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Sample records for ncfm bifidobacterium bifidum

  1. Genome Sequence of the Immunomodulatory Strain Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG 13195

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we report the genome sequences of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain LMG13195. Results from our research group show that this strain is able to interact with human immune cells, generating functional regulatory T cells. PMID:23209243

  2. Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 Modulates the Host Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Taverniti, Valentina; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Duranti, Sabrina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe data obtained from transcriptome profiling of human cell lines and intestinal cells of a murine model upon exposure and colonization, respectively, with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Significant changes were detected in the transcription of genes that are known to be involved in innate immunity. Furthermore, results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that exposure to B. bifidum PRL2010 causes enhanced production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines, presumably through NF-κB activation. The obtained global transcription profiles strongly suggest that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 modulates the innate immune response of the host. PMID:24242237

  3. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples.

  4. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples. PMID:25217723

  5. Exploring Amino Acid Auxotrophy in Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Chiara; Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Lugli, Gabriele A; Turroni, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ossiprandi, Maria C; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and assimilation strategies followed by members of the infant gut microbiota to retrieve nitrogen from the gut lumen are still largely unknown. In particular, no information on these metabolic processes is available regarding bifidobacteria, which are among the first microbial colonizers of the human intestine. Here, evaluation of amino acid auxotrophy and prototrophy of Bifidobacterium bifidum, with particular emphasis on B. bifidum strain PRL2010 (LMG S-28692), revealed a putative auxotrophy for cysteine. In addition, we hypothesized that cysteine plays a role in the oxidative stress response in B. bifidum. The use of glutathione as an alternative reduced sulfur compound did not alleviate cysteine auxotrophy of this strain, though it was shown to stimulate expression of the genes involved in cysteine biosynthesis, reminiscent of oxidative stress response. When PRL2010 was grown on a medium containing complex substrates, such as whey proteins or casein hydrolysate, we noticed a distinct growth-promoting effect of these compounds. Transcriptional analysis involving B. bifidum PRL2010 cultivated on whey proteins or casein hydrolysate revealed that the biosynthetic pathways for cysteine and methionine are modulated by the presence of casein hydrolysate. Such findings support the notion that certain complex substrates may act as potential prebiotics for bifidobacteria in their ecological niche. PMID:26635786

  6. Exploring Amino Acid Auxotrophy in Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Chiara; Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Lugli, Gabriele A.; Turroni, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ossiprandi, Maria C.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and assimilation strategies followed by members of the infant gut microbiota to retrieve nitrogen from the gut lumen are still largely unknown. In particular, no information on these metabolic processes is available regarding bifidobacteria, which are among the first microbial colonizers of the human intestine. Here, evaluation of amino acid auxotrophy and prototrophy of Bifidobacterium bifidum, with particular emphasis on B. bifidum strain PRL2010 (LMG S-28692), revealed a putative auxotrophy for cysteine. In addition, we hypothesized that cysteine plays a role in the oxidative stress response in B. bifidum. The use of glutathione as an alternative reduced sulfur compound did not alleviate cysteine auxotrophy of this strain, though it was shown to stimulate expression of the genes involved in cysteine biosynthesis, reminiscent of oxidative stress response. When PRL2010 was grown on a medium containing complex substrates, such as whey proteins or casein hydrolysate, we noticed a distinct growth-promoting effect of these compounds. Transcriptional analysis involving B. bifidum PRL2010 cultivated on whey proteins or casein hydrolysate revealed that the biosynthetic pathways for cysteine and methionine are modulated by the presence of casein hydrolysate. Such findings support the notion that certain complex substrates may act as potential prebiotics for bifidobacteria in their ecological niche. PMID:26635786

  7. Genetic analyses of the antibiotic resistance of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Yakult YIT 4007.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takashi; Iino, Tohru

    2010-02-28

    Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Yakult YIT 4007 (abbreviated as B. bifidum YIT 4007) is a commercial strain and resistant to erythromycin, neomycin, and streptomycin. Resistances to these antibiotics were endowed by sequential isolation of resistant mutants from its susceptible progenitor strain YIT 4001. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of various candidate genes of both strains led us to find that B. bifidum YIT 4007 had mutations on three copies of 23S ribosomal RNA genes, an 8 bp deletion of the rluD gene for pseudouridine synthase, and a mutation on the rpsL gene for ribosomal protein S12. The responsibility of these mutations to antibiotic resistances was supported by analyses of newly isolated mutants resistant to these antibiotics. The antibiotic resistances of B. bifidum YIT 4007 were evidently acquired by mutations of the structural genes on the chromosome and not associated with mobile genetic elements like insertion sequences, phages, and plasmids.

  8. Review on Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4: Functionality and Nutraceutical Applications as a Probiotic Microorganism.

    PubMed

    Ku, Seockmo; Park, Myeong Soo; Ji, Geun Eog; You, Hyun Ju

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 is a probiotic strain that has been used as a major ingredient to produce nutraceutical products and as a dairy starter since 2000. The various bio-functional effects and potential for industrial application of B. bifidum BGN4 has been characterized and proven by in vitro (i.e., phytochemical bio-catalysis, cell adhesion and anti-carcinogenic effects on cell lines, and immunomodulatory effects on immune cells), in vivo (i.e., suppressed allergic responses in mouse model and anti-inflammatory bowel disease), and clinical studies (eczema in infants and adults with irritable bowel syndrome). Recently, the investigation of the genome sequencing was finished and this data potentially clarifies the biochemical characteristics of B. bifidum BGN4 that possibly illustrate its nutraceutical functionality. However, further systematic research should be continued to gain insight for academic and industrial applications so that the use of B. bifidum BGN4 could be expanded to result in greater benefit. This review deals with multiple studies on B. bifidum BGN4 to offer a greater understanding as a probiotic microorganism available in functional food ingredients. In particular, this work considers the potential for commercial application, physiological characterization and exploitation of B. bifidum BGN4 as a whole. PMID:27649150

  9. Review on Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4: Functionality and Nutraceutical Applications as a Probiotic Microorganism.

    PubMed

    Ku, Seockmo; Park, Myeong Soo; Ji, Geun Eog; You, Hyun Ju

    2016-09-14

    Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 is a probiotic strain that has been used as a major ingredient to produce nutraceutical products and as a dairy starter since 2000. The various bio-functional effects and potential for industrial application of B. bifidum BGN4 has been characterized and proven by in vitro (i.e., phytochemical bio-catalysis, cell adhesion and anti-carcinogenic effects on cell lines, and immunomodulatory effects on immune cells), in vivo (i.e., suppressed allergic responses in mouse model and anti-inflammatory bowel disease), and clinical studies (eczema in infants and adults with irritable bowel syndrome). Recently, the investigation of the genome sequencing was finished and this data potentially clarifies the biochemical characteristics of B. bifidum BGN4 that possibly illustrate its nutraceutical functionality. However, further systematic research should be continued to gain insight for academic and industrial applications so that the use of B. bifidum BGN4 could be expanded to result in greater benefit. This review deals with multiple studies on B. bifidum BGN4 to offer a greater understanding as a probiotic microorganism available in functional food ingredients. In particular, this work considers the potential for commercial application, physiological characterization and exploitation of B. bifidum BGN4 as a whole.

  10. Review on Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4: Functionality and Nutraceutical Applications as a Probiotic Microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Seockmo; Park, Myeong Soo; Ji, Geun Eog; You, Hyun Ju

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 is a probiotic strain that has been used as a major ingredient to produce nutraceutical products and as a dairy starter since 2000. The various bio-functional effects and potential for industrial application of B. bifidum BGN4 has been characterized and proven by in vitro (i.e., phytochemical bio-catalysis, cell adhesion and anti-carcinogenic effects on cell lines, and immunomodulatory effects on immune cells), in vivo (i.e., suppressed allergic responses in mouse model and anti-inflammatory bowel disease), and clinical studies (eczema in infants and adults with irritable bowel syndrome). Recently, the investigation of the genome sequencing was finished and this data potentially clarifies the biochemical characteristics of B. bifidum BGN4 that possibly illustrate its nutraceutical functionality. However, further systematic research should be continued to gain insight for academic and industrial applications so that the use of B. bifidum BGN4 could be expanded to result in greater benefit. This review deals with multiple studies on B. bifidum BGN4 to offer a greater understanding as a probiotic microorganism available in functional food ingredients. In particular, this work considers the potential for commercial application, physiological characterization and exploitation of B. bifidum BGN4 as a whole. PMID:27649150

  11. Bifidobacterium bifidum reduces apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium in necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Khailova, Ludmila; Mount Patrick, Sarah K.; Arganbright, Kelly M.; Halpern, Melissa D.; Kinouchi, Toshi

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating intestinal disease of neonates, and clinical studies suggest the beneficial effect of probiotics in NEC prevention. Recently, we have shown that administration of Bifidobacterium bifidum protects against NEC in a rat model. Intestinal apoptosis can be suppressed by activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The present study investigates the effect of B. bifidum on intestinal apoptosis in the rat NEC model and in an intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6), as a mechanism of protection against mucosal injury. Premature rats were divided into the following three groups: dam fed, hand fed with formula (NEC), or hand fed with formula supplemented with B. bifidum (NEC + B. bifidum). Intestinal Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2), COX-2, PGE2, and apoptotic regulators were measured. The effect of B. bifidum was verified in IEC-6 cells using a model of cytokine-induced apoptosis. Administration of B. bifidum increased expression of TLR-2, COX-2, and PGE2 and significantly reduced apoptosis in the intestinal epithelium of both in vivo and in vitro models. The Bax-to-Bcl-w ratio was shifted toward cell survival, and the number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells was markedly decreased in B. bifidum-treated rats. Experiments in IEC-6 cells showed anti-apoptotic effect of B. bifidum. Inhibition of COX-2 signaling blocked the protective effect of B. bifidum treatment in both in vivo and in vitro models. In conclusion, oral administration of B. bifidum activates TLR-2 in the intestinal epithelium. B. bifidum increases expression of COX-2, which leads to higher production of PGE2 in the ileum and protects against intestinal apoptosis associated with NEC. This study indicates the ability of B. bifidum to downregulate apoptosis in the rat NEC model and in IEC-6 cells by a COX-2-dependent matter and suggests a molecular mechanism by which this probiotic reduces mucosal injury and preserves

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 Cultivated Under In Vitro Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Simiao; Zhao, Xiangna; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Lu, Jing; Zhurina, Daria; Li, Boxing; Riedel, Christian U.; Sun, Yansong; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are frequently used in probiotic food and dairy products. Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 is a promising probiotic candidate strain that displays strong adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells and elicits potent anti-inflammatory capacity both in vitro and in murine models of colitis. The recently sequenced genome of B. bifidum S17 has a size of about 2.2 Mb and encodes 1,782 predicted protein-coding genes. In the present study, a comprehensive proteomic profiling was carried out to identify and characterize proteins expressed by B. bifidum S17. A total of 1148 proteins entries were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), representing 64.4% of the predicted proteome. 719 proteins could be assigned to functional categories according to cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs). The COG distribution of the detected proteins highly correlates with that of the complete predicted proteome suggesting a good coverage and representation of the genomic content of B. bifidum S17 by the proteome. COGs that were highly present in the proteome of B. bifidum S17 were Translation, Amino Acid Transport and Metabolism, and Carbohydrate Transport and Metabolism. Complete sets of enzymes for both the bifidus shunt and the Embden-Meyerh of pathway were identified. Further bioinformatic analysis yielded 28 proteins with a predicted extracellular localization including 14 proteins with an LPxTG-motif for cell wall anchoring and two proteins (elongation factor Tu and enolase) with a potential moonlighting function in adhesion. Amongst the predicted extracellular proteins were five of six pilin proteins encoded in the B. bifidum S17 genome as well as several other proteins with a potential role in interaction with host structures. The presented results are the first compilation of a proteomic reference profile for a B. bifidum strain and will facilitate analysis of the molecular mechanisms of physiology, host-interactions and

  13. Influence of Bifidobacterium bifidum on release of minerals from bread with differing bran content.

    PubMed

    Nalepa, Beata; Siemianowska, Ewa; Skibniewska, Krystyna Anna

    2012-01-01

    Bread is considered an important source of minerals; however, the presence of fiber and phytic acid reduces bioavailability of minerals from cereal products. It is well established that activity of microorganisms in human gut increases the amount of nutrients released during digestion. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of Bifidobacterium bifidum on release of some minerals from bread using an in vitro process of enzymatic digestion. White bread and with addition of 15, 30, or 45% of bran was baked in a bakery by traditional methods, with addition of yeasts and rye leaven, from flour made of wheat, Tonacja variety. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, copper, and iron were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Bread was enzymatically digested in vitro without and with the addition of Bifidobacterium bifidum KD6 (inoculum 10(6) CFU/cm(3)) and percentages of minerals released were determined. The concentration of minerals released during enzymatic digestion varied depending upon the element, quantity of bran, and presence of bacteria. Increase in bran content decreased release of elements. Bifidobacterium bifidum KD6 enhanced amounts of magnesium and zinc released from all types of bread, while manganese and copper rose only from white bread with 15% bran addition. Bacteria decreased amounts of calcium and iron released from bread. Data indicate that diets rich in beneficial bacteria (probiotics) but not balanced with minerals might increase mineral deficiency.

  14. Efficacy of oral Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 on microflora and antioxidant in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-gui; Xu, Hai-bo; Xu, Feng; Zeng, Zhe-ling; Wei, Hua

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, a species of colonic microflora in humans, is involved in the intestinal tract of mice. This study was also conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of this species by evaluating different microbial populations and reactive oxygen species isolated from feces and intestinal contents for 28 days of oral administration. Microbial diversities were assessed through bacterial culture techniques, PCR-DGGE, and real-time PCR. This study showed that the intake of B. bifidum ATCC 29521 significantly (p < 0.05) improved the ecosystem of the intestinal tract of BALB/c mice by increasing the amount of probiotics (Lactobacillus intestinalis and Lactobacillus crispatus) and by reducing unwanted bacterial populations (Enterobacter, Escherichia coli). Antioxidative activities of incubated cell-free extracts were evaluated through various assays, including the scavenging ability of DPPH radical (64.5% and 67.54% (p < 0.05), respectively, at 21 days in nutrients and 28 days in MRS broth), superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical (85% and 61.5% (p < 0.05), respectively, at intestinal contents in nutrients and 21 days in MRS broth). Total reducing power (231.5 μmol/L (p < 0.05), 14 days in MRS broth) and mRNA level of genes related to oxidative stress were also determined. Results indicated that B. bifidum ATCC 29521 elicits a beneficial effect on murine gut microbiota and antioxidant activities compared with the control samples. This species can be considered as a potential bioresource antioxidant to promote health. Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 may also be used as a promising material in microbiological and food applications. PMID:26863255

  15. Administration of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium bifidum Ameliorated Hyperglycemia, Dyslipidemia, and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Bhardwaj, Priyanka; Singh, Rambir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present work was planned to evaluate the antihyperglycemic, lipid-lowering, and antioxidant effect of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium bifidum in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Single daily dose of 1 × 107 cfu/ml of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both was given to Wistar rats orally by gavaging for 28 days. Glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose (FBG), lipid profile, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured from blood. Glycogen from thigh muscles and liver and oxidative stress parameters from pancreas were analyzed. Results: Administration of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both to diabetic rats decreased serum FBG (60.47%, 55.89%, and 56.49%, respectively), HbA1c (28.11%, 28.61%, and 28.28%), total cholesterol (171.69%, 136.47%, and 173.58%), triglycerides (9.935%, 8.58%, and 7.91%), low-density lipoproteins (53.27%, 53.35%, and 52.91%) and very low-density lipoproteins (10%, 8.58%, and 11.15%, respectively) and increased high-density lipoproteins (13.73%, 15.47%, and 15.47%), and insulin (19.50%, 25.80%, and 29.47%, respectively). The treatment also resulted in increase in muscle (171.69%, 136.47%, and 173.58%) and liver (25.82%, 6.63%, and 4.02%) glycogen level. The antioxidant indexes in pancreas of diabetic rats returned to normal level with reduction in lipid peroxidation (30.89%, 46.46%, and 65.36%) and elevation in reduced glutathione (104.5%, 161.34%, and 179.04%), superoxide dismutase (38.65%, 44.32%, and 53.35%), catalase (13.08%, 27%, and 31.52%), glutathione peroxidase (55.56%, 72.23%, and 97.23%), glutathione reductase (49.27%, 88.40%, and 110.86%), and glutathione-S-transferase (140%, 220%, and 246.6%, respectively) on treatment with L. casei, B. bifidum, and combination treatment. Conclusions: Administration of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both ameliorated hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress in STZ

  16. Administration of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium bifidum Ameliorated Hyperglycemia, Dyslipidemia, and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Bhardwaj, Priyanka; Singh, Rambir

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present work was planned to evaluate the antihyperglycemic, lipid-lowering, and antioxidant effect of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium bifidum in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Single daily dose of 1 × 107 cfu/ml of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both was given to Wistar rats orally by gavaging for 28 days. Glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose (FBG), lipid profile, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured from blood. Glycogen from thigh muscles and liver and oxidative stress parameters from pancreas were analyzed. Results: Administration of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both to diabetic rats decreased serum FBG (60.47%, 55.89%, and 56.49%, respectively), HbA1c (28.11%, 28.61%, and 28.28%), total cholesterol (171.69%, 136.47%, and 173.58%), triglycerides (9.935%, 8.58%, and 7.91%), low-density lipoproteins (53.27%, 53.35%, and 52.91%) and very low-density lipoproteins (10%, 8.58%, and 11.15%, respectively) and increased high-density lipoproteins (13.73%, 15.47%, and 15.47%), and insulin (19.50%, 25.80%, and 29.47%, respectively). The treatment also resulted in increase in muscle (171.69%, 136.47%, and 173.58%) and liver (25.82%, 6.63%, and 4.02%) glycogen level. The antioxidant indexes in pancreas of diabetic rats returned to normal level with reduction in lipid peroxidation (30.89%, 46.46%, and 65.36%) and elevation in reduced glutathione (104.5%, 161.34%, and 179.04%), superoxide dismutase (38.65%, 44.32%, and 53.35%), catalase (13.08%, 27%, and 31.52%), glutathione peroxidase (55.56%, 72.23%, and 97.23%), glutathione reductase (49.27%, 88.40%, and 110.86%), and glutathione-S-transferase (140%, 220%, and 246.6%, respectively) on treatment with L. casei, B. bifidum, and combination treatment. Conclusions: Administration of L. casei and B. bifidum alone and in combination of both ameliorated hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress in STZ

  17. Role of sortase-dependent pili of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 in modulating bacterium–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Serafini, Fausta; Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; O’Connell Motherway, Mary; Taverniti, Valentina; Mangifesta, Marta; Milani, Christian; Viappiani, Alice; Roversi, Tommaso; Sánchez, Borja; Santoni, Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Margolles, Abelardo; Piazza, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Bolchi, Angelo; Guglielmetti, Simone; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria represent one of the dominant groups of microorganisms colonizing the human infant intestine. Commensal bacteria that interact with a eukaryotic host are believed to express adhesive molecules on their cell surface that bind to specific host cell receptors or soluble macromolecules. Whole-genome transcription profiling of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010, a strain isolated from infant stool, revealed a small number of commonly expressed extracellular proteins, among which were genes that specify sortase-dependent pili. Expression of the coding sequences of these B. bifidum PRL2010 appendages in nonpiliated Lactococcus lactis enhanced adherence to human enterocytes through extracellular matrix protein and bacterial aggregation. Furthermore, such piliated L. lactis cells evoked a higher TNF-α response during murine colonization compared with their nonpiliated parent, suggesting that bifidobacterial sortase-dependent pili not only contribute to adherence but also display immunomodulatory activity. PMID:23776216

  18. Effect of various metals and calcium metabolism inhibitors on the growth of Bifidobacterium bifidum var. pennsylvanicus.

    PubMed

    Topouzian, N; Joseph, B J; Bezkorovainy, A

    1984-01-01

    In view of the facts that the normal intestinal flora exerts beneficial effects and that bifidobacteria are a more important component in the breast-fed than in the bottle-fed infant, factors affecting the growth of the latter microorganisms are of interest. A series of transition and other metals were shown to be growth inhibitors of Bifidobacterium bifidum var. pennsylvanicus. Such inhibition could be reversed fully or partially by 0.5-1.0 mM Fe2+ in the case of Zn2+, Cu2+, Au3+, Pt4+, La3+, Cr3+, Mn2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+, but not with Ag+, Hg2+, and VO2+. In addition, 2-4 mM Ca2+ substantially relieved the inhibitory effects of Zn2+, Mn2+, and La3+, and partially relieved the effects of Cd2+. Mg2+ was ineffective in relieving Zn2+ inhibition, but Ba2+ and Sr2+ could replace Ca2+ to some extent. The calcium metabolism antagonists verapamil, ruthenium red, 2-chloroadenosine, lasalocid, Ca-ionophore A-23187, and calmodulin inhibitors W-5 and W-7 inhibited microbial growth. Inhibition could be relieved fully or partially with 0.5-1 mM Fe2+. Mg2+ relieved the inhibition by lasalocid, Ca-ionophore A-23187, and verapamil, whereas Ca2+ was effective only in the case of Ca-ionophore A-23187. We conclude that calcium and magnesium fluxes play an important role in the physiology of the bifidobacteria and that several metal growth inhibitors interfere with iron metabolism.

  19. Crystal Structures of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 20 Lacto-N-biosidase from Bifidobacterium bifidum *

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tasuku; Katayama, Takane; Hattie, Mitchell; Sakurama, Haruko; Wada, Jun; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Ashida, Hisashi; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Stubbs, Keith A.; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides contain a large variety of oligosaccharides, of which lacto-N-biose I (Gal-β1,3-GlcNAc; LNB) predominates as a major core structure. A unique metabolic pathway specific for LNB has recently been identified in the human commensal bifidobacteria. Several strains of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria possess lacto-N-biosidase, a membrane-anchored extracellular enzyme, that liberates LNB from the nonreducing end of human milk oligosaccharides and plays a key role in the metabolic pathway of these compounds. Lacto-N-biosidase belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 20, and its reaction proceeds via a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism. Several crystal structures of GH20 β-N-acetylhexosaminidases, which release monosaccharide GlcNAc from its substrate, have been determined, but to date, a structure of lacto-N-biosidase is unknown. Here, we have determined the first three-dimensional structures of lacto-N-biosidase from Bifidobacterium bifidum JCM1254 in complex with LNB and LNB-thiazoline (Gal-β1,3-GlcNAc-thiazoline) at 1.8-Å resolution. Lacto-N-biosidase consists of three domains, and the C-terminal domain has a unique β-trefoil-like fold. Compared with other β-N-acetylhexosaminidases, lacto-N-biosidase has a wide substrate-binding pocket with a −2 subsite specific for β-1,3-linked Gal, and the residues responsible for Gal recognition were identified. The bound ligands are recognized by extensive hydrogen bonds at all of their hydroxyls consistent with the enzyme's strict substrate specificity for the LNB moiety. The GlcNAc sugar ring of LNB is in a distorted conformation near 4E, whereas that of LNB-thiazoline is in a 4C1 conformation. A possible conformational pathway for the lacto-N-biosidase reaction is discussed. PMID:23479733

  20. Randomized controlled trial of live lactobacillus acidophilus plus bifidobacterium bifidum in prophylaxis of diarrhea during radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced diarrhea is frequently observed during pelvic radiotherapy. This study was performed to determine the ability of a probiotic containing live lactobacillus acidophilus plus bifidobacterium bifidum to reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. Methods Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly cisplatin were randomly assigned to a study drug or placebo, in a double-blind study. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) system. Stool consistency and white and red blood cell count in stool were also assessed. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a CTC grade 2 or more, and the need for anti-diarrheal medication. Results A total of 63 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 -3 diarrhea was observed in 45% of the placebo group (n = 31) and 9% of the study drug group (n = 32) (p = 0.002). Anti-diarrheal medication use was significantly reduced in the placebo group (p = 0.03). The patients in the study drug group had a significantly improved stool consistency (p < 0.001). Conclusions Live lactobacillus acidophilus plus bifidobacterium bifidum reduced the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea and the need for anti-diarrheal medication and had a significant benefits on stool consistency. PMID:20444243

  1. Kefir fermented milk and kefiran promote growth of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 and modulate its gene expression.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Fausta; Turroni, Francesca; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Zamboni, Nicole; Bottacini, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Margolles, Abelardo; Ventura, Marco

    2014-05-16

    Bifidobacteria constitute one of the dominant groups of microorganisms colonizing the human gut of infants. Their ability to utilize various host-derived glycans as well as dietary carbohydrates has received considerable scientific attention. However, very little is known about the role of fermented foods, such as kefir, or their constituent glycans, such as kefiran, as substrates for bifidobacterial growth and for the modulation of the expression of bifidobacterial host-effector molecules. Here, we show that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 exhibits high growth performance among the bifidobacterial strains tested when cultivated on kefir and/or kefiran polymer. Furthermore, a 16S rRNA metagenomic approach revealed that the microbiota of kefir is modified upon the addition of PRL2010 cells to the kefir matrix. Finally, our results show that kefir and kefiran are able to influence the transcriptome of B. bifidum PRL2010 causing increased transcription of genes involved in the metabolism of dietary glycans as well as genes that act as host-microbe effector molecules such as pili. Altogether, these data support the use of kefir as a valuable means for the delivery of effective microbial cells in probiotic therapy.

  2. Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071 decreases stress-associated diarrhoea-related symptoms and self-reported stress: a secondary analysis of a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, T; Christman, M C; Nieves, C; Specht, G J; Rowe, C C; Spaiser, S J; Ford, A L; Dahl, W J; Girard, S A; Langkamp-Henken, B

    2016-06-01

    Psychological stress is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) distress. This secondary analysis from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study examined whether three different probiotics could normalise self-reported stress-associated GI discomfort and reduce overall self-reported stress. Undergraduate students (n=581) received Lactobacillus helveticus R0052, Bifidobacterium longum ssp. infantis R0033, Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071, or placebo. Participants self-reported 2 outcomes for a 6-week period, which included final academic exams: daily level of stress (0=no stress to 10=extremely stressed) and weekly three diarrhoea-related symptoms (DS, 1=no discomfort to 7=severe discomfort) using the GI Symptom Rating Scale. Self-reported stress was positively related to DS (P=0.0068). Mean DS scores were lower with B. bifidum versus placebo at week 2 at the average level of stress and the average body mass index (BMI). DS scores were lower with B. bifidum at week 5 versus week 0 and 1 and with B. infantis R0033 at week 6 versus week 0. DS scores were higher when antibiotics were used in the prior week with placebo (P=0.0092). DS were not different with or without antibiotic use with the probiotics. Only B. bifidum had an effect on self-reported stress scores (P=0.0086). The self-reported stress score was also dependent on hours of sleep per day where it decreased by 0.13 for each additional hour of sleep. During a stressful period, B. bifidum R0071 decreases DS and self-reported stress scores. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01709825. PMID:26839075

  3. Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071 decreases stress-associated diarrhoea-related symptoms and self-reported stress: a secondary analysis of a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, T; Christman, M C; Nieves, C; Specht, G J; Rowe, C C; Spaiser, S J; Ford, A L; Dahl, W J; Girard, S A; Langkamp-Henken, B

    2016-06-01

    Psychological stress is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) distress. This secondary analysis from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study examined whether three different probiotics could normalise self-reported stress-associated GI discomfort and reduce overall self-reported stress. Undergraduate students (n=581) received Lactobacillus helveticus R0052, Bifidobacterium longum ssp. infantis R0033, Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071, or placebo. Participants self-reported 2 outcomes for a 6-week period, which included final academic exams: daily level of stress (0=no stress to 10=extremely stressed) and weekly three diarrhoea-related symptoms (DS, 1=no discomfort to 7=severe discomfort) using the GI Symptom Rating Scale. Self-reported stress was positively related to DS (P=0.0068). Mean DS scores were lower with B. bifidum versus placebo at week 2 at the average level of stress and the average body mass index (BMI). DS scores were lower with B. bifidum at week 5 versus week 0 and 1 and with B. infantis R0033 at week 6 versus week 0. DS scores were higher when antibiotics were used in the prior week with placebo (P=0.0092). DS were not different with or without antibiotic use with the probiotics. Only B. bifidum had an effect on self-reported stress scores (P=0.0086). The self-reported stress score was also dependent on hours of sleep per day where it decreased by 0.13 for each additional hour of sleep. During a stressful period, B. bifidum R0071 decreases DS and self-reported stress scores. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01709825.

  4. Fermentation of Metroxylon sagu resistant starch type III by Lactobacillus sp. and Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    PubMed

    Siew-Wai, Loo; Zi-Ni, Tan; Karim, Alias A; Hani, Norziah M; Rosma, Ahmad

    2010-02-24

    The in vitro fermentability of sago (Metroxylon sagu) resistant starch type III (RS(3)) by selected probiotic bacteria was investigated. Sago RS(3) with 12% RS content was prepared by enzymatic debranching of native sago starch with pullulanase enzyme, followed by autoclaving, cooling, and annealing. The fermentation of sago RS(3) by L. acidophilus FTCC 0291, L. bulgaricus FTCC 0411, L. casei FTCC 0442, and B. bifidum BB12 was investigated by observing the bacterial growth, carbohydrate consumption profiles, pH changes, and total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced in the fermentation media. Comparisons were made with commercial fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), Hi-maize 1043, and Hi-maize 240. Submerged fermentations were conducted in 30 mL glass vials for 24 h at 37 degrees C in an oven without shaking. The results indicated that fermentation of sago RS(3) significantly (P < 0.05) yielded the highest count of Lactobacillus sp. accompanied by the largest reduction in pH of the medium. Sago RS(3) was significantly the most consumed substrate compared to FOS and Hi-maizes. PMID:20121195

  5. High Expression of β-Glucosidase in Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 and Application in Conversion of Isoflavone Glucosides During Fermentation of Soy Milk.

    PubMed

    You, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jin Yong; Wu, Qian Qian; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-04-01

    In spite of the reported probiotic effects, Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 (BGN4) showed no β- glucosidase activity and failed to biotransform isoflavone glucosides into the more bioactive aglycones during soy milk fermentation. To develop an isoflavone-biotransforming BGN4, we constructed the recombinant B. bifidum BGN4 strain (B919G) by cloning the structural β- glucosidase gene from B. lactis AD011 (AD011) using the expression vector with the constitutively active promoter 919 from BGN4. As a result, B919G highly expressed β- glucosidase and showed higher β-glucosidase activity and heat stability than the source strain of the β-glucosidase gene, AD011. The biotransformation of daidzin and genistin compounds using the crude enzyme extract from B919G was completed within 4 h, and the bioconversion of daidzin and genistin in soy milk during fermentation with B919G also occurred within 6 h, which was much faster and higher than with AD011. The incorporation of this β-glucosidaseproducing Bifidobacterium strain in soy milk could lead to the production of fermented soy milk with an elevated amount of bioavailable forms of isoflavones as well as to the indigenous probiotic effects of the Bifidobacterium strain.

  6. Structural Basis on the Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Novel 1,2-Alpha L-Fucosidase (AFCA) From Bifidobacterium Bifidum

    SciTech Connect

    Nagae, M.; Tsuchiya, A.; Katayama, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Wakatsuki, S.; Kato, R.

    2009-06-03

    1,2-alpha-L-fucosidase (AfcA), which hydrolyzes the glycosidic linkage of Fucalpha1-2Gal via an inverting mechanism, was recently isolated from Bifidobacterium bifidum and classified as the first member of the novel glycoside hydrolase family 95. To better understand the molecular mechanism of this enzyme, we determined the x-ray crystal structures of the AfcA catalytic (Fuc) domain in unliganded and complexed forms with deoxyfuconojirimycin (inhibitor), 2'-fucosyllactose (substrate), and L-fucose and lactose (products) at 1.12-2.10 A resolution. The AfcA Fuc domain is composed of four regions, an N-terminal beta region, a helical linker, an (alpha/alpha)6 helical barrel domain, and a C-terminal beta region, and this arrangement is similar to bacterial phosphorylases. In the complex structures, the ligands were buried in the central cavity of the helical barrel domain. Structural analyses in combination with mutational experiments revealed that the highly conserved Glu566 probably acts as a general acid catalyst. However, no carboxylic acid residue is found at the appropriate position for a general base catalyst. Instead, a water molecule stabilized by Asn423 in the substrate-bound complex is suitably located to perform a nucleophilic attack on the C1 atom of L-fucose moiety in 2'-fucosyllactose, and its location is nearly identical near the O1 atom of beta-L-fucose in the products-bound complex. Based on these data, we propose and discuss a novel catalytic reaction mechanism of AfcA.

  7. TgaA, a VirB1-Like Component Belonging to a Putative Type IV Secretion System of Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75

    PubMed Central

    Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Miriani, Matteo; Milani, Christian; Scarafoni, Alessio; Corona, Silvia; Ciranna, Alessandro; Arioli, Stefania; Santala, Ville; Iametti, Stefania; Bonomi, Francesco; Ventura, Marco; Mora, Diego; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium bifidum MIMBb75 is a human intestinal isolate demonstrated to be interactive with the host and efficacious as a probiotic. However, the molecular biology of this microorganism is yet largely unknown. For this reason, we undertook whole-genome sequencing of B. bifidum MIMBb75 to identify potential genetic factors that would explain the metabolic and probiotic attributes of this bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis revealed a 45-kb chromosomal region that comprises 19 putative genes coding for a potential type IV secretion system (T4SS). Thus, we undertook the initial characterization of this genetic region by studying the putative virB1-like gene, named tgaA. Gene tgaA encodes a peptidoglycan lytic enzyme containing two active domains: lytic murein transglycosylase (LT, cd00254.3) and cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP, pfam05257.4). By means of several in vitro assays, we experimentally confirmed that protein TgaA, consistent with its computationally assigned role, has peptidoglycan lytic activity, which is principally associated to the LT domain. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling showed that the protein TgaA is abundantly expressed on the cell surface of B. bifidum MIMBb75. According to the literature, the T4SSs, which have not been characterized before in bifidobacteria, can have important implications for bacterial cell-to-cell communication as well as cross talk with host cells, justifying the interest for further studies aimed at the investigation of this genetic region. PMID:24951779

  8. Continuous consumption of fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium bifidum YIT 10347 improves gastrointestinal and psychological symptoms in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    URITA, Yoshihisa; GOTO, Mayu; WATANABE, Toshiyasu; MATSUZAKI, Makoto; GOMI, Atsushi; KANO, Mitsuyoshi; MIYAZAKI, Kouji; KANEKO, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether consumption of probiotic fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium bifidum YIT 10347 improves symptoms in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Thirty-seven FGID patients (18 male, 19 female) aged 12–80 years (mean ± SD, 52.6 ± 17.5 years) whose condition had not improved despite being seen at several medical institutions consumed 100 mL/day of B. bifidum YIT 10347 fermented milk for 4 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated after the enrollment period (BL: baseline), sample consumption period (CP) and 4 weeks after the CP (FP: follow-up period). Gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (FSSG); psychological symptoms were evaluated using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) short form. Concentrations of salivary stress markers and the oxidative stress marker urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured. GSRS subscale scores for abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation significantly improved relative to BL after consumption of the fermented milk, as did FSSG subscale scores for symptoms of acid-related dyspepsia. Some subjective psychological symptoms improved. POMS scores significantly improved, and “Anger-Hostility” subscale scores significantly decreased after the consumption period, while “Vigor” subscale scores marginally increased during the consumption period. The concentrations of urinary 8-OHdG and the stress marker salivary cortisol were significantly lower at CP but returned to baseline levels at FP. Continuous consumption of B. bifidum YIT 10347 fermented milk is expected to improve gastrointestinal symptoms and reduce psychological stress in FGID patients. PMID:25918671

  9. Effect of denak (Oliveria decumbens Vent) on growth and survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum for production of probiotic herbal milk and yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Ehsandoost, E; Gholami, S P; Nazemi, M

    2013-12-15

    This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of different doses (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5%) of Denak powder (Oliveria decumbens Vent) on viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum in milk and yoghurt during 21 day refrigerated storage for production of probiotic herbal milk and yoghurt. In order to determine the effect of different doses of Denak powder on growth of probiotic bacteria in milk and yoghurt, first lyophilized bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus was added to 1 liter of low fat sterilized milk and was considered as control. Denak powder at the concentrations of 0.5, 1 and 1.5% were added to the samples and incubated until acidity reached 40 degrees Dornic and then left in refrigerator. Similar procedure was applied to the bacteria Bifidobacterium bifidum. The results of this experiment indicate the positive correlation between increased bacterial growth and increased Denak concentration. The investigation showed that the yoghurt containing 1% Denak powder had the best for taste, color, and insolubility. The sample with 1.5% Denak powder in milk and yoghurt had greater viscosity than the other samples investigated. The shelf lives of products were determined to be 21 days during which the bacterial count decreased but not less than 10(9). All the results suggest that Denak (Oliveria decumbens Vent) promoted the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria in milk and yoghurt. According to these findings, addition of Denak powder to milk and yoghurt can be recommended to take advantage of their beneficial properties on human health attributed to antimicrobial activities.

  10. Cell-Free Spent Media Obtained from Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium crudilactis Grown in Media Supplemented with 3′-Sialyllactose Modulate Virulence Gene Expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bondue, Pauline; Crèvecoeur, Sébastien; Brose, François; Daube, Georges; Seghaye, Marie-Christine; Griffiths, Mansel W.; LaPointe, Gisèle; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) possess an antimicrobial activity and can promote the growth of bifidobacteria such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. In addition, fermentation of carbohydrates by bifidobacteria can result in the production of metabolites presenting an antivirulence effect on several pathogenic bacteria. Whey is rich in complex bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO) structurally similar to HMO and B. crudilactis, a species of bovine origin, is able to metabolize some of those complex carbohydrates. This study focused on the ability of B. bifidum and B. crudilactis to grow in a culture medium supplemented in 3′-sialyllactose (3′SL) as the main source of carbon, a major BMO encountered in cow milk. Next, the effects of cell-free spent media (CFSM) were tested against virulence expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both strains were able to grow in presence of 3′SL, but B. crudilactis showed the best growth (7.92 ± 0.3 log cfu/ml) compared to B. bifidum (6.84 ± 0.9 log cfu/ml). Then, CFSM were tested for their effects on virulence gene expression by ler and hilA promoter activity of luminescent mutants of E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively, and on wild type strains of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium using RT-qPCR. All CFSM resulted in significant under expression of the ler and hilA genes for the luminescent mutants and ler (ratios of −15.4 and −8.1 respectively) and qseA (ratios of −2.1 and −3.1) for the wild type strain of E. coli O157:H7. The 3′SL, a major BMO, combined with some bifidobacteria strains of bovine or human origin could therefore be an interesting synbiotic to maintain or restore the intestinal health of young children. These effects observed in vitro will be further investigated regarding the overall phenotype of pathogenic agents and the exact nature of the active molecules. PMID:27713728

  11. Integration of genomic and proteomic data to identify candidate genes in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Wu, Yaoping; Qiu, Liang; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2016-09-01

    As the predominant group inhabiting the human gastrointestinal tract, bifidobacteria play a vital role in human nutrition, therapeutics, and health by shaping and maintaining the gut ecosystem, reducing blood cholesterol, and promoting the supply of nutrients. The interaction between bacterial cells and human intestinal epithelial cell lines has been studied for decades in an attempt to understand the mechanisms of action. These studies, however, have been limited by lack of genomic and proteomic database to aid in achieving comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms at molecular levels. Microarray data (GSE: 74119) coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) were performed to detect differentially expressed genes and proteins in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum. Real-time quantitative PCR, gene ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were further conducted for mRNA validation, functional annotation, and pathway identification, respectively. According to the results of microarray, 1,717 differentially expressed genes, including 1,693 upregulated and 24 downregulated genes, were selected and classified by the gene ontology database. The iTRAQ analysis identified 43 differentially expressed proteins, where 29 proteins were upregulated and 14 proteins were downregulated. Eighty-two candidate genes showing consistent differences with microarray and iTRAQ were further validated in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells by real-time quantitative PCR. Nine of the top genes showing interesting results with high confidence were further investigated in vivo in mice intestine samples. Integration of genomic and proteomic data provides an approach to identify candidate genes that are more likely to function in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, positive regulation of apoptosis, membrane proteins, and transferase catalysis. These findings might contribute to our understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating the

  12. Exploring the ameliorative potential of probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum on dextran sodium sulphate induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sagar R; Shandilya, Umesh Kr; Kansal, Vinod K

    2013-02-01

    Conventional medical therapies for ulcerative colitis (UC) are still limited due to the adverse side effects like dose-dependent diarrhoea and insufficient potency to keep in remission for long-term periods. So, new alternatives that provide more effective and safe therapies for ulcerative colitis are constantly being sought. In the present study, probiotic LaBb Dahi was selected for investigation of its therapeutic effect on DSS-induced colitis model in mice. LaBb Dahi was prepared by co-culturing Dahi culture of Lactococci along with selected strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3 in buffalo milk. Four groups of mice (12 each) were fed for 17 d with buffalo milk (normal control), buffalo milk plus DSS (Colitis control), Dahi plus DSS, and LaBb Dahi plus DSS, respectively, with basal diet. The disease activity scores, weight loss, organ weight, colon length, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and β-glucoronidase activity was assessed, and the histopathological picture of the colon of mice was studied. All colitis control mice evidenced significant increase in MPO, β-glucoronidase activity and showed high disease activity scores along with histological damage to colonic tissue. Feeding with LaBb Dahi offered significant reduction in MPO activity, β-glucoronidase activity and improved disease activity scores. We found significant decline in length of colon, organ weight and body weight in colitis induced controls which were improved significantly by feeding LaBb Dahi. The present study suggests that LaBb Dahi can be used as a potential nutraceutical intervention to combat UC related changes and may offer effective adjunctive treatment for management of UC.

  13. Exploring the ameliorative potential of probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum on dextran sodium sulphate induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sagar R; Shandilya, Umesh Kr; Kansal, Vinod K

    2013-02-01

    Conventional medical therapies for ulcerative colitis (UC) are still limited due to the adverse side effects like dose-dependent diarrhoea and insufficient potency to keep in remission for long-term periods. So, new alternatives that provide more effective and safe therapies for ulcerative colitis are constantly being sought. In the present study, probiotic LaBb Dahi was selected for investigation of its therapeutic effect on DSS-induced colitis model in mice. LaBb Dahi was prepared by co-culturing Dahi culture of Lactococci along with selected strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3 in buffalo milk. Four groups of mice (12 each) were fed for 17 d with buffalo milk (normal control), buffalo milk plus DSS (Colitis control), Dahi plus DSS, and LaBb Dahi plus DSS, respectively, with basal diet. The disease activity scores, weight loss, organ weight, colon length, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and β-glucoronidase activity was assessed, and the histopathological picture of the colon of mice was studied. All colitis control mice evidenced significant increase in MPO, β-glucoronidase activity and showed high disease activity scores along with histological damage to colonic tissue. Feeding with LaBb Dahi offered significant reduction in MPO activity, β-glucoronidase activity and improved disease activity scores. We found significant decline in length of colon, organ weight and body weight in colitis induced controls which were improved significantly by feeding LaBb Dahi. The present study suggests that LaBb Dahi can be used as a potential nutraceutical intervention to combat UC related changes and may offer effective adjunctive treatment for management of UC. PMID:23317563

  14. Probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum modulates the formation of aberrant crypt foci, mucin-depleted foci, and cell proliferation on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Kansal, Vinod K; Kruzliak, Peter; Kumari, Archana

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are pre-neoplastic lesions identified in the colon of carcinogen-treated rodents and in humans at high risk for colon cancer. The present study was carried out to divulge the protective potential of the probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3 alone or in combination with piroxicam (PXC) on the development of early biomarkers of colorectal carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). DMH was injected subcutaneously at the rate of 40 mg/kg body weight per animal twice a week for 2 weeks. A total of 120 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to five groups, each group having 24 animals. The rats were fed with buffalo milk or probiotic supplement (20 grams) alone or as an adjunct with PXC in addition to a basal diet ad libitum for 32 weeks. Group I was offered buffalo milk (BM) and served as the control group. Group II was administered DMH along with BM and served as the DMH-control group; group III was administered BM-DMH-PXC, in which besides administering BM-DMH, PXC was also offered. Group IV was offered probiotic LaBb Dahi and DMH, and group V was offered both probiotic LaBb Dahi and PXC along with DMH. The rats were euthanized at the 8(th), 16(th), and 32(nd) week of the experiment and examined for development of ACF, aberrant crypts per ACF (AC/ACF), mucin-depleted foci (MDF), large MDF, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling index. Administration of DMH in rats induced pre-neoplastic lesions (ACF and MDF) and increased the PCNA index in colorectal tissue. A significant (p<0.05) reduction in the number of ACF, AC/ACF, MDF, large MDF, and PCNA labeling index were observed in the probiotic LaBb Dahi group compared with the DMH control group. Feeding rats with LaBb Dahi or treatment with PXC diminished the initiation and progression of DMH-induced pre-neoplastic lesions and the PCNA index, and treatment with

  15. Effect of inulin on the human gut microbiota: stimulation of Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Farias, Carlett; Slezak, Kathleen; Fuller, Zoë; Duncan, Alan; Holtrop, Grietje; Louis, Petra

    2009-02-01

    Prebiotics are food ingredients that improve health by modulating the colonic microbiota. The bifidogenic effect of the prebiotic inulin is well established; however, it remains unclear which species of Bifidobacterium are stimulated in vivo and whether bacterial groups other than lactic acid bacteria are affected by inulin consumption. Changes in the faecal microbiota composition were examined by real-time PCR in twelve human volunteers after ingestion of inulin (10 g/d) for a 16-d period in comparison with a control period without any supplement intake. The prevalence of most bacterial groups examined did not change after inulin intake, although the low G+C % Gram-positive species Faecalibacterium prausnitzii exhibited a significant increase (10.3% for control period v. 14.5% during inulin intake, P=0.019). The composition of the genus Bifidobacterium was studied in four of the volunteers by clone library analysis. Between three and five Bifidobacterium spp. were found in each volunteer. Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum were present in all volunteers, and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium dentium were also detected. Real-time PCR was employed to quantify the four most prevalent Bifidobacterium spp., B. adolescentis, B. longum, B. pseudocatenulatum and B. bifidum, in ten volunteers carrying detectable levels of bifidobacteria. B. adolescentis showed the strongest response to inulin consumption, increasing from 0.89 to 3.9% of the total microbiota (P=0.001). B. bifidum was increased from 0.22 to 0.63% (P<0.001) for the five volunteers for whom this species was present.

  16. The impact of polyphenols on Bifidobacterium growth.

    PubMed

    Gwiazdowska, Daniela; Juś, Krzysztof; Jasnowska-Małecka, Joanna; Kluczyńska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a common group of plant based bioactive compounds, that can affect human health because of their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties as well as free-radical scavenging activity. An increasing interest is observed in the interaction between polyphenols and microbiota occurring in food and the human gut. The aim of the work presented here, was to evaluate the effect of some polyphenolic compounds on the growth of two strains of Bifidobacterium: B. adolescentis and B. bifidum. The influence of some flavonoids: naringinin, hesperidin, rutin, quercetin as well as phenolic acids: gallic, caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic, chlorogenic, vanillic and sinapic was determined by a 96-well microtiter plate assay. In the experiments the effect of three different concentrations of polyphenols: 2, 20 and 100 µg/ml on the growth of Bifidobacterium strains was investigated. All tested compounds influenced the growth of the examined bacteria. Both stimulatory and inhibitory effects were observed in comparison to the positive control. The strongest impact on the growth of bifidobacteria was observed during the first hours of incubation. The constant inhibitory effect was observed for hesperidin and quercetin addition and was dose-dependent. B. bifidum showed a stronger dependence on phenolic acids content in the medium than B. adolescentis during the first hours of incubation. PMID:26619254

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    PubMed Central

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFMTM (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  18. Genomics and ecological overview of the genus Bifidobacterium.

    PubMed

    Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-09-01

    Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are high G+C Gram positive bacteria belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, and represent common inhabitants of the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) of mammals, birds and certain cold-blooded animals. The overall microbial population that resides in the GIT, referred to as the "gut microbiota", is an extremely complex community of microorganisms whose functions are believed to have a significant impact on human physiology. Different ecological relationships between bifidobacteria and their host can be developed, ranging from opportunistic pathogenic interactions (e.g. in the case of Bifidobacterium dentium) to a commensal or even health-promoting relationship (e.g. in the case of Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve species). Among the known health-promoting or probiotic microorganisms, bifidobacteria represent one of the most dominant group and some bifidobacterial species are frequently used as the probiotic ingredient in many functional foods. However, despite the generally accepted importance of bifidobacteria as constituents of the human microbiota, there is only limited information available on their phylogeny, physiology and genetics. Moreover, host-microbiota interactions and cross-talk between different members of the gut microbiota are far from completely understood although they represent a crucial factor in the development and maintenance of human physiology and immune system. The aim of this review is to highlight the genetic and functional features of bifidobacteria residing in the human GIT using genomic and ecology-based information. PMID:21276626

  19. Genomics and ecological overview of the genus Bifidobacterium.

    PubMed

    Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-09-01

    Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are high G+C Gram positive bacteria belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, and represent common inhabitants of the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) of mammals, birds and certain cold-blooded animals. The overall microbial population that resides in the GIT, referred to as the "gut microbiota", is an extremely complex community of microorganisms whose functions are believed to have a significant impact on human physiology. Different ecological relationships between bifidobacteria and their host can be developed, ranging from opportunistic pathogenic interactions (e.g. in the case of Bifidobacterium dentium) to a commensal or even health-promoting relationship (e.g. in the case of Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve species). Among the known health-promoting or probiotic microorganisms, bifidobacteria represent one of the most dominant group and some bifidobacterial species are frequently used as the probiotic ingredient in many functional foods. However, despite the generally accepted importance of bifidobacteria as constituents of the human microbiota, there is only limited information available on their phylogeny, physiology and genetics. Moreover, host-microbiota interactions and cross-talk between different members of the gut microbiota are far from completely understood although they represent a crucial factor in the development and maintenance of human physiology and immune system. The aim of this review is to highlight the genetic and functional features of bifidobacteria residing in the human GIT using genomic and ecology-based information.

  20. Evaluation of genetic diversity among strains of the human gut commensal Bifidobacterium adolescentis

    PubMed Central

    Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the human gut microbiota, being numerically dominant in the colon of infants, while also being prevalent in the large intestine of adults. In this study, we determined and analyzed the pan-genome of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is one of many bacteria found in the human adult gut microbiota. In silico analysis of the genome sequences of eighteen B. adolescentis strains isolated from various environments, such as human milk, human feces and bovine rumen, revealed a high level of genetic variability, resulting in an open pan-genome. Compared to other bifidobacterial taxa such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve, the more extensive B. adolescentis pan-genome supports the hypothesis that the genetic arsenal of this taxon expanded so as to become more adaptable to the variable and changing ecological niche of the gut. These increased genetic capabilities are particularly evident for genes required for dietary glycan-breakdown. PMID:27035119

  1. Evaluation of genetic diversity among strains of the human gut commensal Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the human gut microbiota, being numerically dominant in the colon of infants, while also being prevalent in the large intestine of adults. In this study, we determined and analyzed the pan-genome of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is one of many bacteria found in the human adult gut microbiota. In silico analysis of the genome sequences of eighteen B. adolescentis strains isolated from various environments, such as human milk, human feces and bovine rumen, revealed a high level of genetic variability, resulting in an open pan-genome. Compared to other bifidobacterial taxa such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve, the more extensive B. adolescentis pan-genome supports the hypothesis that the genetic arsenal of this taxon expanded so as to become more adaptable to the variable and changing ecological niche of the gut. These increased genetic capabilities are particularly evident for genes required for dietary glycan-breakdown. PMID:27035119

  2. Evaluation of genetic diversity among strains of the human gut commensal Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Duranti, Sabrina; Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the human gut microbiota, being numerically dominant in the colon of infants, while also being prevalent in the large intestine of adults. In this study, we determined and analyzed the pan-genome of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is one of many bacteria found in the human adult gut microbiota. In silico analysis of the genome sequences of eighteen B. adolescentis strains isolated from various environments, such as human milk, human feces and bovine rumen, revealed a high level of genetic variability, resulting in an open pan-genome. Compared to other bifidobacterial taxa such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium breve, the more extensive B. adolescentis pan-genome supports the hypothesis that the genetic arsenal of this taxon expanded so as to become more adaptable to the variable and changing ecological niche of the gut. These increased genetic capabilities are particularly evident for genes required for dietary glycan-breakdown.

  3. Viability of probiotic (Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei) and nonprobiotic microflora in Argentinian Fresco cheese.

    PubMed

    Vinderola, C G; Prosello, W; Ghiberto, T D; Reinheimer, J A

    2000-09-01

    We evaluated the suitability of Argentinian Fresco cheese as a food carrier of probiotic cultures. We used cultures of Bifidobacterium bifidum (two strains), Bifidobacterium longum (two strains), Bifidobacterium sp. (one strain), Lactobacillus acidophilus (two strains), and Lactobacillus casei (two strains) in different combinations, as probiotic adjuncts. Probiotic, lactic starter (Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus), and contaminant (coliforms, yeasts, and molds) organisms were counted at 0, 30, and 60 d of refrigerated storage. Furthermore, the acid resistance of probiotic and starter bacteria was determined from hydrochloric solutions (pH 2 and 3) of Fresco cheese. The results showed that nine different combinations of bifidobacteria and L. acidophilus had a satisfactory viability (count decreases in 60 d <1 log order) in the cheese. Both combinations of bifidobacteria and L. casei cultures assayed also showed a satisfactory survival (counts decreased <1 log order for bifidobacteria but no decrease was detected for L. casei). On the other hand, the three combinations of bifidobacteria, L. acidophilus, and L. casei tested adapted well to the Fresco cheese environment. When a cheese homogenate at pH 3 was used to partially simulate the acidic conditions in the stomach, the probiotic cultures had an excellent ability to remain viable up to 3 h. At pH 2, the cell viability was more affected; B. bifidum was the most resistant organism. This study showed that the Argentinian Fresco cheese could be used as an adequate carrier of probiotic bacteria.

  4. Glucolytic fingerprinting reveals metabolic groups within the genus Bifidobacterium: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, D; Sánchez, B; Cuesta, I; Cueto-Díaz, S; Hernández-Barranco, A M; Gueimonde, M; De los Reyes-Gavilán, C G

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms of the genus Bifidobacterium are inhabitants of diverse niches including the digestive tract of humans and animals. The species Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve and Bifidobacterium longum have qualified presumption of safety status granted by EFSA and several strains are considered probiotic, and are being included in functional dairy fermented products. In the present work we carried out a preliminary exploration of general metabolic characteristics and organic acid production profiles of a reduced number of strains selected from these and other species of the genus Bifidobacterium. The use of resting cells allowed obtaining metabolic fingerprints without interference of metabolites accumulated during growth in culture media. Acetic acid was the most abundant organic acid formed per mol of glucose consumed (from 1.07 ± 0.03 to 1.71 ± 0.22 mol) followed by lactic acid (from 0.34 ± 0.06 to 0.90 ± 0.12 mol), with moderate differences in production among strains; pyruvic, succinic and formic acids were also produced at considerably lower proportions, with variability among strains. The acetic to lactic acid ratio showed lower values in stationary phase as regard to the exponential phase for most, but not all, the microorganisms; this was due to a decrease in acetic acid molar proportions together with increases of lactic acid proportions in stationary phase. A linear discriminant analysis allowed to cluster strains into species with 51-100% probability, evidencing different metabolic profiles, according to the relative production of organic acids from glucose by resting cells, of microorganisms collected at the exponential phase of growth. Looking for a single metabolic marker that could adequately discriminate metabolic groups, we found that groups established by the acetic to lactic acid ratio fit well with differences previously evidenced by the discriminant analysis. The

  5. Glucolytic fingerprinting reveals metabolic groups within the genus Bifidobacterium: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, D; Sánchez, B; Cuesta, I; Cueto-Díaz, S; Hernández-Barranco, A M; Gueimonde, M; De los Reyes-Gavilán, C G

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms of the genus Bifidobacterium are inhabitants of diverse niches including the digestive tract of humans and animals. The species Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve and Bifidobacterium longum have qualified presumption of safety status granted by EFSA and several strains are considered probiotic, and are being included in functional dairy fermented products. In the present work we carried out a preliminary exploration of general metabolic characteristics and organic acid production profiles of a reduced number of strains selected from these and other species of the genus Bifidobacterium. The use of resting cells allowed obtaining metabolic fingerprints without interference of metabolites accumulated during growth in culture media. Acetic acid was the most abundant organic acid formed per mol of glucose consumed (from 1.07 ± 0.03 to 1.71 ± 0.22 mol) followed by lactic acid (from 0.34 ± 0.06 to 0.90 ± 0.12 mol), with moderate differences in production among strains; pyruvic, succinic and formic acids were also produced at considerably lower proportions, with variability among strains. The acetic to lactic acid ratio showed lower values in stationary phase as regard to the exponential phase for most, but not all, the microorganisms; this was due to a decrease in acetic acid molar proportions together with increases of lactic acid proportions in stationary phase. A linear discriminant analysis allowed to cluster strains into species with 51-100% probability, evidencing different metabolic profiles, according to the relative production of organic acids from glucose by resting cells, of microorganisms collected at the exponential phase of growth. Looking for a single metabolic marker that could adequately discriminate metabolic groups, we found that groups established by the acetic to lactic acid ratio fit well with differences previously evidenced by the discriminant analysis. The

  6. Selection of species-specific DNA probes which detect strain restriction polymorphism in four Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Mangin, I; Bourget, N; Simonet, J M; Decaris, B

    1995-01-01

    Randomly cloned fragments (in a size range 1 to 2.5 kb) of DNA from Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707, B. adolescentis CIP 64.59T, B. bifidum CIP 64.65 and B. animalis ATCC 25527 were used as hybridization probes to characterize strains of these species and distinguish them from closely related Bifidobacterium species. The fragments were screened for hybridization with native DNA from 41 different Bifidobacterium strains. For each species, a fragment hybridizing specifically with DNA from strains of the same species was isolated. Each fragment was then hybridized with restriction digests in order to study the genome polymorphism. In some of the tested B. longum strains including strain ATCC 15707, the species-specific fragment L6/45 hybridized with 2 fragments instead of one as expected. Sequence of the fragment revealed the presence of an ORF which had an amino acid sequence similar to the site-specific recombinases of lambda integrase family. Moreover, Southern analysis demonstrated that at least 3 copies of this fragment are present in the chromosome of B. longum ATCC 15707 and in some other B. longum strains. The species-specific fragment A6/17 of B. adolescentis hybridized with the same restriction fragment on the eight strains of this species tested. The B. bifidum-specific fragment hybridized with different DNA restriction fragments according to the strain. The restriction fragment an1 from B. animalis ATCC 25527 hybridized with the same restriction fragment from strain B. animalis ATCC 27536. However, these two strains could be differentiated by another restriction pattern. Thus, hybridization results highlight the genetic polymorphism which exists among Bifidobacterium strains of the same species.

  7. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM using polymerized whey proteins as wall material.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yujun; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Tiehua; Hendricks, Gregory; Guo, Mingruo

    2016-09-01

    Survivability of probiotics in foods is essential for developing functional food containing probiotics. We investigated polymerized whey protein (PWP)-based microencapsulation process which is developed for protecting probiotics like Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and compared with the method using sodium alginate (SA). The entrapment rate was 89.3 ± 4.8% using PWP, while it was 73.2 ± 1.4% for SA. The microencapsulated NCFM by PWP and SA were separately subjected to digestion juices and post-fermentation storage of fermented cows' and goats' milk using the encapsulated culture. The log viable count of NCFM in PWP-based microencapsulation was 4.56, compared with that of 4.26 in SA-based ones and 3.13 for free culture. Compared with using SA as wall material, PWP was more effective in protecting probiotic. Microencapsulation of L. acidophilus NCFM using PWP as wall material can be exploited in the development of fermented dairy products with better survivability of probiotic organism. PMID:27309796

  8. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Varela, L.; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants. PMID:27242753

  9. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Varela, L; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants.

  10. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile Growth and Toxicity When Co-cultured in Different Prebiotic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Varela, L; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI) which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12) in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy, and Actilight) or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants. PMID:27242753

  11. Tolerance of Bifidobacterium human isolates to bile, acid and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Allano, Solène; Butel, Marie José; Aires, Julio

    2013-06-01

    Bifidobacteria are part of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and are used as probiotics in functional food products because of their health promoting properties. However, only few data are available on the phenotypic characteristics displayed by human bifidobacteria strain populations. In this study we compared the in vitro tolerance to acid, bile and oxygen of the largest number of independent human intestinal strains. Bile and acid tolerance varied among species and independent strains within a species: B. adolescentis strains were the most tolerant to bile followed by Bifidobacterium longum and B. breve; B. longum, B. breve and B. dentium showed the highest viability levels after exposure to acid pH. Oxygen tolerance was largely distributed among intestinal bifidobacteria: B. longum, B. breve and B. bifidum showed the highest oxygen tolerance. B. adolescentis showed the highest susceptibility to acid and oxygen stresses. The present study gave us the opportunity to update our knowledge about the phenotypic characteristics of human intestinal bifidobacteria. B. longum and B. breve harboured the best tolerance to oxygen, bile and acid stresses. Based on such biological characters, B. longum and B. breve species showed the highest interest in terms of potential selection of human probiotics.

  12. Note: evaluation of selective media for the enumeration of Bifidobacterium sp. in milk.

    PubMed

    Payne, J F; Morris, A E; Beers, P

    1999-02-01

    Pure cultures of three species of bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium longum, Bif. adolescentis and Bif. bifidum), Lactobacillus acidophilus and a mixed culture of Lact. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus were each enumerated on two differential media and six selective media for the enumeration of bifidobacteria. The appearance of the colonies on the differential media was as expected but when mixed cultures were present, it proved extremely difficult to distinguish one species from another. Of the selective media, AMC, RMS, NPNL and BL-OG performed well in that they gave good recoveries of bifidobacteria and were inhibitory to the growth of Lact. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Strep. salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lact. acidophilus. However, of these four media, AMC was most convenient as it is based on a commercially available medium, whereas the others must be made up from individual constituents. The AMC agar is thus a good choice for the routine enumeration of bifidobacteria from mixed cultures.

  13. Differential proteome and cellular adhesion analyses of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM grown on raffinose - an emerging prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Ejby, Morten; Majumder, Avishek; Købler, Carsten; Goh, Yong Jun; Thorsen, Kristian; Schmidt, Bjarne; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Brix, Susanne; Mølhave, Kristian; Svensson, Birte

    2016-05-01

    Whole cell and surface proteomes were analyzed together with adhesive properties of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) grown on the emerging prebiotic raffinose, exemplifying a synbiotic. Adhesion of NCFM to mucin and intestinal HT-29 cells increased three-fold after culture with raffinose versus glucose, as also visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Comparative proteomics using 2D-DIGE showed 43 unique proteins to change in relative abundance in whole cell lysates from NCFM grown on raffinose compared to glucose. Furthermore, 14 unique proteins in 18 spots of the surface subproteome underwent changes identified by differential 2DE, including elongation factor G, thermostable pullulanase, and phosphate starvation inducible stress-related protein increasing in a range of +2.1 - +4.7 fold. By contrast five known moonlighting proteins decreased in relative abundance by up to -2.4 fold. Enzymes involved in raffinose catabolism were elevated in the whole cell proteome; α-galactosidase (+13.9 fold); sucrose phosphorylase (+5.4 fold) together with metabolic enzymes from the Leloir pathway for galactose utilization and the glycolysis; β-galactosidase (+5.7 fold); galactose (+2.9/+3.1 fold) and fructose (+2.8 fold) kinases. The insights at the molecular and cellular levels contributed to the understanding of the interplay of a synbiotic composed of NCFM and raffinose with the host. PMID:26959526

  14. Differential proteome and cellular adhesion analyses of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM grown on raffinose - an emerging prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Ejby, Morten; Majumder, Avishek; Købler, Carsten; Goh, Yong Jun; Thorsen, Kristian; Schmidt, Bjarne; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Brix, Susanne; Mølhave, Kristian; Svensson, Birte

    2016-05-01

    Whole cell and surface proteomes were analyzed together with adhesive properties of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) grown on the emerging prebiotic raffinose, exemplifying a synbiotic. Adhesion of NCFM to mucin and intestinal HT-29 cells increased three-fold after culture with raffinose versus glucose, as also visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Comparative proteomics using 2D-DIGE showed 43 unique proteins to change in relative abundance in whole cell lysates from NCFM grown on raffinose compared to glucose. Furthermore, 14 unique proteins in 18 spots of the surface subproteome underwent changes identified by differential 2DE, including elongation factor G, thermostable pullulanase, and phosphate starvation inducible stress-related protein increasing in a range of +2.1 - +4.7 fold. By contrast five known moonlighting proteins decreased in relative abundance by up to -2.4 fold. Enzymes involved in raffinose catabolism were elevated in the whole cell proteome; α-galactosidase (+13.9 fold); sucrose phosphorylase (+5.4 fold) together with metabolic enzymes from the Leloir pathway for galactose utilization and the glycolysis; β-galactosidase (+5.7 fold); galactose (+2.9/+3.1 fold) and fructose (+2.8 fold) kinases. The insights at the molecular and cellular levels contributed to the understanding of the interplay of a synbiotic composed of NCFM and raffinose with the host.

  15. Study on the Influence of Tea Extract on Probiotics in Skim Milk: From Probiotics Propagation to Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gong, Guangyu; Ma, Chengjie; Liu, Zhenmin; Cai, Jie

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the influence of tea extract (TE) on the growth of probiotics in skim milk was examined. Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III, Bifidobacterium bifidum Bb02, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were used in this study. The introduction of TE in milk significantly stimulated the propagation and acidification of L. rhamnosus GG and L. acidophilus NCFM. The antioxidant capacities and the total free amino acid contents of all fermented milk products were enhanced by the addition of TE; however, there were different antioxidant properties and free amino acid contents of fermented milk samples fermented by different bacteria. With a 9% (w/w) level, the fermentation with L. rhamnosus GG and L. acidophilus NCFM showed larger numbers of viable cells and faster acidifying rates, as well as excellent antioxidant capacity and abundant free amino acids.  The stimulative effects of TE on probiotics can be considered for industrial purposes and has practical implications for commercial applications.

  16. Study on the Influence of Tea Extract on Probiotics in Skim Milk: From Probiotics Propagation to Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gong, Guangyu; Ma, Chengjie; Liu, Zhenmin; Cai, Jie

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the influence of tea extract (TE) on the growth of probiotics in skim milk was examined. Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III, Bifidobacterium bifidum Bb02, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were used in this study. The introduction of TE in milk significantly stimulated the propagation and acidification of L. rhamnosus GG and L. acidophilus NCFM. The antioxidant capacities and the total free amino acid contents of all fermented milk products were enhanced by the addition of TE; however, there were different antioxidant properties and free amino acid contents of fermented milk samples fermented by different bacteria. With a 9% (w/w) level, the fermentation with L. rhamnosus GG and L. acidophilus NCFM showed larger numbers of viable cells and faster acidifying rates, as well as excellent antioxidant capacity and abundant free amino acids.  The stimulative effects of TE on probiotics can be considered for industrial purposes and has practical implications for commercial applications. PMID:27384493

  17. Functional Analysis of an S-Layer-Associated Fibronectin-Binding Protein in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    PubMed Central

    Hymes, Jeffrey P.; Johnson, Brant R.; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial surface layers (S-layers) are crystalline arrays of self-assembling proteinaceous subunits called S-layer proteins (Slps) that comprise the outermost layer of the cell envelope. Many additional proteins that are associated with or embedded within the S-layer have been identified in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, an S-layer-forming bacterium that is widely used in fermented dairy products and probiotic supplements. One putative S-layer-associated protein (SLAP), LBA0191, was predicted to mediate adhesion to fibronectin based on the in silico detection of a fibronectin-binding domain. Fibronectin is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of intestinal epithelial cells. Adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells is considered an important trait for probiotic microorganisms during transit and potential association with the intestinal mucosa. To investigate the functional role of LBA0191 (designated FbpB) in L. acidophilus NCFM, an fbpB-deficient strain was constructed. The L. acidophilus mutant with a deletion of fbpB lost the ability to adhere to mucin and fibronectin in vitro. Homologues of fbpB were identified in five additional putative S-layer-forming species, but no homologues were detected in species outside the L. acidophilus homology group. PMID:26921419

  18. Use of tuf gene-based primers for the PCR detection of probiotic Bifidobacterium species and enumeration of bifidobacteria in fermented milk by cultural and quantitative real-time PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Sen-Je; Hwang, Wen-Zhe; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Hsin-Chih; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2010-10-01

    Due to the increasing use of bifidobacteria in probiotic products, it is essential to establish a rapid method for the qualitative and quantitative assay of the bifidobacteria in commercial products. In this study, partial sequences of the tuf gene for 18 Bifidobacterium strains belonging to 14 species were determined. Alignment of these sequences showed that the similarities among these Bifidobacterium species were 82.24% to 99.72%. Based on these tuf gene sequences, 6 primer sets were designed for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay of B. animalis subsp. animalis, B. animalis subsp. lactis, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. longum subsp. infantis, B. longum subsp. longum, and the genus of Bifidobacterium, respectively. These Bifidobacterium species are common probiotic species present in dairy and probiotic products. When each target Bifidobacterium spp. was assayed with the designed primers, PCR product with expected size was generated. In addition, for each target species, more than 70 bacterial strains other than the target species, including strains of other Bifidobacterium species, strains of Lactobacillus spp., Enterococcus spp., and other bacterial species, all generated negative results. PCR assay with primers specific to B. animalis subsp. lactis and B. longum subsp. longum confirmed the presence of these Bifidobacterium species in commercial yogurt products. In addition, for each product, enumeration of the bifidobacteria cells by culture method with BIM-25 agar and the quantitative real-time PCR showed similar cell counts. Such results indicated that within 15-d storage (4 °C) after manufacture, all the bifidobacteria cells originally present in yogurt products were viable and culturable during the storage.

