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Sample records for nci researchers identify

  1. NCI Scientists Create New Assay, Identify Novel Therapeutic Compounds, and Take Places on Front Lines of Cancer Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of scientists and specialists from NCI at Frederick, NCI at Bethesda, the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, and Data Management Services, Inc., has developed the first method for identifying natural products that could increase the effectiveness of camptothecin-based cancer treatments.

  2. A review of NCI's extramural grant portfolio: identifying opportunities for future research in genes and environment in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghazarian, Armen A; Simonds, Naoko I; Bennett, Kelly; Pimentel, Camilla B; Ellison, Gary L; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Schully, Sheri D; Mechanic, Leah E

    2013-04-01

    Genetic and environmental factors jointly influence cancer risk. The NIH has made the study of gene-environment (GxE) interactions a research priority since the year 2000. To assess the current status of GxE research in cancer, we analyzed the extramural grant portfolio of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from Fiscal Years 2007 to 2009. Publications attributed to selected grants were also evaluated. From the 1,106 research grants identified in our portfolio analysis, a random sample of 450 grants (40%) was selected for data abstraction; of these, 147 (33%) were considered relevant. The most common cancer type was breast (20%, n = 29), followed by lymphoproliferative (10%, n = 14), colorectal (9%, n = 13), melanoma/other skin (9%, n = 13), and lung/upper aerodigestive tract (8%, n = 12) cancers. The majority of grants were studies of candidate genes (68%, n = 100) compared with genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (8%, n = 12). Approximately one-third studied environmental exposures categorized as energy balance (37%, n = 54) or drugs/treatment (29%, n = 43). From the 147 relevant grants, 108 publications classified as GxE or pharmacogenomic were identified. These publications were linked to 37 of the 147 grant applications (25%). The findings from our portfolio analysis suggest that GxE studies are concentrated in specific areas. There is room for investments in other aspects of GxE research, including, but not limited to developing alternative approaches to exposure assessment, broadening the spectrum of cancer types investigated, and conducting GxE within GWAS. This portfolio analysis provides a cross-sectional review of NCI support for GxE research in cancer.

  3. Research Advocacy at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    The patient perspective research advocates brings into NCI’s research enterprise helps to inform research focus and support the dissemination of results that lead to new and better cancer prevention, detection, and treatment methods.

  4. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  5. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  6. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  7. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  8. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  9. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  10. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  11. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Program (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  12. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  13. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  14. Published Research - NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer has published much exciting and impactful research over the years. Find here a list of all of these listed in PubMed and others across the field of Cancer Nanotechnology.

  15. Russian delegation visits NIH and NCI to discuss research collaboration

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Center for Global Health hosted a delegation from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research to discuss ongoing and future collaborations in cancer research. The delegation was accompanied by representatives from the US Embassy in Moscow and the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington DC.

  16. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  17. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  18. Building connections between datasets, researchers and publications at NCI using RD-Switchboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, L. A.; Wang, J.; Aryani, A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Barlow, M.

    2016-12-01

    Making research data connected, discoverable and reusable are some of the key enablers of the new data-intensive revolution in research. Using the Research Data Switchboard (RD-Switchboard) (http://www.rd-switchboard.org/) on the Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) data collections metadata catalogue, we show how connectivity graphs can provide a possible solution to machine-actionable literature searches to discover links between reseachers, publications and datasets (see http://rd-switchboard.nci.org.au). RD-Switchboard is an open and collaborative software solution initiated by the Data Description Registry Interoperability (DDRI) working group of the Research Data Alliance (RDA https://rd-alliance.org/groups/data-description-registry-interoperability.html). RD-Switchboard connects datasets on the basis of co-authorship or other collaboration arrangements, such as joint funding and grants. The connections among researchers, publications and datasets can help answer questions like "How many datasets published at NCI has being referenced in research journal articles and which articles?"; "How many researchers and institutes are connected to a given dataset?"; "What are derived data products depend on the source reference data at NCI, who generates those derived data products and who uses them?" Hence, NCI incorporated the RD-Switchboard software to help track and analyze the connectivity. The RD-Switchboard connection report provides the number of connections a dataset has - the more connections a dataset has, the higher the relevance it has within the research community. Through analyzing the connections to datasets, it is also possible to identify high value datasets to researchers and organisations, and help measure the impact that these datasets have had in the published literature.

  19. NCI ALMANAC Tool for Research on Cancer Drug Combinations

    Cancer.gov

    A Cancer Currents blog post on the NCI ALMANAC, a new resource that provides data showing how well pairs of FDA-approved cancer drugs performed in killing tumor cells from NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Lines.

  20. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  1. NCI Study Identifies Essential Genes For Cancer Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Information OppNet NIDB NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Institutes at NIH List of Institutes, Centers & ... The NIH Almanac NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health ® Impact of NIH Research You are here Home » News & ...

  2. Identifying Sedentary Subgroups: The NCI Health Information National Trends Survey

    PubMed Central

    Atienza, Audie A.; Yaroch, Amy L.; Mâsse, Louise C.; Moser, Richard P.; Hesse, Bradford W.; King, Abby C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Developing effective interventions for the 24%–28% of U.S. adults who are sedentary requires a better understanding of the factors related to sedentary lifestyles as well as the communication channels to reach various subgroups. This study identified key sociodemographic and health communication characteristics of various subgroups with high rates of inactivity using signal detection methodology (SDM). Methods The sample from the nationally representative Health Information National Trends Survey 2003 (HINTS; N=6369) was randomly split into two samples. Exploratory analyses (conducted 2004–2005) were employed on the first sample to identify various subgroups, and the stability of inactivity rates in those subgroups was examined in the second sample. Results Eight subgroups with varying levels of inactivity were identified. Three subgroups had inactivity levels ≥40%, while the lowest subgroup had a level of <15%. The highest inactivity subgroup consisted of individuals with at least some college education who were in fair/poor health and who watched 4+ hours of television/day. The second highest inactivity subgroup was composed of those without a college education who tended not to utilize nor attend to many communication channels. The third highest inactive subgroup consisted of those without a college education who read the newspaper and were obese. Levels of subgroup inactivity in the second independent sample were not significantly different from those found in the exploratory sample. Conclusions This study identified empirically-based, physically inactive subgroups that differed on sociodemographic and health communication characteristics. This information should be useful in creating future evidence-based, targeted, and tailored intervention strategies. PMID:17046409

  3. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  4. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  5. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  6. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  7. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  8. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). It will evaluate disparity issues and outcomes in cancer care delivery and treatments. |

  9. NCI & Division Obligations

    Cancer.gov

    Displays obligations for grants, contracts, training fellowships, intramural research, and management and support, including the number of grant awards, funding amounts, and percent of the total NCI budget.

  10. NCI and FDA to Study Cancer Proteogenomics Together | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in proteogenomic regulatory science.  This will allow the agencies to share information that will accelerate the development of proteogenomic technologies and biomarkers, as it relates to precision medicine in cancer.

  11. Comprehensive List of Cancer-Related Genetic Variations of the NCI-60 Panel | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI-60 cell lines are the most frequently studied human tumor cell lines in cancer research. The panel of cell lines represents nine different types of cancer: breast, ovary, prostate, colon, lung, kidney, brain, leukemia, and melanoma. Originally developed to screen anticancer compounds by the NCI Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), the NCI-60 panel has generated the most extensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide. The 60 cell lines have also been extensively analyzed for their gene and microRNA expression levels, DNA mutation status, and DNA copy number variations. These findings have provided the groundwork for research centered on increasing our understanding of tumor biology and drug activity.

  12. Research Tools and Materials | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Research Tools can be found in TTC's Available Technologies and in scientific publications. They are freely available to non-profits and universities through a Material Transfer Agreement (or other appropriate mechanism), and available via licensing to companies. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. NCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. Learn more...

  14. NCI Releases Video: Proteogenomics Research - On the Frontier of Precision Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the release of an educational video titled “Proteogenomics Research: On the Frontier of Precision Medicine."  Launched at the HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala Dinner, catalyzed in part by the Cancer Moonshot initiative and featuring as keynote speaker the 47th Vice President of the United States of America Joseph R.

  15. NCI Awards 18 Grants to Continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) Biomarkers Effort | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI has awarded 18 grants to continue the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), a national infrastructure that supports the integrated development, validation, and clinical application of biomarkers for the early detection of cancer. The awards fund 7 Biomarker Developmental Laboratories, 8 Clinical Validation Centers, 2 Biomarker Reference Laboratories, and a Data Management and Coordinating Center (DMCC). |

  16. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further

  17. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors.

  18. The NCI Thesaurus quality assurance life cycle.

    PubMed

    de Coronado, Sherri; Wright, Lawrence W; Fragoso, Gilberto; Haber, Margaret W; Hahn-Dantona, Elizabeth A; Hartel, Francis W; Quan, Sharon L; Safran, Tracy; Thomas, Nicole; Whiteman, Lori

    2009-06-01

    The National Cancer Institute Enterprise Vocabulary Services (NCI EVS) uses a wide range of quality assurance (QA) techniques to maintain and extend NCI Thesaurus (NCIt). NCIt is a reference terminology and biomedical ontology used in a growing number of NCI and other systems that extend from translational and basic research through clinical care to public information and administrative activities. Both automated and manual QA techniques are employed throughout the editing and publication cycle, which includes inserting and editing NCIt in NCI Metathesaurus. NCI EVS conducts its own additional periodic and ongoing content QA. External reviews, and extensive evaluation by and interaction with EVS partners and other users, have also played an important part in the QA process. There have always been tensions and compromises between meeting the needs of dependent systems and providing consistent and well-structured content; external QA and feedback have been important in identifying and addressing such issues. Currently, NCI EVS is exploring new approaches to broaden external participation in the terminology development and QA process.

  19. Colon Cancer Biomarkers To Identify Patients Suitable For Therapeutic Intervention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  20. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  1. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 9, 2012.

  2. NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 11, 2014.

  3. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  4. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  5. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  6. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  7. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood.

  8. NCI's Proteome Characterization Centers Announced | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). CPTAC is a comprehensive, coordinated team effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows.

  9. NCI and the Chinese National Cancer Center pursue new collaborations in cancer research

    Cancer.gov

    CGH Director, Dr. Ted Trimble, and East Asia Program Director, Dr. Ann Chao, traveled to Beijing with Mr. Matthew Brown from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Global Affairs to attend the Joint Meeting of the NCC and the U.S. NCI.

  10. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through February 5, 2016.

  11. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 12, 2013.

  12. NCI Resource Room at AACR 2017

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers interested in meeting with their Program Directors should contact them ahead of AACR to arrange a time to meet at the NCI Resource Room. This space will be used for one-on-one consultations with NCI staff as well as small group meetings facilitated by the NCI.

  13. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assays.  This community web-based repository for well-characterized quantitative proteomic assays currently consists of 456 unique peptide assays to 282 unique proteins and ser

  14. NCI Researchers Discover Exceptionally Potent Antibodies with Potential for Prophylaxis and Therapy of MERS-Coronavirus Infections | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer In a recent article published in the Journal of Virology, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, reported the identification of three human monoclonal antibodies (m336, m337, and m338) that target the part of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) that is responsible for binding to its receptor. These antibodies are exceptionally potent inhibitors of MERS-CoV infection and also provide a basis for creating a future MERS-CoV vaccine.

  15. NCI60 Cancer Cell Line Panel Data and RNAi Analysis Help Identify EAF2 as a Modulator of Simvastatin and Lovastatin Response in HCT-116 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Sevtap; Azorsa, David O.; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Ibrahim-Zada, Irada; Gonzales, Irma M.; Arora, Shilpi; Henderson, Meredith C.; Choi, Yun Hee; Briollais, Laurent; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Tuzmen, Sukru

    2011-01-01

    Simvastatin and lovastatin are statins traditionally used for lowering serum cholesterol levels. However, there exists evidence indicating their potential chemotherapeutic characteristics in cancer. In this study, we used bioinformatic analysis of publicly available data in order to systematically identify the genes involved in resistance to cytotoxic effects of these two drugs in the NCI60 cell line panel. We used the pharmacological data available for all the NCI60 cell lines to classify simvastatin or lovastatin resistant and sensitive cell lines, respectively. Next, we performed whole-genome single marker case-control association tests for the lovastatin and simvastatin resistant and sensitive cells using their publicly available Affymetrix 125K SNP genomic data. The results were then evaluated using RNAi methodology. After correction of the p-values for multiple testing using False Discovery Rate, our results identified three genes (NRP1, COL13A1, MRPS31) and six genes (EAF2, ANK2, AKAP7, STEAP2, LPIN2, PARVB) associated with resistance to simvastatin and lovastatin, respectively. Functional validation using RNAi confirmed that silencing of EAF2 expression modulated the response of HCT-116 colon cancer cells to both statins. In summary, we have successfully utilized the publicly available data on the NCI60 cell lines to perform whole-genome association studies for simvastatin and lovastatin. Our results indicated genes involved in the cellular response to these statins and siRNA studies confirmed the role of the EAF2 in response to these drugs in HCT-116 colon cancer cells. PMID:21483694

  16. NCI at AACR 2016 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) will be participating at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, to be held April 16-20, 2016, in New Orleans at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Sessions Featuring NCI Staff An overview of the NCI-sponsored sessions and NCI experts presenting at AACR. |

  17. Think Tank: Identifying and Creating the Next Generation of Community-Based Cancer Prevention Studies | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    In late 2015, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention convened cancer prevention research experts and stakeholders to discuss the current state of cancer prevention research, identify key prevention research priorities for the NCI, and identify studies that could be conducted within the NCI Community Oncology Research Program. Read the Cancer Prevention Research journal article (PDF, 532KB). |

  18. CCR researchers identify pathway critical for preventing premature aging | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, fatal disease in which patients age prematurely. To identify primary HGPS driver mechanisms, Nard Kubben, Ph.D., a Research Fellow in the laboratory of Tom Misteli, Ph.D., in CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and colleagues in the NCI High-throughput Imaging Facility developed an imaging-based high-throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen.

  19. Biomimetic tissue-engineered systems for advancing cancer research: NCI Strategic Workshop report.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, Teresa K; Chan, Xin Yi; Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Ji, Kyungmin; Park, Kyung Min; Roshan-Ghias, Alireza; Sethi, Pallavi; Thakur, Archana; Tian, Xi; Villasante, Aranzazu; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Moore, Nicole M; Nagahara, Larry A; Kuhn, Nastaran Z

    2014-10-01

    Advanced technologies and biomaterials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine present tractable biomimetic systems with potential applications for cancer research. Recently, the National Cancer Institute convened a Strategic Workshop to explore the use of tissue biomanufacturing for development of dynamic, physiologically relevant in vitro and ex vivo biomimetic systems to study cancer biology and drug efficacy. The workshop provided a forum to identify current progress, research gaps, and necessary steps to advance the field. Opportunities discussed included development of tumor biomimetic systems with an emphasis on reproducibility and validation of new biomimetic tumor models, as described in this report.

  20. Automated Tools for Clinical Research Data Quality Control using NCI Common Data Elements.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Cody L; Topaloglu, Umit; Bian, Jiang; Hogan, William; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research data generated by a federation of collection mechanisms and systems often produces highly dissimilar data with varying quality. Poor data quality can result in the inefficient use of research data or can even require the repetition of the performed studies, a costly process. This work presents two tools for improving data quality of clinical research data relying on the National Cancer Institute's Common Data Elements as a standard representation of possible questions and data elements to A: automatically suggest CDE annotations for already collected data based on semantic and syntactic analysis utilizing the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Terminology Services' Metathesaurus and B: annotate and constrain new clinical research questions though a simple-to-use "CDE Browser." In this work, these tools are built and tested on the open-source LimeSurvey software and research data analyzed and identified to contain various data quality issues captured by the Comprehensive Research Informatics Suite (CRIS) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

  1. Data mining the NCI cancer cell line compound GI(50) values: identifying quinone subtypes effective against melanoma and leukemia cell classes.

    PubMed

    Marx, Kenneth A; O'Neil, Philip; Hoffman, Patrick; Ujwal, M L

    2003-01-01

    Using data mining techniques, we have studied a subset (1400) of compounds from the large public National Cancer Institute (NCI) compounds data repository. We first carried out a functional class identity assignment for the 60 NCI cancer testing cell lines via hierarchical clustering of gene expression data. Comprised of nine clinical tissue types, the 60 cell lines were placed into six classes-melanoma, leukemia, renal, lung, and colorectal, and the sixth class was comprised of mixed tissue cell lines not found in any of the other five classes. We then carried out supervised machine learning, using the GI(50) values tested on a panel of 60 NCI cancer cell lines. For separate 3-class and 2-class problem clustering, we successfully carried out clear cell line class separation at high stringency, p < 0.01 (Bonferroni corrected t-statistic), using feature reduction clustering algorithms embedded in RadViz, an integrated high dimensional analytic and visualization tool. We started with the 1400 compound GI(50) values as input and selected only those compounds, or features, significant in carrying out the classification. With this approach, we identified two small sets of compounds that were most effective in carrying out complete class separation of the melanoma, non-melanoma classes and leukemia, non-leukemia classes. To validate these results, we showed that these two compound sets' GI(50) values were highly accurate classifiers using five standard analytical algorithms. One compound set was most effective against the melanoma class cell lines (14 compounds), and the other set was most effective against the leukemia class cell lines (30 compounds). The two compound classes were both significantly enriched in two different types of substituted p-quinones. The melanoma cell line class of 14 compounds was comprised of 11 compounds that were internal substituted p-quinones, and the leukemia cell line class of 30 compounds was comprised of 6 compounds that were external

  2. Emergency Preparedness at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Information to help prepare for an emergency. Includes resources for patients and health care providers to continue cancer care, NCI contacts for grantees, and resources to prepare and update NCI employees and contractors.

  3. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  4. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S; Jaffray, D; Chetty, I; Benedict, S

    2014-06-15

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  5. Methods for identifying translational researchers.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Mary K; Johnson, Timothy; Welch, Eric W

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no generally accepted method for identifying the community of translational researchers when evaluating Clinical and Translational Science Centers. We use data from the multiyear evaluation of the University of Illinois at Chicago Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) to investigate the complexities of reliably identifying translational researchers. We use three methods to identify translational researchers: (1) participating in CCTS services and programs; (2) self-identifying as a translational researcher; and (3) engaging in activities that are characteristic of translational science. We find little overlap of these differently defined research groups. We conclude with a discussion of how the findings suggest challenges for evaluating translational science programs and the need for better definition, communication, and demonstration of translational science for scientists and evaluators.

  6. Urologic Oncology Branch - Training - NCI/AFUD | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Postdoctoral Research Training Program This program is designed to train Ph.D. postdoctoral scientists in the growing field of urologic oncology. This program offers fellows the opportunity to participate in a diverse training experience that includes clinical and laboratory research on several urologic malignancies. The program provides an opportunity for selected individuals to complete a research project under the direction of a Senior Investigator in the Intramural Program of the National Cancer Institute.

  7. Former NCI Researcher, George Vande Woude, Receives AAAS Fellowship Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s Note: This article was adapted from a press release and biographical information from the Van Andel Research Institute’s website: http://www.vai.org/en/NewsRoom/press-release-01-28-14.aspx.

  8. Former NCI Researcher, George Vande Woude, Receives AAAS Fellowship Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s Note: This article was adapted from a press release and biographical information from the Van Andel Research Institute’s website: http://www.vai.org/en/NewsRoom/press-release-01-28-14.aspx.

  9. NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Challenge (Registration Now Open) | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Proteogenomics, integration of proteomics, genomics, and transcriptomics, is an emerging approach that promises to advance basic, translational and clinical research.  By combining genomic and proteomic information, leading scientists are gaining new insights due to a more complete and unified understanding of complex biological processes.

  10. BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

  11. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Active NCI Community Oncology Research Program Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Description of the research conducted by the infections and immunoepidemiology branch of NCI

    Cancer.gov

    The research mission of the Infections and Immunoepidemiology Branch is to discover infectious causes of cancer, to elucidate the determinants of malignancy for established oncogenic infections, to uncover novel infection-cancer associations, and to clarify how alterations in immunity and inflammation relate to cancer risk.

