relation to the structure of the modes for both confocal and nonconfocal resonators by Permnoud; use of an open resonator with stepped mirrors has been studied in order to choose a particular longitudinal mode. Studies at the Naval Research Laboratory mirror used configurations that diffraction couple the energy from around the mirror edges, so that the transverse profile inside the resonator can be selective to the fundamental mode.

  7. [Cyclotron based nuclear science]. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 saw the initial runs of three new spectrometers, which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP) (data from which are shown on the cover of this document), the Mass Achroniat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole Dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. The ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. The beam was on target 39% of this time. Studies of nuclear dynamics and nuclear thermodynamics using the neutron ball have come to fruition. A critical re-evaluation of the available data on the giant monopole resonance indicated that the incompressibility is not specified to a range smaller than 200--350 MeV by those data. New systematic experiments using the MDM spectrometer are now underway. The MEGA collaboration obtained the first data on the {mu} {yields} e{gamma} decay rate and determination of the Michel parameter in normal {mu} decay. Experiments appear to confirm the existence of monoenergetic pair peaks even for relatively low Z{sub projectile} -- Z{sub target} combinations. Studies of the ({alpha},2{alpha}) knockout reaction indicate that this reaction may prove to be a valuable tool for determination of reaction rates of astrophysical interest. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. New measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported. The research is presented in nearly 50 brief summaries usually including data and references.

  8. Earth Resources Laboratory research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The accomplishments of the Earth Resources Laboratory's research and technology program are reported. Sensors and data systems, the AGRISTARS project, applied research and data analysis, joint research projects, test and evaluation studies, and space station support activities are addressed.

  9. Analysis of the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station 1-m Telescope using Annular Zernike Polynomials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    University in Flag- staff. From 1993 to 2000 he was an optical engineer and manager of the telescope optics group at Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea , Hawaii...Analysis of the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station 1-m telescope using annular Zernike polynomials Sergio R. Restaino Naval Research Laboratory...Mining and Technology Electrical Engineering Department 801 Leroy Place Socorro, New Mexico 87801 Michael DiVittorio U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff

  10. Naval Medical R and D News, February 2017, Volume 9, Issue 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-01

    NAVAL MEDICAL R&D NEWS February 2017 Volume IX Issue 2 Featured Story: EDGE @NavalMedicalRC Ferbuary 2017 | Vol. 9 Iss. 2...February 2017 | Vol. 9 Iss. 2 1 2 Naval Medical Research Center 2016 Junior Officer of the Year (cover) New Bio-Informatics Software Allows for Interactive...technology, but there is a caveat. Hamilton explained, “Many laboratories new to high-throughput sequencing are ill-equipped to analyze the enormous

  11. Stanford Aerospace Research Laboratory research overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be, addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modelling and control of extremely flexible space structures. The ARL has designed and built several semi-autonomous free-flying robots that perform numerous tasks in a zero-gravity, drag-free, two-dimensional environment. It is envisioned that future generations of these robots will be part of a human-robot team, in which the robots will operate under the task-level commands of astronauts. To make this possible, the ARL has developed a graphical user interface (GUI) with an intuitive object-level motion-direction capability. Using this interface, the ARL has demonstrated autonomous navigation, intercept and capture of moving and spinning objects, object transport, multiple-robot cooperative manipulation, and simple assemblies from both free-flying and fixed bases. The ARL has also built a number of experimental test beds on which the modelling and control of flexible manipulators has been studied. Early ARL experiments in this arena demonstrated for the first time the capability to control the end-point position of both single-link and multi-link flexible manipulators using end-point sensing. Building on these accomplishments, the ARL has been able to control payloads with unknown dynamics at the end of a flexible manipulator, and to achieve high-performance control of a multi-link flexible manipulator.

  12. Stanford Aerospace Research Laboratory research overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.

    1993-02-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be, addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modelling and control of extremely flexible space structures. The ARL has designed and built several semi-autonomous free-flying robots that perform numerous tasks in a zero-gravity, drag-free, two-dimensional environment. It is envisioned that future generations of these robots will be part of a human-robot team, in which the robots will operate under the task-level commands of astronauts. To make this possible, the ARL has developed a graphical user interface (GUI) with an intuitive object-level motion-direction capability. Using this interface, the ARL has demonstrated autonomous navigation, intercept and capture of moving and spinning objects, object transport, multiple-robot cooperative manipulation, and simple assemblies from both free-flying and fixed bases. The ARL has also built a number of experimental test beds on which the modelling and control of flexible manipulators has been studied. Early ARL experiments in this arena demonstrated for the first time the capability to control the end-point position of both single-link and multi-link flexible manipulators using end-point sensing. Building on these accomplishments, the ARL has been able to control payloads with unknown dynamics at the end of a flexible manipulator, and to achieve high-performance control of a multi-link flexible manipulator.

  13. Design and Research of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Dive System on HL-2M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei; Rao, Jao; Song, Shaodong; Wang, He; Chen, Gangyu; Kang, Zhihua; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Jieqiong; Ye, Jiruo; Feng, Kun; Lu, Bo; Huang, Bo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Mingwei; Xuan, Weimin; Rao, Lieying; Li, Qing; Mao, Xiaohui; Duan, Xuru; Liu, Yong

    2017-07-01

    A research has been conducted to develop an 8MW electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECRH/ECCD) system on HL-2M tokamak. The ECRH system compromise eight 1MW gyrotrons, eight evacuated transmission lines and three launchers. The main purpose of the ECRH system was to suppress the neo-classical tearing modes and control the plasma profile. This paper presents an overview of the design and studies performed in this framework. Some primary test results of the critical components have been released in this paper, e.g. polarizers, power monitor and fast steering launchers.

  14. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  15. Office of Naval Research Overview of Corrosion S&T Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    surface treatment • Corrosion informed design modules for commercial CAD / CAE integration Value to Naval Warfighter: • Reduce construction and repair...mitigation strategies Naval Impact: Quantitative prediction enables - Cathodic protection optimization - Alloy design - Assessment of coating galvanic...Better inspection/detection methods and NDI • Better treatment methods and technologies • Smart Design and Engineering • Improved Processes and

  16. Cookstove Laboratory Research - Fiscal Year 2016 Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides an overview of the work conducted by the EPA cookstove laboratory research team in Fiscal Year 2016. The report describes research and activities including (1) ISO standards development, (2) capacity building for international testing and knowledge centers, ...

  17. Cookstove Laboratory Research - Fiscal Year 2016 Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides an overview of the work conducted by the EPA cookstove laboratory research team in Fiscal Year 2016. The report describes research and activities including (1) ISO standards development, (2) capacity building for international testing and knowledge centers, ...

  18. Research Laboratories and Centers Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Research and Development is the research arm of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has three national laboratories and four national centers located in 14 facilities across the country.

  19. Virtual Instruction: A Qualitative Research Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadtlander, Lee M.; Giles, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Online graduate programs in psychology are becoming common; however, a concern has been whether instructors in the programs provide adequate research mentoring. One issue surrounding research mentoring is the absence of research laboratories in the virtual university. Students attending online universities often do research without peer or lab…

  20. Virtual Instruction: A Qualitative Research Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadtlander, Lee M.; Giles, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Online graduate programs in psychology are becoming common; however, a concern has been whether instructors in the programs provide adequate research mentoring. One issue surrounding research mentoring is the absence of research laboratories in the virtual university. Students attending online universities often do research without peer or lab…

  1. Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank L

    2014-12-01

    Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft.

  2. Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

    A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

  3. Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

    A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

  4. Integrated Laboratories: Laying the Foundation for Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillner, Debra K.; Ferrante, Robert F.; Fitzgerald, Jeffrey P.; Schroeder, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    Interest in undergraduate student research has grown in response to initiatives from various professional societies and educational organizations. Participation in research changes student attitudes towards courses as they realize the utility and relevance of what they are learning. At the U.S. Naval Academy, the chemistry majors' curriculum was…

  5. Cast Study: National Naval Medical Center, A Graduate Management Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-10

    of Health Sciences), the Naval Medical Research Institute (now the Naval Medical Research Center), and the Naval Dental School (now the National...Naval Dental Center) (History, 2000). The NNMC mission became regional on January 1, 1973 with the establishment of the National Naval Medical Center...General Surgery Material Management Inpatient Surgery Postal Operations Ophthalmology Oerations Service Oral & Maxillo- Bahelor Housing facial/ Dental

  6. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory catalog of research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Research from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is briefly presented. Topics include: (1) Applied Science; (2) Chemical Sciences; (3) Earth Sciences; (4) Materials Sciences; (5) Accelerator and Fusion Research; (6) Nuclear Science; (7) Physics; (8) Cell and Molecular Biology; (9) Chemical Biodynamics; (10) Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics; (11) Engineering; (12) Environmental Protection, Health and Safety; and (13) Information and Computing Sciences. (WET)

  7. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) 2009 Annual Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory supported research on terrain prediction. Classification is aimed toward developing a machine - learning capability for...characteristics may be largely unknown . Field tests: Machine - learning capabilities for an unmanned ground vehicle on sandy terrain . Extramural Basic Research... learning ARL team capable of meeting the challenges associated with the Soldier’s technology requirements . ARL recruits for and fills positions

  8. Stirling laboratory research engine survey report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. W.; Hoehn, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    As one step in expanding the knowledge relative to and accelerating the development of Stirling engines, NASA, through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is sponsoring a program which will lead to a versatile Stirling Laboratory Research Engine (SLRE). An objective of this program is to lay the groundwork for a commercial version of this engine. It is important to consider, at an early stage in the engine's development, the needs of the potential users so that the SLRE can support the requirements of educators and researchers in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. For this reason, a survey was performed, the results of which are described.

  9. Laboratory research in homeopathy: pro.

    PubMed

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur R

    2006-12-01

    Homeopathy is a holistic method of treatment that uses ultralow doses of highly diluted natural substances originating from plants, minerals, or animals and is based on the principle of "like cures like." Despite being occasionally challenged for its scientific validity and mechanism of action, homeopathy continues to enjoy the confidence of millions of patients around the world who opt for this mode of treatment. Contrary to skeptics' views, research on home-opathy using modern tools mostly tends to support its efficacy and advocates new ideas toward understanding its mechanism of action. As part of a Point-Counterpoint feature, this review and its companion piece in this issue by Moffett et al (Integr Cancer Ther. 2006;5:333-342) are composed of a thesis section, a response section in reaction to the companion thesis, and a rebuttal section to address issues raised in the companion response.

  10. Transformative geomorphic research using laboratory experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sean J.; Ashmore, Peter; Neuman, Cheryl McKenna

    2015-09-01

    Laboratory experiments in geomorphology is the theme of the 46th annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (BGS). While geomorphic research historically has been dominated by field-based endeavors, laboratory experimentation has emerged as an important methodological approach to study these phenomena, employed primarily to address issues related to scale and the analytical treatment of the geomorphic processes. Geomorphic laboratory experiments can result in transformative research. Several examples drawn from the fluvial and aeolian research communities are offered as testament to this statement, and these select transformative endeavors often share very similar attributes. The 46th BGS will focus on eight broad themes within laboratory experimentation, and a diverse group of scientists has been assembled to speak authoritatively on these topics, featuring several high-profile projects worldwide. This special issue of the journal Geomorphology represents a collection of the papers written in support of this symposium.

  11. Stirling Laboratory Research Engine: Preprototype configuration report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1982-02-01

    The concept of a simple Stirling research engine that could be used by industrial, university, and government laboratories was studied. The conceptual and final designs, hardware fabrication and the experimental validation of a preprototype stirling laboratory research engine (SLRE) were completed. Also completed was a task to identify the potential markets for research engines of this type. An analytical effort was conducted to provide a stirling cycle computer model. The versatile engine is a horizontally opposed, two piston, single acting stirling engine with a split crankshaft drive mechanism; special instrumentation is installed at all component interfaces. Results of a thermodynamic energy balance for the system are reported. Also included are the engine performance results obtained over a range of speeds, working pressures, phase angles and gas temperatures. The potential for a stirling research engine to support the laboratory requirements of educators and researchers was demonstrated.

  12. Stirling Laboratory Research Engine: Preprototype configuration report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of a simple Stirling research engine that could be used by industrial, university, and government laboratories was studied. The conceptual and final designs, hardware fabrication and the experimental validation of a preprototype stirling laboratory research engine (SLRE) were completed. Also completed was a task to identify the potential markets for research engines of this type. An analytical effort was conducted to provide a stirling cycle computer model. The versatile engine is a horizontally opposed, two piston, single acting stirling engine with a split crankshaft drive mechanism; special instrumentation is installed at all component interfaces. Results of a thermodynamic energy balance for the system are reported. Also included are the engine performance results obtained over a range of speeds, working pressures, phase angles and gas temperatures. The potential for a stirling research engine to support the laboratory requirements of educators and researchers was demonstrated.

  13. Artist's Concept of NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  14. Artist's Concept of NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  15. Office of Naval Research (ONR) Support for R/V Point Sur Ship Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-07

    WORK UNIT NUMBER N/A 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) San Jose State university Research Foundation 210 N. Fourth St...Enterprise Program Analyst San Jose State University Research Foundation Subject: ONR RV Pt Sur Award N00014-15-1 -2123 Enclosed is the Final...Marine Laboratories No longer employed at MLML Grant Administration: San Jose State University Research Foundation (SJSURF) 210 N. Fourth St. 4th

  16. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  18. Research in clinical laboratory science: professionals' involvement.

    PubMed

    Laudicina, Rebecca; Fenn, JoAnn P; Freeman, Vickie; McCoy, Carol; McLane, Mary Ann; Mundt, Lillian; Polancic, Joan; Randolph, Tim; Shanahan, Kristy

    2011-01-01

    To describe current qualitative and quantitative aspects of research engagement and other scholarly activities conducted by clinical laboratory science (CLS) professionals across a range of employment settings. A link to a 3-part online survey was sent by electronic mail to 7,572 members of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science and 500 program directors. email message, on-line survey all ASCLS members and all directors of accredited clinical laboratory educational programs Quantitative and qualitative measures of professionals' engagement in research and other scholarly activities 556 of 7572 (7.3%) persons completed the survey. Thirty-two percent of survey respondents reported spending between 1 to > 40 work hours per week conducting research with 68% of respondents not participating in research activities. Conducting research is an employment requirement for 18% of survey participants. Twenty-nine percent of respondents have published at least one research article, and 47% of respondents who conduct research have published studies in the journal Clinical Laboratory Science. More than 57% of respondents participate in non-research scholarly activities as part of their employment. CLS professionals who conduct research are more likely to do applied, clinical, or educational research than other types of research. Fifty-seven percent of respondents who conduct research lack external funding for their work. Ninety-three percent of total research dollars is obtained by respondents who hold the Ph.D. degree. The perception of the importance of conducting research varies by employment position. Barriers to participation in research include lack of inclusion of research in the job description, time constraints, inadequate research funding, limited opportunity, and lack of space and equipment. CLS professionals participate in research in limited numbers, and are more likely to engage in non-research types of scholarly activities. Numerous barriers are

  19. Design of coupled cavity with energy modulated electron cyclotron resonance ion source for materials irradiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Chen, J. E.; Kang, M. L.; Lu, Y. R.; Xia, W. L.; Gao, S. L.; Guo, Z. Y.; Liu, G.; Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, K.

    2012-05-01

    The surface topography of samples after irradiation with heavy ions, protons, and helium ions based on accelerators is an important issue in the study of materials irradiation. We have coupled the separated function radio frequency quadrupole (SFRFQ) electrodes and the traditional RFQ electrodes into a single cavity that can provide a 0.8 MeV helium beam for our materials irradiation project. The higher accelerating efficiency has been verified by the successful commissioning of the prototype SFRFQ cavity. An energy modulated electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source can achieve a well-bunched beam by loading a sine wave voltage onto the extracted electrodes. Bunching is achieved without the need for an external bunch cavity, which can substantially reduce the cost of the system and the length of the beam line. The coupled RFQ-SFRFQ with an energy modulated ECR ion source will lead to a more compact accelerator system. The conceptual design of this novel structure is presented in this paper.

  20. Design and research of RF system for 10 MeV compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Hu, TongNing; Liu, KaiFeng; Yang, Jun

    2011-12-01

    A 10 MeV compact cyclotron (CYCHU-10) has been developing in Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). The RF system includes a 10 kW RF power generator and a resonance cavity. There is no automatic frequency tuning equipment in the cavity due to space limitations, so the generator must search and track the cavity resonant frequency. AD9850 synthesizer is used to generate RF signal in the experimental prototype, and a fine sinusoidal waveform around 99 MHz is obtained with the method of picking up a special aliased signal from the synthesizer's output, and the output power level can be set by regulating the resistor connected to the Pin ` R set'. The final stage amplifier based on tetrode operates in the grounded cathode configuration, and the schematic of the tetrode circuit is illustrated. The method of searching the resonant frequency is discussed in detail. For the sake of a compact and robust structure, the resonance cavity will adopt non-uniform characteristic impedance coaxial structure, and the magnet surface electroplated with copper will be used as dummy Dees. The precise shapes and dimensions of the cavity are designed and simulation results are carried out in this paper. The distributions of electromagnetic field are illustrated by means of numerical calculation analysis, and the wooden model test is preformed as well.

  1. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1991--93

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, B.J.; Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 14 wells during 1991--93 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. One hundred sixty-one samples were collected from 10 ground-water monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twenty-one quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 2 were blank samples and 19 were replicate samples. The two blank samples contained concentrations of six inorganic constituents that were slightly greater than the laboratory reporting levels (the smallest measured concentration of a constituent that can be reported using a given analytical method). Concentrations of other constituents in the blank samples were less than their respective reporting levels. The 19 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 614 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 614 data pairs, 588 were statistically equivalent at the 95% confidence level; about 96% of the analytical results were in agreement. Two pairs of turbidity measurements were not evaluated because of insufficient information and one primary sample collected in January 1992 contained tentatively identified organic compounds when the replicate sample did not.