  19. Portrait of an immunoregulatory bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Quigley, Eamonn MM; Shanahan, Fergus; O'Mahony, Liam

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the administration of microbes or microbial metabolites for the prevention and treatment of aberrant inflammatory activity. The protective effects associated with these microbes are mediated by multiple mechanisms involving epithelial cells, DCs and T cells, but most data are derived from animal models. In this addendum, we summarize our recent data, showing that oral consumption of Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 is associated with enhanced IL-10 secretion and Foxp3 expression in human peripheral blood. In addition, we discuss the potential DC subset-specific mechanisms, which could contribute to DCREG and TREG programming by specific gut microbes. PMID:22572827

  20. Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. in fecal samples from breast-fed and bottle-fed infants with and without iron supplement.

    PubMed Central

    Mevissen-Verhage, E A; Marcelis, J H; de Vos, M N; Harmsen-van Amerongen, W C; Verhoef, J

    1987-01-01

    Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. isolated from the feces of 23 neonates during the first 3 months of life were identified. Of the 23 neonates, 10 were breast fed, 6 received an infant formula with iron supplement (5 mg/liter), and 7 received the formula without iron supplement (iron concentration, less than 0.5 mg/liter). The Bifidobacterium spp. most frequently isolated from the three groups of infants were B. longum, B. breve, B. adolescentis, and B. bifidum. The bacteroides spp. most frequently isolated were B. fragilis and B. vulgatus. The most common Clostridium sp. in the three groups of infants was C. perfringens. The type of milk did not select for species of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, or Clostridium, except for Clostridium butyricum, which was isolated significantly more often from bottle-fed infants with iron supplement than from the other groups, and Clostridium tertium, which was more often isolated from breast-fed infants. The species of the three anaerobic genera did not persist for a long period of time in the three groups of infants. PMID:3818925

  1. Isolation and molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium spp. from faeces of the blue-fronted Amazon parrot in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, L; Revolledo, L; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Chacón, J L; Martins, L M; Seixas, G H F; Ferreira, A J P

    2014-12-01

    In Brazil, the blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) is a common pet. The faecal microbiota of these birds include a wide variety of bacterial species, the majority of which belong to the Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) clade. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the diversity and abundance of LAB and Bifidobacterium spp. in the cloacae between wild and captive birds and to select, identify and characterise LAB for consideration as a parrot probiotic. Cloacal swabs were collected from 26 wild and 26 captive birds. Bacterial DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA genes were amplified. The numbers of PCR-positive Enterococcus, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus species isolated from wild and captive birds were significantly different (P<0.05). Enterococcus was the most frequently isolated genus, followed by Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Bifidobacterium. Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus coryniformis, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most frequently isolated species from all birds. This study increases our understanding of the faecal microbiota, and may help to improve the nutrition and habitat management of captive and wild parrots. The bacterial population identified in the faecal microbiota of clinically healthy wild and captive parrots can serve as a database to analyse variations in the gut microbiota of pathogen-infected parrots and to develop probiotics specific to these genera.

  2. Oral administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum for modulating microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Xu, Hai-Bo; Wei, Hua; Zeng, Zhe-Ling; Xu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacteria are generally acknowledged as major gut microflora used as probiotics, which promote human health. In this study, the effects of the administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum on modulating gastrointestinal (GI) tract microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in BALB/c mice were investigated. Results showed that B. bifidum can significantly improve the ecosystem of the GI tract by increasing the amount of probiotics and reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria, as measured by plate count and real-time PCR. After exposure to simulated GI tract conditions, the growth of gut microflora in the B. bifidum group was higher than that in the control group when incubated for 12 h in MRS or nutrient broth adjusted to pH 2.0 or 3.0 or in the presence of a concentration of bile salt (0.45% m/v). The blood biochemical index was examined, and the physiological effect of the cell-free extract of gut microflora was evaluated by measuring the activity of various enzymes, including α-glucosidases, esterase, and lactate dehydrogenase. This study suggested that a B. bifidum strain can stabilize blood sugar, lower cholesterol levels in serum, and improve metabolic activity. Moreover, B. bifidum was a promising enhancer of microbial diversity in mouse intestine and played a vital role in human physiological processes, which can benefit the health of a host. PMID:25630400

  3. Oral administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum for modulating microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Xu, Hai-Bo; Wei, Hua; Zeng, Zhe-Ling; Xu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacteria are generally acknowledged as major gut microflora used as probiotics, which promote human health. In this study, the effects of the administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum on modulating gastrointestinal (GI) tract microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in BALB/c mice were investigated. Results showed that B. bifidum can significantly improve the ecosystem of the GI tract by increasing the amount of probiotics and reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria, as measured by plate count and real-time PCR. After exposure to simulated GI tract conditions, the growth of gut microflora in the B. bifidum group was higher than that in the control group when incubated for 12 h in MRS or nutrient broth adjusted to pH 2.0 or 3.0 or in the presence of a concentration of bile salt (0.45% m/v). The blood biochemical index was examined, and the physiological effect of the cell-free extract of gut microflora was evaluated by measuring the activity of various enzymes, including α-glucosidases, esterase, and lactate dehydrogenase. This study suggested that a B. bifidum strain can stabilize blood sugar, lower cholesterol levels in serum, and improve metabolic activity. Moreover, B. bifidum was a promising enhancer of microbial diversity in mouse intestine and played a vital role in human physiological processes, which can benefit the health of a host.

  4. Bifidobacterium reuteri sp. nov., Bifidobacterium callitrichos sp. nov., Bifidobacterium saguini sp. nov., Bifidobacterium stellenboschense sp. nov. and Bifidobacterium biavatii sp. nov. isolated from faeces of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) and red-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas).

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Futagawa-Endo, Yuka; Schumann, Peter; Pukall, Rüdiger; Dicks, Leon M T

    2012-03-01

    Five strains of bifidobacteria were isolated from faeces of a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) and a red-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas). The five isolates clustered inside the phylogenetic group of the genus Bifidobacterium but did not show high sequence similarities between the isolates and to known species in the genus by phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Sequence analyses of dnaJ1 and hsp60 also indicated their independent phylogenetic positions to each other in the Bifidobacterium cluster. DNA G+C contents of the species ranged from 57.3 to 66.3 mol%, which is within the values recorded for Bifidobacterium species. All isolates showed fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase activity. Based on the data provided, the five isolates represent five novel species, for which the names Bifidobacterium reuteri sp. nov. (type strain: AFB22-1(T) = JCM 17295(T) = DSM 23975(T)), Bifidobacterium callitrichos sp. nov. (type strain: AFB22-5(T) = JCM 17296(T) = DSM 23973(T)), Bifidobacterium saguini sp. nov. (type strain: AFB23-1(T) = JCM 17297(T) = DSM 23967(T)), Bifidobacterium stellenboschense sp. nov. (type strain: AFB23-3(T) = JCM 17298(T) = DSM 23968(T)) and Bifidobacterium biavatii sp. nov. (type strain: AFB23-4(T) = JCM 17299(T) = DSM 23969(T)) are proposed. PMID:22225994

  5. The Differential Proteome of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM Grown on the Potential Prebiotic Cellobiose Shows Upregulation of Two β-Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    van Zanten, Gabriella C.; Sparding, Nadja; Majumder, Avishek; Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Svensson, Birte; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics, prebiotics, and combinations thereof, that is, synbiotics, are known to exert beneficial health effects in humans; however interactions between pro- and prebiotics remain poorly understood at the molecular level. The present study describes changes in abundance of different proteins of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) when grown on the potential prebiotic cellobiose as compared to glucose. Cytosolic cell extract proteomes after harvest at late exponential phase of NCFM grown on cellobiose or glucose were analyzed by two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) in the acidic (pH 4–7) and the alkaline (pH 6–11) regions showing a total of 136 spots to change in abundance. Proteins were identified by MS or MS/MS from 81 of these spots representing 49 unique proteins and either increasing 1.5–13.9-fold or decreasing 1.5–7.8-fold in relative abundance. Many of these proteins were associated with energy metabolism, including the cellobiose related glycoside hydrolases phospho-β-glucosidase (LBA0881) and phospho-β-galactosidase II (LBA0726). The data provide insight into the utilization of the candidate prebiotic cellobiose by the probiotic bacterium NCFM. Several of the upregulated or downregulated identified proteins associated with utilization of cellobiose indicate the presence of carbon catabolite repression and regulation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:25961012

  6. Evaluation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM encapsulated using a novel impinging aerosol method in fruit food products.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Asma; Turner, Mark S; Prabawati, Elisabeth Kartika; Coombes, Allan G A; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of microencapsulation on the survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and their acidification in orange juice at 25°C for nine days and at 4°C over thirty five days of storage. Alginate micro beads (10-40 μm) containing the probiotics were produced by a novel dual aerosol method of alginate and CaCl(2) cross linking solution. Unencapsulated L. rhamnosus GG was found to have excellent survivability in orange juice at both temperatures. However unencapsulated L. acidophilus NCFM showed significant reduction in viability. Encapsulation of these two bacteria did not significantly enhance survivability but did reduce acidification at 25°C and 4°C. In agreement with this, encapsulation of L. rhamnosus GG also reduced acidification in pear and peach fruit-based foods at 25°C, however at 4°C difference in pH was insignificant between free and encapsulated cells. In conclusion, L. rhamnosus GG showed excellent survival in orange juice and microencapsulation has potential in reducing acidification and possible negative sensory effects of probiotics in orange juice and other fruit-based products.

  7. Novel phytases from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697.

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Sanz-Penella, Juan Mario; Yebra, María J; Monedero, Vicente; Haros, Monika

    2012-07-01

    Two novel phytases have been characterized from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The enzymes belong to a new subclass within the histidine acid phytases, are highly specific for the hydrolysis of phytate, and render myo-inositol triphosphate as the final hydrolysis product. They represent the first phytases characterized from this group of probiotic microorganisms, opening the possibilities for their use in the processing of high-phytate-content foods.

  8. Novel Phytases from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Sanz-Penella, Juan Mario; Yebra, María J.

    2012-01-01

    Two novel phytases have been characterized from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The enzymes belong to a new subclass within the histidine acid phytases, are highly specific for the hydrolysis of phytate, and render myo-inositol triphosphate as the final hydrolysis product. They represent the first phytases characterized from this group of probiotic microorganisms, opening the possibilities for their use in the processing of high-phytate-content foods. PMID:22582052

  9. AcmB Is an S-Layer-Associated β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase and Functional Autolysin in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brant R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autolysins, also known as peptidoglycan hydrolases, are enzymes that hydrolyze specific bonds within bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan during cell division and daughter cell separation. Within the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, there are 11 genes encoding proteins with peptidoglycan hydrolase catalytic domains, 9 of which are predicted to be functional. Notably, 5 of the 9 putative autolysins in L. acidophilus NCFM are S-layer-associated proteins (SLAPs) noncovalently colocalized along with the surface (S)-layer at the cell surface. One of these SLAPs, AcmB, a β-N-acetylglucosaminidase encoded by the gene lba0176 (acmB), was selected for functional analysis. In silico analysis revealed that acmB orthologs are found exclusively in S-layer- forming species of Lactobacillus. Chromosomal deletion of acmB resulted in aberrant cell division, autolysis, and autoaggregation. Complementation of acmB in the ΔacmB mutant restored the wild-type phenotype, confirming the role of this SLAP in cell division. The absence of AcmB within the exoproteome had a pleiotropic effect on the extracellular proteins covalently and noncovalently bound to the peptidoglycan, which likely led to the observed decrease in the binding capacity of the ΔacmB strain for mucin and extracellular matrices fibronectin, laminin, and collagen in vitro. These data suggest a functional association between the S-layer and the multiple autolysins noncovalently colocalized at the cell surface of L. acidophilus NCFM and other S-layer-producing Lactobacillus species. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus acidophilus is one of the most widely used probiotic microbes incorporated in many dairy foods and dietary supplements. This organism produces a surface (S)-layer, which is a self-assembling crystalline array found as the outermost layer of the cell wall. The S-layer, along with colocalized associated proteins, is an important mediator of probiotic activity through intestinal adhesion and modulation of

  10. Short- and long-term dynamics in the intestinal microbiota following ingestion of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Yoshiyuki; TAKAMI, Kazuyo; NISHIJIMA, Tomohiko; AOKI, Ryo; MAWATARI, Takashi; IKEDA, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26594607

  11. Short- and long-term dynamics in the intestinal microbiota following ingestion of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Takami, Kazuyo; Nishijima, Tomohiko; Aoki, Ryo; Mawatari, Takashi; Ikeda, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26594607

  12. Crystal structure of α-galactosidase from Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM: insight into tetramer formation and substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Fredslund, Folmer; Hachem, Maher Abou; Larsen, René Jonsgaard; Sørensen, Pernille Gerd; Coutinho, Pedro M; Lo Leggio, Leila; Svensson, Birte

    2011-09-23

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic bacterium known for its beneficial effects on human health. The importance of α-galactosidases (α-Gals) for growth of probiotic organisms on oligosaccharides of the raffinose family present in many foods is increasingly recognized. Here, the crystal structure of α-Gal from L. acidophilus NCFM (LaMel36A) of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 36 (GH36) is determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. In addition, a 1.58-Å-resolution crystallographic complex with α-d-galactose at substrate binding subsite -1 was determined. LaMel36A has a large N-terminal twisted β-sandwich domain, connected by a long α-helix to the catalytic (β/α)(8)-barrel domain, and a C-terminal β-sheet domain. Four identical monomers form a tightly packed tetramer where three monomers contribute to the structural integrity of the active site in each monomer. Structural comparison of LaMel36A with the monomeric Thermotoga maritima α-Gal (TmGal36A) reveals that O2 of α-d-galactose in LaMel36A interacts with a backbone nitrogen in a glycine-rich loop of the catalytic domain, whereas the corresponding atom in TmGal36A is from a tryptophan side chain belonging to the N-terminal domain. Thus, two distinctly different structural motifs participate in substrate recognition. The tetrameric LaMel36A furthermore has a much deeper active site than the monomeric TmGal36A, which possibly modulates substrate specificity. Sequence analysis of GH36, inspired by the observed structural differences, results in four distinct subgroups having clearly different active-site sequence motifs. This novel subdivision incorporates functional and architectural features and may aid further biochemical and structural analyses within GH36.

  13. Survival of free and microencapsulated Bifidobacterium: effect of honey addition.

    PubMed

    Favarin, Luciana; Laureano-Melo, Roberto; Luchese, Rosa Helena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of honey addition on the viability of free and emulsion encapsulated cells of two strains of Bifidobacterium that underwent simulation of human upper gastrointestinal transit. In the control condition, without honey, free cells were drastically reduced after exposure to gastrointestinal conditions. The reduction was more pronounced with Bifidobacterium J7 of human origin. On the other hand, when cells were encapsulated, the viability reduction was higher for strain Bifidobacterium Bb12. The microencapsulation improved the viability maintenance of both Bifidobacterium strains, in recommended amounts for probiotic activity, after exposure to simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Moreover, suspending free cells of both Bifidobacterium strains in honey solutions resulted in a protective effect, equivalent to the plain microencapsulation with sodium alginate 3%. It is concluded that microencapsulation and the addition of honey improved the ability of Bifidobacterium to tolerate gastrointestinal conditions in vitro. PMID:25775038

  14. Gut microbiota analysis reveals a marked shift to bifidobacteria by a starter infant formula containing a synbiotic of bovine milk-derived oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CNCM I-3446.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Umberto; Berger, Bernard; Junick, Jana; Blaut, Michael; Pecquet, Sophie; Rezzonico, Enea; Grathwohl, Dominik; Sprenger, Norbert; Brüssow, Harald; Szajewska, Hania; Bartoli, J-M; Brevaut-Malaty, V; Borszewska-Kornacka, M; Feleszko, W; François, P; Gire, C; Leclaire, M; Maurin, J-M; Schmidt, S; Skórka, A; Squizzaro, C; Verdot, J-J

    2016-07-01

    Non-digestible milk oligosaccharides were proposed as receptor decoys for pathogens and as nutrients for beneficial gut commensals like bifidobacteria. Bovine milk contains oligosaccharides, some of which are structurally identical or similar to those found in human milk. In a controlled, randomized double-blinded clinical trial we tested the effect of feeding a formula supplemented with a mixture of bovine milk-derived oligosaccharides (BMOS) generated from whey permeate, containing galacto-oligosaccharides and 3'- and 6'-sialyllactose, and the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain CNCM I-3446. Breastfed infants served as reference group. Compared with a non-supplemented control formula, the test formula showed a similar tolerability and supported a similar growth in healthy newborns followed for 12 weeks. The control, but not the test group, differed from the breast-fed reference group by a higher faecal pH and a significantly higher diversity of the faecal microbiota. In the test group the probiotic B. lactis increased by 100-fold in the stool and was detected in all supplemented infants. BMOS stimulated a marked shift to a bifidobacterium-dominated faecal microbiota via increases in endogenous bifidobacteria (B. longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. pseudocatenulatum). PMID:26626365

  15. Gut microbiota analysis reveals a marked shift to bifidobacteria by a starter infant formula containing a synbiotic of bovine milk-derived oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CNCM I-3446.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Umberto; Berger, Bernard; Junick, Jana; Blaut, Michael; Pecquet, Sophie; Rezzonico, Enea; Grathwohl, Dominik; Sprenger, Norbert; Brüssow, Harald; Szajewska, Hania; Bartoli, J-M; Brevaut-Malaty, V; Borszewska-Kornacka, M; Feleszko, W; François, P; Gire, C; Leclaire, M; Maurin, J-M; Schmidt, S; Skórka, A; Squizzaro, C; Verdot, J-J

    2016-07-01

    Non-digestible milk oligosaccharides were proposed as receptor decoys for pathogens and as nutrients for beneficial gut commensals like bifidobacteria. Bovine milk contains oligosaccharides, some of which are structurally identical or similar to those found in human milk. In a controlled, randomized double-blinded clinical trial we tested the effect of feeding a formula supplemented with a mixture of bovine milk-derived oligosaccharides (BMOS) generated from whey permeate, containing galacto-oligosaccharides and 3'- and 6'-sialyllactose, and the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain CNCM I-3446. Breastfed infants served as reference group. Compared with a non-supplemented control formula, the test formula showed a similar tolerability and supported a similar growth in healthy newborns followed for 12 weeks. The control, but not the test group, differed from the breast-fed reference group by a higher faecal pH and a significantly higher diversity of the faecal microbiota. In the test group the probiotic B. lactis increased by 100-fold in the stool and was detected in all supplemented infants. BMOS stimulated a marked shift to a bifidobacterium-dominated faecal microbiota via increases in endogenous bifidobacteria (B. longum, B. breve, B. bifidum, B. pseudocatenulatum).

  16. Selective medium for isolation and enumeration of Bifidobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoa, F J; Pares, R

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed for the isolation and enumeration of Bifidobacterium spp. from natural aquatic environments. The method was based on the utilization of a new medium, Bifidobacterium iodoacetate medium 25, and resuscitation techniques were used to isolate injured bifidobacteria. The new medium was tested with a nonselective reference medium on sewage and sewage-polluted surface waters. Relatively little colonial growth of any other bacterial genera occurred; when such colonies did grow, Bifidobacterium could be easily differentiated by its colonial morphology or, after Gram staining, by its typical bifidobacterial morphology. PMID:3415235

  17. Hypocholesterolaemic effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum G4 or Bifidobacterium longum BB536.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheraji, Sadeq Hasan; Ismail, Amin; Manap, Mohd Yazid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Yusof, Rokiah Mohd; Hassan, Fouad Abdulrahman

    2012-11-15

    The effect of a yoghurt supplement containing Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum G4 or Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on plasma lipids, lipid peroxidation and the faecal excretion of bile acids was examined in rats fed a cholesterol-enriched diet. After 8 weeks, the rats in the positive control (PC) group who were fed the cholesterol-enriched diet showed significant increases in plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA). However, groups fed a cholesterol-enriched diet supplemented with yoghurt containing B. pseudocatenulatum G4 or B. longum BB536 had significantly lower plasma TC, LDL-C, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, and MDA than had the PC group after 8 weeks of treatment. In addition, faecal excretion of bile acids was markedly increased in the rats fed the yoghurt containing B. pseudocatenulatum G4 or B. longum BB536 as compared to the PC and NC groups.

  18. Long-term changes in human colonic Bifidobacterium populations induced by a 5-day oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Irène; Lévêque, Christophe; Magne, Fabien; Suau, Antonia; Pochart, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible modifications due to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) treatment on total bacteria and on Bifidobacterium species balance in human colonic microbiota. Eighteen healthy volunteers (19 to 36 years old) were given a 875/125 mg dose of AMC twice a day for 5 days. Fecal samples were obtained before and after antibiotic exposure. After total DNA extraction, total bacteria and bifidobacteria were specifically quantified using real-time PCR. Dominant species were monitored over time using bacterial and bifidobacterial Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE). At the end of AMC exposure, total bacterial concentrations as well as bifidobacteria concentrations were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure:10.7±0.1 log(10) 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 11.1±0.1 log(10) (p = 0.003) and 8.1±0.5 log(10) 16S rRNA gene copies/g vs 9.4±0.3 log(10) (p = 0.003), respectively. At the same time, the mean similarity percentages of TTGE bacteria and TTGE bifidobacteria profiles were significantly reduced compared to before AMC exposure: 51.6%±3.5% vs 81.4%±2.1% and 55.8%±7.6% vs 84.5%±4.1%, respectively. Occurrence of B. adolescentis, B. bifidum and B. pseudocatenulatum/B. catenulatum species significantly decreased. Occurrence of B. longum remained stable. Moreover, the number of distinct Bifidobacterium species per sample significantly decreased (1.5±0.3 vs 2.3±0.3; p = 0.01). Two months after AMC exposure, the mean similarity percentage of TTGE profiles was 55.6% for bacteria and 62.3% for bifidobacteria. These results clearly demonstrated that a common antibiotic treatment may qualitatively alter the colonic microbiota. Such modifications may have potential long-term physiological consequences.

  19. Bile resistance mechanisms in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Most of the probiotic bacteria currently available in the market belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and specific health-promoting activities, such as treatment of diarrhea or amelioration of gastrointestinal discomfort, have been attributed to them. In order to be able to survive the gastrointestinal transit and transiently colonize our gut, these bacteria must be able to counteract the deleterious action of bile salts, which are the main components of bile. Bile salts are detergent-like biological substances synthesized in the liver from cholesterol. Host enzymes conjugate the newly synthesized free bile acids in the liver with the amino acids glycine or taurine, generating conjugated bile salts. These compounds are stored in the gall bladder and they are released into the duodenum during digestion to perform their physiological function, which is the solubilization of fat coming from diet. These bile salts possess strong antimicrobial activity, since they are able to disorganize the structure of the cell membrane, as well as trigger DNA damage. This means that bacteria inhabiting our intestinal tract must have intrinsic resistance mechanisms to cope with bile salts. To do that, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium display a variety of proteins devoted to the efflux of bile salts or protons, to modify sugar metabolism or to prevent protein misfolding. In this manuscript, we review and discuss specific bile resistance mechanisms, as well as the processes responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to bile. PMID:24399996

  20. Directed chromosomal integration and expression of the reporter gene gusA3 in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Grace L; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-10-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a probiotic microbe that survives passage through the human gastrointestinal tract and interacts with the host epithelium and mucosal immune cells. The potential for L. acidophilus to express antigens at mucosal surfaces has been investigated with various antigens and plasmid expression vectors. Plasmid instability and antibiotic selection complicate the possibility of testing these constructs in human clinical trials. Integrating antigen encoding genes into the chromosome for expression is expected to eliminate selection requirements and provide genetic stability. In this work, a reporter gene encoding a β-glucuronidase (GusA3) was integrated into four intergenic chromosomal locations. The integrants were tested for genetic stability and GusA3 activity. Two locations were selected for insertion downstream of constitutively highly expressed genes, one downstream of slpA (LBA0169), encoding a highly expressed surface-layer protein, and one downstream of phosphopyruvate hydratase (LBA0889), a highly expressed gene with homologs in other lactic acid bacteria. An inducible location was selected downstream of lacZ (LBA1462), encoding a β-galactosidase. A fourth location was selected in a low-expression region. The expression of gusA3 was evaluated from each location by measuring GusA3 activity on 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide (MUG). GusA3 activity from both highly expressed loci was more than three logs higher than the gusA3-negative parent, L. acidophilus NCK1909. GusA3 activity from the lacZ locus was one log higher in cells grown in lactose than in glucose. The differences in expression levels between integration locations highlights the importance of rational targeting with gene cassettes intended for chromosomal expression.

  1. Occurrence of Bifidobacterium in the intestine of newborns by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Bezirtzoglou, E; Maipa, V; Chotoura, N; Apazidou, E; Tsiotsias, A; Voidarou, C; Kostakis, D; Alexopoulos, A

    2006-11-01

    Colonization by Bifidobacterium occurs generally within 4 days of life. The new method FISH has been applied for molecular detection of Bifidobacteria. The study was carried out on 26 healthy newborns delivered by vaginal delivery. Breast-fed infants harbor a gastrointestinal flora characterized by an increased concentration of Bifidobacterium cells (by a factor of 1.75). In artificial alimentation, some infants either did not harbor any Bifidobacterium or showed lower numbers of Bifidobacterium. Moreover, male newborns show higher numbers of Bifidobacterium, but in both sexes the predominance of Bifidobacterium is evident after maternal alimentation. PMID:17034855

  2. Bifidobacterium myosotis sp. nov., Bifidobacterium tissieri sp. nov. and Bifidobacterium hapali sp. nov., isolated from faeces of baby common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus L.).

    PubMed

    Michelini, Samanta; Oki, Kaihei; Yanokura, Emiko; Shimakawa, Yasuhisa; Modesto, Monica; Mattarelli, Paola; Biavati, Bruno; Watanabe, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study on bifidobacterial distribution in New World monkeys, six strains belonging to the Bifidobacteriaceae were isolated from faecal samples of baby common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus L.). All the isolates were Gram-positive-staining, anaerobic, asporogenous and fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed relatively low levels of similarity (maximum identity 96 %) to members of the genus Bifidobacterium, and placed the isolates in three independent clusters: strains of cluster I (MRM_5.9T and MRM_5.10) and cluster III (MRM_5.18T and MRM_9.02) respectively showed 96.4 and 96.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Bifidobacterium callitrichos DSM 23973T, while strains of cluster II (MRM_8.14T and MRM_9.14) showed 95.4 % similarity to Bifidobacterium stellenboschense DSM 23968T. Phylogenetic analysis of partial hsp60 and clpC gene sequences supported an independent phylogenetic position of each cluster from each other and from the related type strains B. callitrichos DSM 23973T and B. stellenboschense DSM 23968T. Clusters I, II and III respectively showed DNA G+C contents of 64.9-65.1, 56.4-56.7 and 63.1-63.7 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of MRM_5.9T were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9c dimethylacetal, while C16 : 0 was prominent in strains MRM_5.18T and MRM_8.14T, followed by C18 : 1ω9c and C14 : 0. Biochemical profiles and growth parameters were recorded for all the isolates. Based on the data provided, the clusters represent three novel species, for which the names Bifidobacterium myosotis sp. nov. (type strain MRM_5.9T = DSM 100196T = JCM 30796T), Bifidobacterium hapali sp. nov. (type strain MRM_8.14T = DSM 100202T = JCM 30799T) and Bifidobacterium tissieri sp. nov. (type strain MRM_5.18T = DSM 100201T = JCM 30798T) are proposed. PMID:26515885

  3. Bifidobacterium aerophilum sp. nov., Bifidobacterium avesanii sp. nov. and Bifidobacterium ramosum sp. nov.: Three novel taxa from the faeces of cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus L.).

    PubMed

    Michelini, Samanta; Modesto, Monica; Filippini, Gianfranco; Spiezio, Caterina; Sandri, Camillo; Biavati, Bruno; Pisi, Annamaria; Mattarelli, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Forty-five microorganisms were isolated on bifidobacteria selective medium from one faecal sample of an adult subject of the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus L.). All isolates were Gram-positive, catalase-negative, anaerobic, fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase positive, and asporogenous rod-shaped bacteria. In this study, only eight out of the forty-five strains were characterized more deeply, whereas the others are still currently under investigation. They were grouped by BOX-PCR into three clusters: Cluster I (TRE 17(T), TRE 7, TRE 26, TRE 32, TRE 33, TRE I), Cluster II (TRE C(T)), and Cluster III (TRE M(T)). Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed the results from the cluster analysis and revealed relatively low level similarities to each other (mean value 95%) and to members of the genus Bifidobacterium. All eight isolates showed the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Bifidobacterium scardovii DSM 13734(T) (mean value 96.6%). Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of five housekeeping genes (hsp60, rpoB, clpC, dnaJ and dnaG) supported their independent phylogenetic position to each other and to related species of Bifidobacterium. The G+C contents were 63.2%, 65.9% and 63.0% for Cluster I, Cluster II and Cluster III, respectively. Peptidoglycan types were A3α l-Lys-l-Thr-l-Ala, A4β l-Orn (Lys)-d-Ser-d-Glu and A3β l-Orn-l-Ser-l-Ala in Clusters I, II and III, respectively. Based on the data provided, each cluster represented a novel taxon for which the names Bifidobacterium aerophilum sp. nov. (TRE 17(T)=DSM 100689=JCM 30941; TRE 26=DSM 100690=JCM 30942), Bifidobacterium avesanii sp. nov. (TRE C(T)=DSM 100685=JCM 30943) and Bifidobacterium ramosum sp. nov. (TRE M=DSM 100688=JCM 30944) are proposed.

  4. Bifidobacterium longum bacteremia in preterm infants receiving probiotics.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Claire; Pillonel, Trestan; Torregrossa, Anaïs; Prod'hom, Guy; Fischer, Céline Julie; Greub, Gilbert; Giannoni, Eric

    2015-03-15

    Administration of probiotics to premature newborns has been shown to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis and reduce all-cause mortality. In our hospital, we documented 2 cases of Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis bacteremia in newborns receiving probiotics. By comparative genomics, we confirmed that the strains isolated from each patient originated from the probiotics.

  5. Genomic encyclopedia of type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; Bottacini, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Sanchez, Borja; Viappiani, Alice; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Taminiau, Bernard; Delcenserie, Véronique; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Bifidobacteria represent one of the dominant microbial groups that are present in the gut of various animals, being particularly prevalent during the suckling stage of life of humans and other mammals. However, the overall genome structure of this group of microorganisms remains largely unexplored. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 42 representative (sub)species across the Bifidobacterium genus and used this information to explore the overall genetic picture of this bacterial group. Furthermore, the genomic data described here were used to reconstruct the evolutionary development of the Bifidobacterium genus. This reconstruction suggests that its evolution was substantially influenced by genetic adaptations to obtain access to glycans, thereby representing a common and potent evolutionary force in shaping bifidobacterial genomes.

  6. Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains of the Genus Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; Bottacini, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Sanchez, Borja; Viappiani, Alice; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Taminiau, Bernard; Delcenserie, Véronique; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria represent one of the dominant microbial groups that are present in the gut of various animals, being particularly prevalent during the suckling stage of life of humans and other mammals. However, the overall genome structure of this group of microorganisms remains largely unexplored. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 42 representative (sub)species across the Bifidobacterium genus and used this information to explore the overall genetic picture of this bacterial group. Furthermore, the genomic data described here were used to reconstruct the evolutionary development of the Bifidobacterium genus. This reconstruction suggests that its evolution was substantially influenced by genetic adaptations to obtain access to glycans, thereby representing a common and potent evolutionary force in shaping bifidobacterial genomes. PMID:25085493

  7. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  8. Utilization of galactooligosaccharides by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Jimenez-Espinoza, Rogelio; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Block, David E.; Mills, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible substrates that stimulate the growth of beneficial microbial populations in the intestine, especially Bifidobacterium species. Among them, fructo- and galacto-oligosaccharides are commonly used in the food industry, especially as a supplement for infant formulas. Mechanistic details on the enrichment of bifidobacteria by these prebiotics are important to understand the effects of these dietary interventions. In this study the consumption of galactooligosaccharides was studied for 22 isolates of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, one of the most representative species in the infant gut microbiota. In general all isolates showed a vigorous growth on these oligosaccharides, but consumption of larger galactooligosaccharides was variable. Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 15697 has five genes encoding β-galactosidases, and three of them were induced during bacterial growth on commercial galactooligosaccharides. Recombinant β-galactosidases from B. infantis ATCC 15697 displayed different preferences for β-galactosides such as 4′ and 6′-galactobiose, and four β-galactosidases in this strain released monosaccharides from galactooligosaccharides. Finally, we determined the amounts of short chain fatty acids produced by strain ATCC 15697 after growth on different prebiotics. We observed that biomass and product yields of substrate were higher for lactose and galactooligosaccharides, but the amount of acids produced per cell was larger after growth on human milk oligosaccharides. These results provide a molecular basis for galactooligosaccharide consumption in B. infantis, and also represent evidence for physiological differences in the metabolism of prebiotics that might have a differential impact on the host. PMID:23200660

  9. Oral inoculation of probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM suppresses tumour growth both in segmental orthotopic colon cancer and extra-intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Wei-Chuan; Kong, Man-Shan; Shi, Hai Ning; Walker, W Allan; Lin, Chun-Yen; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Yung-Chang; Jung, Shih-Ming; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2012-06-01

    Modulation of the cellular response by the administration of probiotic bacteria may be an effective strategy for preventing or inhibiting tumour growth. We orally pre-inoculated mice with probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (La) for 14 d. Subcutaneous dorsal-flank tumours and segmental orthotopic colon cancers were implanted into mice using CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinoma cells. On day 28 after tumour initiation, the lamina propria of the colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and spleen were harvested and purified for flow cytometry and mRNA analyses. We demonstrated that La pre-inoculation reduced tumour volume growth by 50·3 %, compared with untreated mice at 28 d after tumour implants (2465·5 (SEM 1290·4) v. 4950·9 (SEM 1689·3) mm³, P<0·001). Inoculation with La reduced the severity of colonic carcinogenesis caused by CT-26 cells, such as level of colonic involvement and structural abnormality of epithelial/crypt damage. Moreover, La enhanced apoptosis of CT-26 cells both in dorsal-flank tumour and segmental orthotopic colon cancer, and the mean counts of apoptotic body were higher in mice pre-inoculated with La (P<0·05) compared with untreated mice. La pre-inoculation down-regulated the CXCR4 mRNA expressions in the colon, MLN and extra-intestinal tissue, compared with untreated mice (P<0·05). In addition, La pre-inoculation reduced the mean fluorescence index of MHC class I (H-2Dd, -Kd and -Ld) in flow cytometry analysis. Taken together, these findings suggest that probiotics La may play a role in attenuating tumour growth during CT-26 cell carcinogenesis. The down-regulated expression of CXCR4 mRNA and MHC class I, as well as increasing apoptosis in tumour tissue, indicated that La may be associated with modulating the cellular response triggered by colon carcinogenesis. PMID:21992995

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bifidobacterium Genus Using Glycolysis Enzyme Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Katelyn; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract that promote the establishment of a healthy microbial consortium in the gut of infants. Recent studies have established that the Bifidobacterium genus is a polymorphic phylogenetic clade, which encompasses a diversity of species and subspecies that encode a broad range of proteins implicated in complex and non-digestible carbohydrate uptake and catabolism, ranging from human breast milk oligosaccharides, to plant fibers. Recent genomic studies have created a need to properly place Bifidobacterium species in a phylogenetic tree. Current approaches, based on core-genome analyses come at the cost of intensive sequencing and demanding analytical processes. Here, we propose a typing method based on sequences of glycolysis genes and the proteins they encode, to provide insights into diversity, typing, and phylogeny in this complex and broad genus. We show that glycolysis genes occur broadly in these genomes, to encode the machinery necessary for the biochemical spine of the cell, and provide a robust phylogenetic marker. Furthermore, glycolytic sequences-based trees are congruent with both the classical 16S rRNA phylogeny, and core genome-based strain clustering. Furthermore, these glycolysis markers can also be used to provide insights into the adaptive evolution of this genus, especially with regards to trends toward a high GC content. This streamlined method may open new avenues for phylogenetic studies on a broad scale, given the widespread occurrence of the glycolysis pathway in bacteria, and the diversity of the sequences they encode. PMID:27242688

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bifidobacterium Genus Using Glycolysis Enzyme Sequences.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Katelyn; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract that promote the establishment of a healthy microbial consortium in the gut of infants. Recent studies have established that the Bifidobacterium genus is a polymorphic phylogenetic clade, which encompasses a diversity of species and subspecies that encode a broad range of proteins implicated in complex and non-digestible carbohydrate uptake and catabolism, ranging from human breast milk oligosaccharides, to plant fibers. Recent genomic studies have created a need to properly place Bifidobacterium species in a phylogenetic tree. Current approaches, based on core-genome analyses come at the cost of intensive sequencing and demanding analytical processes. Here, we propose a typing method based on sequences of glycolysis genes and the proteins they encode, to provide insights into diversity, typing, and phylogeny in this complex and broad genus. We show that glycolysis genes occur broadly in these genomes, to encode the machinery necessary for the biochemical spine of the cell, and provide a robust phylogenetic marker. Furthermore, glycolytic sequences-based trees are congruent with both the classical 16S rRNA phylogeny, and core genome-based strain clustering. Furthermore, these glycolysis markers can also be used to provide insights into the adaptive evolution of this genus, especially with regards to trends toward a high GC content. This streamlined method may open new avenues for phylogenetic studies on a broad scale, given the widespread occurrence of the glycolysis pathway in bacteria, and the diversity of the sequences they encode. PMID:27242688

  12. Characterization of fructose 6 phosphate phosphoketolases purified from Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Grill, J P; Crociani, J; Ballongue, J

    1995-07-01

    Fructose 6 phosphate phosphoketolases (F6PPKs) were purified from Bifidobacterium longum BB536, B. dentium ATCC 27534, B. globosum ATCC 25864, and Bifidobacterium animalis ATCC 25527. Concerning ions (Cu++, Zn++, Ca++, Mg++, Fe++, Co++, Mn++) and common enzyme inhibitors (fructose, ammonium sulfate, iodoacetate, and parachloromercuribenzoic acid), no difference appeared between the enzymes. Cu++, parachloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB), and mercuric acetate induced high enzymatic inhibition. The study of pCMB demonstrated a noncompetitive inhibition. Additional results showed that the sulfhydryl group was not involved in catalytic reaction. Photooxidation experiments and determination of ionizable group pKas (5.16-7.17) suggested the presence of one or more histidines necessary for the catalytic reaction and explained the inhibition observed with pCMB. In light of the noncompetitive inhibition, this group was not directly involved in substrate binding. Determination of Km demonstrated that the affinities for fructose 6 phosphate in the case of animal and human origin strains were close. In addition, the same enzymatic efficiency (Kcat/Km) was obtained for each strain. The F6PPK activity was regulated by sodium pyrophosphate, ATP, and especially by ADP.

  13. Emulsifying, rheological and physicochemical properties of exopolysaccharide produced by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 and Bifidobacterium infantis NCIMB 702205.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, P H P; Bell, A; Grandison, A S; Charalampopoulos, D

    2012-09-01

    The rheological, emulsification and certain physicochemical properties of purified exopolysaccharides (EPS) of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 and Bifidobacterium infantis NCIMB 702205 were studied and compared with those of guar gum and xanthan gum. The two strains were grown in skim milk supplemented with 1.5% (w/v) casein hydrolysate at 37 °C for 24h; they both produced heteropolysaccharides with different molecular mass and composition. The carbohydrate content of both polymers was more than 92% and no protein was detected. The EPS of B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 showed highly branched entangled porous structure under scanning electron microscopy. Higher intrinsic viscosity was observed for the EPS of B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 compared to the EPS of B. infantis NCIMB 702205 and guar gum. Both polymers showed pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid behaviour in an aqueous solution. The EPS of B. infantis NCIMB 702205 and B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 produced more stable emulsions with orange oil, sunflower seed oil, coconut oil and xylene compared to guar and xanthan gum. The EPS of B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 is the most promising one for applications in the food industry, as it had higher intrinsic viscosity, higher apparent viscosity in aqueous solution, porous dense entangled structure and good emulsification activity.

  14. Emulsifying, rheological and physicochemical properties of exopolysaccharide produced by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 and Bifidobacterium infantis NCIMB 702205.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, P H P; Bell, A; Grandison, A S; Charalampopoulos, D

    2012-09-01

    The rheological, emulsification and certain physicochemical properties of purified exopolysaccharides (EPS) of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 and Bifidobacterium infantis NCIMB 702205 were studied and compared with those of guar gum and xanthan gum. The two strains were grown in skim milk supplemented with 1.5% (w/v) casein hydrolysate at 37 °C for 24h; they both produced heteropolysaccharides with different molecular mass and composition. The carbohydrate content of both polymers was more than 92% and no protein was detected. The EPS of B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 showed highly branched entangled porous structure under scanning electron microscopy. Higher intrinsic viscosity was observed for the EPS of B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 compared to the EPS of B. infantis NCIMB 702205 and guar gum. Both polymers showed pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid behaviour in an aqueous solution. The EPS of B. infantis NCIMB 702205 and B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 produced more stable emulsions with orange oil, sunflower seed oil, coconut oil and xylene compared to guar and xanthan gum. The EPS of B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 is the most promising one for applications in the food industry, as it had higher intrinsic viscosity, higher apparent viscosity in aqueous solution, porous dense entangled structure and good emulsification activity. PMID:24751074

  15. Draft genome sequences of two Bifidobacterium sp. from the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide genome sequences for two strains of honey bee associated Bifidobacterium. Reflecting an oxygen-rich niche, both strains possessed catalase, peroxidase, superoxide-dismutase and respiratory chain enzymes indicative of oxidative metabolism. The strains show markedly different carbohydrate ...

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus.

    PubMed

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S; Leyn, Semen A; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Leyn, Semen A.; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics. PMID:26903998

  18. Oral Bifidobacterium longum expressing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone to fight experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pijin; Yang, Yan; Liu, Zhaobing; Huang, Junli; Gong, Yahui; Sun, Hanxiao

    2016-07-01

    The oral delivery of peptides is a highly attractive treatment approach. However, the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract limits its application. Here, we utilize Bifidobacterium as a delivery system to orally deliver a potent anti-inflammatory but short duration peptide alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) against experimental colitis. The aim of our study was to facilitate the efficient oral delivery of α-MSH. We designed a vector of pBDMSH and used it to construct a Bifidobacterium longum expressing α-MSH. We then determined the bioactivity of recombinant Bifidobacterium in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory models of HT-29 cells. Finally, we used Bifidobacterium expressing α-MSH against dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis mice. Results based on the myeloperoxidase activity, the levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 and the histological injury of colon tissue reveal recombinant Bifidobacterium was efficient in attenuating DSS-induced ulcerative colitis, suggesting an alternative way to use Bifidobacterium as a delivery system to deliver α-MSH for DSS-induced ulcerative colitis therapy. PMID:26673899

  19. Yacon flour and Bifidobacterium longum modulate bone health in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fabiana Carvalho; Castro, Adriano Simões Barbosa; Rodrigues, Vívian Carolina; Fernandes, Sérgio Antônio; Fontes, Edimar Aparecida Filomeno; de Oliveira, Tânia Toledo; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; de Luces Fortes Ferreira, Célia Lúcia

    2012-07-01

    Yacon flour has been considered a food with prebiotic potential because of the high levels of fructooligosaccharides, which allows for its use in formulating synbiotic foods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of yacon flour and probiotic (Bifidobacterium longum) on the modulation of variables related to bone health. Thirty-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: control, yacon flour, diet+B. longum, and yacon flour+B. longum. After euthanasia, the bones were removed for analysis of biomechanical properties (thickness, length, and strength of fracture) and mineral content (Ca, Mg, and P); the cecum was removed for analysis of the microbiota and short-chain fatty acids. Tibia Ca, P, and Mg content was significantly (P<.05) higher in groups fed diet+B. longum, yacon flour+B. longum than in the control group. An increase in fracture strength was observed in the yacon flour (8.1%), diet+B. longum (8.6%), and yacon flour+B. longum (14.6%) in comparison to the control group. Total anaerobe and weight of the cecum were higher (P<.05) in rats consuming the yacon flour diet compared with the other groups. Cecal concentration of propionate was higher in all experimental groups compared with the control (P<.05). Yacon flour in combination with B. longum helped increase the concentration of minerals in bones, an important factor in the prevention of diseases such as osteoporosis.

  20. Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis: champion colonizer of the infant gut

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Oligosaccharides are abundant in human milk. Production of these highly diverse structures requires significant energy expenditure by the mother and yet these human milk oligosaccharides offer no direct nutritive value to her infant. A primary function of human milk oligosaccharides is to shape the infant’s intestinal microbiota with life-long consequences. Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis (B. infantis) is unique among gut bacteria in its prodigious capacity to digest and consume any human milk oligosaccharide structure, the result of a large repertoire of bacterial genes encoding an array of glycosidases and oligosaccharide transporters not found in other bacterial species. In vitro, B. infantis grows better than other bacterial strains in the presence of human milk oligosaccharides, displays anti-inflammatory activity in premature intestinal cells, and decreases intestinal permeability. In premature infants, B. infantis given in combination with human milk increases B. infantis and decreases Enterobacteriaceae in the feces. Probiotics containing B. infantis decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants. Colonization with B. infantis is also associated with increased vaccine responses. Probiotic organisms have historically been selected based on ease of production and stability. The advantages of B. infantis, selected through coevolution with human milk glycans, present an opportunity for focused manipulation of the infant intestinal microbiota. PMID:25303277

  1. Transport and metabolism of glucose and arabinose in Bifidobacterium breve.

    PubMed

    Degnan, B A; Macfarlane, G T

    1993-01-01

    Glucose was required for the transport of arabinose into Bifidobacterium breve. The non-metabolisable glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) did not facilitate assimilation of arabinose. Studies using D-[U-14C]-labelled arabinose showed that it was fermented to pyruvate, formate, lactate and acetate, whereas the principal metabolic products of D-[U-14C]-labelled glucose were acetate and formate. In contrast to glucose, arabinose was not incorporated into cellular macromolecules. A variety of metabolic inhibitors and inhibitors of sugar transport (proton ionophores, metal ionophores, compounds associated with electron transport) were used to investigate the mechanisms of sugar uptake. Only NaF, an inhibitor of substrate level phosphorylation, and 2-DG inhibited glucose assimilation. 2-DC had no effect on arabinose uptake, but NaF was stimulatory. High levels of phosphorylation of glucose and 2-DC by PEP and to a lesser degree, ATP were seen in phosphoenolpyruvate: phosphotransferase (PEP:PTS) assays. These data together with strong inhibition of glucose uptake by NaF suggest a role for phosphorylation in the transport process. Arabinose uptake in B. breve was not directly dependent on phosphorylation or any other energy-linked form of transport but may be assimilated by glucose-dependent facilitated diffusion.

  2. Anti-viral Effect of Bifidobacterium adolescentis against Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium adolescentis against noroviruses (NoVs). Murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) used as a surrogate was detected by plaque assay and RT-qPCR. Human NoV virus like particles (VLPs) were detected by cell-binding assay. It was shown that the presence of B. adolescentis could inhibit the multiplication of MNV-1 on RAW 264.7 cells within 48 h of co-incubation period at 37°C. This inhibition did not occur at the viral binding stage, as no difference was observed in MNV-1 genomic copies collected from washed RAW 264.7 cells without and with B. adolescentis after co-incubation for 1 h at room temperature. Meanwhile, the presence of B. adolescentis decreased the binding of human NoV GI.1 VLPs to both Caco-2 cells and HT-29 cells, while no reduction was induced for the binding of human NoV GII.4 VLPs to Caco-2 cells. PMID:27375585

  3. Anti-viral Effect of Bifidobacterium adolescentis against Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium adolescentis against noroviruses (NoVs). Murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) used as a surrogate was detected by plaque assay and RT-qPCR. Human NoV virus like particles (VLPs) were detected by cell-binding assay. It was shown that the presence of B. adolescentis could inhibit the multiplication of MNV-1 on RAW 264.7 cells within 48 h of co-incubation period at 37°C. This inhibition did not occur at the viral binding stage, as no difference was observed in MNV-1 genomic copies collected from washed RAW 264.7 cells without and with B. adolescentis after co-incubation for 1 h at room temperature. Meanwhile, the presence of B. adolescentis decreased the binding of human NoV GI.1 VLPs to both Caco-2 cells and HT-29 cells, while no reduction was induced for the binding of human NoV GII.4 VLPs to Caco-2 cells. PMID:27375585

  4. Qualitative and Semiquantitative Analysis of Fecal Bifidobacterium Species in Centenarians Living in Bama, Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Huang, Guohong; Cai, Da; Li, Danlei; Liang, Xiaolin; Yu, Ting; Shen, Peihong; Su, Haiyan; Liu, Jidong; Gu, Hongcang; Zhao, Mouming; Li, Quanyang

    2015-07-01

    Centenarians constitute a significant subpopulation in the Bama County of Guangxi province in China. The beneficial effects of intestinal microbiota, especially bifidobacteria of centenarians, have been widely accepted; however, knowledge about Bifidobacterium species in centenarians is not adequate. The aim of this study was to investigate the quantity and prevalence of fecal Bifidobacterium in healthy longevous individuals. Fecal samples from eight centenarians from Bama (aged 100 to 108 years), eight younger elderlies from Bama (aged 80 to 99 years), and eight younger elderlies from Nanning (aged 80 to 99 years) were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, species-specific clone library, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction technology (qPCR). A total of eight different Bifidobacterium species were detected. B. dentium, B. longum, B. thermophilum, B. pseudocatenulatum/B. catenulatum, and B. adolescentis were common in fecal of centenarians and young elderly. B. minimum, B. saecularmay/B. pullorum/B. gallinarum, and B. mongoliense were found in centenarians but were absent in the younger elderlies. In addition, Bifidobacterium species found in centenarians were different from those found in Bama young elderly and Nanning young elderly, and the principal differences were the significant increase in the population of B. longum (P < 0.05) and B. dentium (P < 0.05) and the reduction in the frequency of B. adolescentis (P < 0.05), respectively. Centenarians tend to have more complex fecal Bifidobacterium species than young elderlies from different regions.

  5. Diversity of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in feces of herbivores, omnivores and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Futagawa-Endo, Yuka; Dicks, Leon M T

    2010-12-01

    The Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium population in the feces of 26 animals (16 species) were studied by culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques. Lactobacilli were detected from a few herbivores, all carnivores and some omnivores. Lactobacillus johnsonii, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus salivarius, Lactobacillus vaginalis and Lactobacillus ingluviei were the most dominant lactobacilli in carnivores. These species were, however, not predominant in herbivores and omnivores. Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sakei, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, usually present in raw plant material, were present in omnivores but not in carnivores. Bifidobacteria were detected in only four herbivores and two omnivores. Bifidobacterium pseudolongum was the only Bifidobacterium species detected in herbivores. Bifidobacteria detected in the two omnivores are phylogenetically not closely related to known species and are possible novel species in the genus.

  6. Microencapsulation in Alginate and Chitosan Microgels to Enhance Viability of Bifidobacterium longum for Oral Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Timothy W.; Üçok, Elif F.; Tiani, Kendra A.; McClements, David J.; Sela, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are incorporated into a wide variety of foods, supplements, and pharmaceuticals to promote human health and wellness. However, maintaining bacterial cell viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit remains a challenge. Encapsulation of bifidobacteria within food-grade hydrogel particles potentially mitigates their sensitivity to environmental stresses. In this study, Bifidobacterium longum subspecies and strains were encapsulated in core-shell microgels consisting of an alginate core and a microgel shell. Encapsulated obligate anaerobes Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum exhibited differences in viability in a strain-dependent manner, without a discernable relationship to subspecies lineage. This includes viability under aerobic storage conditions and modeled gastrointestinal tract conditions. Coating alginate microgels with chitosan did not improve viability compared to cells encapsulated in alginate microgels alone, suggesting that modifying the surface charge alone does not enhance delivery. Thus hydrogel beads have great potential for improving the stability and efficacy of bifidobacterial probiotics in various nutritional interventions. PMID:27148184

  7. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 Genome Analysis Reveals Clues for Colonization of the Insect Gut

    PubMed Central

    Bottacini, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Sánchez, Borja; Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; Serafini, Fausta; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration. PMID:23028506

  8. Determination of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in breast milk of healthy women by digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Qian, L; Song, H; Cai, W

    2016-09-01

    Breast milk is one of the most important sources of postnatal microbes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is currently used for the quantitative analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in breast milk. However, this method relies on the use of standard curves and is imprecise when quantitating target DNA of low abundance. In contrast, droplet digital PCR (DD-PCR) provides an absolute quantitation without the need for calibration curves. A comparison between DD-PCR and qRT-PCR was conducted for the quantitation of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus 16S RNA genes in human breast milk, and the impacts of selected maternal factors were studied on the composition of these two bacteria in breast milk. From this study, DD-PCR reported between 0-34,460 16S rRNA gene copies of Bifidobacterium genera and between 1,108-634,000 16S rRNA gene copies of Lactobacillus genera in 1 ml breast milk. The 16S rRNA gene copy number of Lactobacillus genera was much greater than that of Bifidobacterium genera in breast milk. DD-PCR showed a 10-fold lower limit of quantitation as compared to qRT-PCR. A higher correlation and agreement was observed between qRT-PCR and DD-PCR in Lactobacillus quantitation as compared to Bifidobacterium quantitation. Based on our DD-PCR quantitation, a low abundance of Bifidobacterium bacteria in breast milk was correlated to higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). However, no significant difference was observed for these two bacteria in breast milk between mothers who had vaginal deliveries and caesarean deliveries. This study suggests that DD-PCR is a better tool to quantitate the bacterial load of breast milk compared to the conventional qRT-PCR method. The number of breast milk Bifidobacterium bacteria is influenced by maternal pre-pregnancy BMI.

  9. Bifidobacterium longum endogalactanase liberates galactotriose from type I galactans.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Sandra W A; Pastink, Marieke I; van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2005-09-01

    A putative endogalactanase gene classified into glycoside hydrolase family 53 was revealed from the genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum strain NCC2705 (Schell et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:14422-14427, 2002). Since only a few endo-acting enzymes from bifidobacteria have been described, we have cloned this gene and characterized the enzyme in detail. The deduced amino acid sequence suggested that this enzyme was located extracellularly and anchored to the cell membrane. galA was cloned without the transmembrane domain into the pBluescript SK(-) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified from the cell extract by anion-exchange and size exclusion chromatography. The purified enzyme had a native molecular mass of 329 kDa, and the subunits had a molecular mass of 94 kDa, which indicated that the enzyme occurred as a tetramer. The optimal pH of endogalactanase activity was 5.0, and the optimal temperature was 37 degrees C, using azurine-cross-linked galactan (AZCL-galactan) as a substrate. The K(m) and V(max) for AZCL-galactan were 1.62 mM and 99 U/mg, respectively. The enzyme was able to liberate galactotrisaccharides from (beta1-->4)galactans and (beta1-->4)galactooligosaccharides, probably by a processive mechanism, moving toward the reducing end of the galactan chain after an initial midchain cleavage. GalA's mode of action was found to be different from that of an endogalactanase from Aspergillus aculeatus. The enzyme seemed to be able to cleave (beta1-->3) linkages. Arabinosyl side chains in, for example, potato galactan hindered GalA.

  10. Role of Calcium Alginate and Mannitol in Protecting Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Mishra, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out to ascertain the mechanism of Ca-alginate and mannitol protection of cell envelope components and secondary proteins of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 weeks of storage at room temperature (25°C) at low water activities (aw) of 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2. Preparation of Ca-alginate and Ca-alginate-mannitol as microencapsulants was carried out by dropping an alginate or alginate-mannitol emulsion containing bacteria using a burette into CaCl2 solution to obtain Ca-alginate beads and Ca-alginate-mannitol beads, respectively. The wet beads were then freeze-dried. The aw of freeze-dried beads was then adjusted to 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 using saturated salt solutions; controls were prepared by keeping Ca-alginate and Ca-alginate-mannitol in aluminum foil without aw adjustment. Mannitol in the Ca-alginate system interacted with cell envelopes during freeze-drying and during storage at low aws. In contrast, Ca-alginate protected cell envelopes after freeze-drying but not during 10-week storage. Unlike Ca-alginate, Ca-alginate-mannitol was effective in retarding the changes in secondary proteins during freeze-drying and during 10 weeks of storage at low aws. It appears that Ca-alginate-mannitol is more effective than Ca-alginate in preserving cell envelopes and proteins after freeze-drying and after 10 weeks of storage at room temperature (25°C). PMID:22843535

  11. Role of calcium alginate and mannitol in protecting Bifidobacterium.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Mishra, Vijay; Shah, Nagendra P

    2012-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was carried out to ascertain the mechanism of Ca-alginate and mannitol protection of cell envelope components and secondary proteins of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 weeks of storage at room temperature (25°C) at low water activities (a(w)) of 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2. Preparation of Ca-alginate and Ca-alginate-mannitol as microencapsulants was carried out by dropping an alginate or alginate-mannitol emulsion containing bacteria using a burette into CaCl(2) solution to obtain Ca-alginate beads and Ca-alginate-mannitol beads, respectively. The wet beads were then freeze-dried. The a(w) of freeze-dried beads was then adjusted to 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2 using saturated salt solutions; controls were prepared by keeping Ca-alginate and Ca-alginate-mannitol in aluminum foil without a(w) adjustment. Mannitol in the Ca-alginate system interacted with cell envelopes during freeze-drying and during storage at low a(w)s. In contrast, Ca-alginate protected cell envelopes after freeze-drying but not during 10-week storage. Unlike Ca-alginate, Ca-alginate-mannitol was effective in retarding the changes in secondary proteins during freeze-drying and during 10 weeks of storage at low a(w)s. It appears that Ca-alginate-mannitol is more effective than Ca-alginate in preserving cell envelopes and proteins after freeze-drying and after 10 weeks of storage at room temperature (25°C). PMID:22843535

  12. Bifidobacterium lemurum sp. nov., from faeces of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Modesto, Monica; Michelini, Samanta; Stefanini, Ilaria; Sandri, Camillo; Spiezio, Caterina; Pisi, Annamaria; Filippini, Gianfranco; Biavati, Bruno; Mattarelli, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Four Gram-positive-staining, microaerophilic, non-spore-forming, fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive bacterial strains were isolated from a faecal sample of a 5-year-old ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The strains showed a peculiar morphology, resembling a small coiled snake, a ring shape, or forming a little 'Y' shape. The isolated strains appeared identical, and LMC 13T was chosen as a representative strain and characterized further. Strain LMC 13T showed an A3β peptidoglycan type, similar to that found in Bifidobacterium longum. The DNA base composition was 57.2 mol% G+C. Almost-complete 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, dnaG, purF, clpC and rpoC gene sequences were obtained, and phylogenetic relationships were determined. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain LMC 13T showed the highest similarity to B. longum subsp. suis ATCC 27533T (96.65 %) and Bifidobacterium saguini DSM 23967T (96.64 %). Strain LMC 13T was located in an actinobacterial cluster and was more closely related to the genus Bifidobacteriumthan to other genera in the Bifidobacteriaceae. On the basis of these results, strain LMC 13T represents a novel species within the genus Bifidobacterium, for which the name Bifidobacterium lemurum sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is LMC 13T ( = DSM 28807T = JCM 30168T).

  13. Bifidobacterium—friend or foe? A case of urinary tract infection with Bifidobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Poonam; Trilligan, Cheryl; Rapose, Alwyn

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium—a commensal of the human intestine is considered non-pathogenic and has been advocated as a probiotic due to its potential beneficial effects. However, there have been case reports implicating bifidobacteria as pathogenic agents in a variety of different infectious conditions. We discuss here one such case of a complicated urinary tract infection associated with Bifidobacterium spp. PMID:25253483

  14. Bifidobacterium moukalabense sp. nov., isolated from the faeces of wild west lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Sayaka; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Nguema, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; Fujita, Shiho; Kitahara, Maki; Yamagiwa, Juichi; Ngomanda, Alfred; Ohkuma, Moriya; Ushida, Kazunari

    2014-02-01

    Gram-staining-positive anaerobic rods were isolated from the faeces of a wild lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park, Gabon, and strain GG01(T) was taxonomically investigated. Based on phylogenetic analyses and specific phenotypic characteristics, the strain belonged to the genus Bifidobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain GG01(T) formed a single monophyletic cluster and had a distinct line of descent. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the type strains of Bifidobacterium catenulatum JCM 1194(T) (98.3%) and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum (98.1%) JCM 1200(T) were the most closely related to this novel strain, although it was clear that they belonged to different species. hsp60 sequences also supported these relationships. The DNA G+C content of this novel strain was 60.1 mol%. Bifidobacterium moukalabense sp. nov. (type strain GG01(T) = JCM 18751(T) = DSM 27321(T)) is proposed.

  15. Bifidobacterium lemurum sp. nov., from faeces of the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Modesto, Monica; Michelini, Samanta; Stefanini, Ilaria; Sandri, Camillo; Spiezio, Caterina; Pisi, Annamaria; Filippini, Gianfranco; Biavati, Bruno; Mattarelli, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Four Gram-positive-staining, microaerophilic, non-spore-forming, fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive bacterial strains were isolated from a faecal sample of a 5-year-old ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta). The strains showed a peculiar morphology, resembling a small coiled snake, a ring shape, or forming a little 'Y' shape. The isolated strains appeared identical, and LMC 13T was chosen as a representative strain and characterized further. Strain LMC 13T showed an A3β peptidoglycan type, similar to that found in Bifidobacterium longum. The DNA base composition was 57.2 mol% G+C. Almost-complete 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, dnaG, purF, clpC and rpoC gene sequences were obtained, and phylogenetic relationships were determined. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain LMC 13T showed the highest similarity to B. longum subsp. suis ATCC 27533T (96.65 %) and Bifidobacterium saguini DSM 23967T (96.64 %). Strain LMC 13T was located in an actinobacterial cluster and was more closely related to the genus Bifidobacteriumthan to other genera in the Bifidobacteriaceae. On the basis of these results, strain LMC 13T represents a novel species within the genus Bifidobacterium, for which the name Bifidobacterium lemurum sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is LMC 13T ( = DSM 28807T = JCM 30168T). PMID:25736415

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bifidobacterium breve CECT 7263, a Strain Isolated from Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Esther; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Marín, María; Fontecha, Javier; Requena, Teresa; Arroyo, Rebeca; Fernández, Leónides

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacterium breve is an actinobacterium frequently isolated from colonic microbiota of breastfeeding babies. Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of a B. breve strain isolated from human milk, B. breve CECT 7263. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the biology of this potential probiotic organism and will allow the characterization of genes related to beneficial properties. PMID:22740680

  17. Identification and Tracing of Bifidobacterium Species by Use of Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Meylan, Valerie; Zink, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Eighty-nine Bifidobacterium strains from 26 species were identified and classified to the species level with an enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR approach. We demonstrated that ERIC-PCR is useful for a phylogenetic and taxonomical analysis but as well as for a species composition analysis of mixed bifidobacterial cultures isolated from dairy products and other environments. PMID:12839818

  18. Genomic and fluxomic analysis of carbohydrate metabolism in Bifidobacterium spp: human symbiotic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifidobacteria are gram-positive microorganisms widely applied in fermented dairy products due to their health-promoting effects. Bifidobacterium ssp. may also represent up to 91% of microbial gut population in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Fructose-6 phosphate phosphoketolase...

  19. Antagonistic activities of some Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from resident infant gastrointestinal microbiota on Gram-negative enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Cristea, Violeta Corina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the consolidation of the anti-infectious barrier against enteric pathogens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Bifidobacterium sp. strains, recently isolated from infant gastrointestinal microbiota on the in vitro growth and virulence features expression of enteropathogenic bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from human feces was examined in vitro against a wide range of Gram negative pathogenic strains isolated from 30 infant patients (3 days to 5 years old) with diarrhea. Both potential probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium ruminantium) and enteropathogenic strains (EPEC, EIEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were identified by MALDI-TOF and confirmed serologically when needed. The bactericidal activity, growth curve, adherence to the cellular HEp-2 substratum and production of soluble virulence factors have been assessed in the presence of different Bifidobacterium sp. cultures and fractions (whole culture and free-cell supernatants). Among the twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains, the largest spectrum of antimicrobial activity against 9 of the 18 enteropathogenic strains was revealed for a B. breve strain recently isolated from infant intestinal feces. The whole culture and free-cell supernatant of B. breve culture decreased the multiplication rate, shortened the log phase and the total duration of the growth curve, with an earlier entrance in the decline phase and inhibited the adherence capacity to a cellular substratum and the swimming/swarming motility too. These results indicate the significant probiotic potential of the B. breve strain. PMID:26921694

  20. Bifidobacterium longum lysate, a new ingredient for reactive skin.

    PubMed

    Guéniche, Audrey; Bastien, Philippe; Ovigne, Jean Marc; Kermici, Michel; Courchay, Guy; Chevalier, Veronique; Breton, Lionel; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle

    2010-08-01

    Reactive skin is characterized by marked sensitivity to physical (heat, cold, wind) or chemical (topically applied products) stimuli and by the impairment of the skin barrier's ability to repair itself. Several lines of evidence suggest that beyond their capacity to positively influence the composition of intestinal microbiota, some probiotic bacteria can modulate the immune system both at local and systemic levels, thereby improving immune defense mechanisms and/or down-regulating immune disorders such as allergies and intestinal inflammation. Several recent human clinical trials clearly suggest that probiotic supplementation might be beneficial to the skin. Using a probiotic lysate, Bifidobacterium longum sp. extract (BL), we demonstrated first in vitro, and then in a clinical trial, that this non-replicating bacteria form applied to the skin was able to improve sensitive skin. The effect of BL were evaluated first on two different models. Using ex vivo human skin explant model we found a statistically significant improvement versus placebo in various parameters associated with inflammation such as a decrease in vasodilation, oedema, mast cell degranulation and TNF-alpha release. Moreover, using nerve cell cultures in vitro, we showed that after 6 h of incubation in culture medium (0.3-1%), the probiotic lysate significantly inhibited capsaicin-induced CGRP release by neurones. Then, a topical cream containing the active extract was tested in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-six female volunteers with reactive skin were randomly given either the cream with the bacterial extract at 10% (n = 33) or the control cream (n = 33). The volunteers applied the cream to the face, arms and legs twice a day for two months. Skin sensitivity was assessed by stinging test (lactic acid) and skin barrier recovery was evaluated by measuring trans-epidermal water loss following barrier disruption induced by repeated tape-stripping at D1, D29 and D57. The

  1. Bifidobacterium aesculapii sp. nov., from the faeces of the baby common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Modesto, M; Michelini, S; Stefanini, I; Ferrara, A; Tacconi, S; Biavati, B; Mattarelli, P

    2014-08-01

    Six Gram-positive-staining, microaerophilic, non-spore-forming, fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive bacterial strains with a peculiar morphology were isolated from faecal samples of baby common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Cells of these strains showed a morphology not reported previously for a bifidobacterial species, which resembled a coiled snake, always coiled or ring shaped or forming a 'Y' shape. Strains MRM 3/1(T) and MRM 4/2 were chosen as representative strains and characterized further. The bacteria utilized a wide range of carbohydrates and produced urease. Glucose was fermented to acetate and lactate. Strain MRM 3/1(T) showed a peptidoglycan type unique among members of the genus Bifidobacterium. The DNA base composition was 64.7 mol% G+C. Almost-complete 16S rRNA, hsp60, clpC and rpoB gene sequences were obtained and phylogenetic relationships were determined. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains MRM 3/1(T) and MRM 4/2 had the highest similarities to Bifidobacterium scardovii DSM 13734(T) (94.6%) and Bifidobacterium stellenboschense DSM 23968(T) (94.5%). Analysis of hsp60 showed that both strains were closely related to B. stellenboschense DSM 23968(T) (97.5% similarity); however, despite this high degree of similarity, our isolates could be distinguished from B. stellenboschense DSM 23968(T) by low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (30.4% with MRM 3/1(T)). Strains MRM 3/1(T) and MRM 4/2 were located in an actinobacterial cluster and were more closely related to the genus Bifidobacterium than to other genera in the family Bifidobacteriaceae. On the basis of these results, strains MRM 3/1(T) and MRM 4/2 represent a novel species within the genus Bifidobacterium, for which the name Bifidobacterium aesculapii sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is MRM 3/1(T) ( = DSM 26737(T) = JCM 18761(T)). PMID:24867172

  2. Draft genome sequences of two Bifidobacterium sp. from the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widely considered probiotic organisms, Bifidobacteria are common inhabitants of the alimentary tract of animals including insects. Bifidobacteria identified from the honey bee are found in larval guts and throughout the alimentary tract, but attain their greatest abundance in the adult hind gut. To further understand the role of Bifidobacteria in honey bees, we sequenced two strains of Bifidobacterium cultured from different alimentary tract environments and life stages. Results Reflecting an oxygen-rich niche, both strains possessed catalase, peroxidase, superoxide-dismutase and respiratory chain enzymes indicative of oxidative metabolism. The strains show markedly different carbohydrate processing capabilities, with one possessing auxiliary and key enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Conclusions As a result of long term co-evolution, honey bee associated Bifidobacterium may harbor considerable strain diversity reflecting adaptation to a variety of different honey bee microenvironments and hive-mediated vertical transmission between generations. PMID:24350840

  3. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum KCTC 12200BP, a probiotic strain promoting the intestinal health.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kwak, Min-Jung; Seo, Jae-Gu; Chung, Myung Jun; Kim, Jihyun F

    2015-11-20

    Bifidobacteria constitute a major group of beneficial intestinal bacteria, and are therefore often used to formulate probiotic products in combination with lactic acid bacteria. The availability of bifidobacterial genome sequences has broadened our knowledge on health-promoting factors as well as their safety assessments. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum CBT BG7 that consists of a 2.45-Mb chromosome and a plasmid.