  14. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  15. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  16. Replication of five prostate cancer loci identified in an Asian population – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Campa, Daniele; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Gapstur, Susan M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hsing, Ann W.; Kraft, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background A recent Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) of prostate cancer in a Japanese population identified five novel regions not previously discovered in other ethnicities. In this study, we attempt to replicate these five loci in a series of nested prostate cancer case-control studies of European ancestry. Methods We genotyped five SNPs: rs13385191 (chromosome 2p24), rs12653946 (5p15), rs1983891 (6p21), rs339331 (6p22) and rs9600079 (13q22), in 7,956 prostate cancer cases and 8,148 controls from a series of nested case-control studies within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We tested each SNP for association with prostate cancer risk and assessed if associations differed with respect to disease severity and age of onset. Results Four SNPs (rs13385191, rs12653946, rs1983891 and rs339331) were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (p-values ranging from 0.01 to 1.1×10-5). Allele frequencies and odds ratios were overall lower in our population of European descent compared to the discovery Asian population. SNP rs13385191 (C2orf43) was only associated with low-stage disease (p=0.009, case-only test). No other SNP showed association with disease severity or age of onset. We did not replicate the 13q22 SNP, rs9600079 (p=0.62). Conclusions Four SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk in an Asian population are also associated with prostate cancer risk in men of European descent. Impact This study illustrates the importance of evaluation of prostate cancer risk markers across ethnic groups. PMID:22056501

  17. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  18. Dinutuximab (Unituxin™) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, NCI entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with United Therapeutics Corp., under which the company assumed responsibility for manufacturing dinutuximab and moving it through the steps required for regulatory approval.

  19. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  20. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  1. NCI Contact Center

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI offers free, scientifically accurate, and easy-to-understand information on a range of cancer topics in English and Spanish. Get live help from compassionate information specialists at 1-800-4-CANCER.

  2. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  3. NCI at ASCO

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-designated cancer centers are being extensively represented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago this year with a large array of clinical trial results and findings.

  4. Overview and Utilization of the NCI Thesaurus

    PubMed Central

    de Coronado, Sherri; Haber, Margaret; Hartel, Frank; Wright, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The NCI Thesaurus is a reference terminology covering areas of basic and clinical science, built with the goal of facilitating translational research in cancer. It contains nearly 110 000 terms in approximately 36000 concepts, partitioned in 20 subdomains, which include diseases, drugs, anatomy, genes, gene products, techniques, and biological processes, among others, all with a cancer-centric focus in content, and originally designed to support coding activities across the National Cancer Institute. Each concept represents a unit of meaning and contains a number of annotations, such as synonyms and preferred name, as well as annotations such as textual definitions and optional references to external authorities. In addition, concepts are modelled with description logic (DL) and defined by their relationships to other concepts; there are currently approximately 90 types of named relations declared in the terminology. The NCI Thesaurus is produced by the Enterprise Vocabulary Services project, a collaborative effort between the NCI Center for Bioinformatics and the NCI Office of Communications, and is part of the caCORE infrastructure stack (http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/NCICB/core). It can be accessed programmatically through the open caBIO API and browsed via the web (http://nciterms.nci.nih.gov). A history of editing changes is also accessible through the API. In addition, the Thesaurus is available for download in various file formats, including OWL, the web ontology language, to facilitate its utilization by others. PMID:18629178

  5. Factors Influencing Patient Pathways for Receipt of Cancer Care at an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A.; Rodriguez, Elisa M.; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G.; Miller, Austin; Erwin, Deborah O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the field of oncology, increasing access to high quality care has been identified as a priority to reduce cancer disparities. Previous research reveals that the facilities where patients receive their cancer care have implications for cancer outcomes. However, there is little understanding of how patients decide where to seek cancer care. This study examined the factors that shape patients’ pathways to seek their cancer care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center (NCI-CCC), and differences in these factors by race, income and education. Methods In-depth interviews and survey questionnaires were administered to a random sample of 124 patients at one NCI-CCC in the Northeast US. In-depth interview data was first analyzed qualitatively to identify themes and patterns in patients’ pathways to receive their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Logistic Regression was used to examine if these pathways varied by patient race, income, and education. Results Two themes emerged: following the recommendation of a physician and following advice from social network members. Quantitative data analysis shows that patient pathways to care at an NCI-CCC varied by education and income. Patients with lower income and education most commonly sought their cancer care at an NCI-CCC due to the recommendation of a physician. Patients with higher income and education most commonly cited referral by a specialist physician or the advice of a social network member. There were no statistically significant differences in pathways to care by race. Conclusions Our findings show that most patients relied on physician recommendations or advice from a social network member in deciding to seek their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Due to the role of physicians in shaping patients’ pathways to the NCI-CCC, initiatives that strengthen partnerships between NCI-CCCs and community physicians who serve underserved communities may improve access to NCI-CCCs. PMID

  6. Study Identifies New Lymphoma Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    NCI researchers have identified new therapeutic targets for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs that hit these targets are under clinical development and the researchers hope to begin testing them in clinical trials of patients with DLBCL.

  7. Identifying Context Variables in Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Carolyn L.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies context variables in written composition from theoretical perspectives in cognitive psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Considers how multiple views of context from across the disciplines can build toward a broader definition of writing. (JD)

  8. Identifying Context Variables in Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Carolyn L.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies context variables in written composition from theoretical perspectives in cognitive psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Considers how multiple views of context from across the disciplines can build toward a broader definition of writing. (JD)

  9. NCI Visuals Online

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  10. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  11. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY..., Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports, 0925-NEW...

  12. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  13. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  14. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Cancer.gov

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  15. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  16. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  17. 2013 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  18. Micatu Tissue Arrayer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI researcher recognized a critical need to create a low-cost, easy-to-use tissue microarrayer (TMA), an instrument used by researchers and pathologists to accurately examine tissue samples from patients.

  19. 2012 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2012 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  20. 2011 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2011 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  1. 2010 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2010 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  2. 2008 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2008 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  3. 2009 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2009 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  4. 2014 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  5. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  6. NCI scientists at forefront of new prostate cancer diagnostics

    Cancer.gov

    Introduction of the UroNav was the result of nearly a decade’s research and development, principally conducted at NCI. Resembling a stylized computer workstation on wheels, the system electronically fuses together pictures from magnetic resonance imaging

  7. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Alliance in the News

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is conducting cutting-edge research using nanotechnology to transform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Read news stories and announcements below about the Alliance's multidisciplinary work.

  8. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  9. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to

  11. New Web-Based Tools Make Systems Pharmacology More Accessible Using Data from the NCI-60 | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    High-throughput biological techniques, like microarrays and drug screens, generate an enormous amount of data that may be critically important for cancer researchers and clinicians. Being able to manipulate the data to extract those pieces of interest, however, can require computational or bioinformatics skills beyond those of the average scientist.

  12. NCI, NHLBI, FDA, AACC, and CMS Collaborate in Advancing Proteomics Regulatory Science | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA. To address this issue, Dr.

  13. NCI's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium 1st Annual Scientific Symposium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  14. Analysis of Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer agents in the NCI60 panel of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Holbeck, Susan L; Collins, Jerry M; Doroshow, James H

    2010-05-01

    Since the early 1990s the Developmental Therapeutics Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines (NCI60) representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anticancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here the results of screening current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anticancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we also carried out a hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anticancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP website (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anticancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use.

  15. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  16. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  17. Clinical research participation among adolescent and young adults at an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and affiliated pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Stacy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Snyder, Mallory A; Reichek, Jennifer; Salsman, John M

    2017-05-01

    Minimal clinical trial participation among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer limits scientific progress and ultimately their clinical care and outcomes. These analyses examine the current state of AYA clinical research participation at a Midwestern comprehensive cancer center and affiliated pediatric hospital to advise program development and increase availability of trials and AYA participation. Enrollment is examined across all diagnoses, the entire AYA age spectrum (15-39), and both cancer therapeutic and supportive care protocols. his study was a retrospective review of electronic medical records via existing databases and registries for all AYAs. Data were collected for AYAs seen by an oncologist at the adult outpatient cancer center or at the pediatric hospital between the years 2010 and 2014. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted to characterize this sample. In the pediatric setting, 42.3% of AYAs were enrolled in a study compared to 11.2% in the adult setting. Regression analyses in the pediatric setting revealed that AYAs with private insurance or Caucasian race were more likely to participate. Within the adult setting, ethnicity, race, insurance, and diagnosis were associated with study participation; 54.8% of study enrollments were for cancer therapeutic and 43.4% for supportive care studies. These results are comparable to previously published data and support the need for new local and national AYA initiatives to increase the availability of and enrollment in therapeutic clinical trials. The same is true for supportive care studies which play a crucial role in improving quality of life.

  18. NCI Cancer Research Data Ecosystem

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic explaining NCI’s present and future efforts to promote a culture of sharing data—clinical, genomic, proteomic, imaging, patient histories, and outcomes data—among stakeholders to impact cancer care.

  19. Replication of five prostate cancer loci identified in an Asian population--results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3).

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Campa, Daniele; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Chanock, Stephen J; Diver, W Ryan; Ganziano, J Michael; Gapstur, Susan M; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Willett, Walter C; Yeager, Meredith; Hsing, Ann W; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of prostate cancer in a Japanese population identified five novel regions not previously discovered in other ethnicities. In this study, we attempt to replicate these five loci in a series of nested prostate cancer case-control studies of European ancestry. We genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP): rs13385191 (chromosome 2p24), rs12653946 (5p15), rs1983891 (6p21), rs339331 (6p22), and rs9600079 (13q22), in 7,956 prostate cancer cases and 8,148 controls from a series of nested case-control studies within the National cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We tested each SNP for association with prostate cancer risk and assessed whether associations differed with respect to disease severity and age of onset. Four SNPs (rs13385191, rs12653946, rs1983891, and rs339331) were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P values ranging from 0.01 to 1.1 × 10(-5)). Allele frequencies and ORs were overall lower in our population of European descent than in the discovery Asian population. SNP rs13385191 (C2orf43) was only associated with low-stage disease (P = 0.009, case-only test). No other SNP showed association with disease severity or age of onset. We did not replicate the 13q22 SNP, rs9600079 (P = 0.62). Four SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk in an Asian population are also associated with prostate cancer risk in men of European descent. This study illustrates the importance of evaluation of prostate cancer risk markers across ethnic groups.

  20. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's gateway for information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial, in which patients with advanced cancer are assigned to treatment arms based on the molecular profiles of their disease.

  1. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's gateway for information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial, in which patients with advanced cancer are assigned to treatment arms based on the molecular profiles of their disease.

  2. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken.

  3. Pseudonymization of patient identifiers for translational research.

    PubMed

    Aamot, Harald; Kohl, Christian Dominik; Richter, Daniela; Knaup-Gregori, Petra

    2013-07-24

    The usage of patient data for research poses risks concerning the patients' privacy and informational self-determination. Next-generation-sequencing technologies and various other methods gain data from biospecimen, both for translational research and personalized medicine. If these biospecimen are anonymized, individual research results from genomic research, which should be offered to patients in a clinically relevant timeframe, cannot be associated back to the individual. This raises an ethical concern and challenges the legitimacy of anonymized patient samples. In this paper we present a new approach which supports both data privacy and the possibility to give feedback to patients about their individual research results. We examined previously published privacy concepts regarding a streamlined de-pseudonymization process and a patient-based pseudonym as applicable to research with genomic data and warehousing approaches. All concepts identified in the literature review were compared to each other and analyzed for their applicability to translational research projects. We evaluated how these concepts cope with challenges implicated by personalized medicine. Therefore, both person-centricity issues and a separation of pseudonymization and de-pseudonymization stood out as a central theme in our examination. This motivated us to enhance an existing pseudonymization method regarding a separation of duties. The existing concepts rely on external trusted third parties, making de-pseudonymization a multistage process involving additional interpersonal communication, which might cause critical delays in patient care. Therefore we propose an enhanced method with an asymmetric encryption scheme separating the duties of pseudonymization and de-pseudonymization. The pseudonymization service provider is unable to conclude the patient identifier from the pseudonym, but assigns this ability to an authorized third party (ombudsman) instead. To solve person-centricity issues, a

  4. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  5. Research Areas: Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's prevention research has a broad focus—from identifying environmental and lifestyle factors that influence cancer risk to studying the biology of how cancer develops and testing ways to disseminate prevention interventions.

  6. The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects: implications for cancer education.

    PubMed

    Kreps, Gary L; Gustafson, David; Salovey, Peter; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Wilbright, Wayne; Bright, Mary Anne; Muha, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported four innovative demonstration research projects, "The Digital Divide Pilot Projects," to test new strategies for disseminating health information via computer to vulnerable consumers. These projects involved active research collaborations between the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and regional cancer control researchers to field test new approaches for enhancing cancer communication in vulnerable communities. The projects were able to use computers to successfully disseminate relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations. These demonstration research projects suggested effective new strategies for using communication technologies to educate underserved populations about cancer prevention, control, and care.

  7. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  8. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  9. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  10. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  11. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - NCI Alliance Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  12. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer funds the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers collectively with the NCI Cancer Training Center. Find out about the funded Centers, to date, that train our next generation of scientists in the field of Canc

  13. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  14. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  15. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  16. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  17. NCI's Distributed Geospatial Data Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larraondo, P. R.; Evans, B. J. K.; Antony, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth systems, environmental and geophysics datasets are an extremely valuable source of information about the state and evolution of the Earth. However, different disciplines and applications require this data to be post-processed in different ways before it can be used. For researchers experimenting with algorithms across large datasets or combining multiple data sets, the traditional approach to batch data processing and storing all the output for later analysis rapidly becomes unfeasible, and often requires additional work to publish for others to use. Recent developments on distributed computing using interactive access to significant cloud infrastructure opens the door for new ways of processing data on demand, hence alleviating the need for storage space for each individual copy of each product. The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has developed a highly distributed geospatial data server which supports interactive processing of large geospatial data products, including satellite Earth Observation data and global model data, using flexible user-defined functions. This system dynamically and efficiently distributes the required computations among cloud nodes and thus provides a scalable analysis capability. In many cases this completely alleviates the need to preprocess and store the data as products. This system presents a standards-compliant interface, allowing ready accessibility for users of the data. Typical data wrangling problems such as handling different file formats and data types, or harmonising the coordinate projections or temporal and spatial resolutions, can now be handled automatically by this service. The geospatial data server exposes functionality for specifying how the data should be aggregated and transformed. The resulting products can be served using several standards such as the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) or Web Feature Service (WFS), Open Street Map tiles, or raw binary arrays under

  18. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Training Funding

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer awards training grants to facilitate the training and education of the next generation of nanotechnology researchers. The grants also provide an opportunity for experienced researchers and established institutions to work together in sharing their knowledge to positively influence the future of nanotechnology.

  19. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  20. NCI SRK Award

    Cancer.gov

    The SRK Fellowship is a highly competitive, unpaid, and annual, one-year program that provides additional mentoring opportunities, networking, seminars, and workshops to help prepare NCI’s female postdoctoral fellows for the competitive nature of the job market and help them remain in a biomedical research career.

  1. NCI SRK Award

    Cancer.gov

    The SRK Fellowship is a highly competitive, unpaid, and annual, one-year program that provides additional mentoring opportunities, networking, seminars, and workshops to help prepare NCI’s female postdoctoral fellows for the competitive nature of the job market and help them remain in a biomedical research career.

  2. Novel Method Of Preparing Vaccines | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    This invention from the NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program describes methods to prepare vaccines for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods of preparing vaccines.

  3. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making a unique, non-obvious, and useful discovery, NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  4. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR), National...

  5. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... study with Matthew Vander Heiden, MD, PhD , of MIT and Dana-Farber. “Detecting the disease earlier in ... the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. Their experiments showed that mice with newly formed ...

  6. A Review of NCI’s Extramural Grant Portfolio: Identifying Opportunities for Future Research in Genes and Environment in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghazarian, Armen A.; Simonds, Naoko I.; Bennett, Kelly; Pimentel, Camilla B.; Ellison, Gary L.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Schully, Sheri D.; Mechanic, Leah E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors jointly influence cancer risk. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has made the study of gene-environment (GxE) interactions a research priority since the year 2000. Methods To assess the current status of GxE research in cancer, we analyzed the extramural grant portfolio of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from Fiscal Years 2007 to 2009. Publications attributed to selected grants were also evaluated. Results From the 1,106 research grants identified in our portfolio analysis, a random sample of 450 grants (40%) was selected for data abstraction; of these, 147 (33%) were considered relevant. The most common cancer type was breast (20%, n=29), followed by lymphoproliferative (10%, n=14), colorectal (9%, n=13), melanoma/other skin (9%, n=13), and lung/upper aero-digestive tract (8%, n=12) cancers. The majority of grants were studies of candidate genes (68%, n=100) compared to genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (8%, n=12). Approximately one third studied environmental exposures categorized as energy balance (37%, n=54) or drugs/treatment (29%, n=43). From the 147 relevant grants, 108 publications classified as GxE or pharmacogenomic were identified. These publications were linked to 37 of the 147 grant applications (25%). Conclusion The findings from our portfolio analysis suggest that GxE studies are concentrated in specific areas. There is room for investments in other aspects of GxE research, including, but not limited to developing alternative approaches to exposure assessment, broadening the spectrum of cancer types investigated, and performing GxE within GWAS. Impact This portfolio analysis provides a cross-sectional review of NCI support for GxE research in cancer. PMID:23462918

  7. Identifying and Avoiding Bias in Research

    PubMed Central

    Pannucci, Christopher J.; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative review provides an overview on the topic of bias as part of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's series of articles on evidence-based medicine. Bias can occur in the planning, data collection, analysis, and publication phases of research. Understanding research bias allows readers to critically and independently review the scientific literature and avoid treatments which are suboptimal or potentially harmful. A thorough understanding of bias and how it affects study results is essential for the practice of evidence-based medicine. PMID:20679844

  8. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) licenses the discoveries of NCI and nine other NIH Institutes so new technologies can be developed and commercialized, to convert them into public health benefits. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  10. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  11. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  12. NIH Institutes and Centers Served by TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    TTC services the NCI Intramural Research laboratories as well as nine other NIH institutes a range of services--NIDA, NIA, NIMHD, NICHD, NLM, CIT, NCCIH, Clinical Center, NEI. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  14. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Cancer.gov

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  15. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    Cancer.gov

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  16. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  17. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  18. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  19. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  20. NCI investment in nanotechnology: achievements and challenges for the future.

    PubMed

    Dickherber, Anthony; Morris, Stephanie A; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers an exceptional and unique opportunity for developing a new generation of tools addressing persistent challenges to progress in cancer research and clinical care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recognizes this potential, which is why it invests roughly $150 M per year in nanobiotechnology training, research and development. By exploiting the various capacities of nanomaterials, the range of nanoscale vectors and probes potentially available suggests much is possible for precisely investigating, manipulating, and targeting the mechanisms of cancer across the full spectrum of research and clinical care. NCI has played a key role among federal R&D agencies in recognizing early the value of nanobiotechnology in medicine and committing to its development as well as providing training support for new investigators in the field. These investments have allowed many in the research community to pursue breakthrough capabilities that have already yielded broad benefits. Presented here is an overview of how NCI has made these investments with some consideration of how it will continue to work with this research community to pursue paradigm-changing innovations that offer relief from the burdens of cancer.

  1. Emergency Services at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Despite precautions and preventive techniques, injuries and emergencies can happen at NCI at Frederick. When they occur, employees should call the same number as they would when they are off-campus: 911.

  2. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  3. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  4. Identifying fruitful connections between and among researchers and practitioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Menzies, Tim; Connelly, Judith R.

    2003-01-01

    Many organizations look to research to yield new and improved products and practices. Connecting practitioners who have the need for research results to the researchers producing those results is important to guiding research and utilizing its results. Likewise, connecting researchers working on related topics to one another, and connecting practitioners with related needs to one another, is important to establishing communities of shared interests. We present an approach that helps identify fruitful such connections.

  5. NCI Blog Post: CPTAC, the Complementary Sibling of TCGA (An Interview with Dr. Henry Rodriguez about NCI’s Proteomics Program) | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    What is proteomics? Proteomics is a highly automated and rapid method for measuring all the proteins in a biological sample. Proteins are the molecules that actually do most of the work inside a cell. When researchers develop cancer drugs, those drugs typically target proteins, so scientists and clinicians really have to understand what the proteins are doing. Proteomics researchers are now able to measure up to 10,000 proteins per tumor sample.

  6. What do medical students understand by research and research skills? Identifying research opportunities within undergraduate projects.