  2. Management of a Major Downsizing at a Naval Shipyard. Research Report No. 52.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, M.; And Others

    Between 1987 and 1990, the work force of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard (Vallejo, California) was reduced from 10,000 to 7,200 employees. The management strategy for moving through this period included the following: (1) using a flexible work force; (2) using Computer-Assisted Manpower Analyses System (CAMAS) flow models to ensure that management…

  3. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Research & Development Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances that drive economic growth require both public and private investment. The U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories play a crucial role by conducting the type of research, testing and evaluation that is beyond the scope of regulators, academia or industry. Examples of such work from the past year can be found in these pages. Idaho National Laboratory’s engineering and applied science expertise helps deploy new technologies for nuclear energy, national security and new energy resources. Unique infrastructure, nuclear material inventory and vast expertise converge at INL, the nation’s nuclear energy laboratory. Productive partnerships with academia, industry and government agencies deliver high-impact outcomes. This edition of INL’s Impacts magazine highlights national and regional leadership efforts, growing capabilities, notable collaborations, and technology innovations. Please take a few minutes to learn more about the critical resources and transformative research at one of the nation’s premier applied science laboratories.

  5. Research in Free Space Optical Data Transfer at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    well. These include spacecraft-to-spacecraft data links for navigation and communications , intra-bus networks on spacecraft, and optical tagging...Recent studies include efforts in optical communications and satellite laser ranging, both conventional and advanced . At this time, NRL has two...for advanced optical communications applications serving Navy needs. NRL’s goals for these programs are to demonstrate feasibility and conduct

  6. Laboratory Apprenticeship through a Student Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Rigano, Donna L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the viability of cognitive apprenticeship for learning science in relation to findings from an investigation of a research project involving high school students working in a university chemical engineering laboratory under the mentorship of a university-based scientist. Reports that students were empowered to seek empirically viable…

  7. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  8. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Earpiece System, or ACCES®, under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Westone Laboratories, Inc. The innovative technology improves...trained in creating impressions for the custom-molded earpieces . Often this meant contacting researchers at AFRL. With hundreds of sets of this product...the flyers’ ears. By integrating specialized electronics into custom-molded earpieces , ACCES allows wearers to experience clear audio communications

  9. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  10. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 μA to 1000 μA, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  11. Perspectives from Former Executives of the DOD Corporate Research Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, DC; and the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) in Dayton, Ohio respectively. These individuals are: John Lyons...13 Vincent Russo and the Air Force Research Laboratory The Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) was activated in 1997. Prior to the creation of... AFRL , the Air Force conducted its research at four major

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  13. Influence of Magnetic Shear on the Collisional Current Driven Ion Cyclotron Instability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-05

    I DRIVEN ION CYCLOTRON INSTA9ILITY(U) NAVAL RESEARCH LAB MASHINOTON DC P SATYRNARAYRNA ET AL. S5 JUL 64 UNCLASSIFIED NRLD-NR-5345 FIG 2/9 L II 13J6...These results are verified by directly solving Eq. (14) using a numerical shooting code. We present the former results in the following. In Fig . 1 we...some light on the magnetic shear required to significantly reduce the growth rate, we plot in Fig . 2, the normalized growth rate versus the normalized

  14. Development of Research Projects in Advanced Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ping; Guha, Suchi

    2008-04-01

    Advanced laboratory serves as a bridge spanning primary physics laboratory and scientific research or industrial activities for undergraduate students. Students not only study modern physics experiments and techniques but also acquire the knowledge of advanced instrumentation. It is of interest to encourage students using the knowledge into research projects at a later stage of the course. We have designed several scientific projects for advanced laboratory to promote student's abilities of independent research. Students work as a team to select the project and search literatures, to perform experiments, and to give presentations. During the research project, instructor only provides necessary equipment for the project without any pre-knowledge of results, giving students a real flavor of scientific research. Our initial attempt has shown some interesting results. We found that students showed a very strong motivation in these projects, and student performances exceeded our expectation. Almost all the students in our first batch of the course have now joined graduate school in Physics and Materials Science. In the future we will also arrange graduate students working with undergraduate students to build a collaborative environment. In addition, a more comprehensive method will be used to evaluate student achievements.

  15. Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, R.E.; Daley, J.G.; Roach, P.D.

    1986-06-01

    Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory has been focused at (1) development of mathematical models and analytical tools for predicting component and engine performance, and (2) experimental research into fundamental heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena occurring in Stirling cycle devices. A result of the analytical effort has been the formation of a computer library specifically for Stirling engine researchers and developers. The library contains properties of structural materials commonly used, thermophysical properties of several working fluids, correlations for heat transfer calculations and general specifications of mechanical arrangements (including various drive mechanisms) that can be utilized to model a particular engine. The library also contains alternative modules to perform analysis at different levels of sophistication, including design optimization. A reversing flow heat transfer facility is operating at Argonne to provide data at prototypic Stirling engine operating conditions under controlled laboratory conditions. This information is needed to validate analytical models.

  16. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  17. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the naval reactors facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Tucker, Betty J.; Twining, Brian V.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Phtsburgh Naval Reactors Ofilce, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997?98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A totalof91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen qualityassurance samples also were collected and analyze~ seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however, some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  18. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Knobel, L.L.; Tucker, B.J.

    1997-12-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 14 wells during 1994--95 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and manmade contaminants. A total of 111 samples were collected from 10 monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twelve quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 1 was a blank sample and 11 were replicate samples. The blank sample contained concentrations of one inorganic constituent, one organic constituent, and five radioactive constituents that were greater than the reporting levels. Concentrations of other constituents in the blank sample were less than their respective reporting levels. The 11 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 293 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 293 data pairs, 258 were statistically equivalent at the 95-percent confidence level; about 88 percent of the analytical results were in agreement.

  19. Chemical and Radiochemical Constituents in Water from Wells in the Vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Bartholomay; L. L. Knobel; B. J. Tucker; B. V. Twining

    2000-06-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997-98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A total of 91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen quality-assurance samples were also collected and analyzed; seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  20. Chemical and Radiochemical Constituents in Water from Wells in the Vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    L. L. Knobel; R. C. Bartholomay; B. J. Tucker; L. M. Williams

    1999-10-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office (IBO), samples water from 13 wells during 1996 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality to the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. The IBO requires information about the mobility of radionuclide- and chemical-waste constituents in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Waste-constituent mobility is determined principally by (1) the rate and direction of ground-water flow; (2) the locations, quantities, and methods of waste disposal; (3) waste-constituents chemistry; and (4) the geochemical processes taking place in the aquifer. The purpose of the data-collection program is to provide IBO with water-chemistry data to evaluate the effect of NRF activities on the water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants.

  1. [Challenges in the context of medical care during a naval research expedition. A case report].

    PubMed

    Schröter, C; Schwarz-Schampera, U; Mommsen, P; Krettek, C

    2014-05-01

    Exploration for natural resources in the seabed of the Indian Ocean was undertaken by the German government institution of earth sciences and resources ("Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe", BGR) in November 2012. To provide for the medical safety of crew and scientists, a cooperation between the BGR and the trauma department of the Hannover Medical School was established. Research by physicians accompanying the naval expedition revealed that medical consultations mainly occur because of respiratory infections, abdominal discomfort, genitourinary discomfort and seasickness, with the rate of traumas being between 31% and 41%. Di Giovanna et al. stated that 97% of all emergencies on cruise ships are not critical and only 3% need an immediate emergency medical intervention. Consultations were already performed on the mainland prior to departure and included minor traumas due to non-appropriate footwear, otitis and respiratory infections. Seasickness was the main reason for consultation during the first days at sea. Strong seas resulted in some bruises. Minor injuries and foreign body injuries to the hands and feet also required consultation. First-degree sunburns resulted from exposure to the sun, while air-conditioning caused rhinosinusitis and conjunctivitis. A special consultation was a buccal splitting of tooth 36. An immediate emergency medical intervention was not necessary due to the relative low level of pain for the patient; however, due to the risk of further damage caused by nocturnal bruxism, a protective splint was formed using a small syringe. Other reasons for consultation were similar to those reported in the general literature. Medical activities at exotic locations may create the vision of a holiday character at first; however, intensive planning and preparation are needed. We recommend contacting police, customs, the federal institute for drugs and medical devices as well as the labour inspectorate, preferably in both the originating

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Commercial Off-The-Shelf Naval Simulations and Classic Operations Research Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    provides the information necessary to produce realistic models. Built upon the two original formulas developed by Larry Bond to first, determine a ship’s...graciously agreed to be my Second Reader. His advice and guidance were the keys to defining the original problem and overcoming those that arose... originally created by Mr. Larry Bond. Harpoon is the name of a comprehensive series of naval warfare games developed initially in miniatures by Larry

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  4. Initiation of Research at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1942-05-21

    A group of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) officials and local dignitaries were on hand on May 8, 1942, to witness the Initiation of Research at the NACA's new Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. The group in this photograph was in the control room of the laboratory's first test facility, the Engine Propeller Research Building. The NACA press release that day noted, "First actual research activities in what is to be the largest aircraft engine research laboratory in the world was begun today at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics laboratory at the Cleveland Municipal Airport.” The ceremony, however, was largely symbolic since most of the laboratory was still under construction. Dr. George W. Lewis, the NACA's Director of Aeronautical Research, and John F. Victory, NACA Secretary, are at the controls in this photograph. Airport Manager John Berry, former City Manager William Hopkins, NACA Assistant Secretary Ed Chamberlain, Langley Engineer-in-Charge Henry Reid, Executive Engineer Carlton Kemper, and Construction Manager Raymond Sharp are also present. The propeller building contained two torque stands to test complete engines at ambient conditions. The facility was primarily used at the time to study engine lubrication and cooling systems for World War II aircraft, which were required to perform at higher altitudes and longer ranges than previous generations.

  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2005 Research Review

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.; Gwinner, D.; Miller, M.; Pitchford, P.

    2006-06-01

    Science and technology are at the heart of everything we do at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, as we pursue innovative, robust, and sustainable ways to produce energy--and as we seek to understand and illuminate the physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering behind alternative energy technologies. This year's Research Review highlights the Lab's work in the areas of alternatives fuels and vehicles, high-performing commercial buildings, and high-efficiency inverted, semi-mismatched solar cells.

  6. Commercial compact cyclotrons in the 90`s

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radio-isotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicate a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper the authors will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. Design criteria for the different types of commercial cyclotrons will be presented, with reference to those demands that differ from those in a research oriented cyclotron project. The authors also discuss the possibility of systems designed for higher energies and capable of extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA.

  7. Cookstove Laboratory Research - Fiscal Year 2016 Report ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides an overview of the work conducted by the EPA cookstove laboratory research team in Fiscal Year 2016. The report describes research and activities including (1) ISO standards development, (2) capacity building for international testing and knowledge centers, (3) laboratory assessments of cookstove systems, (4) journal publications, and (5) cookstove events. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) cookstove laboratory research program was first developed to assist the EPA-led Partnership for Clean Indoor Air and is now part of the U.S. Government’s commitment to the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (the Alliance). Goals of the program are to: (1) support the development of testing protocols and standards for cookstoves through ISO (International Organization for Standardization) TC (Technical Committee) 285: Clean Cookstoves and Clean Cooking Solutions, (2) support the development of international Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers (many sponsored by the Alliance) for scientifically evaluating and certifying cookstoves to international standards, and (3) provide an independent source of data to Alliance partners. This work supports EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. Household air pollution, mainly from solid-fuel cookstoves in the developing world, is estimated to cause approximately 4 million premature deaths per year, and emissions of black carbon and other pollutants from cookstoves aff

  8. Cookstove Laboratory Research - Fiscal Year 2016 Report ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides an overview of the work conducted by the EPA cookstove laboratory research team in Fiscal Year 2016. The report describes research and activities including (1) ISO standards development, (2) capacity building for international testing and knowledge centers, (3) laboratory assessments of cookstove systems, (4) journal publications, and (5) cookstove events. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) cookstove laboratory research program was first developed to assist the EPA-led Partnership for Clean Indoor Air and is now part of the U.S. Government’s commitment to the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves (the Alliance). Goals of the program are to: (1) support the development of testing protocols and standards for cookstoves through ISO (International Organization for Standardization) TC (Technical Committee) 285: Clean Cookstoves and Clean Cooking Solutions, (2) support the development of international Regional Testing and Knowledge Centers (many sponsored by the Alliance) for scientifically evaluating and certifying cookstoves to international standards, and (3) provide an independent source of data to Alliance partners. This work supports EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment. Household air pollution, mainly from solid-fuel cookstoves in the developing world, is estimated to cause approximately 4 million premature deaths per year, and emissions of black carbon and other pollutants from cookstoves aff

  9. Measurements of Cyclotron Features and Pulse Periods in the High-Mass X-Ray Binaries 4U 1538-522 and 4U 1907+09 with the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Caballero, Isabel; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kuhnel, Matthias; Furst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2013-01-01

    We present a spectral and timing analysis of International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of two high-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1538-522 and 4U 1907+09. Our timing measurements for 4U 1538-522 find the pulse period to have exhibited a spin-up trend until approximately 2009, after which there is evidence for a torque reversal, with the source beginning to spin down to the most recently measured period of 525.407 plus or minus 0.001 seconds. The most recent INTEGRAL observations of 4U 1907+09 are not found to yield statistically significant pulse periods due to the significantly lower flux from the source compared with 4U 1538-522. A spectral model consisting of a power-law continuum with an exponential cutoff and modified by two cyclotron resonance scattering features is found to fit both sources well, with the cyclotron scattering features detected at approximately 22 and approximately 49 kiloelectronvolts for 4U 1538-522 and at approximately 18 and approximately 36 kiloelectronvolts for 4U 1907+09. The spectral parameters of 4U 1538-522 are generally not found to vary significantly with flux and there is little to no variation across the torque reversal. Examining our results in conjunction with previous work, we find no evidence for a correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity for 4U 1538-522. 4U 1907+09 shows evidence for a positive correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity, which would make it the fourth, and lowest luminosity, cyclotron line source to exhibit this relationship.

  10. MEASUREMENTS OF CYCLOTRON FEATURES AND PULSE PERIODS IN THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES 4U 1538–522 AND 4U 1907+09 WITH THE INTERNATIONAL GAMMA-RAY ASTROPHYSICS LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Caballero, Isabel; Kühnel, Matthias; Wilms, Jörn; Fürst, Felix

    2013-11-01

    We present a spectral and timing analysis of International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of two high-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1538–522 and 4U 1907+09. Our timing measurements for 4U 1538–522 find the pulse period to have exhibited a spin-up trend until approximately 2009, after which there is evidence for a torque reversal, with the source beginning to spin down to the most recently measured period of 525.407 ± 0.001 s. The most recent INTEGRAL observations of 4U 1907+09 are not found to yield statistically significant pulse periods due to the significantly lower flux from the source compared with 4U 1538–522. A spectral model consisting of a power-law continuum with an exponential cutoff and modified by two cyclotron resonance scattering features is found to fit both sources well, with the cyclotron scattering features detected at ∼22 and ∼49 keV for 4U 1538–522 and at ∼18 and ∼36 keV for 4U 1907+09. The spectral parameters of 4U 1538–522 are generally not found to vary significantly with flux and there is little to no variation across the torque reversal. Examining our results in conjunction with previous work, we find no evidence for a correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity for 4U 1538–522. 4U 1907+09 shows evidence for a positive correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity, which would make it the fourth, and lowest luminosity, cyclotron line source to exhibit this relationship.

  11. Measurements of Cyclotron Features and Pulse Periods in the High-Mass X-Ray Binaries 4U 1538-522 and 4U 1907+09 with the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Caballero, Isabel; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kuhnel, Matthias; Furst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2013-01-01

    We present a spectral and timing analysis of International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of two high-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1538-522 and 4U 1907+09. Our timing measurements for 4U 1538-522 find the pulse period to have exhibited a spin-up trend until approximately 2009, after which there is evidence for a torque reversal, with the source beginning to spin down to the most recently measured period of 525.407 plus or minus 0.001 seconds. The most recent INTEGRAL observations of 4U 1907+09 are not found to yield statistically significant pulse periods due to the significantly lower flux from the source compared with 4U 1538-522. A spectral model consisting of a power-law continuum with an exponential cutoff and modified by two cyclotron resonance scattering features is found to fit both sources well, with the cyclotron scattering features detected at approximately 22 and approximately 49 kiloelectronvolts for 4U 1538-522 and at approximately 18 and approximately 36 kiloelectronvolts for 4U 1907+09. The spectral parameters of 4U 1538-522 are generally not found to vary significantly with flux and there is little to no variation across the torque reversal. Examining our results in conjunction with previous work, we find no evidence for a correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity for 4U 1538-522. 4U 1907+09 shows evidence for a positive correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity, which would make it the fourth, and lowest luminosity, cyclotron line source to exhibit this relationship.

  12. MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports of research funded through the Michigan State University/Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall biosynthesis and proteins, gene expression, stress responses, plant hormone biosynthesis, interactions between the nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria, and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 320 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs. (MHB)

  13. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal laboratories...