  4. Characterization of Immunostimulatory CpG-Rich Sequences from Different Bifidobacterium Species ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Odile; Gafa, Valérie; Kapel, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Bertrand; Butel, Marie-José; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium are partly due to its immunostimulatory properties. These immunostimulatory properties may be linked to the presence of unmethylated CpG motifs specific to bacterial DNA, which may induce a TH1 response by activating Toll-like receptors (TLR). Using in silico analyses, PCR amplification, and dot blotting, we characterized the CpG content of various bifidobacterial strains and evaluated the immunostimulatory properties and genomic heterogeneity of these motifs in the genus. Our in silico study, based on entire genome sequences from five bifidobacterial strains, showed that Bifidobacterium genomes contain numerous CpG motifs, including 5′-purine-purine-CG-pyrimidine-pyrimidine-3′ and 5′-purine-TCG-pyrimidine-pyrimidine-3′ motifs, and biologically active sequences previously identified in lactic acid bacteria. We identified four CpG-rich sequences with Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705. Two sequences with a percent G+C of about 68% included 14 and 16 CpG motifs. Two sequences with a percent G+C of about 60% included 16 and 6 CpG motifs. These sequences induce the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) through a pattern of TLR9 stimulation on RAW 264.7 macrophages. No link could be established between their immunostimulatory properties, the number of CpG motifs, and percent G+C. We investigated inter- and intraspecies heterogeneity in 71 strains of various origins. These sequences were highly conserved in the genus. No link was found between the presence of the CpG-rich sequence and the origin of the strains (healthy, allergic, or preterm infants). The high frequency of CpG motifs in the DNA of Bifidobacterium may play an important role in the immunostimulatory properties of commensal or probiotic bifidobacterial strains. PMID:20208019

  5. Antiviral activity of Bifidobacterium adolescentis SPM1605 against Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Lee, Do Kyung; Park, Jae Eun; Park, Il Ho; Seo, Jae Gu; Ha, Nam Joo

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered one of the most beneficial probiotics and have been widely studied for their effects against specific pathogens. The present study investigated the antiviral activity of probiotics isolated from Koreans against Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). The effect of probiotic isolates against CVB3 was measured by the plaque assay and cellular toxicity of bifidobacteria in HeLa cells was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Among 13 probiotic isolates, 3 Bifidobacterium adolescentis, 2 Bifidobacterium longum and 1 Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum had an antiviral effect against CVB3, while the others did not show such effect. B. adolescentis SPM1605 showed the greatest inhibitory properties against CVB3. When the threshold cycle (CT) values for the treated B. adolescentis SPM1605 samples were compared to the results for the non-treated samples, it was shown that the amplified viral sequences from the CVB3 had their copy number lowered by B. adolescentis SPM1605. Moreover, the gene expression in infected HeLa cells was also inhibited by 50%. The results suggest that B. adolescentis SPM1605 suppresses CVB3 and could be used as an alternative therapy against infectious diseases caused by coxsackieviruses. PMID:26019554

  6. Membrane filter method to study the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium longum on fecal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A large number of commensal bacteria inhabit the intestinal tract, and interbacterial communication among gut microbiota is thought to occur. In order to analyze symbiotic relationships between probiotic strains and the gut microbiota, a ring with a membrane filter fitted to the bottom was used for in vitro investigations. Test strains comprising probiotic nitto strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus NT and Bifidobacterium longum NT) and type strains (L. acidophilus JCM1132T and B. longum JCM1217T) were obtained from diluted fecal samples using the membrane filter to simulate interbacterial communication. Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus pasteurianus, Collinsella aerofaciens, and Clostridium spp. were the most abundant gut bacteria detected before coculture with the test strains. Results of the coculture experiments indicated that the test strains significantly promote the growth of Ruminococcus gnavus, Ruminococcus torques, and Veillonella spp. and inhibit the growth of Sutterella wadsworthensis. Differences in the relative abundances of gut bacterial strains were furthermore observed after coculture of the fecal samples with each test strain. Bifidobacterium spp., which was detected as the dominant strain in the fecal samples, was found to be unaffected by coculture with the test strains. In the present study, interbacterial communication using bacterial metabolites between the test strains and the gut microbiota was demonstrated by the coculture technique. The detailed mechanisms and effects of the complex interbacterial communications that occur among the gut microbiota are, however, still unclear. Further investigation of these relationships by coculture of several fecal samples with probiotic strains is urgently required. PMID:26486646

  7. Membrane filter method to study the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium longum on fecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hidenori; Benno, Yoshimi

    2015-11-01

    A large number of commensal bacteria inhabit the intestinal tract, and interbacterial communication among gut microbiota is thought to occur. In order to analyze symbiotic relationships between probiotic strains and the gut microbiota, a ring with a membrane filter fitted to the bottom was used for in vitro investigations. Test strains comprising probiotic nitto strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus NT and Bifidobacterium longum NT) and type strains (L. acidophilus JCM1132(T) and B. longum JCM1217(T) ) were obtained from diluted fecal samples using the membrane filter to simulate interbacterial communication. Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus pasteurianus, Collinsella aerofaciens, and Clostridium spp. were the most abundant gut bacteria detected before coculture with the test strains. Results of the coculture experiments indicated that the test strains significantly promote the growth of Ruminococcus gnavus, Ruminococcus torques, and Veillonella spp. and inhibit the growth of Sutterella wadsworthensis. Differences in the relative abundances of gut bacterial strains were furthermore observed after coculture of the fecal samples with each test strain. Bifidobacterium spp., which was detected as the dominant strain in the fecal samples, was found to be unaffected by coculture with the test strains. In the present study, interbacterial communication using bacterial metabolites between the test strains and the gut microbiota was demonstrated by the coculture technique. The detailed mechanisms and effects of the complex interbacterial communications that occur among the gut microbiota are, however, still unclear. Further investigation of these relationships by coculture of several fecal samples with probiotic strains is urgently required. PMID:26486646

  8. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations.

  9. Immune Modulating Capability of Two Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium Strains in a Wistar Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; Moran, Javier; Cabello, Estefanía; Suárez, Ana; González, Celestino; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2014-01-01

    Fermented dairy products are the usual carriers for the delivery of probiotics to humans, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus being the most frequently used bacteria. In this work, the strains Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 and Bifidobacterium longum IPLA E44 were tested for their capability to modulate immune response and the insulin-dependent glucose homeostasis using male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet. Three intervention groups were fed daily for 24 days with 10% skimmed milk, or with 109 cfu of the corresponding strain suspended in the same vehicle. A significant increase of the suppressor-regulatory TGF-β cytokine occurred with both strains in comparison with a control (no intervention) group of rats; the highest levels were reached in rats fed IPLA R1. This strain presented an immune protective profile, as it was able to reduce the production of the proinflammatory IL-6. Moreover, phosphorylated Akt kinase decreased in gastroctemius muscle of rats fed the strain IPLA R1, without affecting the glucose, insulin, and HOMA index in blood, or levels of Glut-4 located in the membrane of muscle and adipose tissue cells. Therefore, the strain B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 is a probiotic candidate to be tested in mild grade inflammation animal models. PMID:24971309

  10. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  11. Oral delivery of Bifidobacterium longum expressing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone to combat ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pijin; Yang, Yan; Ding, Qing; Li, Xiuying; Sun, Hanxiao; Liu, Zhaobing; Huang, Junli; Gong, Yahui

    2016-02-01

    α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a tridecapeptide derived from pro-opiomelanocortin that exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties by regulating the production of inflammatory mediators. This peptide has been well established in several inflammatory models, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, its extremely short duration in vivo limits its clinical application. To address this limitation, Bifidobacterium was used here as a carrier to deliver α-MSH. We utilized α-MSH-engineered Bifidobacterium against IBD, which is closely linked to immune and intestinal microbiota dysfunction. First, we constructed a Bifidobacterium longum secreting α-MSH (B. longum-α-MSH). We then tested the recombinant α-MSH expression and determined its bioactivity in HT-29 cells. To assess its effectiveness, B. longum-α-MSH was used against an ulcerative colitis (UC) model in rats induced by dextran sulfate sodium. The data showed that α-MSH expression in B. longum-α-MSH was effective, and its biological activity was similar to the synthesized one. This UC model experiment indicated that B. longum-α-MSH successfully colonized the intestinal gut, expressed bioactive α-MSH and had a significant anti-inflammatory effect. The results demonstrate the feasibility of preventing IBD by using B. longum-α-MSH. PMID:26567174

  12. Detection of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bb12) in the intestine after feeding of sows and their piglets.

    PubMed

    Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Dawson, Harry; Restrepo, Marta; Andrews, Kate; Vinyard, Bryan; Urban, Joseph F

    2008-10-01

    A real-time PCR method has been developed to distinguish Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies in the gastrointestinal tracts of pigs. Identification of a highly conserved single-copy tuf gene encoding the elongation factor Tu involved in bacterial protein biosynthesis was used as a marker to differentiate homologous Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (strain Bb12) from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis, as well as Bifidobacterium suis, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, several species of Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus faecium. Real-time PCR detection of serially diluted DNA extracted from a pure culture of Bb12 was linear for bacterial numbers ranging from 10 to 10,000 tuf gene copies per PCR (r(2) = 0.99). Relative differences in Bb12 bacterial numbers in pigs fed daily with Bb12 were determined after detection of Bb12 tuf gene copies in DNA extracted from the intestinal contents. Piglets treated with Bb12 immediately after birth maintained a high level of Bb12 in their large intestines with continuous daily administration of Bb12. Piglets born to Bb12-treated sows during the last third of their gestation and also treated with Bb12 at birth (T/T group) had a higher number of Bb12 organisms per gram of intestinal contents compared to placebo-treated piglets born to placebo-treated sows (C/C group), Bb12-treated sows (T/C group), or piglets born to placebo sows but treated with Bb12 immediately after birth (C/T group). In addition, there was a significant increase in gene expression for Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in piglets from the T/T group, with no change in TLR2 and TLR4. These findings suggest that the tuf gene represents a specific and functional marker for detecting Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strain Bb12 within the microbiota of the intestine. PMID:18689506

  13. Variations in the Post-weaning Human Gut Metagenome Profile As Result of Bifidobacterium Acquisition in the Western Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Soverini, Matteo; Rampelli, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Schnorr, Stephanie L; Quercia, Sara; Castagnetti, Andrea; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the gut microbiome variation among human populations revealed the existence of robust compositional and functional layouts matching the three subsistence strategies that describe a trajectory of changes across our recent evolutionary history: hunting and gathering, rural agriculture, and urban post-industrialized agriculture. In particular, beside the overall reduction of ecosystem diversity, the gut microbiome of Western industrial populations is typically characterized by the loss of Treponema and the acquisition of Bifidobacterium as an abundant inhabitant of the post-weaning gut microbial ecosystem. In order to advance the hypothesis about the possible adaptive nature of this exchange, here we explore specific functional attributes that correspond to the mutually exclusive presence of Treponema and Bifidobacterium using publically available gut metagenomic data from Hadza hunter-gatherers and urban industrial Italians. According to our findings, Bifidobacterium provides the enteric ecosystem with a diverse panel of saccharolytic functions, well suited to the array of gluco- and galacto-based saccharides that abound in the Western diet. On the other hand, the metagenomic functions assigned to Treponema are more predictive of a capacity to incorporate complex polysaccharides, such as those found in unrefined plant foods, which are consistently incorporated in the Hadza diet. Finally, unlike Treponema, the Bifidobacterium metagenome functions include genes that permit the establishment of microbe-host immunological cross-talk, suggesting recent co-evolutionary events between the human immune system and Bifidobacterium that are adaptive in the context of agricultural subsistence and sedentary societies.

  14. Variations in the Post-weaning Human Gut Metagenome Profile As Result of Bifidobacterium Acquisition in the Western Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Soverini, Matteo; Rampelli, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Schnorr, Stephanie L.; Quercia, Sara; Castagnetti, Andrea; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the gut microbiome variation among human populations revealed the existence of robust compositional and functional layouts matching the three subsistence strategies that describe a trajectory of changes across our recent evolutionary history: hunting and gathering, rural agriculture, and urban post-industrialized agriculture. In particular, beside the overall reduction of ecosystem diversity, the gut microbiome of Western industrial populations is typically characterized by the loss of Treponema and the acquisition of Bifidobacterium as an abundant inhabitant of the post-weaning gut microbial ecosystem. In order to advance the hypothesis about the possible adaptive nature of this exchange, here we explore specific functional attributes that correspond to the mutually exclusive presence of Treponema and Bifidobacterium using publically available gut metagenomic data from Hadza hunter-gatherers and urban industrial Italians. According to our findings, Bifidobacterium provides the enteric ecosystem with a diverse panel of saccharolytic functions, well suited to the array of gluco- and galacto-based saccharides that abound in the Western diet. On the other hand, the metagenomic functions assigned to Treponema are more predictive of a capacity to incorporate complex polysaccharides, such as those found in unrefined plant foods, which are consistently incorporated in the Hadza diet. Finally, unlike Treponema, the Bifidobacterium metagenome functions include genes that permit the establishment of microbe–host immunological cross-talk, suggesting recent co-evolutionary events between the human immune system and Bifidobacterium that are adaptive in the context of agricultural subsistence and sedentary societies. PMID:27462302

  15. Variations in the Post-weaning Human Gut Metagenome Profile As Result of Bifidobacterium Acquisition in the Western Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Soverini, Matteo; Rampelli, Simone; Turroni, Silvia; Schnorr, Stephanie L; Quercia, Sara; Castagnetti, Andrea; Biagi, Elena; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the gut microbiome variation among human populations revealed the existence of robust compositional and functional layouts matching the three subsistence strategies that describe a trajectory of changes across our recent evolutionary history: hunting and gathering, rural agriculture, and urban post-industrialized agriculture. In particular, beside the overall reduction of ecosystem diversity, the gut microbiome of Western industrial populations is typically characterized by the loss of Treponema and the acquisition of Bifidobacterium as an abundant inhabitant of the post-weaning gut microbial ecosystem. In order to advance the hypothesis about the possible adaptive nature of this exchange, here we explore specific functional attributes that correspond to the mutually exclusive presence of Treponema and Bifidobacterium using publically available gut metagenomic data from Hadza hunter-gatherers and urban industrial Italians. According to our findings, Bifidobacterium provides the enteric ecosystem with a diverse panel of saccharolytic functions, well suited to the array of gluco- and galacto-based saccharides that abound in the Western diet. On the other hand, the metagenomic functions assigned to Treponema are more predictive of a capacity to incorporate complex polysaccharides, such as those found in unrefined plant foods, which are consistently incorporated in the Hadza diet. Finally, unlike Treponema, the Bifidobacterium metagenome functions include genes that permit the establishment of microbe-host immunological cross-talk, suggesting recent co-evolutionary events between the human immune system and Bifidobacterium that are adaptive in the context of agricultural subsistence and sedentary societies. PMID:27462302

  16. Identification of species belonging to the Bifidobacterium genus by PCR-RFLP analysis of a hsp60 gene fragment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bifidobacterium represents one of the largest genus within the Actinobacteria, and includes at present 32 species. These species share a high sequence homology of 16S rDNA and several molecular techniques already applied to discriminate among them give ambiguous results. The slightly higher variability of the hsp60 gene sequences with respect to the 16S rRNA sequences offers better opportunities to design or develop molecular assays, allowing identification and differentiation of closely related species. hsp60 can be considered an excellent additional marker for inferring the taxonomy of the members of Bifidobacterium genus. Results This work illustrates a simple and cheap molecular tool for the identification of Bifidobacterium species. The hsp60 universal primers were used in a simple PCR procedure for the direct amplification of 590 bp of the hsp60 sequence. The in silico restriction analysis of bifidobacterial hsp60 partial sequences allowed the identification of a single endonuclease (HaeIII) able to provide different PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns in the Bifidobacterium spp. type strains evaluated. The electrophoretic analyses allowed to confirm the different RFLP patterns. Conclusions The developed PCR-RFLP technique resulted in efficient discrimination of the tested species and subspecies and allowed the construction of a dichotomous key in order to differentiate the most widely distributed Bifidobacterium species as well as the subspecies belonging to B. pseudolongum and B. animalis. PMID:23815602

  17. Interactions between Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides Species in Cofermentations Are Affected by Carbon Sources, Including Exopolysaccharides Produced by Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Arboleya, Silvia; Hernandez-Barranco, Ana M.; Alvarez-Buylla, Jorge R.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Cocultures of strains from two Bifidobacterium and two Bacteroides species were performed with exopolysaccharides (EPS) previously purified from bifidobacteria, with inulin, or with glucose as the carbon source. Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004 grew in glucose but showed poor or no growth in complex carbohydrates (inulin, EPS E44, and EPS R1), whereas Bacteroides grew well in the four carbon sources tested. In the presence of glucose, the growth of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron DSM-2079 was inhibited by B. breve, whereas it remained unaffected in the presence of B. longum. Ba. fragilis DSM-2151 contributed to a greater survival of B. longum, promoting changes in the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and organic acids in coculture with respect to monocultures. In complex carbohydrates, cocultures of bifidobacterium strains with Ba. thetaiotaomicron did not modify the behavior of Bacteroides nor improve the poor growth of bifidobacteria. The metabolic activity of Ba. fragilis in coculture with bifidobacteria was not affected by EPS, but greater survival of bifidobacteria at late stages of incubation occurred in cocultures than in monocultures, leading to a higher production of acetic acid than in monocultures. Therefore, cocultures of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides can behave differently against fermentable carbohydrates as a function of the specific characteristics of the strains from each species. These results stress the importance of considering specific species and strain interactions and not simply higher taxonomic divisions in the relationship among intestinal microbial populations and their different responses to probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:24077708

  18. Safety and intestinal microbiota modulation by the exopolysaccharide-producing strains Bifidobacterium animalis IPLA R1 and Bifidobacterium longum IPLA E44 orally administered to Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Nuria; Binetti, Ana; Gueimonde, Miguel; Alonso, Ana; Garrido, Pablo; González del Rey, Carmen; González, Celestino; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 and Bifidobacterium longum IPLA E44 strains were tested for their safety and ability to modulate the intestinal microbiota in vivo. Chemically simulated gastrointestinal digestion showed considerably lower survival of E44 than R1 strain, the first microorganism also being more sensitive to refrigerated storage in 10% skimmed milk at 4°C. Harmful glycosidic activities were absent, or at low levels, in the strains R1 and E44. Both strains were sensitive to most antibiotics and resistant to aminoglycosides, a common feature in bifidobacteria. Similar to several other bifidobacteria strains, B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 displayed a moderate resistance against tetracycline which correlated with the presence of tet(W) gene in its genome. The general parameters indicating well-being status, as well as translocation to different organs and histological examination of the gut tissues, revealed no changes induced by the administration of bifidobacteria to rats. Twelve-week-old male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups, eight rats in each. Two groups were administered daily over 10⁸cfu of the corresponding strain suspended in 10% skimmed milk for 24 days, whereas rats in the placebo group received skimmed milk without microorganisms added. The microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) were monitored in faeces at different time points during treatment and in caecum content at the end of the assay. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that faecal and caecal Bifidobacterium levels were higher in bifidobacteria-fed rats than in the placebo rats at the end of the intervention, whereas total anaerobic plate counts did not show significant differences. Quantification of B. animalis and B. longum by qPCR showed that, independent of the microorganism administered, treatment with bifidobacteria resulted in higher levels of B. animalis in the caecum. PCR-DGGE analysis of microbial populations revealed a higher diversity of

  19. Aciduric microbial taxa including Scardovia wiggsiae and Bifidobacterium spp. in caries and caries free subjects.

    PubMed

    Henne, Karsten; Rheinberg, Anke; Melzer-Krick, Beate; Conrads, Georg

    2015-10-01

    Actinobacteria came into focus of being potential caries-associated pathogens and could, together with the established Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli thus function as caries indicator species. Here we analyzed the role and diagnostic predictive value of the acidogenic-aciduric species Scardovia wiggsiae and Bifidobacterium dentium together with S. mutans, lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in biofilm of non-cavitated (n = 20) and cavitated (n = 6) caries lesions versus controls (n = 30). For the genus Bifidobacterium and for B. dentium new sets of primers were designed. Based on real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed by DNA sequencing we found a higher prevalence (61.5%) of S. wiggsiae in caries lesions than in controls (40%). However, among the controls we found three individuals with both the highest absolute and relative S. wiggsiae numbers. Testing for S. mutans revealed the same prevalence as S. wiggsiae in caries lesions (61.5%) but in controls its prevalence was only 10%. B. dentium was never found in healthy plaque but in 30.8% of clinical cases, with the highest numbers in cavitated lesions. The Bifidobacterium-genus specific PCR had less discriminative power as more control samples were positive. We calculated the relative abundances and applied receiver operating characteristic analyses. The top results of specificity (93% and 87%) and sensitivity (100% and 88%) were found when the constraint set was "Lactobacillus relative abundance ≥0.02%" and "two aciduric species with a relative abundance of each ≥0.007%". Combinatory measurement of several aciduric taxa may be useful to reveal caries activity or even to predict caries progression. PMID:25933689

  20. The genome of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum IPLA 36007, a human intestinal strain with isoflavone-activation activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bifidobacterium species, including Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, are among the dominant microbial populations of the human gastrointestinal tract. They are also major components of many commercial probiotic products. Resident and transient bifidobacteria are thought to have several beneficial health effects. However, our knowledge of how these bacteria interact and communicate with host cells remains poor. This knowledge is essential for scientific support of their purported health benefits and their rational inclusion in functional foods. Results This work describes the draft genome sequence of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum IPLA 36007, a strain isolated as dominant from the feces of a healthy human. Besides several properties of probiosis, IPLA 36007 exhibited the capability of releasing aglycones from soy isoflavone glycosides. The genome contains 1,851 predicted genes, including 54 genes for tRNAs and fie copies of unique 16S, 23S and 5S rRNA genes. As key attributes of the IPLA 36007 genome we can mention the presence of a lysogenic phage, a cluster encoding type IV fimbriae, and a locus encoding a clustered, regularly interspaced, short, palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas system. Four open reading frames (orfs) encoding β-glucosidases belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase family 3, which may act on isoflavone glycosides, were encountered. Additionally, one gene was found to code for a glycosyl hydrolase of family 1 that might also have β-glucosidase activity. Conclusion The availability of the B. pseudocatenulatum IPLA 36007 genome should allow the enzyme system involved in the release of soy isoflavone aglycones from isoflavone glycosides, and the molecular mechanisms underlying the strain’s probiotic properties, to be more easily understood. PMID:25097668

  1. Prebiotic Effects of Agave salmiana Fructans in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis Cultures.

    PubMed

    Castro-Zavala, Adriana; Juárez-Flores, Bertha I; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Delgado-Portales, Rosa E; Aguirre-Rivera, Juan R; Alcocer-Gouyonnet, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Agave salmiana is a fructan rich species that is widely distributed in Mexico. The aim of this investigation was to extract the fructans of A. salmiana and evaluate their prebiotic effect in 48 hours in vitro cultures of Bifidobacterium lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus and to compare this effect with other available fructan sources. A significant difference in pH, optical density and biomass was found in the cultures depending on the source of fructans and the type of bacteria. It was possible to determine a dose-response effect of the A. salmiana fructans and the growth of the studied strains. PMID:26749843

  2. Prebiotic Effects of Agave salmiana Fructans in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis Cultures.

    PubMed

    Castro-Zavala, Adriana; Juárez-Flores, Bertha I; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Delgado-Portales, Rosa E; Aguirre-Rivera, Juan R; Alcocer-Gouyonnet, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Agave salmiana is a fructan rich species that is widely distributed in Mexico. The aim of this investigation was to extract the fructans of A. salmiana and evaluate their prebiotic effect in 48 hours in vitro cultures of Bifidobacterium lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus and to compare this effect with other available fructan sources. A significant difference in pH, optical density and biomass was found in the cultures depending on the source of fructans and the type of bacteria. It was possible to determine a dose-response effect of the A. salmiana fructans and the growth of the studied strains.

  3. Screening of Bifidobacterium strains isolated from human faeces for antagonistic activities against potentially bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Lorella; Ovidi, Monia; Di Mattia, Elena; Trovatelli, Luigi Daniele; Canganella, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    As probiotic bacteria, strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium colonise the gastro-intestinal tract of humans and animals at the time of birth, and they are found in young as well as in adult individuals in great numbers. Moreover, they can interact with the development of enteric infections by the production of antimicrobial metabolites. In this work 281 strains of bifidobacteria were anaerobically isolated from human faecal samples, supplied by volunteers of different ages (youngs, adults, elders), and preliminarly described by microscopic observation. All strains were screened by the fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (F6PPK) test in order to confirm their classification within the genus Bifidobacterium. Selected strains were used to evaluate their antagonistic activities against Escherichia coli, Salmonella thyphimurium, Staphylococcus lentus, Enterococcus faecalis, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium sporogenes. Experiments were performed in vitro by different methods based on the observation of growth inhibition in Petri dishes. The strains that showed the highest inhibiting activities were compared by SDS-PAGE for total cell proteins, using type strains of human origin as references. Representative isolates were metabolically characterised by the BIOLOG system; a specific database was created with strains obtained from our collection and a statistical evaluation for metabolic patterns was carried out.

  4. In vitro kinetic analysis of oligofructose consumption by Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp. indicates different degradation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Makras, Lefteris; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Adriany, Tom; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-02-01

    The growth of pure cultures of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bacteroides fragilis LMG 10263 on fructose and oligofructose was examined and compared to that of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 through in vitro laboratory fermentations. Gas chromatography (GC) analysis was used to determine the different fractions of oligofructose and their degradation during the fermentation process. Both B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and B. fragilis LMG 10263 were able to grow on oligofructose as fast as on fructose, succinic acid being the major metabolite produced by both strains. B. longum BB536 grew slower on oligofructose than on fructose. Acetic acid and lactic acid were the main metabolites produced when fructose was used as the sole energy source. Increased amounts of formic acid and ethanol were produced when oligofructose was used as an energy source at the cost of lactic acid. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed a preferential metabolism of the short oligofructose fractions (e.g., F2 and F3) for B. longum BB536. After depletion of the short fractions, the larger oligofructose fractions (e.g., F4, GF4, F5, GF5, and F6) were metabolized, too. Both Bacteroides strains did not display such a preferential metabolism and degraded all oligofructose fractions simultaneously, transiently increasing the fructose concentration in the medium. This suggests a different mechanism for oligofructose breakdown between the strain of Bifidobacterium and both strains of Bacteroides, which helps to explain the bifidogenic nature of inulin-type fructans.

  5. Purification and Characterization of Conjugated Bile Salt Hydrolase from Bifidobacterium longum BB536.

    PubMed

    Grill, J; Schneider, F; Crociani, J; Ballongue, J

    1995-07-01

    Bifidobacterium species deconjugate taurocholic, taurodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, glycocholic, glycodeoxycholic, and glycochenodeoxycholic acids. The enzyme level increases in the growth phase. No increase in activity is observed for the cytoplasmic enzyme after addition of conjugated bile acids to a stationary-phase culture. Conjugated bile salt hydrolase (BSH) was purified from Bifidobacterium longum BB536. Its apparent molecular mass in denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was ca. 40,000 Da. The intact enzyme had a relative molecular weight of ca. 250,000 as determined by gel filtration chromatography, suggesting that the native BSH of B. longum is probably a hexamer. The purified enzyme is active towards both glycine and taurine conjugates of cholate, deoxycholate, and chenodeoxycholate. The pH optimum is in the range of 5.5 to 6.5. A loss of BSH activity is observed after incubation at temperatures higher than 42(deg)C; at 60(deg)C, 50% of the BSH activity is lost. The importance of free sulfhydryl groups at the enzyme active center is suggested. For B. longum BB536, no significant difference in the initial rate of deconjugation and enzymatic efficiency appears between bile salts. The enzymatic efficiency is higher for B. longum BB536 than for other genera. In this paper, a new method which permits a display of BSH activity directly on polyacrylamide gels is described; this method confirms the molecular weight obtained for B. longum BB536 BSH.

  6. Novel Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 Strain Active against Rotavirus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Muñoz, José Antonio; Chenoll, Empar; Casinos, Beatriz; Bataller, Esther; Ramón, Daniel; Genovés, Salvador; Montava, Rebeca; Ribes, Juan Manuel; Buesa, Javier; Fàbrega, Joan; Rivero, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children worldwide. It is well known that breast-feeding and vaccination afford infants protection. Since breast-feeding has drastically decreased in developed countries, efforts have been focused on the potential use of probiotics as preventive agents. In this study, a novel Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis strain was isolated from infant feces and selected, based on its capacity to inhibit in vitro rotavirus Wa replication (up to 36.05% infectious foci reduction) and also to protect cells from virus infection (up to 48.50% infectious foci reduction) in both MA-104 and HT-29 cell lines. Furthermore, studies using a BALB/c mouse model have proved that this strain provides preliminary in vivo protection against rotavirus infection. The strain has been deposited in the Spanish Type Culture Collection under the accession number CECT 7210. This novel strain has the main properties required of a probiotic, such as resistance to gastrointestinal juices, biliary salts, NaCl, and low pH, as well as adhesion to intestinal mucus and sensitivity to antibiotics. The food safety status has been confirmed by the absence of undesirable metabolite production and in acute ingestion studies of mice. Overall, these results demonstrate that Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 can be considered a probiotic able to inhibit rotavirus infection. PMID:22003027

  7. Enhanced butyrate formation by cross-feeding between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covian, David; Gueimonde, Miguel; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2015-11-01

    Cross-feeding is an important metabolic interaction mechanism of bacterial groups inhabiting the human colon and includes features such as the utilization of acetate by butyrate-producing bacteria as may occur between Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium genera. In this study, we assessed the utilization of different carbon sources (glucose, starch, inulin and fructooligosaccharides) by strains of both genera and selected the best suited combinations for evidencing this cross-feeding phenomenon. Co-cultures of Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32 with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii S3/L3 with fructooligosaccharides as carbon source, as well as with F. prausnitzii A2-165 in starch, were carried out and the production of short-chain fatty acids was determined. In both co-cultures, acetate levels decreased between 8 and 24 h of incubation and were lower than in the corresponding B. adolescentis monocultures. In contrast, butyrate concentrations were higher in co-cultures as compared to the respective F. prausnitzii monocultures, indicating enhanced formation of butyrate by F. prausnitzii in the presence of the bifidobacteria. Variations in the levels of acetate and butyrate were more pronounced in the co-culture with fructooligosaccharides than with starch. Our results provide a clear demonstration of cross-feeding between B. adolescentis and F. prausnitzii.

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of 45 type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium: a snapshot of its genetic diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Zhang, Wenyi; Guo, Chenyi; Yang, Xianwei; Liu, Wenjun; Wu, Yarong; Song, Yuqin; Kwok, Lai Yu; Cui, Yujun; Menghe, Bilige; Yang, Ruifu; Hu, Liangping; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are well known for their human health-promoting effects and are therefore widely applied in the food industry. Members of the Bifidobacterium genus were first identified from the human gastrointestinal tract and were then found to be widely distributed across various ecological niches. Although the genetic diversity of Bifidobacterium has been determined based on several marker genes or a few genomes, the global diversity and evolution scenario for the entire genus remain unresolved. The present study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 45 type strains. We built a robust genealogy for Bifidobacterium based on 402 core genes and defined its root according to the phylogeny of the tree of bacteria. Our results support that all human isolates are of younger lineages, and although species isolated from bees dominate the more ancient lineages, the bee was not necessarily the original host for bifidobacteria. Moreover, the species isolated from different hosts are enriched with specific gene sets, suggesting host-specific adaptation. Notably, bee-specific genes are strongly associated with respiratory metabolism and are potential in helping those bacteria adapt to the oxygen-rich gut environment in bees. This study provides a snapshot of the genetic diversity and evolution of Bifidobacterium, paving the way for future studies on the taxonomy and functional genomics of the genus. PMID:25658111

  9. In vitro study of the prebiotic xylooligosaccharide (XOS) on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp and Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Summanen, Paula H; Komoriya, Tomoe; Finegold, Sydney M

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that XOS increased the counts of Bifidobacterium in vivo without increasing Lactobacillus in healthy adults. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of XOS on the growth of 35 Bifidobacterium and 29 Lactobacillus strains in in vitro conditions. Bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The growth stimulation was determined by agar dilution technique on plates containing two-fold serial dilutions of XOS (100-0.1 mg/ml). The growth of 86% of Bifidobacterium strains was stimulated at 1.56 mg/ml XOS and 100% at 6.25 mg/ml XOS. The growth of 38% of Lactobacillus strains was stimulated at 1.56 mg/ml XOS and 62% at 6.25 mg/ml XOS; 31% of Lactobacillus were not stimulated by XOS. Our results further suggest that XOS may be beneficial in stimulating intestinal Bifidobacterium without having much effect on Lactobacillus. The potential role for XOS in managing obesity should be investigated further.

  10. Interaction of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb 12) and Salmonella typhimurium in continuous-flow chemostatic culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commercially available probiotic, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) was adapted to and maintained in a continuous-flow chemostat culture. We evaluated the growth characteristics and interactive effects of Bb12 and a porcine-derived Salmonella typhimurium (St) when cultivated singly...

  11. Interaction of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) and Salmonella typhimurium in continuous-flow chemostatic culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A commercially available probiotic, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) was adapted to and maintained in a continuous-flow chemostat culture. We evaluated the growth characteristics and in interactive effects of Bb12 and a porcine-derived Salmonella typhimurium (St) when cultivated si...

  12. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains' tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25's growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25. PMID:27499662

  13. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains’ tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25’s growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25. PMID:27499662

  14. Effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on lipid profile and histopathological changes in hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheraji, S H; Amin, I; Azlan, A; Manap, M Y; Hassan, F A

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on lipid profile, liver and kidney function, and body fat in hypercholesterolaemic rats. 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The negative control group received a standard diet. The positive control group received a cholesterol-enriched diet, whereas the intervention groups received a cholesterol-enriched diet supplemented with B. longum BB536 alone or in combination with inulin or Mangifera pajang fibrous polysaccharides. After 8 weeks, plasma lipids, and liver and kidney function were tested. Intake of the cholesterol-enriched diet increased total cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, creatinine, urea, liver weight, adipose tissue weight, liver lipid deposition and adipocyte size. B. longum BB536 supplementation significantly reduced total cholesterol, liver lipid deposition and adipocyte size, and positively affected liver and kidney function. These effects were significantly increased in the presence of inulin and M. pajang fibrous polysaccharides.

  15. Selection of a Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Strain with a Decreased Ability To Produce Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized a new strain, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 7953, obtained by random UV mutagenesis, which produces less acetic acid than the wild type (CECT 7954) in three different experimental settings: De Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth without sodium acetate, resting cells, and skim milk. Genome sequencing revealed a single Phe-Ser substitution in the acetate kinase gene product that seems to be responsible for the strain's reduced acid production. Accordingly, acetate kinase specific activity was lower in the low acetate producer. Strain CECT 7953 produced less acetate, less ethanol, and more yoghourt-related volatile compounds in skim milk than the wild type did. Thus, CECT 7953 shows promising potential for the development of dairy products fermented exclusively by a bifidobacterial strain. PMID:22389372

  16. Applications of Microencapsulated Bifidobacterium Longum with Eleutherine Americana in Fresh Milk Tofu and Pineapple Juice

    PubMed Central

    Phoem, Atchara N.; Chanthachum, Suphitchaya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P.

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum was microencapsulated by extrusion technique and added in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. Microencapsulation of B. longum with Eleutherine americana extract, oligosaccharides extract, and commercial fructo-oligosaccharides was assessed for the bacterial survival after sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, and refrigeration storage. Microencapsulated B. longum with the extract and oligosaccharides extract in the food products showed better survival than free cells under adverse conditions. Sensory analysis demonstrated that the products containing co-encapsulated bacterial cells were more acceptable by consumers than free cells. Pineapple juice prepared with co-encapsulated cells had lower values for over acidification, compared with the juice with free cells added. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana could enhance functional properties of fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. PMID:25854832

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Bifidobacterium adolescentis xylose isomerase

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Caio Vinicius; Bernardes, Amanda; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Xylose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.5) is a key enzyme in xylose metabolism which is industrially important for the transformation of glucose and xylose into fructose and xylulose, respectively. The Bifidobacterium adolescentis xylA gene (NC_008618.1) encoding xylose isomerase (XI) was cloned and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant XI was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 3350 as the precipitating agent. A complete native data set was collected to 1.7 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.78, b = 123.98, c = 78.63 Å. PMID:23695585

  18. Genomic Characterization and Transcriptional Studies of the Starch-Utilizing Strain Bifidobacterium adolescentis 22L

    PubMed Central

    Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Milani, Christian; Viappiani, Alice; Mangifesta, Marta; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are members of the gut microbiota, but the genetic basis for their adaptation to the human gut is poorly understood. The analysis of the 2,203,222-bp genome of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 22L revealed a nutrient acquisition strategy that targets diet/plant-derived glycans, in particular starch and starch-like carbohydrates. Starch-like carbohydrates were shown to support the growth of B. adolescentis 22L. Transcriptome profiling of 22L cultures grown under in vitro conditions or during colonization of the murine gut by RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR assays revealed the expression of a set of chromosomal loci responsible for starch metabolism as well as for pilus production. Such extracellular structures include so-called sortase-dependent and type IVb pili, which may be involved in gut colonization of 22L through adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25063659

  19. Applications of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium longum with Eleutherine americana in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice.

    PubMed

    Phoem, Atchara N; Chanthachum, Suphitchaya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2015-04-03

    Bifidobacterium longum was microencapsulated by extrusion technique and added in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. Microencapsulation of B. longum with Eleutherine americana extract, oligosaccharides extract, and commercial fructo-oligosaccharides was assessed for the bacterial survival after sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, and refrigeration storage. Microencapsulated B. longum with the extract and oligosaccharides extract in the food products showed better survival than free cells under adverse conditions. Sensory analysis demonstrated that the products containing co-encapsulated bacterial cells were more acceptable by consumers than free cells. Pineapple juice prepared with co-encapsulated cells had lower values for over acidification, compared with the juice with free cells added. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana could enhance functional properties of fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice.

  20. Comparative genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis reveals a strict monophyletic bifidobacterial taxon.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  1. Characterization of a Novel β-l-Arabinofuranosidase in Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kiyotaka; Takashi, Yukari; Obuchi, Eriko; Kitahara, Kanefumi; Suganuma, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pfam DUF1680 (PF07944) is an uncharacterized protein family conserved in many species of bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, and plants. Previously, we cloned and characterized the hypBA2 gene as a β-l-arabinobiosidase in Bifidobacterium longum JCM 1217. In this study, we cloned a DUF1680 family member, the hypBA1 gene, which constitutes a gene cluster with hypBA2. HypBA1 is a novel β-l-arabinofuranosidase that liberates l-arabinose from the l-arabinofuranose (Araf)-β1,2-Araf disaccharide. HypBA1 also transglycosylates 1-alkanols with retention of the anomeric configuration. Mutagenesis and azide rescue experiments indicated that Glu-338 is a critical residue for catalytic activity. This study provides the first characterization of a DUF1680 family member, which defines a new family of glycoside hydrolases, the glycoside hydrolase family 127. PMID:24385433

  2. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12®

    PubMed Central

    Jungersen, Mikkel; Wind, Anette; Johansen, Eric; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Eskesen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®), which is the world’s most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12® has been determined and published. BB-12® originates from Chr. Hansen’s collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12® have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12® exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12®. BB-12® has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12® through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12® has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12® has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12® increases the body’s resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:27682233

  3. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12®

    PubMed Central

    Jungersen, Mikkel; Wind, Anette; Johansen, Eric; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Eskesen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®), which is the world’s most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12® has been determined and published. BB-12® originates from Chr. Hansen’s collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12® have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12® exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12®. BB-12® has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12® through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12® has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12® has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12® increases the body’s resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections.

  4. Intraspecies Genomic Diversity and Long-Term Persistence of Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Andrei V.; Efimov, Boris A.; Smeianov, Vladimir V.; Kafarskaia, Lyudmila I.; Pikina, Alla P.; Shkoporov, Andrei N.

    2015-01-01

    Members of genus Bifidobacterium are Gram-positive bacteria, representing a large part of the human infant microbiota and moderately common in adults. However, our knowledge about their diversity, intraspecific phylogeny and long-term persistence in humans is still limited. Bifidobacterium longum is generally considered to be the most common and prevalent species in the intestinal microbiota. In this work we studied whole genome sequences of 28 strains of B. longum, including 8 sequences described in this paper. Part of these strains were isolated from healthy children during a long observation period (up to 10 years between isolation from the same patient). The three known subspecies (longum, infantis and suis) could be clearly divided using sequence-based phylogenetic methods, gene content and the average nucleotide identity. The profiles of glycoside hydrolase genes reflected the different ecological specializations of these three subspecies. The high impact of horizontal gene transfer on genomic diversity was observed, which is possibly due to a large number of prophages and rapidly spreading plasmids. The pan-genome characteristics of the subspecies longum corresponded to the open pan-genome model. While the major part of the strain-specific genetic loci represented transposons and phage-derived regions, a large number of cell envelope synthesis genes were also observed within this category, representing high variability of cell surface molecules. We observed the cases of isolation of high genetically similar strains of B. longum from the same patients after long periods of time, however, we didn’t succeed in the isolation of genetically identical bacteria: a fact, reflecting the high plasticity of microbiota in children. PMID:26275230

  5. Evaluation of the probiotic properties of new Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and their in vitro effect.

    PubMed

    Presti, I; D'Orazio, G; Labra, M; La Ferla, B; Mezzasalma, V; Bizzaro, G; Giardina, S; Michelotti, A; Tursi, F; Vassallo, M; Di Gennaro, P

    2015-07-01

    Probiotic ingestion is recommended as a preventive approach to maintain the balance of the intestinal microbiota and to enhance the human well-being. During the whole life of each individual, the gut microbiota composition could be altered by lifestyle, diet, antibiotic therapies and other stress conditions, which may lead to acute and chronic disorders. Hence, probiotics can be administered for the prevention or treatment of some disorders, including lactose malabsorption, acute diarrhoea, irritable bowel syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis and mild forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The probiotic-mediated effect is an important issue that needs to be addressed in relation to strain-specific probiotic properties. In this work, the probiotic properties of new Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains were screened, and their effects in vitro were evaluated. They were screened for probiotic properties by determining their tolerance to low pH and to bile salts, antibiotic sensitivity, antimicrobial activity and vitamin B8, B9 and B12 production, and by considering their ability to increase the antioxidant potential and to modulate the inflammatory status of systemic-miming cell lines in vitro. Three out of the examined strains presenting the most performant probiotic properties, as Lactobacillus plantarum PBS067, Lactobacillus rhamnosus PBS070 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis PBSO75, were evaluated for their effects also on human intestinal HT-29 cell line. The obtained results support the possibility to move to another level of study, that is, the oral administration of these probiotical strains to patients with acute and chronic gut disorders, by in vivo experiments.

  6. Hydrolysis of oligofructoses by the recombinant beta-fructofuranosidase from Bifidobacterium lactis.

    PubMed

    Janer, Carolina; Rohr, Lukas M; Peláez, Carmen; Laloi, Maryse; Cleusix, Valentine; Requena, Teresa; Meile, Leo

    2004-05-01

    The ability of the beta-fructofuranosidase (EC 3.2.1.26) from Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140T to cleave a variety of fructooligosaccharides was characterised. We identified its gene on a cloned chromosomal DNA fragment by sequence similarity (69% identity) to the putative CscA protein encoded in the Bifidobacterium longum genome. The deduced amino acid sequence of 532 residues (59.4 kDa) appeared to be identical to the beta-fructofuranosidase from the same strain recently described by Ehrmann et al. (Curr. Microbiol. 2003, 46, 391-397). However, the characterisation of the heterologously expressed enzyme showed several discrepancies to the referred study. First, the B. lactis beta-fructofuranosidase gene was found to have 41% identity with CscA from E. coli in contrast to the 16% reported, therefore it was assigned to as CscA protein instead of BfrA. Second, we observed only low activity of the enzyme towards sucrose (6%) instead of the 100% previously reported. Instead, we measured highest activity (100%) of the enzyme with the oligofructose Raftilose as a substrate compared with the inulin of low degree of polymerisation Raftiline LS (29%) and the highly polymerised Raftiline HP (10%). Altogether, the enzyme showed high affinity to terminal beta(2-1) glycosyl linkages between fructose moieties. The Km values obtained for Raftilose, Raftiline LS and sucrose were 0.12, 7.08 and 8.37 mM, respectively, and V(max) values for the conversion to fructose were calculated to be 5, 21 and 17 micromol/min per mg of protein, respectively. Growth of B. lactis was supported by fructans of low degree of polymerisation (Raftilose and Raftiline LS), whereas we observed no growth with highly polymerised inulin (Raftiline HP).

  7. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model

    PubMed Central

    Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01). Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01) and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05). In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01) and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05) and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01), decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05), normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may protect against

  8. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiang; Linglong, Peng; Weixia, Du; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ). Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01). Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01) and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05). In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01) and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05) and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01), decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05), normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may protect against

  9. Bosom Buddies: The Symbiotic Relationship Between Infants and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum and ssp. infantis. Genetic and Probiotic Features.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Silvia; Stanton, Catherine; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene; Ross, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a complex community that plays an important role in human health from the initial steps of its establishment. Its microbial composition has been suggested to result from selective pressures imposed by the host and is modulated by competition among its members. Bifidobacterium longum is one of the most abundant species of the Bifidobacterium genus in the gut microbiota of healthy breast-fed infants and adults. The recent advancements of 'omics techniques have facilitated the genetic and functional studies of different gut microbiota members. They have revealed the complex genetic pathways used to metabolize different compounds that likely contribute to the competitiveness and persistence of B. longum in the colon. The discovery of a genomic island in B. longum ssp. infantis that encodes specific enzymes for the metabolism of human milk oligosaccharides suggests a specific ecological adaptation. Moreover, B. longum is widely used as probiotic, and beneficial effects in infant health have been reported in several studies. PMID:26934170

  10. Production of exopolysaccharides by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains of human origin, and metabolic activity of the producing bacteria in milk.

    PubMed

    Salazar, N; Prieto, A; Leal, J A; Mayo, B; Bada-Gancedo, J C; de los Reyes-Gavilán, C G; Ruas-Madiedo, P

    2009-09-01

    This work reports on the physicochemical characterization of 21 exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, as well as the growth and metabolic activity of the EPS-producing strains in milk. The strains belong to the species Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus vaginalis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium longum, and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum. The molar mass distribution of EPS fractions showed 2 peaks of different sizes, which is a feature shared with some EPS from bacteria of food origin. In general, we detected an association between the EPS size distribution and the EPS-producing species, although because of the low numbers of human bacterial EPS tested, we could not conclusively establish a correlation. The main monosaccharide components of the EPS under study were glucose, galactose, and rhamnose, which are the same as those found in food polymers; however, the rhamnose and glucose ratios was generally higher than the galactose ratio in our human bacterial EPS. All EPS-producing strains were able to grow and acidify milk; most lactobacilli produced lactic acid as the main metabolite. The lactic acid-to-acetic acid ratio in bifidobacteria was 0.7, close to the theoretical ratio, indicating that the EPS-producing strains did not produce an excessive amount of acetic acid, which could adversely affect the sensory properties of fermented milks. With respect to their viscosity-intensifying ability, L. plantarum H2 and L. rhamnosus E41 and E43R were able to increase the viscosity of stirred, fermented milks to a similar extent as the EPS-producing Streptococcus thermophilus strain used as a positive control. Therefore, these human EPS-producing bacteria could be used as adjuncts in mixed cultures for the formulation of functional foods if probiotic characteristics could be demonstrated. This is the first article reporting the

  11. Sequence analysis of plasmid pKJ50 from Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Park, M S; Shin, D W; Lee, K H; Ji, G E

    1999-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid, pKJ50, isolated from an intestinal bacterium, Bifidobacterium longum KJ, has been determined. The plasmid was analysed and found to be 4960 bp in size with a G+C content of 61.7 mol%. Computer analysis of sequence data revealed three major ORFs encoding putative proteins of 31.5 (ORFI), 24.5 (ORFII) and 38.6 kDa (ORFIII). ORFI encodes a protein with a pI of 10.18 and shows relatively high amino acid sequence similarity (more than 60%) with several plasmid replication proteins from Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Southern blot analysis showed that pKJ50 accumulates an ssDNA intermediate, suggesting that it replicates by a rolling-circle mechanism. Upstream of ORFI, three sets of repeated sequences resembling iteron structures of related plasmids were identified. ORFIII encodes a protein with a pI of 10.97. It also shows a high level of amino acid sequence similarity with some plasmid mobilization proteins. Upstream of ORFIII, a 12 bp stretch resembles an oriT DNA sequence with inverted repeats identical to those found in conjugative plasmids. Hydropathy plot analysis of ORFII, encoding an acidic protein (pI = 4.95), suggests it is a transmembrane protein. Several interesting palindromic sequences, repeat sequences and hairpin-loop structures around ORFI, which might confer regulatory effects on the replication of the plasmid, were also noted. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and in vitro translation confirmed the expression of ORFI and ORFII. RT-PCR produced amplified DNA fragments of the expected sizes, corresponding to ORFI and ORFII. However, no RT-PCR product corresponding to ORFIII was obtained. In vitro translation showed protein bands of the expected sizes, corresponding to each ORF. A shuttle vector capable of transforming Bifidobacterium animalis MB209 was constructed by cloning pKJ50 and a chloramphenicol resistance gene into pBR322.

  12. A pilot study of Bifidobacterium breve in neonates undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Probiotics have currently been widely used in patients undergoing various types of surgeries and improved their clinical outcomes, while data in pediatric cardiac surgery have been lacking. We investigated the safety and effects on the intestinal microbiota of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve in neonates undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Methods This pilot, randomized study was performed in a single-center, university hospital-based pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Twenty-one neonates undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease at >7 days after birth were randomly allocated to two groups: group A received 3 × 109 colony-forming units (CFU)/day of enteral B. breve strain Yakult (BBG-01), which was started 1 week before and terminated 1 week after surgery (n = 10), and group B did not receive BBG-01 (n = 11). Results The characteristics of the patients were similar in both groups. The postoperative days until fulfillment of the criteria for discharge from the PICU tended to be fewer in group A (8 [7–8] days) than in group B (9 [8–14] days) (p = 0.10). Likewise, the postoperative days to enteral nutrition or achievement of caloric goal tended to be fewer in group A than in group B. The Bifidobacterium in fecal samples after initiating BBG-01 in group A were significantly higher in number than that in group B. Enterobacteriaceae were significantly fewer in group A than in group B immediately (7.0 [3.9–7.7] vs. 8.5 [8.0–9.1] log10 cells/g) and 1 week (7.7 [7.0–8.1] vs. 9.3 [8.6–9.5] log10 cells/g) after surgery (p < 0.05 for both comparisons). The number of Pseudomonas after 1 week was significantly lower in group A than in group B (p = 0.04). The concentrations of total organic and acetic acids were also significantly higher in group A than in group B. The postoperative course was uncomplicated and all neonates were discharged alive from the PICU. Conclusions The perioperative

  13. Characterization of recombinant β-fructofuranosidase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis G1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We have previously reported on purification and characterization of β-fructofuranosidase (β-FFase) from Bifidobacterium adolescentis G1. This enzyme showed high activity of hydrolysis on fructo-oligosaccharides with a low degree of polymerization. Recently, genome sequences of B. longum NCC2705 and B. adolescentis ATCC 15703 were determined, and cscA gene in the both genome sequences encoding β-FFase was predicted. Here, cloning of cscA gene encoding putative β-FFase from B. adolescentis G1, its expression in E. coli and properties of the recombinant protein are described. Results Using the information of cscA gene from Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 15703, cscA gene from B. adolescentis G1 was cloned and sequenced. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified β-FFase from B. adolescentis G1 was identical to the deduced amino acid sequences of cscA gene from B. adolescentis G1. To confirm the translated product of the cscA gene, the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. Molecular mass of the purified recombinant enzyme was estimated to be about 66,000 by SDS-PAGE and 60,300 by MALDI TOF-MS. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 5.7 and the enzyme was stable at pH 5.0-8.6. The thermostability of the enzyme was up to 50°C. The Km (mM), Vmax (μmol/mg of protein/min), k0 (sec-1) and k0/Km(mM-1 sec-1) for 1-kestose, neokestose, nystose, fructosylnystose, sucrose and inulin were 1.7, 107, 107.5, 63.2, and 1.7, 142, 142.7, 83.9, and 3.9, 152, 152.8, 39.2, and 2.2, 75, 75.4, 34.3, and 38, 79, 79.4, 2.1, and 25.9, 77, 77.4, 3.0, respectively. The hydrolytic activity was strongly inhibited by AgNO3, SDS, and HgCl2. Conclusion The recombinant enzyme had similar specificity to the native enzyme, high affinity for 1-kestose, and low affinity for sucrose and inulin, although properties of the recombinant enzyme showed slight difference from those of the native one previously described. PMID:20380746

  14. Characterization of ATPase activity of the AAA ARC from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Mabel; de la Rosa, Ana Paulina Barba; Santos, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be probiotics that exist in the large intestine and are helpful to maintain human health. Oral administration of bifidobacteria may be effective in improving the intestinal flora and environment, stimulating the immune response and possibly preventing cancer. However, for consistent and positive results, further well-controlled studies are urgently needed to describe the basic mechanisms of this microorganism. Analysis of the proteasome-lacking Bifidobacterium longum genome reveals that it possesses a gene, IPR003593 AAA ATPase core, which codes a 56 kDa protein containing one AAA ATPase domain. Phylogenetic classification made by CLANS, positioned this sequence into the ARC divergent branch of the AAA ATPase family of proteins. N-terminal analysis of the sequence indicates this protein is closely related to other ATPases such as the Rhodococcus erythropolis ARC, Archaeoglobus fulgidus PAN, Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mpa and the human proteasomal Rpt1 subunit. This gene was cloned, the full-length recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified as a high-molecular size complex and named Bl-ARC. Enzymatic characterization showed that Bl-ARC ATPase is active, Mg(+2)-dependent and sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Gene organization positions bl-arc in a region flanked by a cluster of genes that includes pup, dop and pafA genes. These findings point to a possible function as a chaperone in the degradation pathway via pupylation.

  15. A Mesocosm of Lactobacillus johnsonii, Bifidobacterium longum, and Escherichia coli in the mouse gut.

    PubMed

    Denou, Emmanuel; Rezzonico, Enea; Panoff, Jean-Michel; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Brüssow, Harald

    2009-08-01

    The relative contribution of competition and cooperation at the microbe-microbe level is not well understood for the bacteria constituting the gut microbiota. The high number and variability of human gut commensals have hampered the analysis. To get some insight into the question how so many different bacterial species can coexist in the mammalian gut, we studied the interaction between three human gut commensals (Escherichia coli K-12, Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533, and Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705) in the intestine of gnotobiotic mice. The bacterial titers and their anatomical distribution were studied in the colonized mice. L. johnsonii achieved the highest cell counts in the stomach, while B. longum dominated the colon. The colon was also the intestinal location in which B. longum displayed the highest number of expressed genes, followed by the cecum and the small intestine. Addition of further bacterial strains led to strikingly different results. A Lactobacillus paracasei strain coexisted, while a second B. longum strain was excluded from the system. Notably, this strain lacked an operon involved in the degradation, import, and metabolism of mannosylated glycans. Subsequent introduction of the E. coli Nissle strain resulted in the elimination of L. johnsonii NCC533 and E. coli K-12, while B. longum NCC2705 showed a transient decrease in population size, demonstrating the dynamic nature of microbe-microbe interactions. The study of such simple interacting bacterial systems might help to derive some basic rules governing microbial ecology within the mammalian gut.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a theta-type cryptic plasmid from Bifidobacterium longum FI10564.

    PubMed

    Moon, Gi-Seong; Wegmann, Udo; Gunning, A Patrick; Gasson, Michael J; Narbad, Arjan

    2009-04-01

    A number of bifidobacterial species of human origin were screened for the presence of cryptic plasmids. One strain, Bifidobacterium longum FI10564, harbored plasmids of approximately 2.2 kb, 3.6 kb, and 4.9 kb in size. The smallest plasmid, pFI2576 (2,197 bp), was studied in detail and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. Computer-assisted analysis of this novel plasmid (G+C content 62%) identified 9 putative open reading frames (orfs), 3 of which were shown to be probable genes. These putative genes are arranged in an operon-like structure, in which the overlapping orfs 1 and 2 encode putative Rep proteins and are highly homologous to the rep genes of the B. longum plasmid pMB1 (1,847 bp). The mechanism of replication of pFI2576 was investigated using Southern blot analysis of whole cell lysates, with and without S1 nuclease treatment, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicate that pFI2576 is likely to use the theta mode of replication.

  17. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum ameliorates influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether the oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 could ameliorate influenza virus (IFV) infection in a mice model. Mice were orally administrated BB536 or saline for 2 weeks and then infected with IFV. Orally administered BB536 significantly alleviated symptoms, reduced the loss of body weight, and inhibited viral proliferation in the lungs relative to the control group findings. Histopathological findings in the lungs were improved in the BB536 group compared to control group findings. There was no significant difference in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-10 and IL-12p40 in the lungs between the groups, but the levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ were lower (p=0.076, 0.103, respectively) in the BB536 group compared with those of control group. The levels of IL-6 and IL-10 correlated significantly with the values of weight loss, and the levels of IFN-γ correlated with the virus titers in the lungs. These results suggested the potential of the oral administration of BB536 in ameliorating IFV infection and the possible involvement of anti-inflammatory effects of BB536 in the anti-infection effects against IFV.

  18. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are crucial in Bifidobacterium adolescentis-mediated inhibition of Yersinia enterocolitica infection.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    In industrialized countries bacterial intestinal infections are commonly caused by enteropathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. The interaction of the microbiota with the host immune system determines the adequacy of an appropriate response against pathogens. In this study we addressed whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium adolescentis is protective during intestinal Yersinia enterocolitica infection. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed with B. adolescentis, infected with Yersinia enterocolitica, or B. adolescentis fed and subsequently infected with Yersinia enterocolitica. B. adolescentis fed and Yersinia infected mice were protected from Yersinia infection as indicated by a significantly reduced weight loss and splenic Yersinia load when compared to Yersinia infected mice. Moreover, protection from infection was associated with increased intestinal plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell function was investigated using depletion experiments by injecting B. adolescentis fed, Yersinia infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-mouse PDCA-1 antibody, to deplete plasmacytoid dendritic cells, or respective isotype control. The B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia dissemination to the spleen was abrogated after plasmacytoid dendritic cell depletion indicating a crucial function for pDC in control of intestinal Yersinia infection. We suggest that feeding of B. adolescentis modulates the intestinal immune system in terms of increased plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies, which might account for the B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia enterocolitica infection.

  19. A GntR-type transcriptional repressor controls sialic acid utilization in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of healthy, breast-fed infants. The metabolism of sialic acid, a ubiquitous monosaccharide in the infant and adult gut, by B. breve UCC2003 is dependent on a large gene cluster, designated the nan/nag cluster. This study describes the transcriptional regulation of the nan/nag cluster and thus sialic acid metabolism in B. breve UCC2003. Insertion mutagenesis and transcriptome analysis revealed that the nan/nag cluster is regulated by a GntR family transcriptional repressor, designated NanR. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli EC101 in which the nanR gene had been cloned and overexpressed was shown to bind to two promoter regions within this cluster, each of which containing an imperfect inverted repeat that is believed to act as the NanR operator sequence. Formation of the DNA-NanR complex is prevented in the presence of sialic acid, which we had previously shown to induce transcription of this gene cluster.

  20. Biochemical Characterization and Complete Conversion of Coenzyme Specificity of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ping; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum is a very important gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract for keeping the digestive and immune system healthy. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) from B. longum (BlIDH), a novel member in Type II subfamily, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized in detail. The active form of BlIDH was an 83-kDa homodimer. Kinetic analysis showed BlIDH was a NADP+-dependent IDH (NADP-IDH), with a 567- and 193-fold preference for NADP+ over NAD+ in the presence of Mg2+ and Mn2+, respectively. The maximal activity for BlIDH occurred at 60 °C (with Mn2+) and 65 °C (with Mg2+), and pH 7.5 (with Mn2+) and pH 8.0 (with Mg2+). Heat-inactivation profiles revealed that BlIDH retained 50% of maximal activity after incubation at 45 °C for 20 min with either Mn2+ or Mg2+. Furthermore, the coenzyme specificity of BlIDH can be completely reversed from NADP+ to NAD+ by a factor of 2387 by replacing six residues. This current work, the first report on the coenzyme specificity conversion of Type II NADP-IDHs, would provide better insight into the evolution of NADP+ use by the IDH family. PMID:26927087

  1. Elaboration of a probiotic oblea from whey fermented using Lactobacillus acidophilus or Bifidobacterium infantis.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-de Santiago, G; Sáenz-Collins, C P; Rojas-de Gante, C

    2012-12-01

    A novel probiotic product was developed, which was formulated as an oblea (wafer-type dehydrated traditional Mexican dessert) using goat sweet whey fermented with Bifidobacterium infantis or Lactobacillus acidophilus. To obtain the probiotic oblea, the fermented whey was formulated with prebiotic carbohydrates (inulin and resistant starch) and gelatin, and the preparation was poured onto a polytetrafluoroethylene-coated nonstick baking pan, dried in a convection oven, and finally dehydrated at a low relative humidity and room temperature (23±2°C). The amounts of prebiotic carbohydrates and gelatin to be used in the formulation were determined by a factorial experimental design. An untrained sensory panel evaluated 3 quality characteristics (film formation, homogeneity, and smoothness) in the final product. Three different drying temperatures were tested, namely, 40, 55, and 70°C. Bacterial survival at each temperature was determined by viable plate-counting. The best formulation, based on the quality characteristics tested, consisted of 58.33% (vol/vol) of fermented whey, 8.33% (vol/vol) of 6% (wt/vol) resistant starch dispersion, 16.66% (vol/vol) of 15% (wt/vol) inulin solution, and 16.66% (vol/vol) of a 10% (wt/vol) gelatin solution. Drying at 55±2°C for 2.66±0.22 h allowed for concentrations of probiotic bacteria above 9 log(10) cfu/g, which is above the minimum concentration required in a probiotic product.

  2. Genome Analysis and Characterisation of the Exopolysaccharide Produced by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum 35624™

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Friedrich; Kosma, Paul; O’Callaghan, Amy; Leahy, Sinead; Bottacini, Francesca; Molloy, Evelyn; Plattner, Stephan; Schiavi, Elisa; Gleinser, Marita; Groeger, David; Grant, Ray; Rodriguez Perez, Noelia; Healy, Selena; Svehla, Elisabeth; Windwarder, Markus; Hofinger, Andreas; O’Connell Motherway, Mary; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Xu, Jun; Roper, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe; O’Mahony, Liam

    2016-01-01

    The Bifibobacterium longum subsp. longum 35624™ strain (formerly named Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis) is a well described probiotic with clinical efficacy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome clinical trials and induces immunoregulatory effects in mice and in humans. This paper presents (a) the genome sequence of the organism allowing the assignment to its correct subspeciation longum; (b) a comparative genome assessment with other B. longum strains and (c) the molecular structure of the 35624 exopolysaccharide (EPS624). Comparative genome analysis of the 35624 strain with other B. longum strains determined that the sub-speciation of the strain is longum and revealed the presence of a 35624-specific gene cluster, predicted to encode the biosynthetic machinery for EPS624. Following isolation and acid treatment of the EPS, its chemical structure was determined using gas and liquid chromatography for sugar constituent and linkage analysis, electrospray and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for sequencing and NMR. The EPS consists of a branched hexasaccharide repeating unit containing two galactose and two glucose moieties, galacturonic acid and the unusual sugar 6-deoxy-L-talose. These data demonstrate that the B. longum 35624 strain has specific genetic features, one of which leads to the generation of a characteristic exopolysaccharide. PMID:27656878

  3. Biochemical Characterization and Complete Conversion of Coenzyme Specificity of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Ping; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2016-02-26

    Bifidobacterium longum is a very important gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract for keeping the digestive and immune system healthy. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) from B. longum (BlIDH), a novel member in Type II subfamily, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized in detail. The active form of BlIDH was an 83-kDa homodimer. Kinetic analysis showed BlIDH was a NADP⁺-dependent IDH (NADP-IDH), with a 567- and 193-fold preference for NADP⁺ over NAD⁺ in the presence of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The maximal activity for BlIDH occurred at 60 °C (with Mn(2+)) and 65 °C (with Mg(2+)), and pH 7.5 (with Mn(2+)) and pH 8.0 (with Mg(2+)). Heat-inactivation profiles revealed that BlIDH retained 50% of maximal activity after incubation at 45 °C for 20 min with either Mn(2+) or Mg(2+). Furthermore, the coenzyme specificity of BlIDH can be completely reversed from NADP⁺ to NAD⁺ by a factor of 2387 by replacing six residues. This current work, the first report on the coenzyme specificity conversion of Type II NADP-IDHs, would provide better insight into the evolution of NADP⁺ use by the IDH family.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of Bifidobacterium longum strains that show a differential response to hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Taylor S; Ward, Robert E; Steele, James L; Broadbent, Jeff R

    2015-10-20

    Consumer and commercial interest in foods containing probiotic bifidobacteria is increasing. However, because bifidobacteria are anaerobic, oxidative stress can diminish cell viability during production and storage of bioactive foods. We previously found Bifidobacterium longum strain NCC2705 had significantly greater intrinsic and inducible resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than strain D2957. Here, we explored the basis for these differences by examining the transcriptional responses of both strains to sub-lethal H2O2 exposure for 5- or 60-min. Strain NCC2705 had 288 genes that were differentially expressed after the 5-min treatment and 114 differentially expressed genes after the 60-min treatment. In contrast, strain D2957 had only 21 and 90 differentially expressed genes after the 5- and 60-min treatments, respectively. Both strains showed up-regulation of genes coding enzymes implicated in oxidative stress resistance, such as thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, peroxiredoxin, ferredoxin, glutaredoxin, and anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase, but induction levels were typically highest in NCC2705. Compared to D2957, NCC2705 also had more up-regulated genes involved in transcriptional regulation and more down-regulated genes involved in sugar transport and metabolism. These results provide a greater understanding of the molecular basis for oxidative stress resistance in B. longum and the factors that contribute to strain-to-strain variability in survival in bioactive food products. PMID:26299205

  5. Safety assessment of Bifidobacterium longum JDM301 based on complete genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Zhuo-Yang; Liu, Chang; Malakar, Pradeep K; Guo, Xiao-Kui

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) JDM301 based on complete genome sequences. METHODS: The complete genome sequences of JDM301 were determined using the GS 20 system. Putative virulence factors, putative antibiotic resistance genes and genes encoding enzymes responsible for harmful metabolites were identified by blast with virulence factors database, antibiotic resistance genes database and genes associated with harmful metabolites in previous reports. Minimum inhibitory concentration of 16 common antimicrobial agents was evaluated by E-test. RESULTS: JDM301 was shown to contain 36 genes associated with antibiotic resistance, 5 enzymes related to harmful metabolites and 162 nonspecific virulence factors mainly associated with transcriptional regulation, adhesion, sugar and amino acid transport. B. longum JDM301 was intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and streptomycin and susceptible to vancomycin, amoxicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, rifampicin, imipenem and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazol. JDM301 was moderately resistant to bacitracin, while an earlier study showed that bifidobacteria were susceptible to this antibiotic. A tetracycline resistance gene with the risk of transfer was found in JDM301, which needs to be experimentally validated. CONCLUSION: The safety assessment of JDM301 using information derived from complete bacterial genome will contribute to a wider and deeper insight into the safety of probiotic bacteria. PMID:22346255

  6. Fructose Uptake in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 Is Mediated by an ATP-binding Cassette Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiao; Guo, Yanhong; Shao, Changlin; Sun, Zhongke; Zhurina, Daria; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Wei; Zou, Dayang; Jiang, Zheng; Wang, Xuesong; Zhao, Jiangli; Shang, Wei; Li, Xuelian; Liao, Xiangru; Huang, Liuyu; Riedel, Christian U.; Yuan, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system was identified in Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 that is highly up-regulated during growth on fructose as the sole carbon source. Cloning and expression of the corresponding ORFs (bl0033–0036) result in efficient fructose uptake by bacteria. Sequence analysis reveals high similarity to typical ABC transport systems and suggests that these genes are organized as an operon. Expression of FruE is induced by fructose, ribose, or xylose and is able to bind these sugars with fructose as the preferred substrate. Our data suggest that BL0033–0036 constitute a high affinity fructose-specific ABC transporter of B. longum NCC2705. We thus suggest to rename the coding genes to fruEKFG and the corresponding proteins to FruE (sugar-binding protein), FruK (ATPase subunit), FruF, and FruG (membrane permeases). Furthermore, protein-protein interactions between the components of the transporter complex were determined by GST pulldown and Western blot analysis. This revealed interactions between the membrane subunits FruF and FruG with FruE, which in vivo is located on the external side of the membrane, and with the cytoplasmatic ATPase FruK. This is in line with the proposed model for bacterial ABC sugar transporters. PMID:22102285

  7. Bifidobacterium lactis 420 and fish oil enhance intestinal epithelial integrity in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Mokkala, Kati; Laitinen, Kirsi; Röytiö, Henna

    2016-03-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a predisposing factor for low-grade inflammation-associated conditions, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Dietary components may influence intestinal barrier integrity. We hypothesized that the dietary supplements Bifidobacterium lactis 420, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil have beneficial impacts on intestinal barrier integrity. In addition, we hypothesized that the coadministration of these components results in synergistic benefits to the integrity of the intestinal barrier. To study this, we investigated the impact of cell-free culture supernatant from dietary supplements B lactis 420 and L rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil, separately and in combination, on intestinal permeability in a CaCo-2 cell model. Administered separately, both B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil significantly increased the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier, as determined by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), whereas L rhamnosus did not. The TEER increase with B lactis 420 was dose dependent. Interestingly, a combination of B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil negated the increase in TEER of the single components. mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, was not altered, but the mRNA expression of myosin light chain kinase increased after fish oil treatment. To conclude, single dietary components, namely, B lactis 420 and fish oil, induced beneficial effects on intestinal barrier integrity in vitro, whereas a combination of 2 beneficial test compounds resulted in a null effect. PMID:26923511

  8. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, William J.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Perry, Rechelle; Teh, Koon Hoong; Otter, Don E.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2016-01-01

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present study provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat. PMID:27468806

  9. Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum alters gut luminal metabolism through modification of the gut microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Hirosuke; Odamaki, Toshitaka; Fukuda, Shinji; Kato, Tamotsu; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Jun; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are well known as health-promoting agents that modulate intestinal microbiota. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Using gnotobiotic mice harboring 15 strains of predominant human gut-derived microbiota (HGM), we investigated the effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536-HGM) supplementation on the gut luminal metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics showed significantly increased fecal levels of pimelate, a precursor of biotin, and butyrate in the BB536-HGM group. In addition, the bioassay revealed significantly elevated fecal levels of biotin in the BB536-HGM group. Metatranscriptomic analysis of fecal microbiota followed by an in vitro bioassay indicated that the elevated biotin level was due to an alteration in metabolism related to biotin synthesis by Bacteroides caccae in this mouse model. Furthermore, the proportion of Eubacterium rectale, a butyrate producer, was significantly higher in the BB536-HGM group than in the group without B. longum BB536 supplementation. Our findings help to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the effect of B. longum BB536 on the gut luminal metabolism through its interactions with the microbial community. PMID:26315217

  10. Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum alters gut luminal metabolism through modification of the gut microbial community.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Hirosuke; Odamaki, Toshitaka; Fukuda, Shinji; Kato, Tamotsu; Xiao, Jin-zhong; Abe, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Jun; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are well known as health-promoting agents that modulate intestinal microbiota. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Using gnotobiotic mice harboring 15 strains of predominant human gut-derived microbiota (HGM), we investigated the effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536-HGM) supplementation on the gut luminal metabolism. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics showed significantly increased fecal levels of pimelate, a precursor of biotin, and butyrate in the BB536-HGM group. In addition, the bioassay revealed significantly elevated fecal levels of biotin in the BB536-HGM group. Metatranscriptomic analysis of fecal microbiota followed by an in vitro bioassay indicated that the elevated biotin level was due to an alteration in metabolism related to biotin synthesis by Bacteroides caccae in this mouse model. Furthermore, the proportion of Eubacterium rectale, a butyrate producer, was significantly higher in the BB536-HGM group than in the group without B. longum BB536 supplementation. Our findings help to elucidate the molecular basis underlying the effect of B. longum BB536 on the gut luminal metabolism through its interactions with the microbial community.