    PubMed

    Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah; Drewery, Sarah; Elton, Sarah; Emmerson, Catherine; Marshall, Michelle; Smith, John A; Stark, Patsy; Whittle, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate research exposure leads to increased recruitment into academic medicine, enhanced employability and improved postgraduate research productivity. Uptake of undergraduate research opportunities is reported to be disappointing, and little is known about how students perceive research. To investigate opportunities for undergraduate participation in research, recognition of such opportunities, and associated skills development. A mixed method approach, incorporating student focus and study groups, and documentary analysis at five UK medical schools. Undergraduates recognised the benefits of acquiring research skills, but identified practical difficulties and disadvantages of participating. Analysis of 905 projects in four main research skill areas - (1) research methods; (2) information gathering; (3) critical analysis and review; (4) data processing - indicated 52% of projects provided opportunities for students to develop one or more skills, only 13% offered development in all areas. In 17%, project descriptions provided insufficient information to determine opportunities. Supplied with information from a representative sample of projects (n = 80), there was little consensus in identifying skills among students or between students and researchers. Consensus improved dramatically following guidance on how to identify skills. Undergraduates recognise the benefits of research experience but need a realistic understanding of the research process. Opportunities for research skill development may not be obvious. Undergraduates require training to recognise the skills required for research and enhanced transparency in potential project outcomes.

  7. The NCI-60 Methylome and Its Integration into CellMiner.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Sunshine, Margot; Rajapakse, Vinodh; Luna, Augustin; Kohn, Kurt W; Stevenson, Holly; Wang, Yonghong; Heyn, Holger; Nogales, Vanesa; Moran, Sebastian; Goldstein, David J; Doroshow, James H; Meltzer, Paul S; Esteller, Manel; Pommier, Yves

    2017-02-01

    A unique resource for systems pharmacology and genomic studies is the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel, which provides data for the largest publicly available library of compounds with cytotoxic activity (∼21,000 compounds), including 108 FDA-approved and 70 clinical trial drugs as well as genomic data, including whole-exome sequencing, gene and miRNA transcripts, DNA copy number, and protein levels. Here, we provide the first readily usable genome-wide DNA methylation database for the NCI-60, including 485,577 probes from the Infinium HumanMethylation450k BeadChip array, which yielded DNA methylation signatures for 17,559 genes integrated into our open access CellMiner version 2.0 (https://discover.nci.nih.gov/cellminer). Among new insights, transcript versus DNA methylation correlations revealed the epithelial/mesenchymal gene functional category as being influenced most heavily by methylation. DNA methylation and copy number integration with transcript levels yielded an assessment of their relative influence for 15,798 genes, including tumor suppressor, mitochondrial, and mismatch repair genes. Four forms of molecular data were combined, providing rationale for microsatellite instability for 8 of the 9 cell lines in which it occurred. Individual cell line analyses showed global methylome patterns with overall methylation levels ranging from 17% to 84%. A six-gene model, including PARP1, EP300, KDM5C, SMARCB1, and UHRF1 matched this pattern. In addition, promoter methylation of two translationally relevant genes, Schlafen 11 (SLFN11) and methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), served as indicators of therapeutic resistance or susceptibility, respectively. Overall, our database provides a resource of pharmacologic data that can reinforce known therapeutic strategies and identify novel drugs and drug targets across multiple cancer types. Cancer Res; 77(3); 601-12. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Presley, Carolyn J.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Klepin, Heidi D.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. PMID:27197916

  9. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  10. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  11. CGH and OCC Announce a New, Two-Year Funding Opportunity for NCI-designated Cancer Centers

    Cancer.gov

    CGH and OCC announce a new funding opportunity available from CGH for cancer prevention and control (CPC) researchers at NCI-designated cancer centers: Administrative Supplements to Promote Cancer Prevention and Control Research in Low and Middle Income Countries.

  12. Thrombosis in Cancer: Research Priorities Identified by a National Cancer Institute/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Strategic Working Group.

    PubMed

    Key, Nigel S; Khorana, Alok A; Mackman, Nigel; McCarty, Owen J T; White, Gilbert C; Francis, Charles W; McCrae, Keith R; Palumbo, Joseph S; Raskob, Gary E; Chan, Andrew T; Sood, Anil K

    2016-07-01

    The risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increased in cancer and particularly with chemotherapy, and it portends poorer survival among patients with cancer. However, many fundamental questions about cancer-associated VTE, or Trousseau syndrome, remain unanswered. This report summarizes the proceedings of a working group assembled by the NCI and NHLBI in August 2014 to explore the state of the science in cancer-associated VTE, identify clinically important research gaps, and develop consensus on priorities for future research. Representing a convergence of research priorities between the two NIH Institutes, the workshop addressed epidemiologic, basic science, clinical, and translational issues in cancer-associated VTE. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3671-5. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Engaging basic scientists in translational research: identifying opportunities, overcoming obstacles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This report is based on the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology’s symposium, “Engaging basic Scientists in Translational Research: Identifying Opportunities, Overcoming Obstacles,” held in Chevy Chase, MD, March 24–25, 2011. Meeting participants examined the benefits of engaging basic scientists in translational research, the challenges to their participation in translational research, and the roles that research institutions, funding organizations, professional societies, and scientific publishers can play to address these challenges. PMID:22500917

  14. An overview of the NCI precision medicine trials-NCI MATCH and MPACT.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Chen, Alice P

    2015-09-01

    The concept of oncogene addiction was first proposed by Weinstein in 2002, postulating that tumors rely on a single dominant mutation, the oncogenic "driver", for growth and survival. We have since come to realize that the genomic landscape of tumors is heterogeneous and more complex than previously thought. Advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics over the past decade have shifted treatment paradigms with regard to the development of molecular targeted therapeutics to identify and target the presumptive dominant lesion. As such, the decision of choosing targeted treatment strategies has become increasingly more reliant on the reporting of genomic screens of patients' tumor tissue. Whether this change in treatment paradigm will translate into improved clinical benefit, remains to be seen. To this end, the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched precision-based medicine trials to address this question. NCI Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH), a genomic pre-screening study, was designed to explore the efficacy of using targeted agents to target specific molecular aberrations and whether these same therapies have comparable activity across different tumor subtypes. Molecular Profiling-based Assignment of Cancer Therapy (MPACT), is a smaller, provocative trial designed to address whether targeting an oncogenic "driver" would be more efficacious than one not. The Exceptional Responders' initiative further aims to evaluate patients who have derived an unexpected durable benefit to these therapies, with retrospective analysis of their tumors to delineate potential predictive biomarkers which could predict response. The results of these trials will serve to help guide the field of precision medicine and personalized care.

  15. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1991-09-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990). The objectives of the present study was to evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  16. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-10-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990, 1991, and 1992). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate candidate fungicides.

  17. Identifying mental health nursing research priorities: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Wynaden, Dianne; Heslop, Karen; Omari, Omar Al; Nelson, Deborah; Osmond, Bernadette; Taylor, Monica; Gee, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Engaging in research and using evidence based practice are essential for mental health nurses to provide quality nursing care to consumers and families. This paper reports on a Delphi study that identified the top 10 mental health nursing research priorities at one area health service in Australia servicing a population of 840,000 people. Initially 390 research questions were identified by nurses and these were then reduced to 56 broader questions. Finally, the top 10 questions were ranked in order of importance. The priority questions were clinically and professionally focussed and included research into the delivery and organisation of mental health services and the need to design and evaluate new practice paradigms for nurses in the primary care setting. The mental health knowledge and skill set of graduates from Australian comprehensive nursing programmes along with improved recruitment and retention of graduates in mental health were also identified priority areas for research.

  18. De-identified genomic data sharing: the research participant perspective.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Deborah; Johnson, Catherine O; Bowen, Deborah; Smith, Megan; Wenzel, Lari; Edwards, Karen

    2017-04-05

    Combining datasets into larger and separate datasets is becoming increasingly common, and personal identifiers are often removed in order to maintain participant anonymity. Views of research participants on the use of de-identified data in large research datasets are important for future projects, such as the Precision Medicine Initiative and Cancer Moonshot Initiative. This quantitative study set in the USA examines participant preferences and evaluates differences by demographics and cancer history. Study participants were recruited from the Northwest Cancer Genetics Registry and included cancer patients, their relatives, and controls. A secure online survey was administered to 450 participants. While the majority participants were not concerned about personal identification when participating in a genetic study using de-identified data, they expressed their concern that researchers protect their privacy and information. Most participants expressed a desire that their data should be available for as many research studies as possible, and in doing so, they would increase their chance of receiving personal health information. About 20% of participants felt that a link should not be maintained between the participant and their de-identified data. Reasons to maintain a link included an ability to return individual health results and an ability to support further research. Knowledge of participants' attitudes regarding the use of data into a research repository and the maintenance of a link to de-identified data is critical to the success of recruitment into future genomic research projects.

  19. Identifying and Researching Market Opportunities for New High Technology Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunstan, Peter

    Using a product called the synchro-pulse welder as a case study example, this paper discusses the activities of CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) in identifying and marketing new high-technology products. A general discussion of CSIRO's market research plans includes two goals to be attained within the next 5…

  20. The Use of Citation Counting to Identify Research Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Harry; Woodhead, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The analysis and application of manpower statistics to identify some long-term international research trends in economic entomology and pest conrol are described. Movements in research interests, particularly towards biological methods of control, correlations between these sectors, and the difficulties encountered in the construction of a…

  1. The Use of Citation Counting to Identify Research Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Harry; Woodhead, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The analysis and application of manpower statistics to identify some long-term international research trends in economic entomology and pest conrol are described. Movements in research interests, particularly towards biological methods of control, correlations between these sectors, and the difficulties encountered in the construction of a…

  2. Identifying and Researching Market Opportunities for New High Technology Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunstan, Peter

    Using a product called the synchro-pulse welder as a case study example, this paper discusses the activities of CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) in identifying and marketing new high-technology products. A general discussion of CSIRO's market research plans includes two goals to be attained within the next 5…

  3. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  4. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  5. Identifying and Tracing Persistent Identifiers of Research Resources : Automation, Metrics and Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maull, K. E.; Hart, D.; Mayernik, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Formal and informal citations and acknowledgements for research infrastructures, such as data collections, software packages, and facilities, are an increasingly important function of attribution in scholarly literature. While such citations provide the appropriate links, even if informally, to their origins, they are often done so inconsistently, making such citations hard to analyze. While significant progress has been made in the past few years in the development of recommendations, policies, and procedures for creating and promoting citable identifiers, progress has been mixed in tracking how data sets and other digital infrastructures have actually been identified and cited in the literature. Understanding the full extent and value of research infrastructures through the lens of scholarly literature requires significant resources, and thus, we argue must rely on automated approaches that mine and track persistent identifiers to scientific resources. Such automated approaches, however, face a number of unique challenges, from the inconsistent and informal referencing practices of authors, to unavailable, embargoed or hard-to-obtain full-text resources for text analytics, to inconsistent and capricious impact metrics. This presentation will discuss work to develop and evaluate tools for automating the tracing of research resource identification and referencing in the research literature via persistent citable identifiers. Despite the impediments, automated processes are of considerable importance in enabling these traceability efforts to scale, as the numbers of identifiers being created for unique scientific resources continues to grow rapidly. Such efforts, if successful, should improve the ability to answer meaningful questions about research resources as they continue to grow as a target of advanced analyses in research metrics.

  6. Research Ethics Review: Identifying Public Policy and Program Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Martin A.; Gefenas, Eugenijus; Famenka, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical frame-work for use by fellows of the Fogarty International Center–sponsored Advanced Certificate Program in Research Ethics for Central and Eastern Europe to identify gaps in the public policies establishing research ethics review systems that impede them from doing their job of protecting human research subjects. The framework, illustrated by examples from post-Communist countries, employs a logic model based on the public policy and public management literature. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center’s International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum program. PMID:24782068

  7. Research Initiatives | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides detailed information about currently funded RFA initiatives both led by DCCPS, and those led by other NIH Institutes and Centers (I/Cs) that include DCCPS as a partner. Each initiative includes a table of funded grants and a map that shows the location of funded institutions.

  8. Pharmacologically directed strategies in academic anticancer drug discovery based on the European NCI compounds initiative.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hans R; Govaerts, Anne-Sophie; Fichtner, Iduna; Burtles, Sally; Westwell, Andrew D; Peters, Godefridus J

    2017-07-11

    The European NCI compounds programme, a joint initiative of the EORTC Research Branch, Cancer Research Campaign and the US National Cancer Institute, was initiated in 1993. The objective was to help the NCI in reducing the backlog of in vivo testing of potential anticancer compounds, synthesised in Europe that emerged from the NCI in vitro 60-cell screen. Over a period of more than twenty years the EORTC-Cancer Research Campaign panel reviewed ∼2000 compounds of which 95 were selected for further evaluation. Selected compounds were stepwise developed with clear go/no go decision points using a pharmacologically directed programme. This approach eliminated quickly compounds with unsuitable pharmacological properties. A few compounds went into Phase I clinical evaluation. The lessons learned and many of the principles outlined in the paper can easily be applied to current and future drug discovery and development programmes. Changes in the review panel, restrictions regarding numbers and types of compounds tested in the NCI in vitro screen and the appearance of targeted agents led to the discontinuation of the European NCI programme in 2017 and its transformation into an academic platform of excellence for anticancer drug discovery and development within the EORTC-PAMM group. This group remains open for advice and collaboration with interested parties in the field of cancer pharmacology.

  9. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  10. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  11. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-03-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990 and Schreck et al. 1991). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  12. Faculty Use of Author Identifiers and Researcher Networking Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Clara Y.; Lyon, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey focused on faculty use and knowledge of author identifiers and researcher networking systems, and professional use of social media, at a large state university. Results from 296 completed faculty surveys representing all disciplines (9.3% response rate) show low levels of awareness and variable resource preferences. The…

  13. Identifying emerging research collaborations and networks: Method development

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Ann M.; Martina, Camille A.; O’Dell, Nicole L.; Fogg, Thomas T.; Lurie, Stephen J.; Rubinstein, Eric P.; Pearson, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and translational research is a multidisciplinary, collaborative team process. To evaluate this process, we developed a method to document emerging research networks and collaborations in our medical center to describe their productivity and viability over time. Using an email survey, sent to 1,620 clinical and basic science full-and part-time faculty members, respondents identified their research collaborators. Initial analyses, using Pajek software, assessed the feasibility of using social network analysis (SNA) methods with these data. Nearly 400 respondents identified 1,594 collaborators across 28 medical center departments resulting in 309 networks with 5 or more collaborators. This low-burden approach yielded a rich dataset useful for evaluation using SNA to: a) assess networks at several levels of the organization, including intrapersonal (individuals), interpersonal (social), organizational/institutional leadership (tenure and promotion), and physical/environmental (spatial proximity) and b) link with other data to assess the evolution of these networks. PMID:24019209

  14. Identifying emerging research collaborations and networks: method development.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Ann M; Martina, Camille A; O'Dell, Nicole L; Fogg, Thomas T; Lurie, Stephen J; Rubinstein, Eric P; Pearson, Thomas A

    2014-03-01

    Clinical and translational research is a multidisciplinary, collaborative team process. To evaluate this process, we developed a method to document emerging research networks and collaborations in our medical center to describe their productivity and viability over time. Using an e-mail survey, sent to 1,620 clinical and basic science full- and part-time faculty members, respondents identified their research collaborators. Initial analyses, using Pajek software, assessed the feasibility of using social network analysis (SNA) methods with these data. Nearly 400 respondents identified 1,594 collaborators across 28 medical center departments resulting in 309 networks with 5 or more collaborators. This low-burden approach yielded a rich data set useful for evaluation using SNA to: (a) assess networks at several levels of the organization, including intrapersonal (individuals), interpersonal (social), organizational/institutional leadership (tenure and promotion), and physical/environmental (spatial proximity) and (b) link with other data to assess the evolution of these networks.

  15. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  16. Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  17. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  18. A practical guideline for identifying research intent with projects that collect private, identifiable health information.

    PubMed

    Amdur, Robert J; Speers, Marjorie A

    2003-06-01

    Radiation oncologists frequently engage in activities that involve the collection and analysis of data from medical records. Access to health information is an ethical issue because, if not done according to appropriate guidelines, it constitutes an invasion of privacy or breach in confidentiality. To protect patients for the social harm that may result from medical record review, our society has established laws and regulations that apply to projects that require medical record review. A major branch point in the guidelines for such projects is whether private information will be collected for research or nonresearch purposes. However, a problem with discussing privacy protection in terms of a research versus nonresearch model is that it is difficult to make this distinction for many kinds of projects. The purpose of this paper is to establish a practical guideline that can be used to decide if a project that involves analysis of private, identifiable medical information should be considered research from the regulatory standpoint.

  19. NCI Start-Up 2.0: An Evaluation Option License Program | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Start-Up Evaluation Option License minimizes barriers to entry faced by start-up companies that seek to license NIH technologies. The license encourages and supports the commercial development of early-stage technologies developed in the NIH Intramural Research Program. While the NIH has been quite flexible in structuring licenses for the benefit of start-up companies, one of the goals of the NIH Start-up License program is to further reduce the time and capital to negotiate and finalize an exclusive license agreement. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  20. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  1. Opportunities for Cancer-relevant Innovative Technologies with Transformative Potential | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking input from the community on identifying priorities with regards to supporting innovative technology development for cancer-relevant research. While the NCI provides support for technology development through a variety of mechanisms, it is important to understand whether or not these are sufficient for catalyzing and supporting the development of tools with significant potential for advancing important fields of cancer research or clinical care.

  2. Organizing patient safety research to identify risks and hazards

    PubMed Central

    Battles, J; Lilford, R

    2003-01-01

    Patient safety has become an international priority with major research programmes being carried out in the USA, UK, and elsewhere. The challenge is how to organize research efforts that will produce the greatest yield in making health care safer for patients. Patient safety research initiatives can be considered in three different stages: (1) identification of the risks and hazards; (2) design, implementation, and evaluation of patient safety practices; and (3) maintaining vigilance to ensure that a safe environment continues and patient safety cultures remain in place. Clearly, different research methods and approaches are needed at each of the different stages of the continuum. A number of research approaches can be used at stage 1 to identify risks and hazards including the use of medical records and administrative record review, event reporting, direct observation, process mapping, focus groups, probabilistic risk assessment, and safety culture assessment. No single method can be universally applied to identify risks and hazards in patient safety. Rather, multiple approaches using combinations of these methods should be used to increase identification of risks and hazards of health care associated injury or harm to patients. PMID:14645888

  3. Tracing Scientific Facilities through the Research Literature Using Persistent Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayernik, M. S.; Maull, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tracing persistent identifiers to their source publications is an easy task when authors use them, since it is a simple matter of matching the persistent identifier to the specific text string of the identifier. However, trying to understand if a publication uses the resource behind an identifier when such identifier is not referenced explicitly is a harder task. In this research, we explore the effectiveness of alternative strategies of associating publications with uses of the resource referenced by an identifier when it may not be explicit. This project is explored within the context of the NCAR supercomputer, where we are broadly interesting in the science that can be traced to the usage of the NCAR supercomputing facility, by way of the peer-reviewed research publications that utilize and reference it. In this project we explore several ways of drawing linkages between publications and the NCAR supercomputing resources. Identifying and compiling peer-reviewed publications related to NCAR supercomputer usage are explored via three sources: 1) User-supplied publications gathered through a community survey, 2) publications that were identified via manual searching of the Google scholar search index, and 3) publications associated with National Science Foundation (NSF) grants extracted from a public NSF database. These three sources represent three styles of collecting information about publications that likely imply usage of the NCAR supercomputing facilities. Each source has strengths and weaknesses, thus our discussion will explore how our publication identification and analysis methods vary in terms of accuracy, reliability, and effort. We will also discuss strategies for enabling more efficient tracing of research impacts of supercomputing facilities going forward through the assignment of a persistent web identifier to the NCAR supercomputer. While this solution has potential to greatly enhance our ability to trace the use of the facility through

  4. Types of Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  5. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  6. NCI HPC Scaling and Optimisation in Climate, Weather, Earth system science and the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Bermous, I.; Freeman, J.; Roberts, D. S.; Ward, M. L.; Yang, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has a national focus in the Earth system sciences including climate, weather, ocean, water management, environment and geophysics. NCI leads a Program across its partners from the Australian science agencies and research communities to identify priority computational models to scale-up. Typically, these cases place a large overall demand on the available computer time, need to scale to higher resolutions, use excessive scarce resources such as large memory or bandwidth that limits, or in some cases, need to meet requirements for transition to a separate operational forecasting system, with set time-windows. The model codes include the UK Met Office Unified Model atmospheric model (UM), GFDL's Modular Ocean Model (MOM), both the UK Met Office's GC3 and Australian ACCESS coupled-climate systems (including sea ice), 4D-Var data assimilation and satellite processing, the Regional Ocean Model (ROMS), and WaveWatch3 as well as geophysics codes including hazards, magentuellerics, seismic inversions, and geodesy. Many of these codes use significant compute resources both for research applications as well as within the operational systems. Some of these models are particularly complex, and their behaviour had not been critically analysed for effective use of the NCI supercomputer or how they could be improved. As part of the Program, we have established a common profiling methodology that uses a suite of open source tools for performing scaling analyses. The most challenging cases are profiling multi-model coupled systems where the component models have their own complex algorithms and performance issues. We have also found issues within the current suite of profiling tools, and no single tool fully exposes the nature of the code performance. As a result of this work, international collaborations are now in place to ensure that improvements are incorporated within the community models, and our effort can be targeted

  7. Research Priorities for Fertility and Conception Research as Identified by Multidisciplinary Health Care Practitioners and Researchers.