  14. Air Force Research Laboratory Preparation for Year 2000.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-05

    Air Force Research Laboratory , Phillips Research Site , Kirkland Air Force Base, New...Pentagon, Washington, D.C. 20301-1900. The identity of each writer and caller is fully protected. Acronym AFRL Air Force Research Laboratory INSPECTOR...completion of the implementation phase was May 31, 1999. Air Force Research Laboratory . The Air Force Research

  15. Combined proton and photon irradiation for craniopharyngioma: Long-term results of the early cohort of patients treated at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and Massachusetts General Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, Markus M.; Linggood, Rita M.; Adams, Judy; Munzenrider, John E. . E-mail: jmunzenrider@partners.org

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: We report the results of the early cohort of patients treated for craniopharyngioma with combined proton-photon irradiation at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Methods and Materials: Between 1981 and 1988, 15 patients with craniopharyngioma were treated in part or entirely with fractionated 160 MeV proton beam therapy. The group consisted of 5 children (median age, 15.9 years) and 10 adults (median age, 36.2 years). Median dose prescribed to the tumor was 56.9 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE; 1 proton Gray = 1.1 CGE). The median proton component was 26.9 CGE. Patients were treated after documented recurrence after initial surgery (n = 6) or after subtotal resection or biopsy (n = 9). None had had prior radiation therapy. Results: Median observation period of surviving patients (n = 11) was 13.1 years from radiotherapy. One patient was lost to follow-up with tumor control after 5.2 years. Actuarial 10-year survival rate was 72%. Four patients have died 5-9.1 years after treatment, two from local failure. Actuarial 5- and 10-year local control rates were 93% and 85%, respectively. The functional status of the living adult patients is unaltered from their preradiotherapy status; all of them continued leading normal or near normal working lives. None of the patients treated as a child had experienced recurrence of tumor. One child shows learning difficulties and slight retardation, comparable to his preradiotherapy status. The others have professional achievements within the normal range. Conclusion: Results in terms of survival and local control are comparable with other contemporary series. Although no formal neuropsychological testing was performed, the surrogate measures of lifestyle and professional accomplishments appear to be satisfactory.

  16. Definition of experiments and instruments for a communication/navigation research laboratory. Volume 3: Laboratory descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The following study objectives are covered: (1) identification of major laboratory equipment; (2) systems and operations analysis in support of the laboratory design; and (3) conceptual design of the comm/nav research laboratory.

  17. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated June 22, 1988: 'A dwarf wheat variety known as Yecoro Rojo flourishes in KSC's Biomass Production Chamber. Researchers are gathering information on the crop's ability to produce food, water and oxygen, and then remove carbon dioxide. The confined quarters associated with space travel require researchers to focus on smaller plants that yield proportionately large amounts of biomass. This wheat crop takes about 85 days to grow before harvest.' Plant experiments such as this are the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  18. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Neil Yorio and Lisa Ruffe prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  19. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Lisa Ruffe and Neil Yorio prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  20. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Neil Yorio and Lisa Ruffe prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  1. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated June 22, 1988: 'A dwarf wheat variety known as Yecoro Rojo flourishes in KSC's Biomass Production Chamber. Researchers are gathering information on the crop's ability to produce food, water and oxygen, and then remove carbon dioxide. The confined quarters associated with space travel require researchers to focus on smaller plants that yield proportionately large amounts of biomass. This wheat crop takes about 85 days to grow before harvest.' Plant experiments such as this are the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  2. The Automated Primate Research Laboratory (APRL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a self-contained automated primate research laboratory to study the effects of weightlessness on subhuman primates. Physiological parameters such as hemodynamics, respiration, blood constituents, waste, and diet and nutrition are analyzed for abnormalities in the simulated space environment. The Southeast Asian pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemistrina) was selected for the experiments owing to its relative intelligence and learning capacity. The objective of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a man-tended primate space flight experiment.

  3. Modeling of Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miletta, J.R.; Chase, R.J.; Luu, B.B. ); Williams, J.W.; Viverito, V.J. )

    1993-12-01

    Models are required that permit the estimation of emitted field signatures from EMP simulators to design the simulator antenna structure, to establish the usable test volumes, and to estimate human exposure risk. This paper presents the capabilities and limitations of a variety of EMP simulator models useful to the Army's EMP survivability programs. Comparisons among frequency and time-domain models are provided for two powerful US Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators: AESOP (Army EMP Simulator Operations) and VEMPS II (Vertical EMP Simulator II).

  4. Fuels and Lubrication Researcher at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-08-21

    A researcher at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory studies the fuel ignition process. Improved fuels and lubrication was an area of particular emphasis at the laboratory during World War II. The military sought to use existing types of piston engines in order to get large numbers of aircraft into the air as quickly as possible. To accomplish its goals, however, the military needed to increase the performance of these engines without having to wait for new models or extensive redesigns. The Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory was called on to lead this effort. The use of superchargers successfully enhanced engine performance, but the resulting heat increased engine knock [fuel detonation] and structural wear. These effects could be offset with improved cooling, lubrication, and fuel mixtures. The NACA researchers in the Fuels and Lubrication Division concentrated on new synthetic fuels, higher octane fuels, and fuel-injection systems. The laboratory studied 16 different types of fuel blends during the war, including extensive investigations of triptane and xylidine.

  5. Time transfer between the Goddard Optical Research Facility and the U.S. Naval Observatory using 100 picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, C. O.; Rayner, J. D.; Steggerda, C. A.; Mullendore, J. V.; Small, L.; Wagner, S.

    1983-01-01

    A horizontal two-way time comparison link in air between the University of Maryland laser ranging and time transfer equipment at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) 1.2 m telescope and the Time Services Division of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) was established. Flat mirrors of 25 cm and 30 cm diameter respectively were placed on top of the Washington Cathedral and on a water tower at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Two optical corner reflectors at the USNO reflect the laser pulses back to the GORF. Light pulses of 100 ps duration and an energy of several hundred microjoules are sent at the rate of 10 pulses per second. The detection at the USNO is by means of an RCA C30902E avalanche photodiode and the timing is accomplished by an HP 5370A computing counter and an HP 1000 computer with respect to a 10 pps pulse train from the Master Clock.

  6. Air Force Research Laboratory’s Focused Long Term Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) mission is to provide support to the Air Force (AF) and the warfighters with... Air Force Research Laboratory’s Focused Long Term Challenges Leo J Rose Munitions Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory , 101 W Eglin Blvd...This technology vision, which was born in our Air Force Research Laboratory , builds on the Air Force’s traditional kill

  7. Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study by Nora M Eldredge ARL-SR-0311 February 2015...Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study Nora M Eldredge Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  8. Microbe Hunting in Laboratory Animal Research

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nucleic acid diagnostic technologies have revolutionized microbiology by facilitating rapid, sensitive pathogen surveillance and differential diagnosis of infectious diseases. With the expansion and dissemination of genomic sequencing technology scientists are discovering new microbes at an accelerating pace. In this article we review recent progress in the field of pathogen surveillance and discovery with a specific focus on applications in the field of laboratory animal research. We discuss the challenges in proving a causal relationship between the presence of a candidate organism and disease. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of various assay platforms and describe a staged strategy for viral diagnostics. To illustrate the complexity of pursuing pathogen discovery research, we include examples from our own work that are intended to provide insights into the process that led to the selection of particular strategies. PMID:21131725

  9. Life sciences research using a lunar laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, Leonard F.; Ballard, Rodney W.

    1990-01-01

    The necessity for life sciences research on the lunar surface in order to determine the consequences of returning from extended missions in various low gravity environments and of transiting through high multiple gravity forces during decelerations is discussed. The functions of a lunar gravitational biology laboratory are outlined. Lunar science objectives include investigations in developmental biology including the evaluation of the capacity of diverse organisms to undergo normal development and the evaluation of the use of the lunar environment to study specific developmental phenomena in ways that cannot be accomplished by earth-based research. The need for musculoskeletal studies to examine the dynamics of osteoclast and osteoblast formation and breakdown and to address bone and demineralization problems is discussed. Biological adaptation to hypogravic environments and the effects of radiation and electromagnetic environmental factors are also considered.

  10. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A.

    1992-12-31

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

  12. Bringing ayahuasca to the clinical research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2005-06-01

    Since the winter of 1999, the authors and their research team have been conducting clinical studies involving the administration of ayahuasca to healthy volunteers. The rationale for conducting this kind of research is twofold. First, the growing interest of many individuals for traditional indigenous practices involving the ingestion of natural psychotropic drugs such as ayahuasca demands the systematic study of their pharmacological profiles in the target species, i.e., human beings. The complex nature of ayahuasca brews combining a large number of pharmacologically active compounds requires that research be carried out to establish the safety and overall pharmacological profile of these products. Second, the authors believe that the study of psychedelics in general calls for renewed attention. Although the molecular and electrophysiological level effects of these drugs are relatively well characterized, current knowledge of the mechanisms by which these compounds modify the higher order cognitive processes in the way they do is still incomplete, to say the least. The present article describes the development of the research effort carried out at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, commenting on several methodological aspects and reviewing the basic clinical findings. It also describes the research currently underway in our laboratory, and briefly comments on two new studies we plan to undertake in order to further our knowledge of the pharmacology of ayahuasca.

  13. NASA DC-8 airborne research laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degreef, Leo H.

    1991-01-01

    Since the summer of 1987, NASA Ames Research Center has been operating a DC-8 equipped with CFM 56 engines as a flying research laboratory. In this relatively short time, the DC-8, with its tremendous capabilities, has made significant contributions to numerous scientific fields. Capable of staying aloft for over 12 hours, the DC-8 has flown directly over both the North and South Poles, gathering data relating to the ozone hole. Operating from a few thousand feet to over 40,000 feet above sea level the interchangeable payload capability of the DC-8 has made it a versatile scientific tool. The DC-8 also plays a vital role in the development of new satellite-borne sensors as very often those sensors are test-flown on the DC-8 before they are launched into space. The tremendous range and instrument carrying capability make the DC-8 an ideal flying laboratory. A few of the programs the DC-8 has participated in as well as a sampling of the instruments carried are outlined.

  14. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  15. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yorita, T. Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Ueda, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Morinobu, S.; Tamii, A.; Kamakura, K.

    2014-02-15

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  16. Studies of extraction and transport system for highly charged ion beam of 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Ueda, H; Yasuda, Y; Morinobu, S; Tamii, A; Kamakura, K

    2014-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source is installed to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions especially for highly charged heavy ions which can be accelerated by cyclotrons of Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The beam production developments of several ions from B to Xe have been already done [T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008) and T. Yorita, K. Hatanaka, M. Fukuda, M. Kibayashi, S. Morinobu, H.Okamura, and A. Tamii, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02A332 (2010)] and the further studies for those beam extraction and its transport have been done in order to increase the beam current more. The plasma electrode, extraction electrode, and einzel lens are modified. Especially extraction electrode can be applied minus voltage for the beam extraction and it works well to improve the extracted beam current. The extraction voltage dependences of transmission and emittance also have been studied for beam current improvement which is injected into azimuthally varying field cyclotron at RCNP.

  17. Status report on the design and construction of the Superconducting Source for Ions at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory/Michigan State University

    SciTech Connect

    Zavodszky, P.A.; Arend, B.; Cole, D.; DeKamp, J.; Machicoane, G.; Marti, F.; Miller, P.; Moskalik, J.; Ottarson, J.; Vincent, J.; Zeller, A.; Kazarinov, N.Yu.

    2006-03-15

    A status report of the design and fabrication of a new, fully superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source will be presented. The Superconducting Source for Ions (SuSI) first will operate at 18+14.5 GHz microwave frequencies. A short description of the magnet structure and the injection and extraction hardware will be presented. Several innovative solutions are described, which will allow maximum flexibility in tuning SuSI in order to match the acceptance of the coupled cyclotrons. Details of an ultrahigh temperature inductive oven construction are given as well as a description of the low-energy beam transport line.

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, E

    2008-02-08

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including

  19. Career research opportunities for the medical laboratory scientist.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, David L

    2011-01-01

    Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) typically practice in hospital laboratories; however there are multiple alternatives in research. This article details the advantages of working in a variety of research laboratory settings. These include public institutions, federal laboratory workplaces, private facilities, and industry settings. A view of the different research laboratory settings such as public institutions, federal laboratory workplaces, private facilities, and industry settings will be provided. An assessment on how MLS professionals can prepare for a career in research is outlined and the report concludes with a brief summary of the various aspects of the research setting.

  20. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  1. An architecture for naval telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Chimiak, W J; Rainer, R O; Chimiak, J M; Martinez, R

    1997-03-01

    Navy fleets have a defined overall objective for mission readiness impacted by the health of personnel aboard the ships. Medical treatment facilities on the ships determines the degree of mission readiness. This paper describes the concepts and technologies necessary to establish a Naval telemedicine system, which can drastically improve health care delivery. It consists of various combinations of the following components: Fleet Naval Medical Consultation and Diagnostic Centers, Shipboard Naval Medical Consultation and Diagnostic Centers (hospital ship or combatant ships with medical specialists on board), and Remote Medical Referring Centers such as a ship, a small Naval station annex, or a field hospital. This Naval telemedicine architecture delivers clinical medicine and continuing medical education (CME) by means of computers, video-conferencing systems, or telephony to enhance the quality of care through improved access to research, medical and nonmedical imaging, remote consultations, patient clinical data, and multimedia medical education programs. It integrates the informatics infrastructure and provides a medical telepresence among participants.

  2. The superconducting separated orbit cyclotron tritron

    SciTech Connect

    Trinks, U.; Assmann, W.; Dietl, L.; Hinderer, H.J.; Korner, A; Platzer, A.; Rehm, B.; Rieger, K.; Riess, C.; Savoy, R.

    1985-10-01

    At the Munich Accelerator Laboratory a booster for the existing MP-tandem-the Tritron - is under construction for acceleration of heavy ions to specific energies up to 21 MeV/u. The Tritron/sup +/ is a separated orbit cyclotron similar to the SOC but with the magnets and cavities both superconducting. The Tritron fits well into the existing laboratory. It is projected to be a prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of this type of cyclotron, which may be suited to overcome the limits of the conventional cyclotron concept. First, there are no axial focusing problems. Secondly, there is no crossing of resonances in the betatron frequency diagram, and thirdly, there are no injection and extraction problems. Thus continuous ion beams of high intensity and high quality with energies up to about 1 GeV/u seem within reach by connecting several separated orbit cyclotrons with increasing radii in series.

  3. Progress in research April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, {sup 2}He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the {beta} decay of {sup 57}Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5.

  4. 75 FR 30197 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Personnel Management Demonstration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ...The Office of Naval Research (ONR) proposes to adopt the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Personnel Management Demonstration Project with modifications and one flexibility from the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC). The majority of flexibilities and administrative procedures are expected to be adopted without changes. However, modifications are......

  5. Contamination in Fractured-Rock Aquifers - Research at the former Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Daniel J.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and cooperators are studying chlorinated solvents in a fractured sedimentary rock aquifer underlying the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. Fractured-rock aquifers are common in many parts of the United States and are highly susceptible to contamination, particularly at industrial sites. Compared to 'unconsolidated' aquifers, there can be much more uncertainty about the direction and rate of contaminant migration and about the processes and factors that control chemical and microbial transformations of contaminants. Research at the NAWC is improving understanding of the transport and fate of chlorinated solvents in fractured-rock aquifers and will compare the effectiveness of different strategies for contaminant remediation.

  6. Prediction of Academic Performance of the U.S. Navy Officer Students in Operations Research/Systems Analysis Curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soetrisno, Heru

    A study of the U.S. Navy officer students who were registered in the Operations Research/System Analysis curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in spring, 1974, was conducted using biographical data, the Strong Vocational Interest Blank, and the Graduate Record Examination to develop an equation predicting academic performance of U.S.…

  7. Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics Research with Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Kato, Tsunehiko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Sakawa, Yuichi

    2008-12-01

    Large scale laser facilities mainly constructed for fusion research can be used to produce high-energy-density plasmas like the interior of stars and planets. They can be also used to reproduce the extreme phenomena of explosion and high Mach number flow in mimic scale in laboratory. With advanced diagnostic technique, we can study the physics of plasma phenomena expected to control a variety of phenomena in Universe. The subjects studied so far are reviewed, for example, in [1], [2]. The project to promote the laboratory astrophysics with Gekko XII laser facility has been initiated from April 1st this year as a project of our institute. It consists of four sub-projects. They are 1. Physics of collisionless shock and particle acceleration, 2. Physics of Non LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) photo-ionized plasma, 3. Physics of planets and meteor impact, 4. Development of superconducting Terahertz device. I will briefly explain what the laser astrophysics means and introduce what are the targets of our project. Regarding the first sub-project, we have carried out hydrodynamic and PIC simulation to design the experiments with intense laser. We clarified the physical mechanism of generation of the magnetic field in non-magnetized plasma and the collsionless shock formation caused by the ion orbit modifications by the magnetic fields generated as the result of plasma instability. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  8. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  9. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  10. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  11. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  12. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  13. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession of...

  14. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  15. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  16. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  17. Battery research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, M.M.

    1997-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has, for many years, been engaged in battery-related R and D programs for DOE and the transportation industry. In particular, from 1973 to 1995, ANL played a pioneering role in the technological development of the high-temperature (400 C) lithium-iron disulfide battery. With the emphasis of battery research moving away from high temperature systems toward ambient temperature lithium-based systems for the longer term, ANL has redirected its efforts toward the development of a lithium-polymer battery (60--80 C operation) and room temperature systems based on lithium-ion technologies. ANL`s lithium-polymer battery program is supported by the US Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), 3M and Hydro-Quebec, and the lithium-ion battery R and D efforts by US industry and by DOE.

  18. Research programs at the Research Laboratory of Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jonathan; Kleppner, Daniel; Passero, Barbara

    1991-12-01

    The progress report of the Research Laboratory of Electronics is presented. The following topics are addressed: (1) solid state physics, electronics, and optics including materials and fabrication, quantum effect devices, optics and devices, and surfaces and interfaces; (2) applied physics including atomic, molecular, and optical physics, plasma physics, electromagnetics, and radio astronomy; (3) systems and signals including computer aided design, and digital signal processing; and (4) language, speech, and hearing including speech communication, sensory communication, auditory physiology, and linguistics.

  19. Laboratory Investigation of Whistler Wave Resonances and Wave-Particle Interactions*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, W. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Cothran, C. D.; Blackwell, D.