  11. Oral treatment with Bifidobacterium longum 51A reduced inflammation in a murine experimental model of gout.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A T; Galvão, I; Amaral, F A; Teixeira, M M; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an acute inflammatory disease characterised by the presence of uric acid crystals in the joint. This event promotes neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to tissue damage. We investigated here whether the oral administration of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum 5(1A) (BL) could ameliorate monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in a murine model of gout. Mice received oral administration of BL or saline daily for 7 days and then were injected with MSU in the knee cavity. Treatment with BL significantly alleviated the inflammatory parameters, as seen by reduced hypernociception, reduced neutrophil accumulation in the joint and myeloperoxidase activity in periarticular tissue. There was inhibition of the production of CXCL1 and interleukin(IL)-1β in joints. Levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly higher in the knee tissue of mice treated with than control mice injected with MSU. In conclusion, oral BL treatment reduced the inflammatory response in an experimental murine model of gout, suggesting it may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in patients with gout.

  12. Effects of the probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis in the maternal separation model of depression.

    PubMed

    Desbonnet, L; Garrett, L; Clarke, G; Kiely, B; Cryan, J F; Dinan, T G

    2010-11-10

    The concept that intestinal microbial composition not only affects the health of the gut, but also influences centrally-mediated systems involved in mood, is supported by a growing body of literature. Despite the emergent interest in brain-gut communication and its possible role in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders such as depression, particularly subtypes with accompanying gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, there are few studies dedicated to the search for therapeutic solutions that address both central and peripheral facets of these illnesses. This study aims to assess the potential benefits of the probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis in the rat maternal separation (MS) model, a paradigm that has proven to be of value in the study of stress-related GI and mood disorders. MS adult rat offsprings were chronically treated with bifidobacteria or citalopram and subjected to the forced swim test (FST) to assess motivational state. Cytokine concentrations in stimulated whole blood samples, monoamine levels in the brain, and central and peripheral hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis measures were also analysed. MS reduced swim behavior and increased immobility in the FST, decreased noradrenaline (NA) content in the brain, and enhanced peripheral interleukin (IL)-6 release and amygdala corticotrophin-releasing factor mRNA levels. Probiotic treatment resulted in normalization of the immune response, reversal of behavioral deficits, and restoration of basal NA concentrations in the brainstem. These findings point to a more influential role for bifidobacteria in neural function, and suggest that probiotics may have broader therapeutic applications than previously considered. PMID:20696216

  13. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kelly, William J; Cookson, Adrian L; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C; Perry, Rechelle; Teh, Koon Hoong; Otter, Don E; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Leahy, Sinead C

    2016-01-01

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present study provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat. PMID:27468806

  14. Identification of a Peptide Produced by Bifidobacterium longum CECT 7210 with Antirotaviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chenoll, Empar; Casinos, Beatriz; Bataller, Esther; Buesa, Javier; Ramón, Daniel; Genovés, Salvador; Fábrega, Joan; Rivero Urgell, Montserrat; Moreno Muñoz, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the main causes of acute diarrhea and enteritis in infants. Currently, studies are underway to assess the use of probiotics to improve rotavirus vaccine protection. A previous work demonstrated that the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 is able to hinder rotavirus replication both in vitro and in vivo. The present study takes a systematic approach in order to identify the molecule directly involved in rotavirus inhibition. Supernatant protease digestions revealed both the proteinaceous nature of the active substance and the fact that the molecule responsible for inhibiting rotavirus replication is released to the supernatant. Following purification by cationic exchange chromatography, active fractions were obtained and the functional compound was identified as an 11-amino acid peptide (MHQPHQPLPPT, named 11-mer peptide) with a molecular mass of 1.282 KDa. The functionality of 11-mer was verified using the synthesized peptide in Wa, Ito, and VA70 rotavirus infections of both HT-29 and MA-104 cell lines. Finally, protease activity was detected in B. longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 supernatant, which releases 11-mer peptide. A preliminary identification of the protease is also included in the study. PMID:27199974

  15. Bifidobacterium adolescentis protects from the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Reichold, Astrid; Brenner, Sibylle A; Spruss, Astrid; Förster-Fromme, Karin; Bergheim, Ina; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that an oral supplementation of Bifidobacterium adolescentis protects against a diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in a mouse model, C57BL/6 mice were fed either a Western-style or a control diet±tap water fortified with B. adolescentis (5×10(7) cfu/ml) ad libitum for 12 weeks. Mice fed a Western-style diet gained significantly more weight than mice fed a control diet and developed a mild steatohepatitis. Western-style diet fed groups concomitantly treated with B. adolescentis had significantly decreased liver damage, whereas portal endotoxin levels and toll-like receptor-4 protein levels as well as myeloid differentiation factor 88 mRNA were increased in livers of both Western-style diet fed groups. The protective effects of the B. adolescentis were associated with a significant attenuation of the formation of reactive oxygen species, activation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and induction of markers of inflammation in the liver. Taken together, our data suggest that an oral supplementation of the B. adolescentis attenuates diet-induced steatohepatitis, and this effect is associated with prevention from lipid peroxidation, NFκB activation and finally inflammation in the liver.

  16. Preparation of Eleutherine americana-Alginate Complex Microcapsules and Application in Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Phoem, Atchara N; Chanthachum, Suphitchaya; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation using extrusion and emulsion techniques was prepared for Bifidobacterium longum protection against sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, refrigeration storage and heat treatment. Eleutherine americana was used as the co-encapsulating agent. Hydrolysis of E. americana by gastric and intestinal juices was also determined. E. americana and its oligosaccharide extract demonstrated their resistance to low pH and partial tolerance to human α-amylase. Microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana and oligosaccharide extract prepared by the extrusion technique survived better than that by the emulsion technique under adverse conditions. Survival of microencapsulated cells after exposure to the juices and refrigeration storage was higher than free cells at Weeks 2 and 4. In addition, the viability of microencapsulated cells was better than free cells at 65 °C for 15 min. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana offers the effective delivery of probiotics to colon and maintains their survival in food products. PMID:25629556

  17. Bifidobacterium longum L-arabinose isomerase--overexpression in Lactococcus lactis, purification, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Noora; Nyyssölä, Antti; Salonen, Kalle; Turunen, Ossi

    2012-09-01

    Bifidobacterium longum NRRL B-41409 L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) was cloned and overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis using a phosphate-depletion-inducible expression system. The purified B. longum L-AI was characterized using D-galactose and L-arabinose as the substrates. The enzyme was active and stable at acidic pH with an optimum at pH 6.0-6.5. The enzyme showed the highest activity at 55 °C during a 20-min incubation at pH 6.5. The K(m) value was 120 mM for L-arabinose and 590 mM for D-galactose. The V(max) was 42 U mg(-1) with L-arabinose and 7.7 U mg(-1) with D-galactose as the substrates. The enzyme had very low requirement for metal ions for catalytic activity, but it was stabilized by divalent metal ions (Mg(2+), Mn(2+)). The enzyme bound the metal ions so tightly that they could not be fully removed from the active site by EDTA treatment. Using purified B. longum L-AI as the catalyst at 35 °C, equilibrium yields of 36 % D-tagatose and 11 % L-ribulose with 1.67 M D-galactose and L-arabinose, respectively, as the substrates were reached.

  18. The probiotic Bifidobacterium breve B632 inhibited the growth of Enterobacteriaceae within colicky infant microbiota cultures.

    PubMed

    Simone, Marta; Gozzoli, Caterina; Quartieri, Andrea; Mazzola, Giuseppe; Di Gioia, Diana; Amaretti, Alberto; Raimondi, Stefano; Rossi, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Infant colic is a common gastrointestinal disorder of newborns, mostly related to imbalances in the composition of gut microbiota and particularly to the presence of gas-producing coliforms and to lower levels of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. Probiotics could help to contain this disturbance, with formulations consisting of Lactobacillus strains being the most utilized. In this work, the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve B632 that was specifically selected for its ability to inhibit gas-producing coliforms, was challenged against the Enterobacteriaceae within continuous cultures of microbiota from a 2-month-old colicky infant. As confirmed by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting, B. breve B632 persisted in probiotic-supplemented microbiota cultures, accounting for the 64% of Bifidobacteria at the steady state. The probiotic succeeded in inhibiting coliforms, since FISH and qPCR revealed that the amount of Enterobacteriaceae after 18 h of cultivation was 0.42 and 0.44 magnitude orders lower (P < 0.05) in probiotic-supplemented microbiota cultures than in the control ones. These results support the possibility to move to another level of study, that is, the administration of B. breve B632 to a cohort of colicky newborns, in order to observe the behavior of this strain in vivo and to validate its effect in colic treatment. PMID:25309908

  19. Induction of Sucrose Utilization Genes from Bifidobacterium lactis by Sucrose and Raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Marla I.; Abratt, Valerie R.; Reid, Sharon J.

    2003-01-01

    The probiotic organism Bifidobacterium lactis was isolated from a yoghurt starter culture with the aim of analyzing its use of carbohydrates for the development of prebiotics. A sucrose utilization gene cluster of B. lactis was identified by complementation of a gene library in Escherichia coli. Three genes, encoding a sucrose phosphorylase (ScrP), a GalR-LacI-type transcriptional regulator (ScrR), and a sucrose transporter (ScrT), were identified by sequence analysis. The scrP gene was expressed constitutively from its own promoter in E. coli grown in complete medium, and the strain hydrolyzed sucrose in a reaction that was dependent on the presence of phosphates. Primer extension experiments with scrP performed by using RNA isolated from B. lactis identified the transcriptional start site 102 bp upstream of the ATG start codon, immediately adjacent to a palindromic sequence resembling a regulator binding site. In B. lactis, total sucrase activity was induced by the presence of sucrose, raffinose, or oligofructose in the culture medium and was repressed by glucose. RNA analysis of the scrP, scrR, and scrT genes in B. lactis indicated that expression of these genes was influenced by transcriptional regulation and that all three genes were similarly induced by sucrose and raffinose and repressed by glucose. Analysis of the sucrase activities of deletion constructs in heterologous E. coli indicated that ScrR functions as a positive regulator. PMID:12513973

  20. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  1. Short Fractions of Oligofructose Are Preferentially Metabolized by Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010

    PubMed Central

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Avonts, Lazlo; De Vuyst, Luc

    2004-01-01

    The growth of Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010 on different energy sources was studied through small- and large-scale fermentations. Growth on both more common energy sources (glucose, fructose, galactose, lactose, and sucrose) and inulin-type fructans was examined. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis was used to investigate the kinetics. Gas chromatography was used to determine the fructan degradation during the fermentation process. B. animalis DN-173 010 was unable to grow on a medium containing glucose as the sole energy source. In general, monosaccharides were poor growth substrates for the B. animalis strain. The fermentations with the inulin-type fructans resulted in changes in both growth and metabolite production due to the preferential metabolism of certain fructans, especially the short-chain oligomers. Only after depletion of the shorter chains were the larger fractions also metabolized, although to a lesser extent. Acetic acid was the major metabolite produced during all fermentation experiments. At the beginning of the fermentation, high levels of lactic acid were produced, which were partially replaced by formic acid at later stages. This suggests a shift in sugar metabolism to gain additional ATP that is necessary for growth on oligofructose, which is metabolized more slowly. PMID:15066781

  2. Bioaccessible Antioxidants in Milk Fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Mérilie; Savard, Patricia; Rivière, Audrey; LaPointe, Gisèle

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175–358%) was observed during digestion. PMID:25802836

  3. Biochemical Characterization and Complete Conversion of Coenzyme Specificity of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi-Ping; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum is a very important gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract for keeping the digestive and immune system healthy. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) from B. longum (BlIDH), a novel member in Type II subfamily, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized in detail. The active form of BlIDH was an 83-kDa homodimer. Kinetic analysis showed BlIDH was a NADP⁺-dependent IDH (NADP-IDH), with a 567- and 193-fold preference for NADP⁺ over NAD⁺ in the presence of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The maximal activity for BlIDH occurred at 60 °C (with Mn(2+)) and 65 °C (with Mg(2+)), and pH 7.5 (with Mn(2+)) and pH 8.0 (with Mg(2+)). Heat-inactivation profiles revealed that BlIDH retained 50% of maximal activity after incubation at 45 °C for 20 min with either Mn(2+) or Mg(2+). Furthermore, the coenzyme specificity of BlIDH can be completely reversed from NADP⁺ to NAD⁺ by a factor of 2387 by replacing six residues. This current work, the first report on the coenzyme specificity conversion of Type II NADP-IDHs, would provide better insight into the evolution of NADP⁺ use by the IDH family. PMID:26927087

  4. Allergic Patients with Long-Term Asthma Display Low Levels of Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Arancha; Milani, Christian; López, Patricia; Donado, Carmen D; Cuervo, Adriana; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Turroni, Francesca; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests a relationship between specific allergic processes, such as atopic eczema in children, and an aberrant fecal microbiota. However, little is known about the complete microbiota profile of adult individuals suffering from asthma. We determined the fecal microbiota in 21 adult patients suffering allergic asthma (age 39.43 ± 10.98 years old) and compare it with the fecal microbiota of 22 healthy controls (age 39.29 ± 9.21 years old) using culture independent techniques. An Ion-Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based amplification and sequencing protocol was used to determine the fecal microbiota profile of the individuals. Sequence microbiota analysis showed that the microbial alpha-diversity was not significantly different between healthy and allergic individuals and no clear clustering of the samples was obtained using an unsupervised principal component analysis. However, the analysis of specific bacterial groups allowed us to detect significantly lower levels of bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma. Also, in allergic individuals the Bifidobacterium adolescentis species prevailed within the bifidobacterial population. The reduction in the levels on bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma suggests a new target in allergy research and opens possibilities for the therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota in this group of patients.

  5. Allergic Patients with Long-Term Asthma Display Low Levels of Bifidobacterium adolescentis

    PubMed Central

    Hevia, Arancha; Milani, Christian; López, Patricia; Donado, Carmen D.; Cuervo, Adriana; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Turroni, Francesca; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests a relationship between specific allergic processes, such as atopic eczema in children, and an aberrant fecal microbiota. However, little is known about the complete microbiota profile of adult individuals suffering from asthma. We determined the fecal microbiota in 21 adult patients suffering allergic asthma (age 39.43 ± 10.98 years old) and compare it with the fecal microbiota of 22 healthy controls (age 39.29 ± 9.21 years old) using culture independent techniques. An Ion-Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based amplification and sequencing protocol was used to determine the fecal microbiota profile of the individuals. Sequence microbiota analysis showed that the microbial alpha-diversity was not significantly different between healthy and allergic individuals and no clear clustering of the samples was obtained using an unsupervised principal component analysis. However, the analysis of specific bacterial groups allowed us to detect significantly lower levels of bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma. Also, in allergic individuals the Bifidobacterium adolescentis species prevailed within the bifidobacterial population. The reduction in the levels on bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma suggests a new target in allergy research and opens possibilities for the therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota in this group of patients. PMID:26840903

  6. The Effects of Bifidobacterium breve on Immune Mediators and Proteome of HT29 Cells Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Borja; González-Rodríguez, Irene; Arboleya, Silvia; López, Patricia; Suárez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The use of beneficial microorganisms, the so-called probiotics, to improve human health is gaining popularity. However, not all of the probiotic strains trigger the same responses and they differ in their interaction with the host. In spite of the limited knowledge on mechanisms of action some of the probiotic effects seem to be exerted through maintenance of the gastrointestinal barrier function and modulation of the immune system. In the present work, we have addressed in vitro the response of the intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 to the strain Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004. In the array of 84 genes involved in inflammation tested, the expression of 12 was modified by the bifidobacteria. The genes of chemokine CXCL6, the chemokine receptor CCR7, and, specially, the complement component C3 were upregulated. Indeed, HT29 cells cocultivated with B. breve produced significantly higher levels of protein C3a. The proteome of HT29 cells showed increased levels of cytokeratin-8 in the presence of B. breve. Altogether, it seems that B. breve IPLA20004 could favor the recruitment of innate immune cells to the mucosa reinforcing, as well as the physical barrier of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25793196

  7. Suitability of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus plantarum as probiotics intended for fruit juices containing citrus extracts.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Maddalena, Lucia; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2013-11-01

    A strain of Lactobacillus plantarum and 4 strains of bifidobacteria were inoculated in apple juice and in a commercial beverage labeled as "red-fruit juice," containing citrus extracts as natural preservatives; the suitability of the probiotics was evaluated in relation to their resistance to 2 kinds of citrus extracts (biocitro and lemon extract), survival in juices at 4 and 37 °C, and inhibition of Zygosaccharomyces bailii. Cell count of L. plantarum and bifidobacteria over time was fitted through the Weibull equation, for the evaluation of the first reduction time (δ), death time, and microbiological shelf life (the break-point was set to 7 log cfu/mL). Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis experienced the highest δ-value (23.21 d) and death time (96.59 d) in the red-fruit juice at 4 °C, whereas L. plantarum was the most promising strain in apple juice at 37 °C. Biocitro and lemon extract did not exert a biocidal effect toward probiotics; moreover, the probiotics controlled the growth of Z. bailii and the combination of L. plantarum with 40 ppm of biocitro reduced the level of the yeast after 18 d by 2 log cfu/mL.

  8. Coculture fermentations of Bifidobacterium species and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron reveal a mechanistic insight into the prebiotic effect of inulin-type fructans.

    PubMed

    Falony, Gwen; Calmeyn, Thomas; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-04-01

    Four bifidobacteria, each representing a cluster of strains with specific inulin-type-fructan degradation capacities, were grown in coculture fermentations with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262, a strain able to metabolize both oligofructose and inulin. In a medium for colon bacteria with inulin as the sole added energy source, the ability of the bifidobacteria to compete for this substrate reflected phenotypical variation. Bifidobacterium breve Yakult, a strain that was not able to degrade oligofructose or inulin, was outcompeted by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. Bifidobacterium adolescentis LMG 10734, a strain that could degrade oligofructose (displaying a preferential breakdown mechanism) but that did not grow on inulin, managed to become competitive when oligofructose and short fractions of inulin started to accumulate in the fermentation medium. Bifidobacterium angulatum LMG 11039(T), a strain that was previously shown to degrade all oligofructose fractions simultaneously and to be able to partially break down inulin, was competitive from the beginning of the fermentation, consuming short fractions of inulin from the moment they appeared. Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047, representing a cluster of bifidobacteria that shared both high fructose consumption and oligofructose degradation rates and were able to perform partial breakdown of inulin, was the dominating strain in a coculture with B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. These observations indicate that distinct subgroups within the large-intestinal Bifidobacterium population will be stimulated by different groups of prebiotic inulin-type fructans, a variation that could be reflected in differences concerning their health-promoting effects.

  9. Screening for plasmids among human bifidobacteria species: sequencing and analysis of pBC1 from Bifidobacterium catenulatum L48.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Martín, Pablo; Flórez, Ana Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2007-03-01

    Analysis of 72 bifidobacterial isolates for plasmid DNA identified six different plasmid profiles, two profiles consisted of a single plasmid and four contained at least two. A plasmid identified in a Bifidobacterium catenulatum strain (pBC1) was chosen for further characterization based on its small size and stability. The plasmid was shown to be a circular molecule of 2540 base pairs with an overall G+C content of 64%. At the putative origin of replication a direct repeat of 24 nucleotides repeated three and a half times was observed, as well as five inverted repeats, which resembled the organization of theta-type replicating plasmids. Three open reading frames encoding peptides larger than 50 amino acids were also identified: repB, encoding a replicase of 315 amino acids, a transcriptionally coupled gene (orfX-like), similar to the orfX of some theta-replicating lactococcal plasmids, and copG-like in the complementary strand, which showed a conserved domain present in proteins of the CopG family. Comparison of the deduced RepB protein of pBC1 to other replication proteins in databases, identified pMB1 from Bifidobacterium longum as its closest relative (81% amino acid identity). The pBC1 replicon proved to be functional in several Bifidobacterium species, including B. animalis, B. longum, and B. pseudocatenulatum. Hybridization experiments showed the replicon was uncommon among bifidobacteria. The relative copy number of pBC1 was estimated to be 30.9+/-4.62 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

  10. High purity galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) enhance specific Bifidobacterium species and their metabolic activity in the mouse gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Monteagudo-Mera, A.; Arthur, J.C.; Jobin, C.; Keku, T.; Bruno-Barcena, J.M.; Azcarate-Peril, M.A

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotics are selectively fermented ingredients that result in specific changes in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota, thus conferring benefit(s) upon the host health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a β (1–4) galacto-oligosaccharides formulation consisting of 90% pure GOS (GOS90), on the composition and activity of the mouse gut microbiota. Germ-free mice were colonized with microbiota from four pathogen-free wt 129 mice donors (SPF), and stools were collected during a feeding trial in which GOS90 was delivered orally for 14 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons showed that Bifidobacterium and specific Lactobacillus, Bacteroides and Clostridiales were more prevalent in GOS90-fed mice after 14 days, although the prebiotic impact on Bifidobacterium varied among individual mice. Prebiotic feeding also resulted in decreased abundance of Bacteroidales, Helicobacter and Clostridium. High-throughput quantitative PCR showed an increased abundance of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, B. pseudocatenulatum, B. lactis and B. gallicum in the prebiotic-fed mice. Control female mice showed a higher diversity (Phylogenetic Diversity PD = 15.1 ± 3.4 in stools and PD = 13.0 ± 0.6 in intestinal contents) than control males (PD = 7.8 ± 1.6 in stool samples and PD = 9.5 ± 1.0 in intestinal contents). GOS90 did not modify inflammatory biomarkers (IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α). Decreased butyrate, acetate and lactate concentrations in stools of prebiotic fed mice suggested an increase in colonic absorption and reduced excretion. Overall, our results demonstrate that GOS90 is capable of modulating the intestinal microbiome resulting in expansion of the probiome (autochtonous commensal intestinal bacteria considered to have a beneficial influence on health). PMID:26839072

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium longum Attenuate Lung Injury and Inflammatory Response in Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Khailova, Ludmila; Petrie, Benjamin; Baird, Christine H.; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A.; Wischmeyer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Probiotic use to prevent nosocomial gastrointestinal and potentially respiratory tract infections in critical care has shown great promise in recent clinical trials of adult and pediatric patients. Despite well-documented benefits of probiotic use in intestinal disorders, the potential for probiotic treatment to reduce lung injury following infection and shock has not been well explored. Objective Evaluate if Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or Bifidobacterium longum (BL) treatment in a weanling mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) peritonitis will protect against lung injury. Methods 3 week-old FVB/N mice were orally gavaged with 200 µl of either LGG, BL or sterile water (vehicle) immediately prior to CLP. Mice were euthanized at 24 h. Lung injury was evaluated via histology and lung neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining. mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α, MyD88, TLR-4, TLR-2, NFΚB (p50/p105) and Cox-2 in the lung analyzed via real-time PCR. TNF-α and IL-6 in lung was analyzed via ELISA. Results LGG and BL treatment significantly improved lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and lung neutrophil infiltration was significantly lower than in untreated septic mice. Lung mRNA and protein levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and gene expression of Cox-2 were also significantly reduced in mice receiving LGG or BL treatment. Gene expression of TLR-2, MyD88 and NFΚB (p50/p105) was significantly increased in septic mice compared to shams and decreased in the lung of mice receiving LGG or BL while TLR-4 levels remained unchanged. Conclusions Treatment with LGG and BL can reduce lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and is associated with reduced lung inflammatory cell infiltrate and decreased markers of lung inflammatory response. Probiotic therapy may be a promising intervention to improve clinical lung injury following systemic infection and sepsis. PMID:24830455

  12. Characterization of a Bifidobacterium longum BORI dipeptidase belonging to the U34 family.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong Min; Ji, Geun Eog; Cho, Sang Hee; Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2007-09-01

    A dipeptidase was purified from a cell extract of Bifidobacterium longum BORI by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose columns. The purified dipeptidase had a molecular mass of about 49 kDa and was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 50 degrees C. The enzyme was a strict dipeptidase, being capable of hydrolyzing a range of dipeptides but not tri- and tetrapeptides, p-nitroanilide derivatives of amino acids, or N- or C-terminus-blocked dipeptides. A search of the amino acid sequence of an internal tryptic fragment against protein sequences deduced from the total genome sequence of B. longum NCC2705 revealed that it was identical to an internal sequence of the dipeptidase gene (pepD), which comprised 1,602 nucleotides encoding 533 amino acids with a molecular mass of 60 kDa, and thereby differed considerably from the 49-kDa mass of the purified dipeptidase. To understand this discrepancy, pepD was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector (pBAD-TOPO derivative) to generate the recombinant plasmids pBAD-pepD and pBAD-pepD-His (note that His in the plasmid designation stands for a polyhistidine coding region). Both plasmids were successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein PepD-His was purified using nickel-chelating affinity chromatography and reconfirmed by internal amino acid sequencing. The PepD sequence was highly homologous to those of the U34 family of peptidases, suggesting that the B. longum BORI dipeptidase is a type of cysteine-type N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase and has a beta-hairpin motif similar to that of penicillin V acylase, which is activated by autoproteolytic processing.

  13. Transcription Analysis of a Lantibiotic Gene Cluster from Bifidobacterium longum DJO10A▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Li, Xiulan; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum DJO10A was previously demonstrated to produce a lantibiotic, but only during growth on agar media. To evaluate the feasibility of production of this lantibiotic in broth media, a transcription analysis of the lanA gene was undertaken. Comparative microarray analysis of broth and agar cultures of B. longum DJO10A revealed that the lantibiotic production, modification, transport/peptidase, and immunity genes were significantly upregulated in agar cultures, while the two-component regulatory genes were expressed equally under both conditions. This suggested that the signal transduction regulatory system should function in broth cultures. Real-time PCR and Northern hybridization confirmed that lanA gene expression was significantly repressed in broth cultures. A crude lantibiotic preparation from an agar-grown culture was obtained, and its antimicrobial spectrum analysis revealed a broad inhibition range. Addition of this extract to broth cultures of B. longum DJO10A induced lanA gene expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Subinoculation using >10% of an induced broth culture maintained lanA expression. The expression of lanA was log-phase specific, being significantly downregulated in stationary phase. Transcription start analysis of lanA revealed a 284-bp 5′ untranslated region, which was proposed to be involved in repression of transcription, while an inverted repeat structure located at bp −75 relative to the transcription start was strategically located to likely function as a binding site for the two-component response regulator. Understanding the transcription regulation of this lanA gene is the first step toward enabling production of this novel and potentially interesting lantibiotic in broth cultures. PMID:21742926

  14. Immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide from Bifidobacterium longum suppresses Th2 immune responses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Kitazawa, H; Iwabuchi, N; Xiao, J Z; Miyaji, K; Iwatsuki, K; Saito, T

    2006-07-01

    We have reported previously that novel immunostimulatory sequence (ISS) oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) BL07S from a probiotic strain of Bifidobacterium longum inhibited immunoglobulin (Ig) E production in vitro. However, whether ISS-ODNs from probiotics regulate T helper type 2 (Th2)-polarized immune reactions in vivo remains unclear. To evaluate the inhibitory effects of ODN BL07S on type I allergic response, BALB/c mice were injected with or without ODN BL07S in the presence of ovalbumin (OVA) on days 0 and 14. Serum Ig levels (IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a) and cytokine levels (interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13) were investigated in splenocyte cultures from days 14-28. Production of OVA-specific and total IgE were significantly suppressed by administration of ODN BL07S, but not by ODN BL06S, a non-ISS-ODN. Compared to controls, ODN BL07S induced significantly lower levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) in splenocyte cultures, and significantly higher levels of serum OVA-specific IgG2a. These effects of ODN BL07S on modulation of Th2 immune response were dose-dependent. The present results demonstrate that ODN BL07S from genomic DNA of B. longum BB536 prevents antigen-induced Th2 immune responses in vivo, suggesting that ISS-ODNs from probiotics might be useful in preventing allergic disease.

  15. Probiotics Lactobacillus plantarum and bifidobacterium B94: cognitive function in demyelinated model

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Rasouli koohi, Samira; Khodaii, Zohreh; Soleymanzadeh Moghadam, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the immune system that creates damage of Learning and memory in that. Using probiotic supplements is recommended for preventing MS disease and improving memory. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) and bifidobacterium B94 (BB94), on acquisition phase of spatial memory in the local demyelination of rats` hippocampus. Methods: In this study, 32 male Wistar rats were divided into control, damage group and treatment groups. Treatment groups were including (LP) and (BB94). After the induction of demyelination by 3 μl of EB into the right dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in treatment groups, 1.5×108 probiotic bacteria were administered by gavage for 28 days. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests (p≤0.05). Results: Findings demonstrated that injection of EB caused a significant increase in traveled distance (p<0.01) and also escape latency (p<0.05) compared with control group. Also, effect administrations of (LP) and (BB94) on traveled distance and escape latency were reviewed, and it was determined that administration of them do not cause significant reduction in the traveled distance compared with the lesion group. Also mentioned probiotics has no significant effect on swimming speed compared with lesion and saline groups. Conclusion: According to some studies, probiotics have a positive impact on improving the performance of spatial memory and learning, although the results of the current study could not indicate finality of this assumption. It seems that more researches is needed on this subject. PMID:27579282

  16. Phytate degradation by human gut isolated Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC27919 and its probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Haros, Monika; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Almgren, Annette; Larsson-Alminger, Marie; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Andlid, Thomas

    2009-09-30

    The growing awareness of the relationship between diet and health has led to an increasing demand for food products that support health above and beyond providing basic nutrition. Probiotics are live organisms present in foods, which yield health benefits related to their interactions with the gastrointestinal tract. Phytases are a subgroup of phosphatases that catalyse the desphosphorylation of phytate, which reduces its negative impact on mineral bioavailability, and generates lower inositol phosphates. The aims of this investigation were to (i) study the ability of the probiotic candidate Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum to degrade phytate in synthetic medium, to (ii) identify the lower inositol phosphates generated, to (iii) study its survival under conditions mimicking gastrointestinal passage and finally to (iv) assess adhesion of the bacteria to Caco-2 cells. The first steps of InsP(6) degradation by B. pseudocatenulatum phytate-degrading enzyme/s were preferentially initiated at the DL-6-position and 5-position of the myo-inositol ring. It suggests that the main InsP(6) degradation pathway by B. pseudocatenulatum by sequential removal of phosphate groups was D/L-Ins(1,2,3,4,5)P(5) or D/L-Ins(1,2,3,4,6)P(5); D/L-Ins(1,2,3,4)P(4); to finally Ins(1,2,3)P(3) and D/L-Ins(1,2,4)P(3)/D/L-Ins(1,3,4)P(3). This human strain also showed a notable tolerance to bile as well as a selective adhesion capacity (adhesion to control surfaces was zero), to human intestinal Caco-2 cells comparable to the commercial probiotic B. lactis. The phytate-degrading activity constitutes a novel metabolic trait which could contribute to the improvement of mineral absorption in the intestine as a nutritional probiotic feature with potential trophic effect in human gut. PMID:19674804

  17. Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 127 β-L-arabinofuranosidase from Bifidobacterium longum

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tasuku; Saikawa, Kyo; Kim, Seonah; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Ishiwata, Akihiro; Kaeothip, Sophon; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ito, Yukishige; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2014-04-25

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HypBA1 β-L-arabinofuranosidase belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 127. • Crystal structure of HypBA1 was determined. • HypBA1 consists of a catalytic barrel and two additional β-sandwich domains. • The active site contains a Zn{sup 2+} coordinated by glutamate and three cysteines. • A possible reaction mechanism involving cysteine as the nucleophile is proposed. - Abstract: Enzymes acting on β-linked arabinofuranosides have been unknown until recently, in spite of wide distribution of β-L-arabinofuranosyl oligosaccharides in plant cells. Recently, a β-L-arabinofuranosidase from the glycoside hydrolase family 127 (HypBA1) was discovered in the newly characterized degradation system of hydroxyproline-linked β-L-arabinooligosaccharides in the bacterium Bifidobacterium longum. Here, we report the crystal structure of HypBA1 in the ligand-free and β-L-arabinofuranose complex forms. The structure of HypBA1 consists of a catalytic barrel domain and two additional β-sandwich domains, with one β-sandwich domain involved in the formation of a dimer. Interestingly, there is an unprecedented metal-binding motif with Zn{sup 2+} coordinated by glutamate and three cysteines in the active site. The glutamate residue is located far from the anomeric carbon of the β-L-arabinofuranose ligand, but one cysteine residue is appropriately located for nucleophilic attack for glycosidic bond cleavage. The residues around the active site are highly conserved among GH127 members. Based on biochemical experiments and quantum mechanical calculations, a possible reaction mechanism involving cysteine as the nucleophile is proposed.

  18. Differential Transcriptional Response of Bifidobacterium longum to Human Milk, Formula Milk, and Galactooligosaccharide▿ †

    PubMed Central

    González, Rina; Klaassens, Eline S.; Malinen, Erja; de Vos, Willem M.; Vaughan, Elaine E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the effects of human breast milk on the development of the intestinal bifidobacteria and associated health effects, the transcriptome of Bifidobacterium longum LMG 13197 grown in breast milk and formula milk containing galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides was compared to that obtained in a semisynthetic medium with glucose. Total RNA was isolated from exponentially growing cells and hybridized to a clone library-based microarray. Inserts of clones with significant hybridization signals were sequenced and identified. The B. longum transcriptomes obtained during growth on human and formula milk were more similar to each other than to that obtained from growth in semisynthetic medium with glucose. Remarkably, there were only a few genes implicated in carbohydrate metabolism that were similarly upregulated during growth in both human and formula milk although oligosaccharides were added to the formula. Common highly upregulated genes notably included putative genes for cell surface type 2 glycoprotein-binding fimbriae that are implicated in attachment and colonization in the intestine. Genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism formed the dominant group specifically upregulated in breast milk and included putative genes for N-acetylglucosamine degradation and for metabolism of mucin and human milk oligosaccharides via the galactose/lacto-N-biose gene cluster. This supports the notion that the bifidogenic effect of human milk is to a great extent based on its oligosaccharides. The transcriptional effect of semisynthetic medium containing GOS, which, like human milk, contains a large amount of lactose and galactose, on the B. longum transcriptome was also studied and revealed substantial similarity with carbohydrate-utilization genes upregulated during growth in human milk. This knowledge provides leads to optimizing formula milk to better simulate the observed bifidogenic effects of human breast milk. PMID

  19. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, D.L.; Dogenski, M.; Thomazini, M.; Heinemann, R.J.B.; Favaro-Trindade, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (103 CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at −18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved. PMID:24516445

  20. Transcriptome analysis and physiology of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 cells under continuous culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, V; Grattepanche, F; Moine, D; Berger, B; Rezzonico, E; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2012-12-01

    A central issue in the use of probiotics in food and food supplements is their sensitivity to many environmental stress factors. The resistance of probiotic cells to lethal stress can be improved by application of homologous or heterologous sub-lethal stress during culture. This screening procedure is generally performed using batch cultures. Continuous cultures could be a suitable and more efficient method to test different stress factors on one culture instead of repeating several batch cultures. However, before testing stresses using continuous cultures, the physiological stability of continuously produced cells over a considered time period must be first evaluated. A continuous culture of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 was maintained for 211 h at a dilution rate of 0.1 per h, mimicking a deceleration growth phase culture. Stable viable cell counts were measured over the culture period, decreasing only moderately from 8.8 to 8.6 log10 cfu/ml. A slight shift in metabolite production, characterized by increased lactate and decreased acetate, formate and ethanol concentrations was observed. Susceptibilities to antibiotics and stress conditions were stable (cefotaxim, ampicillin, ceftazidime) or moderately affected (simulated gastric juices, heat, bile salts, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, penicillin, vancomycin and neomycin) over culturing time. Comparison of gene transcription profiles between samples collected after 31 h of continuous culture and samples collected after 134 and 211 h revealed only limited changes in expression of 1.0 and 3.8% of total genes, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that continuous culture can be used to produce bacterial cells with stable physiological properties suitable for fast and efficient screening of sub-lethal stress conditions. PMID:23234728

  1. Genomic Overview and Biological Functions of Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis in Bifidobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Sánchez, Borja; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2014-01-01

    For many years, bacterial exopolysaccharides (EPS) have received considerable scientific attention, mainly due to their contribution to biofilm formation and, above all, because EPS are potential virulence factors. In recent times, interest in EPS research has enjoyed a welcome boost thanks to the discovery of their ability to mediate communication processes with their surrounding environment and to their contribution to host health maintenance. In this review, we provide a fresh perspective on the genetics and activity of these polymers in members of the Bifidobacterium genus, a common gut inhabitant of humans and animals that has been associated with several health-promoting effects. Bifidobacteria can use EPS to protect themselves against the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, thus improving their persistence in the host. Indeed, the relevant function of EPS for bifidobacteria is underlined by the fact that most genomes sequenced until now contain genes related to EPS biosynthesis. A high interspecies variability in the number of genes and structural organization is denoted among species/subspecies; thus, eps clusters in this genus do not display a consensus genetic architecture. Their different G+C content compared to that of the whole genome suggests that eps genes have been acquired by horizontal transfer. From the host perspective, EPS-producing bifidobacteria are able to trigger both innate and adaptive immune responses, and they are able to modulate the composition and activity of the gut microbiota. Thus, these polymers seem to be critical in understanding the physiology of bifidobacteria and their interaction with the host. PMID:24123746

  2. Bifidobacterium pseudolongum are efficient indicators of animal fecal contamination in raw milk cheese industry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The contamination of raw milk cheeses (St-Marcellin and Brie) from two plants in France was studied at several steps of production (raw milk, after addition of rennet - St-Marcellin - or after second maturation - Brie -, after removal from the mold and during ripening) using bifidobacteria as indicators of fecal contamination. Results Bifidobacterium semi-quantitative counts were compared using PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR. B. pseudolongum were detected in 77% (PCR-RFLP; 1.75 to 2.29 log cfu ml-1) and 68% (real-time PCR; 2.19 to 2.73 log cfu ml-1) of St-Marcellin samples and in 87% (PCR-RFLP; 1.17 to 2.40 log cfu ml-1) of Brie cheeses samples. Mean counts of B. pseudolongum remained stable along both processes. Two other populations of bifidobacteria were detected during the ripening stage of St-Marcellin, respectively in 61% and 18% of the samples (PCR-RFLP). The presence of these populations explains the increase in total bifidobacteria observed during ripening. Further characterization of these populations is currently under process. Forty-eight percents (St-Marcellin) and 70% (Brie) of the samples were B. pseudolongum positive/E. coli negative while only 10% (St-Marcellin) and 3% (Brie) were B. pseudolongum negative/E. coli positive. Conclusions The increase of total bifidobacteria during ripening in Marcellin's process does not allow their use as fecal indicator. The presence of B. pseudolongum along the processes defined a contamination from animal origin since this species is predominant in cow dung and has never been isolated in human feces. B. pseudolongum was more sensitive as an indicator than E. coli along the two different cheese processes. B. pseudolongum should be used as fecal indicator rather than E. coli to assess the quality of raw milk and raw milk cheeses. PMID:21816092

  3. Effect of repeated oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on apomorphine-induced rearing behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Shuzo; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric illness. Disruption of the dopaminergic system has been suggested to be the pathogenic cause of this disease. The effect of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536) on schizophrenic behavior was investigated in an animal model. Daily administration of BB536 (10(9) CFU/mouse, p.o. for 2 weeks) was found to reduce rearing behavior augmented by the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine and to decrease the resting level of plasma corticosterone and the ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan. These results suggest the potential of BB536 for supplemental treatment of the symptoms of schizophrenia.

  4. Effect of repeated oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on apomorphine-induced rearing behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    ORIKASA, Shuzo; NABESHIMA, Kazumi; IWABUCHI, Noriyuki; XIAO, Jin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric illness. Disruption of the dopaminergic system has been suggested to be the pathogenic cause of this disease. The effect of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536) on schizophrenic behavior was investigated in an animal model. Daily administration of BB536 (109 CFU/mouse, p.o. for 2 weeks) was found to reduce rearing behavior augmented by the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine and to decrease the resting level of plasma corticosterone and the ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan. These results suggest the potential of BB536 for supplemental treatment of the symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:27508116

  5. Oral administration of an immunostimulatory DNA sequence from Bifidobacterium longum improves Th1/Th2 balance in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Miyaji, Kazuhiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Saito, Tadao

    2006-08-01

    We have reported the antiallergic activities of the immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) BL07S, identified from genomic DNA of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 from in vitro and in vivo studies. The present study evaluated the efficiency of ODN BL07S in preventing allergic responses by oral administration. Oral administration of BL07S suppressed serum ovalbumin (OVA)-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E levels and improved the OVA-specific IgG2a/IgG1 ratio. ODN BL07S increased Th1 cytokine and decreased Th2 cytokine production in splenocytes. These results suggest that immunostimulatory ODNs are potentially associated with the antiallergic effects of probiotics.

  6. Cholesterol-lowering probiotics: in vitro selection and in vivo testing of bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Alessandra; Amaretti, Alberto; Leonardi, Alan; Boschetti, Elisa; Danesi, Francesca; Matteuzzi, Diego; Roncaglia, Lucia; Raimondi, Stefano; Rossi, Maddalena

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-four strains of bifidobacteria belonging to Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, and Bifidobacterium pseu-docatenulatum were assayed in vitro for the ability to assimilate cholesterol and for bile salt hydrolase (BSH) against glycocholic and taurodeoxycholic acids (GCA and TDCA). Cholesterol assimilation was peculiar characteristic of two strains belonging to the species B. bifidum (B. bifidum MB 107 and B. bifidum MB 109), which removed 81 and 50 mg of cholesterol per gram of biomass, being the median of specific cholesterol absorption by bifidobacteria 19 mg/g. Significant differences in BSH activities were not established among bifidobacterial species. However, the screening resulted in the selection of promising strains able to efficiently deconjugate GCA and TDCA. No relationship was recognized between BSH phenotype and the extent of cholesterol assimilation. On the basis of cholesterol assimilation or BSHGCA and BSHTDCA activities, B. bifidum MB 109 (DSMZ 23731), B. breve MB 113 (DSMZ 23732), and B. animalis subsp. lactis MB 2409 (DSMZ 23733) were combined in a probiotic mixture to be fed to hypercholesterolemic rats. The administration of this probiotic formulation resulted in a significant reduction of total cholesterol and low-density cholesterol (LDL-C), whereas it did not affect high-density cholesterol (HDL-C) and HDL-C/LDL-C ratio.

  7. Effects of the Food Manufacturing Chain on the Viability and Functionality of Bifidobacterium animalis through Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Prasitpuriprecha, Chutinun; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn

    2016-01-01

    The viability and functionality of probiotics may be influenced by industrial production processes resulting in a decrease in probiotic efficiency that benefit the health of humans. This study aimed to investigate the probiotic characteristics of Bifidobacterium strains isolated from fecal samples of healthy Thai infants. In the present work, three local strains (BF014, BF052, and BH053) belonging to Bifidobacterium animalis showed a great resistance against conditions simulating the gastrointestinal tract. Among these, B. animalis BF052 possessed considerable probiotic properties, including high acid and bile tolerance, strong adhesion capability to Caco-2 cells, and inhibitory activity against pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae. This strain also exhibited a high survival rate compared to commercial strains during storage in a wide variety of products, including pasteurized milk, soy milk, drinking yogurt, and orange juice. The impact of food processing processes as well as the freeze-drying process, storage of freeze-dried powders, and incorporation of freeze-dried cells in food matrix on probiotic properties was also determined. The stability of the probiotic properties of the BF052 strain was not affected by food processing chain, especially its resistance in the simulated gastrointestinal conditions and its adherence ability to Caco-2 cells. It indicates that it satisfies the criteria as a potential probiotic and may be used as an effective probiotic starter in food applications. PMID:27333286

  8. Effects of the Food Manufacturing Chain on the Viability and Functionality of Bifidobacterium animalis through Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Charnchai, Pattra; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Prasitpuriprecha, Chutinun; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn; Jantama, Kaemwich

    2016-01-01

    The viability and functionality of probiotics may be influenced by industrial production processes resulting in a decrease in probiotic efficiency that benefit the health of humans. This study aimed to investigate the probiotic characteristics of Bifidobacterium strains isolated from fecal samples of healthy Thai infants. In the present work, three local strains (BF014, BF052, and BH053) belonging to Bifidobacterium animalis showed a great resistance against conditions simulating the gastrointestinal tract. Among these, B. animalis BF052 possessed considerable probiotic properties, including high acid and bile tolerance, strong adhesion capability to Caco-2 cells, and inhibitory activity against pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae. This strain also exhibited a high survival rate compared to commercial strains during storage in a wide variety of products, including pasteurized milk, soy milk, drinking yogurt, and orange juice. The impact of food processing processes as well as the freeze-drying process, storage of freeze-dried powders, and incorporation of freeze-dried cells in food matrix on probiotic properties was also determined. The stability of the probiotic properties of the BF052 strain was not affected by food processing chain, especially its resistance in the simulated gastrointestinal conditions and its adherence ability to Caco-2 cells. It indicates that it satisfies the criteria as a potential probiotic and may be used as an effective probiotic starter in food applications. PMID:27333286

  9. Bifidobacterium longum-fermented broccoli supernatant inhibited the growth of Candida albicans and some pathogenic bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suido, Hirohisa; Miyao, Manabu

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a growth inhibitory material against some pathogenic microorganisms, using beneficial bacteria such as Bifidobacterium species and certain types of vegetables which can be good substrates for the growth of the beneficial bacteria. At first, various vegetable juices were screened for the growth promotion of Bifidobacterium longum etc. Among the vegetables tested, broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis L.) and cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) showed excellent growth promoting activities for B. longum. Secondly, the B. longum-fermented broccoli (BFB) and Lactobacillus pentosus-fermented broccoli (LFB) supernatants were prepared and the growth inhibitory activities against Candida albicans were determined. Both of them showed dose-dependent, growth inhibitory effects, and the effect of BFB was superior to LFB. It was thought that the superior effect of BFB could be mainly attributed to the acids, especially acetic acid, produced by B. longum. BFB also inhibited some pathogenic bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans and Porphylomonas gingivalis. In conclusion, broccoli was found to be a good growth-promoting substance for B. longum. The fermented product, BFB, appears to be a usable material that inhibits the growth of C. albicans and some pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18661679

  10. Changes in growth and survival of Bifidobacterium by coculture with Propionibacterium in soy milk, cow's milk, and modified MRS medium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian Qian; You, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Kwon, Bin; Ji, Geun Eog

    2012-06-15

    Bifidobacterium adolescentis Int57 (Int57) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii ATCC 13673 (ATCC 13673) were grown either in coculture or as pure cultures in different media, such as cow's milk, soybean milk, and modified MRS medium. The viable cell counts of bacteria, changes in pH, concentrations of organic acids, and contents of various sugars were analyzed during incubation up to 7days. In soy milk, the survival of cocultured Int57 was six times higher than the monocultured cells, and ATCC 13673 cocultured with Int57 consumed 69.4% of lactic acid produced by Int57 at the end of fermentation. In cow's milk, coculture with ATCC 13673 increased the growth of Int57 from 24h until 120h by approximately tenfold and did not affect the survival of Int57 cells. After 96h of fermentation of modified MRS, the survival of ATCC 13673 cells cocultured with Int57 increased by 3.2- to 7.4-folds as compared with ATCC 13673 monoculture, whereas the growth of Int57 cells was unaffected. The growth and metabolic patterns of two strains during coculture showed noticeable differences between food grade media and laboratory media. The consumption of stachyose in soy milk during coculture of Int57 with ATCC 13673 was increased by more than twice compared with Int57 monoculture, and completed within 24h. The combinational use of Bifidobacterium and Propionibacterium could be applied to the development of fermented milk or soy milk products.

  11. Evaluation of amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and species-specific PCR for identification of Bifidobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Krízová, Jana; Spanová, Alena; Rittich, Bohuslav

    2006-01-01

    Molecular biological methods based on genus-specific PCR, species-specific PCR, and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) of two PCR amplicons (523 and 914bp) using six restriction enzymes were used to differentiate among species of Bifidobacterium. The techniques were established using DNA from 16 type and reference strains of bifidobacteria of 11 species. The discrimination power of 914bp amplicon digestion was higher than that of 523bp amplicon digestion. The 914bp amplicon digestion by six restrictases provided unique patterns for nine species; B. catenulatum and B. pseudocatenulatum were not differentiated yet. The NciI digestion of the 914bp PCR product enabled to discriminate between each of B. animalis, B. lactis, and B. gallicum. The reference strain B. adolescentis CCM 3761 was reclassified as a member of the B. catenulatum/B. pseudocatenulatum group. The above-mentioned methods were applied for the identification of seven strains of Bifidobacterium spp. collected in the Culture Collection of Dairy Microorganisms (CCDM). The strains collected in CCDM were differentiated to the species level. Six strains were identified as B. lactis, one strain as B. adolescentis.

  12. Bifidobacterium spp. influences the production of autoinducer-2 and biofilm formation by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghoon; Lee, Jae Won; Kang, Seo-Gu; Oh, Sejong; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-10-01

    The effect of Bifidobacterium spp. on the production of quorum-sensing (QS) signals and biofilm formation by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 was investigated. In an AI-2 bioassay, cell extracts of Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707 resulted in a 98-fold reduction in AI-2 activity in EHEC O157:H7 as well as in the Vibrio harveyi reporter strain, even though they did not inhibit the growth of EHEC O157:H7. In addition, they resulted in a 36% reduction in biofilm formation by the organism. Consistently, the virulence of EHEC O157:H7 was significantly attenuated by the presence of cell extracts of B. longum ATCC 15707 in the Caenorhabditis elegans nematode in vivo model. By a proteome analysis using two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), we determined that seven proteins including formation of iron-sulfur protein (NifU), thiol:disulfide interchange protein (DsbA), and flagellar P-ring protein (FlgI) were differentially regulated in the EHEC O157:H7 when supplemented with cell extracts of B. longum ATCC 15707. Taken together, these findings propose a novel function of a dairy adjunct in repressing the virulence of EHEC O157:H7.

  13. A New Insight into the Physiological Role of Bile Salt Hydrolase among Intestinal Bacteria from the Genus Bifidobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Piotr; Podleśny, Marcin; Glibowski, Paweł; Targoński, Zdzisław

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence of bile salt hydrolase in fourteen strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Deconjugation activity was detected using a plate test, two-step enzymatic reaction and activity staining on a native polyacrylamide gel. Subsequently, bile salt hydrolases from B. pseudocatenulatum and B. longum subsp. suis were purified using a two-step chromatographic procedure. Biochemical characterization of the bile salt hydrolases showed that the purified enzymes hydrolyzed all of the six major human bile salts under the pH and temperature conditions commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. Next, the dynamic rheometry was applied to monitor the gelation process of deoxycholic acid under different conditions. The results showed that bile acids displayed aqueous media gelating properties. Finally, gel-forming abilities of bifidobacteria exhibiting bile salt hydrolase activity were analyzed. Our investigations have demonstrated that the release of deconjugated bile acids led to the gelation phenomenon of the enzymatic reaction solution containing purified BSH. The presented results suggest that bile salt hydrolase activity commonly found among intestinal microbiota increases hydrogel-forming abilities of certain bile salts. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that bile salt hydrolase activity among Bifidobacterium is directly connected with the gelation process of bile salts. In our opinion, if such a phenomenon occurs in physiological conditions of human gut, it may improve bacterial ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract and their survival in this specific ecological niche. PMID:25470405

  14. Effects of the Food Manufacturing Chain on the Viability and Functionality of Bifidobacterium animalis through Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Charnchai, Pattra; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Prasitpuriprecha, Chutinun; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn; Jantama, Kaemwich

    2016-01-01

    The viability and functionality of probiotics may be influenced by industrial production processes resulting in a decrease in probiotic efficiency that benefit the health of humans. This study aimed to investigate the probiotic characteristics of Bifidobacterium strains isolated from fecal samples of healthy Thai infants. In the present work, three local strains (BF014, BF052, and BH053) belonging to Bifidobacterium animalis showed a great resistance against conditions simulating the gastrointestinal tract. Among these, B. animalis BF052 possessed considerable probiotic properties, including high acid and bile tolerance, strong adhesion capability to Caco-2 cells, and inhibitory activity against pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae. This strain also exhibited a high survival rate compared to commercial strains during storage in a wide variety of products, including pasteurized milk, soy milk, drinking yogurt, and orange juice. The impact of food processing processes as well as the freeze-drying process, storage of freeze-dried powders, and incorporation of freeze-dried cells in food matrix on probiotic properties was also determined. The stability of the probiotic properties of the BF052 strain was not affected by food processing chain, especially its resistance in the simulated gastrointestinal conditions and its adherence ability to Caco-2 cells. It indicates that it satisfies the criteria as a potential probiotic and may be used as an effective probiotic starter in food applications.

  15. Autoinducer-2 Plays a Crucial Role in Gut Colonization and Probiotic Functionality of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Bottacini, Francesca; Lanigan, Noreen; Casey, Pat G.; Huys, Geert; Nelis, Hans J.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we show that luxS of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is involved in the production of the interspecies signaling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2), and that this gene is essential for gastrointestinal colonization of a murine host, while it is also involved in providing protection against Salmonella infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that a B. breve luxS-insertion mutant is significantly more susceptible to iron chelators than the WT strain and that this sensitivity can be partially reverted in the presence of the AI-2 precursor DPD. Furthermore, we show that several genes of an iron starvation-induced gene cluster, which are downregulated in the luxS-insertion mutant and which encodes a presumed iron-uptake system, are transcriptionally upregulated under in vivo conditions. Mutation of two genes of this cluster in B. breve UCC2003 renders the derived mutant strains sensitive to iron chelators while deficient in their ability to confer gut pathogen protection to Salmonella-infected nematodes. Since a functional luxS gene is present in all tested members of the genus Bifidobacterium, we conclude that bifidobacteria operate a LuxS-mediated system for gut colonization and pathogen protection that is correlated with iron acquisition. PMID:24871429

  16. In Vitro Kinetic Analysis of Fermentation of Prebiotic Inulin-Type Fructans by Bifidobacterium Species Reveals Four Different Phenotypes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Falony, Gwen; Lazidou, Katerina; Verschaeren, An; Weckx, Stefan; Maes, Dominique; De Vuyst, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic analyses of bacterial growth, carbohydrate consumption, and metabolite production of 18 Bifidobacterium strains grown on fructose, oligofructose, or inulin were performed. A principal component analysis of the data sets, expanded with the results of a genetic screen concerning the presence of a β-fructofuranosidase gene previously encountered in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140T, revealed the existence of four clusters among the bifidobacteria tested. Strains belonging to a first cluster could not degrade oligofructose or inulin. Strains in a second cluster could degrade oligofructose, displaying a preferential breakdown mechanism, but did not grow on inulin. Fructose consumption was faster than oligofructose degradation. A third cluster was composed of strains that degraded all oligofructose fractions simultaneously and could partially break down inulin. Oligofructose degradation was substantially faster than fructose consumption. A fourth, smaller cluster consisted of strains that shared high fructose consumption and oligofructose degradation rates and were able to perform partial breakdown of inulin. For all strains, a metabolic shift toward more acetate, formate, and ethanol production, at the expense of lactate production, was observed during growth on less readily fermentable energy sources. No correlation between breakdown patterns and the presence of the β-fructofuranosidase gene could be detected. These variations indicate niche-specific adaptation of bifidobacteria and could have in vivo implications on the strain specificity of the stimulatory effect of inulin-type fructans on bifidobacteria. PMID:19011052

  17. Effect of Bifidobacterium breve on the Intestinal Microbiota of Coeliac Children on a Gluten Free Diet: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Quagliariello, Andrea; Aloisio, Irene; Bozzi Cionci, Nicole; Luiselli, Donata; D’Auria, Giuseppe; Martinez-Priego, Llúcia; Pérez-Villarroya, David; Langerholc, Tomaž; Primec, Maša; Mičetić-Turk, Dušanka; Di Gioia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is associated with alterations of the intestinal microbiota. Although several Bifidobacterium strains showed anti-inflammatory activity and prevention of toxic gliadin peptides generation in vitro, few data are available on their efficacy when administered to CD subjects. This study evaluated the effect of administration for three months of a food supplement based on two Bifidobacterium breve strains (B632 and BR03) to restore the gut microbial balance in coeliac children on a gluten free diet (GFD). Microbial DNA was extracted from faeces of 40 coeliac children before and after probiotic or placebo administration and 16 healthy children (Control group). Sequencing of the amplified V3-V4 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA gene as well as qPCR of Bidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Bacteroides fragilis group Clostridium sensu stricto and enterobacteria were performed. The comparison between CD subjects and Control group revealed an alteration in the intestinal microbial composition of coeliacs mainly characterized by a reduction of the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, of Actinobacteria and Euryarchaeota. Regarding the effects of the probiotic, an increase of Actinobacteria was found as well as a re-establishment of the physiological Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. Therefore, a three-month administration of B. breve strains helps in restoring the healthy percentage of main microbial components. PMID:27782071

  18. Modulatory effects of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on defecation in elderly patients receiving enteral feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Junko; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Shirahata, Akira; Baba, Mieko; Abe, Akie; Ogawa, Koichi; Shimoda, Taeko

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the health management of elderly patients receiving enteral feeding. METHODS: Two double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were performed with long-term inpatients receiving enteral tube feeding at Kitakyushu Hospital Group, Fukuoka, Japan. BB536 was administered as BB536-L and BB536-H powders that contained approximately 2.5 × 1010 and 5 × 1010 cfu of BB536, respectively. In the first trial, 83 patients (age range: 67-101 years) were randomized into 2 groups that received placebo (placebo group) or BB536-H (BB536 group) powders. In the second trial, 123 patients (age range: 65-102 years) were randomized into 3 groups, and each group received placebo (placebo group), BB536-L (BB536-L group), or BB536-H (BB536-H group) powders. Each patient received the study medication for 16 wk after 1 wk of pre-observation. Fecal samples were collected from each patient prior to and after the intervention during Trial 2. Clinical observations included body temperature, occurrence of infection, frequency of defecation, and fecal microbiota. RESULTS: No significant changes were observed in the frequency of defecation for either treatment in Trial 1. However, a significant change was noted in the BB536-L group (P = 0.0439) in Trial 2 but not in the placebo or BB536-H groups. Subgroup analyses based on the frequency of defecation for each patient during the pre-observation period for both trials revealed significant increases in bowel movements in patients with a low frequency of defecation and significant decreases in the bowel movements of patients with a high frequency of defecation during the intervention period in the BB536 groups. The combination of Trials 1 and 2 data revealed a modulatory effect of BB536 ingestion on the changes in bowel movements. Significantly increased bowel movements were observed in patients in the low frequency subgroup with significant intergroup differences (P < 0

  19. Ethnic diversity of gut microbiota: species characterization of Bacteroides fragilis group and genus Bifidobacterium in healthy Belgian adults, and comparison with data from Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Watanuki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2013-08-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiota is related to host health, and it is thought that dietary habits may play a role in shaping this composition. Here, we examined the population size and prevalence of six predominant bacterial genera and the species compositions of genus Bifidobacterium (g-Bifid) and Bacteroides fragilis group (g-Bfra) in 42 healthy Belgian adults by quantitative PCR (qPCR) over a period of one month. The population sizes and prevalence of these bacteria were basically stable throughout the study period. The predominant g-Bifid species were Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum ss. longum, and the predominant g-Bfra species were Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides uniformis, and Bacteroides ovatus. The Belgian gut microbiota data were then compared with gut microbiota data from 46 Japanese subjects collected according to the same protocol (Matsuki et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70, 167-173, 2004). The population size and prevalence of Bifidobacterium catenulatum group were significantly lower in the Belgian gut microbiota than in the Japanese gut microbiota (P < 0.001); however, the population size and prevalence of g-Bifid did not differ. This species-level qPCR analysis will be helpful for investigating the diversity of gut microbiota among ethnic groups.

  20. Analyses of the bifid shunt and carbohydrate metabolism in Bifidobacterium spp. using **13C-labeled substrates and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifidobacteria are Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria whose presence in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is widely considered as a positive influence on human health. This is especially true in the early development of the infant GIT. Analyses of the genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum sugges...

  1. Insights into the Ropy Phenotype of the Exopolysaccharide-Producing Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis A1dOxR

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Sánchez, Borja; Moine, Deborah; Berger, Bernard; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    The proteome of the ropy strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis A1dOxR, compared to that of its nonropy isogenic strain, showed an overproduction of a protein involved in rhamnose biosynthesis. Results were confirmed by gene expression analysis, and this fact agreed with the high rhamnose content of the ropy exopolysaccharide. PMID:23584772

  2. A Bifidobacterium-based synbiotic product to reduce the transmission of C. jejuni along the poultry food chain.

    PubMed

    Baffoni, Loredana; Gaggìa, Francesca; Di Gioia, Diana; Santini, Cecilia; Mogna, Luca; Biavati, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    With the ban of dietary antimicrobial agents, the use of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics has attracted a great deal of attention in order to improve intestinal health and control food-borne pathogens, which is an important concern for the production of safe meat and meat products. Recently, Campylobacter jejuni has emerged as a leading bacterial cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans, and epidemiological evidences indicate poultry and poultry products as the main source of human infection. This work aimed at the development of a synbiotic mixture capable of modulating the gut microbiota of broiler chickens to obtain an increase of the beneficial bacteria (i.e. bifidobacteria, lactobacilli) and a competitive reduction of C. jejuni. The prebiotic compound used in the mixture was chosen after an in vivo trial: a fructooligosaccharide and a galactooligosaccharide were separately administered to broilers mixed with normal feed at a concentration of 0.5% and 3%, respectively. Quantitative PCR on DNA extracted from fecal samples revealed a significant (p<0.05) increase of Bifidobacterium spp. in broilers treated with the galactooligosaccharide, coupled to a decrease (p<0.05) of Campylobacter spp. The galactooligosaccharide was then combined with a probiotic Bifidobacterium strain (B. longum subsp. longum PCB133), possessing in vitro antimicrobial activity against C. jejuni. The strain was microencapsulated in a lipid matrix to ensure viability into the feed and resistance to stomach transit. Finally, the synbiotic mixture was administered to broiler chickens for 14 days mixed with normal feed in order to have an intake of 10(9)CFU of PCB133/day. Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Campylobacter spp., B. longum subsp. longum and C. jejuni were quantified in fecal samples. PCB133 was recovered in feces of all animals. C. jejuni concentration in poultry feces was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in chickens administered with the synbiotic mixture. This study

  3. Survival of Bifidobacterium longum immobilized in calcium alginate beads in simulated gastric juices and bile salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, K Y; Heo, T R

    2000-02-01

    Bifidobacterium longum KCTC 3128 and HLC 3742 were independently immobilized (entrapped) in calcium alginate beads containing 2, 3, and 4% sodium alginate. When the bifidobacteria entrapped in calcium alginate beads were exposed to simulated gastric juices and a bile salt solution, the death rate of the cells in the beads decreased proportionally with an increase in both the alginate gel concentration and bead size. The initial cell numbers in the beads affected the numbers of survivors after exposure to these solutions; however, the death rates of the viable cells were not affected. Accordingly, a mathematical model was formulated which expressed the influences of several parameters (gel concentration, bead size, and initial cell numbers) on the survival of entrapped bifidobacteria after sequential exposure to simulated gastric juices followed by a bile salt solution. The model proposed in this paper may be useful for estimating the survival of bifidobacteria in beads and establishing optimal entrapment conditions.

  4. Genomics of the Genus Bifidobacterium Reveals Species-Specific Adaptation to the Glycan-Rich Gut Environment

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Ferrario, Chiara; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria represent one of the dominant microbial groups that occur in the gut of various animals, being particularly prevalent during the suckling period of humans and other mammals. Their ability to compete with other gut bacteria is largely attributed to their saccharolytic features. Comparative and functional genomic as well as transcriptomic analyses have revealed the genetic background that underpins the overall saccharolytic phenotype for each of the 47 bifidobacterial (sub)species representing the genus Bifidobacterium, while also generating insightful information regarding carbohydrate resource sharing and cross-feeding among bifidobacteria. The abundance of bifidobacterial saccharolytic features in human microbiomes supports the notion that metabolic accessibility to dietary and/or host-derived glycans is a potent evolutionary force that has shaped the bifidobacterial genome. PMID:26590291

  5. An immunostimulatory DNA sequence from a probiotic strain of Bifidobacterium longum inhibits IgE production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shimosato, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Kokubo, Sadayuki; Saito, Tadao

    2006-04-01

    The immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) BL07 (5'-GCGTCGGTTTCGGTGCTCAC-3') was identified from the genomic DNA of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum BB536. ODN BL07 stimulated B-lymphocyte proliferation and induced interleukin-12 (IL-12) production in macrophage-like J774.1 cells. ODNs BL07 and BL07S (modified with phosphorothioate backbone) significantly inhibited immunoglobulin E (IgE) production and stimulated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-12 production, but did not affect IL-4 secretion in murine splenic cells of ovalbumin-primed BALB/c mice. These ODNs also significantly inhibited production of IgE in purified murine B cells in the presence of IL-4 and anti-CD40. The results suggest the potential of ODNs BL07 and BL07S in preventing IgE-related immune responses and the possible involvement of ODN BL07 in the antiallergic efficacy of B. longum BB536.