    PubMed

    Moran, Lisa J; Spencer, Laura; Russell, Darryl L; Hull, Mary Louise; Robertson, Sarah A; Varcoe, Tamara J; Davies, Michael J; Brown, Hannah M; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2016-01-13

    The Robinson Research Institute of the University of Adelaide convened a multidisciplinary group of n = 33 clinicians, researchers and representatives of government organisations on the 2 October 2014 for a workshop entitled "Promoting fertility and healthy conception. How do we generate greater reproductive health awareness?" The key aim of the workshop was to assess the body of knowledge that informs clinical practice and government policy, and to identify questions and additional information needed by health practitioners and government representatives working in the field of reproductive health and to frame future research and policy. The workshop identified topics that fell mostly into three categories: lifestyle-related, societal and biological factors. The lifestyle topics included nutrition and diet, exercise, obesity, shift work and other factors deemed to be modifiable at the level of the individual. The societal topics included discussions of matters that are structural, and resistant to change by individuals, including specific ethical issues, social disadvantage, government and educational policies. The biological factors are intrinsic physical states of the individual, and included many factors where there is a dense body of scientific knowledge which may not be readily accessible in less academic language. This workshop thus provided an opportunity to identify further actions that could be undertaken to meet the needs of diverse organisations and groups of professionals with an interest in human fertility. Since so many factors in our social and biological environment can impact fertility and preconception health, it is imperative to involve many disciplines or levels of government or societal organisations that have not traditionally been involved in this area.

  8. Research Priorities for Fertility and Conception Research as Identified by Multidisciplinary Health Care Practitioners and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Lisa J.; Spencer, Laura; Russell, Darryl L.; Hull, Mary Louise; Robertson, Sarah A.; Varcoe, Tamara J.; Davies, Michael J.; Brown, Hannah M.; Rodgers, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    The Robinson Research Institute of the University of Adelaide convened a multidisciplinary group of n = 33 clinicians, researchers and representatives of government organisations on the 2 October 2014 for a workshop entitled “Promoting fertility and healthy conception. How do we generate greater reproductive health awareness?” The key aim of the workshop was to assess the body of knowledge that informs clinical practice and government policy, and to identify questions and additional information needed by health practitioners and government representatives working in the field of reproductive health and to frame future research and policy. The workshop identified topics that fell mostly into three categories: lifestyle-related, societal and biological factors. The lifestyle topics included nutrition and diet, exercise, obesity, shift work and other factors deemed to be modifiable at the level of the individual. The societal topics included discussions of matters that are structural, and resistant to change by individuals, including specific ethical issues, social disadvantage, government and educational policies. The biological factors are intrinsic physical states of the individual, and included many factors where there is a dense body of scientific knowledge which may not be readily accessible in less academic language. This workshop thus provided an opportunity to identify further actions that could be undertaken to meet the needs of diverse organisations and groups of professionals with an interest in human fertility. Since so many factors in our social and biological environment can impact fertility and preconception health, it is imperative to involve many disciplines or levels of government or societal organisations that have not traditionally been involved in this area. PMID:26771633

  9. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  10. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  11. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  12. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  13. Identifying research priorities for effective retention strategies in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Anna; Daykin, Anne; Shaw, Alison R G; Lane, Athene J; Blazeby, Jane M; Clarke, Mike; Williamson, Paula; Gamble, Carrol

    2017-08-31

    The failure to retain patients or collect primary-outcome data is a common challenge for trials and reduces the statistical power and potentially introduces bias into the analysis. Identifying strategies to minimise missing data was the second highest methodological research priority in a Delphi survey of the Directors of UK Clinical Trial Units (CTUs) and is important to minimise waste in research. Our aim was to assess the current retention practices within the UK and priorities for future research to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies to reduce attrition. Seventy-five chief investigators of NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA)-funded trials starting between 2009 and 2012 were surveyed to elicit their awareness about causes of missing data within their trial and recommended practices for improving retention. Forty-seven CTUs registered within the UKCRC network were surveyed separately to identify approaches and strategies being used to mitigate missing data across trials. Responses from the current practice surveys were used to inform a subsequent two-round Delphi survey with registered CTUs. A consensus list of retention research strategies was produced and ranked by priority. Fifty out of seventy-five (67%) chief investigators and 33/47 (70%) registered CTUs completed the current practice surveys. Seventy-eight percent of trialists were aware of retention challenges and implemented strategies at trial design. Patient-initiated withdrawal was the most common cause of missing data. Registered CTUs routinely used newsletters, timeline of participant visits, and telephone reminders to mitigate missing data. Whilst 36 out of 59 strategies presented had been formally or informally evaluated, some frequently used strategies, such as site initiation training, have had no research to inform practice. Thirty-five registered CTUs (74%) participated in the Delphi survey. Research into the effectiveness of site initiation training, frequency of patient contact

  14. A method for identifying research priorities for health systems research on health and aging.

    PubMed

    Sivananthan, Saskia N; Chambers, Larry W

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and feasible priority-setting method conducted within a limited budget was used to identify research topics that would have an influence on health services for older adults. Health and aging researchers, policy makers, and caregivers were recruited to complete Delphi surveys that generated and ranked topics and identified other potential researchers. An interdisciplinary team of researchers was selected to produce and submit a proposal to a peer-review-granting agency. This method can be adapted by organizations to determine the focus of their research agenda and to engage individuals for collaboration on future research projects.

  15. Identifying multiple submissions in Internet research: preserving data integrity.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Anne M; Daniel, Candice M; Williams, Mark L; Baird, Grayson L

    2008-11-01

    Internet-based sexuality research with hidden populations has become increasingly popular. Respondent anonymity may encourage participation and lower social desirability, but associated disinhibition may promote multiple submissions, especially when incentives are offered. The goal of this study was to identify the usefulness of different variables for detecting multiple submissions from repeat responders and to explore incentive effects. The data included 1,900 submissions from a three-session Internet intervention with a pretest and three post-test questionnaires. Participants were men who have sex with men and incentives were offered to rural participants for completing each questionnaire. The final number of submissions included 1,273 "unique", 132 first submissions by "repeat responders" and 495 additional submissions by the "repeat responders" (N = 1,900). Four categories of repeat responders were identified: "infrequent" (2-5 submissions), "persistent" (6-10 submissions), "very persistent" (11-30 submissions), and "hackers" (more than 30 submissions). Internet Provider (IP) addresses, user names, and passwords were the most useful for identifying "infrequent" repeat responders. "Hackers" often varied their IP address and identifying information to prevent easy identification, but investigating the data for small variations in IP, using reverse telephone look up, and patterns across usernames and passwords were helpful. Incentives appeared to play a role in stimulating multiple submissions, especially from the more sophisticated "hackers". Finally, the web is ever evolving and it will be necessary to have good programmers and staff who evolve as fast as "hackers".

  16. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  17. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  18. NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) cancer information summaries: history, editorial processes, influence, and reach.

    PubMed

    Manrow, Richard E; Beckwith, Margaret; Johnson, Lenora E

    2014-03-01

    In the National Cancer Act of 1971, the Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) was given a mandate to "Collect, analyze, and disseminate all data useful in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer, including the establishment of an International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) to collect, catalog, store, and disseminate insofar as feasible the results of cancer research undertaken in any country for the use of any person involved in cancer research in any country" (National Cancer Act of 1971, S 1828, 92nd Congress, 1st Sess (1971)). In subsequent legislation, the audience for NCI's information dissemination activities was expanded to include physicians and other healthcare professionals, patients and their families, and the general public, in addition to cancer researchers. The Institute's response to these legislative requirements was to create what is now known as the Physician Data Query (PDQ®) cancer information database. From its beginnings in 1977 as a database of NCI-sponsored cancer clinical trials, PDQ has grown to include extensive information about cancer treatment, screening, prevention, supportive and palliative care, genetics, drugs, and more. Herein, we describe the history, editorial processes, influence, and global reach of one component of the PDQ database, namely its evidence-based cancer information summaries for health professionals. These summaries are widely recognized as important cancer information and education resources, and they further serve as foundational documents for the development of other cancer information products by NCI and other organizations.

  19. 76 FR 44593 - Identifying the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Science and Research Needs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Science and Research Needs; Availability of a Draft Report; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug... announcing the availability of a draft report entitled ``Identifying CDER's Science and Research Needs... efforts. Through external communication of the science and research needs outlined in the report,...

  20. Research fronts analysis : A bibliometric to identify emerging fields of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Sayaka; Ando, Satoko

    Research fronts analysis identifies emerging areas of research through observing co-clustering in highly-cited papers. This article introduces the concept of research fronts analysis, explains its methodology and provides case examples. It also demonstrates developing research fronts in Japan by looking at the past winners of Thomson Reuters Research Fronts Awards. Research front analysis is currently being used by the Japanese government to determine new trends in science and technology. Information professionals can also utilize this bibliometric as a research evaluation tool.

  1. Identifying Priorities for International Arctic Research and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachold, V.; Hik, D.; Barr, S.

    2015-12-01

    Participants. This paper presents an overview of IASC´s efforts and achievements in terms of identifying Arctic research priorities and providing scientific expertise to policy makers and people who live in or near the Arctic.

  2. Identifying Multiple Submissions in Internet Research: Preserving Data Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Anne M.; Daniel, Candice M.; Williams, Mark L.; Baird, Grayson L.

    2008-01-01

    Internet-based sexuality research with hidden populations has become increasingly popular. Respondent anonymity may encourage participation and lower social desirability, but associated disinhibition may promote multiple submissions, especially when incentives are offered. The goal of this study was to identify the usefulness of different variables for detecting multiple submissions from repeat responders and to explore incentive effects. The data included 1,900 submissions from a three-session Internet intervention with a pretest and three post-test questionnaires. Participants were men who have sex with men and incentives were offered to rural participants for completing each questionnaire. The final number of submissions included 1,273 “unique”, 132 first submissions by “repeat responders” and 495 additional submissions by the “repeat responders” (N = 1,900). Four categories of repeat responders were identified: “infrequent” (2–5 submissions), “persistent” (6–10 submissions), “very persistent” (11–30 submissions), and “hackers” (more than 30 submissions). Internet Provider (IP) addresses, user names, and passwords were the most useful for identifying “infrequent” repeat responders. “Hackers” often varied their IP address and identifying information to prevent easy identification, but investigating the data for small variations in IP, using reverse telephone look up, and patterns across usernames and passwords were helpful. Incentives appeared to play a role in stimulating multiple submissions, especially from the more sophisticated “hackers”. Finally, the web is ever evolving and it will be necessary to have good programmers and staff who evolve as fast as “hackers”. PMID:18240015

  3. Hierarchical Decimal Classification of Information Related to Cancer Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, John H.

    The classification may be used (1) to identify cancer research efforts supported by NCI in selected areas of research (at any general or specific level desired), (2) to store information related to cancer research and retrieve this information on request, and (3) to match interests of cancer research scientists against information in published…

  4. Hierarchical Decimal Classification of Information Related to Cancer Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, John H.

    The classification may be used (1) to identify cancer research efforts supported by NCI in selected areas of research (at any general or specific level desired), (2) to store information related to cancer research and retrieve this information on request, and (3) to match interests of cancer research scientists against information in published…

  5. NCI/DCCPS R21 Program Announcements | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  6. NCI/DCCPS R03 Program Announcements | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  7. Fasciola and fasciolosis in ruminants in Europe: Identifying research needs.

    PubMed

    Beesley, N J; Caminade, C; Charlier, J; Flynn, R J; Hodgkinson, J E; Martinez-Moreno, A; Martinez-Valladeres, M; Perez, J; Rinaldi, L; Williams, D J L

    2017-10-06

    Fasciola hepatica is a trematode parasite with a global distribution, which is responsible for considerable disease and production losses in a range of food producing species. It is also identified by WHO as a re-emerging neglected tropical disease associated with endemic and epidemic outbreaks of disease in human populations. In Europe, F. hepatica is mostly associated with disease in sheep, cattle and goats. This study reviews the most recent advances in our understanding of the transmission, diagnosis, epidemiology and the economic impact of fasciolosis. We also focus on the impact of the spread of resistance to anthelmintics used to control F. hepatica and consider how vaccines might be developed and applied in the context of the immune-modulation driven by the parasite. Several major research gaps are identified which, when addressed, will contribute to providing focussed and where possible, bespoke, advice for farmers on how to integrate stock management and diagnosis with vaccination and/or targeted treatment to more effectively control the parasite in the face of increasing the prevalence of infection and spread of anthelmintic resistance that are likely to be exacerbated by climate change. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Onchocerciasis, an undiagnosed disease in Mozambique: identifying research opportunities.

    PubMed

    Noormahomed, Emilia V; Akrami, Kevan; Mascaró-Lazcano, Carmen

    2016-03-31

    The objective of this paper is to summarise and critically review the available data about onchocerciasis in Mozambique, in order to report epidemiological and clinical aspects related to the disease and identify gaps in knowledge. The paper is intended to raise awareness of the existence and importance of this disease and to define research priorities. We examined the scarce epidemiological data at our disposal: two diagnostic studies in 1997 and 1998 (first reports on the existence of onchocerciasis in Mozambique), and two Rapid Epidemiological Mapping of Onchocerciasis (REMO) surveys in 2001 and 2007. We examined differences in study designs and methodologies as well as the differing geographical locations to explain the divergence in findings among the studies. Evidence indicates that onchocerciasis is hypoendemic in Mozambique (with national and imported cases), but still largely remains an undiagnosed illness. There is no awareness of the clinical aspects of the disease and nor of the differential diagnosis with lepromatous leprosy and dermatitis caused by Scabies spp. The use of skin biopsy and a symptom screening questionnaire, combined with nodule rate, in the first two studies may have captured even atypical or subacute presentations. Both REMO surveys relied solely on nodule detection and in the six years between the two studies, the prevalence of nodules detected more than doubled. The epidemiology and clinical aspects of the disease are unknown in Mozambique. Since the last REMO took place in 2007 and since the population is subject to large-scale movement and displacement, it is important to develop tools to identify and analyse populations that are at high risk for onchocerciasis. Cases of onchocerciasis may be misdiagnosed as leprosy or scabies that fail to improve despite being subjected to treatment against leprosy. Techniques to enable a differential diagnosis need to be established by training health professionals on the recognition of this

  9. Researchers identify potential therapeutic targets for a rare childhood cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    CCR researchers have identified the mechanism behind a rare but extremely aggressive childhood cancer called alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) and have pinpointed a potential drug target for its treatment. Learn more...

  10. Identifying health problems and health research priorities in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Feachem, R G; Graham, W J; Timaeus, I M

    1989-06-01

    Section 5, we draw these strands together and, having reviewed current approaches to prioritizing health problems and suggested some ways in which they could be improved, in Section 6 identify several research priorities, emphasizing the need for methodological research. This paper was commissioned in March 1987; prepared in draft and presented to a meeting at Chateau de Bossey, Geneva, Switzerland during 15-17 July; and revised and completed in September 1987. It is in no sense definitive or final.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  11. Halaven® - eribulin mesylate (analog of halichondrin B) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Under a CRADA with NCI, Eisai Co. provided eribulin for NCI's preclinical development activities and to support NCI's Phase I clinical trials. Eisai ultimately took the product, Halaven®, to licensure.

  12. Representing the NCI Thesaurus in OWL DL: Modeling tools help modeling languages

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Natalya F.; de Coronado, Sherri; Solbrig, Harold; Fragoso, Gilberto; Hartel, Frank W.; Musen, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Thesaurus is a biomedical reference ontology. The NCI Thesaurus is represented using Description Logic, more specifically Ontylog, a Description logic implemented by Apelon, Inc. We are exploring the use of the DL species of the Web Ontology Language (OWL DL)—a W3C recommended standard for ontology representation—instead of Ontylog for representing the NCI Thesaurus. We have studied the requirements for knowledge representation of the NCI Thesaurus, and considered how OWL DL (and its implementation in Protégé-OWL) satisfies these requirements. In this paper, we discuss the areas where OWL DL was sufficient for representing required components, where tool support that would hide some of the complexity and extra levels of indirection would be required, and where language expressiveness is not sufficient given the representation requirements. Because many of the knowledge-representation issues that we encountered are very similar to the issues in representing other biomedical terminologies and ontologies in general, we believe that the lessons that we learned and the approaches that we developed will prove useful and informative for other researchers. PMID:19789731

  13. Linking Researchers with their Research: Persistent identifiers, registries, and interoperability standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haak, Laurel; Bryant, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    While in some scientific disciplines researcher identification and data citation is an established community norm, lack of interoperability between identification systems for research works on the one hand and ambiguity of contributor names on the other remains a major hurdle. Improving the ease by which researchers are uniquely and unambiguously associated with their research contributions across systems and disciplines can support citability and in turn provide incentives to share works and datasets. This in turn can facilitate information flow and enable data re-use. In this presentation, we will illustrate the potential of coordinating persistent identifier initiatives across e-infrastructures using ORCID and the ODIN Project. ORCID is a community-driven organization that provides a registry of unique and persistent identifiers for researchers. The ORCID registry connects together existing but fragmented researcher identifiers, and stores persistent connections to publications, datasets, grants, and current and past affiliations. ODIN--the ORCID and DataCite Interoperability Framework--is a two-year EC project with the goal of connecting existing identifiers across multiple services and infrastructures. Together, these two efforts have supported improvements in the way author and contributor information is collected for publications and datasets that go a long way to addressing name ambiguity and citability problems in research communication.

  14. Strengthening the Cancer Research Enterprise - Annual Plan

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's expanding infrastructure, support for scientists at every career stage, and funding of small business innovation enables discoveries that advance cancer research. Read more about how NCI is strenghtening the cancer research enterprise.

  15. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  16. Identifiability and privacy in pluripotent stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Rosario; Andrews, Peter W; Baltz, Jay M; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Burton, Paul; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Hull, Sara Chandros; Jung, Ji-Won; Kurtz, Andreas; Lomax, Geoffrey; Ludwig, Tenneille; McDonald, Michael; Morris, Clive; Ng, Huck Hui; Rooke, Heather; Sharma, Alka; Stacey, Glyn N; Williams, Clare; Zeng, Fanyi; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2014-04-03

    Data sharing is an essential element of research; however, recent scientific and social developments have challenged conventional methods for protecting privacy. Here we provide guidance for determining data sharing thresholds for human pluripotent stem cell research aimed at a wide range of stakeholders, including research consortia, biorepositories, policy-makers, and funders.

  17. 2007 EORTC-NCI-ASCO annual meeting: molecular markers in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lukan, C

    2008-01-01

    The recent EORTC-NCI-ASCO Annual Meeting on 'Molecular Markers in Cancer' was held on 15-17 November 2007 in Brussels, Belgium. It was the largest meeting to date and marked the first year in which the American Association of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) joined in the efforts of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in organizing this annual event. More than 300 clinicians, pathologists, laboratory scientists and representatives from regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry came together for three days of intense discussion, debate and reflection on the latest biomarker therapeutic discoveries, strategies and clinical applications. The poster discussion sessions featured 79 research abstracts. The three most outstanding abstracts, all authored by young female researchers, were selected for presentation during the main meeting sessions. Highlights of each scientific session are presented.

  18. Identifying Research Priorities for School Improvement in the Developing World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Robyn; Fernandez-Hermosilla, Magdalena; Anderson, Stephen; Mundy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses a research agenda setting project conducted for an international non-governmental organization which aims to help create a regionally relevant, high-quality knowledge base on key education issues of policy and practice. Specifically, we illustrate how our team adapted the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHRNI)…

  19. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care.

  20. Auditing the NCI thesaurus with semantic web technologies.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-11-06

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed.