    2011-12-01

    Standing whistler wave patterns have been investigated in the Naval Research Laboratory's Space Physics Simulation Chamber. Partial reflection of the antenna-launched whistler waves from the chamber end boundaries sets up a combination of standing and traveling waves. By controlling the axial magnetic field strength profile, cyclotron absorption of the whistler waves can be induced before reflection occurs, leaving only the forward propagating waves. Under uniform axial magnetic field conditions, the addition of planar conducting grids across the vacuum chamber cross-section at the ends of the plasma column provides improved reflecting surfaces, improving the cavity Q. This experimental configuration is being used to investigate whistler wave-energetic electron interactions and pitch-angle scattering under simulated radiation belt plasma conditions. Electrons beams with controllable energy are produced by a hollow cathode source and introduced into the experimental region with selectable pitch angle. Experimental results from the whistler wave resonance and electron scattering experiments will be presented. *Work sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  20. Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion Physics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold; March, Paul; Williams, Nehemiah; ONeill, William

    2011-01-01

    NASA/JSC is implementing an advanced propulsion physics laboratory, informally known as "Eagleworks", to pursue propulsion technologies necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system over the next 50 years, and enabling interstellar spaceflight by the end of the century. This work directly supports the "Breakthrough Propulsion" objectives detailed in the NASA OCT TA02 In-space Propulsion Roadmap, and aligns with the #10 Top Technical Challenge identified in the report. Since the work being pursued by this laboratory is applied scientific research in the areas of the quantum vacuum, gravitation, nature of space-time, and other fundamental physical phenomenon, high fidelity testing facilities are needed. The lab will first implement a low-thrust torsion pendulum (<1 uN), and commission the facility with an existing Quantum Vacuum Plasma Thruster. To date, the QVPT line of research has produced data suggesting very high specific impulse coupled with high specific force. If the physics and engineering models can be explored and understood in the lab to allow scaling to power levels pertinent for human spaceflight, 400kW SEP human missions to Mars may become a possibility, and at power levels of 2MW, 1-year transit to Neptune may also be possible. Additionally, the lab is implementing a warp field interferometer that will be able to measure spacetime disturbances down to 150nm. Recent work published by White [1] [2] [3] suggests that it may be possible to engineer spacetime creating conditions similar to what drives the expansion of the cosmos. Although the expected magnitude of the effect would be tiny, it may be a "Chicago pile" moment for this area of physics.

  1. Flight Research Building at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1942-09-21

    The Flight Research Building at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory is a 272- by 150-foot hangar with an internal height up to 90 feet. The hangar’s massive 37.5-foot-tall and 250-foot-long doors can be opened in sections to suit different size aircraft. The hangar has sheltered a diverse fleet of aircraft over the decades. These have ranged from World War II bombers to Cessna trainers and from supersonic fighter jets to a DC–9 airliner. At the time of this September 1942 photograph, however, the hangar was being used as an office building during the construction of the laboratory. In December of 1941, the Flight Research Building became the lab’s first functional building. Temporary offices were built inside the structure to house the staff while the other buildings were completed. The hangar offices were used for an entire year before being removed in early 1943. It was only then that the laboratory acquired its first aircraft, pilots and flight mechanics. The temporary one-story offices can be seen in this photograph inside the large sliding doors. Also note the vertical lift gate below the NACA logo. The gate was installed so that the tails of larger aircraft could pass into the hangar. The white Farm House that served as the Administration Building during construction can be seen in the distance to the left of the hangar.

  2. Recent development and progress of IBA cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeven, W.; Abs, M.; Delvaux, J. L.; Forton, E.; Jongen, Y.; Medeiros Romao, L.; Nactergal, B.; Nuttens, V.; Servais, T.; Vanderlinden, T.; Zaremba, S.

    2011-12-01

    Several cyclotron development projects were recently realized by Ion Beam Applications S.A. (IBA). This contribution presents three of them: (i) the intensity enhancement of the Cyclone 30 cyclotron, a machine mainly used for the production of SPECT isotopes. This project is related with the increased demand for 201Tl because of the shortage of Mo/Tc generators from nuclear reactors, (ii) development of a new versatile multiple-particle K = 30 isotope-production cyclotron (the Cyclone 30XP) being able to accelerate H -, D - and also α-particles. The α-beam of this cyclotron will allow the production of new therapeutic isotopes (e.g. 211At) and (iii) commissioning of the Cyclone 70 cyclotron installed for Arronax in France. This machine is similar to the C30XP but provides higher energy ( K = 70) and allows research on new types of medical isotopes.

  3. Supercharger Research at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1944-01-21

    A researcher in the Supercharger Research Division at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory measures the blade thickness on a supercharger. Superchargers were developed at General Electric used to supply additional air to reciprocating engines. The extra air resulted in increased the engine’s performance, particularly at higher altitudes. The Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory had an entire division dedicated to superchargers during World War II. General Electric developed the supercharger in response to a 1917 request from the NACA to develop a device to enhance high-altitude flying. The supercharger pushed larger volumes of air into the engine manifold. The extra oxygen allowed the engine to operate at its optimal sea-level rating even when at high altitudes. Thus, the aircraft could maintain its climb rate, maneuverability and speed as it rose higher into the sky. NACA work on the supercharger ceased after World War II due to the arrival of the turbojet engine. The Supercharger Research Division was disbanded in October 1945 and reconstituted as the Compressor and Turbine Division.

  4. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  5. The Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre established by the Heavy Ion Laboratory of the University of Warsaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choiński, J.; Jastrzębskia, J.; Kilian, K.; Mazur, I.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pękal, A.; Szczepaniak, D.

    2014-03-01

    The Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre was recently installed on the premises of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw. Equipped with a medical PETtrace p/d cyclotron , radiochemistry synthesis and dispensing units and a modern quality control laboratory the Centre is intended to produce regularly for commercial purposes the classic PET radiopharmaceuticals ( such -as e.g. FDG- ). Situated on the largest Warsaw scientific campus OCHOTA, an important part of the Centre's activities will also be devoted to the production of known species for preclinical studies and research into innovative radiopharmaceuticals in collaboration with other scientific units of this Campus as well as with members of the Warsaw Consortium for PET Collaboration. Research into the accelerator production route of 99mTc will also begin shortly.

  6. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  7. Beam tomography research at Daresbury Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, K. M.; Ibison, M. G.; Holder, D. J.; Muratori, B. D.; Wolski, A.; Kourkafas, G.; Shepherd, B. J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Beam tomography research at Daresbury Laboratory has focussed on the development of normalised phase space techniques-starting with the idea of sampling tomographic projections at equal phase advances. This idea has influenced the design and operation of the tomography sections at the Photo Injector Test Facility at Zeuthen (PITZ) and at the Accelerator and Lasers in Combined Experiments (ALICE) at Daresbury. We have studied the feasibility of using normalised phase space to measure the effect of space charge. Quadrupole scan measurements are carried out at two different parts of a beamline. Reconstructions at the same location give results that are clearly rotated with respect to each other in normalised phase space. We are able to show that a significant part of this rotation can be attributed to the effect of space charge. We show how the normalised phase space technique can be used to increase the reliability of the Maximum Entropy Technique (MENT). While MENT is known for its ability to work with just a few projections, the accuracy of its reconstructions has seldom been questioned. We show that for typical phase space distributions, MENT could produce results that look quite different from the original. We demonstrate that a normalised phase space technique could give results that are closer to the actual distribution. We also present simpler ways of deriving the phase space tomography formalism and the Maximum Entropy Technique.

  8. Smart Materials Research at NRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matic, Peter

    1996-01-01

    This presentation covers the use of smart materials in Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) research for sensors, actuators, and modeling and control. Emphasis is on optical fiber Bragg gratings, piezoelectric actuators, shape memory alloy actuators, and polymer matrix and interfaces.

  9. Hyperspectral imager development at Army Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam

    2008-04-01

    Development of robust compact optical imagers that can acquire both spectral and spatial features from a scene of interest is of utmost importance for standoff detection of chemical and biological agents as well as targets and backgrounds. Spectral features arise due to the material properties of objects as a result of the emission, reflection, and absorption of light. Using hyperspectral imaging one can acquire images with narrow spectral bands and take advantage of the characteristic spectral signatures of different materials making up the scene in detection of objects. Traditional hyperspectral imaging systems use gratings and prisms that acquire one-dimensional spectral images and require relative motion of sensor and scene in addition to data processing to form a two-dimensional image cube. There is much interest in developing hyperspectral imagers using tunable filters that acquire a two-dimensional spectral image and build up an image cube as a function of time. At the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), we are developing hyperspectral imagers using a number of novel tunable filter technologies. These include acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) that can provide adaptive no-moving-parts imagers from the UV to the long wave infrared, diffractive optics technology that can provide image cubes either in a single spectral region or simultaneously in different spectral regions using a single moving lens or by using a lenslet array, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based Fabry-Perot (FP) tunable etalons to develop miniature sensors that take advantage of the advances in microfabrication and packaging technologies. New materials are being developed to design AOTFs and a full Stokes polarization imager has been developed, diffractive optics lenslet arrays are being explored, and novel FP tunable filters are under fabrication for the development of novel miniature hyperspectral imagers. Here we will brief on all the technologies being developed and present

  10. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. The author found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. The author shows how a conventional carbon negative ion source located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sample changing to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  11. Beam Propagation Studies at NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) July 1983 to June 1984. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-30

    mixtures to the drift tube a flow -through S system ws adopted. The gas (water pumpod N2 or zero grade air) van supplied from a regulated cylinder. When wet...gas was desired it was passed through a water saturated sponge inside a 15 cm diamter lucite tube. The flow rate and pressure in the lucite tube...art compressible flow algorithm (flux-corrected transport [51) with an appropriate chemical reaction scheme in order to compute the evolution and

  12. The 2-D simulations of the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. G.

    1985-05-01

    Two-dimensional gas-dynamic simulations of the NRL laser experiment have been performed to study the formation of aneurysms in the blast wave and to study the formation of structure internal to the blast front itself. In one set of simulations the debris shell was perturbed sinusoidally in mass and position and also perturbed to mimic the action of a slow jet of material leaving the target at slower speeds than the bulk of the debris. In all cases the blast wave remained stable to any aneurysm-like instability. Internal structure, however, was quite easily produced and grew as a function of time. In the other set of simulations the effect of a pre-heated channel upon the propagation of the blast wave was examined. Bulges in the blast wave shock front were produced in these simulations that could be the beginning of the aneurysm phenomenon, but the preheated channel by itself appears to be insufficient to produce the observed aneurysm.

  13. Accelerator Development for the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Free Electron Laser Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    34triple point" junction of the vacuum , ceramic insulator , and metal electrode. This leads to the flashover of the insulator , causing an arc which acts as...tungsten wire (25.4 um) into the transport vacuum system. The diode is housed in an Astron ceramic insulator stack. The voltage profile across the diode...accelerator vacuum wall. It is across these insulating breaks that the accelerating voltage is applied to the electron beam and any breakdown in these gaps

  14. Capturing Nonlinearities with the Naval Research Laboratory's Global and Mesoscale 4DVar Data Assimilation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. L.; Xu, L.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical weather prediction models and observation (forward) operators are important components of modern data assimilation systems. They are inherently nonlinear or even highly nonlinear at times. These nonlinearities can be handled through an iterative procedure, often referred to as the "outer loop" / "inner loop" formulation in 3D/4DVar data assimilation. In the "inner loop", one typically minimizes a cost-function around a previous 3D/4D state that is already a good approximation of the true nonlinear state. Additional "outer loops" are then used to account for the missing nonlinearity in both the NWP model and the observation operator. There is no formal proof of convergence in the aforementioned iterative procedure in general. However, it can be formally shown that the procedure can converge under certain condition (e.g. the Gauss-Newton algorithm). In practice, the iterative procedure works quite well due to the fact that the NWP model and the observation operators are generally quite good in capturing majority of the nonlinearity in dynamical process. The NRL global and mesoscale 4DVar systems use the Accelerated Representer (AR) formulation to solve the analysis equations in observation space. The dual formulation has several strategic advantages, but also present additional challenges unique to this formulation. This presentation will describe various methods used within the NRL Accelerated Representer 4DVar formulations to extend the solution methods to weakly nonlinear problems. These include ocean surface wind speed assimilation, assimilation of water vapor sensitive radiances, the multiple outer loop formulation, and the inclusion of linearized physics in the tangent linear and adjoint models.

  15. Records Systems of the Naval Research Laboratory: Central Records and Directives System Records.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-24

    20 2.2.3.6 Special Collections ................. 20 3. DIRECTIVES SYSTEM RECORDS ................. . 21 3.1 The Management Information Division...the Photographic Branch, the Supply Division, the Fi- nancial Management Division, the Public Works Division, and the Person- nel Division. In...Records and Correspondence Management Branch. Beginning in 1959, NRL, like the rest of the Navy, switched to a strict numerical filing system . This was a

  16. The NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Phase-Locked gyrotron oscillator program for SDIO/IST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, W. M.; Fliflet, A. W.; Gold, S. H.; Burke, J.; Black, W. M.; Barnett, L.

    1988-07-01

    This report is on the phase locked gyrotron oscillator program for SDIO/IST. The introduction summarizes the program as well as possible SDIO applications for high power phase locked microwave and millimeter wave sources. It considers the different possible architectures for a phased array for an SDIO mission. Section 2 summarizes results in theory. The main accomplishment was the development of a slow time scale code which examines phase locking in time varying situations. Section 3 summarizes the experimental design of the low power experiment which will examine phase locking in overmode cavities. Section 4 summarizes the results of the slotted cavity experiments. The axial slots allow for mode control. With a slotted cavity, a gyrotron oscillator has reliably generated 35 MW at 35 GHz in a standing TE Sub 13 mode. Section 5 summarizes results on the VEBA driven free running oscillator. This experiment has succeeded in generating 200 MW at 35 GHz in a TE sub 62 mode. Section 6 discusses experimental design of the VEBA fundamental mode three cavity phase-locked oscillator at 35 GHz. This experiment is expected to produce phase-locked power at the 5 MW level. Section 7 discusses the experimental results up to now on this experiment. Section 8 discusses the experimental design of the strongly coupled phase-locked oscillator experiment.

  17. Accelerator Development in Support of the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Beam Dynamic Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    vacuum field shaping electrode it can be seen that the electric field ’.2 directs electrons away from the insulator surface at angles mostly... insulator area of 1495 cm2 , a pulse duration of 0.25 sec, and effective insulator length of 12.5 cm, and using the pessimistic SNLA breakdown constant of...away from the insulator surface at angles ranging from 52 to 56 degrees, except for the cathode triple point where the angles drop to 37

  18. A History of the Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., 1927-1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-22

    section devoted to the study of lubricants. of particular interest was the development of * special purpose oils and greases which had all the...This section studied the physical chemistry of oil-soluble soaps, colloid structures in greases , * and drag reduction by macromolecular colloids in...to the control of grease properties, and to the reduction of turbulence losses of water borne vehicles (sponsored fundging, 1966: ONR, $136.OK

  19. Laser Target Design Scaling for the Upgraded NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-30

    0.0290 cm 0.0625 Divergence 80 80 80 80 deg 80 Intensity-ab 6.70E13 1.20E14 1.06E14 1.28E14 W/cm2 9.77E13 Absorption 0.59 0.72 0.85 0.90 0.9310 KE...cm 0.0093 0.0079 Divergence 80 80 80 deg 80 80 *Intensity-.a 1.06E12 1.03E13 1.28E14 8.70E14 9.78E15 Absorption 0.95 0.93 0.90 0.61 0.49 KE fraction...Target Z 13 13 13 13 Radius (d) 0.0290 0.0290 0.0290 an 0.0290 j~ Divergence 80 80 80 deg 80 *Intensity.ab 2.25E15 5.80E14 1.28E14 W/cnW 1.93E13

  20. Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory Command History, OPNAV 5750-1 Fiscal Year 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-26

    PAGE] iv TABLE OF CONTENTS Part 1. Basic Historical Narrative a) Command Mission...3 Part 2. Special Topics, as applicable (1) Statistics on major functions...year ..................... 25 Part 3. List of supporting documents (1) NSMRL Reports and journal articles ........................................26

  1. US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    nature that is to be expected of Er ions in a glass host. Small differences are able to be observed though. The height of the 1532-nm peak relative ...ARL-TN-0711 ● NOV 2015 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014 Final...is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TN-0711 ● NOV 2015 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research

  2. 8. EXTERIOR DETAIL, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) (1991). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EXTERIOR DETAIL, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 18, Power Plant Laboratory Complex, Northeast corner of C & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. 7. EXTERIOR NORTHWEST VIEW, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. EXTERIOR NORTHWEST VIEW, BUILDING 18 (POWER PLANT RESEARCH LABORATORY) (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 18, Power Plant Laboratory Complex, Northeast corner of C & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  5. Symposium on Structural Intermetallics: Perspectives on Science and Technology Held at the Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad, India on 5-6 February 1994. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-06

    Contribution from France T.Khan and S.Naka ONERA, France 4. Microstructure, Processing and Properties of MoSi2 D.A. Hardwick Rockwell Science Centre, USA i 5...Effect of Microstructure on the Creep of Molybdenum Disilicides and their Composites3 K. Sadananda and R. Feng Naval Research Laboratory, USA i 6... properties such as low density, high thermal conductivity and excellent environmental resistance. Nevertheless, a reasonable combination of toughness and

  6. Frontiers for Laboratory Research of Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Hantao; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Magnetic reconnection occcurs throughout heliophysical and astrophysical plasmas as well as in laboratory fusion plasmas. Two broad categories of reconnection models exist: collisional MHD and collisionless kinetic. Eight major questions with respect to magnetic connection are set down, and past and future devices for studying them in the laboratory are described. Results of some computerized simulations are compared with experiments.