  6. Characterization of a novel β-L-arabinofuranosidase in Bifidobacterium longum: functional elucidation of a DUF1680 protein family member.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kiyotaka; Takashi, Yukari; Obuchi, Eriko; Kitahara, Kanefumi; Suganuma, Toshihiko

    2014-02-21

    Pfam DUF1680 (PF07944) is an uncharacterized protein family conserved in many species of bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, and plants. Previously, we cloned and characterized the hypBA2 gene as a β-L-arabinobiosidase in Bifidobacterium longum JCM 1217. In this study, we cloned a DUF1680 family member, the hypBA1 gene, which constitutes a gene cluster with hypBA2. HypBA1 is a novel β-L-arabinofuranosidase that liberates L-arabinose from the L-arabinofuranose (Araf)-β1,2-Araf disaccharide. HypBA1 also transglycosylates 1-alkanols with retention of the anomeric configuration. Mutagenesis and azide rescue experiments indicated that Glu-338 is a critical residue for catalytic activity. This study provides the first characterization of a DUF1680 family member, which defines a new family of glycoside hydrolases, the glycoside hydrolase family 127.

  7. A peptidome-based phylogeny pipeline reveals differential peptides at the strain level within Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Gutiérrez-Jácome, Alberto; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are gut commensal microorganisms belonging to the Actinobacteria group. Some specific strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are used in functional foods as they are able to exert health-promoting effects in the human host. Due to the limited genetic variability within this subspecies, it is sometimes difficult for a manufacturer to properly track its strain once included in dairy products or functional foods. In this paper, we present a peptidome-based analysis in which the proteomes of a set of B. animalis subsp. lactis strains were digested in silico with human gut endopeptidases. The molecular masses were compared along all the strains to detect strain-specific peptides. These peptides may be interesting towards the development of methodologies for strain identification in the final product. PMID:27554155

  8. Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis to Milk Oligosaccharides Increases Adhesion to Epithelial Cells and Induces a Substantial Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Devon W.; O’Callaghan, John; Buttó, Ludovica F.; Slattery, Helen; Lane, Jonathan; Clyne, Marguerite; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh; Hickey, Rita M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that milk oligosaccharides may contribute not only to selective growth of bifidobacteria, but also to their specific adhesive ability. Human milk oligosaccharides (3′sialyllactose and 6′sialyllactose) and a commercial prebiotic (Beneo Orafti P95; oligofructose) were assayed for their ability to promote adhesion of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 to HT-29 and Caco-2 human intestinal cells. Treatment with the commercial prebiotic or 3′sialyllactose did not enhance adhesion. However, treatment with 6′sialyllactose resulted in increased adhesion (4.7 fold), while treatment with a mixture of 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose substantially increased adhesion (9.8 fold) to HT-29 intestinal cells. Microarray analyses were subsequently employed to investigate the transcriptional response of B. longum subsp. infantis to the different oligosaccharide treatments. This data correlated strongly with the observed changes in adhesion to HT-29 cells. The combination of 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose resulted in the greatest response at the genetic level (both in diversity and magnitude) followed by 6′sialyllactose, and 3′sialyllactose alone. The microarray data was further validated by means of real-time PCR. The current findings suggest that the increased adherence phenotype of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis resulting from exposure to milk oligosaccharides is multi-faceted, involving transcription factors, chaperone proteins, adhesion-related proteins, and a glycoside hydrolase. This study gives additional insight into the role of milk oligosaccharides within the human intestine and the molecular mechanisms underpinning host-microbe interactions. PMID:23805302

  9. Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 Induces Tolerance in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Study of the Mechanisms Involved in the Immunoregulatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    MURATA, Kozue; TOMOSADA, Yohsuke; VILLENA, Julio; CHIBA, Eriko; SHIMAZU, Tomoyuki; ASO, Hisashi; IWABUCHI, Noriyuki; XIAO, Jin-zhong; SAITO, Tadao; KITAZAWA, Haruki

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium breve MCC-117 is able to significantly reduce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in porcine intestinal epithelial (PIE) cells and to improve IL-10 levels in CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ lymphocytes in response to heat-stable enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), while the immunoregulatory effect of B. adolescentis ATCC15705 was significantly lower than that observed for the MCC-117 strain. Considering the different capacities of the two bifidobacterium strains to activate toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and their differential immunoregulatory activities in PIE and immune cells, we hypothesized that comparative studies with both strains could provide important information regarding the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of bifidobacteria. In this work, we demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of B. breve MCC-117 was achieved by a complex interaction of multiple negative regulators of TLRs as well as inhibition of multiple signaling pathways. We showed that B. breve MCC-117 reduced heat-stable ETEC PAMP-induced NF-κB, p38 MAPK and PI3 K activation and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PIE cells. In addition, we demonstrated that B. breve MCC-117 may activate TLR2 synergistically and cooperatively with one or more other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and that interactions may result in a coordinated sum of signals that induce the upregulation of A20, Bcl-3, Tollip and SIGIRR. Upregulation of these negative regulators could have an important physiological impact on maintaining or reestablishing homeostatic TLR signals in PIE cells. Therefore, in the present study, we gained insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunoregulatory effect of B. breve MCC-117. PMID:24936377

  10. Bifidobacterium breve and Streptococcus thermophilus secretion products enhance T helper 1 immune response and intestinal barrier in mice.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Sandrine; Laharie, David; Asensio, Corinne; Vidal-Martinez, Teresita; Candalh, Céline; Rullier, Anne; Zerbib, Frank; Mégraud, Francis; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Heyman, Martine

    2005-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria or their secretion products can modulate immune responses differently in normal and inflammatory conditions. This comparative study analyzes the effect of oral administration of living lactic acid bacteria, or their conditioned media, on the epithelial and immune functions of colitis-prone C57BL/6 IL-10-deficient mice. Mice were untreated (control) or infected with Helicobacter hepaticus with or without oral treatment with living bacteria, Bifidobacterium breve C50 and Streptococcus thermophilus 065 (LB), or their culture-conditioned media (CM). Histology, cytokine mRNA, electrical resistance, and barrier capacity of colonic samples as well as cytokine secretion by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells were studied. Helicobacter hepaticus mice developed only mild colitis, which was not modified in LB or CM groups. In the CM (but not the LB) group, the colonic barrier was reinforced as compared to the other groups, as evidenced by decreased horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transcytosis and mannitol fluxes and increased electrical resistance. In MLN, the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IFNgamma was significantly higher in CM (2.06% and 1.98%, respectively) mice than in H. hepaticus (1.1% and 0.47%, P < 0.05) or control mice. In addition, the nonspecific stimulation of IFNgamma, TNFalpha, and IL-12 secretion by MLN cells was significantly higher in the CM group as compared to the other groups. In the absence of severe colitis, Bifidobacterium breve C50- and Streptococcus thermophilus 065-conditioned media can reinforce intestinal barrier capacity and stimulate Th1 immune response, highlighting the involvement of lactic acid bacteria-derived components in host defense.

  11. Identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium species isolated from food with genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted probes by colony hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, P; Pfefferkorn, A; Teuber, M; Meile, L

    1997-01-01

    A Bifidobacterium genus-specific target sequence in the V9 variable region of the 16S rRNA has been elaborated and was used to develop a hybridization probe. The specificity of this probe, named lm3 (5'-CGGGTGCTI*CCCACTTTCATG-3'), was used to identify all known type strains and distinguish them from other bacteria. All of the 30 type strains of Bifidobacterium which are available at the German culture collection Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, 6 commercially available production strains, and 34 closely related relevant strains (as negative controls) were tested. All tested bifidobacteria showed distinct positive signals by colony hybridization, whereas all negative controls showed no distinct dots except Gardnerella vaginalis DSM4944 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii DSM4902, which gave slight signals. Furthermore, we established a method for isolation and identification of bifidobacteria from food by using a PCR assay without prior isolation of DNA but breaking the cells with proteinase K. By this method, all Bifidobacterium strains lead to a DNA product of the expected size. We also established a quick assay to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium counts in food and feces by dilution plating and colony hybridization. We were able to demonstrate that 2.1 x 10(6) to 2.3 x 10(7) colonies/g of sour milk containing bifidobacteria hybridized with the specific nucleotide probe. With these two methods, genus-specific colony hybridization and genus-specific PCR, it is now possible to readily and accurately detect any bifidobacteria in food and fecal samples and to discriminate between them and members of other genera. PMID:9097423

  12. Secreted factors from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis inhibit NF-κB-mediated interleukin-8 gene expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhonggui; Wang, Jinfeng; Cheng, Yi; Liu, Xin; Huang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strain BB12 in stimulated Caco-2 cells and to characterize the factors responsible for these anti-inflammatory effects. Characterization and purification studies indicate that BB12's anti-inflammatory factors might include a 50-kDa proteinaceous compound that is stable under a variety of heat and pH conditions. PMID:21926200

  13. Characterization of an insertion sequence-like element, ISBlo15, identified in a size-increased cryptic plasmid pBK283 in Bifidobacterium longum BK28.

    PubMed

    Fukiya, Satoru; Sugiyama, Tomohiko; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi

    2010-08-01

    The characteristics of mobile genetic elements in bifidobacteria are not well understood. We characterized an insertion sequence-like element of the IS200/IS605 family found in a size-increased cryptic plasmid in Bifidobacterium longum. During a plasmid profile analysis of B. longum BK strains, we encountered a 6.5-kbp cryptic plasmid pBK283 in B. longum BK28, the size of which has not been identified in bifidobacteria. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that an insertion sequence-like element was inserted into the 5.0-kbp pKJ50-like plasmid and resulted in a size increase of pBK283. The element, named ISBlo15, was 1593 bp in length and contained a single ORF encoding a putative transposase, which is similar to the transposase OrfB encoded by IS200/IS605 family elements. Several sequence characteristics, including conserved transposase motifs in OrfB and terminal palindromic sequences that differ from the typical terminal inverted repeats, strongly suggested that ISBlo15 is a member of the IS200/IS605 family. Sequences similar to ISBlo15 were widely distributed among the nine Bifidobacterium species tested, and those of highly homologous sequences were detected only in Bifidobacterium gallicum JCM8224(T).

  14. Human intestinal mucosa-associated Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains with probiotic properties modulate IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12 gene expression in THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Čitar, M; Hacin, B; Tompa, G; Štempelj, M; Rogelj, I; Dolinšek, J; Narat, M; Matijašić, B Bogovič

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are considered one of the permanent genera of the physiological human intestinal microbiota and represent an enormous pool of potential probiotic candidates. Approximately 450 isolates of presumptive Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium strains were obtained from bioptic samples of colonic and ileal mucosa from 15 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. On the basis of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, 20 strains were selected for further taxonomic classification and characterisation, as well as assessment of probiotic properties and safety. Importantly, selected strains showed the capability of colonising different parts of the intestine. The most frequently isolated species was Lactobacillus paracasei followed by Lactobacillus fermentum. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials of human and veterinary importance, however, tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistance was observed in Lactobacillus plantarum and L. fermentum strains. Thirteen strains were able to ferment more than 19 different carbon sources and three out of five tested strains exerted antagonistic activity against several different indicator strains. Two Lactobacillus isolates (L. paracasei L350 and L. fermentum L930 bb) and one Bifidobacterium isolate (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis IM386) fulfilled in vitro selection criteria for probiotic strains and exhibited strong downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12 and upregulation of anti-inflammatory IL-10. The selected strains represent suitable candidates for further studies regarding their positive influence on host health and could play an important role in ameliorating the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Immunoreactive Proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCDM 372 Identified by Gnotobiotic Mono-Colonized Mice Sera, Immune Rabbit Sera and Non-immune Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Górska, Sabina; Dylus, Ewa; Rudawska, Angelika; Brzozowska, Ewa; Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Razim, Agnieszka; Kozakova, Hana; Gamian, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The Bifidobacteria show great diversity in the cell surface architecture which may influence the physicochemical properties of the bacterial cell and strain specific properties. The immunomodulatory role of bifidobacteria has been extensively studied, however studies on the immunoreactivity of their protein molecules are very limited. Here, we compared six different methods of protein isolation and purification and we report identification of immunogenic and immunoreactive protein of two human Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains. We evaluated potential immunoreactive properties of proteins employing polyclonal sera obtained from germ free mouse, rabbit and human. The protein yield was isolation method-dependent and the reactivity of proteins detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting was heterogeneous and varied between different serum samples. The proteins with the highest immunoreactivity were isolated, purified and have them sequenced. Among the immunoreactive proteins we identified enolase, aspartokinase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK (B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952) and sugar ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, peptidoglycan synthethase penicillin-binding protein 3, transaldolase, ribosomal proteins and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (B. longum ssp. longum CCDM 372). PMID:27746766

  16. The combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppresses airway inflammation in a murine model for chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Seil; Vos, Arjan P; Morgan, Mary E; Garssen, Johan; Georgiou, Niki A; Boon, Louis; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the use of interventions that target the intestinal microbiota as a treatment approach for asthma. This study is aimed at exploring the therapeutic effects of long-term treatment with a combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides on airway inflammation and remodeling. A murine ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma model was used. Pulmonary airway inflammation; mRNA expression of pattern recognition receptors, Th-specific cytokines and transcription factors in lung tissue; expression of Foxp3 in blood Th cells; in vitro T cell activation; mast cell degranulation; and airway remodeling were examined. The combination of B. breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppressed pulmonary airway inflammation; reduced T cell activation and mast cell degranulation; modulated expression of pattern recognition receptors, cytokines and transcription factors; and reduced airway remodeling. The treatment induced regulatory T cell responses, as shown by increased Il10 and Foxp3 transcription in lung tissue, and augmented Foxp3 protein expression in blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. This specific combination of beneficial bacteria with non-digestible oligosaccharides has strong anti-inflammatory properties, possibly via the induction of a regulatory T cell response, resulting in reduced airway remodeling and, therefore, may be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammation in allergic asthma.

  17. The Host Genotype and Environment Affect Strain Types of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Inhabiting the Intestinal Tracts of Twins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Hang, Xiaomin; Tan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influences of host genotype and environment on Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum inhabiting human intestines at the strain level, six pairs of twins, divided into two groups (children and adults), were recruited. Each group consisted of two monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs and one dizygotic (DZ) twin pair. Child twins had been living together from birth, while adult twins had been living separately for 5 to 10 years. A total of 345 B. longum subsp. longum isolates obtained from 60 fecal samples from these twins were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and 35 sequence types (STs) were finally acquired. Comparison of strains within and between the twin pairs showed that no strains with identical STs were observed between unrelated individuals or within adult DZ twin pairs. Eight STs were found to be monophyletic, existing within MZ twins and child DZ twins. The similarity of strain types within child cotwins was significantly higher than that within adult cotwins, which indicated that environment was one of the important determinants in B. longum subsp. longum strain types inhabiting human intestines. However, although these differences between MZ and DZ twins were observed, it is still difficult to reach an exact conclusion about the impact of host genotype. This is mainly because of the limited number of subjects tested in the present study and the lack of strain types tracing in the same twin pairs from birth until adulthood. PMID:25956768

  18. Cell viability of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis under freeze-drying, storage and gastrointestinal tract simulation conditions.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi, Fatemeh; Shuhaimi, Mustafa; Ariff, Arbakariya; Manap, Yazid A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the survival of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 10140 during freeze-drying process by microencapsulation, using a special pediatric prebiotics mixture (galactooligosaccharides and fructooligosaccharides). Probiotic microorganisms were encapsulated with a coat combination of prebiotics-calcium-alginate prior to freeze-drying. Both encapsulated and free cells were then freeze-dried in their optimized combinations of skim milk and prebiotics. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to produce a coating combination as well as drying medium with the highest cell viability during freeze-drying. The optimum encapsulation composition was found to be 2.1 % Na-alginate, 2.9 % prebiotic, and 21.7 % glycerol. Maximum survival predicted by the model was 81.2 %. No significant (p > 0.05) difference between the predicted and experimental values verified the adequacy of final reduced models. The protection ability of encapsulation was then examined over 120 days of storage at 4 and 25 °C and exposure to a sequential model of infantile GIT conditions including both gastric conditions (pH 3.0 and 4.0, 90 min, 37 °C) and intestinal conditions (pH 7.5, 5 h, 37 °C). Significantly improved cell viability showed that microencapsulation of B. lactis 10140 with the prebiotics was successful in producing a stable symbiotic powdery nutraceutical.

  19. Lyophilised Vegetal BM 297 ATO-Inulin lipid-based synbiotic microparticles containing Bifidobacterium longum LMG 13197: design and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Amakiri, A C; Kalombo, L; Thantsha, M S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the manufacturing and characterisation of Vegetal BM 297 ATO-inulin-Bifidobacterium longum LMG 13197 microparticles prepared by freeze drying. Emulsions containing 1%, 1.5%, 2%, 3.5% or 5% w/v inulin were prepared, with or without centrifugation before freeze drying. Morphological properties, particle size distribution, encapsulation efficiency of the microparticles and their ability to preserve viability of the enclosed B. longum LMG 13197 cells were evaluated. The microparticles produced from both formulations without a centrifugation step were irregular, porous with concavities and contained high number of bacterial cells. Formulations with or without inulin had average particle sizes of 33.4-81.0 μm with encapsulation efficiencies of 82% and 88%, respectively. Vegetal-inulin microparticles have the morphology and size that will enable their even distribution in final food products, and hence, they have the potential for use as a functional food additive because they are likely to deliver sufficient numbers of viable bacteria.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Global Changes in Protein Expression during Bile Salt Exposure of Bifidobacterium longum NCIMB 8809

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Borja; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Margolles, Abelardo; Zagorec, Monique

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation to and tolerance of bile stress are among the main limiting factors to ensure survival of bifidobacteria in the intestinal environment of humans. The effect of bile salts on protein expression patterns of Bifidobacterium longum was examined. Protein pattern comparison of strains grown with or without bile extract allowed us to identify 34 different proteins whose expression was regulated. The majority of these proteins were induced after both a minor (0.6 g liter−1) and a major (1.2 g liter−1) exposure to bile. These include general stress response chaperones, proteins involved in transcription and translation and in the metabolism of amino acids and nucleotides, and several enzymes of glycolysis and pyruvate catabolism. Remarkably, xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, the key enzyme of the so-called bifidobacterial shunt, was found to be upregulated, and the activity on fructose 6-phosphate was significantly higher for protein extracts of cells grown in the presence of bile. Changes in the levels of metabolic end products (acetate and lactate) were also detected. These results suggest that bile salts, to which bifidobacteria are naturally exposed, induce a complex physiological response rather than a single event in which proteins from many different functional categories take part. This study has extended our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the capacity of intestinal bifidobacteria to tolerate bile. PMID:16077128

  1. Strain-dependent augmentation of tight-junction barrier function in human primary epidermal keratinocytes by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium lysates.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Reshma; McBain, Andrew J; O'Neill, Catherine A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated whether probiotic lysates can modify the tight-junction function of human primary keratinocytes. The keratinocytes were grown on cell culture inserts and treated with lysates from Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus fermentum, or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. With the exception of L. fermentum (which decreased cell viability), all strains markedly enhanced tight-junction barrier function within 24 h, as assessed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). However, B. longum and L. rhamnosus GG were the most efficacious, producing dose-dependent increases in resistance that were maintained for 4 days. These increases in TEER correlated with elevated expression of tight-junction protein components. Neutralization of Toll-like receptor 2 abolished both the increase in TEER and expression of tight-junction proteins induced by B. longum, but not L. rhamnosus GG. These data suggest that some bacterial strains increase tight-junction function via modulation of protein components but the different pathways involved may vary depending on the bacterial strain. PMID:23770906

  2. Strain-Dependent Augmentation of Tight-Junction Barrier Function in Human Primary Epidermal Keratinocytes by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Reshma; McBain, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether probiotic lysates can modify the tight-junction function of human primary keratinocytes. The keratinocytes were grown on cell culture inserts and treated with lysates from Bifidobacterium longum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus fermentum, or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. With the exception of L. fermentum (which decreased cell viability), all strains markedly enhanced tight-junction barrier function within 24 h, as assessed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). However, B. longum and L. rhamnosus GG were the most efficacious, producing dose-dependent increases in resistance that were maintained for 4 days. These increases in TEER correlated with elevated expression of tight-junction protein components. Neutralization of Toll-like receptor 2 abolished both the increase in TEER and expression of tight-junction proteins induced by B. longum, but not L. rhamnosus GG. These data suggest that some bacterial strains increase tight-junction function via modulation of protein components but the different pathways involved may vary depending on the bacterial strain. PMID:23770906

  3. A novel gene cluster allows preferential utilization of fucosylated milk oligosaccharides in Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum SC596

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Kirmiz, Nina; Davis, Jasmine C.; Totten, Sarah M.; Lemay, Danielle G.; Ugalde, Juan A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The infant intestinal microbiota is often colonized by two subspecies of Bifidobacterium longum: subsp. infantis (B. infantis) and subsp. longum (B. longum). Competitive growth of B. infantis in the neonate intestine has been linked to the utilization of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). However, little is known how B. longum consumes HMO. In this study, infant-borne B. longum strains exhibited varying HMO growth phenotypes. While all strains efficiently utilized lacto-N-tetraose, certain strains additionally metabolized fucosylated HMO. B. longum SC596 grew vigorously on HMO, and glycoprofiling revealed a preference for consumption of fucosylated HMO. Transcriptomes of SC596 during early-stage growth on HMO were more similar to growth on fucosyllactose, transiting later to a pattern similar to growth on neutral HMO. B. longum SC596 contains a novel gene cluster devoted to the utilization of fucosylated HMO, including genes for import of fucosylated molecules, fucose metabolism and two α-fucosidases. This cluster showed a modular induction during early growth on HMO and fucosyllactose. This work clarifies the genomic and physiological variation of infant-borne B. longum to HMO consumption, which resembles B. infantis. The capability to preferentially consume fucosylated HMO suggests a competitive advantage for these unique B. longum strains in the breast-fed infant gut. PMID:27756904

  4. Yoghurt fermented by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus H+ -ATPase-defective mutants exhibits enhanced viability of Bifidobacterium breve during storage.

    PubMed

    Ongol, Martin Patrick; Sawatari, Yuki; Ebina, Yoshiko; Sone, Teruo; Tanaka, Michiko; Tomita, Fusao; Yokota, Atsushi; Asano, Kozo

    2007-05-30

    Persistent acid production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus during refrigerated storage is a major cause of reduced viability of probiotic strains such as Bifidobacterium breve in yoghurt. It was established that H+ -ATPase-defective mutants of lactic acid bacteria have reduced growth and metabolism in low pH environments. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate inhibition of post-acidification and maintenance of B. breve viability in yoghurt fermented by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus mutants with reduced membrane-bound H+ -ATPase activity during refrigerated storage. Spontaneous neomycin mutants of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus that had a significantly (P < or = 0.05) reduced H+ -ATPase activity were successfully isolated. Yoghurt fermented using L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus SBT0164 No. 55-1 (mutant) starter culture had markedly reduced post-acidification and maintained viability (> or = 10(8) CFU/ml) of both Bifidobacteruim breve JCM 1192(T) and Bifidobacteruim breve JCM 7017 during storage at 10 degrees C for 21 days. These results clearly showed that yoghurt fermented by mutants of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus with reduced membrane-bound H+ -ATPase activity has reduced post-acidification that prolongs viability of B. breve in yoghurt during refrigerated storage.

  5. Alleviation of high fat diet‐induced obesity by oligofructose in gnotobiotic mice is independent of presence of Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Nora; Hanske, Laura; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Scope Diet‐induced obesity is associated with changes in the gut microbiota and low‐grade inflammation. Oligofructose was reported to ameliorate high fat diet‐induced metabolic disorders in mice by restoring the number of intestinal bifidobacteria. However, this has not been experimentally demonstrated. Methods and results We fed conventional mice, germfree mice, mice associated with a simplified human gut microbiota composed of eight bacterial species including Bifidobacterium longum (SIHUMI), and mice associated with SIHUMI without B. longum a low fat diet (LFD), a high fat diet (HFD), or a HFD containing 10% oligofructose (HFD + OFS) for five weeks. We assessed body composition, bacterial cell numbers and metabolites, markers of inflammation, and gut permeability. Conventional mice fed HFD or HFD + OFS did not differ in body weight gain and glucose tolerance. The gnotobiotic mouse groups fed LFD or HFD + OFS gained less body weight and body fat, and displayed an improved glucose tolerance compared with mice fed HFD. These differences were not affected by the presence of B. longum. Mice fed HFD showed no signs of inflammation or increased intestinal permeability. Conclusion The ability of oligofructose to reduce obesity and to improve glucose tolerance in gnotobiotic mice fed HFD was independent of the presence of B. longum. PMID:26202344

  6. Immunomodulation by Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 in the murine lamina propria requires retinoic acid-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Ferstl, Ruth; Ziegler, Mario; Frei, Remo; Nehrbass, Dirk; Lauener, Roger P; Akdis, Cezmi A; O'Mahony, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate dendritic cell processing of the microbiota promotes intestinal homeostasis and protects against aberrant inflammatory responses. Mucosal CD103(+) dendritic cells are able to produce retinoic acid from retinal, however their role in vivo and how they are influenced by specific microbial species has been poorly described. Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 (B. infantis) feeding to mice resulted in increased numbers of CD103(+)retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH)(+) dendritic cells within the lamina propria (LP). Foxp3(+) lymphocytes were also increased in the LP, while TH1 and TH17 subsets were decreased. 3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal (citral) treatment of mice blocked the increase in CD103(+)RALDH(+) dendritic cells and the decrease in TH1 and TH17 lymphocytes, but not the increase in Foxp3(+) lymphocytes. B. infantis reduced the severity of DSS-induced colitis, associated with decreased TH1 and TH17 cells within the LP. Citral treatment confirmed that these effects were RALDH mediated. RALDH(+) dendritic cells decreased within the LP of control inflamed animals, while RALDH(+) dendritic cells numbers were maintained in the LP of B. infantis-fed mice. Thus, CD103(+)RALDH(+) LP dendritic cells are important cellular targets for microbiota-associated effects on mucosal immunoregulation.

  7. Immunomodulation by Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 in the Murine Lamina Propria Requires Retinoic Acid-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Patrycja; Ferstl, Ruth; Ziegler, Mario; Frei, Remo; Nehrbass, Dirk; Lauener, Roger P.; Akdis, Cezmi A.; O'Mahony, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate dendritic cell processing of the microbiota promotes intestinal homeostasis and protects against aberrant inflammatory responses. Mucosal CD103+ dendritic cells are able to produce retinoic acid from retinal, however their role in vivo and how they are influenced by specific microbial species has been poorly described. Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 (B. infantis) feeding to mice resulted in increased numbers of CD103+retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH)+ dendritic cells within the lamina propria (LP). Foxp3+ lymphocytes were also increased in the LP, while TH1 and TH17 subsets were decreased. 3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal (citral) treatment of mice blocked the increase in CD103+RALDH+ dendritic cells and the decrease in TH1 and TH17 lymphocytes, but not the increase in Foxp3+ lymphocytes. B. infantis reduced the severity of DSS-induced colitis, associated with decreased TH1 and TH17 cells within the LP. Citral treatment confirmed that these effects were RALDH mediated. RALDH+ dendritic cells decreased within the LP of control inflamed animals, while RALDH+ dendritic cells numbers were maintained in the LP of B. infantis-fed mice. Thus, CD103+RALDH+ LP dendritic cells are important cellular targets for microbiota-associated effects on mucosal immunoregulation. PMID:23704880

  8. Oral Feeding of Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis: Colonic Morphological Changes in Rat Model of TNBS-Induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Javed, Najma H; Alsahly, Musaad B; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. It has been proposed that modifying the bacterial flora in intestine with probiotics may decrease the inflammatory process and prevent relapses in UC. We investigated the possible protective and therapeutic effects of a single strand of probiotic, Bifidobacterium infantis (BI), on colonic inflammation, in rats with regular feedings. Two groups of Lewis rats were prepared (n = 8). The first group was the control, sham-fed group (n = 4). The other group was the experimental BI-fed group (n = 4). Colitis was induced in both groups by intrarectal administration of TNBS under light anesthesia. The sham-fed colitis induced groups received a daily oral gavage feeding of 1.0 mL distilled water, whereas the B. infantis-fed group received 0.205 g of B. infantis dissolved in 1.0 mL distilled water daily. The change in body weight and food and water intake was recorded over the course of each study and analyzed. The rats were euthanized and tissues from the descending colon were harvested and analyzed microscopically and histologically. Results of our study indicated significant reduction in inflammation, mucosal damage, and preservation of goblet cells, as compared to the control animals. Modulation of gastrointestinal (GI) flora suggests a promising field in developing strategies for prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases by dietary modifications. PMID:27127686

  9. A Conserved Two-Component Signal Transduction System Controls the Response to Phosphate Starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Fernández, Matilde; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; MacSharry, John; Zomer, Aldert

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on the identification and molecular characterization of the two-component regulatory system (2CRS) PhoRP, which controls the response to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. The response regulator PhoP was shown to bind to the promoter region of pstSCAB, specifying a predicted Pi transporter system, as well as that of phoU, which encodes a putative Pi-responsive regulatory protein. This interaction is assumed to cause transcriptional modulation under conditions of Pi limitation. Our data suggest that the phoRP genes are subject to positive autoregulation and, together with pstSCAB and presumably phoU, represent the complete regulon controlled by the phoRP-encoded 2CRS in B. breve UCC2003. Determination of the minimal PhoP binding region combined with bioinformatic analysis revealed the probable recognition sequence of PhoP, designated here as the PHO box, which together with phoRP is conserved among many high-GC-content Gram-positive bacteria. The importance of the phoRP 2CRS in the response of B. breve to Pi starvation conditions was confirmed by analysis of a B. breve phoP insertion mutant which exhibited decreased growth under phosphate-limiting conditions compared to its parent strain UCC2003. PMID:22635988

  10. Identification of surface-associated proteins of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 by enzymatic shaving.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dequan; Sun, Yu; Liu, Fei; Li, Aili; Yang, Limei; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microorganisms of the human and animal intestinal tract, and their surface proteins can mediate bacterial communication and chemical sensing in the environment, as well as facilitate interactions between bacteria and the host. However, a systematic study of the outer surface-associated proteome of bifidobacteria has not been undertaken. In the present study, the proteins located on the surface of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 were systematically identified by a nongel proteomic approach, which consisted of the shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and an analysis of the released peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 105 surface-associated proteins were found, of which 15 proteins could potentially be involved in adhesion and interactions between bifidobacteria and the host. The proteins related to adhesion and interaction between bacteria and the host include pilus structure proteins (Fim A, Fim B), 10 moonlighting proteins, an NLP/P60 family protein, an immunogenic secreted protein, and a putative sugar-binding secreted protein. The results provide the basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between bifidobacteria and the host. PMID:27132091

  11. In vitro digestion of sinigrin and glucotropaeolin by single strains of Bifidobacterium and identification of the digestive products.

    PubMed

    Cheng, D-L; Hashimoto, K; Uda, Y

    2004-03-01

    Three strains of Bifidobacterium sp., B. pseudocatenulatum, B. adolescentis, and B. longum were studied for their ability to digest glucosinolates, sinigrin (SNG) and glucotropaeolin (GTL), in vitro. All strains digested both glucosinolates during 24-48 h cultivation, accompanied by a decline in the medium pH from 7.1 to 5.2. The digestion of glucosinolates by a cell-free extract prepared from sonicated cells of B. adolescentis, but not cultivated broth, increased in the presence of 0.5 mM l-ascorbic acid. Also, a time-dependent formation of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) was observed when the cell-free extract was incubated with 0.25 mM SNG for 120 min at pH 7.0. These reaction features suggest that the digestive activity may have been due to an enzyme similar to myrosinase, an enzyme of plant origin. GC-MS analysis of the Bifidobacterial cultured broth showed that the major products were 3-butenenitrile (BCN) and phenylacetonitrile (PhACN), from SNG and GTL, respectively and nitriles, probably due to a decrease in the pH of the media. AITC and benzyl isothiocyanate (BzITC) were barely detectable in the broth. It was concluded that the three species of Bifidobacteria could be involved in digestive degradation of glucosinolates in the human intestinal tract.

  12. A nutritious medida (Sudanese cereal thin porridge) prepared by fermenting malted brown rice flour with Bifidobacterium longum BB 536.

    PubMed

    Kabier, Barka M; Mustafa, Suhaimi; Kharidah, Muhammad; Suraini, Abd-Aziz; Abdul Manap, Yazid

    2004-09-01

    The nutritive value of spontaneously fermented brown rice flour medida, a Sudanese cereal thin porridge, is low. This study was carried out to improve the nutritional quality of medida. The flour was soaked and malted at 30◦C to optimise the protein content. Flour malted for two days had the highest protein content. Skim milk was added to the malted brown rice flour medida and fermented using Bifidobacterium longum BB 536. Maximum count of B. longum BB 536 up to 9 log CFU/ ml was attained at 4.6 final fermentation pH. The resultant viscosity was similar to that of the spontaneously fermented brown rice flour medida. There was significant (P< 0.01) increase in both the energy density and the protein content, having increased 12 folds and 24 folds, respectively. The essential amino acids including lysine and methionine were highly augmented. The resultant medida have stable flowing characteristics and meet the whole protein and energy requirements for infants and children aged 1 - 10 years old.

  13. A prebiotic mixture improved Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis gastrointestinal in vitro resistance in petit-suisse.

    PubMed

    Padilha, Marina; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete; Vieira, Antonio Diogo Silva; Costa, Mayra Garcia Maia; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2016-05-18

    The survival of two probiotic strains -Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 - incorporated into probiotic (PC) and into synbiotic (SC, with inulin + fructooligosaccharides, respectively, at 7.5 and at 2.5 g per 100 g) petit-suisse cheese was investigated in the beginning (day 1) and at the end (28 days) of storage at 4 °C when the food products were subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal simulated assays. Species-specific quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) combined with propidium monoazide (PMA-qPCR) was employed to quantify the strains. Initial La-5 and Bb-12 populations were always above 7 log CFU g(-1). The presence of the prebiotic ingredients in SC improved the Bb-12 and La-5 resistance after the 6 h assay, with higher populations in all the in vitro stages and throughout the storage period (p < 0.05), leading to equal or superior survival rates (SR) in SC of both probiotic strains, in the beginning as well as at the end of storage. The mean La-5 SR were 58% (PC) and 67% (SC), whereas the mean Bb-12 SR were 60% (PC) and 79% (SC). Our findings suggest that the addition of a prebiotic mixture in petit-suisse cheese was advantageous, since it improved both the Bb-12 and La-5 viability and tolerance under in vitro gastrointestinal simulated conditions, both in the fresh product and in the product refrigerated for 28 days. PMID:27112363

  14. Microencapsulated Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 favorably modulates gut microbiota and reduces circulating endotoxins in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Rodes, Laetitia; Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota is a bacterial bioreactor whose composition is an asset for human health. However, circulating gut microbiota derived endotoxins cause metabolic endotoxemia, promoting metabolic and liver diseases. This study investigates the potential of orally delivered microencapsulated Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 15697 to modulate the gut microbiota and reduce endotoxemia in F344 rats. The rats were gavaged daily with saline or microencapsulated B. infantis ATCC 15697. Following 38 days of supplementation, the treated rats showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in fecal Bifidobacteria (4.34 ± 0.46 versus 2.45 ± 0.25% of total) and B. infantis (0.28 ± 0.21 versus 0.52 ± 0.12 % of total) and a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in fecal Enterobacteriaceae (0.80 ± 0.45 versus 2.83 ± 0.63% of total) compared to the saline control. In addition, supplementation with the probiotic formulation reduced fecal (10.52 ± 0.18 versus 11.29 ± 0.16 EU/mg; P = 0.01) and serum (0.33 ± 0.015 versus 0.30 ± 0.015 EU/mL; P = 0.25) endotoxins. Thus, microencapsulated B. infantis ATCC 15697 modulates the gut microbiota and reduces colonic and serum endotoxins. Future preclinical studies should investigate the potential of the novel probiotic formulation in metabolic and liver diseases. PMID:24967382

  15. A prebiotic mixture improved Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis gastrointestinal in vitro resistance in petit-suisse.

    PubMed

    Padilha, Marina; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete; Vieira, Antonio Diogo Silva; Costa, Mayra Garcia Maia; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2016-05-18

    The survival of two probiotic strains -Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 - incorporated into probiotic (PC) and into synbiotic (SC, with inulin + fructooligosaccharides, respectively, at 7.5 and at 2.5 g per 100 g) petit-suisse cheese was investigated in the beginning (day 1) and at the end (28 days) of storage at 4 °C when the food products were subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal simulated assays. Species-specific quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) combined with propidium monoazide (PMA-qPCR) was employed to quantify the strains. Initial La-5 and Bb-12 populations were always above 7 log CFU g(-1). The presence of the prebiotic ingredients in SC improved the Bb-12 and La-5 resistance after the 6 h assay, with higher populations in all the in vitro stages and throughout the storage period (p < 0.05), leading to equal or superior survival rates (SR) in SC of both probiotic strains, in the beginning as well as at the end of storage. The mean La-5 SR were 58% (PC) and 67% (SC), whereas the mean Bb-12 SR were 60% (PC) and 79% (SC). Our findings suggest that the addition of a prebiotic mixture in petit-suisse cheese was advantageous, since it improved both the Bb-12 and La-5 viability and tolerance under in vitro gastrointestinal simulated conditions, both in the fresh product and in the product refrigerated for 28 days.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveals the Metabolic Insight on Consumption of Prebiotics and Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Han; An, Hyun Joo; Garrido, Daniel; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a common member of the intestinal microbiota in breast-fed infants and capable of metabolizing human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). To investigate the bacterial response to different prebiotics, we analyzed both cell wall associated and whole cell proteins in B. infantis. Proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS followed by comparative proteomics to deduce the protein localization within the cell. Enzymes involved in the metabolism of lactose, glucose, galactooligosaccharides, fructooligosaccharides and HMO were constitutively expressed exhibiting less than two-fold change regardless of the sugar used. In contrast, enzymes in N-Acetylglucosamine and sucrose catabolism were induced by HMO and fructans, respectively. Galactose-metabolizing enzymes phosphoglucomutase, UDP-glucose 4-epimerase and UTP glucose-1-P uridylytransferase were expressed constitutively, while galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, increased their expression three fold when HMO and lactose were used as substrates for cell growth. Cell wall-associated proteomics also revealed ATP-dependent sugar transport systems associated with consumption of different prebiotics. In addition, the expression of 16 glycosyl hydrolases revealed the complete metabolic route for each substrate. Mucin, which possesses O-glycans that are structurally similar to HMO did not induced the expression of transport proteins, hydrolysis or sugar metabolic pathway indicating B. infantis do not utilize these glycoconjugates. PMID:23469017

  17. Transcriptional Regulation and Characterization of a Novel β-Fructofuranosidase-Encoding Gene from Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sinéad M.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-01-01

    An operon involved in fructooligosaccharide breakdown was identified in the genome of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. This 2.6-kb transcriptional unit was comprised of three genes that encoded a putative permease, a conserved hypothetical protein, and a β-fructofuranosidase. Active transcription of the operon was observed when B. breve UCC2003 was grown on sucrose or Actilight, while transcription appeared to be repressed when the organism was grown on glucose, fructose, a combination of glucose and sucrose, or a combination of fructose and sucrose. The β-fructofuranosidase encoded by this operon was purified and biochemically characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for catalytic activity were determined to be pH 6.0 and 37°C, respectively, and there was a dependence on bivalent cations, particularly manganese. The Km and Vmax values for sucrose hydrolysis were determined to be 25 ± 2 mM and 24 ± 3 μmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. Interestingly, the enzyme was shown to specifically catalyze cleavage of the β(2-1) glycosidic bond between glucose and its neighboring fructose moiety in sucrose and other fructooligosaccharides with a relatively low degree of polymerization, and there was no detectable activity towards the β(2-1) glycosidic bond between two fructose moieties within the same substrate. To our knowledge, such an enzymatic activity has not previously been described in bifidobacteria or other gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16000751

  18. Microcalorimetric assay on the antimicrobial property of five hydroxyanthraquinone derivatives in rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L.) to Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhao, H; Kong, W; Jin, C; Zhao, Y; Qu, Y; Xiao, X

    2010-07-01

    It was found that the intestinal bacteria balance would be deteriorated by rhubarb especially in long term treatment. Bifidobacteria is one of the most common species of probiotics in human intestine. The suppression of this particular probiotic, such as Bifidobacterium adolescentis, one of the dominant anaerobes in the intestines of humans, might lead to imbalance of intestinal flora and is considered to be potentially riskful for human health. Hence, the inhibitory effects of the five main components of hydroxyanthraquinones (HAQs) contained in rhubarb on B. adolescentis growth were investigated by microcalorimetry to discover the suppression potential of rhubarb and the structure-function relationship of such HAQs. The value of the maximum power- output (P(max)) and slope (k) of the thermogenic growth curves of B. adolescentis were found of decrease in the presence of the five HAQs, while the peak time (T(p)) of the thermogenic curves were found to be delayed. The sequence of antimicrobial activity of the five HAQs is rhein>emodin>aloe-emodin>chrysophanol>physicion. The functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl and hydroxylmethyl on phenyl ring in HAQs could improve the antimicrobial activity. The influence of substituent groups on anti- B. adolescentis activity might be related with the polarity and the sequence was carboxyl>hydroxyl>hydroxylmethyl>methyl and methoxyl.

  19. Effect of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis on lipid profile in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ejtahed, H S; Mohtadi-Nia, J; Homayouni-Rad, A; Niafar, M; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M; Mofid, V; Akbarian-Moghari, A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotic and conventional yogurt on the lipid profile in type 2 diabetic people. In a randomized double-blind controlled trial, 60 people (23 males and 37 females) with type 2 diabetes and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) greater than 2.6 mmol/L were assigned to 2 groups. Participants consumed daily 300 g of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 or 300 g of conventional yogurt for 6 wk. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements and 3-d, 24-h dietary recalls were collected at the baseline and at the end of the trial. Probiotic yogurt consumption caused a 4.54% decrease in total cholesterol and a 7.45% decrease in LDL-C compared with the control group. No significant changes from baseline were shown in triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the probiotic group. The total cholesterol:HDL-C ratio and LDL-C:HDL-C ratio as atherogenic indices significantly decreased in the probiotic group compared with the control group. Probiotic yogurt improved total cholesterol and LDL-C concentrations in type 2 diabetic people and may contribute to the improvement of cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:21700013

  20. Oral Feeding of Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis: Colonic Morphological Changes in Rat Model of TNBS-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Najma H.; Alsahly, Musaad B.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. It has been proposed that modifying the bacterial flora in intestine with probiotics may decrease the inflammatory process and prevent relapses in UC. We investigated the possible protective and therapeutic effects of a single strand of probiotic, Bifidobacterium infantis (BI), on colonic inflammation, in rats with regular feedings. Two groups of Lewis rats were prepared (n = 8). The first group was the control, sham-fed group (n = 4). The other group was the experimental BI-fed group (n = 4). Colitis was induced in both groups by intrarectal administration of TNBS under light anesthesia. The sham-fed colitis induced groups received a daily oral gavage feeding of 1.0 mL distilled water, whereas the B. infantis-fed group received 0.205 g of B. infantis dissolved in 1.0 mL distilled water daily. The change in body weight and food and water intake was recorded over the course of each study and analyzed. The rats were euthanized and tissues from the descending colon were harvested and analyzed microscopically and histologically. Results of our study indicated significant reduction in inflammation, mucosal damage, and preservation of goblet cells, as compared to the control animals. Modulation of gastrointestinal (GI) flora suggests a promising field in developing strategies for prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases by dietary modifications. PMID:27127686

  1. Comparative transcriptomics reveals key differences in the response to milk oligosaccharides of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Lemay, Danielle G.; Sela, David A.; German, J. Bruce; Mills, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk enhances the predominance of Bifidobacterium species in the infant gut, probably due to its large concentration of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Here we screened infant-gut isolates of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium bifidum using individual HMO, and compared the global transcriptomes of representative isolates on major HMO by RNA-seq. While B. infantis displayed homogeneous HMO-utilization patterns, B. bifidum were more diverse and some strains did not use fucosyllactose (FL) or sialyllactose (SL). Transcriptomes of B. bifidum SC555 and B. infantis ATCC 15697 showed that utilization of pooled HMO is similar to neutral HMO, while transcriptomes for growth on FL were more similar to lactose than HMO in B. bifidum. Genes linked to HMO-utilization were upregulated by neutral HMO and SL, but not by FL in both species. In contrast, FL induced the expression of alternative gene clusters in B. infantis. Results also suggest that B. bifidum SC555 does not utilize fucose or sialic acid from HMO. Surprisingly, expression of orthologous genes differed between both bifidobacteria even when grown on identical substrates. This study highlights two major strategies found in Bifidobacterium species to process HMO, and presents detailed information on the close relationship between HMO and infant-gut bifidobacteria. PMID:26337101

  2. Selective and differential enumerations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium spp. in yoghurt--a review.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Rabia; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-10-01

    Yoghurt is increasingly being used as a carrier of probiotic bacteria for their potential health benefits. To meet with a recommended level of ≥10(6) viable cells/g of a product, assessment of viability of probiotic bacteria in market preparations is crucial. This requires a working method for selective enumeration of these probiotic bacteria and lactic acid bacteria in yoghurt such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. casei and Bifidobacterium. This chapter presents an overview of media that could be used for differential and selective enumerations of yoghurt bacteria. De Man Rogosa Sharpe agar containing fructose (MRSF), MRS agar pH 5.2 (MRS 5.2), reinforced clostridial prussian blue agar at pH 5.0 (RCPB 5.0) or reinforced clostridial agar at pH 5.3 (RCA 5.3) are suitable for enumeration of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus when the incubation is carried out at 45°C for 72h. S. thermophilus (ST) agar and M17 are recommended for selective enumeration of S. thermophilus. Selective enumeration of Lb. acidophilus in mixed culture could be made in Rogosa agar added with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (X-Glu) or MRS containing maltose (MRSM) and incubation in a 20% CO2 atmosphere. Lb. casei could be selectively enumerated on specially formulated Lb. casei (LC) agar from products containing yoghurt starter bacteria (S. thermophilus and Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus), Lb. acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp. and Lb. casei. Bifidobacterium could be enumerated on MRS agar supplemented with nalidixic acid, paromomycin, neomycin sulphate and lithium chloride (MRS-NPNL) under anaerobic incubation at 37°C for 72h.

  3. Development of a Double-Crossover Markerless Gene Deletion System in Bifidobacterium longum: Functional Analysis of the α-Galactosidase Gene for Raffinose Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Yosuke; Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Fukuma, Hidenori; Murayama, Hiroki; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Functional analysis of Bifidobacterium genes is essential for understanding host-Bifidobacterium interactions with beneficial effects on human health; however, the lack of an effective targeted gene inactivation system in bifidobacteria has prevented the development of functional genomics in this bacterium. Here, we report the development of a markerless gene deletion system involving a double crossover in Bifidobacterium longum. Incompatible plasmid vectors were used to facilitate a second crossover step. The conditional replication vector pBS423-ΔrepA, which lacks the plasmid replication gene repA, was integrated into the target gene by a first crossover event. Subsequently, the replicative plasmid pTBR101-CM, which harbors repA, was introduced into this integrant to facilitate the second crossover step and subsequent elimination of the excised conditional replication vector from the cells by plasmid incompatibility. The proposed system was confirmed to work as expected in B. longum 105-A using the chromosomal full-length β-galactosidase gene as a target. Markerless gene deletion was tested using the aga gene, which encodes α-galactosidase, whose substrates include raffinose. Almost all the pTBR101-CM-transformed strains became double-crossover recombinants after subculture, and 4 out of the 270 double-crossover recombinants had lost the ability to assimilate raffinose. Genotype analysis of these strains revealed markerless gene deletion of aga. Carbohydrate assimilation analysis and α-galactosidase activity measurement were conducted using both the representative mutant and a plasmid-based aga-complemented strain. These functional analyses revealed that aga is the only gene encoding a functional α-galactosidase enzyme in B. longum 105-A. PMID:22582061

  4. Development of a double-crossover markerless gene deletion system in Bifidobacterium longum: functional analysis of the α-galactosidase gene for raffinose assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yosuke; Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Fukuma, Hidenori; Murayama, Hiroki; Kano, Yasunobu; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Functional analysis of Bifidobacterium genes is essential for understanding host-Bifidobacterium interactions with beneficial effects on human health; however, the lack of an effective targeted gene inactivation system in bifidobacteria has prevented the development of functional genomics in this bacterium. Here, we report the development of a markerless gene deletion system involving a double crossover in Bifidobacterium longum. Incompatible plasmid vectors were used to facilitate a second crossover step. The conditional replication vector pBS423-ΔrepA, which lacks the plasmid replication gene repA, was integrated into the target gene by a first crossover event. Subsequently, the replicative plasmid pTBR101-CM, which harbors repA, was introduced into this integrant to facilitate the second crossover step and subsequent elimination of the excised conditional replication vector from the cells by plasmid incompatibility. The proposed system was confirmed to work as expected in B. longum 105-A using the chromosomal full-length β-galactosidase gene as a target. Markerless gene deletion was tested using the aga gene, which encodes α-galactosidase, whose substrates include raffinose. Almost all the pTBR101-CM-transformed strains became double-crossover recombinants after subculture, and 4 out of the 270 double-crossover recombinants had lost the ability to assimilate raffinose. Genotype analysis of these strains revealed markerless gene deletion of aga. Carbohydrate assimilation analysis and α-galactosidase activity measurement were conducted using both the representative mutant and a plasmid-based aga-complemented strain. These functional analyses revealed that aga is the only gene encoding a functional α-galactosidase enzyme in B. longum 105-A.

  5. Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Exo-β-1,3-Galactanase, an Enzyme for the Degradation of Type II Arabinogalactan

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Takenori; Sakamoto, Ayami; Shimokawa, Michiko; Kitahara, Kanefumi

    2014-01-01

    Type II arabinogalactan (AG-II) is a suitable carbohydrate source for Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, but the degradative enzymes have never been characterized. In this study, we characterized an exo-β-1,3-galactanase, BLLJ_1840, belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 43 from B. longum subsp. longum JCM1217. The recombinant BLLJ_1840 expressed in Escherichia coli hydrolyzed β-1,3-linked galactooligosaccharides but not β-1,4- and β-1,6-linked galactooligosaccharides. The enzyme also hydrolyzed larch wood arabinogalactan (LWAG), which comprises a β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked galactan side chains. The kcat/Km ratio of dearabinosylated LWAG was 24-fold higher than that of β-1,3-galactan. BLLJ_1840 is a novel type of exo-β-1,3-galactanase with a higher affinity for the β-1,6-substituted β-1,3-galactan than for nonsubstituted β-1,3-galactan. BLLJ_1840 has 27% to 28% identities with other characterized exo-β-1,3-galactanases from bacteria and fungi. The homologous genes are conserved in several strains of B. longum subsp. longum and B. longum subsp. infantis but not in other bifidobacteria. Transcriptional analysis revealed that BLLJ_1840 is intensively induced with BLLJ_1841, an endo-β-1,6-galactanase candidate, in the presence of LWAG. This is the first report of exo-β-1,3-galactanase in bifidobacteria, which is an enzyme used for the acquisition of AG-II in B. longum subsp. longum. PMID:24837371

  6. Antimicrobial activity and antibiotic susceptibility of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. intended for use as starter and probiotic cultures

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Ralitsa; Yocheva, Lyubomira; Tserovska, Lilia; Zhelezova, Galina; Stefanova, Nina; Atanasova, Akseniya; Danguleva, Antonia; Ivanova, Gergana; Karapetkov, Nikolay; Rumyan, Nevenka; Karaivanova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity and antibiotic susceptibility were tested for 23 Lactobacillus and three Bifidobacterium strains isolated from different ecological niches. Agar-well diffusion method was used to test the antagonistic effect (against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Candida albicans) of acid and neutralized (pH 5.5) lyophilized concentrated supernatants (cell-free supernatant; CFS) and whey (cell-free whey fractions; CFW) from de Man–Rogosa–Sharpe/trypticase-phytone-yeast broth and skim milk. Acid CFS and CFW showed high acidification rate-dependent bacterial inhibition; five strains were active against C. albicans. Neutralized CFS/CFW assays showed six strains active against S. aureus (L. acidophilus L-1, L. brevis 1, L. fermentum 1, B. animalis subsp. lactis L-3), E. coli (L. bulgaricus 6) or B. cereus (L. plantarum 24-4В). Inhibition of two pathogens with neutralized CFS (L. bulgaricus 6, L. helveticus 3, L. plantarum 24-2L, L. fermentum 1)/CFW (L. plantarum 24-5D, L. plantarum 24-4В) was detected. Some strains maintained activity after pH neutralization, indicating presence of active substances. The antibiotics minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the Epsilometer test method. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, gentamicin, erythromycin and tetracycline. Four lactobacilli were resistant to one antibiotic (L. rhamnosus Lio 1 to streptomycin) or two antibiotics (L. acidophilus L-1 and L. brevis 1 to kanamycin and clindamycin; L. casei L-4 to clindamycin and chloramphenicol). Vancomycin MICs > 256 μg/mL indicated intrinsic resistance for all heterofermentative lactobacilli. The antimicrobially active strains do not cause concerns about antibiotic resistance transfer and could be used as natural biopreservatives in food and therapeutic formulations. PMID:26019620

  7. Genome Structure of the Symbiont Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 and Gene Expression Profiling in Response to Lactulose-Derived Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Moreno, F Javier; Sanz, María L; Sanz, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 was isolated from stools of a breast-fed infant. Although, this strain is generally considered an adult-type bifidobacterial species, it has also been shown to have pre-clinical efficacy in obesity models. In order to understand the molecular basis of its adaptation to complex carbohydrates and improve its potential functionality, we have analyzed its genome and transcriptome, as well as its metabolic output when growing in galacto-oligosaccharides derived from lactulose (GOS-Lu) as carbon source. B. pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 shows strain-specific genome regions, including a great diversity of sugar metabolic-related genes. A preliminary and exploratory transcriptome analysis suggests candidate over-expression of several genes coding for sugar transporters and permeases; furthermore, five out of seven beta-galactosidases identified in the genome could be activated in response to GOS-Lu exposure. Here, we also propose that a specific gene cluster is involved in controlling the import and hydrolysis of certain di- and tri-saccharides, which seemed to be those primarily taken-up by the bifidobacterial strain. This was discerned from mass spectrometry-based quantification of different saccharide fractions of culture supernatants. Our results confirm that the expression of genes involved in sugar transport and metabolism and in the synthesis of leucine, an amino acid with a key role in glucose and energy homeostasis, was up-regulated by GOS-Lu. This was done using qPCR in addition to the exploratory information derived from the single-replicated RNAseq approach, together with the functional annotation of genes predicted to be encoded in the B. pseudocatenulatum CETC 7765 genome. PMID:27199952

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of Bifidobacterium longum-mediated human interleukin-2 with endostatin or TRAIL in transplanted tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yan; Kou, Lei; Wang, Jian-Jun; Xu, Gen-Xing

    2012-03-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2), as an important cytokine in immune response, has been demonstrated to have therapeutic activity in several cancer models. In our previous study, we showed that the pBV22210 vector containing a chloramphenicol resistance gene and the cryptic plasmid, pMB1, from the Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) strain could stably replicate and did not significantly affect the biological characteristics of B. longum. In this study, B. longum was transfected by electroporation with pBV22210 containing IL-2 (B. longum-pBV22210-IL-2), its growth curve was determined, and its inhibitory effect on tumor xenografts in mice was examined. The results showed that B. longum-pBV22210-IL-2 reduced the tumor size and prolonged the survival time of H22 tumor-bearing mice. In addition, when cyclophosphamide (CTX), B. longum-pBV22210-endostatin, or B. longum-pBV22210-TRAIL was combined with B. longum-pBV22210-IL-2, the antitumor effect was significantly enhanced. The survival times of the mice in the combination groups of B. longum-pBV22210-endostatin or B. longum-pBV22210-TRAIL were longer than those of the mice in the B. longum-pBV22210-IL-2 alone group. However, when CTX was added, the survival times of the mice showed no statistically significant difference compared with those of the mice in the dextrose-saline solution group. These results suggest that B. longum-pBV22210-IL-2 has potent antitumor effects that could be enhanced when combined with chemotherapeutic drugs or other antitumor genes.

  9. Effect of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum probiotic feeding on enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Mélanie; Kheadr, Ehab E; Dabour, Nassra; Richard, Denis; Fliss, Ismaïl

    2006-08-15

    The effectiveness of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum RBL 71 as a probiotic against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection was studied using a murine model. BALB/c mice were fed the probiotic for 7 days before or after single challenge with E. coli O157:H7. Fecal B. thermacidophilum RBL 71 and E. coli O157:H7 counts obtained by selective culturing methods were assessed for 1 week before and after infection while feed intake, body weight and composition were monitored during 1 week after infection. Histology of gut tissue (jejunum, ileum and colon) and production of fecal IgA antibodies and serum IgG+IgM antibodies to E. coli O157:H7 were analyzed until 1 and 2 weeks post-infection, respectively. The pathogenicity of E. coli O157:H7, marked by body weight loss and intestinal histopathological changes in the infected group, was significantly reduced in the B. thermacidophilum-treated group. Feeding B. thermacidophilum RBL 71 for 7 days before infection resulted in greater post-challenge feed intake and weight gain and lower fecal levels of E. coli O157:H7. Post-infection levels of anti-E. coli O157:H7-specific IgA in feces and IgG+IgM in serum were higher in mice fed bifidobacteria. Intestinal injuries were also attenuated and reaction of the lymphoid component in the mucosa of the ileum was greater in the bifidobacteria-fed group. A lesser degree of protection against E. coli O157:H7 infection was observed when bifidobacteria were given during the 7 days after E. coli O157:H7 infection. These results demonstrate that feeding the probiotic B. thermacidophilum RBL 71 to mice can reduce the severity of E. coli O157:H7 infection, and suggest that this strain represents a good candidate for the prevention of enteric infections in human.

  10. Bifidobacterium fermented milk and galacto-oligosaccharides lead to improved skin health by decreasing phenols production by gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, K; Masuoka, N; Kano, M; Iizuka, R

    2014-06-01

    A questionnaire survey found that women suffering from abnormal bowel movements have many skin problems such as a high frequency of dry skin. Although there are similarities between the structure and barrier function mechanism of the gut and skin, experimental data are insufficient to show an association between the intestinal environment and skin conditions. Phenols, for example phenol and p-cresol, as metabolites of aromatic amino acids produced by gut bacteria, are regarded as bioactive toxins and serum biomarkers of a disturbed gut environment. Recent studies have demonstrated that phenols disturb the differentiation of monolayer-cultured keratinocytes in vitro, and that phenols produced by gut bacteria accumulate in the skin via the circulation and disrupt keratinocyte differentiation in hairless mice. Human studies have demonstrated that restriction of probiotics elevated serum free p-cresol levels and harmed skin conditions (reduced skin hydration, disrupted keratinisation). In contrast, daily intake of the prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) restored serum free p-cresol levels and skin conditions in adult women. Moreover, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial demonstrated that the daily intake of fermented milk containing the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult and prebiotic GOS reduced serum total phenol levels and prevented skin dryness and disruption of keratinisation in healthy adult women. It is concluded that phenols produced by gut bacteria are one of the causes of skin problems. Probiotics and/or prebiotics, such as B. breve strain Yakult and/or GOS, are expected to help maintain a healthy skin by decreasing phenols production by gut microbiota. These findings support the hypothesis that probiotics and prebiotics provide health benefits to the skin as well as the gut.

  11. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G.; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  12. Functional analysis of bifidobacterial promoters in Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli using the α-galactosidase gene as a reporter.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Tamai, Saki; Hirayama, Yosuke; Onodera, Ai; Koguchi, Hiroka; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukiya, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    Heterologous gene expression in bifidobacteria requires weak, strong, and inducible promoters depending on the objectives of different expression studies. Weak promoters in Escherichia coli can also be desirable for stable heterologous gene cloning. Here, we developed a reporter system using the Bifidobacterium longum α-galactosidase gene and investigated the activity and inducibility of seven bifidobacterial promoters in B. longum and their activities in E. coli. These studies revealed diverse promoter activities. Three promoters were highly active in B. longum, but only slightly active in E. coli. Among these, two phosphoketolase gene (xfp) promoters exhibited strong activity in B. longum cells grown on glucose. In contrast, the promoter activity of the fructose transporter operon (fruEKFG) was strongly induced by carbohydrates other than glucose, including fructose, xylose, and ribose. These promoters will allow strong or highly inducible expression in bifidobacteria and stable gene cloning in E. coli. In contrast to the functions of these promoters, the promoter of sucrose-utilization operon cscBA showed very high activity in E. coli but low activity in B. longum. Other three promoters were functional in both B. longum and E. coli. In particular, two sucrose phosphorylase gene (scrP) promoters showed inducible activity by sucrose and raffinose in B. longum, indicating their applicability for regulated expression studies. The diverse promoter functions revealed in this study will contribute to enabling the regulated expression of heterologous genes in bifidobacteria research.

  13. Fast screening of Bifidobacterium longum sublethal stress conditions in a novel two-stage continuous culture strategy.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, V; Grattepanche, F; Berger, B; Rezzonico, E; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2013-06-01

    A central issue in the application of probiotics as food additives is their fastidious production and their sensitivity to many environmental stresses. The importance of inducible cell-protective mechanisms triggered by application of sublethal stresses for survival under stress conditions has been demonstrated. Continuous cultures could be a suitable and more efficient method to test stress factors on one culture instead of several repeated batch cultures. In this study, the application of a two-stage continuous culture of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 was investigated. The first reactor was operated under fixed conditions at 37 °C and pH 6.0 and used to produce cells with controlled physiology, mimicking cells in the late exponential growth phase. Stress pretreatment combinations of pH (6.0, 5.0 and 4.0), temperature (37, 45 and 47 °C) and NaCl (0, 5 and 10%) were tested in the second reactor. Of all tested combinations, only those of pH 4.0 significantly decreased cell viability in the second reactor compared to control conditions (37 °C, pH 6.0, 0% NaCl) and, therefore, could not be considered as sublethal stresses. Pretreatments with 5 or 10% NaCl had a negative effect on cell viability after gastric lethal stress. A significant improvement in cell resistance to heat lethal stress (56 °C, 5 min) was observed for cells pretreated at 47 °C. In contrast, heat pretreatment negatively affected cell viability after freeze drying and osmotic lethal stresses. The two-stage continuous culture allowed for efficient screening of several stress pretreatments during the same experiment with up to four different conditions tested per day. Optimal sublethal stress conditions can also be applied for producing cells with traditional batch cultures. PMID:23443949

  14. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4(+) lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4(+) Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  15. Overexpression of Small Heat Shock Protein Enhances Heat- and Salt-Stress Tolerance of Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705.

    PubMed

    Khaskheli, Gul Bahar; Zuo, FangLei; Yu, Rui; Chen, ShangWu

    2015-07-01

    Bifidobacteria are probiotics that are incorporated live into various dairy products. They confer health-promotive effects via gastrointestinal tract colonization. However, to provide their health-beneficial properties, they must battle the various abiotic stresses in that environment, such as bile salts, acids, oxygen, and heat. In this study, Bifidobacterium longum salt- and heat-stress tolerance was enhanced by homologous overexpression of a small heat shock protein (sHsp). A positive contribution of overproduced sHsp to abiotic stress tolerance was observed when the bacterium was exposed to heat and salt stresses. Significantly higher survival of B. l ongum NCC2705 overexpressing sHsp was observed at 30 and 60 min into heat (55 °C) and salt (5 M NaCl) treatment, respectively. Thermotolerance analysis at 47 °C with sampling every 2 h also revealed the great potential tolerance of the engineered strain. Cell density and acid production rate increased for the sHsp-overexpressing strain after 8 and 10 h of both heat and salt stresses. In addition, tolerance to bile salts, low pH (3.5) and low temperature (4 °C) was also increased by homologous overexpression of the sHsp hsp20 in B. l ongum. Results revealed that hsp20 overexpression in B longum NCC2705 plays a positive cross-protective role in upregulating abiotic responses, ensuring the organism's tolerance to various stress conditions; therefore, sHsp-overexpressing B. l ongum is advised for fermented dairy foods and other probiotic product applications.

  16. Identification of Antihypertensive Peptides Derived from Low Molecular Weight Casein Hydrolysates Generated during Fermentation by Bifidobacterium longum KACC 91563

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Go Eun; Chang, Oun Ki; Jo, Su-Mi; Han, Gi-Sung; Park, Beom-Young; Ham, Jun-Sang; Jeong, Seok-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was evaluated for the low-molecular-weight fraction (<3 kDa) obtained from milk fermentation by Bifidobacterium longum KACC91563. The ACE inhibitory activity in this fraction was 62.3%. The peptides generated from the <3 kDa fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quantitative time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Of the 28 peptides identified, 11 and 16 were identified as β-casein (CN) and αs1-CN, respectively. One peptide was identified as κ-CN. Three peptides, YQEPVLGPVRGPFPIIV, QEPVLGPVRGPFPIIV, and GPVRGPFPIIV, from β-CN corresponded to known antihypertensive peptides. We also found 15 peptides that were identified as potential antihypertensive peptides because they included a known antihypertensive peptide fragment. These peptides were as follows: RELEELNVPGEIVE (f1-14), YQEPVLGPVRGPFP (f193-206), EPVLGPVRGPFPIIV (f195-206), PVLGPVRGPFPIIV (f196-206), VLGPVRGPFPIIV (f197-206), and LGPVRGPFPIIV (f198-206) for β-CN; and APSFSDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f176-199), SFSDIPNPIGSENSEKT- TMPLW (f178-199), FSDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f179-199), SDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f180-199), DIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f181-199), IPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f182-199), PIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f185-199), IGSENSEKTTMPLW (f186-199), and SENSEKTTMPLW (f188-199) for αs1-CN. From these results, B. longum could be used as a starter culture in combination with other lactic acid bacteria in the dairy industry, and/or these peptides could be used in functional food manufacturing as additives for the development of a product with beneficial effects for human health. PMID:26877633

  17. Genome Structure of the Symbiont Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 and Gene Expression Profiling in Response to Lactulose-Derived Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Moreno, F. Javier; Sanz, María L.; Sanz, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 was isolated from stools of a breast-fed infant. Although, this strain is generally considered an adult-type bifidobacterial species, it has also been shown to have pre-clinical efficacy in obesity models. In order to understand the molecular basis of its adaptation to complex carbohydrates and improve its potential functionality, we have analyzed its genome and transcriptome, as well as its metabolic output when growing in galacto-oligosaccharides derived from lactulose (GOS-Lu) as carbon source. B. pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 shows strain-specific genome regions, including a great diversity of sugar metabolic-related genes. A preliminary and exploratory transcriptome analysis suggests candidate over-expression of several genes coding for sugar transporters and permeases; furthermore, five out of seven beta-galactosidases identified in the genome could be activated in response to GOS-Lu exposure. Here, we also propose that a specific gene cluster is involved in controlling the import and hydrolysis of certain di- and tri-saccharides, which seemed to be those primarily taken-up by the bifidobacterial strain. This was discerned from mass spectrometry-based quantification of different saccharide fractions of culture supernatants. Our results confirm that the expression of genes involved in sugar transport and metabolism and in the synthesis of leucine, an amino acid with a key role in glucose and energy homeostasis, was up-regulated by GOS-Lu. This was done using qPCR in addition to the exploratory information derived from the single-replicated RNAseq approach, together with the functional annotation of genes predicted to be encoded in the B. pseudocatenulatum CETC 7765 genome. PMID:27199952

  18. Integrated Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of the Bile Stress Response in a Centenarian-originated Probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BBMN68*

    PubMed Central

    An, Haoran; Douillard, François P.; Wang, Guohong; Zhai, Zhengyuan; Yang, Jin; Song, Shuhui; Cui, Jianyun; Ren, Fazheng; Luo, Yunbo; Zhang, Bing; Hao, Yanling

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are natural inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract and well known for their health-promoting effects. Tolerance to bile stress is crucial for bifidobacteria to survive in the colon and to exert their beneficial actions. In this work, RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis complemented with proteomic analysis was used to investigate the cellular response to bile in Bifidobacterium longum BBMN68. The transcript levels of 236 genes were significantly changed (≥ threefold, p < 0.001) and 44 proteins were differentially abundant (≥1.6-fold, p < 0.01) in B. longum BBMN68 when exposed to 0.75 g l−1 ox-bile. The hemolysin-like protein and bile efflux systems were significantly over produced, which might prevent bile adsorption and exclude bile, respectively. The cell membrane composition was modified probably by an increase of cyclopropane fatty acid and a decrease of transmembrane proteins, resulting in a cell membrane more impermeable to bile salts. Our hypothesis was later confirmed by surface hydrophobicity assay. The transcription of genes related to xylose utilization and bifid shunt were up-regulated, which increased the production of ATP and reducing equivalents to cope with bile-induced damages in a xylan-rich colon environment. Bile salts signal the B. longum BBMN68 to gut entrance and enhance the expression of esterase and sortase associated with adhesion and colonization in intestinal tract, which was supported by a fivefold increased adhesion ability to HT-29 cells by BBMN68 upon bile exposure. Notably, bacterial one-hybrid and EMSA assay revealed that the two-component system senX3-regX3 controlled the expression of pstS in bifidobacteria and the role of this target gene in bile resistance was further verified by heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis. Taken altogether, this study established a model for global response mechanisms in B. longum to bile. PMID:24965555

  19. Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate degradation by Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 improves mineral availability of high fibre rye-wheat sour bread.

    PubMed

    García-Mantrana, Izaskun; Monedero, Vicente; Haros, Monika

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this investigation was to develop baking products using Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC27919, a phytase producer, as a starter in sourdough for the production of whole rye-wheat mixed bread. This Bifidobacterium strain contributed to myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) hydrolysis, resulting in breads with higher mineral availability as was predicted by the phytate/mineral molar ratios, which remained below the inhibitory threshold values for Ca and Zn intestinal absorption. The products with sourdough showed similar technological quality as their homologous without sourdough, with levels of acetic and d/l lactic acids in dough and bread baking significantly higher with the use of sourdough. The overall acceptability scores showed that breads with 25% of whole rye flour were highly accepted regardless of the inclusion of sourdough. This work emphasises that the in situ production of phytase during fermentation by GRAS/QPS microorganisms constitutes a strategy which is particularly appropriate for reducing the phytate contents in products for human consumption.