  1. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  2. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  3. TCGA researchers identify potential drug targets, markers for leukemia risk

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a deadly cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Their wo

  4. Identifying Future Scientists: Predicting Persistence into Research Training

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This study used semistructured interviews and grounded theory to look for characteristics among college undergraduates that predicted persistence into Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training. Participants in the summer undergraduate and postbaccalaureate research programs at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine were interviewed at the start, near the end, and 8–12 months after their research experience. Of more than 200 themes considered, five characteristics predicted those students who went on to Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training or to M.D. training intending to do research: 1) Curiosity to discover the unknown, 2) Enjoyment of problem solving, 3) A high level of independence, 4) The desire to help others indirectly through research, and 5) A flexible, minimally structured approach to the future. Web-based surveys with different students confirmed the high frequency of curiosity and/or problem solving as the primary reason students planned research careers. No evidence was found for differences among men, women, and minority and nonminority students. Although these results seem logical compared with successful scientists, their constancy, predictive capabilities, and sharp contrast to students who chose clinical medicine were striking. These results provide important insights into selection and motivation of potential biomedical scientists and the early experiences that will motivate them toward research careers. PMID:18056303

  5. Identifying future scientists: predicting persistence into research training.

    PubMed

    McGee, Richard; Keller, Jill L

    2007-01-01

    This study used semistructured interviews and grounded theory to look for characteristics among college undergraduates that predicted persistence into Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training. Participants in the summer undergraduate and postbaccalaureate research programs at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine were interviewed at the start, near the end, and 8-12 months after their research experience. Of more than 200 themes considered, five characteristics predicted those students who went on to Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training or to M.D. training intending to do research: 1) Curiosity to discover the unknown, 2) Enjoyment of problem solving, 3) A high level of independence, 4) The desire to help others indirectly through research, and 5) A flexible, minimally structured approach to the future. Web-based surveys with different students confirmed the high frequency of curiosity and/or problem solving as the primary reason students planned research careers. No evidence was found for differences among men, women, and minority and nonminority students. Although these results seem logical compared with successful scientists, their constancy, predictive capabilities, and sharp contrast to students who chose clinical medicine were striking. These results provide important insights into selection and motivation of potential biomedical scientists and the early experiences that will motivate them toward research careers.

  6. Identifying reasons for failure in biomedical research and publishing.

    PubMed

    Bousfield, D

    2009-07-01

    The regular assessment of Brazilian scientific output means that individual university departments need to constantly improve the quantity and quality of their scientific output. A significant proportion of this output involves the work of Master's and Doctoral students, but getting this work published in a suitable journal can often prove to be a challenge. Although students' lack of fluency in English is a contributing factor, many of the problems observed have an early origin in the formulation of the research problem and its relevance to current research trends in the international literature. In short, more time needs to be spent in the library and less in the laboratory, and more effort needs to be made in teaching students basic research skills such as the effective use of bibliographic databases like PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus.

  7. Identifying Vasopressor and Inotrope Use for Health Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Fawzy, Ashraf; Bradford, Mark; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Identifying vasopressor and inotrope (vasopressor) use from administrative claims data may provide an important resource to study the epidemiology of shock. Objectives: Determine accuracy of identifying vasopressor use using International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) coding. Methods: Using administrative data enriched with pharmacy billing files (Premier, Inc., Charlotte, NC), we identified two cohorts: adult patients admitted with a diagnosis of sepsis from 2010 to 2013 or pulmonary embolism (PE) from 2008 to 2011. Vasopressor administration was obtained using pharmacy billing files (dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, milrinone, norepinephrine, phenylephrine, vasopressin) and compared with ICD-9-CM procedure code for vasopressor administration (00.17). We estimated performance characteristics of the ICD-9-CM code and compared patients’ characteristics and mortality rates according to vasopressor identification method. Measurements and Main Results: Using either pharmacy data or the ICD-9-CM procedure code, 29% of 541,144 patients in the sepsis cohort and 5% of 81,588 patients in the PE cohort were identified as receiving a vasopressor. In the sepsis cohort, the ICD-9-CM procedure code had low sensitivity (9.4%; 95% confidence interval, 9.2–9.5), which increased over time. Results were similar in the PE cohort (sensitivity, 5.8%; 95% confidence interval, 5.1–6.6). The ICD-9-CM code exhibited high specificity in the sepsis (99.8%) and PE (100%) cohorts. However, patients identified as receiving vasopressors by ICD-9-CM code had significantly higher unadjusted in-hospital mortality, had more acute organ failures, and were more likely hospitalized in the Northeast and West. Conclusions: The ICD-9-CM procedure code for vasopressor administration has low sensitivity and selects for higher severity of illness in studies of shock. Temporal changes in sensitivity would likely make longitudinal shock

  8. Human Antibodies and Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Therapeutic | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program researchers developed multiple novel human anti-HIV-1 domain antibodies and their fusion proteins with two-domain or single-domain human soluble CD4 that can potentially be used alone or synergistically with other anti-HIV-1 antibodies and antiretroviral drugs as therapeutics and/or preventatives for infection by different HIV-1 strains. These are available for co-development and licensing.

  9. Identifying Data-Driven Instructional Systems. Research to Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The study summarized in this research to practice brief, "Creating data-driven instructional systems in school: The new instructional leadership," Halverson, R., Grigg, J., Pritchett, R., & Thomas, C. (2015), "Journal of School Leadership," 25. 447-481, investigated whether student outcome improvements were linked to the…

  10. Amusement Arcades Help Identify Teen Needs. Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews research on youth motivation for visiting amusement arcades and on the relationship among the school achievement, socioeconomic status, and self-esteem of fourth graders. Implications for camp involve providing adolescents with unstructured leisure time with little overt adult supervision and providing early intervention for low-achieving…

  11. Identifying Future Scientists: Predicting Persistence into Research Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Richard; Keller, Jill L.

    2007-01-01

    This study used semistructured interviews and grounded theory to look for characteristics among college undergraduates that predicted persistence into Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. training. Participants in the summer undergraduate and postbaccalaureate research programs at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine were interviewed at the start, near the end,…

  12. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  14. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  15. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Cancer.gov

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  16. GPU accelerated implementation of NCI calculations using promolecular density.

    PubMed

    Rubez, Gaëtan; Etancelin, Jean-Matthieu; Vigouroux, Xavier; Krajecki, Michael; Boisson, Jean-Charles; Hénon, Eric

    2017-05-30

    The NCI approach is a modern tool to reveal chemical noncovalent interactions. It is particularly attractive to describe ligand-protein binding. A custom implementation for NCI using promolecular density is presented. It is designed to leverage the computational power of NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators through the CUDA programming model. The code performances of three versions are examined on a test set of 144 systems. NCI calculations are particularly well suited to the GPU architecture, which reduces drastically the computational time. On a single compute node, the dual-GPU version leads to a 39-fold improvement for the biggest instance compared to the optimal OpenMP parallel run (C code, icc compiler) with 16 CPU cores. Energy consumption measurements carried out on both CPU and GPU NCI tests show that the GPU approach provides substantial energy savings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Industry-identified combustion research needs: Special study

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.G.; Soelberg, N.R.; Kessinger, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the development and demonstration of innovative combustion technologies that improve energy conservation and environmental practices in the US industrial sector. The report includes recommendations by industry on R&D needed to resolve current combustion-related problems. Both fundamental and applied R&D needs are presented. The report assesses combustion needs and suggests research ideas for seven major industries, which consume about 78% of all energy used by industry. Included are the glass, pulp and paper, refinery, steel, metal casting, chemicals, and aluminum industries. Information has been collected from manufacturers, industrial operators, trade organizations, and various funding organizations and has been supplemented with expertise at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to develop a list of suggested research and development needed for each of the seven industries.

  18. Mentoring international research ethics trainees: identifying best practices.

    PubMed

    Loue, Sana; Loff, Bebe

    2013-12-01

    Mentoring is an important component of training in the basic and clinical sciences due to the increasing complexities associated with establishing a career. Data relating to 466 long-term trainees in research ethics training programs were obtained from the Fogarty International Center's database. Data were supplemented with survey data (n = 17) and telephone interviews (n = 10) of the 21 principal investigators whose programs offered long-term training. The programs most successful with mentoring involved (1) the provision of an orientation for the trainees at the commencement of training; (2) a highly structured process of mentoring that required regular meetings and task achievement timelines; (3) intensive, frequent contact with the PI; and (4) support with personal issues that were troublesome to trainees. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center's International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development program.

  19. Identifying and controlling emerging foodborne pathogens: research needs.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, R L

    1997-01-01

    Systems for managing the risks associated with foodborne pathogens are based on detailed knowledge of the microorganisms and the foods with which they are associated--known hazards. An emerging pathogen, however, is an unknown hazard; therefore, to control it, key data must be acquired to convert the pathogen from an unknown to a known hazard. The types of information required are similar despite the identity of the new agent. The key to rapid control is rapid mobilization of research capabilities targeted at addressing critical knowledge gaps. In addition, longer-term research is needed to improve our ability to respond quickly to new microbial threats and help us become more proactive at anticipating and preventing emergence. The type of contingency planning used by the military in anticipating new threats serves as a useful framework for planning for new emergence.

  20. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  1. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  2. Sourcing Program: To identify outstanding women and ethnic minorities in research and research management

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, S.H.

    1991-08-01

    To meet the challenges of the changing demographics and a projected shortage of technically trained workers in the 21st century, Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) is increasing its commitment to develop a diverse work force with the abilities to carry out the Laboratory's missions. In addition to the recruitment programs already established at LLNL, a sourcing program to identify outstanding women and minorities in research and research management was initiated in the summer of 1990. A research methodology, time table, selection criteria, and data generation strategy were designed and implemented for this program. Through extensive contacts with R D facilities, women's and minority professional organizations, national research councils, technical professional societies and universities, other sourcing programs were investigated and evaluated and a network of contacts and resources was developed. This report describes the design and implementation of the sourcing program targeting outstanding women and minorities in science and engineering. It details the investigation and evaluation of sourcing programs in other R D facilities and provides information regarding methods and sources used to identify potential candidates. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. 10 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. CellMiner Companion: an interactive web application to explore CellMiner NCI-60 data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Gribskov, Michael; Hazbun, Tony R; Pascuzzi, Pete E

    2016-08-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel is an invaluable resource for cancer researchers, providing drug sensitivity, molecular and phenotypic data for a range of cancer types. CellMiner is a web resource that provides tools for the acquisition and analysis of quality-controlled NCI-60 data. CellMiner supports queries of up to 150 drugs or genes, but the output is an Excel file for each drug or gene. This output format makes it difficult for researchers to explore the data from large queries. CellMiner Companion is a web application that facilitates the exploration and visualization of output from CellMiner, further increasing the accessibility of NCI-60 data. The web application is freely accessible at https://pul-bioinformatics.shinyapps.io/CellMinerCompanion The R source code can be downloaded at https://github.com/pepascuzzi/CellMinerCompanion.git ppascuzz@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially

  5. A terminological and ontological analysis of the NCI Thesaurus.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, W; Smith, B; Goldberg, L

    2005-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Thesaurus is described by its authors as "a biomedical vocabulary that provides consistent, unambiguous codes and definitions for concepts used in cancer research" and which "exhibits ontology-like properties in its construction and use". We performed a qualitative analysis of the Thesaurus in order to assess its conformity with principles of good practice in terminology and ontology design. We used both the on-line browsable version of the Thesaurus and its OWL-representation (version 04.08b, released on August 2, 2004), measuring each in light of the requirements put forward in relevant ISO terminology standards and in light of ontological principles advanced in the recent literature. We found many mistakes and inconsistencies with respect to the term-formation principles used, the underlying knowledge representation system, and missing or inappropriately assigned verbal and formal definitions. Version 04.08b of the NCI Thesaurus suffers from the same broad range of problems that have been observed in other biomedical terminologies. For its further development, we recommend the use of a more principled approach that allows the Thesaurus to be tested not just for internal consistency but also for its degree of correspondence to that part of reality which it is designed to represent.

  6. Computational Challenges and Collaborative Projects in the NCI Quantitative Imaging Network.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Keyvan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Chenevert, Thomas L; Rubin, Daniel L; Sunderland, John J; Nordstrom, Robert J; Buatti, John; Hylton, Nola

    2016-12-01

    The Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) conducts research in development and validation of imaging tools and methods for predicting and evaluating clinical response to cancer therapy. Members of the network are involved in examining various imaging and image assessment parameters through network-wide cooperative projects. To more effectively use the cooperative power of the network in conducting computational challenges in benchmarking of tools and methods and collaborative projects in analytical assessment of imaging technologies, the QIN Challenge Task Force has developed policies and procedures to enhance the value of these activities by developing guidelines and leveraging NCI resources to help their administration and manage dissemination of results. Challenges and Collaborative Projects (CCPs) are further divided into technical and clinical CCPs. As the first NCI network to engage in CCPs, we anticipate a variety of CCPs to be conducted by QIN teams in the coming years. These will be aimed to benchmark advanced software tools for clinical decision support, explore new imaging biomarkers for therapeutic assessment, and establish consensus on a range of methods and protocols in support of the use of quantitative imaging to predict and assess response to cancer therapy.

  7. The Prevalence of Stalking among College Students: The Disparity between Researcher- and Self-Identified Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Corinne L.; Marsil, Dorothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Researchers examined the prevalence of self-identified and researcher-identified stalking victimization among college students. Participants and Methods: A representative sample of 1,573 (70.1% female; 29.9% male) student respondents completed an online stalking questionnaire. Results: Overall, 12% self-identified as having been…

  8. Auditing the NCI Thesaurus with Semantic Web Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed. PMID:18999265

  9. Keeping NCI at Frederick Pest-Free—Doug Vaughn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Nuisance critters and creepy crawlers aren’t a problem at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick, and that’s largely thanks to the efforts of Douglas Vaughn, the institution’s pest controller. Endearingly known to some staff as “Doug the Bug Guy,” Vaughn has been doing pest control for 39 years, 22 of which have been at NCI at Frederick. However, he doesn’t just handle bugs, and he isn’t the average exterminator.

  10. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  11. Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: Mechanisms and Opportunities to Mitigate. Report of an NCI Workshop, September 19, 2016.

    PubMed

    Citrin, Deborah E; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Walker, Amanda J; Freeman, Michael L; Eke, Iris; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Arankalayil, Molykutty J; Cohen, Eric P; Wilkins, Ruth C; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Anscher, Mitchell S; Movsas, Benjamin; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C; Mendonca, Marc S; Wynn, Thomas A; Coleman, C Norman

    2017-07-01

    A workshop entitled "Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: Mechanisms and Opportunities to Mitigate" (held in Rockville, MD, September 19, 2016) was organized by the Radiation Research Program and Radiation Oncology Branch of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), to identify critical research areas and directions that will advance the understanding of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) and accelerate the development of strategies to mitigate or treat it. Experts in radiation biology, radiation oncology and related fields met to identify and prioritize the key areas for future research and clinical translation. The consensus was that several known and newly identified targets can prevent or mitigate RIF in pre-clinical models. Further, basic and translational research and focused clinical trials are needed to identify optimal agents and strategies for therapeutic use. It was felt that optimally designed preclinical models are needed to better study biomarkers that predict for development of RIF, as well as to understand when effective therapies need to be initiated in relationship to manifestation of injury. Integrating appropriate endpoints and defining efficacy in clinical trials testing treatment of RIF were felt to be critical to demonstrating efficacy. The objective of this meeting report is to (a) highlight the significance of RIF in a global context, (b) summarize recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms of RIF, (c) discuss opportunities for pharmacological mitigation, intervention and modulation of specific molecular pathways, (d) consider the design of optimal clinical trials for mitigation and treatment and (e) outline key regulatory nonprescriptive frameworks for approval.

  12. Trends in research on energy balance supported by the National Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Siddiqi, Sameer M; Berrigan, David A; Ross, Sharon A; Nebeling, Linda C; Dowling, Emily C

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, the body of research linking energy balance to the incidence, development, progression, and treatment of cancer has grown substantially. No prior NIH portfolio analyses have focused on energy balance within one institute. This portfolio analysis describes the growth of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant research on energy balance-related conditions and behaviors from 2004 to 2010 following the release of an NCI research priority statement in 2003 on energy balance and cancer-related research. Energy balance grants from fiscal years (FY) 2004 to 2010 were identified using multiple search terms and analyzed between calendar years 2008 and 2010. Study characteristics related to cancer site, design, population, and energy balance area (physical activity, diet, and weight) were abstracted. From FY2004 to FY2010, the NCI awarded 269 energy balance-relevant grants totaling $518 million. In FY2010, 4.2% of NCI's total research project grants budget was allocated to energy balance research, compared to 2.1% in FY2004. The NCI more than doubled support for investigator-initiated research project grants (R01) and increased support for cooperative agreement (U01, U54) and exploratory research (R21) grants. In the portfolio, research examining energy balance areas in combination accounted for 41.6%, and observational and interventional studies were equally represented (38.3% and 37.2%, respectively). Breast cancer was the most commonly studied cancer. Inclusion of minorities rose, and funding specific to cancer survivors more than doubled. From FY2004 to FY2010, NCI's investment in energy balance and related health behavior research showed growth in funding and diversity of mechanisms, topics, and disciplines-growth that reflects new directions in this field. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Oncofertility resources at NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Clayman, Marla L; Harper, Maya M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Reinecke, Joyce; Shah, Shivani

    2013-12-01

    NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) set the standard for providing exemplary patient care. Quality cancer care includes discussions about fertility and referrals to fertility specialists for patients at risk for sterility. This study sought to determine what fertility preservation (FP) resources are available in CCCs and how well those are integrated into patient care. Leaders at each CCC received a letter requesting a short telephone interview with individuals who could provide information about the institution's FP resources. A semi-structured interview guide was used and responses were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 30 of the 39 CCCs that see adult patients (77%). The remaining institutions included 4 nonresponders, 3 that referred the interviewers to childhood cancer survivorship clinics, 1 that refused, and 1 that could not identify any FP resources. Participants were primarily affiliated with reproductive endocrinology (n=15) or hematology/oncology divisions (n=10). Institutional policies regarding consistent provision of FP information were rare (n=4), although most sites (n=20) either had some services on-site or had referral programs (n=8). However, only 13 had some experimental services, such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Respondents reported barriers to provision of FP, including oncologists' identification of patients at risk, low referral rates, and perceptions of patient prognosis. Only 8 (27%) sites had staff with time dedicated to FP. CCCs vary widely in implementing FP-recommended practice to their patients. CCCs are positioned to provide exemplary oncofertility care, but most need to better integrate FP information and referral into practice.

  14. 2013 NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Annual Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  15. Help NCI at Frederick “Knock Out Hunger” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI at Frederick is once again participating in the Feds Feed Families initiative, an annual food drive that addresses severe shortages of non-perishable items in food banks across D.C., Maryland, and Virginia during the summer months, when giving is at its lowest.

  16. 2013 NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Annual Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  17. Apply for Cancer Control Grants | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  18. Information for Our Partners | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY). | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  19. Review and evaluation of the NCI/NTP carcinogenesis bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Hottendorf, G.H.; Pachter, I.J.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the carcinogenesis bioassay results obtained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) indicates that approximately one-half of the bioassays directed by both institutions were positive for carcinogenicity. The more recent 85 bioassays completed by NTP reveal a higher proportion of studies interpreted as demonstrating no evidence of carcinogenicity than represented in the initial 198 bioassays conducted by NCI. Of the 100 NCI bioassays that were not positive for carcinogenicity 3 (3%) were classified in the category of ''no evidence for carcinogenicity in two animal species.'' Of the 43 NTP bioassays that were not positive for carcinogenicity 36 (84%) were placed in the category of ''no carcinogenic effects.'' The reason for this shift from a 33:1 positive to negative ratio in the NCI bioassays to an approximately 1:1 ratio in the NTP bioassays appears to be a difference in interpretation of the adequacy of the testing. Uniform criteria for concluding that a bioassay is negative must be developed and the results of all existing and future carcinogenesis bioassays must be interpreted with these exclusive criteria. Other bioassay problems are explored, including the incomplete validation of the carcinogenesis bioassay protocol by confirmatory results with positive and negative reference agents, the apparent lack of bioavailability data for some orally administered negative compounds, the continued use of mouse hepatic neoplasia as a single discriminating parameter, the variability in the inter- and intrastudy incidence of spontaneous tumors, and the continued reliance on the maximum tolerated dose.