  7. Productivity Measurement in Research and Development Laboratories.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    relative position); 2. The totem pole (correlates relative position with salary); 3. The check sheet (evaluates individual characterizations); 4. The...are tabu - lated and interpreted for each question. Upper laboratory management provided 85% of all responses. The majority of laboratories

  8. The Acquisition and Use of Morbidity Data in Naval Environments,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-06

    AD-AlAS 366 NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA F/ 6/5 THE ACQUISITION AND USE OF MORBIDITY DATA IN NAVAL ENVIRONMENTS-ETCIU) AUG681 W MPUGH...ACQUISITION AND USE OF MORBIDITY c~DATE IN NAVAL ENVIRONMENTS W. M.PUGH &D. D.BECK REPORT NO. 81-24 0 OB q1Eq 4 NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER P.O0...Acquisition and Use of Morbidity Data in Naval Environments VA William M. Pugh* and Donald D. Beck** Naval Health Research Center San Diego, California

  9. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte harvests a potato grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled environment Life Support system (CELSS) in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' His work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  10. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte (right) and Cheryl Mackowiak harvest potatoes grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled Enviornment Life Support System (CELSS in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  11. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte (right) and Cheryl Mackowiak harvest potatoes grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled Enviornment Life Support System (CELSS in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  12. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte harvests a potato grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled environment Life Support system (CELSS) in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' His work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  13. Evaluation of a Regional, High-Resolution, Arctic Sea Ice forecasts in support of 2015 Summer and Autumn U.S. Coast Guard and Office of Naval Research Operations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, D. A.; Allard, R.; Posey, P. G.; Rogers, W.; Dykes, J. D.; Wang, S.; Jin, Y.; Holt, T.; Smedstad, O. M.; Phelps, M.; Geiszler, D.

    2016-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), as part of the Regional Arctic Prediction component of the Earth System Prediction Capability (ESPC) program, has developed a regional, high resolution, Arctic modeling system to support U.S. Coast Guard and Office of Naval Research Arctic operations in the summer and autumn of 2015. The modeling system is composed of the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS), the Community Ice CodE (CICE), and Wave Watch III (WW3). The system provided real-time, 72-hr forecasts of environmental conditions for the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas. The modeling components assimilate atmosphere, ocean and ice observations available from satellite and in situ sources. In this study, the 1-3 day sea ice forecasts are examined. Specifically, we compare modeled ice concentration, ice thickness, ice drift, and ice edge location with satellite, buoy, and ship observations. Results will also be compared to the U.S. Navy's operational Arctic Cap Nowcast/Forecast System, a two-way coupled ice-ocean system forced with NAVGEM atmospheric data.

  14. Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO) satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Davis, Curtiss O.

    1999-10-01

    The Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have initiated the Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technology (HRST) program to demonstrate the utility of a hyperspectral earth-imaging system to support Naval needs for characterization of the littoral regions of the world. One key component of the HRST program is the development of the Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO) satellite system to provide a large hyperspectral data base. NEMO will carry the Coastal Ocean Imaging Spectrometer (COIS) which will provide images of littoral regions with 210 spectral channels over a bandpass of 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer. Since ocean environments have reflectances typically less than 5%, this system requires a very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). COIS will sample over a 30 km swath width with a 60 m Ground Sample Distance (GSD) with the ability to go to a 30 m GSD by utilizing the systems attitude control system to 'nod' (i.e., use ground motion compensation to slow down the ground track of the field of view). Also included in the payload is a co-registered 5 m Panchromatic Imager (PIC) to provide simultaneous high spatial resolution imagery. A sun-synchronous, 97.81 degree inclination, circular orbit of 605 km allows continuous repeat coverage of the whole earth. One unique aspect of NEMO is an on-board processing system, a feature extraction and data compression software package developed by NRL called the Optical Real-Time Spectral Identification System (ORASIS). ORASIS employs a parallel, adaptive hyperspectral method for real time scene characterization, data reduction, background suppression, and target recognition. The use of ORASIS is essential for management of the massive amounts of data expected from the NEMO HSI system, and for developing Naval products under HRST. The combined HSI and panchromatic images will provide critical phenomenology to aid in the operation of Naval systems in the littoral environment. The imagery can also satisfy a number of

  15. Stirling engine research at national and university laboratories in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) reviewed research projects that are related to the development of Stirling engines and that are under way at Japanese national laboratories and universities. The research and development focused on component rather than on whole engine development. PNL obtained the information from a literature review and interviews conducted at the laboratories and universities. The universities have less equipment available and operate with smaller staffs for research than do the laboratories. In particular, the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory and the Aerospace Laboratory conduct high-quality component and fundamental work. Despite having less equipment, some of the researchers at the universities conduct high-quality fundamental research. As is typical in Japan, several of the university professors are very active in consulting and advisory capacities to companies engaged in Stirling engine development, and also with government and association advisory and technical committees. Contacts with these professors and selective examination of their research are good ways to keep abreast of Japanese Stirling developments.

  16. Emerging Infectious Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia: Cambodia, Indonesia, and the Naval Area Medical Research Unit 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-22

    change in the Asia-Pacific Emerging Infectious Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia: Cambodia, Indonesia , and the Naval Area Medical...2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Emerging Infectious Disease Surveillance in Southeast Asia: Cambodia, Indonesia , and the Naval Area Medical...denominator, this paper compares barriers to EID surveillance in Cambodia and Indonesia and presents key factors? uncovered through extensive interviews

  17. Naval Health Research Center (NHRC) Report for the Calendar Year 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    are a pre- requisite for infectious disease control. Medical laboratory services must become available to the people, especially children , even though...Clinical Psychophysiology Department & NRMC’s Department of Psychiatry) "Structure of Sleep and the Parasomnias : Sleepwalking, Night Terrors and Enuresis

  18. 24. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, Natick, Mass, Climatic Building, First Floor Plan, Architectural. Drawing No. 35-07-01, Sheet 2 of 72, 1952, updated to 1985. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  19. 25. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN DRAWING. Quartermaster Research and Development Laboratory, Natick, Mass. Climatic Building, First Floor Plan, Refrigeration and Engineering. Drawing No. 35-07-01, Sheet 52 of 72, 1952. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  20. US Army Research Laboratory Lightweight and Specialty Metals Branch Research and Development (FY14)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    ARL-SR-0319•APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory Lightweight and Specialty Metals Branch Research and Development (FY14...to the originator. ARL-SR-0319•APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory Lightweight and Specialty Metals Branch Research and...Lightweight and Specialty Metals Branch Research and Development (FY14) Mark A Tschopp and Heidi E Maupin ARL-SR-0319 Approved for public release

  1. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  2. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  3. Entrance to the NACA's Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1948-08-21

    The sign near the entrance of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory. The name was changed several weeks later to the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in honor of the NACA’s former Director of Aeronautical Research, George W. Lewis. The research laboratory has had five different names since its inception in 1941. The Cleveland laboratory was originally known as the NACA Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory. In 1947 it was renamed the NACA Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory to reflect the expansion of the research activities beyond just engines. Following the death of George Lewis, the name was changed to the NACA Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory in September 1948. On October 1, 1958, the lab was incorporated into the new NASA space agency, and it was renamed the NASA Lewis Research Center. Following John Glenn’s flight on the space shuttle, the name was changed again to the NASA Glenn Research Center on March 1, 1999. From his office in Washington DC, George Lewis managed the aeronautical research conducted at the NACA for over 20 years. His most important accomplishment, however, may have been an investigative tour of German research facilities in the fall of 1936. The visit resulted in the broadening of the scope of the NACA’s research and the physical expansion that included the new engine laboratory in Cleveland.

  4. Evaluating cryostat performance for naval applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, David; Willen, Dag; Fesmire, James; Johnson, Wesley; Smith, Jonathan; Meneghelli, Barry; Demko, Jonathan; George, Daniel; Fowler, Brian; Huber, Patti

    2012-06-01

    The Navy intends to use High Temperature Superconducting Degaussing (HTSDG) coil systems on future Navy platforms. The Navy Metalworking Center (NMC) is leading a team that is addressing cryostat configuration and manufacturing issues associated with fabricating long lengths of flexible, vacuum-jacketed cryostats that meet Navy shipboard performance requirements. The project includes provisions to evaluate the reliability performance, as well as proofing of fabrication techniques. Navy cryostat performance specifications include less than 1 Wm-1 heat loss, 2 MPa working pressure, and a 25-year vacuum life. Cryostat multilayer insulation (MLI) systems developed on the project have been validated using a standardized cryogenic test facility and implemented on 5-meterlong test samples. Performance data from these test samples, which were characterized using both LN2 boiloff and flow-through measurement techniques, will be presented. NMC is working with an Integrated Project Team consisting of Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Carderock Division, Southwire Company, nkt cables, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ASRC Aerospace, and NASA Kennedy Space Center (NASA-KSC) to complete these efforts. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This material is submitted with the understanding that right of reproduction for governmental purposes is reserved for the Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Virginia 22203-1995.

  5. Performance Evaluation of a Dual Linear Ion Trap-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer for Proteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Senko, Michael W.; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A novel dual cell linear ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) and its performance characteristics are reported. A linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer has been modified to incorporate a LTQ-Velos mass spectrometer. This modified instrument features efficient ion accumulation and fast MS/MS acquisition capabilities of dual cell linear RF ion trap instruments coupled to the high mass accuracy, resolution, and dynamic range of a FT-ICR for improved proteomic coverage. The ion accumulation efficiency is demonstrated to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed with LTQ-FT Ultra instrumentation. The proteome coverage with yeast was shown to increase over the previous instrument generation by 50% (100% increase on the peptide level). In addition, many lower abundance level yeast proteins were only detected with this modified instrument. This novel configuration also enables beam type CID fragmentation using a dual cell RF ion trap mass spectrometer. This technique involves accelerating ions between traps while applying an elevated DC offset to one of the traps to accelerate ions and induce fragmentation. This instrument design may serve as a useful option for labs currently considering purchasing new instrumentation or upgrading existing instruments. PMID:23590889

  6. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1989--90

    SciTech Connect

    Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Wegner, S.J.; Edwards, D.D.

    1992-06-01

    Ground-water-chemistry data collected during 1989--90 from 13 sites on the eastern Snake River Plain is presented as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing water-quality monitoring program in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Ranges of concentrations for total cations and dissolved anions were calcium--29 to 64 mg/L (milligrams per liter), potassium--1.5 to 2.6 mg/L, magnesium--8.6 to 28 mg/L, sodium--5.6 to 17 mg/L, bromide--0.02 to 0.35 mg/L, chloride--5.7 to 1 10 mg/L, sulfate-- 19 to 59 mg/L, and fluoride--less than 0. 1 to 0. 3 mg/L. Purgeable organic compounds and extractable acid and base/neutral organic compounds were detected in water from two and nine sites, respectively. Concentrations of total organic carbon ranged from 0. t to 0.9 mg/L. Total phenols in 9 of 13 samples ranged from 1 to 9 micrograms per liter. Dissolved concentrations of tritium and thorium-230 ranged from less than the reporting level. Concentrations of dissolved gross beta-particle radioactivity as cesium-137 ranged from 2.89{plus_minus}0.53 to 5.52{plus_minus}0.58 pCi/L. Concentrations of radium-226 ranged from 0.042{plus_minus}0.006 to 0.095{plus_minus}0.009 pCi/L.

  7. Naval Medical R and D News. March 2017, Volume 9, Issue 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    Medical Research Center (Feature) Military Medicine Provides World-Class Solutions for Combat Casualties From Naval Medical Research Center Public... Researchers from the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division and the Naval Postgraduate School spent the voyage conducting experiments to...interruptions, motion sickness incidence, and Sopite syndrome on surgical procedures while in a shipboard environment.... From Naval Medical Research

  8. Power and energy research at the Army Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Edward C.; Wood, Mark C.

    2012-06-01

    The requirement for power and energy in a modernized, highly digital and network-centric Army is growing exponentially. In addition to the ongoing demand for improved soldier portable power sources, the need for more electric capabilities for combat and unmanned platforms and the requirements of emerging Operational Energy doctrine are driving development of high density, energy efficient power technologies. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is addressing these needs through developing a number of underpinning power and energy component technologies at the fundamental research level. ARL is leveraging core expertise in microelectronics and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), energy conversion, energy storage, and wideband gap materials and devices to advance selected niche areas that address military demands beyond commercial needs in partnership with the Army Research, Development and Engineering centers (RDECs), other services, other agencies, industry, and academia. The technologies under development can be broadly characterized under power generation and energy conversion, energy storage, power distribution, and thermal management. This discussion outlines progress, approach and the way ahead for ARL efforts.

  9. Maritime security laboratory for maritime security research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunin, Barry J.; Sutin, Alexander; Bruno, Michael S.

    2007-04-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology has established a new Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) to facilitate advances in methods and technologies relevant to maritime security. MSL is designed to enable system-level experiments and data-driven modeling in the complex environment of an urban tidal estuary. The initial focus of the laboratory is on the threats posed by divers and small craft with hostile intent. The laboratory is, however, evolvable to future threats as yet unidentified. Initially, the laboratory utilizes acoustic, environmental, and video sensors deployed in and around the Hudson River estuary. Experimental data associated with boats and SCUBA divers are collected on a computer deployed on board a boat specifically designed and equipped for these experiments and are remotely transferred to a Visualization Center on campus. Early experiments utilizing this laboratory have gathered data to characterize the relevant parameters of the estuary, acoustic signals produced by divers, and water and air traffic. Hydrophones were deployed to collect data to enable the development of passive acoustic methodologies for maximizing SCUBA diver detection distance. Initial results involving characteristics of the estuary, acoustic signatures of divers, ambient acoustic noise in an urban estuary, and transmission loss of acoustic signals in a wide frequency band are presented. These results can also be used for the characterization of abnormal traffic and improvement of underwater communication in a shallow water estuary.

  10. Sandia, California Tritium Research Laboratory transition and reutilization project

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes a project within Sandia National Laboratory to convert the shut down Tritium Research Laboratory into a facility which could be reused within the laboratory complex. In the process of decommissioning and decontaminating the facility, the laboratory was able to save substantial financial resources by transferring much existing equipment to other DOE facilities, and then expeditiously implementing a decontamination program which has resulted in the building being converted into laboratory space for new lab programs. This project of facility reuse has been a significant financial benefit to the laboratory.

  11. Cyber Security Research at Lincoln Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-15

    wearable  devices  that  contain...U.S.  missions  assured  at  modest  cost.   Lincoln  Laboratory  has  been  developing   technology  in  support  of...and  the   scalability  of  resource  usage.  Lincoln  Laboratory  is  developing   technology  that  will

  12. Mobile teleoperator research at Savannah River Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J S

    1985-01-01

    A Robotics Technology Group was organized at Savannah River Laboratory to employ modern automation and robotics for applications at the Savannah River site. Several industrial robots have been installed in plant processes. Other robotics systems are under development in the laboratories, including mobile teleoperators for general remote tasks and emergency response operations. This paper discusses present work on a low-cost wheeled mobile vehicle, a modular light duty manipulator arm, a large gantry telerobot system, and a high technology six-legged walking robot with a teleoperated arm.

  13. Office of Naval Research High School Intern Program (ONR HSIP), (1987-1991)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    of Science A NathM~tics; Durham, PC 2770 Advisor: Dr. J.D.. Costlow ( Crustacean developmmnt) Research Topic/Paper Title: Effects of the pesticide...animale) Research Topic/Paper Title: Effects of salinity and peptides on crustacean larval development fs. Susan D. Tettey 400 Leslie Lane Emeld Isle, VC...Carteret High School; Norehtead City, NC 21557 Advisor: Dr. J.D. Costlow ( Crustacean development) Research Topic/Pape Title: Culture of regenerated chetse

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-15 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar

    2016-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2011-03-01

    The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  16. A New Gas Stopper for Heavy Element Chemistry Research at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Marisa; Tereshatov, Evgeny; Devanzo, Michael; Sefcik, Jordan; Bennett, Megan; Mayorov, Dmitriy; Werke, Tyler; Folden, Charles

    2014-09-01

    A Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC) to facilitate the chemical study of the heaviest elements, created via fusion-evaporation reactions, has been fabricated at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. This gas stopper is a hybrid of previously used RTCs in the transactinide field and one used at Michigan State University for stopping products from projectile fragmentation reactions. Our RTC uses laminar gas flow and a series of electrodes that create a potential gradient to efficiently transport evaporation residues to an appropriate chemistry experiment. The RTC was characterized offline using 216Po recoils from a 228Th source and online using a high cross section fusion-evaporation reaction, 118Sn(40Ar, 6n)152Er. Results show an online extraction efficiency of (70 +/ - 9)%, which is comparable to devices used worldwide. This talk will discuss the design of the RTC and present results from offline and online experiments.

  17. Summary Reports of Naval Academy Research Council Sponsored Faculty Projects 1983-1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    RESULTS : In the summer of 1984 I completed my research into the relation- ship between geography and lordship in late Anglo-Saxon England. The pat- tern...discover their relationship to the king. The results of this research will be presented in November 1984 at a professional con- ference. Finally, I...AND RESULTS : Data have been collected in the following categories: (1) a careful review of related extant theory; (2) the extensive material from

  18. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 5, May 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    nurses who support Navy Nurse Corps initiatives for Navy Medicine ! In addition, I offer a special recognition to the 34 uniformed Navy Nurse Corps...Nurse Researchers across Navy Medicine who support nursing research initiatives. We only comprise one percent of the Navy Nurse Corps but we are proud...circadian hormone profiles, and cognitive function of nurses and corpsmen working on rotating shifts. The team will empirically test alternative sleep

  19. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 3, March 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-29

    at the forefront of Navy Medicine and gave awards to three returning researchers and one Navy Hospital Corpsman; Lt. Cmdr. Michael Gregory, Lt...Collaborations in Egypt 4 Navy Medicine R&D COs Meet in San Antonio 5 NMRC Researchers Conduct Phase 1 Malaria Clinical...projects in areas such as military operational and expeditionary medicine , combat casualty care, vaccine development, fatigue intervention, resiliency

  20. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Graduate Student Research Program Final Reports, Volume 8, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Group at the Phillips Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force Base...for Summer Graduate Student Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC...2390 S. York Street Denver, CO 80208-0177 Final Report for: Summer Faculty Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force

  1. From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Keevil, C. William; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial. Background: There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission. Methods: In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components. Results: Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials. Conclusions: Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs. PMID:26163568

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  3. [The flagship of the national naval medical science (on the 80th anniversary of establishment of the 1st Central Research Institute of the Defense Ministry of Russian Federation)].