  20. Cell-free preparations of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain La-5 and Bifidobacterium longum strain NCC2705 affect virulence gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Mundi, A; Delcenserie, V; Amiri-Jami, M; Moorhead, S; Griffiths, M W

    2013-10-01

    Campylobacter spp. are among the most commonly reported bacterial causes of acute diarrheal disease in humans worldwide. Potential virulence factors include motility, chemotaxis, colonization ability, adhesion to intestinal cells, invasion and epithelial translocation, intracellular survival, and formation of toxins. Probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains are known to have an inhibitory effect against the growth of various foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain La-5 and Bifidobacterium longum strain NCC2705 cell-free spent media (CFSM) on the expression of virulence genes (cadF, cdtB, flaA, and ciaB) of Campylobacter jejuni strain 81-176 and a luxS mutant, using real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated that the CFSM of both probiotic strains were able to down-regulate the expression of ciaB (ratio of -2.80 and -5.51, respectively) and flaA (ratio of -7.00 and -5.13, respectively) in the wild-type Campylobacter strain. In the luxS mutant, where the activated methyl cycle is disrupted, only the ciaB gene (ratio -7.21) was repressed in the presence of La-5 CFSM. A supplementation of homocysteine to restore the disrupted cycle was able to partially reestablish the probiotic effect of both strains. luxS and the activated methyl cycle might play an active role in the modulation of virulence of C. jejuni by probiotic extracts.

  1. Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate degradation by Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 improves mineral availability of high fibre rye-wheat sour bread.

    PubMed

    García-Mantrana, Izaskun; Monedero, Vicente; Haros, Monika

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this investigation was to develop baking products using Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC27919, a phytase producer, as a starter in sourdough for the production of whole rye-wheat mixed bread. This Bifidobacterium strain contributed to myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) hydrolysis, resulting in breads with higher mineral availability as was predicted by the phytate/mineral molar ratios, which remained below the inhibitory threshold values for Ca and Zn intestinal absorption. The products with sourdough showed similar technological quality as their homologous without sourdough, with levels of acetic and d/l lactic acids in dough and bread baking significantly higher with the use of sourdough. The overall acceptability scores showed that breads with 25% of whole rye flour were highly accepted regardless of the inclusion of sourdough. This work emphasises that the in situ production of phytase during fermentation by GRAS/QPS microorganisms constitutes a strategy which is particularly appropriate for reducing the phytate contents in products for human consumption. PMID:25704711

  2. CD19 LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION INDUCED BY Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IN C57BL/6 MICE EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Claudia de Mello; ZORGI, Nahiara Esteves; MEIRELES, Luciana Regina; GARCIA, João Luis; de ANDRADE, Heitor Franco

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is frequently acquired through the oral route by the ingestion of cysts or oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii. Once ingested, the parasites penetrate the intestinal epithelial cells and rapidly disseminate to all organs in the host. During T. gondii infection, the intestinal microbiota plays an important role in stimulating a protective immune response against the parasite. In this sense the use of probiotics is worthy of note since they are live microorganisms that have beneficial effects on the host through stimulation of the immune response that can be important in the control of T. gondii proliferation and dissemination in the host. In the present study, the action of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis was investigated in C57BL/6 mice infected with oocysts of ME49 strain of T. gondii. The probiotic had an immunomodulatory action, inducing CD19 lymphocyte proliferation and consequently increasing anti-T. gondii antibody level.Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactisprovided protection in supplemented mice, compared to the control group. In addition, supplemented animals had milder inflammatory process in the small intestine, indicating that the probiotic protects the intestinal mucosa during infection with T. gondii. It was concluded that the probioticB. animalis subsp. lactis induces humoral immune response capable of providing protection against T. gondii infection. PMID:27074320

  3. Antiviral effects of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 and Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205 and SPM1206 on rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells and a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo Yeon; Lee, Do Kyung; Ha, Nam Joo; Shin, Hea Soon

    2015-11-01

    Rotavirus is worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis including severe diarrhea and fatal dehydration in infants and young children. There is an available vaccination program for preventing rotavirus infection, but it has limits and restrictions. Probiotics therapy could be an alternative method of antiviral prevention and modulation against rotavirus infection. In this study, we screened the antiviral activity of probiotic bacteria such as 3 Lactobacillus spp. and 14 Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from young Korean. Three of the bacteria, Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211, Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205, and SPM1206, inhibited human strain Wa rotavirus infection in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, these bacterial strains inhibited rotavirus replication in a rotavirus-infected neonatal mouse model. To clarify the mechanism of inhibition, we investigated gene expression of Interferon (IFN)-signaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors. All 3 probiotics increased IFN-α and IFN-β levels compared with the control. Gene expression of IFNsignaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors also increased. Overall, these results indicate that L. ruminis SPM0211, B. longum SPM1205 and 1206 efficiently inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro and in vivo. Especially, the antiviral effect of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 is worthy of notice. This is the first report of L. ruminis with antiviral activity. Anti-rotaviral effects of the 3 probiotics are likely due to their modulation of the immune response through promoting type I IFNs, which are key regulators in IFN signaling pathway.

  4. Identification of the gene for beta-fructofuranosidase of Bifidobacterium lactis DSM10140(T) and characterization of the enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Matthias A; Korakli, Maher; Vogel, Rudi F

    2003-06-01

    Bifidobacterium lactis is a moderately oxygen-tolerant, saccharolytic bacterium often used in combination with fructooligosaccharides (FOS) as a probiotic supplement in diverse dairy products. This is the first report describing the gene structure and enzymatic properties of a beta-fructofuranosidase [EC 3.2.1.26] from Bifidobacteria. BfrA was identified in Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140(T) and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The G+C content was identical with the G+C content as determined for the total genomic DNA (61.9 mol %). The gene codes for a 532-aa residue polypeptide of 59.4 kDa. Surprisingly, the deduced aa sequence revealed only minor similarity to other fructofuranosidases (18% to E. coli cscA). The enzyme was purified to homogeneity after incorporation of a C-terminal 6 x HIS affinity tag. It hydrolased sucrose, 1-kestose, Raftilose, Actilight, inulin, and raffinose (100%, 91%, 84%, 80%, 37%, 4%). Fructose moieties were released in an exo-type fashion. Substrates with alpha-glycosidic linkages or residues other than fructose were not attacked. The kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) for sucrose hydrolysis were 10.3 m M and 0.031 microM/min (pH 7.6; 37 degrees C). The activity was abolished by Zn(2+) (1 m M) and significantly inhibited by Fe(2+) and Ni(2+) (10 m M). The enzyme showed its maximal activity at 40 degrees C.

  5. CD19 LYMPHOCYTE PROLIFERATION INDUCED BY Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IN C57BL/6 MICE EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Claudia de Mello; Zorgi, Nahiara Esteves; Meireles, Luciana Regina; Garcia, João Luis; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is frequently acquired through the oral route by the ingestion of cysts or oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii. Once ingested, the parasites penetrate the intestinal epithelial cells and rapidly disseminate to all organs in the host. During T. gondii infection, the intestinal microbiota plays an important role in stimulating a protective immune response against the parasite. In this sense the use of probiotics is worthy of note since they are live microorganisms that have beneficial effects on the host through stimulation of the immune response that can be important in the control of T. gondii proliferation and dissemination in the host. In the present study, the action of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis was investigated in C57BL/6 mice infected with oocysts of ME49 strain of T. gondii. The probiotic had an immunomodulatory action, inducing CD19 lymphocyte proliferation and consequently increasing anti-T. gondii antibody level. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis provided protection in supplemented mice, compared to the control group. In addition, supplemented animals had milder inflammatory process in the small intestine, indicating that the probiotic protects the intestinal mucosa during infection with T. gondii. It was concluded that the probiotic B. animalis subsp. lactis induces humoral immune response capable of providing protection against T. gondii infection. PMID:27074320

  6. In Vitro Antibacterial Mechanism of Action of Crude Garlic (Allium sativum) Clove Extract on Selected Probiotic Bifidobacterium Species as Revealed by SEM, TEM, and SDS-PAGE Analysis.

    PubMed

    Booyens, J; Labuschagne, M C; Thantsha, M S

    2014-06-01

    There has been much research on the effects of garlic (Allium sativum) on numerous pathogens, but very few, if any, studies on its effect on beneficial, probiotic bifidobacteria. We have recently shown that garlic exhibits antibacterial activity against bifidobacteria. The mechanism by which garlic kills bifidobacteria is yet to be elucidated. This study sought to determine the mechanism of action of garlic clove extract on selected Bifidobacterium species using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis. SEM micrographs revealed unusual morphological changes such as cell elongation, cocci-shaped cells with cross-walls, and distorted cells with bulbous ends. With TEM, observed changes included among others, condensation of cytoplasmic material, disintegration of membranes, and loss of structural integrity. SDS-PAGE analysis did not reveal any differences in whole-cell protein profiles of untreated and garlic clove extract-treated cells. The current study is the first to reveal the mechanism of action of garlic clove extract on probiotic Bifidobacterium species. The results indicate that garlic affects these beneficial bacteria in a manner similar to that exhibited in pathogens. These results therefore further highlight that caution should be taken especially when using raw garlic and probiotic bifidobacteria simultaneously as viability of these bacteria could be reduced by allicin released upon crushing of garlic cloves, thereby limiting the health benefits that the consumer anticipate to gain from probiotics.

  7. Hypocholesterolemic effect of sonication-killed Bifidobacterium longum isolated from healthy adult Koreans in high cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hea Soon; Park, Shin Young; Lee, Do Kyung; Kim, Sun Ae; An, Hyang Mi; Kim, Jung Rae; Kim, Mi Jin; Cha, Min Gyeong; Lee, Si Won; Kim, Kyung Joo; Lee, Kang Oh; Ha, Nam Joo

    2010-09-01

    We have previously reported that live Bifidobacterium longum SPM1207, a strain isolated from healthy adult Koreans, significantly reduced serum cholesterol in broth and rat. We here examined the effect of oral administration of sonication-killed B. longum SPM1207 on serum cholesterol in rats in order to investigate whether this killed strain could be utilized as a potent probiotics for human and animals. Dietary treatments consisted of 3 treatment groups of 24 rats each randomly assigned to either normal diet, high cholesterol diet and saline (HCS), or high cholesterol diet and sonication-killed B. longum SPM1207 (HCKB) for 3 weeks. Although HDL-cholesterol levels in the serum were not significantly (p > 0.05) different between HCKB rats and HCS rats, total and LDL-cholesterol levels in the serum were significantly (p < 0.05) less increased in HCKB (total: 177.71 mg/dL, LDL-: 60.50 mg/dL) rats when compared to HCS (total: 237.17 mg/dL, LDL-: 71.50 mg/dL) rats. AI was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in HCKB (4.95 mg/dL) rats when compared to HCS (9.22 mg/dL) rats. Body weight increase and relative liver weight were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in HCKB rats when compared to HCS rats. Over the time, high cholesterol diet caused dry feces accompanied by decreased fecal water content (66.00 to 61.94%) but sonication-killed B. longum SPM1207 administration increased fecal water content (71.58 to 74.25%). The results in the current study provide evidence that the sonication-killed cells of B. logum SPM1207 isolated from healthy adult Koreans have a greater potential to be used as a cholesterol-lowering agent. Furthermore, the current study suggest that this killed specific strain may play role in part in blocking the body weight increase and relieving or eliminating constipation.

  8. Catabolism of glucose and lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-12-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with (13)C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-(13)Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-(13)Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-(13)C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by (13)C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only

  9. Influence of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 intake on faecal microbiota in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season.

    PubMed

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kondo, Shizuki; Miyaji, Kazuhiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Togashi, Hideo; Enomoto, Tadao; Benno, Yoshimi

    2007-10-01

    It has been reported that intake of yogurt or powder supplemented with the Bifidobacterium longum BB536 probiotic strain alleviated subjective symptoms and affected blood markers of allergy in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis) during the pollen seasons of 2004 and 2005, based on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Furthermore, the 2004 study found that intestinal bacteria such as the Bacteroides fragilis group significantly fluctuated during the pollen season in JCPsis individuals and intake of BB536 yogurt tended to suppress these fluctuations. The present study investigated faecal microbiota to examine whether any changes occurred during the pollen season and whether any influence was exerted by intake of BB536 powder in the 2005 pollen season, which happened to be a heavy season, to confirm the 2004 findings and to evaluate the relationship of microbiota with symptom development. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 JCPsis subjects received BB536 or a placebo for 13 weeks during the pollen season. Another 14 Japanese cedar pollen (JCP)-specific IgE negative healthy subjects received placebo for the same period. Faecal samples were collected before (week 0), during (weeks 4, 8 and 13) and after (week 17) intervention, and out of JCP season (week 28). Faecal microbiota were analysed using terminal-RFLP (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR methods. Principal component analysis based on T-RFLP indicated distinct patterns of microbiota between healthy subjects and JCPsis subjects in the placebo group, but an intermediate pattern in the BB536 group at week 13, the last stage of the pollen season. The coordinate of principal component 1 at week 13 correlated with composite scores of JCPsis symptoms recorded during the pollen season. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and the Bacteroides fragilis group were identified as the main contributors to microbiotal fluctuations. Real-time PCR indicated that BB536 intake suppressed

  10. Catabolism of Glucose and Lactose in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Studied by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gaspar, Paula; Sánchez, Borja; Gueimonde, Miguel; Neves, Ana Rute

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics in several commercial products; however, to date there is little knowledge about their carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In this work, we studied the metabolism of glucose and lactose in the widely used probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 by in vivo 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The metabolism of [1-13C]glucose was characterized in cells grown in glucose as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the metabolism of lactose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1 of the glucose or the galactose moiety was determined in suspensions of cells grown in lactose. These experiments allowed the quantification of some intermediate and end products of the metabolic pathways, as well as determination of the consumption rate of carbon sources. Additionally, the labeling patterns in metabolites derived from the metabolism of glucose specifically labeled with 13C on carbon 1, 2, or 3 in cells grown in glucose or lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the glucose moiety ([1-13Cglucose]lactose), lactose specifically labeled in carbon 1 of the galactose moiety ([1-13Cgalactose]lactose), and [1-13C]glucose in lactose-grown cells were determined in cell extracts by 13C NMR. The NMR analysis showed that the recovery of carbon was fully compatible with the fructose 6-phosphate, or bifid, shunt. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acetate kinase, fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase, and pyruvate formate lyase differed significantly between glucose and lactose cultures. The transcriptional analysis of several putative glucose and lactose transporters showed a significant induction of Balat_0475 in the presence of lactose, suggesting a role for this protein as a lactose permease. This report provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the metabolic flux distribution in the catabolic pathway of glucose and lactose in bifidobacteria and shows that the bifid shunt is the only pathway

  11. Suppressive effects of bifidobacteria on lipid peroxidation in the colonic mucosa of iron-overloaded mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Sawada, H; Ohishi, K; Yoshida, Y; Yokoi, W; Watanabe, T; Yokokura, T

    2001-07-01

    The antioxidative effects of live bifidobacteria on lipid peroxidation in the colonic mucosa were investigated. Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Yakult, which has been used for production of fermented milk, most effectively inhibited lipid peroxidation catalyzed by ferrous iron in liposomes among 10 species of bifidobacteria from human intestinal flora. Oral administration of B. bifidum strain Yakult for 2 wk significantly decreased the level of lipid peroxide (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance) in the colonic mucosa of iron-overload mice (Fe 0.07% in diet). The iron concentrations in plasma and cecum contents were not affected by administration of B. bifidum strain Yakult. Bifidobacterium bifidum strain Yakult had no chelating or incorporating activity for ferrous iron in vitro. Therefore, the antioxidative effect of B. bifidum strain Yakult in the colonic mucosa was not thought to be based on the removal of ferrous iron from the reaction system of lipid peroxidation. These results suggested that B. bifidum strain Yakult protected the colonic mucosa from oxidative injury without inhibiting iron absorption. PMID:11467806

  12. Bacteria-mediated in vivo delivery of quantum dots into solid tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Mei; Luo, Dan; Wang, Lijun; Hong, Yuankai; Yang, Yepeng; Sha, Yinlin

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach using the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum as a vehicle to deliver QDs into the deep tissue of solid tumors in vivo was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifidobacterium bifidum delivery system has intrinsic biocompatibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The targeting efficacy was improved by folic acids. -- Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals, so-called quantum dots (QDs), promise potential application in bioimaging and diagnosis in vitro and in vivo owing to their high-quality photoluminescence and excellent photostability as well as size-tunable spectra. Here, we describe a biocompatible, comparatively safe bacteria-based system that can deliver QDs specifically into solid tumor of living animals. In our strategy, anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (B. bifidum) that colonizes selectively in hypoxic regions of animal body was successfully used as a vehicle to load with QDs and transported into the deep tissue of solid tumors. The internalization of lipid-encapsuled QDs into B. bifidum was conveniently carried by electroporation. To improve the efficacy and specificity of tumor targeting, the QDs-carrying bacterium surface was further conjugated with folic acids (FAs) that can bind to the folic acid receptor overexpressed tumor cells. This new approach opens a pathway for delivering different types of functional cargos such as nanoparticles and drugs into solid tumor of live animals for imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 Reduces Obesity-Associated Inflammation by Restoring the Lymphocyte-Macrophage Balance and Gut Microbiota Structure in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Pérez, Angela; Neef, Alexander; Sanz, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives The role of intestinal dysbiosis in obesity-associated systemic inflammation via the cross-talk with peripheral tissues is under debate. Our objective was to decipher the mechanisms by which intervention in the gut ecosystem with a specific Bifidobacterium strain reduces systemic inflammation and improves metabolic dysfunction in obese high-fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Methods Adult male wild-type C57BL-6 mice were fed either a standard or HFD, supplemented with placebo or Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765, for 14 weeks. Lymphocytes, macrophages and cytokine/chemokine concentrations were quantified in blood, gut, liver and adipose tissue using bead-based multiplex assays. Biochemical parameters in serum were determined by ELISA and enzymatic assays. Histology was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. Results B. pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 reduced obesity-associated systemic inflammation by restoring the balance between regulatory T cells (Tregs) and B lymphocytes and reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines of adaptive (IL-17A) and innate (TNF-α) immunity and endotoxemia. In the gut, the bifidobacterial administration partially restored the HFD-induced alterations in microbiota, reducing abundances of Firmicutes and of LPS-producing Proteobacteria, paralleled to reductions in B cells, macrophages, and cytokines (IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-17A), which could contribute to systemic effects. In adipose tissue, bifidobacterial administration reduced B cells whereas in liver the treatment increased Tregs and shifted different cytokines (MCP-1 plus ILP-10 in adipose tissue and INF-γ plus IL-1β in liver). In both tissues, the bifidobacteria reduced pro-inflammatory macrophages and, TNF-α and IL-17A concentrations. These effects were accompanied by reductions in body weight gain and in serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose and insulin levels and improved oral glucose

  14. Detection and characterization of Bifidobacterium crudilactis and B. mongoliense able to grow during the manufacturing process of French raw milk cheeses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study of a production chain of raw milk cheeses (St Marcellin, Vercors area, France) led to the isolation of two Bifidobacterium populations: B. crudilactis and B. mongoliense, that were able to grow along the production chain. The aims of this study were to further detect and characterize these bacteria along the process and evaluate the ability of some strains to survive or grow in adverse conditions. Results Using PCR coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism, B. crudilactis and B. mongoliense were detected in respectively 77% and 30% of St Marcellin cheeses from production chain after 21 days of ripening. They were present in more than half of all analyzed retail cheeses with counts going from 1.6 to 5 log cfu g-1 for B. crudilactis and 1.4 to 7 log cfu g-1 for B. mongoliense. Bifidobacterium mongoliense was sensitive to pH 2, with an observed decrease of at least 3 log for both studied strains (FR49/f/2 and FR41/2) after 1 h incubation. At pH 3, no significant decrease was observed. Good survival was observed for the same strains in presence of pancreatic juice with a decrease of less than one log. Survival of strain FR49/f/2 was better than FR41/2 with a decrease of 3 logarithms (in presence of 1% bile salts) and almost 2 logarithms (in presence of 0.5% bile salts). The genotypic analyses using total DNA-DNA hybridization, GC% content, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequencing analysis (MLSA) confirmed the classification of Bifidobacterium. crudilactis and B. mongoliense into two different clusters well separated from other bifidobacteria clusters. Conclusions According to the observed characteristics such as survival in adverse conditions and their ability to grow under 12°C during the manufacturing process of the cheeses, which has never been described for bifidobacteria and which is a very interesting technological asset, these B. crudilactis and B. mongoliense strains should be further investigated for a potential

  15. Effect of fermented milk containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium longum on plasma lipids of women with normal or moderately elevated cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Sara; Borges, Nuno

    2009-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of milk fermented with Lactobacillus acidophilus 145 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on plasma lipids in a sample of adult women. A double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over study (two periods of four weeks each separated by a 1-week washout period) was performed in 34 women, aged between 18 and 65 years. Group A consumed 125 g fermented milk three times a day for the first 4 weeks while group B consumed regular yoghurt under the same conditions. (Groups A and B switched products for the second treatment period). Women taking the test product with a baseline total cholesterol above 190 mg/dl showed a significant reduction in LDL cholesterol. HDL cholesterol was also reduced by the test product. We conclude that the fermented milk may help to reduce LDL levels in hypercholesterolemic adult women.

  16. Burdock fermented by Aspergillus awamori elevates cecal Bifidobacterium, and reduces fecal deoxycholic acid and adipose tissue weight in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yukako; Sitanggang, Novita Vivi; Sato, Satoko; Ohnishi, Nanae; Inoue, Junji; Iguchi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Toshiro; Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Harada, Kazuki; Kato, Norihisa

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with burdock powder and Aspergillus awamori-fermented burdock powder at 5% on the intestinal luminal environment and body fat in rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Food intake and growth were unaffected by dietary manipulation. Consumption of the burdock and fermented burdock diets significantly elevated fecal IgA and mucins (indices of intestinal immune and barrier functions) and reduced fecal lithocholic acid (a risk factor for colon cancer) (p<0.05). The fermented burdock diet markedly elevated cecal Bifidobacterium and organic acids, including lactate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate, and reduced fecal deoxycholic acid (a risk factor for colon cancer) and perirenal adipose tissue weight (p<0.05), but the burdock diet did not. These results suggest that consumption of fermented burdock improves the intestinal luminal environment and suppresses obesity in rats fed a HF diet. PMID:23291748

  17. Isolation and Purification of Recombinant Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases of the Strain Bifidobacterium longum B379M and Investigation of Their Activity.

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, M G; Mavletova, D A; Kolchina, N V; Nezametdinova, V Z; Danilenko, V N

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we identified six serine/threonine protein kinases (STPK) of Bifidobacterium and named them Pkb1-Pkb6. In the present study, we optimized methods for isolation of the six STPK catalytic domains proteins of B. longum B379M: a method for isolation of Pkb3 and Pkb4 in native conditions, a method for isolation of Pkb5 in denaturing conditions, and a method for isolation of Pkb1, Pkb2, and Pkb6 from inclusion bodies. The dialysis conditions for the renaturation of the proteins were optimized. All of the enzymes were isolated in quantities sufficient for study of the protein activity. The proteins were homogeneous according to SDS-PAGE. The autophosphorylation ability of Pkb1, Pkb3, Pkb4, and Pkb6 was investigated for the first time. Autophosphorylation was detected only for the Pkb3 catalytic domain.

  18. Effects of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 supplementation on body weight, fecal pH, acetate, lactate, calprotectin, and IgA in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Ruchika; Koebnick, Corinna; Schildt, Janko; Mueller, Manfred; Radke, Michael; Blaut, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to abnormal bacterial colonization of the intestine with ensuing adverse health effects. To examine whether the oral application of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (probiotic) may improve selected indicators of health status in preterm infants, a double blind, placebo controlled randomized clinical study was performed on 69 preterm infants (<37 gestation wk). Weight gain was defined as the primary outcome measure. In antibiotic-treated infants, probiotic supplementation resulted in a higher body weight compared with placebo (p < 0.001). In the probiotic group, the fecal pH was significantly lower than in the placebo group. The fecal concentrations of acetate and lactate were 42 and 38% higher, respectively, in the probiotic group than in the placebo group. Fecal calprotectin was lower in the probiotic group (p = 0.041), while fecal IgA was higher in this group compared with the placebo group (p = 0.021). PMID:18552710

  19. Inhibitory effect of Bifidobacterium longum cultures on the azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci formation and fecal bacterial beta-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, N; Reddy, B S

    1994-12-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental studies suggest that consumption of fermented milk products and lactic bacterial cultures that are used to ferment the dairy products, decrease the incidence of certain types of cancer. The present study was designed to determine the effect of lyophilized cultures of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum), a lactic bacteria, on the azoxymethane (AOM)-induced preneoplastic lesions such as aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in the colon and on fecal bacterial beta-glucuronidase activity in male F344 rats. At 5 weeks of age, groups of animals were fed the AIN-76A (control) and the experimental diets containing 1.5% and 3% lyophilized cultures of B. longum. At 10 weeks of age, all animals received sc injection of AOM dissolved in normal saline at a dose rate of 20 mg/kg body wt, once weekly for 2 weeks. The animals were necropsied 6 weeks after the last AOM injection, and the ACF were visualized under light microscopy in the formalin-fixed, unsectioned methylene blue-stained colons where they were distinguished by their increased size, more prominent epithelial cells, and pericryptal space. The cecal contents were analyzed for bacterial beta-glucuronidase activity. The feeding of lyophilized cultures of B. longum significantly inhibited the ACF formation (53%) and the crypt multiplicity in the colon. A significant decrease in the fecal bacterial beta-glucuronidase was also observed in the animals fed the diets containing Bifidobacterium supplements as compared with control diet. These results demonstrate that B. longum in diet influences the metabolic activity of certain types of intestinal microflora that are involved in the production of beta-glucuronidase. Furthermore, the findings also suggest that B. longum supplements inhibit ACF formation, an early preneoplastic marker of malignant potential in the process of colon carcinogenesis.

  20. Bifidobacterium infantis strains with and without a combination of Oligofructose and Inulin (OFI) attenuate inflammation in DSS-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nadia; Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran; Ahrne, Siv; Berggren, Anna; Jeppsson, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be through different factors and there is a relationship between the gut flora and the risk of its development. Probiotics can manipulate the microflora in chronic inflammation and may be effective in treating inflammation. Bifidobacterium are saccharolytic and their growth in the gut can be promoted by non-absorbable carbohydrates and its increase in the colon appears to be of benefit. Methods Oligofructose and inulin (OFI) alone and the two B. infantis DSM 15158 and DSM 15159 with and without OFI, were fed to Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days prior to colitis induction and administrations continued for another 7 days with the DSS. Colitis severity assessed using a Disease Activity Index. Samples were collected 7 days after colitis induction, for intestinal bacterial flora, bacterial translocation, short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), myeloperoxidase (MPO), cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-10 and TGF-β) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Results OFI alone or the B. infantis strains with and without OFI improved significantly the DAI and decreased colonic MPO activity. Colonic tissue IL-1β decreased significantly in all treated groups except B. infantis DSM 15158. MDA decreased significantly in B. infantis DSM 15159 with and without OFI compared to colitis control. Succinic acid increased significantly in OFI group with and without DSM 15159 compared to all groups. Sum values of propionic, succinic acid and butyric acid increased significantly in all groups compare to the colitis control. Bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes decreased significantly in all groups compared to colitis control. Translocation to the liver decreased significantly in all groups compare to the colitis control and OFI + B. infantis DSM 15158 groups. Conclusion Administrations of OFI and Bifidobacterium improve DSS-induced acute colitis and have an anti-inflammatory effect. Major differences in effect were observed between the

  1. Bifidobacterium longum CCM 7952 Promotes Epithelial Barrier Function and Prevents Acute DSS-Induced Colitis in Strictly Strain-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Hudcovic, Tomas; Zakostelska, Zuzana; Drab, Vladimir; Spanova, Alena; Rittich, Bohuslav; Kozakova, Hana; Schabussova, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced microbial diversity has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and probiotic bacteria have been proposed for its prevention and/or treatment. Nevertheless, comparative studies of strains of the same subspecies for specific health benefits are scarce. Here we compared two Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains for their capacity to prevent experimental colitis. Methods Immunomodulatory properties of nine probiotic bifidobacteria were assessed by stimulation of murine splenocytes. The immune responses to B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 (Bl 7952) and CCDM 372 (Bl 372) were further characterized by stimulation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cell, HEK293/TLR2 or HEK293/NOD2 cells. A mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis was used to compare their beneficial effects in vivo. Results The nine bifidobacteria exhibited strain-specific abilities to induce cytokine production. Bl 372 induced higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in spleen and dendritic cell cultures compared to Bl 7952. Both strains engaged TLR2 and contain ligands for NOD2. In a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis, Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, reduced clinical symptoms and preserved expression of tight junction proteins. Importantly, Bl 7952 improved intestinal barrier function as demonstrated by reduced FITC-dextran levels in serum. Conclusions We have shown that Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, protected mice from the development of experimental colitis. Our data suggest that although some immunomodulatory properties might be widespread among the genus Bifidobacterium, others may be rare and characteristic only for a specific strain. Therefore, careful selection might be crucial in providing beneficial outcome in clinical trials with probiotics in IBD. PMID:26218526

  2. Administration of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 in early childhood: a post-trial effect on caries occurrence at four years of age.

    PubMed

    Taipale, T; Pienihäkkinen, K; Alanen, P; Jokela, J; Söderling, E

    2013-01-01

    Probiotic bifidobacteria are widely used in the prevention of childhood diseases. These bacteria are also associated with caries occurrence. The present secondary analysis in a low-caries population evaluated the effect of early administration of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12) on caries occurrence and identified markers of dental decay in early childhood. In the original randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (NCT00638677, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov), infants (n = 106) received BB-12, xylitol or sorbitol tablets from the age of 1-2 months to 2 years with a slow-release pacifier or a spoon (daily dose of BB-12 10(10) colony-forming units, polyol 200-600 mg). The present data were collected using clinical examinations and questionnaires at the age of 4 years. The occurrence of dental caries was assessed using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System. Oral hygiene status and mutans streptococci (MS) levels were also determined. No differences were detected between the study groups in the occurrence of enamel caries (p = 0.268) or obvious dentinal caries (p = 0.201). The occurrence of caries was associated with daily consumption of sweet drinks (p = 0.028), visible plaque observed (p = 0.002) and MS detected in the dental plaque (p = 0.002). Administration of BB-12 in infancy does not seem to increase or decrease the occurrence of caries by 4 years of age in a low-caries population. PMID:23571819

  3. Probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum) Increase Bone Mass Density and Upregulate Sparc and Bmp-2 Genes in Rats with Bone Loss Resulting from Ovariectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Sabran, Mohd Redzwan; Karimi, Golgis; Hwei, Angela Ng Min; Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Ahmad, Zuraini; Ibrahim, Zuriati; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host, when administered in adequate amounts. Mostly, probiotics affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the host and alter the composition of gut microbiota. Nowadays, the incidence of hip fractures due to osteoporosis is increasing worldwide. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats have fragile bone due to estrogen deficiency and mimic the menopausal conditions in women. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) on bone mass density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone remodeling, bone structure, and gene expression in OVX rats. The rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (sham, OVX, and the OVX group supplemented with 1 mL of B. longum 108–109 colony forming units (CFU)/mL). B. longum was given once daily for 16 weeks, starting from 2 weeks after the surgery. The B. longum supplementation increased (p < 0.05) serum osteocalcin (OC) and osteoblasts, bone formation parameters, and decreased serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and osteoclasts, bone resorption parameters. It also altered the microstructure of the femur. Consequently, it increased BMD by increasing (p < 0.05) the expression of Sparc and Bmp-2 genes. B. longum alleviated bone loss in OVX rats and enhanced BMD by decreasing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. PMID:26366421

  4. Characterization of exopolysaccharides produced by Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and its cholate-resistant derivative strain IPLA B667dCo.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Nuria; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Prieto, Alicia; Calle, Luis P; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G

    2012-02-01

    Bifidobacteria are natural members of the human intestinal microbiota and some strains are being used as probiotics. Adaptation to bile can allow them to increase survival in gastrointestinal conditions, thus improving their viability. Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and the cholate-resistant strain B. longum IPLA B667dCo produced exopolysaccharides (EPS) that were partially characterized. Analysis by size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering indicated that the EPS crude fractions of both strains contained two polymer peaks of different molar mass. On the basis of chromatographic techniques both peaks appeared to be heteropolysaccharides. The smaller peak was mainly composed of glucose, galactose and rhamnose whose molar ratios and linkage types showed slight variations between the EPS fractions of both strains. The bigger peak consisted of glucose and galactose; the monosaccharide composition was identical in the EPS fractions of the two microorganisms, but their infrared spectra presented some differences regarding compounds other than carbohydrates that seem to be associated to the polymer. Differences in the composition of EPS fractions did not affect the capability of crude EPS from B. longum to be fermented by the human intestinal microbiota in fecal batch cultures.

  5. Encapsulation of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BIOMA 5920 with alginate-human-like collagen and evaluation of survival in simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Ran; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Fan, Dai-Di; Mi, Yu; Yang, Chan-Yuan; Jia, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Alginate (ALg)-human-like collagen (HLC) microspheres were prepared by the technology of electrostatic droplet generation in order to develop a biocompatible vehicle for probiotic bacteria. Microparticles were spherical with mean particle size of 400μm. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of ALg-HLC microspheres could reach 92-99.2%. Water-soluble and fibrous human-like collagen is combined with sodium alginate through intermolecular hydrogen bonding and electrostatic force which were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thus the matrix of ALg-HLC was very stable. Bifidobacterium longum BIOMA 5920, as a kind of probiotic bacteria, was encapsulated with alginate-human-like collagen to survive and function in simulated gastrointestinal juice. Microparticles were very easy to degradation in simulated intestinal juices. After incubation in simulated gastric (pH 2.0, 2h), the encapsulated B. longum BIOMA 5920 numbers were 4.81 ± 0.38 log cfu/g.

  6. Purification and characterization of a novel protein produced by Bifidobacterium longum SBT2928 that inhibits the binding of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Pb176 (CFA/II) to gangliotetraosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, S; Hashiba, H; Hirota, T; Forstner, J F

    1999-04-01

    A novel protein (BIF) which shows inhibitory activity on the binding of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Pb176 (ETEC with colonization factor antigen (CFA) II, which consists of coli surface-associated antigens CS1 and CS3) to gangliotetraosylceramide (asialo GM1 or GA1) was isolated from the culture supernatant fluid of Bifidobacterium longum SBT2928 (BL2928) at its stationary phase. The homogeneity of the final preparation of BIF was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE, polyacrylamide gel electrofocusing and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The BIF was characterized as (i) a protein with an M(r) of approximately 104 kDa when chromatographed on a gel filtration column, and 52 kDa when separated on SDS-PAGE, and (ii) having an isoelectric point of 5.9. No change in size was produced by thiol reduction. These results suggest that BIF is a homodimer consisting of identical 52 kDa monomers. The purified BIF at the concentration of 25 micrograms protein ml-1 caused a 50% reduction in binding of the ETEC strain to GA1.

  7. Transmission of Intestinal Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains from Mother to Infant, Determined by Multilocus Sequencing Typing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Hiroshi; Kushiro, Akira; Ishikawa, Eiji; Muylaert, Delphine; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Martin, Rocio; Ben Amor, Kaouther; Oozeer, Raish; Knol, Jan; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of neonates are colonized by bacteria immediately after birth. It has been discussed that the intestinal microbiota of neonates includes strains transferred from the mothers. Although some studies have indicated possible bacterial transfer from the mother to the newborn, this is the first report confirming the transfer of bifidobacteria at the strain level. Here, we investigated the mother-to-infant transmission of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum by genotyping bacterial isolates from the feces of mothers before delivery and of their infants after delivery. Two hundred seven isolates from 8 pairs of mothers and infants were discriminated by multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. By both methods, 11 strains of B. longum subsp. longum were found to be monophyletic for the feces of the mother and her infant. This finding confirms that these strains were transferred from the intestine of the mother to that of the infant. These strains were found in the first feces (meconium) of the infant and in the feces at days 3, 7, 30, and 90 after birth, indicating that they stably colonize the infant's intestine immediately after birth. The strains isolated from each family did not belong to clusters derived from any of the other families, suggesting that each mother-infant pair might have unique family-specific strains. PMID:21821739

  8. Effect of a Ropy Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Strain Orally Administered on DSS-Induced Colitis Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Vezza, Teresa; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Margolles, Abelardo; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bifidobacteria, particularly Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, are used in the functional food industry as promising probiotics with purported beneficial effects. We used three isogenic strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis, with different EPS producing phenotypes (mucoid-ropy and non-ropy), in order to determine their capability to survive the murine gastrointestinal tract transit, as well as to evaluate their role in improving clinical outcomes in a chemically-induced colitis model. The three strains were able to survive in the intestinal tract of C57BL/6J mice during the course of the intervention study. Furthermore, the disease activity index (DAI) of the animal group treated with the ropy strain was significantly lower than of the DAI of the placebo group at the end of the treatment. However, no significant differences were found among the three strains. The analysis of several immune parameters, such as TNFα and IL-10 quantified in blood plasma and lymphocyte populations enumerated in mesenteric nodes, showed some significant variations among the four experimental animal groups. Remarkably, a higher capability of the ropy strain to increase regulatory T-cells in mesenteric lymphoid nodes was demonstrated, suggesting a higher ability of this strain to regulate inflammatory responses at mucosal level. Our data indicate that strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis producing EPS that confer a mucoid-ropy phenotype could represent promising candidates to perform further studies targeting intestinal inflammatory processes. PMID:27375589

  9. Supplementation of Bifidobacterium longum to a high-fat, low-calcium diet lowers cytolytic activity of fecal water in rats injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Seto, Y; Hashiba, H

    1998-02-01

    The effects of supplementing Bifidobacterium longum SBT 2928 and Lactobacillus acidophilus SBT 2062 to a high-fat, low-calcium diet on bile acid concentration, fatty acid concentration, cytolytic activity and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of fecal water in rats injected with and without 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) were examined. Male Wistar rats at 8 weeks of age were fed a diet containing 18% coconut oil, 2% corn oil and 0.1% calcium for 15 d. Lyophilized cultures were supplemented to test diets at a concentration of 1%. The feeding of a high-fat, low-calcium diet elevated the bile acid concentration, cytolytic activity and ALP activity of fecal water as compared to the AIN-76A diet, whereas the fatty acid concentration was not changed. None of the cultures had any effect on these parameters. Furthermore, 8 week-old rats were given a single subcutaneous injection of DMH at 40 mg/kg body weight, and fed the same diets for 15 d. The DMH injection had no effect on the bile acid concentration but increased the fatty acid concentration and cytolytic activity of fecal water. In contrast, ALP activity was lower in the DMH-treated rats than in the non-treated rats. The ingestion of B. longum lowered cytolytic activity but had no effect on the bile acids, fatty acids and ALP activity of fecal water. L. acidophilus had no effect on these parameters. PMID:9591245

  10. Clostridium butyricum combined with Bifidobacterium infantis probiotic mixture restores fecal microbiota and attenuates systemic inflammation in mice with antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) is one of the most common complications of most types of antibiotics. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of Clostridium butyricum, Bifidobacterium infantis, and their mixture for AAD treatment in mice. AAD models were administered with single probiotic strain and probiotic mixture for short term and long term to evaluate the changes of the composition and diversity of intestinal microbiota, histopathology of the colon, and the systemic inflammation. Our data indicated that long-term probiotic therapy, but not short-term course, exerted beneficial effects on the restoration of the intestinal microbiota, the recovery of the tissue architecture, and attenuation of systemic inflammation. All predominant fecal bacteria reached normal level after the long-term probiotic mixture treatment, while IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α also returned to normal level. However, the efficacy for AAD was time dependent and probiotic strain specific. Short-term administration of probiotic strains or mixture showed no apparent positive effects for AAD. In addition, the beneficial effects of C. butyricum combined with B. infantis probiotic mixture were superior to their single strain. This research showed that supplementation with C. butyricum combined with B. infantis probiotic mixture may be a simple and effective method for AAD treatment.

  11. Bifidobacterium longum Alleviates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis by Suppressing IL-17A Response: Involvement of Intestinal Epithelial Costimulatory Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Eiji; Ogita, Tasuku; Miyamoto, Junki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi

    2013-01-01

    Although some bacterial strains show potential to prevent colitis, their mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the anti-colitic mechanisms of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis JCM 1222T, focusing on the relationship between interleukin (IL)-17A secreting CD4+ T cells and intestinal epithelial costimulatory molecules in mice. Oral administration of JCM 1222T to mice alleviated dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. The expression of type 1 helper T (Th1)- and IL-17 producing helper T (Th17)-specific cytokines and transcriptional factors was suppressed by JCM 1222T treatment. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from colitic mice induced IL-17A production from CD4+ T cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent manner, and this was suppressed by oral treatment with JCM 1222T. Using blocking antibodies for costimulatory molecules, we revealed that epithelial costimulatory molecules including CD80 and CD40, which were highly expressed in IECs from colitic mice, were involved in IEC-induced IL-17A response. Treatment of mice and intestinal epithelial cell line Colon-26 cells with JCM 1222T decreased the expression of CD80 and CD40. Collectively, these data indicate that JCM 1222T negatively regulate epithelial costimulatory molecules, and this effect might be attributed, at least in part, to suppression of IL-17A in DSS-induced colitis. PMID:24255712

  12. Suppressive effects of Bifidobacterium longum on the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced with T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2009-04-01

    In human trials, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 alleviates subjective symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis, an IgE-mediated type I allergy caused by exposure to Japanese cedar, and significantly suppresses the increase of plasma thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) associated with pollen dispersion. In the present study, we investigated the suppressive effects of BB536 on the production of T helper type 2 (Th2)-attracting chemokines, such as TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), together with the mechanisms of their production. Murine splenocytes were cultured with heat-killed BB536, and the levels of Th2-attracting chemokines in the supernatants were measured. TARC and MDC were produced in cultures without stimulation, and the production was significantly suppressed by BB536. These chemokines were produced by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of splenocytes stimulated with an anti-CD40 antibody. Furthermore, TARC production was induced with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor that was produced by T cells and dendritic cells. BB536 suppressed MDC production induced with the anti-CD40 antibody by APCs from the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches, and it suppressed TARC production by APCs from the spleen and MLNs. These results indicate that BB536 suppresses the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced by the T cell-APC interaction, suggesting a novel mechanism for alleviating symptoms of allergic disorders by probiotics.

  13. Cross-feeding between Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and acetate-converting, butyrate-producing colon bacteria during growth on oligofructose.

    PubMed

    Falony, Gwen; Vlachou, Angeliki; Verbrugghe, Kristof; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-12-01

    In vitro coculture fermentations of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and two acetate-converting, butyrate-producing colon bacteria, Anaerostipes caccae DSM 14662 and Roseburia intestinalis DSM 14610, with oligofructose as the sole energy source, were performed to study interspecies interactions. Two clearly distinct types of cross-feeding were identified. A. caccae DSM 14662 was not able to degrade oligofructose but could grow on the fructose released by B. longum BB536 during oligofructose breakdown. R. intestinalis DSM 14610 could degrade oligofructose, but only after acetate was added to the medium. Detailed kinetic analyses of oligofructose breakdown by the last strain revealed simultaneous degradation of the different chain length fractions, in contrast with the preferential degradation of shorter fractions by B. longum BB536. In a coculture of both strains, initial oligofructose degradation and acetate production by B. longum BB536 took place, which in turn also allowed oligofructose breakdown by R. intestinalis DSM 14610. These and similar cross-feeding mechanisms could play a role in the colon ecosystem and contribute to the combined bifidogenic/butyrogenic effect observed after addition of inulin-type fructans to the diet.

  14. Effect of the oral intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium longum BB536 on the cell numbers of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in microbiota.

    PubMed

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Sugahara, Hirosuke; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Tanabe, Soichi; Tominaga, Tomoya; Togashi, Hideo; Benno, Yoshimi; Xiao, Jin-zhong

    2012-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains have been suggested to be associated with acute and persistent diarrheal disease, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, although further epidemiological studies are needed for clarification. Here, a pilot study was performed to examine the effect of the oral administration of yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain on the cell numbers of fecal ETBF in a healthy population. Among 420 healthy adults, 38 subjects were found to be ETBF carriers, giving a prevalence of approximately 9%. Among them, 32 subjects were enrolled in an open, randomized, parallel-group study to ingest yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (BB536Y group), for 8 weeks, with milk provided to the control group (milk group). The cell numbers of ETBF and the dominant species of the B. fragilis group were measured by a quantitative PCR method. Compared with the baseline values, there was a significant decrease in the cell number of ETBF at week 8 in the BB536Y group but not in the milk group. Linear mixed models analysis for longitudinal data revealed a significant difference in the changes of ETBF cell number between the two groups during the intervention phase. These results imply the potential of probiotic yogurt for eliminating ETBF in the microbiota, but its clinical significance needs to be evaluated in the future. This is the first report of a possible effect of probiotic intake on ETBF in the microbiota.

  15. In vitro fermentation of rice bran combined with Lactobacillus acidophilus 14 150B or Bifidobacterium longum 05 by the canine faecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ogué-Bon, Eva; Khoo, Christina; Hoyles, Lesley; McCartney, Anne L; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert A

    2011-03-01

    The fermentability of rice bran (RB), alone or in combination with one of two probiotics, by canine faecal microbiota was evaluated in stirred, pH-controlled, anaerobic batch cultures. RB enhanced the levels of bacteria detected by probes Bif164 (bifidobacteria) and Lab158 (lactic acid bacteria); however, addition of the probiotics did not have a significant effect on the predominant microbial counts compared with RB alone. RB sustained levels of Bifidobacterium longum 05 throughout the fermentation; in contrast, Lactobacillus acidophilus 14 150B levels decreased significantly after 5-h fermentation. RB fermentation induced changes in the short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profile. However, RB combined with probiotics did not alter the SCFA levels compared with RB alone. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of samples obtained at 24 h showed a treatment effect with RB, which was not observed in the RB plus probiotic systems. Overall, the negative controls displayed lower species richness than the treatment systems and their banding profiles were distinct. This study illustrates the ability of a common ingredient found in pet food to modulate the canine faecal microbiota and highlights that RB may be an economical alternative to prebiotics for use in dog food. PMID:21204868

  16. Effective Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium infantis encapsulation with chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) and flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) mucilage and soluble protein by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mariela; Oomah, B Dave; Rubilar, Mónica; Shene, Carolina

    2017-02-01

    Mucilage (M) and soluble protein (SP) extracted from chia seed and flaxseed were used as encapsulating material for two probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus plantarum by spray drying. Probiotic survival and viability after spray drying and during storage were evaluated. B. infantis and L. plantarum displayed high survival (⩾98%) after encapsulation with mixtures of maltodextrin (MD) combined with M and SP from flaxseed (MD:FM:FSP - 7.5:0.2:7.5%, w/w/w) and chia seed (MD:CM:CSP - 7.5:0.6:7.5%, w/w/w), respectively. These ternary blends protected the probiotics and enhanced their resistance to simulated gastric juice and bile solution. Probiotics encapsulated with the ternary blends incorporated in instant juice powder exhibited high viability (>9Log10CFU/g) after 45days refrigerated storage. Encapsulation with the ternary blends reduced particle size of the probiotic powders thereby offering additional functional benefits. Our results reveal that chia seed and flaxseed are excellent sources of probiotic encapsulating agents.

  17. Probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum) Increase Bone Mass Density and Upregulate Sparc and Bmp-2 Genes in Rats with Bone Loss Resulting from Ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Sabran, Mohd Redzwan; Karimi, Golgis; Hwei, Angela Ng Min; Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Ahmad, Zuraini; Ibrahim, Zuriati; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host, when administered in adequate amounts. Mostly, probiotics affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the host and alter the composition of gut microbiota. Nowadays, the incidence of hip fractures due to osteoporosis is increasing worldwide. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats have fragile bone due to estrogen deficiency and mimic the menopausal conditions in women. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) on bone mass density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone remodeling, bone structure, and gene expression in OVX rats. The rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (sham, OVX, and the OVX group supplemented with 1 mL of B. longum 10(8)-10(9) colony forming units (CFU)/mL). B. longum was given once daily for 16 weeks, starting from 2 weeks after the surgery. The B. longum supplementation increased (p < 0.05) serum osteocalcin (OC) and osteoblasts, bone formation parameters, and decreased serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and osteoclasts, bone resorption parameters. It also altered the microstructure of the femur. Consequently, it increased BMD by increasing (p < 0.05) the expression of Sparc and Bmp-2 genes. B. longum alleviated bone loss in OVX rats and enhanced BMD by decreasing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. PMID:26366421

  18. Dietary supplementation of Bifidobacterium longum strain AH1206 increases its cecal abundance and elevates intestinal interleukin-10 expression in the neonatal piglet.

    PubMed

    Herfel, Tina M; Jacobi, Sheila K; Lin, Xi; Jouni, Zeina E; Chichlowski, Maciej; Stahl, Chad H; Odle, Jack

    2013-10-01

    Intestinal microbiota of infants differ in response to gestational age, delivery mode and feeding regimen. Dietary supplementation of probiotic bacteria is one method of promoting healthy populations. We examined the impact of a novel probiotic strain of Bifidobacterium longum (AH1206) on the health, growth and development of neonatal pigs as a model for infants. Day-old pigs were fed milk-based formula containing AH1206 at 0, 10⁹, or 10¹¹ CFU/d for 18 d (n=10/treatment). Differences were not detected in growth, organ weights or body temperatures (P>0.1); however pigs fed the high dose showed a small (2%) reduction in feed intake. Bacterial translocation was not affected as indicated by total anaerobic and aerobic counts (CFU) in samples of spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes (P>0.1). Feeding AH1206 had no effects on fecal consistency, but increased the density of B. longum in the cecum. Ileal TNF expression tended to increase (P=0.08) while IL-10 expression increased linearly (P=0.01) with supplementation. Based upon findings in the suckling piglet model, we suggest that dietary supplementation with B. longum (AH1206) may be safe for human infants based on a lack of growth, development or deleterious immune-related effects observed in piglets. PMID:23872134

  19. In vitro fermentation of rice bran combined with Lactobacillus acidophilus 14 150B or Bifidobacterium longum 05 by the canine faecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ogué-Bon, Eva; Khoo, Christina; Hoyles, Lesley; McCartney, Anne L; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert A

    2011-03-01

    The fermentability of rice bran (RB), alone or in combination with one of two probiotics, by canine faecal microbiota was evaluated in stirred, pH-controlled, anaerobic batch cultures. RB enhanced the levels of bacteria detected by probes Bif164 (bifidobacteria) and Lab158 (lactic acid bacteria); however, addition of the probiotics did not have a significant effect on the predominant microbial counts compared with RB alone. RB sustained levels of Bifidobacterium longum 05 throughout the fermentation; in contrast, Lactobacillus acidophilus 14 150B levels decreased significantly after 5-h fermentation. RB fermentation induced changes in the short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profile. However, RB combined with probiotics did not alter the SCFA levels compared with RB alone. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of samples obtained at 24 h showed a treatment effect with RB, which was not observed in the RB plus probiotic systems. Overall, the negative controls displayed lower species richness than the treatment systems and their banding profiles were distinct. This study illustrates the ability of a common ingredient found in pet food to modulate the canine faecal microbiota and highlights that RB may be an economical alternative to prebiotics for use in dog food.

  20. In vitro gastrointestinal resistance of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 in soy and/or milk-based synbiotic apple ice creams.

    PubMed

    Matias, Natalia Silva; Padilha, Marina; Bedani, Raquel; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2016-10-01

    The viability and resistance to simulated gastrointestinal (GI) conditions of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 in synbiotic ice creams, in which milk was replaced by soy extract and/or whey protein isolate (WPI) with inulin, were investigated. The ice creams were showed to be satisfactory vehicles for La-5 and Bb-12 (populations around 7.5logCFU/g), even after the whole storage period (84days/-18°C). In all formulations, the propidium monoazide qPCR (PMA-qPCR) analysis demonstrated that probiotics could resist the in vitro GI assay, with significant survival levels, achieving survival rates exceeding 50%. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy images evidenced cells with morphological differences, suggesting physiological changes in response to the induced stress during the in vitro assay. Although all formulations provided resistance to the probiotic strains under GI stress, the variation found in probiotic survival suggests that GI tolerance is indeed affected by the choice of the food matrix. PMID:27387254

  1. D-Tagatose production in the presence of borate by resting Lactococcus lactis cells harboring Bifidobacterium longum L-arabinose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Noora; Salonen, Kalle; Leisola, Matti; Nyyssölä, Antti

    2013-04-01

    Bifidobacterium longum NRRL B-41409 L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) was overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis using a phosphate depletion inducible expression system. The resting L. lactis cells harboring the B. longum L-AI were used for production of D-tagatose from D-galactose in the presence of borate buffer. Multivariable analysis suggested that high pH, temperature and borate concentration favoured the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose. Almost quantitative conversion (92 %) was achieved at 20 g L⁻¹ substrate and at 37.5 °C after 5 days. The D-tagatose production rate of 185 g L⁻¹ day ⁻¹ was obtained at 300 g L⁻¹ galactose, at 1.15 M borate, and at 41 °C during 10 days when the production medium was changed every 24 h. There was no significant loss in productivity during ten sequential 24 h batches. The initial D-tagatose production rate was 290 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹ under these conditions.

  2. A Single Mutation in the Gene Responsible for the Mucoid Phenotype of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Confers Surface and Functional Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Sánchez, Borja; Álvarez-Martín, Pablo; López, Patricia; Martínez-Álvarez, Noelia; Delley, Michele; Martí, Marc; Varela, Encarna; Suárez, Ana; Antolín, María; Guarner, Francisco; Berger, Bernard; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are extracellular carbohydrate polymers synthesized by a large variety of bacteria. Their physiological functions have been extensively studied, but many of their roles have not yet been elucidated. We have sequenced the genomes of two isogenic strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis that differ in their EPS-producing phenotype. The original strain displays a nonmucoid appearance, and the mutant derived thereof has acquired a mucoid phenotype. The sequence analysis of their genomes revealed a nonsynonymous mutation in the gene Balat_1410, putatively involved in the elongation of the EPS chain. By comparing a strain from which this gene had been deleted with strains containing the wild-type and mutated genes, we were able to show that each strain displays different cell surface characteristics. The mucoid EPS synthesized by the strain harboring the mutation in Balat_1410 provided higher resistance to gastrointestinal conditions and increased the capability for adhesion to human enterocytes. In addition, the cytokine profiles of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and ex vivo colon tissues suggest that the mucoid strain could have higher anti-inflammatory activity. Our findings provide relevant data on the function of Balat_1410 and reveal that the mucoid phenotype is able to alter some of the most relevant functional properties of the cells. PMID:26362981

  3. A Versatile Family 3 Glycoside Hydrolase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis Hydrolyzes β-Glucosides of the Fusarium Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol, Nivalenol, and HT-2 Toxin in Cereal Matrices.

    PubMed

    Michlmayr, Herbert; Varga, Elisabeth; Malachova, Alexandra; Nguyen, Nhung Thi; Lorenz, Cindy; Haltrich, Dietmar; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Glycosylation plays a central role in plant defense against xenobiotics, including mycotoxins. Glucoconjugates of Fusarium toxins, such as deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-d-glucoside (DON-3G), often cooccur with their parental toxins in cereal-based food and feed. To date, only limited information exists on the occurrence of glucosylated mycotoxins and their toxicological relevance. Due to a lack of analytical standards and the requirement of high-end analytical instrumentation for their direct determination, hydrolytic cleavage of β-glucosides followed by analysis of the released parental toxins has been proposed as an indirect determination approach. This study compares the abilities of several fungal and recombinant bacterial β-glucosidases to hydrolyze the model analyte DON-3G. Furthermore, substrate specificities of two fungal and two bacterial (Lactobacillus brevis and Bifidobacterium adolescentis) glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidases were evaluated on a broader range of substrates. The purified recombinant enzyme from B. adolescentis (BaBgl) displayed high flexibility in substrate specificity and exerted the highest hydrolytic activity toward 3-O-β-d-glucosides of the trichothecenes deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol, and HT-2 toxin. A Km of 5.4 mM and a Vmax of 16 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) were determined with DON-3G. Due to low product inhibition (DON and glucose) and sufficient activity in several extracts of cereal matrices, this enzyme has the potential to be used for indirect analyses of trichothecene-β-glucosides in cereal samples.

  4. Effective Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium infantis encapsulation with chia seed (Salvia hispanica L.) and flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) mucilage and soluble protein by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mariela; Oomah, B Dave; Rubilar, Mónica; Shene, Carolina

    2017-02-01

    Mucilage (M) and soluble protein (SP) extracted from chia seed and flaxseed were used as encapsulating material for two probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus plantarum by spray drying. Probiotic survival and viability after spray drying and during storage were evaluated. B. infantis and L. plantarum displayed high survival (⩾98%) after encapsulation with mixtures of maltodextrin (MD) combined with M and SP from flaxseed (MD:FM:FSP - 7.5:0.2:7.5%, w/w/w) and chia seed (MD:CM:CSP - 7.5:0.6:7.5%, w/w/w), respectively. These ternary blends protected the probiotics and enhanced their resistance to simulated gastric juice and bile solution. Probiotics encapsulated with the ternary blends incorporated in instant juice powder exhibited high viability (>9Log10CFU/g) after 45days refrigerated storage. Encapsulation with the ternary blends reduced particle size of the probiotic powders thereby offering additional functional benefits. Our results reveal that chia seed and flaxseed are excellent sources of probiotic encapsulating agents. PMID:27596397

  5. Effect of a Ropy Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Strain Orally Administered on DSS-Induced Colitis Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Vezza, Teresa; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Margolles, Abelardo; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bifidobacteria, particularly Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, are used in the functional food industry as promising probiotics with purported beneficial effects. We used three isogenic strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis, with different EPS producing phenotypes (mucoid-ropy and non-ropy), in order to determine their capability to survive the murine gastrointestinal tract transit, as well as to evaluate their role in improving clinical outcomes in a chemically-induced colitis model. The three strains were able to survive in the intestinal tract of C57BL/6J mice during the course of the intervention study. Furthermore, the disease activity index (DAI) of the animal group treated with the ropy strain was significantly lower than of the DAI of the placebo group at the end of the treatment. However, no significant differences were found among the three strains. The analysis of several immune parameters, such as TNFα and IL-10 quantified in blood plasma and lymphocyte populations enumerated in mesenteric nodes, showed some significant variations among the four experimental animal groups. Remarkably, a higher capability of the ropy strain to increase regulatory T-cells in mesenteric lymphoid nodes was demonstrated, suggesting a higher ability of this strain to regulate inflammatory responses at mucosal level. Our data indicate that strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis producing EPS that confer a mucoid-ropy phenotype could represent promising candidates to perform further studies targeting intestinal inflammatory processes. PMID:27375589

  6. Effect of a Ropy Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Strain Orally Administered on DSS-Induced Colitis Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Vezza, Teresa; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Margolles, Abelardo; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bifidobacteria, particularly Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, are used in the functional food industry as promising probiotics with purported beneficial effects. We used three isogenic strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis, with different EPS producing phenotypes (mucoid-ropy and non-ropy), in order to determine their capability to survive the murine gastrointestinal tract transit, as well as to evaluate their role in improving clinical outcomes in a chemically-induced colitis model. The three strains were able to survive in the intestinal tract of C57BL/6J mice during the course of the intervention study. Furthermore, the disease activity index (DAI) of the animal group treated with the ropy strain was significantly lower than of the DAI of the placebo group at the end of the treatment. However, no significant differences were found among the three strains. The analysis of several immune parameters, such as TNFα and IL-10 quantified in blood plasma and lymphocyte populations enumerated in mesenteric nodes, showed some significant variations among the four experimental animal groups. Remarkably, a higher capability of the ropy strain to increase regulatory T-cells in mesenteric lymphoid nodes was demonstrated, suggesting a higher ability of this strain to regulate inflammatory responses at mucosal level. Our data indicate that strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis producing EPS that confer a mucoid-ropy phenotype could represent promising candidates to perform further studies targeting intestinal inflammatory processes.

  7. Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 8145 Reduces Fat Content and Modulates Lipid Metabolism and Antioxidant Response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Patricia; Llopis, Silvia; González, Nuria; Chenoll, Empar; López-Carreras, Noemi; Aleixandre, Amaya; Chen, Yang; Karoly, Edwuard D; Ramón, Daniel; Genovés, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    Recently, microbial changes in the human gut have been proposed as a possible cause of obesity. Therefore, modulation of microbiota through probiotic supplements is of great interest to support obesity therapeutics. The present study examines the functional effect and metabolic targets of a bacterial strain, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis CECT 8145, selected from a screening in Caenorhabditis elegans. This strain significantly reduced total lipids (40.5% ± 2.4) and triglycerides (27.6% ± 0.5), exerting antioxidant effects in the nematode (30% ± 2.8 increase in survival vs control); activities were also preserved in a final food matrix (milk). Furthermore, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses in nematodes fed with strain CECT 8145 revealed modulation of the energy and lipid metabolism, as well as the tryptophan metabolism (satiety), as the main metabolic targets of the probiotic. In conclusion, our study describes for the first time a new B. animalis subsp. lactis strain, CECT 8145, as a promising probiotic for obesity disorders. Furthermore, the data support future studies in obesity murine models. PMID:27054371

  8. Genome-Wide Identification of Small RNAs in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 and Their Regulation Role in the Adaption to Gastrointestinal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, De-Quan; Liu, Fei; Sun, Yu; Yang, Li-Mei; Xin, Li; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bifidobacteria are one of the predominant bacterial species in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and play a vital role in the host’s health by acting as probiotics. However, how they regulate themselves to adapt to GIT of their host remains unknown. Methods Eighteen bifidobacterial strains were used to analyze their adaptive capacities towards simulated GIT environment. The strain with highest survival rate and adhesion ability was selected for comparative genome as well as transcriptomic analysis. Results The Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 strain was demonstrated to have the highest survival rate and adhesion ability in simulated GIT treatments. The comparative genome analysis revealed that the KLDS 2.0603 has most similar whole genome sequence compared with BB-12 strain. Eleven intergenic sRNAs were identified after genomes prediction and transcriptomic analysis of KLDS 2.0603. Transcriptomic analysis also showed that genes (mainly sRNAs targeted genes) and sRNAs were differentially expressed in different stress conditions, suggesting that sRNAs might play a crucial role in regulating genes involved in the stress resistance of this strain towards environmental changes. Conclusions This study first provided deep and comprehensive insights into the regulation of KLDS 2.0603 strain at transcription and post-transcription level towards environmental. PMID:25706951

  9. Characterisation of the Poly-(Vinylpyrrolidone)-Poly-(Vinylacetate-Co-Crotonic Acid) (PVP:PVAc-CA) Interpolymer Complex Matrix Microparticles Encapsulating a Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 Probiotic Strain.

    PubMed

    Mamvura, C I; Moolman, F S; Kalombo, L; Hall, A N; Thantsha, M S

    2011-06-01

    The method of producing poly-(vinylpyrrolidone)-poly-(vinylacetate-co-crotonic acid) (PVP:PVAc-CA) interpolymer complex matrix microparticles in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), encapsulating bacteria, has recently been developed. This study was aimed at probing the external and internal structure of these microparticles, which can be used in food. The encapsulation efficiency and distribution of encapsulated Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 within these microparticles were also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed irregular, mostly small, smooth microparticles with no visible bacterial cells on the surface. However, some of the microparticles appeared to have porous surfaces. The results of a Microtrac S3500 particle size analyzer showed that the PVP:PVAc-CA interpolymer complex matrix microparticles encapsulating B. lactis Bb12 had an average particle size of 166.1 μm (<350 μm designated standard size for microparticles). The D 10, D 50 and D 90 values for these microparticles were 48.16, 166.06 and 382.55 μm, respectively. Both SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed a high density of bacterial cells within the microparticles. An average encapsulation efficiency of 96% was achieved. Consequently, the microparticles have the potential to be evenly distributed in foods, deliver adequate amounts of probiotics and produce minimal adverse effects on the texture and mouth feel of the foods into which they are incorporated. PMID:26781573

  10. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 cell surface hydrophobicity and survival of the cells under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Shakirova, Laisana; Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Auzina, Lilija; Zikmanis, Peteris

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and the survival of these cells were examined in response to varied cultivation conditions and adverse environmental conditions. An inverse linear relationship (P < 0.01) was detected between the CSH of intact L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 and survival of cells subjected to subsequent freezing/thawing, long-term storage or exposure to mineral and bile acids. The observed relationships were supported by significant correlations between the CSH and changes in composition of the cell envelopes (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) of L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 examined using FT-IR spectroscopy and conventional biochemical analysis methods. The results also suggest that the estimates of hydrophobicity, being a generalized characteristic of cell surfaces, are important parameters to predict the ability of intact probiotic bacteria to endure extreme environments and therefore should be monitored during cultivation. A defined balance of cell components, which can be characterized by the reduced CSH values, apparently helps to ensure the resistance, improved viability and hence the overall probiotic properties of bacteria. PMID:23053348

  11. Combined Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Grown on Xylo-Oligosaccharides and a Model of Their Utilization▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Ofir; Jacobsen, Susanne; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Pedersen, Martin Bastian; Garrigues, Christel; Svensson, Birte

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), which are classified as emerging prebiotics, selectively enhance the growth of bifidobacteria in general and of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains in particular. To elucidate the metabolism of XOS in the well-documented and widely used probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BB-12, a combined proteomic and transcriptomic approach was applied, involving DNA microarrays, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analyses of samples obtained from cultures grown on either XOS or glucose. The analyses show that 9 of the 10 genes that encode proteins predicted to play a role in XOS catabolism (i.e., XOS-degrading and -metabolizing enzymes, transport proteins, and a regulatory protein) were induced by XOS at the transcriptional level, and the proteins encoded by three of these (β-d-xylosidase, sugar-binding protein, and xylose isomerase) showed higher abundance on XOS. Based on the obtained results, a model for the catabolism of XOS in BB-12 is suggested, according to which the strain utilizes an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system (probably for oligosaccharides) to bind XOS on the cell surface and transport them into the cell. XOS are then degraded intracellularly through the action of xylanases and xylosidases to d-xylose, which is subsequently metabolized by the d-fructose-6-P shunt. The findings obtained in this study may have implications for the design of a synbiotic application containing BB-12 and the XOS used in the present study. PMID:20851982

  12. Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum taken in combination reduce the apoptosis propensity in the limbic system after myocardial infarction in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Girard, Stéphanie-Anne; Bah, Thierno Madjou; Kaloustian, Sévan; Lada-Moldovan, Laura; Rondeau, Isabelle; Tompkins, Thomas A; Godbout, Roger; Rousseau, Guy

    2009-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) stimulates the release of pro-inflammatory substances that induce apoptosis in the limbic system. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are considered as the root cause of apoptosis, although the mechanism is not fully explained and/or understood at this time. In addition, depression may induce gastrointestinal perturbations that maintain the elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It has been shown that some specific probiotic formulations may reduce gastrointestinal problems induced by stress and the pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine ratio. Therefore, we hypothesised that probiotics, when given prophylactically, may diminish the apoptosis propensity in the limbic system following a MI. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given probiotics (Lactobacillus helveticus and Bifidobacterium longum in combination) or placebo in their drinking-water for four consecutive weeks. A MI was then induced in the rats by occluding the left anterior coronary artery for 40 min. Rats were killed following a 72 h reperfusion period. Infarct size was not different in the two groups. Bax/Bcl-2 (pro-apoptotic/anti-apoptotic) ratio and caspase-3 (pro-apoptotic) activity were reduced in the amygdala (lateral and medial), as well as in the dentate gyrus in the probiotics group when compared with the placebo. Akt activity (anti-apoptotic) was increased in these same three regions. No significant difference was observed in Ca1 and Ca3 for the different markers measured. In conclusion, the probiotics L. helveticus and B. longum, given in combination as preventive therapy, reduced the predisposition of apoptosis found in different cerebral regions following a MI.

  13. Metabolism of rutin and poncirin by human intestinal microbiota and cloning of their metabolizing α-L-rhamnosidase from Bifidobacterium dentium.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seo-Hyeon; Hyun, Yang-Jin; Shim, Juwon; Hong, Sung-Woon; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To understand the metabolism of flavonoid rhamnoglycosides by human intestinal microbiota, we measured the metabolic activity of rutin and poncirin (distributed in many functional foods and herbal medicine) by 100 human stool specimens. The average α-Lrhamnosidase activities on the p-nitrophenyl-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, rutin, and poncirin subtrates were 0.10 ± 0.07, 0.25 ± 0.08, and 0.15 ± 0.09 pmol/min/mg, respectively. To investigate the enzymatic properties, α-L-rhamnosidase-producing bacteria were isolated from the specimens, and the α-L-rhamnosidase gene was cloned from a selected organism, Bifidobacterium dentium, and expressed in E. coli. The cloned α-L-rhamnosidase gene contained a 2,673 bp sequcence encoding 890 amino acid residues. The cloned gene was expressed using the pET 26b(+) vector in E. coli BL21, and the expressed enzyme was purified using Ni(2+)-NTA and Q-HP column chromatography. The specific activity of the purified α-L-rhamnosidase was 23.3 μmol/min/mg. Of the tested natural product constituents, the cloned α-L-rhamnosidase hydrolyzed rutin most potently, followed by poncirin, naringin, and ginsenoside Re. However, it was unable to hydrolyze quercitrin. This is the first report describing the cloning, expression, and characterization of α-L-rhamnosidase, a flavonoid rhamnoglycosidemetabolizing enzyme, from bifidobacteria. Based on these findings, the α-L-rhamnosidase of intestinal bacteria such as B. dentium seem to be more effective in hydrolyzing (1-->6) bonds than (1-->2) bonds of rhamnoglycosides, and may play an important role in the metabolism and pharmacological effect of rhamnoglycosides.