  20. Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge. The TTC recommends that you discuss the most favorable type of partnership with our Invention Development and Marketing Unit. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  1. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  2. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  3. New NCI-N87-derived human gastric epithelial line after human telomerase catalytic subunit over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva-Pava, Kathy; Navabi, Nazanin; Skoog, Emma C; Lindén, Sara K; Oleastro, Mónica; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cellular model correctly mimicking the gastric epithelium to overcome the limitation in the study of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: Aiming to overcome this limitation, clones of the heterogenic cancer-derived NCI-N87 cell line were isolated, by stably-transducing it with the human telomerase reverse-transcriptase (hTERT) catalytic subunit gene. The clones were first characterized regarding their cell growth pattern and phenotype. For that we measured the clones’ adherence properties, expression of cell-cell junctions’ markers (ZO-1 and E-cadherin) and ability to generate a sustained transepithelial electrical resistance. The gastric properties of the clones, concerning expression of mucins, zymogens and glycan contents, were then evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining, Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and PAS/Alcian Blue-staining, immunocytochemistry and Western blot. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the hTERT-expressing gastric cell line for H. pylori research, by performing co-culture assays and measuring the IL-8 secretion, by ELISA, upon infection with two H. pylori strains differing in virulence. RESULTS: Compared with the parental cell line, the most promising NCI-hTERT-derived clones (CL5 and CL6) were composed of cells with homogenous phenotype, presented higher relative telomerase activities, better adhesion properties, ability to be maintained in culture for longer periods after confluency, and were more efficient in PAS-reactive mucins secretion. Both clones were shown to produce high amounts of MUC1, MUC2 and MUC13. NCI-hTERT-CL5 mucins were shown to be decorated with blood group H type 2 (BG-H), Lewis-x (Lex), Ley and Lea and, in a less extent, with BG-A antigens, but the former two antigens were not detected in the NCI-hTERT-CL6. None of the clones exhibited detectable levels of MUC6 nor sialylated Lex and Lea glycans. Entailing good gastric properties, both NCI-hTERT-clones were found to produce

  4. Former WHK Intern Returns to NCI at Frederick as Earl-Stadtman Investigator | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling (LCDS) recently welcomed John Brognard, Ph.D., as the new Earl-Stadtman Investigator. While Brognard is new to this role, he is not new to NCI at Frederick. In high school, Brognard was a Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern in what was formerly known as the ABL research program, where he worked under Bob Moschel, Ph.D., senior investigator, and Gary Pauly, Ph.D., currently a staff scientist in the Chemical Biology Laboratory.

  5. Former WHK Intern Returns to NCI at Frederick as Earl-Stadtman Investigator | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling (LCDS) recently welcomed John Brognard, Ph.D., as the new Earl-Stadtman Investigator. While Brognard is new to this role, he is not new to NCI at Frederick. In high school, Brognard was a Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern in what was formerly known as the ABL research program, where he worked under Bob Moschel, Ph.D., senior investigator, and Gary Pauly, Ph.D., currently a staff scientist in the Chemical Biology Laboratory.

  6. A framework for identifying public research priorities: an application in forestry research.

    Treesearch

    Glenn Fox

    1986-01-01

    Discusses attempts to model and measure the relationship between research and development activity and the rate and nature of technological change in recent decades. Reviews efforts to model optimal research resource allocation, and presents a model for southern pine forestry research.

  7. Identifying research priorities for public health research to address health inequalities: use of Delphi-like survey methods.

    PubMed

    Turner, S; Ollerhead, E; Cook, A

    2017-10-09

    In the funding of health research and public health research it is vital that research questions posed are important and that funded research meets a research need or a gap in evidence. Many methods are used in the identification of research priorities, however, these can be resource intensive, costly and logistically challenging. Identifying such research priorities can be particularly challenging for complex public health problems as there is a need to consult a number of experts across disciplines and with a range of expertise. This study investigated the use of Delphi-like survey methods in identifying important research priorities relating to health inequalities and framing tractable research questions for topic areas identified. The study was conducted in two phases, both using Delphi-like survey methods. Firstly, public health professionals with an interest in health inequalities were asked to identify research priorities. Secondly academic researchers were asked to frame tractable research questions relating to the priorities identified. These research priorities identified using Delphi-like survey methods were subsequently compared to those identified using different methods. A total of 52 public health professionals and 21 academics across the United Kingdom agreed to take part. The response rates were high, from public health professionals across three survey rounds (69%, 50% and 40%) and from academics across one round (52%), indicating that participants were receptive to the method and motivated to respond. The themes identified as encompassing the most important research priorities were mental health, healthy environment and health behaviours. Within these themes, the topic areas that emerged most strongly included community interventions for prevention of mental health problems and the food and alcohol environment. Some responses received from academic researchers were (as requested) in the form of tractable research questions, whereas others

  8. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  9. The Tumor Microenvironment at a Turning Point Knowledge Gained Over the Last Decade, and Challenges and Opportunities Ahead: A White Paper from the NCI TME Network.

    PubMed

    DeClerck, Yves A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Woodhouse, Elisa C; Singer, Dinah S; Mohla, Suresh

    2017-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, the Tumor Microenvironment Network (TMEN), supported by the NCI (Bethesda, MD), has promoted collaborative research with the explicit goal of fostering multi-institutional and transdisciplinary groups that are capable of addressing complex issues involving the tumor microenvironment. The main goal of the TMEN was to generate novel information about the dynamic complexity of tumor-host interactions in different organ systems with emphasis on using human tissues and supplemented by experimental models. As this initiative comes to a close, members of the TMEN took time to examine what has been accomplished by the Network and importantly to identify the challenges and opportunities ahead. This consensus document summarizes for the broader scientific community discussions that occurred at the two final meetings of the TMEN in 2015 and 2016. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1051-9. ©2017 AACR.

  10. The preclinical new drug research program of the National Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, J S

    1984-01-01

    The discovery and development of anticancer drugs with clinical potential are the responsibility of the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment, National Cancer Institute (NCI). Approximately 10,000 compounds/year are selectively acquired and screened against murine tumor models in order to discover new, active materials. The program required to accomplish this objective, as well as the subsequent tasks of formulation development and toxicology testing, is described. Since its inception in 1955, the preclinical new drug research program of the NCI has played a major role in the discovery and development of new agents which have been entered into clinical trial. The NCI has been responsible for the discovery of eight of the 16 commercially available drugs discovered since 1955. In addition, the NCI has played an important role in the clinical evaluation of all 16 of these New Drug Application (NDA)-approved drugs. During 1977-1982, the NCI filed Investigational New Drug Applications (INDA) for 33 cytotoxic agents. It was responsible for the discovery of the antitumor activity of 73% of these compounds. Most of the INDA compounds were acquired directly through NCI efforts. The DTP active acquisition program was responsible for obtaining 69% of these materials, with an additional 12% coming from the DTP intramural research program. Only 19% were received as voluntary submissions. The DTP active acquisition and screening effort is shown to have played even a larger role in identifying and obtaining those compounds which are currently in earlier stages of the NCI drug discovery and development process.

  11. Engaging patients in health research: identifying research priorities through community town halls.

    PubMed

    Etchegary, Holly; Bishop, Lisa; Street, Catherine; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Humphries, Dale; Vat, Lidewij Eva; Barrett, Brendan

    2017-03-11

    The vision of Canada's Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research is that patients be actively engaged as partners in health research. Support units have been created across Canada to build capacity in patient-oriented research and facilitate its conduct. This study aimed to explore patients' health research priorities in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Eight town halls were held with members of the general public in rural and urban settings across the province. Sessions were a hybrid information-consultation event, with key questions about health research priorities and outcomes guiding the discussion. Sixty eight members of the public attended town hall sessions. A broad range of health experiences in the healthcare system were recounted. Key priorities for the public included access and availability of providers and services, disease prevention and health promotion, and follow-up support and community care. In discussing their health research priorities, participants spontaneously raised a broad range of suggestions for improving the healthcare system in our jurisdiction. Public research priorities and suggestions for improving the provision of healthcare provide valuable information to guide Support Units' planning and priority-setting processes. A range of research areas were raised as priorities for patients that are likely comparable to other healthcare systems. These create a number of health research questions that would be in line with public priorities. Findings also provide lessons learned for others and add to the evidence base on patient engagement methods.

  12. Lowy Named Acting NCI Director April 2015

    Cancer.gov

    Douglas Lowy, M.D., today was officially named the National Cancer Institute’s Acting Director. Dr. Lowy, a cancer researcher for more than 40 years, received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama in 2014 for his research th

  13. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting you to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  14. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  15. FGFR2 is amplified in the NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cell line and is required for growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Anjili; Ware, Christopher; Davis, Lenora; Gazdar, Adi; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Lutterbach, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant kinase activation resulting from mutation, amplification, or translocation can drive growth and survival in a subset of human cancer. FGFR2 is amplified in breast and gastric cancer, and we report here the first characterization of FGFR2 gene amplification in colorectal cancer in the NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cell line. FGFR2 is highly expressed and activated in NCI-H716 cells, and FGFR selective small molecule inhibitors or FGFR2 shRNA strongly inhibited cell viability in vitro, indicating "addiction" of NCI-H716 cells to FGFR2. NCI-H716 growth in a xenograft model was also inhibited by an FGFR small molecule inhibitor. FGFR2 was required for activation of multiple downstream signaling proteins including AKT, ERK, S6RP and NFKB. Inhibition of downstream kinases such as AKT or ERK alone had modest effects on proliferation, whereas combined inhibition of AKT and ERK signaling resulted in a loss of viability similar to FGFR2 inhibition. We identified elevated FGFR2 expression in a small subset of primary colorectal cancer, however FGFR2 amplification was not observed. Although FGFR2 amplification is not common in primary colon cancer or lymph node and liver metastases, other subsets of colorectal cancer such as ascites, from which the NCI-H716 cell line was derived, have yet to be tested. These results suggest that emerging FGFR inhibitor therapeutics may have efficacy in a subset of colon cancer driven by FGFR2 amplification.

  16. Using a research framework to identify knowledge gaps in research on food marketing to children in Australia.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kathy; Kelly, Bridget; King, Lesley

    2009-06-01

    Research in the field of food marketing to children requires a better understanding of the research gaps in order to inform policy development. The purpose of this paper was to propose a framework for classifying food marketing research, using Australian research on food marketing to children to demonstrate how this framework can be used to determine knowledge gaps. A literature review of research databases and 'grey' material was conducted to identify research from the previous 10 years. Studies were classified according to their research focus, and media type, as either: exposure, including content analyses; effects of exposure, including opinions, attitudes and actions resulting from food marketing exposure; regulations, including the type and level of regulation that applies to food marketing; or breaches of regulations, including instances where marketing regulations have been violated. The majority of Australian research on food marketing to children has focused on television advertising and exposure research. Research has consistently shown that the content of food marketing directed at children is predominately for unhealthy foods. There is a lack of research on the effects of food marketing, which would be valuable to inform policy. The development of a logical framework for food marketing research allows for the identification of research gaps and enables research priorities to be identified.

  17. Who We Are | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    DCCPS was organized in 1997 to lead NCI’s efforts in cancer control research. Since that time, the division has grown and evolved to become a stronghold of NCI’s campaign to eliminate suffering and death from cancer.

  18. Provocative Questions in Cancer: NCI Seminar

    Cancer.gov

    science writers' seminar to discuss various aspects of one of NCI’s signature efforts -- the Provocative Questions project. Discussion will focus on the scientific research that surrounds some of these questions.

  19. Vision and Mission | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences both generates new knowledge and seeks to ensure that the products of cancer control research are effectively applied in all segments of the population.

  20. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  1. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  2. Novel target for high-risk neuroblastoma identified in pre-clinical research | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Pre-clinical research by investigators at the Center for Cancer Research and their colleagues have identified a number of novel epigenetic targets for high-risk neuroblastoma and validated a promising new targeted inhibitor in pre-clinical models.  Read more...

  3. NCI at Frederick Scientific Library Reintroduces Scientific Publications Database | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A 20-year-old database of scientific publications by NCI at Frederick, FNLCR, and affiliated employees has gotten a significant facelift. Maintained by the Scientific Library, the redesigned database—which is linked from each of the Scientific Library’s web pages—offers features that were not available in previous versions, such as additional search limits and non-traditional metrics for scholarly and scientific publishing known as altmetrics.

  4. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  5. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  6. Like a Good Neighbor, NCI-Frederick Is There | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The main campus of the National Cancer Institute at Frederick is an island of sorts: 68 acres of land that was once part of Fort Detrick. Accessing NCI property means passing through the Fort Detrick gates and crossing the post. While the campus is surrounded by the military installation, is protected by NIH police, and doesn’t allow the use of tobacco products, it is not a part of the military.

  7. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  8. Success Stories | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Some of our partnerships have resulted in the commercialization of therapeutics, vaccines, diagnostics, medical devices and research tools that benefit patients worldwide. TTC is proud to share a few examples of our successful partnerships. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. Identifying emerging issues in forestry as a tool for research planning.

    Treesearch

    Hans M. Gregersen; Allen L. Lundgren; Pamela J. Jakes; David N. Bengston

    1989-01-01

    A Delphi exercise is used to identify emerging issues in National Forest management and use, the relative importance of the issues, and barriers to resolving issues. USDA Forest Service managers agree on the importance of the 11 issues identified; however, researchers and National Forest managers do not always agree on the importance of issues or barriers.

  10. Identifying and Creating the Next Generation of Community-Based Cancer Prevention Studies: Summary of a National Cancer Institute Think Tank.

    PubMed

    McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Pearson, Deborah C; Kramer, Barnett S; Ford, Leslie G; Lippman, Scott M

    2017-02-01

    In late 2015, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention convened cancer prevention research experts and stakeholders to discuss the current state of cancer prevention research, identify key prevention research priorities for the NCI, and identify studies that could be conducted within the NCI Community Oncology Research Program. Goals included identifying cancer prevention research opportunities offering the highest return on investment, exploring the concept of precision prevention and what is needed to advance this area of research, and identifying possible targets for prevention. Four study populations were considered for cancer prevention research: healthy people, those at increased risk for a specific cancer, people with preneoplastic lesions, and children, adolescents, and young adults. Priorities that emerged include screening (e.g., surveillance intervals, tomosynthesis vs. digital mammography), a pre-cancer genome atlas (PreTCGA), HPV vaccines, immunoprevention of noninfectious origins, and overdiagnosis. Challenges exist, as the priority list is ambitious and potentially expensive. Clinical trials need to be carefully designed to include and maximize prospective tissue collection. Exploring existing cofunding mechanisms will likely be necessary. Finally, relationships with a new generation of physician specialists will need to be cultivated to reach the target populations. Cancer Prev Res; 10(2); 99-107. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Priority setting partnership to identify the top 10 research priorities for the management of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, Katherine H O; Flaherty, Helen; Daley, David J; Pascoe, Roland; Penhale, Bridget; Clarke, Carl E; Sackley, Catherine; Storey, Stacey

    2014-12-14

    This priority setting partnership was commissioned by Parkinson's UK to encourage people with direct and personal experience of the condition to work together to identify and prioritise the top 10 evidential uncertainties that impact on everyday clinical practice for the management of Parkinson's disease (PD). The UK. Anyone with experience of PD including: people with Parkinson's (PwP), carers, family and friends, healthcare and social care professionals. Non-clinical researchers and employees of pharmaceutical or medical devices companies were excluded. 1000 participants (60% PwP) provided ideas on research uncertainties, 475 (72% PwP) initially prioritised them and 27 (37% PwP) stakeholders agreed a final top 10. Using a modified nominal group technique, participants were surveyed to identify what issues for the management of PD needed research. Unique research questions unanswered by current evidence were identified and participants were asked to identify their top 10 research priorities from this list. The top 26 uncertainties were presented to a consensus meeting with key stakeholders to agree the top 10 research priorities. 1000 participants provided 4100 responses, which contained 94 unique unanswered research questions that were initially prioritised by 475 participants. A consensus meeting with 27 stakeholders agreed the top 10 research priorities. The overarching research aspiration was an effective cure for PD. The top 10 research priorities for PD management included the need to address motor symptoms (balance and falls, and fine motor control), non-motor symptoms (sleep and urinary dysfunction), mental health issues (stress and anxiety, dementia and mild cognitive impairments), side effects of medications (dyskinesia) and the need to develop interventions specific to the phenotypes of PD and better monitoring methods. These research priorities identify crucial gaps in the existing evidence to address everyday practicalities in the management of the

  12. Priority setting partnership to identify the top 10 research priorities for the management of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Katherine H O; Flaherty, Helen; Daley, David J; Pascoe, Roland; Penhale, Bridget; Clarke, Carl E; Sackley, Catherine; Storey, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This priority setting partnership was commissioned by Parkinson's UK to encourage people with direct and personal experience of the condition to work together to identify and prioritise the top 10 evidential uncertainties that impact on everyday clinical practice for the management of Parkinson's disease (PD). Setting The UK. Participants Anyone with experience of PD including: people with Parkinson's (PwP), carers, family and friends, healthcare and social care professionals. Non-clinical researchers and employees of pharmaceutical or medical devices companies were excluded. 1000 participants (60% PwP) provided ideas on research uncertainties, 475 (72% PwP) initially prioritised them and 27 (37% PwP) stakeholders agreed a final top 10. Methods Using a modified nominal group technique, participants were surveyed to identify what issues for the management of PD needed research. Unique research questions unanswered by current evidence were identified and participants were asked to identify their top 10 research priorities from this list. The top 26 uncertainties were presented to a consensus meeting with key stakeholders to agree the top 10 research priorities. Results 1000 participants provided 4100 responses, which contained 94 unique unanswered research questions that were initially prioritised by 475 participants. A consensus meeting with 27 stakeholders agreed the top 10 research priorities. The overarching research aspiration was an effective cure for PD. The top 10 research priorities for PD management included the need to address motor symptoms (balance and falls, and fine motor control), non-motor symptoms (sleep and urinary dysfunction), mental health issues (stress and anxiety, dementia and mild cognitive impairments), side effects of medications (dyskinesia) and the need to develop interventions specific to the phenotypes of PD and better monitoring methods. Conclusions These research priorities identify crucial gaps in the existing evidence to

  13. A New Tool for Identifying Research Standards and Evaluating Research Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.; Paul, Pallab; Stewart, Kim A.; Mukhopadhyay, Kausiki

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about the evaluation of faculty research productivity in promotion and tenure decisions, including many articles that seek to determine the rank of various marketing journals. Yet how faculty evaluators combine journal quality, quantity, and author contribution to form judgments of a scholar's performance is unclear. A…

  14. A New Tool for Identifying Research Standards and Evaluating Research Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.; Paul, Pallab; Stewart, Kim A.; Mukhopadhyay, Kausiki

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about the evaluation of faculty research productivity in promotion and tenure decisions, including many articles that seek to determine the rank of various marketing journals. Yet how faculty evaluators combine journal quality, quantity, and author contribution to form judgments of a scholar's performance is unclear. A…

  15. Identifying Research Priorities: Themes and Directions for the TESOL International Research Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, G. Richard; Lightbown, Patsy M.; Snow, Catherine; Christian, Donna; de Bot, Kees; Lynch, Brian K.; Nunan, David; Duff, Patricia A.; Freeman, Donald; Bailey, Kathleen M.

    2001-01-01

    Highlights research priorities for the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) field, including the following: age of beginning instruction, learning to read in a second language, dual-language education for English language learners, language assessment and program evaluation, English as a global language, learning English for…

  16. Person/Situation Selection Research: The Problem of Identifying Salient Situational Dimensions. Research Report No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Benjamin

    The study was concerned with the persistent problem in conducting person/situation research--the identification of relevant dimensions or features of the situation. Since the usual strategy for discovering relevant perceptual dimension of organizational life is to ask organizational employees to respond to a set of predetermined questions, this…

  17. mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of radioresistant NCI-H520 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUO, WEI; XIE, LI; ZHAO, LONG; ZHAO, YUEHUAN

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of radioresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to identify key molecules conferring radioresistance, the radioresistant subclone NCI-H520/R, derived from the NCI-H520 NSCLC cell line, was established with eight rounds of sublethal irradiation. The radioresistant features were subsequently assessed using a clonogenic assay, analysis of apoptosis and an MTT assay, the gene expression levels were examined using an Agilent Whole Human Genome 4×44 k Oligo microarray and Agilent Human miRCURY™ LNA array, and confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis were performed to determine the biological functions of the subset of differentially expressed genes. miRNA-mRNA correlation analysis between the expression levels of each miRNA and all its predicted target genes was performed to further understand the radioresistance in the NCI-H520 cells. Following eight rounds of sublethal irradiation, a total of 2,862 mRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the NCI-H520/R cells, including 893 upregulated genes and 1,969 downregulated genes. A total of 162 upregulated miRNAs and 274 downregulated miRNAs were significantly deregulated in the NCI-H520/R cells. Multiple core regulatory processes and signaling pathways were identified as being of likely relevance to radioresistance in NCI-H520/R cells, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway. The expression of genes associated with radioresistance reflects the complex biological processes involved in clinical cancer cell eradication and requires further investigation for future enhancement of therapy. PMID:25873351

  18. Systematically Identifying Relevant Research: Case Study on Child Protection Social Workers' Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Paula; Taylor, Brian J.; Campbell, Anne; McQuilkin, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Context: The development of a consolidated knowledge base for social work requires rigorous approaches to identifying relevant research. Method: The quality of 10 databases and a web search engine were appraised by systematically searching for research articles on resilience and burnout in child protection social workers. Results: Applied Social…

  19. Removing the College Involvement "Research Asterisk": Identifying and Rethinking Predictors of American Indian College Student Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify campus environmental predictors of American Indian college student involvement. The American Indian research asterisk, or not including American Indian data, has prevailed over student development research for decades. As a result, student affairs professionals have been limited in their ability to develop…

  20. Removing the College Involvement "Research Asterisk": Identifying and Rethinking Predictors of American Indian College Student Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify campus environmental predictors of American Indian college student involvement. The American Indian research asterisk, or not including American Indian data, has prevailed over student development research for decades. As a result, student affairs professionals have been limited in their ability to develop…

  1. Systematically Identifying Relevant Research: Case Study on Child Protection Social Workers' Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Paula; Taylor, Brian J.; Campbell, Anne; McQuilkin, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Context: The development of a consolidated knowledge base for social work requires rigorous approaches to identifying relevant research. Method: The quality of 10 databases and a web search engine were appraised by systematically searching for research articles on resilience and burnout in child protection social workers. Results: Applied Social…

  2. Researchers Use a Kinome Screen to Identify New Therapeutic Targets | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The tumor suppressor p53 is mutated in over 50% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), yet there are currently no available therapies to target it. CTD2 researchers at the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center hypothesized that HNSCC cancer cells with p53 mutations are dependent on particular kinases for survival. In a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, they sought to identify these kinases using RNAi against known kinase genes in mouse and human cell lines.