    PubMed

    Chumakov, Vl V; Arkhipov, A V; Borodavko, V K; Vasil'kov, A M; Groshilin, S M; Ivanov, A O; Smurov, A V

    2013-02-01

    The article is devoted to the 80th anniversary of the formation of the naval medical science subunit, which is the part of the 1st Central Research Institute of the Defense Ministry of Russian Federation. In the 30th years of XX century, a group of naval doctors formulated the main directions of preventive naval medicine. For eight decades, several generations of medical scientists have developed and ensured implementation of regulatory requirements for habitability and ergonomics of Navy ships. At the present stage, this work focuses on promising directions of the development of the domestic military shipbuilding and the use of advanced and innovative biomedical technologies.

  4. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  5. First charge breeding of a rare-isotope beam with the electron-beam ion trap of the ReA post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Baumann, T. M.; Cooper, K.; Kittimanapun, K.; Rodriguez, A. J.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Williams, S. J.; Wittmer, W.; Leitner, D.; Bollen, G.

    2014-02-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder is being brought into operation at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The EBIT is part of the ReA post-accelerator for reacceleration of rare isotopes, which are thermalized in a gas "stopping" cell after being produced at high energy by projectile fragmentation. The ReA EBIT has a distinctive design; it is characterized by a high-current electron gun and a two-field superconducting magnet to optimize the capture and charge-breeding efficiency of continuously injected singly charged ion beams. Following a brief overview of the reaccelerator system and the ReA EBIT, this paper presents the latest commissioning results, particularly, charge breeding and reacceleration of the highly charged rare isotopes, 76Ga24 +, 25 +.

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  7. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 4, April 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    prevention and rehabilitation, fatigue and sleep performance, and environmental physiology. “Our team at NHRC is comprised of experts in biomedical...limits of healthy warfighters ~ Evaluate new technologies for enhancing performance and reducing injuries ~ Support sleep optimization and fatigue...the Sleep Lab, including current research into sleep optimization throughout the continuum of military service, and the Environmental Chamber, which

  8. Leveraging ISI Multi-Model Prediction for Navy Operations: Proposal to the Office of Naval Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Atmosphere Studies Professor, Climate Dynamics Program Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic & Earth Sciences George Mason University 284 Research...The potential to leverage existing and planned efforts to produce intra-seasonal to seasonal and interannual climate predictions, by U.S. national...operational climatological products and in developing the next generation Navy seamless weather and climate prediction system. We propose to foster this

  9. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    research on terrain prediction. Classification is aimed toward developing a machine - learning capability for UGVs to remotely sense local and near-field... Machine - learning capabilities for an unmanned ground vehicle on sandy terrain . Extramural Basic Research 39 Designing Mechano-responsive Polymers to...research partners and collaborators . Our goal continues to be a preeminent, multi-disciplinary, adaptive, and learning ARL team capable of meeting the

  10. Naval Medical R and D News Special Edition: 2016 MHSRS Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    brain injury and neurotrauma, Aug. 16. Full Article NMRC Researcher Recipient of MHSRS Team Award for Outstanding Research Researchers from the Naval...cause of lost duty days for military personnel for more than 60 years. Full Article NMRC Scientist Researches Humanized Lab Model to Understand...Research Center, presented findings on a pilot study to demonstrate how a humanized mouse laboratory model may help in the development of a vaccine to

  11. Cost Benefit Analysis of the Installation of a Wind Turbine on a Naval Ship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    highly dependent on the overall operational concept and mission of the ship. A coupled ocean/atmosphere mesoscale prediction software ( COAMPS ...concept and mission of the ship. A coupled ocean/atmosphere mesoscale prediction software ( COAMPS ) developed by the Naval Research Laboratory is used in...ATMOSPHERE MESOSCALE PREDICTION SYSTEM ( COAMPS ) ....................................................................................50 C. INPUTS FOR THE

  12. Chemical exposures in research laboratories in a university.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shiro; Okamoto, Satoru; Yamada, Chikahisa; Ukai, Hirohiko; Samoto, Hajime; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2008-04-01

    Research laboratories in a university were investigated for air-borne levels of legally designated organic solvents and specified chemical substances. Repeated surveys in 2004-5 (four times in the two years) of about 720 laboratories (thus 2,874 laboratories in total) revealed that the solvent concentrations were in excess of the Administrative Control Levels only in a few laboratories (the conditions improved shortly after the identification) and none with regard to specified chemicals. Thus, working environments were in Control Class 1 in almost all (99.5%) laboratories examined. Such conditions were achieved primarily by extensive installation and use of local exhaust systems. The survey further revealed that types of chemicals used in research laboratories were extremely various (only poorly covered by the regulation) whereas the amounts of each chemical to be consumed were quite limited. For protection of health of researchers (including post- and under-graduate students) in laboratories, therefore, it appeared more appropriate to make personal exposure assessment rather than evaluation of levels of chemicals in air of research laboratories. Considering unique characteristics of research activity, it is important to educate each researcher to make his/her own efforts to protect his/her health, through supply of knowledge on toxicity of chemicals as well as that on proper use of protective equipments including exhaust chambers.

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R

    2002-06-20

    Established by Congress in 1991, the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program provides the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories, like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL or the Laboratory), with the flexibility to invest up to 6% of their budget in long-term, high-risk, and potentially high payoff research and development (R&D) activities to support the DOE/NNSA's national security missions. By funding innovative R&D, the LDRD Program at LLNL develops and extends the Laboratory's intellectual foundations and maintains its vitality as a premier research institution. As proof of the Program's success, many of the research thrusts that started many years ago under LDRD sponsorship are at the core of today's programs. The LDRD Program, which serves as a proving ground for innovative ideas, is the Laboratory's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. Basic and applied research activities funded by LDRD enhance the Laboratory's core strengths, driving its technical vitality to create new capabilities that enable LLNL to meet DOE/NNSA's national security missions. The Program also plays a key role in building a world-class multidisciplinary workforce by engaging the Laboratory's best researchers, recruiting its future scientists and engineers, and promoting collaborations with all sectors of the larger scientific community.

  14. Naval applications of a TAE-derived executive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberek, Michael; Borders, Stephen; Masse, Serge

    1986-01-01

    Global Imaging introduced an interactive image processing system in 1985, featuring the Global Applications Executive (GAE) which is a modified Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) environment. The executive plus a large variety of image processing functions, known commercially as the System 9000, are designed to operate on the Hewlett-Packard as its standard desktop computer (NSDTC), the System 9000 has found easy acceptance for Naval image processing applications. The Department of Oceanography at the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, has installed an NSDTC with an image processing upgrade. This interactive digital image processing workstation is used by the midshipmen and staff for training and research in remote sensing oceanography. The turn-key system provides the capability to process imagery from commonly used Earth observation spacecraft, in conjunction with in situ data sets. The Acoustic Group at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. has acquired its first System 9000 to interactively process ocean acoustic data gathered by shipboard sensors. Finally, the Naval Oceanographic Facility in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi has acquired a System 9000 to provide a second generation Tactical Environmental Support System (TESS 2) prototype with image processing capabilities. This will permit merging of conventional data with polar orbiting spacecraft imagery. A brief description of these applications and the TAE-derived system is presented.

  15. Final Technical Report on Office of Naval Research Contract Number N00014-77-C-0354.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-23

    through the contract period. This contract supported research on the physical oceanography of the Gulf Stream, * which included several sub-projects (each...Additional funding from the National Science Foundation’s Physical Oceanography Program Supported this participation. Project D was conducted in collaboration...with Profcsor D. Randolph Watts, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island. lie was supported by the Physical Oceanography Programs

  16. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 8, Issue 1, January 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    analysis so researchers can identify which strains of influenza are circulating. The influenza virus can be unpredictable and is capable of...evolving. The ability of the influenza virus to change over time is why new vaccines are developed every year to ensure it provides protection against...the strains known to be in circulation. After NHRC scientists identify the presence and strain of influenza virus , the team further analyzes the

  17. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 6, June 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Security, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Spring Research Festival gives the Fort Detrick...insects. Rather than killing insects, DEET works by making it hard for biting bugs to smell prey. “A lot of people don’t think about mosquitoes and...custom- molded earplugs on the LCS crew, as well as, a leading member of NSMRL’s hearing conservation group. His scientific acumen and ability to

  18. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 5, May 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    efforts cannot fully address today’s complex and interconnected problems . Being located on Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, where many injured...hiring to create interdisciplinary teams designed to “attack” a problem from numerous pathways. This approach encourages scientists to think...provides an interdisciplinary view of the problem under investigation and leads to cutting- edge solutions and product-driven research. For example

  19. Office of Naval Research (ONR) Support for R/V Point Sur Ship Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    Maritime Academy, iVlonterey Bay, Northridge, Pomona, Sacramento, San Bernardmo, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, San Marcos ...NUMBER N/A 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER N/A 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) San Jose State University Research Foundation 210 N...Fourth St, 4’^*’ Floor San Jose, CA 95112 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER N/A 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS{ES

  20. Naval Medical Research and Development News. Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    conducting groundbreaking aeromedical research to enhance the health, safety and performance of NASA astronauts. May 28, 1959, a squirrel monkey...with NASA Story by Richard D. Arnold, NAMRU-D NAMRL’s lab squirrel monkey, Miss Baker, was one of the first two primates launched into space and...as conditions on the ground changed, the final seven units were built to hold 50 patients each. Since opening Nov. 7, the hospital -- known as

  1. North American deep underground laboratories: Soudan Underground Laboratory, SNOLab, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past several decades, fundamental physics experiments have required access to deep underground laboratories to satisfy the increasingly strict requirements for ultra-low background environments and shielding from cosmic rays. In this presentation, I summarize the existing and anticipated physics programs and laboratory facilities of North America's deep facilities: The Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, SNOLab in Ontario, Canada, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

  2. Viral Vector Biosafety in Laboratory Animal Research.

    PubMed

    Collins, Dalis E; Reuter, Jon D; Rush, Howard G; Villano, Jason S

    2017-06-01

    Viral vector research presents unique occupational health and safety challenges to institutions due to the rapid development of both in vivo and in vitro gene-editing technologies. Risks to human and animal health make it incumbent on institutions to appropriately evaluate viral vector usage in research on the basis of available information and governmental regulations and guidelines. Here we review the factors related to risk assessment regarding viral vector usage in animals and the relevant regulatory documents associated with this research, and we highlight the most commonly used viral vectors in research today. This review is particularly focused on the background, use in research and associated health and environmental risks related to adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, lentiviral, and herpesviral vectors.

  3. ONR (Office of Naval Research) Far East Scientific Bulletin. Volume 12, Number 1, January-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G.B.; Kawano, S.

    1987-03-01

    This is a quarterly publication presenting articles covering recent developments in Far Eastern (particularly Japanese) scientific research. Current practice and concepts of superlattice devices are covered. Chinese research efforts in plasma science and technology are discussed. Highlights of the BEAMS '86 Conference and some of the interesting research developments at several Japanese university and industrial laboratories are presented. Some of the papers presented demonstrate Chinese research in high-resolution imaging, electron crystallography, and chemical analysis. Recent research efforts in a number of ceramics-related areas are discussed. The Pohang Institute of Science and Technology has been established to further Korea's commitment to scientific and technological advancement. The physics and control of transitional and turbulent flow processes are discussed at this symposium. Tokamaks, helical systems, and laser fusion research are discussed. Chinese research in superconductive electronics is directed to SQUID magnetometry for biological and geophysical applications and to millimeter and submillimeter wave applications.

  4. Introducing Undergraduates to a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a student project which is intended to teach undergraduates concepts and techniques of nuclear physics, experimental methods used in particle detection, and provide experience in a functioning research environment. Included are detailed procedures for carrying out the project. (CC)

  5. Introducing Undergraduates to a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a student project which is intended to teach undergraduates concepts and techniques of nuclear physics, experimental methods used in particle detection, and provide experience in a functioning research environment. Included are detailed procedures for carrying out the project. (CC)

  6. Airsickness During Naval Flight Officer Training: Basic Squadron VT-10 (New Syllabus).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-27

    Htouk, MlC, USN . Chief Scientific Advisor Commanding Officerg \\ ~27 March• 1961 SNAVAL AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABOR-ATORY NAVAL AIR STATION...INTRODUCTION This is the fourth in a series of research reports dealing with a longitudinal study of airsickness in Naval Flight Officer (NFO...function of the individuai hops. 12 " VEDICATION INCIDENCE STUDENT RATINGS AL. SMMNTS S3S ThMAL as !10 • HOP IDENTIFIER - SWiflO V’TIO C NlEW SYLLA8UJS

  7. Helical Explosive Flux Compression Generator Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) explosive pulsed power program. These include circuit codes such as Microcap and

  8. The Biographical Inventory in Naval Aviation Selection: Inside the Black Box. Research Report. RR-04-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.

    2004-01-01

    A biographical inventory has been used in the selection of students for naval aviation training since World War II, and its validity in predicting their retention-attrition in this training has been well established. This study investigated the constructs underlying the inventory and their relations to students' retention-attrition. A factor…

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  10. Research on Space Environmental Effect of Organic Composite Materials for Thermal Management of Satellites Using MC-50 Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Weon; Kim, Dong-Iel; Huh, Yong-Hak; Yang, Tae-Keun; Lee, Ho-Young; Kim, Yong-Hyup

    2005-12-01

    The organic material is one of the most popular material for the satellites and the spacecrafts in order to perform the thermal management, and to protect direct exposure from the space environment. The present paper observes material property changes of organic material under the space environment by using ground facilities. One of the representative organic thermal management material of satellites, 2 mil ITO(Indium Tin Oxide) coated aluminized KAPTON was selected for experiments. In order to investigate the single parametric effect of protons in space environment, MC-50 cyclotron system in KIRAMS(Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science) was utilized for the ion beam irradiation of protons and ion beam dose was set to the Very Large August 1972 EVENT model, the highest protons occurrence near the earth orbit in history. The energy of ion beam is fixed to 30MeV(mega electron volt), observed average energy, and the equivalent irradiance time conditions were set to 1-year, 3-year, 5-year and 10-year exposure in space. The procedure of analyses includes the measurement of the ultimate tensile strength for the assessment of quantitative degradation in material properties, and the imaging analyses of crystalline transformation and damages on the exposed surface by FE-SEM(Field Emission Scanning Electron Spectroscopy) etc.

  11. Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories balloon operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danaher, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The establishment and functions of the AFCRL balloon operations facility are discussed. The types of research work conducted by the facility are defined. The facilities which support the balloon programs are described. The free balloon and tethered balloon capabilities are analyzed.

  12. Research Review: Laboratory Student Magazine Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Explores research on student-produced magazines at journalism schools, including the nature of various programs and curricular structures, ethical considerations, and the role of faculty advisors. Addresses collateral sources that provide practical and philosophical foundations for the establishment and conduct of magazine production programs.…

  13. Solar Pond Research at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Focus is on applications that utilize the seasonal heat-storage capability of the solar pond for low-temperature thermal processes, however the results of the research are directly applicable to electricity-generating and other applications. Important technical results are summarized.

  14. Research Review: Laboratory Student Magazine Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Explores research on student-produced magazines at journalism schools, including the nature of various programs and curricular structures, ethical considerations, and the role of faculty advisors. Addresses collateral sources that provide practical and philosophical foundations for the establishment and conduct of magazine production programs.…

  15. Activities of the Research Laboratory of Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jonathan; Kleppner, Daniel

    1991-08-01

    This progress report contains both a statement of research objectives and a summary of research efforts for research projects listed. Partial contents include: (1) submicron structures technology and research; (2) microstructural evolution in thin films of electronic materials; (3) focused ion beam fabrication; (4) chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces; (5) measurement of electron-phonon interactions through large-amplitude phonon excitation; (6) chemical beam epitaxy of compound semiconductors; (7) high-frequency InAlAs/InGaAs metal-insulator-doped semiconductor field-effect transistors for telecommunications; (8) novel superconducting tunneling structures; (9) optics and quantum electronics; (10) superconducting electronic devices; (11) synchrotron X ray studies of surface disordering; (12) semiconductor surface studies; (13) single electron transistors; (14) quantum optics and photonics; (15) plasma dynamics; (16) electromagnetic wave theory and applications; (17) radio astronomy; (18) digital signal processing; (19) speech processing; (20) custom integrated circuits; (21) speech communication; (22) sensory communications; (23) signal transmission in the auditory system; and (24) linguistics.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, D.

    2014-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report fulfills that requirement.

  17. Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

  18. Dental Laboratory Technology. Project Report Phase I with Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappe', Hoyt; Smith, Debra S.

    This report provides results of Phase I of a project that researched the occupational area of dental laboratory technology, established appropriate committees, and conducted task verification. These results are intended to guide development of a program designed to train dental laboratory technicians. Section 1 contains general information:…

  19. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Summer Faculty Research Program Final Reports, Volume 5B, Wright Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Laboratory Technical Directorates and Air Force Air Logistics Centers. Each participant provided a report of their research , and these...reports are consolidated into this annual report. 14. SUBJECT TERMS AIR FORCE RESEARCH , AIR FORCE , ENGINEERING, LABORATORIES , REPORTS, SUMMER...216-6940 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM - 1994 SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS

  20. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Graduate Student Research Program Final Reports, Volume 8, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    Research Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Albuquerque, New Mexico Sponsored by: Air ...Summer Research Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by. Air Force Office of Scientific Research Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico...UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM -- 1993 SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM FINAL REPORTS VOLUME 8

  1. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one-half hour at the...

  2. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the...

  3. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the...

  4. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public for...

  5. Supporting the Creation of New Institutional Review Boards in Developing Countries: The U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lescano, A. Roxana; Blazes, David L.; Montano, Silvia M.; Kochel, Tadeusz; Moran, Zoe; Lescano, Andres G.; Martin, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) has worked in Peru since 1983, conducting research on diseases of military importance in large part by interacting with multiple research partners across the scientific community of Central America and South America. Over the years, NMRCD has had research collaborations in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Belize, Honduras, Suriname, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Argentina. In addition to the various infectious diseases research collaborations, NMRCD has supported capacity building for research ethics and the creation of new institutional review boards. This article describes the contributions of NMRCD to research ethics training in Central America and South America, with specific emphasis on the support given to the creation of new institutional review boards. PMID:19160615

  6. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  7. A New Investigative Sophomore Organic Laboratory Involving Individual Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharas, Gregory B.