  14. Probiotic Streptococcus thermophilus FP4 and Bifidobacterium breve BR03 Supplementation Attenuates Performance and Range-of-Motion Decrements Following Muscle Damaging Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Ralf; Purpura, Martin; Stone, Jason D.; Turner, Stephanie M.; Anzalone, Anthony J.; Eimerbrink, Micah J.; Pane, Marco; Amoruso, Angela; Rowlands, David S.; Oliver, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have immunomodulatory effects. However, little is known about the potential benefit of probiotics on the inflammation subsequent to strenuous exercise. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, crossover design separated by a 21-day washout, 15 healthy resistance-trained men ingested an encapsulated probiotic Streptococcus (S.) thermophilus FP4 and Bifidobacterium (B.) breve BR03 at 5 bn live cells (AFU) concentration each, or a placebo, daily for 3 weeks prior to muscle-damaging exercise (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02520583). Isometric strength, muscle soreness, range of motion and girth, and blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations were measured from pre- to 72 h post-exercise. Statistical analysis was via mixed models and magnitude-based inference to the standardized difference. Probiotic supplementation resulted in an overall decrease in circulating IL-6, which was sustained to 48 h post-exercise. In addition, probiotic supplementation likely enhanced isometric average peak torque production at 24 to 72 h into the recovery period following exercise (probiotic–placebo point effect ±90% CI: 24 h, 11% ± 7%; 48 h, 12% ± 18%; 72 h, 8% ± 8%). Probiotics also likely moderately increased resting arm angle at 24 h (2.4% ± 2.0%) and 48 h (1.9% ± 1.9%) following exercise, but effects on soreness and flexed arm angle and CK were unclear. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with probiotic strains S. thermophilus FP4 and B. breve BR03 attenuates performance decrements and muscle tension in the days following muscle-damaging exercise. PMID:27754427

  15. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates the Uptake of α-(1,6)-Linked Dietary Oligosaccharides in Bifidobacterium and Correlates with Competitive Growth on These Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ejby, Morten; Fredslund, Folmer; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Vujičić Žagar, Andreja; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andersen, Thomas Lars; Svensson, Birte; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2016-09-16

    The molecular details and impact of oligosaccharide uptake by distinct human gut microbiota (HGM) are currently not well understood. Non-digestible dietary galacto- and gluco-α-(1,6)-oligosaccharides from legumes and starch, respectively, are preferentially fermented by mainly bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the human gut. Here we show that the solute binding protein (BlG16BP) associated with an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 binds α-(1,6)-linked glucosides and galactosides of varying size, linkage, and monosaccharide composition with preference for the trisaccharides raffinose and panose. This preference is also reflected in the α-(1,6)-galactoside uptake profile of the bacterium. Structures of BlG16BP in complex with raffinose and panose revealed the basis for the remarkable ligand binding plasticity of BlG16BP, which recognizes the non-reducing α-(1,6)-diglycoside in its ligands. BlG16BP homologues occur predominantly in bifidobacteria and a few Firmicutes but lack in other HGMs. Among seven bifidobacterial taxa, only those possessing this transporter displayed growth on α-(1,6)-glycosides. Competition assays revealed that the dominant HGM commensal Bacteroides ovatus was out-competed by B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 in mixed cultures growing on raffinose, the preferred ligand for the BlG16BP. By comparison, B. ovatus mono-cultures grew very efficiently on this trisaccharide. These findings suggest that the ABC-mediated uptake of raffinose provides an important competitive advantage, particularly against dominant Bacteroides that lack glycan-specific ABC-transporters. This novel insight highlights the role of glycan transport in defining the metabolic specialization of gut bacteria. PMID:27502277

  16. Intravenous Administration Is an Effective and Safe Route for Cancer Gene Therapy Using the Bifidobacterium-Mediated Recombinant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Ganciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huicong; He, Zhiliang; Wang, Changdong; Xie, Tingting; Liu, Lin; Liu, Chuanyang; Song, Fangzhou; Ma, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV TK/GCV) system is one of the best studied cancer suicide gene therapy systems. Our previous study showed that caspase 3 expression was upregulated and bladder tumor growth was significantly reduced in rats treated with a combination of Bifidobacterium (BF) and HSV TK/GCV (BF-rTK/GCV). However, it was raised whether the BF-mediated recombinant thymidine kinase combined with ganciclovir (BF-rTK/GCV) was safe to administer via venous for cancer gene therapy. To answer this question, the antitumor effects of BF-rTK/GCV were mainly evaluated in a xenograft nude mouse model bearing MKN-45 gastric tumor cells. The immune response, including analysis of cytokine profiles, was analyzed to evaluate the safety of intramuscular and intravenous injection of BF-rTK in BALB/c mice. The results suggested that gastric tumor growth was significantly inhibited in vivo by BF-rTK/GCV. However, the BF-rTK/GCV had no effect on mouse body weight, indicating that the treatment was safe for the host. The results of cytokine profile analysis indicated that intravenous injection of a low dose of BF-rTK resulted in a weaker cytokine response than that obtained with intramuscular injection. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed that intravenous administration did not affect the expression of immune-associated TLR2 and TLR4. Finally, the BF-rTK/GCV inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in mouse model, which is helpful for inhibiting of tumor angiogenesis. That meant intravenous administration of BF-rTK/GCV was an effective and safe way for cancer gene therapy. PMID:27275821

  17. Mutual Cross-Feeding Interactions between Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum NCC2705 and Eubacterium rectale ATCC 33656 Explain the Bifidogenic and Butyrogenic Effects of Arabinoxylan Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Audrey; Gagnon, Mérilie; Weckx, Stefan; Roy, Denis; De Vuyst, Luc

    2015-11-01

    Arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (AXOS) are a promising class of prebiotics that have the potential to stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria and the production of butyrate in the human colon, known as the bifidogenic and butyrogenic effects, respectively. Although these dual effects of AXOS are considered beneficial for human health, their underlying mechanisms are still far from being understood. Therefore, this study investigated the metabolic interactions between Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum NCC2705 (B. longum NCC2705), an acetate producer and arabinose substituent degrader of AXOS, and Eubacterium rectale ATCC 33656, an acetate-converting butyrate producer. Both strains belong to prevalent species of the human colon microbiota. The strains were grown on AXOS during mono- and coculture fermentations, and their growth, AXOS consumption, metabolite production, and expression of key genes were monitored. The results showed that the growth of both strains and gene expression in both strains were affected by cocultivation and that these effects could be linked to changes in carbohydrate consumption and concomitant metabolite production. The consumption of the arabinose substituents of AXOS by B. longum NCC2705 with the concomitant production of acetate allowed E. rectale ATCC 33656 to produce butyrate (by means of a butyryl coenzyme A [CoA]:acetate CoA-transferase), explaining the butyrogenic effect of AXOS. Eubacterium rectale ATCC 33656 released xylose from the AXOS substrate, which favored the B. longum NCC2705 production of acetate, explaining the bifidogenic effect of AXOS. Hence, those interactions represent mutual cross-feeding mechanisms that favor the coexistence of bifidobacterial strains and butyrate producers in the same ecological niche. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the bifidogenic and butyrogenic effects of AXOS.

  18. Production of immune response mediators by HT-29 intestinal cell-lines in the presence of Bifidobacterium-treated infant microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, S; Bahrami, B; Macfarlane, S; Gueimonde, M; Macfarlane, G T; de los Reyes-Gavilán, C G

    2015-01-01

    The colonisation and establishment of the intestinal microbiota starts immediately at birth and is essential for the development of the intestine and the immune system. This microbial community gradually increases in number and diversity until the age of two or three years when it becomes a stable ecosystem resembling that of adults. This period constitutes a unique window of opportunity to modulate it through probiotic action, with a potential impact in later health. In the present work we have investigated how putative bifidobacterial probiotics modify the metabolic profiles and immune-modulatory properties of faecal microbiotas. An in vitro pH-controlled single-stage continuous-culture system (CCS) inoculated with infant faeces was employed to characterise the effects of two Bifidobacterium species on the intestinal microbiotas in three children, together with the effects of these modified microbiotas on cytokine production by HT-29 cells. Intestinal bacterial communities, production of short-chain fatty acids and lactate were determined by quantitative PCR and gas chromatography, respectively. Cytokines production by HT-29 cells was measured by ELISA. The combination of CCS with infant faeces and human intestinal cells provided a suitable model to evaluate the specific modulation of the intestinal microbiota and immune system by probiotics. In the CCS, infant faecal microbiotas were influenced by the addition of bifidobacteria, resulting in changes in their ability to induce the production of immune mediators by HT-29 cells. The different metabolic and immunological responses induced by the bifidobacterial species tested indicate the need to assess potential probiotics in model systems including complex intestinal microbiotas. Potential probiotic bifidobacteria can modulate the infant microbiota and its ability to induce the production of mediators of the immune response by intestinal cells.

  19. Combination of Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 and Bifidobacterium longum R0175 reduces post-myocardial infarction depression symptoms and restores intestinal permeability in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Arseneault-Bréard, Jessica; Rondeau, Isabelle; Gilbert, Kim; Girard, Stéphanie-Anne; Tompkins, Thomas A; Godbout, Roger; Rousseau, Guy

    2012-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) in rats is accompanied by apoptosis in the limbic system and a behavioural syndrome similar to models of depression. We have already shown that probiotics can reduce post-MI apoptosis and designed the present study to determine if probiotics can also prevent post-MI depressive behaviour. We also tested the hypothesis that probiotics achieve their central effects through changes in the intestinal barrier. MI was induced in anaesthetised rats via 40-min transient occlusion of the left anterior coronary artery. Sham rats underwent the same surgical procedure without actual coronary occlusion. For 7 d before MI and between the seventh post-MI day and euthanasia, half the MI and sham rats were given one billion live bacterial cells of Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 and Bifidobacterium longum R0175 per d dissolved in water, while the remaining animals received only the vehicle (maltodextrin). Depressive behaviour was evaluated 2 weeks post-MI in social interaction, forced swimming and passive avoidance step-down tests. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by oral administration with fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, 4 h before euthanasia. MI rats displayed less social interaction and impaired performance in the forced swimming and passive avoidance step-down tests compared to the sham controls (P < 0·05). Probiotics reversed the behavioural effects of MI (P < 0·05), but did not alter the behaviour of sham rats. Intestinal permeability was increased in MI rats and reversed by probiotics. In conclusion, L. helveticus R0052 and B. longum R0175 combination interferes with the development of post-MI depressive behaviour and restores intestinal barrier integrity in MI rats.

  20. Effect on components of the intestinal microflora and plasma neuropeptide levels of feeding Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bifidobacterium lactis, and inulin to adult and elderly rats.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Violetta; Rowland, Ian; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Naughton, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the mixture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. rhamnosus strain GG, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, and inulin on intestinal populations of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria in adult and elderly rats fed the same (in quality and quantity) diet. The portal plasma levels of two neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), were also evaluated to assess the physiological consequences of the synbiotic treatment for the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of rats of different ages. Adult (n = 24) and elderly (n = 24) male rats were fed the AIN-93 M maintenance diet. After 2 weeks of adaptation, the diet of 12 rats of each age group was supplemented with 8% inulin and with strains GG and Bb12 to provide 2.2 x 10(9) CFU of each strain g(-1) of the diet. Blood and different regions of the GI tract were sampled from all rats after 21 days of the treatment. Treatment with the mixture of strain GG, strain BB12, and inulin induced significantly different changes in the numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria of the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon microflora. Moreover, the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture increased the concentrations of NPY and PYY for adult rats. For the elderly animals, the PYY concentration was not changed, while the NPY concentration was decreased by treatment with the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture. The results of the present study indicate that the physiological status of the GI tract, and not just diet, has a major role in the regulation of important groups of the GI bacteria community, since even the outcome of the dietary modification with synbiotics depends on the ages of the animals.

  1. Crystal structure of a metal-dependent phosphoesterase (YP_910028.1) from Bifidobacterium adolescentis: Computational prediction and experimental validation of phosphoesterase activity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gye Won; Ko, Jaeju; Farr, Carol L.; Deller, Marc C.; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D.; Sefcikova, Jana; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Beuning, Penny J.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of an unliganded and adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) bound, metal-dependent phosphoesterase (YP_910028.1) from Bifidobacterium adolescentis are reported at 2.4 Å and 1.94 Å, respectively. Functional characterization of this enzyme was guided by computational analysis and then confirmed by experiment. The structure consists of a PHP (Polymerase and Histidinol Phosphatase, Pfam: PF02811) domain with a second domain (residues 105–178) inserted in the middle of the PHP sequence. The insert domain functions in binding AMP, but the precise function and substrate specificity of this domain is unknown. Initial bioinformatics analyses yielded multiple potential functional leads, with most of them suggesting DNA polymerase or DNA replication activity. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a potential DNA polymerase function that was somewhat supported by global structural comparisons identifying the closest structural match to the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III. However, several other functional predictions, including phosphoesterase, could not be excluded. THEMATICS, a computational method for the prediction of active sites from protein 3D structures, identified potential reactive residues in YP_910028.1. Further analysis of the predicted active site and local comparison with its closest structure matches strongly suggested phosphoesterase activity, which was confirmed experimentally. Primer extension assays on both normal and mismatched DNA show neither extension nor degradation and provide evidence that YP_910028.1 has neither DNA polymerase activity nor DNA proofreading activity. These results suggest that many of the sequence neighbors previously annotated as having DNA polymerase activity may actually be misannotated. PMID:21538547

  2. Effect on components of the intestinal microflora and plasma neuropeptide levels of feeding Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bifidobacterium lactis, and inulin to adult and elderly rats.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, Violetta; Rowland, Ian; Cani, Patrice D; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Naughton, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the mixture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. rhamnosus strain GG, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, and inulin on intestinal populations of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria in adult and elderly rats fed the same (in quality and quantity) diet. The portal plasma levels of two neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), were also evaluated to assess the physiological consequences of the synbiotic treatment for the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of rats of different ages. Adult (n = 24) and elderly (n = 24) male rats were fed the AIN-93 M maintenance diet. After 2 weeks of adaptation, the diet of 12 rats of each age group was supplemented with 8% inulin and with strains GG and Bb12 to provide 2.2 x 10(9) CFU of each strain g(-1) of the diet. Blood and different regions of the GI tract were sampled from all rats after 21 days of the treatment. Treatment with the mixture of strain GG, strain BB12, and inulin induced significantly different changes in the numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria of the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon microflora. Moreover, the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture increased the concentrations of NPY and PYY for adult rats. For the elderly animals, the PYY concentration was not changed, while the NPY concentration was decreased by treatment with the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture. The results of the present study indicate that the physiological status of the GI tract, and not just diet, has a major role in the regulation of important groups of the GI bacteria community, since even the outcome of the dietary modification with synbiotics depends on the ages of the animals. PMID:17021202

  3. Mutual Cross-Feeding Interactions between Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum NCC2705 and Eubacterium rectale ATCC 33656 Explain the Bifidogenic and Butyrogenic Effects of Arabinoxylan Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Audrey; Gagnon, Mérilie; Weckx, Stefan; Roy, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (AXOS) are a promising class of prebiotics that have the potential to stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria and the production of butyrate in the human colon, known as the bifidogenic and butyrogenic effects, respectively. Although these dual effects of AXOS are considered beneficial for human health, their underlying mechanisms are still far from being understood. Therefore, this study investigated the metabolic interactions between Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum NCC2705 (B. longum NCC2705), an acetate producer and arabinose substituent degrader of AXOS, and Eubacterium rectale ATCC 33656, an acetate-converting butyrate producer. Both strains belong to prevalent species of the human colon microbiota. The strains were grown on AXOS during mono- and coculture fermentations, and their growth, AXOS consumption, metabolite production, and expression of key genes were monitored. The results showed that the growth of both strains and gene expression in both strains were affected by cocultivation and that these effects could be linked to changes in carbohydrate consumption and concomitant metabolite production. The consumption of the arabinose substituents of AXOS by B. longum NCC2705 with the concomitant production of acetate allowed E. rectale ATCC 33656 to produce butyrate (by means of a butyryl coenzyme A [CoA]:acetate CoA-transferase), explaining the butyrogenic effect of AXOS. Eubacterium rectale ATCC 33656 released xylose from the AXOS substrate, which favored the B. longum NCC2705 production of acetate, explaining the bifidogenic effect of AXOS. Hence, those interactions represent mutual cross-feeding mechanisms that favor the coexistence of bifidobacterial strains and butyrate producers in the same ecological niche. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the bifidogenic and butyrogenic effects of AXOS. PMID:26319874

  4. Effect on Components of the Intestinal Microflora and Plasma Neuropeptide Levels of Feeding Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Inulin to Adult and Elderly Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lesniewska, Violetta; Rowland, Ian; Cani, Patrice D.; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Naughton, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the mixture of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. rhamnosus strain GG, Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12, and inulin on intestinal populations of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria in adult and elderly rats fed the same (in quality and quantity) diet. The portal plasma levels of two neuropeptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY), were also evaluated to assess the physiological consequences of the synbiotic treatment for the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of rats of different ages. Adult (n = 24) and elderly (n = 24) male rats were fed the AIN-93 M maintenance diet. After 2 weeks of adaptation, the diet of 12 rats of each age group was supplemented with 8% inulin and with strains GG and Bb12 to provide 2.2 × 109 CFU of each strain g−1 of the diet. Blood and different regions of the GI tract were sampled from all rats after 21 days of the treatment. Treatment with the mixture of strain GG, strain BB12, and inulin induced significantly different changes in the numbers of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and enterobacteria of the stomach, small intestine, cecum, and colon microflora. Moreover, the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture increased the concentrations of NPY and PYY for adult rats. For the elderly animals, the PYY concentration was not changed, while the NPY concentration was decreased by treatment with the GG, BB12, and inulin mixture. The results of the present study indicate that the physiological status of the GI tract, and not just diet, has a major role in the regulation of important groups of the GI bacteria community, since even the outcome of the dietary modification with synbiotics depends on the ages of the animals. PMID:17021202

  5. Secreted Metabolites of Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus acidophilus Protect Immature Human Enterocytes from IL-1β-Induced Inflammation: A Transcription Profiling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuangshuang; Guo, Yuming; Ergun, Ayla; Lu, Lei; Walker, W. Allan; Ganguli, Kriston

    2015-01-01

    Combination regimens of Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus acidophilus have been demonstrated to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this protective effect are not well understood. Additionally, conditioned media from individual cultures of these two probiotics show strain specific modulation of inflammation using in vitro human intestinal NEC models. Here we report a transcription profiling analysis of gene expression in immature human fetal intestinal epithelial cells (H4 cells) pretreated with conditioned media from B. infantis (BCM) or L. acidophilus (LCM) prior to IL-1β stimulation. Compared with control media, the two probiotic-conditioned media (PCM) treatments altered the expression of hundreds of genes involved in the immune response, apoptosis and cell survival, cell adhesion, the cell cycle, development and angiogenesis. In IL-1β-stimulated cells, PCM treatment decreased the upregulation of genes in the NF-κB activation pathway and downregulated genes associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Compared with LCM, BCM showed more significant modulatory effects on ECM remodeling, reflected by a lower p value. IL-6 and IL-8 production was significantly reduced in IL-1β-stimulated cells pretreated with PCM (p<0.05), which was consistent with their altered gene expression. Western blot analysis showed that compared with IL-1β stimulation alone, PCM treatment attenuated the decrease of cytoplasmic IκBα and NF-κB p65 levels as well as the increase of nuclear NF-κB p65 levels in the stimulated cells (p<0.05). In conclusion, PCM treatment exerted anti-inflammatory effects in immature human fetal enterocytes primarily by modulating genes in the NF-κB signaling and ECM remodeling pathways. Additionally, some components of these signaling pathways, particularly the ECM remodeling pathway, were more profoundly affected by BCM than LCM. PMID:25906317

  6. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study.

    PubMed

    Merenstein, Daniel J; Tan, Tina P; Molokin, Aleksey; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Roberts, Robert F; Shara, Nawar M; Mete, Mihriye; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of adults who were prescribed a 10-day course of antibiotics for a respiratory infection. Secondary aims were to assess the ability of BB-12 to affect the expression of whole blood immune markers associated with cell activation and inflammatory response. A phase I, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted in compliance with FDA guidelines for an Investigational New Drug (IND). Forty participants were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12 -supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 d. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, assessed by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 165 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no differences between the control and BB-12 groups. When compared to the control group, B lactis fecal levels were modestly higher in the BB-12-supplemented group. In a small subset of patients, changes in whole blood expression of genes associated with regulation and activation of immune cells were detected in the BB-12-supplemented group. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well tolerated when consumed by healthy adults concurrently taking antibiotics. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential immunomodulatory effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in a variety of disease states.

  7. Innate mechanisms for Bifidobacterium lactis to activate transient pro-inflammatory host responses in intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization of germ-free rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Hoffmann, Micha; Szcesny, Silke; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2005-08-01

    Bifidobacteria comprise a dominant microbial population group in the human intestinal tract with purported beneficial health effects on the host. In this study, we characterized the molecular mechanisms for the initial interaction of probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis strain BB12 with native and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines. We showed that B. lactis-monoassociated Fisher F344 rats transiently induce phosphorylation/activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptionally active subunit RelA and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 in native IEC at day 5 after initial bacterial colonization. In addition, Interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene expression was significantly increased at day 5, demonstrating the physiological relevance of transient transcription factor activation in IEC. In contrast, Bacteroides vulgatus-monoassociated Fisher rats revealed RelA but not p38 MAPK phosphorylation and failed to trigger significant IL-6 gene expression in native IEC. Moreover, we demonstrated that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB RelA and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in IEC lines. Adenoviral delivery of mutant IKK-beta (Ad5dnIKKbeta) and inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway through the pharmacological inhibitor SB203580 significantly blocked B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression in IEC, suggesting that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB and MAPK signaling to induce gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Regarding the mechanisms of bacteria epithelial cell cross-talk, B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression was completely inhibited in TLR2 deficient mouse embryogenic fibroblasts (MEF TLR2-/-) as well as TLR2DeltaTIR transfected Mode-K cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that probiotic bacteria transiently trigger innate signal transduction and pro-inflammatory gene expression in the intestinal epithelium at early stages of bacterial colonization.

  8. Enzyme stability of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze drying and during storage in low water activity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-08-01

    Stability of enzymes such as β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), hexokinase (HK), and ATPase of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 wk of storage at low water activity (a(w)) at room temperature was studied. Bacteria were microencapsulated using alginate formulation with or without mannitol fortification (sodium alginate and mannitol [SAM] and sodium alginate [SA], respectively) by creating gel beads followed by freeze drying. Two types of dried gel beads were then stored at low a(w), such as 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2; storage in an aluminum foil was used as control. All storage was carried out at room temperature of 25 °C for 10 wk. Measurement of β-gal, β-glu, LDH, PK, HK, and ATPase (with or without exposure to pH 2.0 for 2 h) activities was carried out before freeze drying, after freeze drying, and after 10 wk of storage. There was a significant decrease in almost all enzyme activities, except that of PK. SAM and SA showed no different effect on maintaining enzyme activities during freeze drying. Storage for 10 wk at room temperature at various low a(w) using SAM and SA system had a significant effect on retention of most enzymes studied, except that of PK and LDH. Storage at a(w) of 0.07 and 0.1 was more effective in maintaining enzyme activities than storage at a(w) of 0.2 and in an aluminum foil. However, mannitol fortification into alginate system did not significantly improve retention of enzymes during 10 wk of storage. PMID:21696390

  9. Bifidobacterium population analysis in the infant gut by direct mapping of genomic hybridization patterns: potential for monitoring temporal development and effects of dietary regimens.

    PubMed

    Boesten, Rolf; Schuren, Frank; Ben Amor, Kaouther; Haarman, Monique; Knol, Jan; de Vos, Willem M

    2011-05-01

    A bifidobacterial mixed-species microarray platform was used in a proof-of-principle study to address the composition and development of bifidobacteria in DNA extracted from faecal samples. These were collected in a time-course of 2 years since birth and derived from human infants that were breastfed, standard formula-fed or received a prebiotic formula during their weaning period. A set of over 50 samples was analysed, testifying for the throughput of the designed platform for multiple genome hybridizations. The generated data revealed that faecal samples of breastfed infants contained a high abundance of genomic DNA homologous to Bifidobacterium breve. In contrast, faecal samples from standard formula-fed infants lacked detectable amounts of this B. breve DNA but contained genes with high similarity to B. longum. Remarkably, infants that received breastmilk and later a prebiotic formula consisting of a standard formula milk containing a mixture of specific galacto- and fructo-oligosaccharides, continued to harbour a B. breve-dominant faecal population. One infant that received standard formula in combination with the additional B. lactis Bb12 culture, contained significant amounts of faecal DNA belonging to Bb12 but only during the period of ingestion. The microarray platform showed sufficient sensitivity to analyse the B. breve group at the strain level. Overall, the B. breve populations observed in the faecal samples of the studied infants showed a stable composition over time and were unique per infant. In conclusion, our results show the applicability of comparative genome hybridization to study bifidobacterial populations in infant faecal samples without the use of any amplification step. PMID:21375714

  10. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study

    PubMed Central

    Merenstein, Daniel J; Tan, Tina P; Molokin, Aleksey; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Roberts, Robert F; Shara, Nawar M; Mete, Mihriye; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of adults who were prescribed a 10-day course of antibiotics for a respiratory infection. Secondary aims were to assess the ability of BB-12 to affect the expression of whole blood immune markers associated with cell activation and inflammatory response. A phase I, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted in compliance with FDA guidelines for an Investigational New Drug (IND). Forty participants were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12 -supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 d. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, assessed by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 165 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no differences between the control and BB-12 groups. When compared to the control group, B lactis fecal levels were modestly higher in the BB-12-supplemented group. In a small subset of patients, changes in whole blood expression of genes associated with regulation and activation of immune cells were detected in the BB-12-supplemented group. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well tolerated when consumed by healthy adults concurrently taking antibiotics. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential immunomodulatory effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in a variety of disease states. PMID:25569274

  11. Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions of Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32 and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and their interaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gut microbiota plays an important role in human health and disease by acting as a metabolic organ. Metagenomic sequencing has shown how dysbiosis in the gut microbiota is associated with human metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Modeling may assist to gain insight into the metabolic implication of an altered microbiota. Fast and accurate reconstruction of metabolic models for members of the gut microbiota, as well as methods to simulate a community of microorganisms, are therefore needed. The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) database contains functional annotation for nearly 4,650 bacterial genomes. This tremendous new genomic information adds new opportunities for systems biology to reconstruct accurate genome scale metabolic models (GEMs). Results Here we assembled a reaction data set containing 2,340 reactions obtained from existing genome-scale metabolic models, where each reaction is assigned with KEGG Orthology. The reaction data set was then used to reconstruct two genome scale metabolic models for gut microorganisms available in the IMG database Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32, which produces acetate during fermentation, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165, which consumes acetate and produces butyrate. F. prausnitzii is less abundant in patients with Crohn’s disease and has been suggested to play an anti-inflammatory role in the gut ecosystem. The B. adolescentis model, iBif452, comprises 699 reactions and 611 unique metabolites. The F. prausnitzii model, iFap484, comprises 713 reactions and 621 unique metabolites. Each model was validated with in vivo data. We used OptCom and Flux Balance Analysis to simulate how both organisms interact. Conclusions The consortium of iBif452 and iFap484 was applied to predict F. prausnitzii’s demand for acetate and production of butyrate which plays an essential role in colonic homeostasis and cancer prevention. The assembled reaction set is a useful tool to generate bacterial draft

  12. In vitro fermentation of sugar beet arabino-oligosaccharides by fecal microbiota obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis to selectively stimulate the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Vigsnæs, Louise Kristine; Holck, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S; Licht, Tine Rask

    2011-12-01

    The potential prebiotic properties of arabino-oligosaccharides (AOS) derived from sugar beet pulp was studied using mixed cultures of human fecal bacteria from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), in remission or with active disease, and in healthy controls. These results were compared to those for fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), which are known to have a prebiotic effect. Fermentation studies were carried out using a small-scale static batch system, and changes in the fecal microbial communities and metabolites were monitored after 24 h by quantitative real-time PCR and short-chain fatty acid analysis. With a few minor exceptions, AOS affected the communities similarly to what was seen for FOS. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were selectively increased after fermentation of AOS or FOS by fecal microbiota derived from UC patients. The stimulation of growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. was accompanied by a high production of acetate and hence a decrease of pH. The fermentation of AOS may help improve the inflammatory conditions in UC patients through stimulation of bacteria eliciting anti-inflammatory responses and through production of acetate. AOS may therefore represent a new prebiotic candidate for reduction of the risk of flare-ups in UC patients. However, human trials are needed to confirm a health-promoting effect.

  13. Suppression subtractive hybridisation and real-time PCR for strain-specific quantification of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed.

    PubMed

    Fibi, Silvia; Klose, Viviana; Mohnl, Michaela; Weber, Barbara; Haslberger, Alexander G; Sattler, Verity Ann

    2016-04-01

    To ensure quality management during the production processes of probiotics and for efficacy testing in vivo, accurate tools are needed for the identification and quantification of probiotic strains. In this study, a strain-specific qPCR assay based on Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation (SSH) for identifying unique sequences, was developed to quantify the strain Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed. Seventy potential BAN specific sequences were obtained after SSH of the BAN genome, with a pool of closely related strain genomes and subsequent differential screening by dot blot hybridisation. Primers were designed for 30 sequences which showed no match with any sequence database entry, using BLAST and FASTA. Primer specificity was assessed by qPCR using 45 non-target strains and species in a stepwise approach. Primer T39_S2 was the only primer pair without any unspecific binding properties and it showed a PCR efficiency of 80% with a Cq value of 17.32 for 20 ng BAN DNA. Optimised feed-matrix dependent calibration curve for the quantification of BAN was generated, ranging from 6.28 × 10(3)cfu g(-1) to 1.61 × 10(6)cfu g(-1). Limit of detection of the qPCR assay was 2 × 10(1)cfu g(-1) BAN. Applicability of the strain-specific qPCR assay was confirmed in a spiking experiment which added BAN to the feed in two concentrations, 2 × 10(6)cfu g(-1) and 2 × 10(4)cfu g(-1). Results showed BAN mean recovery rates in feed of 1.44 × 10(6) ± 4.39 × 10(5)cfu g(-1) and 1.59 × 10(4) ± 1.69 × 10(4)cfu g(-1), respectively. The presented BAN-specific qPCR assay can be applied in animal feeding trials, in order to control the correct inclusion rates of the probiotic to the feed, and it could further be adapted, to monitor the uptake of the probiotic into the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens. PMID:26883620

  14. Suppression subtractive hybridisation and real-time PCR for strain-specific quantification of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed.

    PubMed

    Fibi, Silvia; Klose, Viviana; Mohnl, Michaela; Weber, Barbara; Haslberger, Alexander G; Sattler, Verity Ann

    2016-04-01

    To ensure quality management during the production processes of probiotics and for efficacy testing in vivo, accurate tools are needed for the identification and quantification of probiotic strains. In this study, a strain-specific qPCR assay based on Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation (SSH) for identifying unique sequences, was developed to quantify the strain Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed. Seventy potential BAN specific sequences were obtained after SSH of the BAN genome, with a pool of closely related strain genomes and subsequent differential screening by dot blot hybridisation. Primers were designed for 30 sequences which showed no match with any sequence database entry, using BLAST and FASTA. Primer specificity was assessed by qPCR using 45 non-target strains and species in a stepwise approach. Primer T39_S2 was the only primer pair without any unspecific binding properties and it showed a PCR efficiency of 80% with a Cq value of 17.32 for 20 ng BAN DNA. Optimised feed-matrix dependent calibration curve for the quantification of BAN was generated, ranging from 6.28 × 10(3)cfu g(-1) to 1.61 × 10(6)cfu g(-1). Limit of detection of the qPCR assay was 2 × 10(1)cfu g(-1) BAN. Applicability of the strain-specific qPCR assay was confirmed in a spiking experiment which added BAN to the feed in two concentrations, 2 × 10(6)cfu g(-1) and 2 × 10(4)cfu g(-1). Results showed BAN mean recovery rates in feed of 1.44 × 10(6) ± 4.39 × 10(5)cfu g(-1) and 1.59 × 10(4) ± 1.69 × 10(4)cfu g(-1), respectively. The presented BAN-specific qPCR assay can be applied in animal feeding trials, in order to control the correct inclusion rates of the probiotic to the feed, and it could further be adapted, to monitor the uptake of the probiotic into the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens.

  15. Two β-Galactosidases from the Human Isolate Bifidobacterium breve DSM 20213: Molecular Cloning and Expression, Biochemical Characterization and Synthesis of Galacto-Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Suljic, Jasmina; Kittl, Roman; Pham, Ngoc Hung; Kosma, Paul; Haltrich, Dietmar; Nguyen, Thu-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Two β-galactosidases, β-gal I and β-gal II, from Bifidobacterium breve DSM 20213, which was isolated from the intestine of an infant, were overexpressed in Escherichia coli with co-expression of the chaperones GroEL/GroES, purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Both β-gal I and β-gal II belong to glycoside hydrolase family 2 and are homodimers with native molecular masses of 220 and 211 kDa, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for hydrolysis of the two substrates o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (oNPG) and lactose were determined at pH 7.0 and 50°C for β-gal I, and at pH 6.5 and 55°C for β-gal II, respectively. The kcat/Km values for oNPG and lactose hydrolysis are 722 and 7.4 mM−1s−1 for β-gal I, and 543 and 25 mM−1s−1 for β-gal II. Both β-gal I and β-gal II are only moderately inhibited by their reaction products D-galactose and D-glucose. Both enzymes were found to be very well suited for the production of galacto-oligosaccharides with total GOS yields of 33% and 44% of total sugars obtained with β-gal I and β-gal II, respectively. The predominant transgalactosylation products are β-D-Galp-(1→6)-D-Glc (allolactose) and β-D-Galp-(1→3)-D-Lac, accounting together for more than 75% and 65% of the GOS formed by transgalactosylation by β-gal I and β-gal II, respectively, indicating that both enzymes have a propensity to synthesize β-(1→6) and β-(1→3)-linked GOS. The resulting GOS mixtures contained relatively high fractions of allolactose, which results from the fact that glucose is a far better acceptor for galactosyl transfer than galactose and lactose, and intramolecular transgalactosylation contributes significantly to the formation of this disaccharide. PMID:25089712

  16. Antitumorigenic activity of the prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose in combination with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Dolara, Piero; Giannini, Augusto; Biggeri, Annibale; Salvadori, Maddalena; Clune, Yvonne; Collins, Kevin J; Paglierani, Milena; Caderni, Giovanna

    2002-11-01

    Prebiotics such as fructans, and probiotics such as Lactobacilli or Bifidobacteria, or a combination of prebiotics and probiotics (synbiotics) are thought to be protective against colon cancer. Therefore, we studied whether the prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose (Raftilose-Synergy1, briefly, Synergy1, 10% of the diet), probiotics [Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb12) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG), each at 5x10(8) c.f.u./g diet] or synbiotics (a combination of the two) protect rats against azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer. Male F344 rats were divided into: Controls; PRE, which were fed a diet containing Synergy1; PRO, fed a diet containing LGG and Bb12; PREPRO, fed a diet containing Synergy1, LGG and BB12. Ten days after beginning the diets, rats were treated with AOM (15 mg/kg s.c. two times); dietary treatments were continued for the entire experiment. Thirty-one weeks after AOM, rats treated with Synergy1 (PRE and PREPRO groups) had a significantly lower (P < 0.001) number of tumours (adenomas and cancers) than rats without Synergy1 (colorectal tumours/rat were 1.9 +/- 1.7, 1.1 +/- 1.1, 2.2 +/- 1.4 and 0.9 +/- 1.2 in Controls, PRE, PRO and PREPRO groups, respectively, means +/- SD). A slight, not significant effect of probiotics in reducing malignant tumours was also observed (P = 0.079). Caecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were higher (P < 0.001) in the groups treated with Synergy1. Apoptosis was increased in the normal mucosa of the PRO group, while no variation was observed in the tumours. Colonic proliferation was lower in the PRE group as compared with Controls. Glutathione S-transferase placental enzyme pi type expression, and to a lesser extent, inducible NO synthase were depressed in the tumours from rats in the PRE and PREPRO groups. Cycloxygenase-2 expression was increased in the tumours of control rats but not in those from PRE, PRO or PREPRO rats. In conclusion, prebiotic administration in the diet decreases AOM-induced carcinogenesis

  17. Wild-type and IL10-null mice have differential colonic epithelial gene expression responses to dietary supplementation with synbiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis and inulin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Chan, Wan-Chun; Hu, Zihua

    2014-03-01

    Prebiotic plus probiotic (synbiotic) supplementations promote fermentation and have shown anti-inflammatory activity in colonic epithelium. However, in many instances, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have demonstrated adverse effects after prebiotic supplementation at a dose well tolerated by normal individuals. To test the hypothesis that the host inflammation affects the colonic epithelial response to increased fermentation, the gene expression of colonic epithelium was analyzed. In a 1-way experimental design to test the effect of supplements in wild-type mice using the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G) as the control diet, fermentable fiber inulin (5%) in the absence or presence of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) (10(8) CFU/kg diet) showed limited effects on gene expression as determined by whole-genome microarray. Bb12 supplementation alone was known not to increase fermentation and here instead significantly upregulated genes in nucleic acid metabolic processes. The effects of the synbiotic diet were then determined in mice exposed to LPS-induced inflammation in a 2-way experimental design testing the effect of diet and LPS. The microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on the wild-type mice revealed that LPS-induced changes in the colonic epithelium were 4- to 10-fold less in the synbiotic diet group compared with the control diet group. Unlike the wild-type mice, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10)-null mice (susceptible to IBD) given the synbiotic diet, compared with those given the control diet, had 3- to 40-fold increased expression of inflammation-related genes such as Cxcl1 (chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1) and S100a9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9) in the absence and presence of LPS exposure. These contrasting intestinal epithelial responses to increased fermentation in wild-type and IL10-null mice are similar

  18. Effects of synbiotic fermented milk containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12 on the fecal microbiota of adults with irritable bowel syndrome: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bogovič Matijašić, Bojana; Obermajer, Tanja; Lipoglavšek, Luka; Sernel, Tjaša; Locatelli, Igor; Kos, Mitja; Šmid, Alenka; Rogelj, Irena

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentric study to investigate the influence of a synbiotic fermented milk on the fecal microbiota composition of 30 adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The synbiotic product contained Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12, Streptococcus thermophilus, and dietary fiber (90% inulin, 10% oligofructose), and a heat-treated fermented milk without probiotic bacteria or dietary fiber served as placebo. Stool samples were collected after a run-in period, a 4-wk consumption period, and a 1-wk follow-up period, and were subjected to real-time PCR and 16S rDNA profiling by next-generation sequencing. After 4wk of synbiotic (11 subjects) or placebo (19 subjects) consumption, a greater increase in DNA specific for L. acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis was detected in the feces of the synbiotic group compared with the placebo group by quantitative real-time PCR. After 1wk of follow-up, the content of L. acidophilus La-5 and B. animalis ssp. lactis decreased to levels close to initial levels. No significant changes with time or differences between the groups were observed for Lactobacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, Bifidobacterium, or all bacteria. The presence of viable BB-12- and La-5-like bacteria in the feces resulting from the intake of synbiotic product was confirmed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. At the end of consumption period, the feces of all subjects assigned to the synbiotic group contained viable bacteria with a BB-12-like RAPD profile, and after 1wk of follow-up, BB-12-like bacteria remained in the feces of 87.5% of these subjects. The presence of La-5-like colonies was observed less frequently (37.5 and 25% of subjects, respectively). Next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons revealed that only the percentage of sequences assigned to Strep. thermophilus was temporarily increased in both groups, whereas the

  19. THE EFFECT OF PROBIOTIC FERMENTED MILK THAT INCLUDES BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS CNCM I-2494 ON THE REDUCTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL DISCOMFORT AND SYMPTOMS IN ADULTS: A NARRATIVE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Waitzberg, Dan L; Quilici, Flávio A; Michzputen, Sender; Friche Passos, Maria do Carmo

    2015-08-01

    Objetivo: determinar la eficacia de la leche fermentada con Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-2429 en la reducción de el malestar gastrointestinal (GI) en adultos sanos. Métodos: se realizó una búsqueda sistemática en la literatura para identificar estudios que informaron del uso de B. animalis spp. lactis para molestias/ confort GI en adultos sanos. Se identificaron un total de 5.329 registros, de estos se evaluaron 99 artículos de texto completo. Las búsquedas de ensayos adicionales se realizaron utilizando los nombres de los autores de cada estudio identificado y varias bases de datos relevantes. La selección de los estudios se llevó a cabo de acuerdo con las guías de Artículos de Información Preferidos para Revisiones Sistemáticas y Meta-Análisis (PRISMA). Los estudios eran incluidos si eran ensayos randomizados controlados, si los sujetos de estudio eran adultos sanos y si el grupo de intervención recibió B. lactis CNCM I-2494. Se excluyeron los estudios que no eran randomizados, que incluían adultos que no estaban sanos, que incluían el uso de cualquier otra intervención o si comparaban diferentes productos sin un grupo placebo. La calidad metodológica de los estudios se evaluó utilizando la Escala de Calidad de Oxford y la Evaluación Cochrane de ocultamiento. No fue posible un metaanálisis. Resultados: la estrategia de búsqueda identificó dos estudios que incluyeron un total de 538 mujeres sanas, con edades entre 18 a 60 años, de peso normal o sobrepeso (IMC de 18-30 kg/m2). En uno de los estudios las molestias GI disminuyeron significativamente en el grupo de probióticos frente al grupo control, sin diferencias en el otro. El porcentaje de respondedores para el bienestar GI fue mayor en el grupo de probióticos frente al grupo control en el primer estudio, pero no en el segundo. Los síntomas GI se redujeron significativamente en el grupo probiótico frente al grupo control en ambos estudios. La función intestinal solo se evaluó en

  20. Elucidating the gut microbiome of ulcerative colitis: bifidobacteria as novel microbial biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Duranti, Sabrina; Gaiani, Federica; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Milani, Christian; Grandi, Andrea; Bolchi, Angelo; Santoni, Andrea; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Ferrario, Chiara; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Bertoni, Simona; Vivo, Valentina; Serafini, Fausta; Barbaro, Maria Raffaella; Fugazza, Alessandro; Barbara, Giovanni; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Cantoni, Anna Maria; de'Angelis, Gian Luigi; Barocelli, Elisabetta; de'Angelis, Nicola; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco; Turroni, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with a substantial alteration of specific gut commensals, some of which may be involved in microbiota-mediated protection. In this study, microbiota cataloging of UC patients by 16S rRNA microbial profiling revealed a marked reduction of bifidobacteria, in particular the Bifidobacterium bifidum species, thus suggesting that this taxon plays a biological role in the aetiology of UC. We investigated this further through an in vivo trial by testing the effects of oral treatment with B. bifidum PRL2010 in a wild-type murine colitis model. TNBS-treated mice receiving 10(9) cells of B. bifidum PRL2010 showed a marked reduction of all colitis-associated histological indices as well as maintenance of mucosal integrity as it was shown by the increase in the expression of many tight junction-encoding genes. The protective role of B. bifidum PRL2010, as well as its sortase-dependent pili, appears to be established through the induction of an innate immune response of the host. These results highlight the importance of B. bifidum as a microbial biomarker for UC, revealing its role in protection against experimentally induced colitis. PMID:27604252

  1. A study of the effect of dietary fiber fractions obtained from artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) on the growth of intestinal bacteria associated with health.

    PubMed

    Fissore, Eliana N; Santo Domingo, Cinthia; Gerschenson, Lía N; Giannuzzi, Leda

    2015-05-01

    The effect of different fractions enriched in soluble fiber obtained from artichoke using citric acid or citric acid/hemicellulase on the selective growth of Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11863 was evaluated. Gompertz modeling of Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 growth showed a higher specific growth rate (μ: 0.16 h(-1)) in the presence of fractions isolated from stems using hemicellulase (fraction A) than in the presence of glucose (μ: 0.09 h(-1)). In the case of Bifidobacterium bifidum 11863, the highest μ was obtained for the microorganism grown in the presence of fraction A and for the fraction isolated from stems without hemicellulase, their rate being twice that observed for glucose (0.04 h(-1)). The positive prebiotic activity scores observed with respect to Escherichia coli 25922 indicated that fibers assayed are metabolized as well as glucose by Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11863 and that they are selectively metabolized by these microorganisms. The potential capacity to selectively stimulate the growth of intestinal bacteria associated with health shown by fraction A can be ascribed to its high inulin and low methylation degree pectin contents. PMID:25904284

  2. A study of the effect of dietary fiber fractions obtained from artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) on the growth of intestinal bacteria associated with health.

    PubMed

    Fissore, Eliana N; Santo Domingo, Cinthia; Gerschenson, Lía N; Giannuzzi, Leda

    2015-05-01

    The effect of different fractions enriched in soluble fiber obtained from artichoke using citric acid or citric acid/hemicellulase on the selective growth of Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11863 was evaluated. Gompertz modeling of Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 growth showed a higher specific growth rate (μ: 0.16 h(-1)) in the presence of fractions isolated from stems using hemicellulase (fraction A) than in the presence of glucose (μ: 0.09 h(-1)). In the case of Bifidobacterium bifidum 11863, the highest μ was obtained for the microorganism grown in the presence of fraction A and for the fraction isolated from stems without hemicellulase, their rate being twice that observed for glucose (0.04 h(-1)). The positive prebiotic activity scores observed with respect to Escherichia coli 25922 indicated that fibers assayed are metabolized as well as glucose by Lactobacillus plantarum 8114 and Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11863 and that they are selectively metabolized by these microorganisms. The potential capacity to selectively stimulate the growth of intestinal bacteria associated with health shown by fraction A can be ascribed to its high inulin and low methylation degree pectin contents.

  3. Biochemical and kinetic characterisation of a novel xylooligosaccharide-upregulated GH43 β-d-xylosidase/α-l-arabinofuranosidase (BXA43) from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12.

    PubMed

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Sørensen, Kim Ib; Gilad, Ofir; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Jacobsen, Susanne; Svensson, Birte

    2013-01-01

    The Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 gene BIF_00092, assigned to encode a β-d-xylosidase (BXA43) of glycoside hydrolase family 43 (GH43), was cloned with a C-terminal His-tag and expressed in Escherichia coli. BXA43 was purified to homogeneity from the cell lysate and found to be a dual-specificity exo-hydrolase active on para-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (pNPX), para-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside (pNPA), β-(1 → 4)-xylopyranosyl oligomers (XOS) of degree of polymerisation (DP) 2-4, and birchwood xylan. A phylogenetic tree of the 92 characterised GH43 enzymes displayed five distinct groups (I - V) showing specificity differences. BXA43 belonged to group IV and had an activity ratio for pNPA:pNPX of 1:25. BXA43 was stable below 40°C and at pH 4.0-8.0 and showed maximum activity at pH 5.5 and 50°C. Km and kcat for pNPX were 15.6 ± 4.2 mM and 60.6 ± 10.8 s-1, respectively, and substrate inhibition became apparent above 18 mM pNPX. Similar kinetic parameters and catalytic efficiency values were reported for β-d-xylosidase (XynB3) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T‒6 also belonging to group IV. The activity of BXA43 for xylooligosaccharides increased with the size and was 2.3 and 5.6 fold higher, respectively for xylobiose and xylotetraose compared to pNPX. BXA43 showed clearly metal inhibition for Zn2+ and Ag+, which is different to its close homologues. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modelling indicated that Arg505Tyr506 present in BXA43 are probably important for binding to xylotetraose at subsite +3 and occur only in GH43 from the Bifidobacterium genus. PMID:24025736

  4. In Vitro Fermentation of caprine milk oligosaccharides by bifidobacteria isolated from breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Thum, Caroline; Roy, Nicole C; McNabb, Warren C; Otter, Don E; Cookson, Adrian L

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the catabolism and fermentation of caprine milk oligosaccharides (CMO) by selected bifidobacteria isolated from 4 breast-fed infants. Seventeen bifidobacterial isolates consisting of 3 different species (Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum and Bifidobacterium bifidum) were investigated. A CMO-enriched fraction (CMOF) (50% oligosaccharides, 10% galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), 20% lactose, 10% glucose and 10% galactose) from caprine cheese whey was added to a growth medium as a sole source of fermentable carbohydrate. The inclusion of the CMOF was associated with increased bifidobacterial growth for all strains compared to glucose, lactose, GOS, inulin, oligofructose, 3'-sialyl-lactose and 6'-sialyl-lactose. Only one B. bifidum strain (AGR2166) was able to utilize the sialyl-CMO, 3'-sialyl-lactose and 6'-sialyl-lactose, as carbohydrate sources. The inclusion of CMOF increased the production of acetic and lactic acid (P < 0.001) after 36 h of anaerobic fermentation at 37 °C, when compared to other fermentable substrates. Two B. bifidum strains (AGR2166 and AGR2168) utilised CMO, contained in the CMOF, to a greater extent than B. breve or B. longum subsp longum isolates, and this increased CMO utilization was associated with enhanced sialidase activity. CMOF stimulated bifidobacterial growth when compared to other tested fermentable carbohydrates and also increased the consumption of mono- and disaccharides, such as galactose and lactose present in the CMOF. These findings indicate that the dietary consumption of CMO may stimulate the growth and metabolism of intestinal Bifidobacteria spp. including B. bifidum typically found in the large intestine of breast-fed infants.

  5. In Vitro Fermentation of caprine milk oligosaccharides by bifidobacteria isolated from breast-fed infants

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Caroline; Roy, Nicole C; McNabb, Warren C; Otter, Don E; Cookson, Adrian L

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the catabolism and fermentation of caprine milk oligosaccharides (CMO) by selected bifidobacteria isolated from 4 breast-fed infants. Seventeen bifidobacterial isolates consisting of 3 different species (Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum and Bifidobacterium bifidum) were investigated. A CMO-enriched fraction (CMOF) (50% oligosaccharides, 10% galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), 20% lactose, 10% glucose and 10% galactose) from caprine cheese whey was added to a growth medium as a sole source of fermentable carbohydrate. The inclusion of the CMOF was associated with increased bifidobacterial growth for all strains compared to glucose, lactose, GOS, inulin, oligofructose, 3'-sialyl-lactose and 6'-sialyl-lactose. Only one B. bifidum strain (AGR2166) was able to utilize the sialyl-CMO, 3'-sialyl-lactose and 6'-sialyl-lactose, as carbohydrate sources. The inclusion of CMOF increased the production of acetic and lactic acid (P < 0.001) after 36 h of anaerobic fermentation at 37°C, when compared to other fermentable substrates. Two B. bifidum strains (AGR2166 and AGR2168) utilised CMO, contained in the CMOF, to a greater extent than B. breve or B. longum subsp longum isolates, and this increased CMO utilization was associated with enhanced sialidase activity. CMOF stimulated bifidobacterial growth when compared to other tested fermentable carbohydrates and also increased the consumption of mono- and disaccharides, such as galactose and lactose present in the CMOF. These findings indicate that the dietary consumption of CMO may stimulate the growth and metabolism of intestinal Bifidobacteria spp. including B. bifidum typically found in the large intestine of breast-fed infants. PMID:26587678

  6. Construction of Bifidobacterium infantis as a live oral vaccine that expresses antigens of the major fimbrial subunit (CfaB) and the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB) from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongping; Luo, Yaolin; Huang, Xueping; Song, Fangzhou; Liu, Geli

    2012-02-01

    We sought to develop Bifidobacterium infantis (BI) as a vehicle for the expression of heterologous antigens. Two proteins of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) were expressed in BI: CfaB, a major fimbrial subunit protein, and LTB, the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin. The expression of CfaB and LTB in BI was verified by electrophoretic analysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were then subjected to intragastric immunization with BI-CfaB and BI-LTB systems both separately and together. ELISA was used to characterize the serum and mucosal immune responses against ETEC antigens. The immunized rats were intraperitoneally challenged with wild-type ETEC H10407 to study the immune response in vivo. The serum titres of IgG and faecal IgA antibodies in the BI-CfaB plus BI-LTB mixed vaccination group were significantly greater than those in the other two groups, which were immunized with a single vaccine (P<0.05). However, no significant difference was seen between the two groups that received a single immunization. These results suggest that expressing CfaB and LTB in BI provides a probiotic system with immunogenic properties. Furthermore, the expression of LTB in BI preserved its mucosal adjuvant effect. So this study confirms that BI can be used as a novel oral vaccine expression system for a heterologous antigen and BI-LTB can provide mucosal adjuvant properties. PMID:22053005

  7. Administration of Bifidobacterium breve PS12929 and Lactobacillus salivarius PS12934, Two Strains Isolated from Human Milk, to Very Low and Extremely Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Laura; de Andrés, Javier; Montes, María Teresa; Rodríguez, Juan M.; Sáenz de Pipaón, Miguel; Espinosa-Martos, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The preterm infant gut has been described as immature and colonized by an aberrant microbiota. Therefore, the use of probiotics is an attractive practice in hospitals to try to reduce morbidity and mortality in this population. The objective of this pilot study was to elucidate if administration of two probiotic strains isolated from human milk to preterm infants led to their presence in feces. In addition, the evolution of a wide spectrum of immunological compounds, including the inflammatory biomarker calprotectin, in both blood and fecal samples was also assessed. For this purpose, five preterm infants received two daily doses (~109 CFU) of a 1 : 1 mixture of Bifidobacterium breve PS12929 and Lactobacillus salivarius PS12934. Bacterial growth was detected by culture-dependent techniques in all the fecal samples. The phylum Firmicutes dominated in nearly all fecal samples while L. salivarius PS12934 was detected in all the infants at numerous sample collection points and B. breve PS12929 appeared in five fecal samples. Finally, a noticeable decrease in the fecal calprotectin levels was observed along time. PMID:25759843

  8. A Novel Lactobacillus casei LP1 Producing 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid, a Bifidogenic Growth Stimulator.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jo-Eun; Kim, Tae-Jung; Moon, Gi-Seong

    2015-03-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (DHNA) is a bifidogenic growth stimulator (BGS) and could be a functional food ingredient since bifidobacteria are beneficial for human health. For that reason, lactic acid bacteria producing DHNA have been screened. A lactic acid bacterium LP1 strain isolated from a natural cheese was confirmed to produce DHNA, analyzed by a HPLC method. The strain was identified as Lactobacillus casei by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The cell-free supernatant of fermented whey produced by L. casei LP1 presented the BGS activity for three bifidobacterial strains such as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis KCTC 3127, Bifidobacterium bifidum KCTC 3202, and Bifidobacterium breve KCTC 3220 which were human-originated. To the best of our knowledge, a L. casei strain which can produce DHNA was firstly identified in this study. PMID:25866754

  9. [Antibacterial effects of water-soluble low-molecular-weight chitosans on different microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, D V; Avdienko, I D; Bannikova, G E; Zueva, O Iu; Varlamov, V P

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight chitosans with a viscosity-average molecular weight (Mv) of 5 to 27 kDa and equal degree of deacetylation (DD, 85%) were highly active against Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Enterobacter agglomerans, Bacillus subtilis, and Bifidobacterium bifidum 791, causing death of 80 to 100% of cells. An exception to this tendency was Escherichia coli, for which the rate of cell death, induced by the 5-kDa chitosan, was 38%. The antibacterial effect was manifested as early as 10 min after incubation of 12-kDa chitosan with B. subtilis or E. coli cells. Candida krusei was almost insensitive to the above crab chitosans. However, Candida krusei was highly sensitive to chitosans with Mv 5, 6, 12, 15.7, and 27 kDa: the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) varied from 0.06 to 0.005%. Chitosans with M, 5, 12, and 15.7 kDa exerted an antibacterial effect on Staphylococcus aureus. Chitosans with Mv 5, 15.7, and 27 kDa had no effect on Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 14893. The antibacterial effect of the 4-kDa chitosan on E. coli and B. bifidum 791 increased with DD in the range 55-85%.

  10. Effect of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BB536 [corrected] in relieving clinical symptoms and modulating plasma cytokine levels of Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J Z; Kondo, S; Yanagisawa, N; Takahashi, N; Odamaki, T; Iwabuchi, N; Iwatsuki, K; Kokubo, S; Togashi, H; Enomoto, K; Enomoto, T

    2006-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms have been shown to be effective in the treatment of allergic inflammation and food allergy, but their efficacy remains controversial. This study tested the effect of a yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum BB536 in the treatment of Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis). Forty subjects with a clinical history of JCPsis were given yoghurt either containing BB536 (BB536 yoghurt) or without BB536 (placebo yoghurt) at 2 X 100 g per day for 14 weeks, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective symptoms and self-care measures were recorded daily and blood samples were taken before and during the intervention (at weeks 4, 9, and 14) to measure the blood parameter levels related to JCPsis. Yoghurt supplemented with BB536 significantly alleviated eye symptoms compared with placebo yoghurt (odds ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.97; p = 0.044). Although no statistically significant differences were detected, nasal symptoms such as itching, rhinorrhea, and blockage, as well as throat symptoms tended to be relieved with the BB536 yoghurt. BB536 tended to suppress the decreasing blood levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-y) and the increasing blood eosinophil rates; a significantly higher IFN-gamma level was observed for the difference from baseline at week 4. A decreased trend in the difference from baseline levels of JCP-specific IgE levels was also observed at week 4 in the BB536 group compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, these results suggest that intake of BB536-supplemented yoghurt may relieve JCPsis symptoms, probably through a modulating effect on Th balance.

  11. Fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 improves gastrointestinal well-being and digestive symptoms in women reporting minor digestive symptoms: a randomised, double-blind, parallel, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Guyonnet, Denis; Schlumberger, Armelle; Mhamdi, Leila; Jakob, Stefan; Chassany, Olivier

    2009-12-01

    The ability of probiotics to improve bowel habits or transit time has been shown in healthy populations. Additional data are required to support the use of specific probiotics to improve gastrointestinal (GI) well-being. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of consuming fermented milk (FM) on GI well-being, digestive symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) amongst women without diagnosed GI disorders. In this double-blind, controlled, parallel-design study, subjects were randomised to ingest daily either 2 x 125 g FM containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 and yoghurt strains or a control non-fermented dairy product for 4 weeks followed by a 4-week wash-out period. GI well-being and digestive symptoms were assessed weekly. HRQoL was measured every 4 weeks. Data were analysed using analysis of covariance and logistic regression, correcting for baseline values on the full analysis set population of 197 women (aged 18-60 years). The percentage of women reporting an improvement in their GI well-being was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the FM group v. the control group (OR 1.69; 95 % CI 1.17, 2.45). A significantly (P < 0.05) more pronounced decrease in the composite score of digestive symptoms was observed in the FM group when comparing with the control group (least squares mean - 0.57; 95 % CI - 1.12, - 0.02). Among HRQoL dimensions, the digestive comfort score was significantly (P < 0.05) improved in the FM group compared with the control group. The present study showed that the daily consumption of a specific FM is able to improve GI well-being and digestive symptoms in adult women without GI disorders. PMID:19622191

  12. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all P<0·05). Effects on defecation frequency were similar for the two doses tested, suggesting that a ceiling effect was reached with the one billion dose. Overall, 4 weeks' supplementation with the probiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385). PMID:26382580

  13. Impact of inulin and okara on Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 viability in a fermented soy product and probiotic survival under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Bedani, Raquel; Rossi, Elizeu Antonio; Isay Saad, Susana Marta

    2013-06-01

    The effect of inulin and/or okara flour on Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 viability in a fermented soy product (FSP) and on probiotic survival under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions were investigated throughout 28 days of storage at 4 °C. Employing a 2(2) design, four FSP trials were produced from soymilk fermented with ABT-4 culture (La-5, Bb-12, and Streptococcus thermophilus): FSP (control); FSP-I (with inulin, 3 g/100 mL of soymilk); FSP-O (with okara, 5 g/100 mL); FSP-IO (with inulin + okara, ratio 3:5 g/100 mL). Probiotic viabilities ranged from 8 to 9 log cfu/g during the 28 days of storage, and inulin and/or okara flour did not affect the viability of La-5 and Bb-12. Bb-12 resistance to the artificial gastrointestinal juices was higher than for La-5, since the Bb-12 and La-5 populations decreased approximately 0.6 log cfu/g and 3.8 log cfu/g, respectively, throughout storage period. Even though the protective effect of inulin and/or okara flour on probiotic microorganisms was not significant, when compared to a fresh culture, the FSP matrix improved Bb-12 survival on day 1 of storage and may be considered a good vehicle for Bb-12 and could play an important role in probiotic protection against gastrointestinal juices. PMID:23541206

  14. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Bifidobacterium BB12, and Lactobacillus casei DN001 modulate gene expression of subset specific transcription factors and cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of obese and overweight people.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Mitra; Shidfar, Farzad; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Mofid, Vahid; Hossein zadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad; Bidad, Katayoon; Najafi, Forouzan; Gheflati, Zahra; Chamari, Maryam; Salehi, Eisa

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are believed to have interaction with immune cells through sustained effects on gene expression of different cytokines and transcription factors. The present randomized doubled-blind controlled clinical trial was performed recruiting 75 individuals with BMI 25-35, who were randomly assigned to the following three groups: Group 1 (n = 25) who consumed regular yogurt as part of a low calorie diet [RLCD], group 2 (n = 25) who received probiotic yogurt with a LCD [PLCD] and group 3 (n = 25) who consumed probiotic yogurt without LCD [PWLCD] for 8 week. Participants in PLCD and PWLCD groups received 200 g/day yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5, Bifidobacterium Bb12, and lactobacillus casei DN001 10(8) cfu/gr. The expression of the FOXP3, T-bet, GATA3, TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β, and ROR-γt in PBMCs genes were assessed, before and after intervention. In three groups, ROR-γt expression was reduced (P = 0.007) and FOXP3 was increased (P < 0.001). The expression of TNFα, TGFβ, and GATA3 genes did not change among all groups after intervention. Interestingly, the expression of T-bet gene, which was significantly decreased in PLCD and PWLCD groups (P < 0.001), whereas gene expression of IFN-γ decreased in all three groups. Our results suggest that weight loss diet and probiotic yogurt had synergistic effects on T-cell subset specific gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells among overweight and obese individuals. PMID:24019207

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 induce different age-related metabolic profiles revealed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy in urine and feces of mice.

    PubMed

    Brasili, Elisa; Mengheri, Elena; Tomassini, Alberta; Capuani, Giorgio; Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Sciubba, Fabio; Marini, Federico; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    Age-related dysbioses of intestinal microbiota and decline in the overall metabolic homeostasis are frequently found in the elderly. Probiotic supplementation may represent a way to prevent or reduce the senescence-associated metabolic disorders. The present study evaluated the metabolic impact of Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 supplementation in relation to age by analyzing urine and feces metabolic profiles using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis. Adult (3 mo old) and aged (16 mo old) mice received an oral supplementation of the 2 probiotics (1 × 10(9) colony-forming units/d each) or phosphate buffered saline (control) daily for 30 d. Urine and feces were collected for 48 h before the end of the study. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis showed that the urinary discriminant metabolites for the probiotic treatment included higher dimethylglycine in adult and aged mice, lower sarcosine and nicotinate in adult mice, higher N-methylnicotinamide in adult mice and lower N-methylnicotinamide in aged mice compared with their controls. These results indicate a probiotic-induced modulation of homocysteine and NAD metabolism pathways, which have important implications because these pathways are involved in essential cellular processes that can be altered in senescence. The probiotic supplementation also modified the fecal metabolic profiles, inducing in both adult and aged mice higher 4-hydroxyphenylacetate and lower xylose in treated mice compared with their control mice, whereas valerate was greater in treated adult mice and lower in treated aged mice compared with their controls. The ANOVA simultaneous component analysis on urinary and fecal metabolic profiling showed an age × treatment interaction (P < 0.05), confirming the age-related modulation of the metabolic response to probiotic supplementation. The results suggest that L. acidophilus and B. lactis may prevent or reduce age

  16. Fermentation of glucose, lactose, galactose, mannitol, and xylose by bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Stouthamer, A H

    1968-08-01

    For six strains of Bifidobacterium bifidum (Lactobacillus bifidus), fermentation balances of glucose, lactose, galactose, mannitol, and xylose were determined. Products formed were acetate, l(+)-lactate, ethyl alcohol, and formate. l(+)-Lactate dehydrogenase of all strains studied was found to have an absolute requirement for fructose-1,6-diphosphate. The phosphoroclastic enzyme could not be demonstrated in cell-free extracts. Cell suspensions fermented pyruvate to equimolar amounts of acetate and formate. Alcohol dehydrogenase was shown in cell-free extracts. Possible explanations have been suggested for the differences in fermentation balances found for different strains and carbon sources. By enzyme determinations, it was shown that bifidobacteria convert mannitol to fructose-6-phosphate by an inducible polyol dehydrogenase and fructokinase. For one strain of B. bifidum, molar growth yields of glucose, lactose, galactose, and mannitol were determined. The mean value of Y (ATP), calculated from molar growth yields and fermentation balances, was 11.3.

  17. Xylo-oligosaccharides alone or in synbiotic combination with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis induce bifidogenesis and modulate markers of immune function in healthy adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, factorial cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Childs, Caroline E; Röytiö, Henna; Alhoniemi, Esa; Fekete, Agnes A; Forssten, Sofia D; Hudjec, Natasa; Lim, Ying Ni; Steger, Cara J; Yaqoob, Parveen; Tuohy, Kieran M; Rastall, Robert A; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Gibson, Glenn R

    2014-06-14

    Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics are dietary ingredients with the potential to influence health and mucosal and systemic immune function by altering the composition of the gut microbiota. In the present study, a candidate prebiotic (xylo-oligosaccharide, XOS, 8 g/d), probiotic (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07, 109 colony-forming units (CFU)/d) or synbiotic (8 g XOS+109 CFU Bi-07/d) was given to healthy adults (25-65 years) for 21 d. The aim was to identify the effect of the supplements on bowel habits, self-reported mood, composition of the gut microbiota, blood lipid concentrations and immune function. XOS supplementation increased mean bowel movements per d (P= 0·009), but did not alter the symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain or flatulence or the incidence of any reported adverse events compared with maltodextrin supplementation. XOS supplementation significantly increased participant-reported vitality (P= 0·003) and happiness (P= 0·034). Lowest reported use of analgesics was observed during the XOS+Bi-07 supplementation period (P= 0·004). XOS supplementation significantly increased faecal bifidobacterial counts (P= 0·008) and fasting plasma HDL concentrations (P= 0·005). Bi-07 supplementation significantly increased faecal B. lactis content (P= 0·007), lowered lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-4 secretion in whole-blood cultures (P= 0·035) and salivary IgA content (P= 0·040) and increased IL-6 secretion (P= 0·009). XOS supplementation resulted in lower expression of CD16/56 on natural killer T cells (P= 0·027) and lower IL-10 secretion (P= 0·049), while XOS and Bi-07 supplementation reduced the expression of CD19 on B cells (XOS × Bi-07, P= 0·009). The present study demonstrates that XOS induce bifidogenesis, improve aspects of the plasma lipid profile and modulate the markers of immune function in healthy adults. The provision of XOS+Bi-07 as a synbiotic may confer further benefits due to the discrete effects of Bi-07 on the gut

  18. Effect of Infant Formula Containing a Low Dose of the Probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-3446 on Immune and Gut Functions in C-Section Delivered Babies: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Baglatzi, L.; Gavrili, S.; Stamouli, K.; Zachaki, S.; Favre, L.; Pecquet, S.; Benyacoub, J.; Costalos, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the absence of breast-feeding and its immunomodulatory factors, supplementation of starter infant formula (IF) with probiotics is currently used to support immune functions and gut development. AIM To assess whether immune-related beneficial effects of regular dose (107 CFU/g of powder) of the probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-3446 (hereafter named B. lactis) in starter IF supplementation can be maintained with starter IF containing a low dose (104 CFU/g of powder) of B. lactis. METHOD This trial was designed as a pilot, prospective, double-blind, randomized, single-center clinical trial of two parallel groups (n = 77 infants/group) of C-section delivered infants receiving a starter IF containing either low dose or regular dose of the probiotic B. lactis from birth to six months of age. In addition, a reference group of infants breast-fed for a minimum of four months (n = 44 infants), also born by C-section, were included. All groups were then provided follow-up formula without B. lactis up to 12 months of age. Occurrence of diarrhea, immune and gut maturation, responses to vaccinations, and growth were assessed from birth to 12 months. The effect of low-dose B. lactis formula was compared to regular-dose B. lactis formula, considered as reference for IF with probiotics, and both were further compared to breast-feeding as a physiological reference. RESULTS Data showed that feeding low-dose B. lactis IF provides similar effects as feeding regular-dose B. lactis IF or breast milk. No consistent statistical differences regarding early life protection against gastrointestinal infections, immune and gut maturation, microbiota establishment, and growth were observed between randomized formula-fed groups as well as with the breast-fed reference group. CONCLUSION This pilot study suggests that supplementing C-section born neonates with low-dose B. lactis-containing starter formula may impact immune as well as gut maturation similarly to regular-dose B

  19. A Phytase-Based Reporter System for Identification of Functional Secretion Signals in Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Osswald, Annika; Westermann, Christina; Sun, Zhongke; Riedel, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Health-promoting effects have been attributed to a number of Bifidobacterium sp. strains. These effects as well as the ability to colonise the host depend on secreted proteins. Moreover, rational design of protein secretion systems bears the potential for the generation of novel probiotic bifidobacteria with improved health-promoting or therapeutic properties. To date, there is only very limited data on secretion signals of bifidobacteria available. Using in silico analysis, we demonstrate that all bifidobacteria encode the major components of Sec-dependent secretion machineries but only B. longum strains harbour Tat protein translocation systems. A reporter plasmid for secretion signals in bifidobacteria was established by fusing the coding sequence of the signal peptide of a sialidase of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17 to the phytase gene appA of E. coli. The recombinant strain showed increased phytase activity in spent culture supernatants and reduced phytase levels in crude extracts compared to the control indicating efficient phytase secretion. The reporter plasmid was used to screen seven predicted signal peptides in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum E18. The tested signal peptides differed substantially in their efficacy to mediate protein secretion in different host strains. An efficient signal peptide was used for expression and secretion of a therapeutically relevant protein in B. bifidum S17. Expression of a secreted cytosine deaminase led to a 100-fold reduced sensitivity of B. bifidum S17 to 5-fluorocytosine compared to the non-secreted cytosine deaminase suggesting efficient conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to the cytotoxic cancer drug 5-fluorouracil by cytosine deaminase occurred outside the bacterial cell. Selection of appropriate signal peptides for defined protein secretion might improve therapeutic efficacy as well as probiotic properties of bifidobacteria. PMID:26086721

  20. Comparison of mupirocin-based media for selective enumeration of bifidobacteria in probiotic supplements.

    PubMed

    Bunesova, Vera; Musilova, Sarka; Geigerova, Martina; Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech

    2015-02-01

    An international standard already exists for the selective enumeration of bifidobacteria in milk products. This standard uses Transgalactosylated oligosaccharides (TOS) propionate agar supplemented with mupirocin. However, no such standard method has been described for the selective enumeration of bifidobacteria in probiotic supplements, where the presence of bifidobacteria is much more variable than in milk products. Therefore, we enumerated bifidobacteria by colony count technique in 13 probiotic supplements using three media supplemented with mupirocin (Mup; 100mg/l): TOS, Bifidobacteria selective medium (BSM) and modified Wilkins-Chalgren anaerobe agar with soya peptone (WSP). Moreover, the potential growth of bifidobacterial strains often used in probiotic products was performed in these media. All 13 products contained members of the genus Bifidobacterium, and tested mupirocin media were found to be fully selective for bifidobacteria. However, the type strain Bifidobacterium bifidum DSM 20456 and collection strain B. bifidum DSM 20239 showed statistically significant lower counts on TOS Mup media, compared to BSM Mup and WSP Mup media. Therefore, the TOS Mup medium recommended by the ISO standard cannot be regarded as a fully selective and suitable medium for the genus Bifidobacterium. In contrast, the BSM Mup and WSP Mup media supported the growth of all bifidobacterial species.