  3. NCI-60 Whole Exome Sequencing and Pharmacological CellMiner Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, William C.; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D.; Davis, Sean R.; Reinhold, Spencer W.; Kohn, Kurt W.; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S.; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, “Genetic variant versus drug visualization”, provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, “Genetic variant summation” allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based Cell

  4. NCI-60 whole exome sequencing and pharmacological CellMiner analyses.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Sousa, Fabricio; Sunshine, Margot; Abaan, Ogan D; Davis, Sean R; Reinhold, Spencer W; Kohn, Kurt W; Morris, Joel; Meltzer, Paul S; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes). Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002). These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, "Genetic variant versus drug visualization", provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, "Genetic variant summation" allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based CellMiner version, for

  5. A modified Delphi consensus study to identify UK osteopathic profession research priorities.

    PubMed

    Rushton, A B; Fawkes, C A; Carnes, D; Moore, A P

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing emphasis to take an evidence-based approach to healthcare. To obtain evidence relevant to the osteopathic profession a clear research direction is required based on the views of stakeholders in the osteopathic profession. A modified Delphi consensus approach was conducted to explore the views of osteopaths and patients regarding research priorities for osteopathy. Osteopaths and patients were invited to complete an online questionnaire survey (n = 145). Round 1 requested up to 10 research priority areas and the rationale for their selection. All of the themes from Round 1 were fed back verbatim, and in Round 2 participants were asked to rank the importance of the research priorities on a 5-point Likert scale. Finally, in Round 3 participants were asked to rank the importance of a refined list of research topics which had reached consensus. Descriptive analysis and use of Kendall's coefficient of concordance enabled interpretation of consensus. The response rate for Round 1 was 87.9% and identified 610 research priority areas. Round 2 identified 69 research themes as important, and Round 3 identified 20 research priority topic areas covering four themes: effectiveness of osteopathic treatment (7 areas prioritised), role of osteopathy: the management of four conditions were prioritised, risks with osteopathic treatment (two areas prioritised) and outcomes of osteopathic treatment (two areas prioritised). The findings will be taken forward to develop the research strategy for osteopathy.

  6. Using Liberating Structures to Increase Engagement in Identifying Priorities for the APNA Research Council.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jane S; Lewin, Linda; Beeber, Linda; Willis, Danny G

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, the Co-Chairs and Steering Committee of the Research Council members recognized the need to reevaluate the council's priorities. To determine the top priorities for the Research Council. Use of liberating structures: Impromptu Speed Networking, 1-2-4-all, and Crowd Sourcing. Identified Research Council priorities included the following: efforts to increase psychiatric mental health (PMH) research funding; serve as a connector to bring researchers together; foster research through state chapters; increase collaboration between PhDs and DNPs; and develop models for organizational support for PMH staff nurse involvement in research. The liberating structures used are valuable strategies for engaging groups of people to identify what matters most to the group. Through the use of these novel techniques, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association Research Council has identified priorities for the work of the council. This has led to actions planned for the coming future with the intent to move PMH nursing research forward. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. The risk of re-identification versus the need to identify individuals in rare disease research

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Mats G; Lochmüller, Hanns; Riess, Olaf; Schaefer, Franz; Orth, Michael; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Molster, Caron; Dawkins, Hugh; Taruscio, Domenica; Posada, Manuel; Woods, Simon

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing concern in the ethics literature and among policy makers that de-identification or coding of personal data and biospecimens is not sufficient for protecting research subjects from privacy invasions and possible breaches of confidentiality due to the possibility of unauthorized re-identification. At the same time, there is a need in medical science to be able to identify individual patients. In particular for rare disease research there is a special and well-documented need for research collaboration so that data and biosamples from multiple independent studies can be shared across borders. In this article, we identify the needs and arguments related to de-identification and re-identification of patients and research subjects and suggest how the different needs may be balanced within a framework of using unique encrypted identifiers. PMID:27222291

  8. Enhanced Missing Proteins Detection in NCI60 Cell Lines Using an Integrative Search Engine Approach.

    PubMed

    Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Garin-Muga, Alba; Prieto, Gorka; Bejarano, Bartolomé; Marcilla, Miguel; Marín-Vicente, Consuelo; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Casal, J Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Corrales, Fernando J; Segura, Victor

    2017-10-11

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) aims deciphering the complete map of the human proteome. In the past few years, significant efforts of the HPP teams have been dedicated to the experimental detection of the missing proteins, which lack reliable mass spectrometry evidence of their existence. In this endeavor, an in depth analysis of shotgun experiments might represent a valuable resource to select a biological matrix in design validation experiments. In this work, we used all the proteomic experiments from the NCI60 cell lines and applied an integrative approach based on the results obtained from Comet, Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem. This workflow benefits from the complementarity of these search engines to increase the proteome coverage. Five missing proteins C-HPP guidelines compliant were identified, although further validation is needed. Moreover, 165 missing proteins were detected with only one unique peptide, and their functional analysis supported their participation in cellular pathways as was also proposed in other studies. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the gene expression levels and the proteomic identifications from the common cell lines between the NCI60 and the CCLE project to suggest alternatives for further validation of missing protein observations.

  9. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  10. AACR-NCI-EORTC--21st International Symposium. Molecular targets and cancer therapeutics--Part 2.

    PubMed

    Walker, Karen; Padhiar, Meenal

    2010-01-01

    The 21st international symposium of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the NCI and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), held in Boston, included topics covering the development of therapeutics and molecular targets in the field of cancer research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of novel drugs for cancer. Investigational drugs discussed include RO-506876 (F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd), GDC-0980 (Genentech Inc), EMD-1214063 and EMD-1204831 (Merck Serono SA), AR-mTOR01 and AR-mTOR-26 (Array BioPharma Inc), GSK-2126458 (GlaxoSmithKline plc), EXEL-1415 and EXEL-2008 (Exelixis Inc), FP-1039 (FivePrime Therapeutics Inc), and AV-412 (AVEO Pharmaceuticals Inc).

  11. (Updated) NCI Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget Proposes $25 Million for Frederick National Lab | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; image by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer The additional funding requested for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) in the Fiscal 2016 Bypass Budget was $25 million, or approximately 3.5 percent of the total additional funding request of $715 million. Officially called the Professional Judgment Budget, the Bypass Budget is a result of the National Cancer Act of 1971, which authorizes NCI to submit a budget directly to the president, to send to Congress. With a focus on NCI’s research priorities and areas of cancer research with potential for investment, the Bypass Budget specifies additional funding, over and above the current budget, that is needed to advance

  12. AACR-NCI-EORTC--21st International Symposium. Molecular targets and cancer therapeutics--Part 1.

    PubMed

    Walker, Karen; Padhiar, Meenal

    2010-01-01

    The 21st international symposium of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the NCI and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), held in Boston, included topics covering the development of therapeutics and molecular targets in the field of cancer research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of novel drugs for cancer. Investigational drugs discussed include XL-139 (Bristol-Myers Squibb Co/Exelixis Inc), SPC-3042 (Enzon Pharmaceuticals Inc/ Santaris Pharma A/S), CH-5137291 (Chugai Pharmaceutical Co Ltd), SN-29966/SN-29926/SN-3000 (Proacta Inc), withaferin-A (University of Kansas), Reolysin (Oncolytics Biotech Inc), EZN-3889 and EZN-3892 (Enzon Pharmaceuticals/Santaris Pharma), and CBP-501 (CanBas Co Ltd/Takeda Pharmaceutical Co Ltd).

  13. Community Participatory Research With Deaf Sign Language Users to Identify Health Inequities

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Steven; Klein, Jonathan D.; Pollard, Robert Q.; Samar, Vincent; Schlehofer, Deirdre; Starr, Matthew; Sutter, Erika; Yang, Hongmei

    2011-01-01

    Deaf people who use American Sign Language (ASL) are medically underserved and often excluded from health research and surveillance. We used a community participatory approach to develop and administer an ASL-accessible health survey. We identified deaf community strengths (e.g., a low prevalence of current smokers) and 3 glaring health inequities: obesity, partner violence, and suicide. This collaborative work represents the first time a deaf community has used its own data to identify health priorities. PMID:22021296

  14. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  15. Critical research needs for identifying future changes in Gulf coral reef ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Feary, David A; Burt, John A; Bauman, Andrew G; Al Hazeem, Shaker; Abdel-Moati, Mohamed A; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa A; Anderson, Donald M; Amos, Carl; Baker, Andrew; Bartholomew, Aaron; Bento, Rita; Cavalcante, Geórgenes H; Chen, Chaolun Allen; Coles, Steve L; Dab, Koosha; Fowler, Ashley M; George, David; Grandcourt, Edwin; Hill, Ross; John, David M; Jones, David A; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Mahmoud, Huda; Moradi Och Tapeh, Mahdi; Mostafavi, Pargol Ghavam; Naser, Humood; Pichon, Michel; Purkis, Sam; Riegl, Bernhard; Samimi-Namin, Kaveh; Sheppard, Charles; Vajed Samiei, Jahangir; Voolstra, Christian R; Wiedenmann, Joerg

    2013-07-30

    Expert opinion was assessed to identify current knowledge gaps in determining future changes in Arabian/Persian Gulf (thereafter 'Gulf') coral reefs. Thirty-one participants submitted 71 research questions that were peer-assessed in terms of scientific importance (i.e., filled a knowledge gap and was a research priority) and efficiency in resource use (i.e., was highly feasible and ecologically broad). Ten research questions, in six major research areas, were highly important for both understanding Gulf coral reef ecosystems and also an efficient use of limited research resources. These questions mirrored global evaluations of the importance of understanding and evaluating biodiversity, determining the potential impacts of climate change, the role of anthropogenic impacts in structuring coral reef communities, and economically evaluating coral reef communities. These questions provide guidance for future research on coral reef ecosystems within the Gulf, and enhance the potential for assessment and management of future changes in this globally significant region.

  16. Critical research needs for identifying future changes in Gulf coral reef ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Feary, David A.; Burt, John A.; Bauman, Andrew G.; Al Hazeem, Shaker; Abdel-Moati, Mohamed A.; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa A.; Anderson, Donald M.; Amos, Carl; Baker, Andrew; Bartholomew, Aaron; Bento, Rita; Cavalcante, Geórgenes H.; Chen, Chaolun Allen; Coles, Steve L.; Dab, Koosha; Fowler, Ashley M.; George, David; Grandcourt, Edwin; Hill, Ross; John, David M.; Jones, David A.; Keshavmurthy, Shashank; Mahmoud, Huda; Moradi Och Tapeh, Mahdi; Mostafavi, Pargol Ghavam; Naser, Humood; Pichon, Michel; Purkis, Sam; Riegl, Bernhard; Samimi-Namin, Kaveh; Sheppard, Charles; Vajed Samiei, Jahangir; Voolstra, Christian R.; Wiedenmann, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Expert opinion was assessed to identify current knowledge gaps in determining future changes in Arabian/ Persian Gulf (thereafter ‘Gulf’) coral reefs. Thirty-one participants submitted 71 research questions that were peer-assessed in terms of scientific importance (i.e., filled a knowledge gap and was a research priority) and efficiency in resource use (i.e., was highly feasible and ecologically broad). Ten research questions, in six major research areas, were highly important for both understanding Gulf coral reef ecosystems and also an efficient use of limited research resources. These questions mirrored global evaluations of the importance of understanding and evaluating biodiversity, determining the potential impacts of climate change, the role of anthropogenic impacts in structuring coral reef communities, and economically evaluating coral reef communities. These questions provide guidance for future research on coral reef ecosystems within the Gulf, and enhance the potential for assessment and management of future changes in this globally significant region. PMID:23643407

  17. Persistent Identifiers for Field Expeditions: A Next Step for the US Oceanographic Research Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, Robert; Carbotte, Suzanne; Chandler, Cynthia; Smith, Shawn; Stocks, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Oceanographic research cruises are complex affairs, typically requiring an extensive effort to secure the funding, plan the experiment, and mobilize the field party. Yet cruises are not typically published online as first-class digital objects with persistent, citable identifiers linked to the scientific literature. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R; info@rvdata.us) program maintains a master catalog of oceanographic cruises for the United States research fleet, currently documenting over 6,000 expeditions on 37 active and retired vessels. In 2015, R2R started routinely publishing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for each completed cruise. Cruise DOIs, in turn, are linked to related persistent identifiers where available including the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) for members of the science party, the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) for physical specimens collected during the cruise, the Open Funder Registry (FundRef) codes that supported the experiment, and additional DOIs for datasets, journal articles, and other products resulting from the cruise. Publishing a persistent identifier for each field expedition will facilitate interoperability between the many different repositories that hold research products from cruises; will provide credit to the investigators who secured the funding and carried out the experiment; and will facilitate the gathering of fleet-wide altmetrics that demonstrate the broad impact of oceanographic research.

  18. Health Research and Millennium Development Goals: Identifying the Gap From Public Health Perspective.

    PubMed

    El Lawindi, Mona I; Galal, Yasmine S; Khairy, Walaa A

    2015-08-23

    Assessing the research output within the universities could provide an effective means for tracking the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) progress. This analytical database study was designed to assess the trend of research theses conducted by the Public Health Department (PHD), Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University during the period 1990 to 2014 as related to the: MDGS, Faculty and department research priority plans and to identify the discrepancies between researchers' priorities versus national and international research priorities. A manual search of the theses was done at the Postgraduate Library using a specially designed checklist to chart adherence of each thesis to: MDGs, Faculty and department research plans (RPs). The theses' profile showed that the highest research output was for addressing the MDGS followed by the PHD and Faculty RPs. Compliance to MDGs 5 and 6 was obvious, whereas; MDGs 2, 3, and 7 were not represented at all after year 2000. No significant difference was found between PH theses addressing the Faculty RPs and those which were not before and after 2010. A significantly lower percent of PH theses was fulfilling the PHD research priorities compared to those which were not after 2010. This study showed a definite decline in research output tackling the MDGS and PHD research priorities, with a non-significant increase in the production of theses addressing the Faculty RPs. The present study is a practical model for policy makers within the universities to develop and implement a reliable monitoring and evaluation system for assessment of research output.

  19. Theoretical analysis of the binding of iron(III) protoporphyrin IX to 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone via DFT-D3, MEP, QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL studies.

    PubMed

    Nkungli, Nyiang Kennet; Ghogomu, Julius Numbonui

    2017-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones display diverse pharmacological properties, including antimalarial activities. Their pharmacological activities have been studied in depth, but little of this research has focused on their antimalarial mode of action. To elucidate this antimalarial mechanism, we investigated the nature of the interactions between iron(III) protoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)PPIX) and the thione-thiol tautomers of 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (MAPTSC). Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3), the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), the noncovalent interaction (NCI) index, the electron localization function (ELF), the localized orbital locator (LOL), and thermodynamic calculations were employed in this work. Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding is expected to inhibit hemozoin formation, thereby preventing Fe(III)PPIX detoxification in plasmodia. Preliminary studies geared toward the identification of atomic binding sites in the thione-thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were carried out using molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps and conceptual DFT-based local reactivity indices. The thionic sulfur and the (2) N-azomethine nitrogen/thiol sulfur of, respectively, the thione and thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were identified as the most favorable nucleophilic sites for electrophilic attack. The negative values of the computed Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding energies, enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies are indicative of the existence and stability of Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes. MAPTSC-Fe(III) coordinate bonds and strong hydrogen bonds (N-H···O) between the NH2 group in MAPTSC and the C=O group in one propionate side chain of Fe(III)PPIX are crucial to Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding. QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL analyses revealed a subtle interplay of weak noncovalent interactions dominated by dispersive-like van der Waals interactions between Fe(III)PPIX and MAPTSC that stabilize the Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes.

  20. Rationale, Procedures, and Response Rates for the 2015 Administration of NCI's Health Information National Trends Survey: HINTS-FDA 2015.

    PubMed

    Blake, Kelly D; Portnoy, David B; Kaufman, Annette R; Lin, Chung-Tung Jordan; Lo, Serena C; Backlund, Eric; Cantor, David; Hicks, Lloyd; Lin, Amy; Caporaso, Andrew; Davis, Terisa; Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W

    2016-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to monitor population trends in cancer communication practices, information preferences, health risk behaviors, attitudes, and cancer knowledge. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognized HINTS as a unique data resource for informing its health communication endeavors and partnered with NCI to field HINTS-FDA 2015. HINTS-FDA 2015 was a self-administered paper instrument sent by mail May 29 to September 8, 2015, using a random probability-based sample of U.S. postal addresses stratified by county-level smoking rates, with an oversampling of high and medium-high smoking strata to increase the yield of current smokers responding to the survey. The response rate for HINTS-FDA 2015 was 33% (N = 3,738). The yield of current smokers (n = 495) was lower than expected, but the sampling strategy achieved the goal of obtaining more former smokers (n = 1,132). Public-use HINTS-FDA 2015 data and supporting documentation have been available for download and secondary data analyses since June 2016 at http://hints.cancer.gov . NCI and FDA encourage the use of HINTS-FDA for health communication research and practice related to tobacco-related communications, public knowledge, and behaviors as well as beliefs and actions related to medical products and dietary supplements.

  1. Improving global data infrastructures for more effective and scalable analysis of Earth and environmental data: the Australian NCI NERDIP Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Wyborn, Lesley; Druken, Kelsey; Richards, Clare; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Rozas Larraondo, Pablo; Steer, Adam; Smillie, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) facility hosts one of Australia's largest repositories (10+ PBytes) of research data collections spanning datasets from climate, coasts, oceans, and geophysics through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and the social sciences domains. The data are obtained from national and international sources, spanning a wide range of gridded and ungridded (i.e., line surveys, point clouds) data, and raster imagery, as well as diverse coordinate reference projections and resolutions. Rather than managing these data assets as a digital library, whereby users can discover and download files to personal servers (similar to borrowing 'books' from a 'library'), NCI has built an extensive and well-integrated research data platform, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP, http://nci.org.au/data-collections/nerdip/). The NERDIP architecture enables programmatic access to data via standards-compliant services for high performance data analysis, and provides a flexible cloud-based environment to facilitate the next generation of transdisciplinary scientific research across all data domains. To improve use of modern scalable data infrastructures that are focused on efficient data analysis, the data organisation needs to be carefully managed including performance evaluations of projections and coordinate systems, data encoding standards and formats. A complication is that we have often found multiple domain vocabularies and ontologies are associated with equivalent datasets. It is not practical for individual dataset managers to determine which standards are best to apply to their dataset as this could impact accessibility and interoperability. Instead, they need to work with data custodians across interrelated communities and, in partnership with the data repository, the international scientific community to determine the most useful approach. For the data repository, this approach is essential to enable

  2. Health Research and Millennium Development Goals: Identifying the Gap From Public Health Perspective

    PubMed Central

    El Lawindi, Mona I.; Galal, Yasmine S.; Khairy, Walaa A.