    1997-07-01

    The problem-solving approach calls for a laboratory curriculum that provides a greater intellectual challenge and the resemblance to a research experience. A curriculum was designed which involves individual research projects for the nine laboratories of the spring quarter of a three-quarter introductory organic chemistry course. These projects integrate the instructor's research and learning experiences for the students via interdisciplinary approaches of classical organic chemistry and polymer chemistry. The foundations for the individual research projects are laid out during the first and second quarters of laboratory instruction when students are introduced to classic synthetic, separation and purification techniques. In the third quarter of lab sequence, in carrying out the individual research projects, the emphasis is shifted towards obtaining and interpreting data for compounds that are not described in the laboratory manual rather than making representative compounds. The research is an open end laboratory project that includes an on-line and printed Chemical Abstracts literature search, molecular computer modeling, a microscale monomer synthesis and characterization, scale-up synthesis, polymer synthesis and characterization. By changing functional groups on the vinyl monomer molecule, the class can explore reactivity of one "family" of compounds and consequently polymers. This approach is based on the integration of genuine research experience with laboratory instruction in accessible but non-trivial manner.

  8. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Functionality and architecture of the NSRL Telemetry Warehouse are also described as well as the web interface, data structure, security aspects, and...Experiment Controller 6 4.5 Telemetry Sensors 7 4.6 Custom Data Processing Nodes 7 5. Web Interface 8 6. Data Structure 8 6.1 Measurements 8...telemetry in comma-separated value (CSV) format from the web interface or via custom applications developed by researchers using the client application

  9. Army Research Laboratory. 1999 Annual Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    and by 1990 they had developed new methods to synthesis nanoparticles. The surface areas of aerogel MgO particles are 350 to 500 m2; those...deformation. Researchers have obtained detailed information on the frag- mentation process by analytical and computational methods and by experi...coordinated through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and VAMAS, to study and compare various testing methods . The round robin results

  10. NASA/WVU Software Research Laboratory, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabolish, George J.; Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    In our second year, the NASA/WVU Software Research Lab has made significant strides toward analysis and solution of major software problems related to V&V activities. We have established working relationships with many ongoing efforts within NASA and continue to provide valuable input into policy and decision-making processes. Through our publications, technical reports, lecture series, newsletters, and resources on the World-Wide-Web, we provide information to many NASA and external parties daily. This report is a summary and overview of some of our activities for the past year. This report is divided into 6 chapters: Introduction, People, Support Activities, Process, Metrics, and Testing. The Introduction chapter (this chapter) gives an overview of our project beginnings and targets. The People chapter focuses on new people who have joined the Lab this year. The Support chapter briefly lists activities like our WWW pages, Technical Report Series, Technical Lecture Series, and Research Quarterly newsletter. Finally, the remaining four chapters discuss the major research areas that we have made significant progress towards producing meaningful task reports. These chapters can be regarded as portions of drafts of our task reports.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Research Highlights 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The research and development highlights are summarized. The world's brightest source of X-rays could revolutionize materials research. Test of a prototype insertion device, a key in achieving brilliant X-ray beams, have given the first glimpse of the machine's power. Superconductivity research focuses on the new materials' structure, economics and applications. Other physical science programs advance knowledge of material structures and properties, nuclear physics, molecular structure, and the chemistry and structure of coal. New programming approaches make advanced computers more useful. Innovative approaches to fighting cancer are being developed. More experiments confirm the passive safety of Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor concept. Device simplifies nuclear-waste processing. Advanced fuel cell could provide better mileage, more power than internal combustion engine. New instruments find leaks in underground pipe, measure sodium impurities in molten liquids, detect flaws in ceramics. New antibody findings may explain ability to fight many diseases. Cadmium in cigarettes linked to bone loss in women. Programs fight deforestation in Nepal. New technology could reduce acid rain, mitigate greenhouse effect, enhance oil recovery. Innovative approaches transfer Argonne-developed technology to private industry. Each year Argonne educational programs reach some 1200 students.

  12. Low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The measurement of naturally occurring radioisotopes whose half lives are less than a few hundred million years but more than a few years provides information about the temporal behavior of geologic and climatic processes, the temporal history of meteoritic bodies as well as the production mechanisms of these radioisotopes. A new extremely sensitive technique for measuring these radioisotopes at tandem Van de Graaff and cyclotron facilities has been very successful though the high cost and limited availability have been discouraging. We have built and tested a low energy cyclotron for radiocarbon dating similar in size to a conventional mass spectrometer. These tests clearly show that with the addition of a conventional ion source, the low energy cyclotron can perform the extremely high sensitivity /sup 14/C measurements that are now done at accelerator facilities. We found that no significant background is present when the cyclotron is tuned to accelerate /sup 14/C negative ions and the transmission efficiency is adequate to perform radiocarbon dating on milligram samples of carbon. The internal ion source used did not produce sufficient current to detect /sup 14/C directly at modern concentrations. We show how a conventional carbon negative ion source, located outside the cyclotron magnet, would produce sufficient beam and provide for quick sampling to make radiocarbon dating milligram samples with a modest laboratory instrument feasible.

  13. ONR (Office of Naval Research) Far East Scientific Information Bulletin. Volume 14, Number 2, April-June 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    carbides and borides on an alloy deposition from the gas phase. Surface surface); and (2) synthesis of new materials precipitation is also being studied...breeder * Analysis of Damage/Endurance Relation- reactors, and high temperature gas -cooled ships in Structural Materials for High reactors. Cyclotron... materials used in 1988), pp 733-742. gas turbines. In the past this market has not been available to the Japanese except for 8. H. Onodera, K. Ohno, T

  14. Refinement of experimental design and conduct in laboratory animal research.

    PubMed

    Bailoo, Jeremy D; Reichlin, Thomas S; Würbel, Hanno

    2014-01-01

    The scientific literature of laboratory animal research is replete with papers reporting poor reproducibility of results as well as failure to translate results to clinical trials in humans. This may stem in part from poor experimental design and conduct of animal experiments. Despite widespread recognition of these problems and implementation of guidelines to attenuate them, a review of the literature suggests that experimental design and conduct of laboratory animal research are still in need of refinement. This paper will review and discuss possible sources of biases, highlight advantages and limitations of strategies proposed to alleviate them, and provide a conceptual framework for improving the reproducibility of laboratory animal research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  16. Consultation and Decision Processes in a Research and Development Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clagett G.

    1970-01-01

    Study of relationship between consultation and decision processes in an industrial research laboratory showed the efficacy of multidirectional consultation coupled with a pattern of shared, decentralized decision making. (Author/KJ)

  17. Research and Laboratory Instruction--An Experiment in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramm, Kenneth R.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an attempt to incorporate research into laboratory work in an introductory ecology class and a senior seminar. The investigation involves the examination of rhythms of food consumption and circadian activities in humans. (GS)

  18. The Career Development Program at Du Pont's Pioneering Research Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nusbaum, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Career Development Program, designed to help professional employees accept responsibility for their own careers, located at Du Pont's Pioneering Research Laboratory. Covers the concepts governing the program, program elements, and working with management to address program goals. (CH)

  19. Xerox' Canadian Research Facility: The Multinational and the "Offshore" Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchessault, R. H.; Myers, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    The history, logistics, and strategy behind the Xerox Corporation's Canadian research laboratory, a subsidiary firm located outside the United States for reasons of manpower, tax incentives, and quality of life, are described. (MSE)

  20. Research and Laboratory Instruction--An Experiment in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramm, Kenneth R.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an attempt to incorporate research into laboratory work in an introductory ecology class and a senior seminar. The investigation involves the examination of rhythms of food consumption and circadian activities in humans. (GS)

  1. Space Station life science research facility - The vivarium/laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Arno, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research opportunities possible with the Space Station are discussed. The objective of the research program will be study gravity relationships for animal and plant species. The equipment necessary for space experiments including vivarium facilities are described. The cost of the development of research facilities such as the vivarium/laboratory and a bioresearch centrifuge is examined.

  2. QUALITY ASSURANCE IN RESEARCH LABORATORIES: RULES AND REASON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality Assurance in Research Laboratories: Rules and Reason

    Ron Rogers, Quality Assurance and Records Manager, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL/ORD/US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709

    To anyone who has actively participated in research, as I have...

  3. QUALITY ASSURANCE IN RESEARCH LABORATORIES: RULES AND REASON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality Assurance in Research Laboratories: Rules and Reason

    Ron Rogers, Quality Assurance and Records Manager, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL/ORD/US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27709

    To anyone who has actively participated in research, as I have...

  4. Integrated Laboratories: Crossing Traditional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillner, Debra K.; Ferrante, Robert F.; Fitzgerald, Jeffrey P.; Heuer, William B.; Schroeder, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    A new, integrated laboratory curriculum was recently developed at the U.S. Naval Academy in response to the 1999 ACS Committee on Professional Training guidelines that required inclusion of biochemistry and a stronger emphasis on student research. To meet these ACS requirements and to introduce more student choice in the major, we embarked on a…

  5. Integrated Laboratories: Crossing Traditional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillner, Debra K.; Ferrante, Robert F.; Fitzgerald, Jeffrey P.; Heuer, William B.; Schroeder, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    A new, integrated laboratory curriculum was recently developed at the U.S. Naval Academy in response to the 1999 ACS Committee on Professional Training guidelines that required inclusion of biochemistry and a stronger emphasis on student research. To meet these ACS requirements and to introduce more student choice in the major, we embarked on a…

  6. ONR (Office of Naval Research) Far East Scientific Bulletin. Volume 12, Number 2, April-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G.B.; Kawano, S.

    1987-06-01

    Partial contents include: High-Temperature Oxide Superconductors in Japan; The Indian Department of Ocean Development; International Conference on Semiconductor and Integrated-Circuit Technology, Beijing, China; Propeller-Hull Interaction Research in Japan; Third U.S.-Japan Seminar on Dielectric and Piezoelectric Ceramics; Visits to Some Heat Transfer Research Groups in Japan; Chinese Institute of Electronics 1986 International Conference on Radar; Three Out-of-the-Ordinary Hydrodynamics Research Investigations Underway in Japan; Research Activities of Kajima Corp. including some technical details of carbon-fiber-reinforced cement; International Conference on Laser Advanced Materials Processing; Optoelectrics Joint Research Laboratory--A review of accomplishments; International Meetings in the Far East, 1987-1994.

  7. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  8. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  9. Adaptive optics research at Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Darryl P.; Primmerman, Charles A.

    A development history is presented for adaptive-optics methods of optical aberration measurement and correction in real time, which are applicable to the thermal blooming of high-energy laser beams, the compensation of a laser beam propagating from ground to space, and compensation by means of a synthetic beacon. Attention is given to schematics of the various adaptive optics system types, which cover the cases of cooperative and uncooperative targets. Representative research projects encompassed by the high-energy propagation range in West Palm Beach are the 'Everlaser' instrumented target vehicle, the OCULAR multidither system installation, and the Atmospheric Compensation Experiment Adaptive Optics System.

  10. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

  11. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  12. Life extension research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; DuCharme, A.R. Jr.; DeBey, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) plant life extension (PLEX) effort, the DOE Technology Management Center at Sandia is actively participating in life extension research efforts. In the areas of reliability and surveillance, systems modelling techniques are being explored to identify those components which, if their reliability changes, could most impact safety. Results of an application of these techniques to the Surry nuclear plant were compared to an industry life extension categorization also performed at Surry. For selected types of components identified during this study, the degradation and failure mechanisms are being explored and state-of-the-art monitoring techniques are being evaluated. Initial results are presented. In the area of cable life extension, a definition study is under way to define utility-specific as well as collective industry actions that would facilitate extending cable life. Some recommendations of this study are also provided.

  13. 2011 ESTCP Live Site Demonstrations, Vallejo CA, ESTCP MR-1165, Demonstration Data Report, Former Mare Island Naval Shipyard, MTADS Discrimination Array, (TEMTADS) Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-05

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6110--12-9397 2011 ESTCP Live Site Demonstrations Vallejo , CA ESTCP MR-1165 Demonstration...b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 2011 ESTCP Live Site Demonstrations Vallejo , CA ESTCP MR-1165 Demonstration...Hertz IVS Instrument Verification Strip (f)MINSY (former) Mare Island Naval Shipyard, located in Vallejo , CA MR Munitions Response MTADS Multi-sensor

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, J P; Fox, K J

    2008-03-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps BNL to respond new scientific opportunities within

  15. Summer Research Program (1992). Summer Faculty Research Program (SFRP) Reports. Volume 3. Phillips Laboratory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-28

    Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base NM 87117-6008 Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base...Zindel, D.: 1963, Z. Astrophys. 57, 82. 29-13 FINAL REPORT SUMMER FACULTY RESEARCH PROGRAM AT PHILLIPS LABORATORY KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific

  16. Guard House at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1945-08-21

    A vehicle leaves the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory on August 14, 1945. At 7 p.m. that evening President Truman announced that Japan had accepted terms for surrender and World War II was over. The end of the war brought significant changes for the laboratory. The NACA would cease its troubleshooting of military aircraft and return to research. Researchers would increase their efforts to address the new technologies that emerged during the war. The entire laboratory was reorganized in October to better investigate turbojets, ramjets, and rockets. The guard house sat on the main entrance to the laboratory off of Brookpark Road. The building was fairly small and easily crowded. In the early 1960s a new security facility was built several hundred feet beyond the original guard house. The original structure remained in place for several years but was not utilized. The subsequent structure was replaced in 2011 by a new building and entrance configuration.

  17. Speech coding research at Bell Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atal, Bishnu S.

    2004-05-01

    The field of speech coding is now over 70 years old. It started from the desire to transmit voice signals over telegraph cables. The availability of digital computers in the mid 1960s made it possible to test complex speech coding algorithms rapidly. The introduction of linear predictive coding (LPC) started a new era in speech coding. The fundamental philosophy of speech coding went through a major shift, resulting in a new generation of low bit rate speech coders, such as multi-pulse and code-excited LPC. The semiconductor revolution produced faster and faster DSP chips and made linear predictive coding practical. Code-excited LPC has become the method of choice for low bit rate speech coding applications and is used in most voice transmission standards for cell phones. Digital speech communication is rapidly evolving from circuit-switched to packet-switched networks to provide integrated transmission of voice, data, and video signals. The new communication environment is also moving the focus of speech coding research from compression to low cost, reliable, and secure transmission of voice signals on digital networks, and provides the motivation for creating a new class of speech coders suitable for future applications.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  19. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 2, Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Research Extension Program Phillips Laboratory Kirtland Air Force Base Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base...Program Phillips Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force Office of Scientific Research Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C. and Arkansas Tech University...Summer Research Extension Program (SREP) Phillips

  20. 76 FR 24974 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following four panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one hour at the...

  1. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  2. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  3. SANDERLINO, Final Report: Part C, A Research Study into KBS for Command and Control in Naval and TMD Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for Command and Control in Naval and TMD Applications Personal Author: Various from Logica , British Aerospace & Cambridge Consul. Corporate Author Or...Programme SANDERLING 706.70040 ARE, Portsdown SLS21C/19 Authors: Status: Signed : Various from Logica , British Aerospace and Cambridge Consultants...Ltd. Final <T. G^uJ - Authorised PLEASE RETURN TO: SDI TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER ©1990 Logica UK Ltd. Copyright in the whole and every part of

  4. Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petrolem by the development of different sources of energy. The study was accomplished under a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy's San Francisco Operations Office and the Department of the Navy's Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, for joint research and development of geothermal energy at military installations.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  7. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  8. Spatial cyclotron damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. L.

    1970-01-01

    To examine spatial electron cyclotron damping in a uniform Vlasov plasma, it is noted that the plasma response to a steady-state transverse excitation consists of several terms (dielectric-pole, free-streaming, and branch-cut), but that the cyclotron-damped pole term is the dominant term for z l = c/w sub ce provided (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1. If the latter inequality does not hold, then the free-streaming and branch-cut terms persist well past z = c/w sub ce as w sub 1 approaches w sub ce, making experimental measurement of cyclotron damping essentially impossible. Considering only (w sub pe/w sub ce) squared (c/a) is much greater than 1, it is shown how collisional effects should be estimated and how a finite-width excitation usually has little effect on the cyclotron-damped part of the response. Criteria is established concerning collisional damping, measurable damping length sizes, and allowed uncertainty in the magnetic field Beta. Results of numerical calculations, showing the regions in the appropriate parameter spaces that meet these criteria, are presented. From these results, one can determine the feasibility of, or propose parameter values for, an experiment designed to measure spatial cyclotron damping. It is concluded that the electron temperature T sub e should be at least 1 ev., and preferably 10 ev. or higher, for a successful experiment.

  9. ONR (Office of Naval Research) Tropical Cyclone Motion Research Initiative: Mid-Year Review, Discussion and Working Group Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    participation of cooperating agencies, such as the Hurricane Research Division (HRD) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA...studied the structure and effects of inner gyres similar to the alpha-gyres. Observational studies at the Hurricane Research Division in Miami, Florida...existing-aircraft, the first priority is for reconnaissance of Atlantic hurricanes and tropical cyclones threatening Hawaii or the west coast of the USA

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining

  11. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and

  12. Lawrence's Legacy : Seaborg's Cyclotron - The 88-Inch Cyclotron turns 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Margaret; Clark, David

    2003-04-01

    In 1958, Sputnik had recently been launched by the Russians, leading to worry in Congress and increased funding for science and technology. Ernest Lawrence was director of the "Rad Lab" at Berkeley. Another Nobel Prize winner, Glenn Seaborg, was Associate Laboratory Director and Director of the Nuclear Chemistry Division. In this atmosphere, Lawrence was phoned by commissioners of the Atomic Energy Commission and asked what they could do for Seaborg, "because he did such a fine job of setting up the chemistry for extracting plutonium from spent reactor fuel" [1]. In this informal way, the 90-Inch (eventually 88-Inch) Cyclotron became a line item in the federal budget at a cost of 3M (later increased to 5M). The 88-Inch Cyclotron achieved first internal beam on Dec. 12, 1961 and first external beam in May 1962. Forty years later it is still going strong. Pieced together from interviews with the retirees who built it, Rad Lab reports and archives from the Seaborg and Lawrence collections, the story of its design and construction - on-time and under-budget - provides a glimpse into the early days of big science. [1] remarks made by Elmer Kelly, "Physicist-in-charge' of the project on the occasion of the 40th anniversary celebration.