  1. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27536282

  2. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27536282

  3. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs.

  4. A randomised controlled trial of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve BBG-001 in preterm babies to prevent sepsis, necrotising enterocolitis and death: the Probiotics in Preterm infantS (PiPS) trial.

    PubMed Central

    Costeloe, Kate; Bowler, Ursula; Brocklehurst, Peter; Hardy, Pollyanna; Heal, Paul; Juszczak, Edmund; King, Andy; Panton, Nicola; Stacey, Fiona; Whiley, Angela; Wilks, Mark; Millar, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and late-onset sepsis remain important causes of death and morbidity in preterm babies. Probiotic administration might strengthen intestinal barrier function and provide protection; this is supported by published meta-analyses, but there is a lack of large well-designed trials. OBJECTIVE To test the use of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve strain BBG-001 to prevent NEC, late-onset sepsis and death in preterm babies while monitoring probiotic colonisation of participants. DESIGN Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. SETTING Recruitment was carried out in 24 hospitals, and the randomisation programme used a minimisation algorithm. Parents, clinicians and outcome assessors were blinded to the allocation. PARTICIPANTS Babies born between 23 and 30 weeks' gestation and randomised within 48 hours of birth. Exclusions included life-threatening or any gastrointestinal malformation detected within 48 hours of birth and no realistic chance of survival. INTERVENTIONS Active intervention: 1 ml of B. breve BBG-001 in one-eighth-strength infant formula Neocate(®) (Nutricia Ltd, Trowbridge, UK), (6.7 × 10(7) to 6.7 × 10(9) colony-forming units) per dose administered enterally. Placebo: 1 ml of one-eighth-strength infant formula Neocate. Started as soon as practicable and continued daily until 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Primary outcomes were an episode of bloodstream infection, with any organism other than a skin commensal, in any baby between 72 hours and 46 weeks' postmenstrual age; an episode of NEC Bell stage ≥ 2 in any baby; and death before discharge from hospital. Secondary outcomes included stool colonisation with B. breve. RESULTS In total, 654 babies were allocated to receive probiotic and 661 to receive placebo over 37 months from July 2010. Five babies were withdrawn; 650 babies from the probiotic group and 660 from the placebo group were included in the primary analysis

  5. Benzoic Acid Production with Respect to Starter Culture and Incubation Temperature during Yogurt Fermentation using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Jeon, Hye-Lin; Eom, Su Jin; Yoo, Mi-Young; Lim, Sang-Dong; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acid is occasionally used as a raw material supplement in food products and is sometimes generated during the fermentation process. In this study, the production of naturally occurring yogurt preservatives was investigated for various starter cultures and incubation temperatures, and considered food regulations. Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium lactis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Bifidobacterium breve were used as yogurt starter cultures in commercial starters. Among these strains, L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei showed the highest production of benzoic acid. Therefore, the use of L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, S. thermophilus, and different incubation temperatures were examined to optimize benzoic acid production. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a central composite design was performed for various incubation temperatures (35-44℃) and starter culture inoculum ratios (0-0.04%) in a commercial range of dairy fermentation processes. The optimum conditions were 0.04% L. rhamnosus, 0.01% L. paracasei, 0.02% S. thermophilus, and 38.12℃, and the predicted and estimated concentrations of benzoic acid were 13.31 and 13.94 mg/kg, respectively. These conditions maximized naturally occurring benzoic acid production during the yogurt fermentation process, and the observed production levels satisfied regulatory guidelines for benzoic acid in dairy products. PMID:27433115

  6. Benzoic Acid Production with Respect to Starter Culture and Incubation Temperature during Yogurt Fermentation using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Mi-Young; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acid is occasionally used as a raw material supplement in food products and is sometimes generated during the fermentation process. In this study, the production of naturally occurring yogurt preservatives was investigated for various starter cultures and incubation temperatures, and considered food regulations. Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium lactis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Bifidobacterium breve were used as yogurt starter cultures in commercial starters. Among these strains, L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei showed the highest production of benzoic acid. Therefore, the use of L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, S. thermophilus, and different incubation temperatures were examined to optimize benzoic acid production. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a central composite design was performed for various incubation temperatures (35-44℃) and starter culture inoculum ratios (0-0.04%) in a commercial range of dairy fermentation processes. The optimum conditions were 0.04% L. rhamnosus, 0.01% L. paracasei, 0.02% S. thermophilus, and 38.12℃, and the predicted and estimated concentrations of benzoic acid were 13.31 and 13.94 mg/kg, respectively. These conditions maximized naturally occurring benzoic acid production during the yogurt fermentation process, and the observed production levels satisfied regulatory guidelines for benzoic acid in dairy products. PMID:27433115

  7. Growth and Survival of Some Probiotic Strains in Simulated Ice Cream Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayouni, A.; Ehsani, M. R.; Azizi, A.; Razavi, S. H.; Yarmand, M. S.

    A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) experiment was applied in triplicates to evaluate the survival of four probiotic strains in simulated ice cream conditions. The growth and survival rate of these probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum) in varying amount of sucrose (10, 15, 20 and 25%), oxygen scavenging components (0.05% L-cysteine and 0.05% L-ascorbate) and temperatures (4 and -20°C) during different periods of time (1, 2 and 3 months) were evaluated in MRS-broth medium. Optical density at 580 nm was used to measure growth. Lactobacilli strains proved to be highly resistant in comparison with Biffidobacteria strains. The viable cell number of Lactobacillus casei in different sucrose concentrations, different oxidoreduction potentials and refrigeration temperature was 1x1010, 2x108 and 5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively. Growth and survival rate of Lactobacillus casei showed to be the highest.

  8. Mother-to-Infant Transmission of Intestinal Bifidobacterial Strains Has an Impact on the Early Development of Vaginally Delivered Infant's Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Hiroshi; Kushiro, Akira; Ishikawa, Eiji; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Gawad, Agata; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Martin, Rocio; Ben-Amor, Kaouther; Knol, Jan; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Bifidobacterium species are one of the major components of the infant's intestine microbiota. Colonization with bifidobacteria in early infancy is suggested to be important for health in later life. However, information remains limited regarding the source of these microbes. Here, we investigated whether specific strains of bifidobacteria in the maternal intestinal flora are transmitted to their infant's intestine. Materials and Methods Fecal samples were collected from healthy 17 mother and infant pairs (Vaginal delivery: 12; Cesarean section delivery: 5). Mother's feces were collected twice before delivery. Infant's feces were collected at 0 (meconium), 3, 7, 30, 90 days after birth. Bifidobacteria isolated from feces were genotyped by multilocus sequencing typing, and the transitions of bifidobacteria counts in infant's feces were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Stains belonging to Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, were identified to be monophyletic between mother's and infant's intestine. Eleven out of 12 vaginal delivered infants carried at least one monophyletic strain. The bifidobacterial counts of the species to which the monophyletic strains belong, increased predominantly in the infant's intestine within 3 days after birth. Among infants delivered by C-section, monophyletic strains were not observed. Moreover, the bifidobacterial counts were significantly lower than the vaginal delivered infants until 7 days of age. Conclusions Among infants born vaginally, several Bifidobacterium strains transmit from the mother and colonize the infant's intestine shortly after birth. Our data suggest that the mother's intestine is an important source for the vaginal delivered infant's intestinal microbiota. PMID:24244304

  9. Comparative determination of two probiotics by QCM and OWLS-based immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Szalontai, Helga; Adányi, Nóra; Kiss, Attila

    2014-09-25

    The regular consumption of foods containing probiotic bacteria has beneficial physiological effects on the health and the digestion system. There is a need for novel analytical approaches for the determination of these bacteria that are faster than the classical plate counting method. For this purpose, two label-free biosensors were investigated and presented in this paper: Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) and Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS) based direct immunosensors were developed for real-time direct detection of probiotic bacteria in fermented dairy products. Bifidobacterium bifidum O1356 and Lactobacillus acidophilus O1132 were detected by polyclonal anti-B. bifidum IgG and anti-L. acidophilus IgG immobilized on the sensors' surface. Sulfo-LC-SPDP cross linking agent was used to bind antibodies to the gold surface of the QCM's AT-cut quartz wafer. Concerning OWLS, antibodies were covalently bound to the amino groups of the silanized surface of the waveguide by glutaraldehyde. The dynamic measuring range was found between 1.0E+3 and 5.0E+5CFUmL(-1) in 100 fold diluted fermented milk products by QCM and with OWLS. Considering the current legislation of the probiotic content in probiotic products, the two developed immunosensors can be applied for rapid quantification of L. acidophilus and B. bifidum in fermented milk. These examinations offer effective alternatives to the microbiological plate counting method. PMID:24768869

  10. Isolation of Bifidobacteria from Breast Milk and Assessment of the Bifidobacterial Population by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Quantitative Real-Time PCR ▿

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rocío; Jiménez, Esther; Heilig, Hans; Fernández, Leonides; Marín, María L.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Rodríguez, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to elucidate if breast milk contains bifidobacteria and whether they can be transmitted to the infant gut through breastfeeding. Twenty-three women and their respective infants provided samples of breast milk and feces, respectively, at days 4 to 7 after birth. Gram-positive and catalase-negative isolates from specific media with typical bifidobacterial shapes were identified to the genus level by F6PPK (fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase) assays and to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bifidobacterial communities in breast milk were assessed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and their levels were estimated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRTi-PCR). Bifidobacteria were present in 8 milk samples and 21 fecal samples. Bifidobacterium breve, B. adolescentis, and B. bifidum were isolated from milk samples, while infant feces also contained B. longum and B. pseudocatenulatum. PCR-DGGE revealed the presence of one to four dominant bifidobacterial bands in 22 milk samples. Sequences with similarities above 98% were identified as Bifidobacterium breve, B. adolescentis, B. longum, B. bifidum, and B. dentium. Bifidobacterial DNA was detected by qRTi-PCR in the same 22 milk samples at a range between 40 and 10,000 16S rRNA gene copies per ml. In conclusion, human milk seems to be a source of living bifidobacteria for the infant gut. PMID:19088308

  11. Bifidobacteria isolated from infants and cultured on human milk oligosaccharides affect intestinal epithelial function

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; De Lartigue, Guillaume; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are the third most abundant component of breast milk. Our laboratory has previously revealed gene clusters specifically linked to HMO metabolism in select bifidobacteria isolated from fecal samples of infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that growth of select bifidobacteria on HMO stimulates the intestinal epithelium. Methods Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were incubated with lactose (LAC) or HMO-grown Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) or B. bifidum. Bacterial adhesion and translocation was measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and tight junction proteins was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase. Distribution of tight junction proteins was measured using immunofluorescent microscopy. Results We showed that HMO-grown B. infantis had significantly higher rate of adhesion to HT-29 cells compared to B. bifidum. B. infantis also induced expression of a cell membrane glycoprotein, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand -1. Both B. infantis and B. bifidum grown on HMO caused less occludin relocalization and higher expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10 compared to LAC-grown bacteria in Caco-2 cells. B. bifidum grown on HMO showed higher expression of junctional adhesion molecule and occludin in Caco-2 cell and HT-29 cells. There were no significant differences between LAC or HMO treatments in bacterial translocation. Conclusions This study provides evidence for the specific relationship between HMO-grown bifidobacteria and intestinal epithelial cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMO-induced changes in the bifidobacteria-intestinal cells interaction. PMID:22383026

  12. Comparison of the Compositions of the Stool Microbiotas of Infants Fed Goat Milk Formula, Cow Milk-Based Formula, or Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Gowri Pathmanathan, Siva; Zhou, Shao J.; Makrides, Maria; Gibson, Robert A.; Sullivan, Thomas; Prosser, Colin G.; Lowry, Dianne; Hodgkinson, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the compositions of the fecal microbiotas of infants fed goat milk formula to those of infants fed cow milk formula or breast milk as the gold standard. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences was used in the analysis of the microbiotas in stool samples collected from 90 Australian babies (30 in each group) at 2 months of age. Beta-diversity analysis of total microbiota sequences and Lachnospiraceae sequences revealed that they were more similar in breast milk/goat milk comparisons than in breast milk/cow milk comparisons. The Lachnospiraceae were mostly restricted to a single species (Ruminococcus gnavus) in breast milk-fed and goat milk-fed babies compared to a more diverse collection in cow milk-fed babies. Bifidobacteriaceae were abundant in the microbiotas of infants in all three groups. Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most commonly detected bifidobacterial species. A semiquantitative PCR method was devised to differentiate between B. longum subsp. longum and B. longum subsp. infantis and was used to test stool samples. B. longum subsp. infantis was seldom present in stools, even of breast milk-fed babies. The presence of B. bifidum in the stools of breast milk-fed infants at abundances greater than 10% of the total microbiota was associated with the highest total abundances of Bifidobacteriaceae. When Bifidobacteriaceae abundance was low, Lachnospiraceae abundances were greater. New information about the composition of the fecal microbiota when goat milk formula is used in infant nutrition was thus obtained. PMID:23455335

  13. Comparison of the compositions of the stool microbiotas of infants fed goat milk formula, cow milk-based formula, or breast milk.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Gowri Pathmanathan, Siva; Zhou, Shao J; Makrides, Maria; Gibson, Robert A; Sullivan, Thomas; Prosser, Colin G; Lowry, Dianne; Hodgkinson, Alison J

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the compositions of the fecal microbiotas of infants fed goat milk formula to those of infants fed cow milk formula or breast milk as the gold standard. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences was used in the analysis of the microbiotas in stool samples collected from 90 Australian babies (30 in each group) at 2 months of age. Beta-diversity analysis of total microbiota sequences and Lachnospiraceae sequences revealed that they were more similar in breast milk/goat milk comparisons than in breast milk/cow milk comparisons. The Lachnospiraceae were mostly restricted to a single species (Ruminococcus gnavus) in breast milk-fed and goat milk-fed babies compared to a more diverse collection in cow milk-fed babies. Bifidobacteriaceae were abundant in the microbiotas of infants in all three groups. Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most commonly detected bifidobacterial species. A semiquantitative PCR method was devised to differentiate between B. longum subsp. longum and B. longum subsp. infantis and was used to test stool samples. B. longum subsp. infantis was seldom present in stools, even of breast milk-fed babies. The presence of B. bifidum in the stools of breast milk-fed infants at abundances greater than 10% of the total microbiota was associated with the highest total abundances of Bifidobacteriaceae. When Bifidobacteriaceae abundance was low, Lachnospiraceae abundances were greater. New information about the composition of the fecal microbiota when goat milk formula is used in infant nutrition was thus obtained.

  14. Hypolipidemic effects of lactic acid bacteria fermented cereal in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objectives of the present study were to investigate the efficacy of the mixed culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus (DSM 20242), Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082) and Lactobacillus helveticus (CK60) in the fermentation of maize and the evaluation of the effect of the fermented meal on the lipid profile of rats. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups and each group placed on a Diet A (high fat diet into which a maize meal fermented with a mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242), B bifidum (DSM 20082) and Lb helveticus (CK 60) was incorporated), B (unfermented high fat diet) or C (commercial rat chow) respectively after the first group of 7 rats randomly selected were sacrificed to obtain the baseline data. Thereafter 7 rats each from the experimental and control groups were sacrificed weekly for 4 weeks and the plasma, erythrocytes, lipoproteins and organs of the rats were assessed for cholesterol, triglyceride and phospholipids. Results Our results revealed that the mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242), B bifidum (DSM 20082) and Lb helveticus (CK 60) were able to grow and ferment maize meal into ‘ogi’ of acceptable flavour. In addition to plasma and hepatic hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia, phospholipidosis in plasma, as well as cholesterogenesis, triglyceride constipation and phospholipidosis in extra-hepatic tissues characterized the consumption of unfermented hyperlipidemic diets. However, feeding the animals with the fermented maize diet reversed the dyslipidemia. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that consumption of mixed culture lactic acid bacteria (Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242), Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082) and Lb helveticus (CK 60) fermented food results in the inhibition of fat absorption. It also inhibits the activity of HMG CoA reductase. This inhibition may be by feedback inhibition or repression of the transcription of the gene encoding the enzyme via activation of the sterol

  15. Effects of probiotic supplementation over 5 months on routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures in healthy active adults.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; West, N P; Horn, P L; Lehtinen, M J; Koerbin, G; Pyne, D B; Lahtinen, S J; Fricker, P A; Cripps, A W

    2014-11-01

    Use of probiotic-containing foods and probiotic supplements is increasing; however, few studies document safety and tolerability in conjunction with defined clinical end points. This paper reports the effects of 150 days of supplementation with either a single- (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04) or a double-strain (Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07) probiotic on routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures in healthy active adults. Pre- to post-intervention changes in laboratory measures were determined and compared between supplement and placebo groups. Overall there were few differences in routine haematology and clinical chemistry measures between supplement and placebo groups post-intervention. Exceptions included plasma calcium (P=0.03) and urea (P=0.015); however, observed changes were small and within assay-specific laboratory reference ranges. These data provide evidence supporting the use of these probiotic supplements over a period of 5 months in healthy active adults without obvious safety or tolerability issues.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Commercially Available Freeze Dried Powdered Probiotics on Mutans Streptococci Count: A Randomized, Double Blind, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anup; Ganta, Shravani; Sidiq, Mohsin; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti; Acharya, Siddharth; Singh, Kushpal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Probiotic approaches are being considered to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms and are an alternative and promising way to combat infections by using harmless bacteria to displace pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of commercially available freeze dried powdered probiotics on mutans streptococci count among 12–15 year-old Indian schoolchildren. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two phases of in-vitro (phase I) and in-vivo (phase II) study, which was a double blind, randomized and placebo controlled clinical trial. A total of 33 schoolchildren between 12–15 years were included in the study. They were randomly allocated to three groups. Group A included 11 children using freeze dried Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium lactis. Group B included 11 children using freeze dried lactic acid bacillus only. Group C included 11 children using placebo powder. The study was conducted over a period of three weeks and examination and sampling of the subjects were done on days 0 (baseline), seven, 14 and 21. Results: For both the intervention groups A and B, statistically significant reduction (P<0.05) in salivary mutans streptococci counts was recorded up to the second week. Conclusion: Oral administration of probiotics showed a short-term effect on reduction of mutans streptococci count and showed a preventive role in caries development. PMID:27252756

  17. Effect of grape polyphenols on lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria growth: resistance and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tabasco, Raquel; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Monagas, María; Bartolomé, Begoña; Victoria Moreno-Arribas, M; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa

    2011-10-01

    Food polyphenols are able to selectively modify the growth of susceptible micro-organisms. This study describes the effect of a flavan-3-ol enriched grape seed extract (GSE) on the growth of several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria and the ability of the resistant strains to metabolize these compounds. Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus vaginalis strains showed a remarkable sensitivity to the phenolic extracts assayed, including a GSE fraction consisting mainly in (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (GSE-M). On the other hand, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus strains reached maximal growth with the GSE fractions, including a rich-oligomeric (GSE-O) fraction. Within bifidobacteria, Bifidobacterium lactis BB12 showed the highest sensitivity to the phenolic extracts assayed, whereas Bifidobacterium breve 26M2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum HDD541 reached maximum growth in presence of GSE-O and GSE-M fractions. Metabolism of flavan-3-ols by LAB and bifidobacteria resistant strains was investigated in vitro. The results revealed that only L. plantarum IFPL935 was able to metabolize the polyphenols studied by means of galloyl-esterase, decarboxylase and benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities that led to the formation of gallic acid, pyrogallol and catechol, respectively. An unknown metabolite that does not exhibit a phenolic-acid-type structure was also detected, which suggests a new enzyme activity in L. plantarum IFPL935 able to degrade flavan-3-ol monomers. PMID:21839384

  18. Polysaccharide from seeds of Plantago asiatica L. affects lipid metabolism and colon microbiota of mouse.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Wu, Qi-Meng; Li, Chang; Fu, Zhi-Hong; Gong, Joshua; Cui, Steve W; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. was given via oral administration to mice (0.4 g/kg body weight, 30 days) to observe its effects on mouse nutrient metabolism and colon microbiota. It was found the polysaccharide intake could lower the apparent absorption of lipid. Total triglyceride, cholesterol, and atherogenic index in blood serum with total lipid and cholesterol levels in liver of polysaccharide group mice were all significantly lower than those of the control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the effect of the polysaccharide intake on mouse colon bacterial communities was investigated. Mice from the polysaccharide group showed a higher colon bacterial diversity than the control group. Bacteroides sp., Eubacterium sp., butyrate-producing bacteria Butyrivibrio sp., and probiotics Bifidobacterium bifidum , Lactobacillus fermentum , and Lactobacillus reuteri in mouse colon were all increased after polysaccharide intake. These indicated that the intake of polysaccharide from P. asiatica L. could be beneficial for lipid metabolism and colon microbiota. PMID:24341731

  19. Molecular properties and prebiotic effect of inulin obtained from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    López-Molina, Dorotea; Navarro-Martínez, María Dolores; Rojas Melgarejo, Francisco; Hiner, Alexander N P; Chazarra, Soledad; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2005-06-01

    A high molecular weight inulin has been prepared from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) agroindustrial wastes using environmentally benign aqueous extraction procedures. Physico-chemical analysis of the properties of artichoke inulin was carried out. Its average degree of polymerization was 46, which is higher than for Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, and dahlia inulins. GC-MS confirmed that the main constituent monosaccharide in artichoke inulin was fructose and its degradation by inulinase indicated that it contained the expected beta-2,1-fructan bonds. The FT-IR spectrum was identical to that of chicory inulin. These data indicate that artichoke inulin will be suitable for use in a wide range of food applications. The health-promoting prebiotic effects of artichoke inulin were demonstrated in an extensive microbiological study showing a long lasting bifidogenic effect on Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 cultures and also in mixed cultures of colonic bacteria.

  20. Probiotics for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of C. difficile Infections: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lynne V

    2015-04-13

    Clostridium difficile infections are a global clinical concern and are one of the leading causes of nosocomial outbreaks. Preventing these infections has benefited from multidisciplinary infection control strategies and new antibiotics, but the problem persists. Probiotics are effective in preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and may also be a beneficial strategy for C. difficile infections, but randomized controlled trials are scarce. This meta-analysis pools 21 randomized, controlled trials for primary prevention of C. difficile infections (CDI) and four trials for secondary prevention of C. difficile recurrences and assesses the efficacy of specific probiotic strains. Four probiotics significantly improved primary CDI prevention: (Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus casei DN114001, a mixture of L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, and a mixture of L. acidophilus, L. casei and L. rhamnosus). None of the tested probiotics significantly improved secondary prevention of CDI. More confirmatory randomized trials are needed to establish if probiotics are useful for preventing C. difficile infections. v.

  1. Molecular properties and prebiotic effect of inulin obtained from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    López-Molina, Dorotea; Navarro-Martínez, María Dolores; Rojas Melgarejo, Francisco; Hiner, Alexander N P; Chazarra, Soledad; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2005-06-01

    A high molecular weight inulin has been prepared from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) agroindustrial wastes using environmentally benign aqueous extraction procedures. Physico-chemical analysis of the properties of artichoke inulin was carried out. Its average degree of polymerization was 46, which is higher than for Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, and dahlia inulins. GC-MS confirmed that the main constituent monosaccharide in artichoke inulin was fructose and its degradation by inulinase indicated that it contained the expected beta-2,1-fructan bonds. The FT-IR spectrum was identical to that of chicory inulin. These data indicate that artichoke inulin will be suitable for use in a wide range of food applications. The health-promoting prebiotic effects of artichoke inulin were demonstrated in an extensive microbiological study showing a long lasting bifidogenic effect on Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521 cultures and also in mixed cultures of colonic bacteria. PMID:15960982

  2. Probiotics for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of C. difficile Infections: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne V.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are a global clinical concern and are one of the leading causes of nosocomial outbreaks. Preventing these infections has benefited from multidisciplinary infection control strategies and new antibiotics, but the problem persists. Probiotics are effective in preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and may also be a beneficial strategy for C. difficile infections, but randomized controlled trials are scarce. This meta-analysis pools 21 randomized, controlled trials for primary prevention of C. difficile infections (CDI) and four trials for secondary prevention of C. difficile recurrences and assesses the efficacy of specific probiotic strains. Four probiotics significantly improved primary CDI prevention: (Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus casei DN114001, a mixture of L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, and a mixture of L. acidophilus, L. casei and L. rhamnosus). None of the tested probiotics significantly improved secondary prevention of CDI. More confirmatory randomized trials are needed to establish if probiotics are useful for preventing C. difficile infections. PMID:27025619

  3. Effect of sequential bio-processing conditions on the content and composition of vitamin K2 and isoflavones in fermented soy food.

    PubMed

    Puri, Alka; Mir, Showkat Rasool; Panda, Bibhu Prasad

    2015-12-01

    In the present research, effect of sequential addition of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bacillus subtilis and Rhizopus oligosporus on content and composition of vitamin K2 and isoflavones in fermented soy foods have been investigated. Initially, soybeans were fermented with B. bifidum; then this fermented mass was re-fermented with co-culture of B. subtilis and R. oligosporus. The evolved sequence of microbes inoculation tended towards significantly (p < 0.5) higher enzymes levels (126.16 ± 2.23 IU/mg lipase, 36.52 ± 1.25 IU/mg phytase and 8.52 ± 1.12 IU/mg β-glucosidase); maximum menaquinone-7 production (9.3 ± 1.27 μg/g); and isoflavone content (84.64 ± 1.97 % daidzein, 99.29 ± 0.86 % genistein, 96.42 ± 1.32 % glycitein) after 72 h of solid-state fermentation. The study showed that co-fermentation of soybean with different microbes in a particular sequence can enhance nutritional value batter than the mono-culture fermentation due to the positive correlation between enzymes (lipase, phytase, β-glucosidase) levels, menaquinone-7 and soy isoflavones content.

  4. Bifidus milk powder: processing parameter standardization and shelf stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Selvamuthukumaran, Meenakshisundaram; Muthukumaran, Selva; Shukla, Shiv Shankar

    2016-04-01

    Spray dried bifidus milk powder was prepared by supplementing cow milk with different level of additives to obtain slurry of desired concentration. The slurry was pasteurized, cooled and inoculated with Bifidobacterium bifidum, incubated and dried to produce a bifidus milk powder. Among the various bifidus milk powder prepared, the slurry of mention the level total soluble solids exhibited good organoleptic characteristics and it has been standardized for further analysis. Moisture content, bulk density, insolubility index, hydroxymethyl furfural and thiobarbituric acid value of bifidus milk powder significantly increased, while the reflectance value significantly decreased during storage. The B. bifidum count significantly reduced and the bacterium were not detected at the end of the mention storage duration. As such the sentence is not acceptable in the abstract. The reconstituted bifidus milk powder was considered acceptable with an overall acceptability score of 6.97 on a nine-point Hedonic scale and showed a shelf stability of 120 days at ambient temperature condition (27 ± 2 °C). PMID:27413234

  5. Transposon Mutagenesis in Bifidobacterium breve: Construction and Characterization of a Tn5 Transposon Mutant Library for Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Motherway, Mary O’Connell; Lanigan, Noreen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are claimed to contribute positively to human health through a range of beneficial or probiotic activities, including amelioration of gastrointestinal and metabolic disorders, and therefore this particular group of gastrointestinal commensals has enjoyed increasing industrial and scientific attention in recent years. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these probiotic mechanisms are still largely unknown, mainly due to the fact that molecular tools for bifidobacteria are rather poorly developed, with many strains lacking genetic accessibility. In this work, we describe the generation of transposon insertion mutants in two bifidobacterial strains, B. breve UCC2003 and B. breve NCFB2258. We also report the creation of the first transposon mutant library in a bifidobacterial strain, employing B. breve UCC2003 and a Tn5-based transposome strategy. The library was found to be composed of clones containing single transposon insertions which appear to be randomly distributed along the genome. The usefulness of the library to perform phenotypic screenings was confirmed through identification and analysis of mutants defective in D-galactose, D-lactose or pullulan utilization abilities. PMID:23737995

  6. Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Watkins, Claire; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, and B. bifidum are generally dominant in infants, whereas B. catenulatum, B. adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more prevalent in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effects of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria have been associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria compositional changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence or absence in many disease states.

  7. Probiotic supplementation influences faecal short chain fatty acids in infants at high risk for eczema.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Rutten, N B M M; Besseling-van der Vaart, I; Niers, L E M; Choi, Y H; Rijkers, G T; van Hemert, S

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota plays a role in the development of allergies. Based on the immunomodulating capacities of bacteria, various studies have investigated the potential role for probiotics in the prevention of childhood eczema. In a previous study we have shown that significantly less children developed eczema after probiotic supplementation (Bifidobacterium bifidum W23, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis W52 and Lactococcus lactis W58, Ecologic(®)Panda) at three months of age as compared to controls. Here, metabolites in faecal samples of these 3-month old children were measured by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance to investigate possible gut metabolic alterations. Lower amounts of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), succinate, phenylalanine and alanine were found in faecal samples of children later developing eczema, whereas the amounts of glucose, galactose, lactate and lactose were higher compared to the children not developing eczema. Although these differences were already present at the age of 3 months, eczema did not develop in the majority of children before the age of 1 year. Supplementation of multispecies probiotics seems to induce higher levels of lactate and SCFAs, and lower levels of lactose and succinate when compared with the placebo group. This might explain the temporary preventive effect of probiotics on the development of eczema. These results highlight the role bacterial metabolites may play in development of the immune system, even before clinical manifestations of allergic disease arise.

  8. Isolation and prebiotic activity of water-soluble polysaccharides fractions from the bamboo shoots (Phyllostachys praecox).

    PubMed

    He, Shudong; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hanju; Wang, Junhui; Cao, Xiaodong; Ye, Yongkang

    2016-10-20

    The water-soluble polysaccharides from bamboo shoots (Phyllostachys praecox) (WBP) were isolated, and the characterizations as well as prebiotic activities were investigated. The yield of WBP was 7.58±0.31% under optimal hot-water extraction conditions. Two fractions, i.e., WBP-1 and WBP-2 with molecular weight of 83.50kDa and 80.08kDa, respectively, were purified by chromatography. Both the polysaccharides fractions were identified as heteropolysaccharides-protein complexes composed of 15 kinds of common amino acids in protein part and rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose in different molar ratios in polysaccharide part. The existence of α- and β-glycosidic linkages between the sugar units was confirmed by FTIR and NMR spectra. Compared with the blank control and the reference of FOS, WBP-1 and WBP-2 significantly increased the numbers of Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium bifidum (P<0.05), which contributed to the production of organic acids, suggesting that the polysaccharides have potential prebiotic properties. PMID:27474570

  9. Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Watkins, Claire; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, and B. bifidum are generally dominant in infants, whereas B. catenulatum, B. adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more prevalent in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effects of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria have been associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria compositional changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence or absence in many disease states. PMID:27594848

  10. Probiotic supplement consumption alters cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a preliminary study using healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, N J; Garaiova, I; Williams, E A; Michael, D R; Plummer, S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of daily probiotic supplementation upon the immune profile of healthy participants by the assessment of ex vivo cytokine production. Twenty healthy adult volunteers received a multi-strain probiotic supplement consisting of two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus (CUL60 and CUL21), Bifidobacterium lactis (CUL34) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (CUL20) and fructooligosaccharide for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide and cytokine production was assessed. Postintervention, a significant decrease in the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β was apparent when PBMCs were incubated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, whilst a significant increase in IL-10 and transforning growth factor-β production was seen when the cells were incubated without an additional stimulus. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of a multi-strain probiotic supplement to alter the immune response as demonstrated by changes in ex vivo cytokine production. Such results demonstrate the potential benefit of probiotic supplementation for healthy individuals and warrants further investigation.

  11. Probiotic supplement consumption alters cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a preliminary study using healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, N J; Garaiova, I; Williams, E A; Michael, D R; Plummer, S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of daily probiotic supplementation upon the immune profile of healthy participants by the assessment of ex vivo cytokine production. Twenty healthy adult volunteers received a multi-strain probiotic supplement consisting of two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus (CUL60 and CUL21), Bifidobacterium lactis (CUL34) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (CUL20) and fructooligosaccharide for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide and cytokine production was assessed. Postintervention, a significant decrease in the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β was apparent when PBMCs were incubated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, whilst a significant increase in IL-10 and transforning growth factor-β production was seen when the cells were incubated without an additional stimulus. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of a multi-strain probiotic supplement to alter the immune response as demonstrated by changes in ex vivo cytokine production. Such results demonstrate the potential benefit of probiotic supplementation for healthy individuals and warrants further investigation. PMID:24311314

  12. Gut Bifidobacteria Populations in Human Health and Aging.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Silvia; Watkins, Claire; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota has increasingly been shown to have a vital role in various aspects of human health. Indeed, several studies have linked alterations in the gut microbiota with the development of different diseases. Among the vast gut bacterial community, Bifidobacterium is a genus which dominates the intestine of healthy breast-fed infants whereas in adulthood the levels are lower but relatively stable. The presence of different species of bifidobacteria changes with age, from childhood to old age. Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, and B. bifidum are generally dominant in infants, whereas B. catenulatum, B. adolescentis and, as well as B. longum are more prevalent in adults. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating which shows beneficial effects of supplementation with bifidobacteria for the improvement of human health conditions ranging from protection against infection to different extra- and intra-intestinal positive effects. Moreover, bifidobacteria have been associated with the production of a number of potentially health promoting metabolites including short chain fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid and bacteriocins. The aim of this mini-review is to describe the bifidobacteria compositional changes associated with different stages in life, highlighting their beneficial role, as well as their presence or absence in many disease states. PMID:27594848

  13. [Probiotics as stimulators of immune response against pathogens in the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhin, O V; Afanasyev, S S; Bykov, A S

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes whether.it is expedient to use oral probiotics for the stimulation of immune response against pathogens in the respiratory tract. It considers a relationship between.mucosal microbial colonization in different biotopes of the body and mucosal.immunity in the respiratory tract. The principal and terminological controversial issues of colonic dysbiosis and the possibilities of using the medicines and products containing live commensals/symbionts to correct microbiota disturbances are examined. There are data on the degree of resistance and resilience of the colonic microbial community exposed to destabilizing factors, antibiotics in particular. The properties of probiotics that have been proven to enhance host response against pathogens and the phenomena that characterize these probiotics as immunomodifiers and distinguish them from other immunostimulating/immunomodulating agents are described. Criteria for choosing effective and safe oral probiotics to stimulate an immune response in the respiratory tract are formulated. Finally, we review the data on the clinical and immunomodulatory effects of dietary supplement containing a combination of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus gasseri PA 16/8, Bifidobacterium bifidum MF 20/5 and Bifidobacterium longum SP 07/3) with vitamins and minerals as an agent to prevent and reduce the severity of acute and recurrent respiratory tract infections. PMID:27458629

  14. Oral administration of fermented milk supplemented with synbiotics can influence the physiological condition of Wistar rats in a dose-sensitive and sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Miao, Junjie; Lang, Chunhui; Kang, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Shijie; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Fermented milk supplemented with two probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM) and a prebiotic (isomaltooligosaccharide) was orally administered to Wistar rats for 30 days using three dosages. A commercial yogurt was used as a placebo. After treatment, the total protein, hemoglobin, and albumin levels in serum were significantly increased in female rats compared with those in the control group (p<0.05), whereas no significant change occurred in the male rats. A significant decrease in serum glucose levels was observed in male rats administered a low dosage of the tested fermented milk (p<0.05). The serum triglyceride level was significantly decreased in both male and female rats (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between rats groups in body weight, food intake, food utilization rate, red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and total cholesterol. These results suggest that the fermented milk supplemented with synbiotics altered the nutritive status of the host animal and contributed to their health. However, such potent health-promoting effects could be deeply associated with the dose and sex specific. Therefore, different physiological targets and population characteristics should be managed with different combinations of probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:27200262

  15. Oral administration of fermented milk supplemented with synbiotics can influence the physiological condition of Wistar rats in a dose-sensitive and sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    MIAO, Junjie; LANG, Chunhui; KANG, Zhiyuan; ZHU, Hong; WANG, Shijie; LI, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Fermented milk supplemented with two probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM) and a prebiotic (isomaltooligosaccharide) was orally administered to Wistar rats for 30 days using three dosages. A commercial yogurt was used as a placebo. After treatment, the total protein, hemoglobin, and albumin levels in serum were significantly increased in female rats compared with those in the control group (p<0.05), whereas no significant change occurred in the male rats. A significant decrease in serum glucose levels was observed in male rats administered a low dosage of the tested fermented milk (p<0.05). The serum triglyceride level was significantly decreased in both male and female rats (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between rats groups in body weight, food intake, food utilization rate, red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and total cholesterol. These results suggest that the fermented milk supplemented with synbiotics altered the nutritive status of the host animal and contributed to their health. However, such potent health-promoting effects could be deeply associated with the dose and sex specific. Therefore, different physiological targets and population characteristics should be managed with different combinations of probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:27200262

  16. Multilocus sequence typing of bifidobacterial strains from infant's faeces and human milk: are bifidobacteria being sustainably shared during breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Makino, H; Martin, R; Ishikawa, E; Gawad, A; Kubota, H; Sakai, T; Oishi, K; Tanaka, R; Ben-Amor, K; Knol, J; Kushiro, A

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be one of the most important beneficial intestinal bacteria for infants, contributing to the priming of the mucosal immune system. These microbes can also be detected in mother's milk, suggesting a potential role of human milk in the colonisation of infant's gut. However, little is known about the timing of bacteria appearance in human milk, and whether human milk is the first source of inoculation. Here, we investigated whether specific strains are shared sustainably between maternal milk and infant's gut. Faecal samples and human milk were collected from 102 healthy mother-infant pairs (infant's faeces: meconium, 7, 30 days of age; mother's milk: once before delivery, colostrum, 7, 30 days after delivery). Bifidobacterial strains were isolated from these samples, and were discriminated by means of multilocus sequencing typing. No bifidobacteria were detected from human milk collected before delivery, or colostrum. Strains were isolated only from human milk samples obtained 7 days after birth or later. On the other hand, bifidobacterial strains were obtained from infant's faeces throughout the study period, sometimes as early as the first day of life (meconium). We have found that bifidobacterial species belonging to Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum could be identified as monophyletic between infant's faeces and their mother's milk. These strains were confirmed to be sustainably shared between maternal milk and infant's gut. Moreover, monophyletic strains were isolated at the same time point or earlier from infant's faeces than from human milk, and none were isolated earlier from human milk than from infant's faeces. Although it remains unclear whether human milk is the first source of microbes for infants, our results confirm that human milk is a reservoir of bifidobacteria, and specific strains are shared between infant's intestine and human milk during breastfeeding. PMID

  17. Multilocus sequence typing of bifidobacterial strains from infant's faeces and human milk: are bifidobacteria being sustainably shared during breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Makino, H; Martin, R; Ishikawa, E; Gawad, A; Kubota, H; Sakai, T; Oishi, K; Tanaka, R; Ben-Amor, K; Knol, J; Kushiro, A

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be one of the most important beneficial intestinal bacteria for infants, contributing to the priming of the mucosal immune system. These microbes can also be detected in mother's milk, suggesting a potential role of human milk in the colonisation of infant's gut. However, little is known about the timing of bacteria appearance in human milk, and whether human milk is the first source of inoculation. Here, we investigated whether specific strains are shared sustainably between maternal milk and infant's gut. Faecal samples and human milk were collected from 102 healthy mother-infant pairs (infant's faeces: meconium, 7, 30 days of age; mother's milk: once before delivery, colostrum, 7, 30 days after delivery). Bifidobacterial strains were isolated from these samples, and were discriminated by means of multilocus sequencing typing. No bifidobacteria were detected from human milk collected before delivery, or colostrum. Strains were isolated only from human milk samples obtained 7 days after birth or later. On the other hand, bifidobacterial strains were obtained from infant's faeces throughout the study period, sometimes as early as the first day of life (meconium). We have found that bifidobacterial species belonging to Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum could be identified as monophyletic between infant's faeces and their mother's milk. These strains were confirmed to be sustainably shared between maternal milk and infant's gut. Moreover, monophyletic strains were isolated at the same time point or earlier from infant's faeces than from human milk, and none were isolated earlier from human milk than from infant's faeces. Although it remains unclear whether human milk is the first source of microbes for infants, our results confirm that human milk is a reservoir of bifidobacteria, and specific strains are shared between infant's intestine and human milk during breastfeeding.

  18. Anti-inflammatory properties of probiotic bacteria on Salmonella-induced IL-8 synthesis in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Malago, J J; Tooten, P C J; Koninkx, J F J G

    2010-06-01

    Invasion of the gut by pathogenic Salmonella leads to production of IL-8 that initiates inflammatory reactions to combat the bacterium. However, its persistent production causes tissue damage and interventions that suppress IL-8 production prevent tissue damage. We hypothesised that probiotics could mediate their benefits via inhibition of IL-8 synthesis. Caco-2 cells were infected with probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis W52, Lactobacillus casei W56, Lactococcus lactis W58, Lactobacillus acidophilus W70, Bifidobacterium bifidum W23, or Lactobacillus salivarius W24 or pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis 857 at 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 10, 20, 100 or 200 bacterial cells/Caco-2 cell for 1 hour. Cells were also exposed to a combination of one probiotic bacterium (200 bacterial cells/Caco-2 cell) and the graded numbers of Salmonella as either co-incubation (1 hour) or pre-incubation of the probiotic bacterium (1 hour) followed by Salmonella (1 hour). The cells recovered for 2 or 24 hours. IL-8 and Hsp70 were determined by ELISA and Western blot respectively. Both probiotics and Salmonella induced a dose- and time-dependent synthesis of IL-8 but probiotics induced far lower IL-8 levels than Salmonella. The Salmonella-induced IL-8 was significantly suppressed by B. infantis W52, L. casei W56 and L. lactis W58 at low numbers of Salmonella (0.2 to 20 bacterial cells/Caco-2 cell) and within 2 hours of recovery. The observed probiotic-mediated reduction in IL-8 secretion was transient, and lost after a few hours. In addition, these three probiotics induced a significant increase in Hsp70 expression while L. acidophilus W70, B. bifidum W23 and L. salivarius W24 induced a weak Hsp70 expression and could not suppress the Salmonella-induced IL-8 synthesis. We conclude that suppression of Salmonella-induced IL-8 synthesis by Caco-2 cells is exhibited by probiotics that induce expression of Hsp70, suggesting that the protective role of probiotics could be mediated, at least in

  19. Purification and certain properties of a bacteriocin from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, T; Iwanami, T; Hirasawa, M; Watanabe, C; McGhee, J R; Shiota, T

    1982-01-01

    An inhibition factor from Streptococcus mutans strain C3603 (serotype c) was purified and isolated, and its properties indicated that it was a bacteriocin. Bacteriocin C3603 is a basic protein with a pI value of 10 and a molecular weight of 4,800. The activity of this bacteriocin was not affected by pH over a range of 1.0 to 12.0 or by storage at 100 degrees C for 10 min at pH 2.0 to 7.0 or storage at 121 degrees C for 15 min at pH 4.0. Pronase; papain, phospholipase C, trypsin, and alpha-amylase had no effect on the activity of the bacteriocin, whereas alpha-chymotrypsin and pancreatin were partially active against it. Bacteriocin activity was greater against certain S. mutans strains of serotypes b, c, e, and f than against certain S. mutans strains of serotypes a, d, and g. Bacteriocin C3603 was also effective against selected strains of S. sanguis, S. salivarius, S. bovis, S. faecium, S. lactis, Lactobacillus casei, L. plantarum, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bacteroides melaninogenicus, but it was not effective against certain strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Corynebacterium parvum, and Candida albicans. The inhibition of S. mutans strains BHT and PS-14 by bacteriocin C3603 was found to be due to the bacteriocidal activity of the bacteriocin. When water or a diet containing bacteriocin C3603 was consumed by gnotobiotic and specific pathogen-free rats infected with S. mutans PS-14, the caries score was found to be significantly reduced. Images PMID:7068219

  20. The effect of probiotics on serum levels of cytokine and endotoxin in peritoneal dialysis patients: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-K; Wu, Y-Y; Yang, Y-F; Ting, I-W; Lin, C-C; Yen, T-H; Chen, J-H; Wang, C-H; Huang, C-C; Lin, H-C

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory markers such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are elevated in dialysis patients and can predict cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Endotoxin is an important source and also another marker of inflammation in patients with chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of oral probiotics on serum levels of endotoxemia and cytokines in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. The decline of residual renal function, peritonitis episodes, and cardiovascular events were also recorded. From July 2011 to June 2012, a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in PD patients. The intervention group received one capsule of probiotics containing 10(9) cfu Bifobacterium bifidum A218, 10(9) cfu Bifidobacterium catenulatum A302, 10(9) cfu Bifidobacterium longum A101, and 10(9) cfu Lactobacillus plantarum A87 daily for six months, while the placebo group received similar capsules containing maltodextrin for the same duration. Levels of serum TNF-α, interferon gamma, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, and endotoxin were measured before and six months after intervention. 39 patients completed the study (21 in the probiotics group and 18 in the placebo group). In patients receiving probiotics, levels of serum TNF-α, IL-5, IL-6, and endotoxin significantly decreased after six months of treatment, while levels of serum IL-10 significantly increased. In contrast, there were no significant changes in levels of serum cytokines and endotoxin in the placebo group after six months. In addition, the residual renal function was preserved in patients receiving probiotics. In conclusion, probiotics could significantly reduce the serum levels of endotoxin, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), IL-5, increase the serum levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and preserve residual renal function in PD patients.

  1. The effect of a multispecies synbiotic mixture on the duration of diarrhea and length of hospital stay in children with acute diarrhea in Turkey: single blinded randomized study.

    PubMed

    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Dalgic, Nazan; Guven, Sirin; Ozen, Metehan; Kara, Ates; Arica, Vefik; Metin-Timur, Ozge; Sancar, Mesut; Kurugol, Zafer; Tanir, Gonul; Ozturk, Didem; Aydogdu, Selime; Tutanc, Murat; Eren, Makbule; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2013-04-01

    Probiotics have been successfully used for the treatment of acute diarrhea in children and this effect depends on the strains and dose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a synbiotic mixture on the duration of diarrhea and the length of hospital stay in children with acute watery diarrhea. This is a prospective randomized, multicenter single blinded clinical trial in hospitalized children with acute watery diarrhea. All children were treated with conventional hydration therapy with or without a daily dose of a synbiotic (2.5 × 10(9) CFU live bacteria including Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Enterococcus faecium, and 625 mg fructooligosaccharide) for 5 days. The primary endpoint was duration of diarrhea and duration of hospitalization was the secondary endpoint. Among 209 eligible children, 113 received the synbiotic mixture and 96 served as a control. The duration of diarrhea was significantly shorter (∼36 h) in children receiving the synbiotic group than the controls (77.9 ± 30.5 vs. 114.6 ± 37.4 h, p < 0.0001). The duration of hospitalization was shorter in children receiving the synbiotic group (4.94 ± 1.7 vs. 5.77 ± 1.97 days, p = 0.002). The effect of synbiotic mixture on diarrhea started after 24th hours and stool frequency significantly decreased after 24th and 48th hours. The percentage of diarrhea-free children is significantly higher in synbiotic group at 48th and 72nd hours of synbiotic group. In conclusion, this study showed a reduction in diarrhea duration by approximately 36 h and a reduction in the duration of hospitalization with approximately 1 day in children with acute diarrhea with this synbiotic mixture.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Bifidobacterium actinocoloniiforme Type Strain DSM 22766T, Isolated from Bumblebee Digestive Tracts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohan; E, Zhiguo; Gu, Donglu; Lv, Longxian; Li, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are one of the most important beneficial bacteria in the gut of mammals and insects. We sequenced the genome of B. actinocoloniiforme DSM 22766, which was isolated from the digestive tracts of bumblebees. The genome contains 1,548 protein-coding genes, 49 RNAs and two CRISPR repeats. PMID:26404606

  3. EFFECT OF LACTOBACILLUS AND BIFIDOBACTERIUM ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY. (R826138)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Presence of two Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium probiotic strains in the neonatal ileum.

    PubMed

    Wall, Rebecca; Hussey, Seamus Gerard; Ryan, C Anthony; O'Neill, Martin; Fitzgerald, Gerald; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2008-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to examine the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria microbiota in the human ileum at a very early stage of life. Ileostomy effluents from two infants, taken at different time points, were plated on Lactobacillus selective agar and cys-MRS containing mupirocin to select for bifidobacteria. In one case, a stool sample following ileostomy reversal was subsequently analyzed microbiologically. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing was used to investigate the cultivable population of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine the non-cultivable population. The probiotic strain, Lactobacillus paracasei NFBC 338, was recovered at both time points from one of the infants and dominated in the small intestine for a period of over 3 weeks. Moreover, the probiotic strain, B. animalis subsp. lactis Bb12, was obtained from the other infant. This study shows the presence of two known probiotic strains in the upper intestinal tract at an early stage of human life and thus provides some evidence for their ability to colonize the infant small intestine. PMID:18059489

  5. Bifidobacterial succession and correlation networks in a large unselected cohort of mothers and their children.

    PubMed

    Avershina, E; Storrø, O; Øien, T; Johnsen, R; Wilson, R; Egeland, T; Rudi, K

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are a major microbial component of infant gut microbiota, which is believed to promote health benefits for the host and stimulate maturation of the immune system. Despite their perceived importance, very little is known about the natural development of and possible correlations between bifidobacteria in human populations. To address this knowledge gap, we analyzed stool samples from a randomly selected healthy cohort of 87 infants and their mothers with >90% of vaginal delivery and nearly 100% breast-feeding at 4 months. Fecal material was sampled during pregnancy, at 3 and 10 days, at 4 months, and at 1 and 2 years after birth. Stool samples were predicted to be rich in the species Bifidobacterium adolescentis, B. bifidum, B. dentium, B. breve, and B. longum. Due to high variation, we did not identify a clear age-related structure at the individual level. Within the population as a whole, however, there were clear age-related successions. Negative correlations between the B. longum group and B. adolescentis were detected in adults and in 1- and 2-year-old children, whereas negative correlations between B. longum and B. breve were characteristic for newborns and 4-month-old infants. The highly structured age-related development of and correlation networks between bifidobacterial species during the first 2 years of life mirrors their different or competing nutritional requirements, which in turn may be associated with specific biological functions in the development of healthy gut. PMID:23124244

  6. Fermented Acanthopanax koreanum Root Extract Reduces UVB- and H2O2-Induced Senescence in Human Skin Fibroblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Ja; Bae, Young-Seuk

    2016-07-28

    The present study assessed the effects of an aqueous extract of Acanthopanax koreanum root (AE) and of AE following fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum and Bifidobacterium bifidum) (AEF) on human skin fibroblast HS68 cells exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation and oxidative stress. AEF effectively antagonized the senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining and upregulation of p53 and p21(Cip1/WAF1) induced by UVB or H2O2 treatment in HS68 cells. It also exhibited excellent antioxidant activities in radical scavenging assays and reduced the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species induced by UVB or H2O2 treatment. The antioxidant and antisenescent activities of AEF were greater than those of nonfermented A. koreanum extract. AEF significantly repressed the UVB- or H2O2-induced activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -3, overexpression of MMP-1, and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. This repression of NF-κB activation and MMP-1 overexpression was attenuated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase activator, suggesting that this AEF activity was dependent on this signaling pathway. Taken together, these data indicated that AEF-mediated antioxidant and anti-photoaging activities may produce anti-wrinkle effects on human skin. PMID:27090187

  7. Bifidobacterial Succession and Correlation Networks in a Large Unselected Cohort of Mothers and Their Children

    PubMed Central

    Storrø, O.; Øien, T.; Johnsen, R.; Wilson, R.; Egeland, T.; Rudi, K.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are a major microbial component of infant gut microbiota, which is believed to promote health benefits for the host and stimulate maturation of the immune system. Despite their perceived importance, very little is known about the natural development of and possible correlations between bifidobacteria in human populations. To address this knowledge gap, we analyzed stool samples from a randomly selected healthy cohort of 87 infants and their mothers with >90% of vaginal delivery and nearly 100% breast-feeding at 4 months. Fecal material was sampled during pregnancy, at 3 and 10 days, at 4 months, and at 1 and 2 years after birth. Stool samples were predicted to be rich in the species Bifidobacterium adolescentis, B. bifidum, B. dentium, B. breve, and B. longum. Due to high variation, we did not identify a clear age-related structure at the individual level. Within the population as a whole, however, there were clear age-related successions. Negative correlations between the B. longum group and B. adolescentis were detected in adults and in 1- and 2-year-old children, whereas negative correlations between B. longum and B. breve were characteristic for newborns and 4-month-old infants. The highly structured age-related development of and correlation networks between bifidobacterial species during the first 2 years of life mirrors their different or competing nutritional requirements, which in turn may be associated with specific biological functions in the development of healthy gut. PMID:23124244

  8. Th17 responses and natural IgM antibodies are related to gut microbiota composition in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; de Paz, Banesa; Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; Hevia, Arancha; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; Suárez, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis, characterized by a reduced Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. In this study, in vitro cultures revealed that microbiota isolated from SLE patient stool samples (SLE-M) promoted lymphocyte activation and Th17 differentiation from naïve CD4+ lymphocytes to a greater extent than healthy control-microbiota. Enrichment of SLE-M with Treg-inducing bacteria showed that a mixture of two Clostridia strains significantly reduced the Th17/Th1 balance, whereas Bifidobacterium bifidum supplementation prevented CD4+ lymphocyte over-activation, thus supporting a possible therapeutic benefit of probiotics containing Treg-inducer strains in order to restore the Treg/Th17/Th1 imbalance present in SLE. In fact, ex vivo analyses of patient samples showed enlarged Th17 and Foxp3+ IL-17+ populations, suggesting a possible Treg-Th17 trans-differentiation. Moreover, analyses of fecal microbiota revealed a negative correlation between IL-17+ populations and Firmicutes in healthy controls, whereas in SLE this phylum correlated directly with serum levels of IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine slightly reduced in patients. Finally, the frequency of Synergistetes, positively correlated with the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in healthy controls, tended to be reduced in patients when anti-dsDNA titers were increased and showed a strong negative correlation with IL-6 serum levels and correlated positively with protective natural IgM antibodies against phosphorylcholine. PMID:27044888

  9. cDNA sequence and expression analysis of an antimicrobial peptide, theromacin, in the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiaoqing; Wang, Gailing; Yuan, Hanwen; Chai, Yi; Xiao, Zhili

    2010-09-01

    Bivalve molluscs rely on the interaction between cellular and humoral factors for protection against potential pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proven to be one of the most important humoral components that afford resistance to pathogen infection. The AMP gene to be identified was that encoding theromacin in the triangle-shell pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii (Hc theromacin); this gene was identified from a suppression subtractive hybridization library, and subsequently cloned by 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). The full-length theromacin cDNA contains 547 bp, with a 294-bp open reading frame that encodes a 97-amino acid peptide, and the deduced peptide sequence contains a 61-amino acid putative mature peptide. The sequence also contains 10 cysteine residues. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR analysis showed that Hc theromacin transcripts were constitutively expressed in the liver, foot, gill, adductor muscle, heart, mantle, intestine, and hemocytes, with the highest level in hemocytes. Theromacin mRNA levels were found to increase after challenge with gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. After injection of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, Hc theromacin expression showed the highest fold-change at 48 and 36 h after infection, respectively, and its levels decreased gradually thereafter. PMID:20639135

  10. Mucosal immunology and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Dongarrà, Maria Luisa; Rizzello, Valeria; Muccio, Letizia; Fries, Walter; Cascio, Antonio; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2013-02-01

    The cross-talk between the mucosa-associated immune system and microbiota is critical in mucosal tissue homeostasis as well as in protection against infectious and inflammatory diseases occurring at mucosal sites. This recent evidence has paved the way to therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating the mucosa-associated immune system using probiotics. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate dendritic cell (DC) activation, polarizing the subsequent T cell activity toward Th1 (e.g. Lactobacillus (Lb) acidophilus), Th2 (Lb.reuteri and Bifidobacterium bifidum) or, as more recently demonstrated, Th17 responses induced by specific strains such as Lb.rhamnosus GG and Lac23a, the latter isolated in our laboratory. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of probiotics effects on mucosal immunology, particularly on cells of the innate immunity such as DCs. We also highlight our own experiences in modulating DC functions by commensal bacteria and discuss the relevance of probiotics administration in the treatment of human immunopathologies.

  11. Necrotising enterocolitis and mortality in preterm infants after introduction of probiotics: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Noor; van de Graaf, Rob; Been, Jasper V.; de Jonge, Rogier C. J.; Hanff, Lidwien M.; Wijnen, René M. H.; Kornelisse, René F.; Reiss, Irwin K. M.; Vermeulen, Marijn J.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the clinical effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is conflicting and cohort studies lacked adjustment for time trend and feeding type. This study investigated the association between the introduction of routine probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum; Infloran®) on the primary outcome ‘NEC or death’. Preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks or birth weight <1500 gram) admitted before (Jan 2008–Sep 2012; n = 1288) and after (Oct 2012–Dec 2014; n = 673) introduction of probiotics were compared. Interrupted time series logistic regression models were adjusted for confounders, effect modification by feeding type, seasonality and underlying temporal trends. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses showed no difference in ‘NEC or death’ between the two periods. The overall incidence of NEC declined from 7.8% to 5.1% (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.93, p = 0.02), which was not statistically significant in the adjusted models. Introduction of probiotics was associated with a reduced adjusted odds for ‘NEC or sepsis or death’ in exclusively breastmilk-fed infants (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21–0.93, p = 0.03) only. We conclude that introduction of probiotics was not associated with a reduction in ‘NEC or death’ and that type of feeding seems to modify the effects of probiotics. PMID:27545195

  12. Comparison of the concentrations of phenolic compounds in olive oils and other plant oils: correlation with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Medina, Eduardo; de Castro, Antonio; Romero, Concepcion; Brenes, Manuel

    2006-07-12

    The antimicrobial activity of different edible vegetable oils was studied. In vitro results revealed that the oils from olive fruits had a strong bactericidal action against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, this effect being higher in general against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, olive oils showed bactericidal activity not only against harmful bacteria of the intestinal microbiota (Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli) also against beneficial microorganisms such as Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum. Otherwise, most of the foodborne pathogens tested (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica, Yersinia sp., and Shigella sonnei) did not survive after 1 h of contact with olive oils. The dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl oleuropein and ligstroside aglycons, hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, were the phenolic compounds that statistically correlated with bacterial survival. These findings were confirmed by testing each individual phenolic compound, isolated by HPLC, against L. monocytogenes. In particular, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon showed a potent antimicrobial activity. These results indicate that not all oils classified as "olive oil" had similar bactericidal effects and that this bioactivity depended on their content of certain phenolic compounds.

  13. Necrotising enterocolitis and mortality in preterm infants after introduction of probiotics: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Noor; van de Graaf, Rob; Been, Jasper V; de Jonge, Rogier C J; Hanff, Lidwien M; Wijnen, René M H; Kornelisse, René F; Reiss, Irwin K M; Vermeulen, Marijn J

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the clinical effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is conflicting and cohort studies lacked adjustment for time trend and feeding type. This study investigated the association between the introduction of routine probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum; Infloran(®)) on the primary outcome 'NEC or death'. Preterm infants (gestational age <32 weeks or birth weight <1500 gram) admitted before (Jan 2008-Sep 2012; n = 1288) and after (Oct 2012-Dec 2014; n = 673) introduction of probiotics were compared. Interrupted time series logistic regression models were adjusted for confounders, effect modification by feeding type, seasonality and underlying temporal trends. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses showed no difference in 'NEC or death' between the two periods. The overall incidence of NEC declined from 7.8% to 5.1% (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.93, p = 0.02), which was not statistically significant in the adjusted models. Introduction of probiotics was associated with a reduced adjusted odds for 'NEC or sepsis or death' in exclusively breastmilk-fed infants (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.93, p = 0.03) only. We conclude that introduction of probiotics was not associated with a reduction in 'NEC or death' and that type of feeding seems to modify the effects of probiotics. PMID:27545195

  14. Biochemical Engineering Approaches for Increasing Viability and Functionality of Probiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Truong, Dieu-Hien; Kouhoundé, Sonagnon; Ly, Sokny; Razafindralambo, Hary; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The literature presents a growing body of evidence demonstrating the positive effect of probiotics on health. Probiotic consumption levels are rising quickly in the world despite the fluctuation of their viability and functionality. Technological methods aiming at improving probiotic characteristics are thus highly wanted. However, microbial metabolic engineering toolbox is not available for this kind of application. On the other hand, basic microbiology teaches us that bacteria are able to exhibit adaptation to external stresses. It is known that adequately applied sub-lethal stress, i.e., controlled in amplitude and frequency at a given stage of the culture, is able to enhance microbial robustness. This property could be potentially used to improve the viability of probiotic bacteria, but some technical challenges still need to be overcome before any industrial implementation. This review paper investigates the different technical tools that can be used in order to define the proper condition for improving viability of probiotic bacteria and their implementation at the industrial scale. Based on the example of Bifidobacterium bifidum, potentialities for simultaneously improving viability, but also functionality of probiotics will be described. PMID:27271598

  15. Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei A13 in Argentinian probiotic cheese and its impact on the characteristics of the product.

    PubMed

    Vinderola, G; Prosello, W; Molinari, F; Ghiberto, D; Reinheimer, J

    2009-10-31

    The growth capacity of probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei A13, Bifidobacterium bifidum A1 and L. acidophilus A3 in a probiotic fresh cheese commercialized in Argentina since 1999 was studied during its manufacture and refrigerated storage at 5 degrees C and 12 degrees C for 60 days. Additionally, viable cell counts for probiotic bacteria in the commercial product are reported for batch productions over the last 9 years. L. paracasei A13 grew a half log order at 43 degrees C during the manufacturing process of probiotic cheese and another half log order during the first 15 days of storage at 5 degrees C, without negative effects on sensorial properties of the product. However, a negative impact on sensorial characteristics was observed when cheeses were stored at 12 degrees C for 60 days. Colony counts in the commercial product showed variations from batch to batch over the last 9 years. However, colony counts for each probiotic bacterium were always above the minimum suggested. Growth capacity of L. paracasei A13 in cheese during manufacturing and storage, mainly at temperatures commonly found in retail display cabinets in supermarkets (12 degrees C or more), would make it necessary to re-evaluate its role as possible probiotic starter and the consequences on food sensorial characteristics if storage temperature during commercial shelf life is not tightly controlled.

  16. Microencapsulation of Probiotics by Calcium Alginate-gelatinized Starch with Chitosan Coating and Evaluation of Survival in Simulated Human Gastro-intestinal Condition

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi Zanjani, Mohammad Ali; Ghiassi Tarzi, Babak; Sharifan, Anousheh; Mohammadi, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Microencapsulation as one of the most modern methods has considerable effects on probiotic survival. In this study Lactobacillus casei (ATCC 39392) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (ATCC 29521) were encapsulated using calcium alginate-gelatinized starch, chitosan coating and inulin via emulsion technique, and were incubated in simulated gastric juice (along with pepsin, pH=1.5) and simulated intestinal juice (along with pancreatin and bile salts, pH = 8) for 2 hours at 37 oC. The morphology and size of microcapsules were measured by scanning electron and optical microscopy. The results indicated that the survival of microencapsulated probiotic increased significantly in simulated gastro-intestinal condition (P < 0.05). Chitosan coating played a significant role in the protection of probiotic bacteria in simulated gastro-intestinal condition and the diameter of the microcapsules increased with the addition of chitosan coating. In general, this study indicated that microencapsulation with alginate-gelatinized starch coated with chitosan could successfully and significantly protect probiotic bacteria against adverse condition of simulated human gastro-intestinal condition. PMID:25276184

  17. Anti-Amnesic Effect of Fermented Ganoderma lucidum Water Extracts by Lactic Acid Bacteria on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu Jin; Yang, Hee Sun; Jo, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Cheon; Park, Tae Young; Choi, Bong Suk; Seo, Kyoung Sun; Huh, Chang Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-amnesic effect of fermented Ganoderma lucidum water extracts (GW) on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in rats. GW were fermented by the lactic acid bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (FGWB), followed by Lactobacillus sakei LI033 (FGWBL). To induce amnesia, scopolamine (1 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected into rats 30 min before the behavioral tests. Step-through latencies of rats treated with primary fermented extracts (300 mg/kg, FGWB) and secondary fermented extracts (300 mg/kg, FGWBL) were significantly longer than those of rats treated with GW (300 mg/kg) in the retention trial of the multiple trial passive avoidance test. In the Morris water maze task, FGWBL significantly shortened escape latencies in training trials. Furthermore, swimming times within the target zone during the probe trial with FGWBL were significantly higher than the GW and FGWB treatments. In addition, acetylcholinesterase activities were lower in the brains of scopolamine-treated rats treated with FGWBL. These results suggest that FGWBL could be useful to enhance learning memory and cognitive function via cholinergic dysfunction. PMID:26176000

  18. Biochemical Engineering Approaches for Increasing Viability and Functionality of Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Thanh; Truong, Dieu-Hien; Kouhoundé, Sonagnon; Ly, Sokny; Razafindralambo, Hary; Delvigne, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The literature presents a growing body of evidence demonstrating the positive effect of probiotics on health. Probiotic consumption levels are rising quickly in the world despite the fluctuation of their viability and functionality. Technological methods aiming at improving probiotic characteristics are thus highly wanted. However, microbial metabolic engineering toolbox is not available for this kind of application. On the other hand, basic microbiology teaches us that bacteria are able to exhibit adaptation to external stresses. It is known that adequately applied sub-lethal stress, i.e., controlled in amplitude and frequency at a given stage of the culture, is able to enhance microbial robustness. This property could be potentially used to improve the viability of probiotic bacteria, but some technical challenges still need to be overcome before any industrial implementation. This review paper investigates the different technical tools that can be used in order to define the proper condition for improving viability of probiotic bacteria and their implementation at the industrial scale. Based on the example of Bifidobacterium bifidum, potentialities for simultaneously improving viability, but also functionality of probiotics will be described. PMID:27271598

  19. Probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus suppresses DMH-induced procarcinogenic fecal enzymes and preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci in early colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Angela; Shukla, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Diet makes an important contribution to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk implying risks for CRC are potentially reducible. Therefore, the probiotics have been suggested as the prophylactic measure in colon cancer. In this study, different probiotics were used to compare their protective potential against 1,2 dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced chemical colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats. Animals belonging to different probiotic groups were fed orally with 1 × 10(9) lactobacilli daily for 1 week, and then a weekly injection of DMH was given intraperitoneally fo