  13. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  14. Enabling UAS Research at the NASA EAV Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey A.

    2015-01-01

    The Exploration Aerial Vehicles (EAV) Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center leads research into intelligent autonomy and advanced control systems, bridging the gap between simulation and full-scale technology through flight test experimentation on unmanned sub-scale test vehicles.

  15. Integrating Interdisciplinary Research-Based Experiences in Biotechnology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Rupa S.; Wales, Melinda E.

    2012-01-01

    The increasingly interdisciplinary nature of today's scientific research is leading to the transformation of undergraduate education. In addressing these needs, the University of Houston's College of Technology has developed a new interdisciplinary research-based biotechnology laboratory curriculum. Using the pesticide degrading bacterium,…

  16. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  17. Using a Dining Facility as an Introductory Psychology Research Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koschmann, Nancy; Wesp, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Describes different research activities that can be used in a college dining facility to make it a real-life laboratory where students can apply research skills and learn about the scientific method. Offers evidence that the experience provides an effective tool to teach the scientific method. (CMK)

  18. Strategic Plan for the ORD National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has a valued reputation for supporting the Agency’s mission of protecting human health and the environment with multidisciplinary expertise that brings cutting-edge research and technology to address critical exposure questions and...

  19. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  20. Strategic Plan for the ORD National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has a valued reputation for supporting the Agency’s mission of protecting human health and the environment with multidisciplinary expertise that brings cutting-edge research and technology to address critical exposure questions and...

  1. The Development of Research as a Role in Laboratory Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Fred M., Jr.; Page, Jane A.

    A 20-item questionnaire was mailed to 123 laboratory schools to investigate their involvement with educational research. The findings on the 57 schools that responded were organized into two categories: (1) background information on all respondents; and (2) information on research activities based on responses of the 39 schools identified as…

  2. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN, NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD), is responsible for conducting research to improve the risk assessment of chemicals for potential effects ...

  3. A User Task Analysis for Command and Control Systems and its Use in Human-Computer Interaction Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-03

    The Advanced Interfaces Section of the Human - Computer Interaction (HCI) Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is engaged in creating and...computer interfaces. Human - computer interaction , Task analysis, Command and control.

  4. Smithsonian’s Manpower Research and Advisory Services: a 22-Year Partnership with the Office of Naval Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Educational liaison LCDR Dudley Cass BUPERS Officer placement Mr. Bruce Dunning et al.* Bureau of Social Science Research Marketing navy careers Dr...Technology ASW teams effectiveness Dr. George Kettner* Information Spectrum, Inc. Project UPGRADE Dr. David Kieras * University of Arizona Computerized

  5. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  6. Location for the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This diagram shows the planned locations of the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL) and the Space Station Commerce Park at Kennedy Space Center. The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for the planned 400- acre commerce park.

  7. Location for the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This diagram shows the planned locations of the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL) and the Space Station Commerce Park at Kennedy Space Center. The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for the planned 400- acre commerce park.

  8. The Warsaw K=160 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choinski, J.; Miszczak, J.; Sura, J.

    2001-12-01

    The overview of the Warsaw cyclotron facility is presented. The facility consists of K=160 cyclotron, 10 GHz ECR ion source, and several experimental stations. The cyclotron is of compact design with 2 straight dees. A yearly operation time is about 2900 hours on an average for the past few years. The cyclotron can deliver beams up to Ar with energy up to 10 MeV/amu to the experimental area. Experimental stations are: 1) The multidetector OSIRIS II, allows the study of exotic nuclei in the double magic 100Sn region. The experimental set-up consists of 8 HPGe detectors equipped with charged particle 4π multiplicity filter SiBall, 50 elements BGO γ-rays multiplicity filter, 4 sector polarimeter and electron conversion detector system. 2) CUDAC-Coulomb Universal Detector Scattering Chamber-an array of PIN-diodes in connection with HPGe detectors and the computer data analysis package GOSIA, maintained by the Laboratory allows investigation the Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) reactions. 3) IGISOL or Helium-jet transport system opened investigation of the reaction products by means of the online mass separator with ion-guide system. The system uses the Scandinavian-type mass separator built in INR Świerk, Poland. 4) Giant Dipole Resonance studies using experimental set-up JANOSIK developed for the detection of high-energy photons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. The set-up consists of a large NaI(Tl) detector (25 cm×29 cm) surrounded by shields: passive lead shield, active anticoincidence plastic shield and LiH shield to absorb neutrons, and a multiplicity filter of 32 small scintillator detectors (BaF2 and NaI(Tl)). 5) Laser spectroscopy stand now in test phase. The laser spectroscopy group at HIL has completed an equipment consisting of Argon ion Laser Innova 400-25W in all lines and coherent Ring Laser 669-21 as well as atomic beam apparatus.

  9. Inflation and cyclotron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the Universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that slow roll conditions on the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field satisfying unconventional dispersion relations.

  10. Tree Topping Ceremony at NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications. This photo depicts construction workers taking part in a tree topping ceremony as the the final height of the laboratory is framed. The ceremony is an old German custom of paying homage to the trees that gave their lives in preparation of the building site.

  11. Tree Topping Ceremony at NASA's Propulsion Research Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications. This photo depicts construction workers taking part in a tree topping ceremony as the the final height of the laboratory is framed. The ceremony is an old German custom of paying homage to the trees that gave their lives in preparation of the building site.

  12. A Research-Based Laboratory Course Designed to Strengthen the Research-Teaching Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra, Karlett J.; Osgood, Marcy P.; Pappas, Donald L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 10-week laboratory course of guided research experiments thematically linked by topic, which had an ultimate goal of strengthening the undergraduate research-teaching nexus. This undergraduate laboratory course is a direct extension of faculty research interests. From DNA isolation, characterization, and mutagenesis, to protein…

  13. A Research-Based Laboratory Course Designed to Strengthen the Research-Teaching Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra, Karlett J.; Osgood, Marcy P.; Pappas, Donald L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 10-week laboratory course of guided research experiments thematically linked by topic, which had an ultimate goal of strengthening the undergraduate research-teaching nexus. This undergraduate laboratory course is a direct extension of faculty research interests. From DNA isolation, characterization, and mutagenesis, to protein…

  14. FY03 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C

    2004-03-05

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2003, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of researching and developing the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the LDRD program and the ''Tech Base'' program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2003, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technology areas that have been identified as critical for the present and future work of the Laboratory, and are

  15. Steam Plant at the Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1945-09-21

    The Steam Plant at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory supplies steam to the major test facilities and office buildings. Steam is used for the Icing Research Tunnel's spray system and the Engine Research Building’s desiccant air dryers. In addition, its five boilers supply heat to various buildings and the cafeteria. Schirmer-Schneider Company built the $141,000 facility in the fall of 1942, and it has been in operation ever since.

  16. Research project on nanospace laboratory and related topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Isao

    1996-04-01

    The research project on Nano-Space Laboratory and related topics are reviewed. This project has been funded by the Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology since 1994. The project is classified into three major topics: (1) materials development by atom lab, (2) materials development by molecular lab and (3) development of theory and basic technology for nano-space research. The paper describes progress of the research with emphasis placed especially on new process technologies.

  17. Proceedings: EPRI Cancer Workshop II on laboratory research

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.

    1993-09-01

    A workshop on Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) and Cancer was held in Washington, DC, on September 6, 1991, organized by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) EMF Health Studies Program. The primary objective of the EPRI Cancer Research Workshop II was to review the status and future of the Institute`s laboratory research program on EMF and cancer; program direction had been determined based on recommendations from EPRI`s first cancer workshop in July 1988. Research that addressed these recommendations in the intervening three years, either within the EPRI program or in other programs around the world, was reviewed. To identify laboratory research that would be responsive to current needs, workshop participants discussed four experimental systems, key results, and areas for further research. These systems include the mouse skin tumor model, use of C3H/l0T1/2 cells and their derivatives, the nude mouse model, and pineal research. In the final phase of the workshop participants developed recommendations for future research that could help resolve what role, if any, EMF exposure plays in carcinogenesis. EPRI`s EMF Health Studies Program is considering these recommendations within the process of evaluating existing projects and developing new laboratory research.

  18. Nano-G research laboratory for a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, Friedrich O. (Inventor); Garriott, Owen K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An acceleration free research laboratory is provided that is confined within a satellite but free of any physical engagement with the walls of the satellite, wherein the laboratory has adequate power, heating, cooling, and communications services to conduct basic research and development. An inner part containing the laboratory is positioned at the center-of-mass of a satellite within the satellite's outer shell. The satellite is then positioned such that its main axes are in a position parallel to its flight velocity vector or in the direction of the residual acceleration vector. When the satellite is in its desired orbit, the inner part is set free so as to follow that orbit without contacting the inside walls of the outer shell. Sensing means detect the position of the inner part with respect to the outer shell, and activate control rockets to move the outer shell; thereby, the inner part is repositioned such that it is correctly positioned at the center-of-mass of the satellite. As a consequence, all disturbing forces, such as drag forces, act on the outer shell, and the inner part containing the laboratory is shielded and is affected only by gravitational forces. Power is supplied to the inner part and to the laboratory by a balanced microwave/laser link which creates the kind of environment necessary for basic research to study critical phenomena such as the Lambda transition in helium and crystal growth, and to perform special metals and alloys research, etc.

  19. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  20. Space Station Freedom: a unique laboratory for gravitational biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Cowing, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide a permanent laboratory in space with unparalleled opportunities to perform biological research. As with any spacecraft there will also be limitations. It is our intent to describe this space laboratory and present a picture of how scientists will conduct research in this unique environment we call space. SSF is an international venture which will continue to serve as a model for other peaceful international efforts. It is hoped that as the human race moves out from this planet back to the moon and then on to Mars that SSF can serve as a successful example of how things can and should be done.

  1. Space Station Freedom: a unique laboratory for gravitational biology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Cowing, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide a permanent laboratory in space with unparalleled opportunities to perform biological research. As with any spacecraft there will also be limitations. It is our intent to describe this space laboratory and present a picture of how scientists will conduct research in this unique environment we call space. SSF is an international venture which will continue to serve as a model for other peaceful international efforts. It is hoped that as the human race moves out from this planet back to the moon and then on to Mars that SSF can serve as a successful example of how things can and should be done.

  2. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2016-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  3. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  4. Laboratory Research: A Question of When, Not If.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    RD-A±53 298 LABORATORY RESEARCH: A QUESTION OF WHEN NOT IF(U) 1/1 MICHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY D R ILGEN MAR 85 TR-85-i N68814...Daniel R. Ilgen Michigan State University To Appear in E. A. Locke (Ed.) (1985) Generalizing from laboratory to field settings: Research findings from...D T IC NR170-961 ELECTE Technical Report 85-1 MAY 3 Department of Psychology and Department of Management Michigan State University B UNCLASSIFIED

  5. [Medical research in the US Armed Forces. Part 4].

    PubMed

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V N; Ivchenko, E V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2013-01-01

    The present article is the fourth part of the review dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. The first, second and the third parts were published in the previous issues of the journal. Specifically this article is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Navy. It is shown that in the US Navy the fundamental and a part of applied investigations are conducted in the Office of Naval Research while more practical research is carried out at the Naval Medical Research Center. The latter includes the Naval Health Research Center, the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory and seven Naval Medical Research Units which are successively presented. The particular research programs conducted in the above mentioned organizations are discussed.

  6. 2011 Naval Energy Forum. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-14

    APPLIED RESEARCH ASSOCIATES • CHASE SUPPLY, INC. • ESPEY MGF. & ELECTRONICS • FREE FLOW POWER • LIVEFUELS • MILSPRAY MILITARY TECHNOLOGIES • PETRA...Untitled Document 2011navy.html[3/24/2016 10:32:34 AM] Files are in Adobe format. Download the newest version from Adobe. NAVAL ENERGY FORUM...Richard Carlin, Head, Sea Warfare and Weapons Department, Office of Naval Research PANEL: EXTERNAL PERSPECTIVES ON ENERGY INNOVATION BG Bob Barnes, USA

  7. The changing role of the National Laboratories in materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Fluss, M.

    1995-06-02

    The role of the National Laboratories is summarized from the era of post World War II to the present time. The U.S. federal government policy for the National Laboratories and its influence on their materials science infrastructure is reviewed with respect to: determining overall research strategies, various initiatives to interact with industry (especially in recent years), building facilities that serve the nation, and developing leading edge research in the materials sciences. Despite reductions in support for research in the U.S. in recent years, and uncertainties regarding the specific policies for R&D in the U.S., there are strong roles for materials research at the National Laboratories. These roles will be centered on the abilities of the National Laboratories to field multidisciplinary teams, the use of unique cutting edge facilities, a focus on areas of strength within each of the labs, increased teaming and partnerships, and the selection of motivated research areas. It is hoped that such teaming opportunities will include new alliances with China, in a manner similar, perhaps, to those recently achieved between the U.S. and other countries.

  8. DESALINATION AND WATER TREATMENT RESEARCH AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Rigali, Mark J.; Miller, James E.; Altman, Susan J.; Biedermann, Laura; Brady, Patrick Vane.; Kuzio, Stephanie P.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Rempe, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Water is the backbone of our economy - safe and adequate supplies of water are vital for agriculture, industry, recreation, and human consumption. While our supply of water today is largely safe and adequate, we as a nation face increasing water supply challenges in the form of extended droughts, demand growth due to population increase, more stringent health-based regulation, and competing demands from a variety of users. To meet these challenges in the coming decades, water treatment technologies, including desalination, will contribute substantially to ensuring a safe, sustainable, affordable, and adequate water supply for the United States. This overview documents Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL, or Sandia) Water Treatment Program which focused on the development and demonstration of advanced water purification technologies as part of the larger Sandia Water Initiative. Projects under the Water Treatment Program include: (1) the development of desalination research roadmaps (2) our efforts to accelerate the commercialization of new desalination and water treatment technologies (known as the 'Jump-Start Program),' (3) long range (high risk, early stage) desalination research (known as the 'Long Range Research Program'), (4) treatment research projects under the Joint Water Reuse & Desalination Task Force, (5) the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership Program, (6) water treatment projects funded under the New Mexico Small Business Administration, (7) water treatment projects for the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), (8) Sandia- developed contaminant-selective treatment technologies, and finally (9) current Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funded desalination projects.

  9. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  10. Smart Electronic Laboratory Notebooks for the NIST Research Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Richard S.; McLean, Mark J.; Osborn, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory notebooks have been a staple of scientific research for centuries for organizing and documenting ideas and experiments. Modern laboratories are increasingly reliant on electronic data collection and analysis, so it seems inevitable that the digital revolution should come to the ordinary laboratory notebook. The most important aspect of this transition is to make the shift as comfortable and intuitive as possible, so that the creative process that is the hallmark of scientific investigation and engineering achievement is maintained, and ideally enhanced. The smart electronic laboratory notebooks described in this paper represent a paradigm shift from the old pen and paper style notebooks and provide a host of powerful operational and documentation capabilities in an intuitive format that is available anywhere at any time. PMID:26958447

  11. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W.

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  12. Smart Electronic Laboratory Notebooks for the NIST Research Environment.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; McLean, Mark J; Osborn, William A

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory notebooks have been a staple of scientific research for centuries for organizing and documenting ideas and experiments. Modern laboratories are increasingly reliant on electronic data collection and analysis, so it seems inevitable that the digital revolution should come to the ordinary laboratory notebook. The most important aspect of this transition is to make the shift as comfortable and intuitive as possible, so that the creative process that is the hallmark of scientific investigation and engineering achievement is maintained, and ideally enhanced. The smart electronic laboratory notebooks described in this paper represent a paradigm shift from the old pen and paper style notebooks and provide a host of powerful operational and documentation capabilities in an intuitive format that is available anywhere at any time.

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2005-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2006-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2008-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science

  16. Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R; Holzrichter, J

    1999-05-01

    In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs.

  17. The Naval Campaign in Gallipoli - 1915 Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AIR WAR COLLEGE() RESEARCH REPORT No. AU-AWC-86-188 THE NAVAL CAMPAIGN IN GALLIPOLI -1915 I LESSONS LEARNED By LT COL DOUGLAS J . SCOTT DTic s MARI...UNIVERSITY THE NAVAL CAMPAIGN IW GALLIPOLI - 1915 LESSONS LEARNED by DOUGLAS J . SCOTT LIEUTENANT COLONEL, USAF A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY...RESEARCH REPORT ABSTRACT TITLE: The Naval Campaign in Gallipoli - 1915 Lessons Learned AUTHOR: Douglas J . Scott , Lieutenant Colonel, USAF •An analysis

  18. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  19. An Experimental System for Research on Dynamic Skills Training.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    largely with CBI of knowledge systems, coher- ent bodies of essentially propositional knowledge. Little research has been per- farmed on techniques for...1 CDR Charles W. Hutchins Naval Air Systems Command Hq 1 Dr. Alvah Bittner AIR-34OF Naval Biodynamics Laboratory Navy Department New Orleans, Lousiana

  20. EPA Research and Development: National Exposure Research Laboratory

    EPA Science Inventory

    This course is for Biology majors, primarily those in the completed Freshman Biology. Students enrolled in the course are expected to have completed Freshman Biology. With some background in biology as a strt, students begin to think about doing some research as part of their u...