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the research output within the universities could provide an effective means for tracking the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) progress. This analytical database study was designed to assess the trend of research theses conducted by the Public Health Department (PHD), Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University during the period 1990 to 2014 as related to the: MDGS, Faculty and department research priority plans and to identify the discrepancies between researchers’ priorities versus national and international research priorities. A manual search of the theses was done at the Postgraduate Library using a specially designed checklist to chart adherence of each thesis to: MDGs, Faculty and department research plans (RPs). The theses’ profile showed that the highest research output was for addressing the MDGS followed by the PHD and Faculty RPs. Compliance to MDGs 5 and 6 was obvious, whereas; MDGs 2, 3, and 7 were not represented at all after year 2000. No significant difference was found between PH theses addressing the Faculty RPs and those which were not before and after 2010. A significantly lower percent of PH theses was fulfilling the PHD research priorities compared to those which were not after 2010. This study showed a definite decline in research output tackling the MDGS and PHD research priorities, with a non-significant increase in the production of theses addressing the Faculty RPs. The present study is a practical model for policy makers within the universities to develop and implement a reliable monitoring and evaluation system for assessment of research output. PMID:26652084

  3. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  4. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  5. A critical assessment of research needs identified by the dietary guidelines committees from 1980 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Myers, Esther F; Khoo, Chor-San; Murphy, William; Steiber, Alison; Agarwal, Sanjiv

    2013-07-01

    The Dietary Goals for the United States were introduced in 1977 and have been followed by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) every 5 years from 1980 to 2010. The DGA provide science-based advice to promote health and reduce risk for major chronic diseases through diet and physical activity. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committees are charged to provide updates of the DGA topics using the best available science. The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committees' reports also identified 169 research gaps. To date, these gaps have not been compiled and assessed. We evaluated trends in number, topics, and specificity of research gaps by year by placing them in the following topic categories: general, chronic diseases/conditions, diet/diet pattern, food/ingredient, and nutrient-specific research gaps. Some research topics (eg, sodium and hypertension and appropriate uses of DGA) have been identified consistently across the years, some emerged in later years (eg, increasingly specific research gaps between dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular disease), and others appeared intermittently (eg, relationships between dietary components and cancer). These results are a call to action for all DGA stakeholders to have an immediate dialogue about how the research enterprise can best address critical research needs in a timely way to support public policy. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying future research needs in landscape genetics: Where to from here?

    Treesearch

    Niko Balkenhol; Felix Gugerli; Sam A. Cushman; Lisette P. Waits; Aurelie Coulon; J. W. Arntzen; Rolf Holderegger; Helene H. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Landscape genetics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that combines methods and concepts from population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. The interest in landscape genetics is steadily increasing, and the field is evolving rapidly. We here outline four major challenges for future landscape genetic research that were identified during an...

  7. Identifying and Investigating Difficult Concepts in Engineering Mechanics and Electric Circuits. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streveler, Ruth; Geist, Monica; Ammerman, Ravel; Sulzbach, Candace; Miller, Ronald; Olds, Barbara; Nelson, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This study extends ongoing work to identify difficult concepts in thermal and transport science and measure students' understanding of those concepts via a concept inventory. Two research questions provided the focal point: "What important concepts in electric circuits and engineering mechanics do students find difficult to learn?" and…

  8. Identifying Effective Methods of Instruction for Adult Emergent Readers through Community-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmer, Rachel; Hayes-Harb, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present a community-based research project aimed at identifying effective methods and materials for teaching English literacy skills to adult English as a second language emergent readers. We conducted a quasi-experimental study whereby we evaluated the efficacy of two approaches, one based on current practices at the English Skills Learning…

  9. Identifying Effective Methods of Instruction for Adult Emergent Readers through Community-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmer, Rachel; Hayes-Harb, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present a community-based research project aimed at identifying effective methods and materials for teaching English literacy skills to adult English as a second language emergent readers. We conducted a quasi-experimental study whereby we evaluated the efficacy of two approaches, one based on current practices at the English Skills Learning…

  10. A Workplace Incivility Roadmap: Identifying Theoretical Speedbumps and Alternative Routes for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kathi N; Diaz, Ismael; Wooderson, R Linden; McDonald, Jennifer N; Smittick, Amber L; Lomeli, Laura C

    2017-07-27

    Andersson and Pearson's (1999) seminal article on workplace incivility has paved the way for nearly two decades of research focusing on rude and discourteous behavior at work. We now have a better understanding of the dynamics associated with uncivil workplace interactions including the characteristics of those who instigate and are targeted with workplace incivility, the negative consequences of incivility, the mechanisms that link incivility and negative outcomes, and the boundary conditions that affect these relationships. The present article provides a "roadmap" for workplace incivility researchers by identifying five assumptions that we propose are acting as "speedbumps" in current workplace incivility research by limiting advancements about what workplace incivility is and how it functions. We then introduce five "alternative routes" for future workplace incivility research based on these identifications. Our goal is to guide and accelerate research toward a more nuanced understanding of workplace incivility as behavior that occurs within an organizational system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Strategies to design clinical studies to identify predictive biomarkers in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Sanmamed, Miguel F; Bosch, Ana; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Schalper, Kurt A; Segura, Victor; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Tabernero, Josep; Sweeney, Christopher J; Choueiri, Toni K; Martín, Miguel; Fusco, Juan Pablo; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria Esperanza; Calvo, Alfonso; Prior, Celia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pio, Ruben; Gonzalez-Billalabeitia, Enrique; Gonzalez Hernandez, Alvaro; Páez, David; Piulats, Jose María; Gurpide, Alfonso; Andueza, Mapi; de Velasco, Guillermo; Pazo, Roberto; Grande, Enrique; Nicolas, Pilar; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Garcia-Donas, Jesus; Castellano, Daniel; Pajares, María J; Suarez, Cristina; Colomer, Ramon; Montuenga, Luis M; Melero, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of reliable biomarkers to predict efficacy and toxicity of anticancer drugs remains one of the key challenges in cancer research. Despite its relevance, no efficient study designs to identify promising candidate biomarkers have been established. This has led to the proliferation of a myriad of exploratory studies using dissimilar strategies, most of which fail to identify any promising targets and are seldom validated. The lack of a proper methodology also determines that many anti-cancer drugs are developed below their potential, due to failure to identify predictive biomarkers. While some drugs will be systematically administered to many patients who will not benefit from them, leading to unnecessary toxicities and costs, others will never reach registration due to our inability to identify the specific patient population in which they are active. Despite these drawbacks, a limited number of outstanding predictive biomarkers have been successfully identified and validated, and have changed the standard practice of oncology. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary panel reviews how those key biomarkers were identified and, based on those experiences, proposes a methodological framework-the DESIGN guidelines-to standardize the clinical design of biomarker identification studies and to develop future research in this pivotal field.

  12. About the Cancer Biomarkers Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Biomarkers Research Group promotes research to identify, develop, and validate biological markers for early cancer detection and cancer risk assessment. Activities include development and validation of promising cancer biomarkers, collaborative databases and informatics systems, and new technologies or the refinement of existing technologies. NCI DCP News Note Consortium on Imaging and Biomarkers (CIB) Created: Eight Grants Awarded to Improve Accuracy of Cancer Screening, Detection, and Diagnosis |

  13. A feasibility study of returning clinically actionable somatic genomic alterations identified in a research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Arango, Natalia Paez; Brusco, Lauren; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Chen, Ken; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Holla, Vijaykumar; Johnson, Amber; Litzenburger, Beate; Khotskaya, Yekaterina B; Sanchez, Nora; Bailey, Ann; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Horombe, Chacha; Kopetz, Scott; Farhangfar, Carol J; Routbort, Mark; Broaddus, Russell; Bernstam, Elmer V; Mendelsohn, John; Mills, Gordon B; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2017-06-27

    Molecular profiling performed in the research setting usually does not benefit the patients that donate their tissues. Through a prospective protocol, we sought to determine the feasibility and utility of performing broad genomic testing in the research laboratory for discovery, and the utility of giving treating physicians access to research data, with the option of validating actionable alterations in the CLIA environment. 1200 patients with advanced cancer underwent characterization of their tumors with high depth hybrid capture sequencing of 201 genes in the research setting. Tumors were also tested in the CLIA laboratory, with a standardized hotspot mutation analysis on an 11, 46 or 50 gene platform. 527 patients (44%) had at least one likely somatic mutation detected in an actionable gene using hotspot testing. With the 201 gene panel, 945 patients (79%) had at least one alteration in a potentially actionable gene that was undetected with the more limited CLIA panel testing. Sixty-four genomic alterations identified on the research panel were subsequently tested using an orthogonal CLIA assay. Of 16 mutations tested in the CLIA environment, 12 (75%) were confirmed. Twenty-five (52%) of 48 copy number alterations were confirmed. Nine (26.5%) of 34 patients with confirmed results received genotype-matched therapy. Seven of these patients were enrolled onto genotype-matched targeted therapy trials. Expanded cancer gene sequencing identifies more actionable genomic alterations. The option of CLIA validating research results can provide alternative targets for personalized cancer therapy.

  14. Identifying research priorities for the health care of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Donna

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to identify priority statements for research into the healthcare of children and adolescents a search of multiple research databases and the Internet was undertaken. There is a considerable body of literature outlining research priorities that are built around specific disorders or specialist services, which are not readily applicable to the general healthcare of children and adolescents. A few general statements of research priorities were identified, but these were mainly developed to inform research programs in the US. In addition there was little evidence that these agendas had incorporated the needs of the consumers of this healthcare namely, children and adolescents, and their families. Therefore, there is a need to address the needs of a broader community in regards to the research agenda for the healthcare of children and adolescents. The advantage of an agenda developed by multiple stakeholder groups is that it will have broader meaning to a wider community. However at this stage, there is no such statement that can readily inform a general program of reserch into the healthcare of children and adolescents.

  15. Computational Environments and Analysis methods available on the NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Foster, C.; Minchin, S. A.; Pugh, T.; Lewis, A.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful in-situ computational environment to enable both high performance computing and data-intensive science across a wide spectrum of national environmental data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress in addressing harmonisation of the underlying data collections for future transdisciplinary research that enable accurate climate projections. NCI makes available 10+ PB major data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. The data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. This computational environment supports a catalogue of integrated reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. To enable transdisciplinary research on this scale, data needs to be harmonised so that researchers can readily apply techniques and software across the corpus of data available and not be constrained to work within artificial disciplinary boundaries. Future challenges will

  16. Research citation analysis of nursing academics in Canada: identifying success indicators.

    PubMed

    Hack, Thomas F; Crooks, Dauna; Plohman, James; Kepron, Emma

    2010-11-01

    This article is a report of a citation analysis of research publications by Canadian nursing academics. Citation analysis can yield objective criteria for assessing the value of published research and is becoming increasingly popular as an academic evaluation tool in universities around the world. Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of academic researchers and identifying leaders among them. The journal publication records of 737 nursing academics at 33 Canadian universities and schools of nursing were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: number of citations for each journal publication, summative citation count of all published papers and the Scopus h-index. Preliminary citation analysis was conducted from June to July 2009, with the final analysis performed on 2 October 2009 following e-mail verification of publication lists. The top 20 nursing academics for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of career citations for all publications, number of career citations for first-authored publications, most highly cited first-authored publications, the Scopus h-index for all publications and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. Citation analysis metrics are useful for evaluating the research performance of academic researchers in nursing. Institutions are encouraged to protect the research time of successful and promising nursing academics, and to dedicate funds to enhance the research programmes of underperforming academic nursing groups. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Identifying optimal postmarket surveillance strategies for medical and surgical devices: implications for policy, practice and research.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Umoquit, Muriah; Lehoux, Pascale; Ross, Sue; Ducey, Ariel; Urbach, David R

    2013-03-01

    Non-drug technologies offer many benefits, but have been associated with adverse events, prompting calls for improved postmarket surveillance. There is little empirical research to guide the development of such a system. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal postmarket surveillance strategies for medical and surgical devices. Qualitative methods were used for sampling, data collection and analysis. Stakeholders from Canada and the USA representing different roles and perspectives were first interviewed to identify examples and characteristics of different surveillance strategies. These stakeholders and others they recommended were then assembled at a 1-day nominal group meeting to discuss and prioritise the components of a postmarket device surveillance system, and research needed to achieve such a system. Consultations were held with 37 participants, and 47 participants attended the 1-day meeting. They recommended a multicomponent system including reporting by facilities, clinicians and patients, supported with some external surveillance for validation and real-time trials for high-risk devices. Many considerations were identified that constitute desirable characteristics of, and means by which to implement such a system. An overarching network was envisioned to broker linkages, establish a shared minimum dataset, and support communication and decision making. Numerous research questions were identified, which could be pursued in tandem with phased implementation of the system. These findings provide unique guidance for establishing a device safety network that is based on existing initiatives, and could be expanded and evaluated in a prospective, phased fashion as it was developed.

  18. Human Trafficking in Ethiopia: A Scoping Review to Identify Gaps in Service Delivery, Research, and Policy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Dana C; Choi, Kristen R; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Lori, Jody R

    2016-03-31

    The purpose of this review is to integrate evidence on human trafficking in Ethiopia and identify gaps and recommendations for service delivery, research and training, and policy. A scoping literature review approach was used to systematically search nursing, medical, psychological, law, and international databases and synthesize information on a complex, understudied topic. The search yielded 826 articles, and 39 met the predetermined criteria for inclusion in the review. Trafficking in Ethiopia has occurred internally and externally in the form of adult and child labor and sex trafficking. There were also some reports of organ trafficking and other closely related human rights violations, such as child marriage, child soldiering, and exploitative intercountry adoption. Risk factors for trafficking included push factors (poverty, political instability, economic problems, and gender discrimination) and pull factors (demand for cheap labor). Trafficking was associated with poor health and economic outcomes for victims. Key recommendations for service delivery, research and training, and policy are identified, including establishing comprehensive services for survivor rehabilitation and reintegration, conducting quantitative health outcomes research, and reforming policy around migration and trafficking. Implementing the recommendations identified by this review will allow policy makers, researchers, and practitioners to take meaningful steps toward confronting human trafficking in Ethiopia.

  19. Identifying and prioritizing uncertainties: patient and clinician engagement in the identification of research questions.

    PubMed

    Elwyn, Glyn; Crowe, Sally; Fenton, Mark; Firkins, Lester; Versnel, Jenny; Walker, Samantha; Cook, Ivor; Holgate, Stephen; Higgins, Bernard; Gelder, Colin

    2010-06-01

    To arrive at an agreed, prioritized ranking of treatment uncertainties in asthma that need further research, by developing a collaboration of patients, carers and clinicians, facilitated by the James Lind Alliance Working Partnership between Asthma UK and the British Thoracic Society. A four-step procedure: (1) establish a collaborative Working Partnership; (2) identify and collect treatment uncertainties by using a patient survey and analysing existing systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and query-answering services; (3) categorize uncertainties; and (4) convene a workshop using a nominal group process to establish a ranked prioritization of treatment uncertainties in asthma. Agreement and rankings were reached for 10 treatment uncertainties. The highest was given to the uncertainty surrounding the adverse effects of inhaled and oral steroids. The top three priorities dealt with clinical management issues, where uncertainties still exist, namely concerns about the side effects of inhaled and oral steroids, how to manage asthma when other illnesses exist or how to rely on personal decisions in an ever-changing illness (self-management). The key outcome is the generation of a prioritized list of treatment uncertainties in asthma, agreed by a collaboration of patients and health professionals, to inform the commissioning of new research. Such a large number of patient-identified treatment uncertainties had not previously been identified in the literature, an indication perhaps that asthma self-management is a neglected research area. Whether the results have an influence of research funding decisions is not yet known.

  20. Building persistent identifier systems for geoscience research - Technical solutions and community governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J. F.; Lehnert, K. A.; Huber, R.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of the Internet gave rise to the expectation that the internet would lead to greater accessibility, transparency and reproducibility of research results. New communication technologies enabled far easier and faster collaboration in larger, geographically more distributed networks. However, the distributed and disorganised nature of the internet not only allowed new technologies to emerge, it also made it difficult to maintain a persistent record of science. Persistent identifiers were invented to allow unambiguous identification of resources on the net. At first, these resources referred to scholarly literature and related resources. The concept of using persistent identifiers has since been expanded to other, non-textual resources, like datasets and geological specimens, and more recently to authors and contributors of scholarly works, and to software and instruments.Setting up identifier systems is technically trivial. The real challenge lies in creating a governance system for the respective identifiers. While Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) were originally invented by the publishing industry, they quickly became an established way for the identification of research resources. Other identifier systems, some of them using DOI as an example, were developed as grass-roots efforts by the scientific community.Together with semantic technologies and linked data, unambiguous identification allows us to harness information at large scales beyond human comprehension. The technical possibilities offered by technology challenge some of the norms of scholarly cooperation, such as using and sharing resources beyond the emulation of paper-based publications.This presentation will discuss the development of persistent identification of research resources as a community effort, using the technical and governance patterns developed for DOI and for IGSN for data as an example.

  1. Integrating constitutive gene expression and chemoactivity: mining the NCI60 anticancer screen.

    PubMed

    Covell, David G

    2012-01-01

    Studies into the genetic origins of tumor cell chemoactivity pose significant challenges to bioinformatic mining efforts. Connections between measures of gene expression and chemoactivity have the potential to identify clinical biomarkers of compound response, cellular pathways important to efficacy and potential toxicities; all vital to anticancer drug development. An investigation has been conducted that jointly explores tumor-cell constitutive NCI60 gene expression profiles and small-molecule NCI60 growth inhibition chemoactivity profiles, viewed from novel applications of self-organizing maps (SOMs) and pathway-centric analyses of gene expressions, to identify subsets of over- and under-expressed pathway genes that discriminate chemo-sensitive and chemo-insensitive tumor cell types. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is used to quantify the accuracy of discriminating genes to predict tumor cell chemoactivity. LDA results find 15% higher prediction accuracies, using ∼30% fewer genes, for pathway-derived discriminating genes when compared to genes derived using conventional gene expression-chemoactivity correlations. The proposed pathway-centric data mining procedure was used to derive discriminating genes for ten well-known compounds. Discriminating genes were further evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to reveal a cellular genetic landscape, comprised of small numbers of key over and under expressed on- and off-target pathway genes, as important for a compound's tumor cell chemoactivity. Literature-based validations are provided as support for chemo-important pathways derived from this procedure. Qualitatively similar results are found when using gene expression measurements derived from different microarray platforms. The data used in this analysis is available at http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/andhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/geo (GPL96, GSE32474).

  2. NIOSH/NCI study of exposure to diesel exhaust in underground mines -- An industry perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, C.J.

    1999-07-01

    In 1992, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) initiated a study, funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), to evaluate the health effects, if any, involving underground miners exposure to diesel exhaust. An industry organization, the Methane Awareness Research Group (MARG) already in place to respond to gassy mine related issues, was redirected to work with diesel concerns. In 1995, NIOSH released a draft protocol and feasibility assessment, indicating its intent to initiate a study at 14 underground mines, some of which were operated by MARG members. After considerable debate on the study protocol, in-mine industrial hygiene studies were begun in December, 1997 and expected to end in early 1999.

  3. Multi-Task Project to Provide Research Support for Human Research and Engineering Goals Identified by the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Jefferson City, MO Phone:573-681-5126 E-mail: rooneyi(a>lincolnu.edu Principle Investigators for contract’s 5 Task Areas: Task I : James Rooney...identified Tasks all structured within a single contract. This contract contained Five Task areas: Task I was an administrative task; Task II-V were...Manager’s Overview of the Report (Task I ) 3. Summary Final Budget Invoice and Budget unspent balance 4. Technical Reports of the Research Tasks (II - V

  4. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget... comments in writing, request more information on the proposed project, or to obtain a copy of the data... National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance...

  5. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) Summary: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the... Program (CTRP) Database. Type of Information Collection Request: REVISION of currently approved collection... developing an electronic resource, the NCI Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, to serve as...

  6. The next step for stress research in primates: To identify relationships between glucocorticoid secretion and fitness.

    PubMed

    Beehner, Jacinta C; Bergman, Thore J

    2017-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are hormones that mediate the energetic demands that accompany environmental challenges. It is therefore not surprising that these metabolic hormones have come to dominate endocrine research on the health and fitness of wild populations. Yet, several problems have been identified in the vertebrate research that also apply to the non-human primate research. First, glucocorticoids should not be used as a proxy for fitness (unless a link has previously been established between glucocorticoids and fitness for a particular population). Second, stress research in behavioral ecology has been overly focused on "chronic stress" despite little evidence that chronic stress hampers fitness in wild animals. Third, research effort has been disproportionately focused on the causes of glucocorticoid variation rather than the fitness consequences. With these problems in mind, we have three objectives for this review. We describe the conceptual framework behind the "stress concept", emphasizing that high glucocorticoids do not necessarily indicate a stress response, and that a stress response does not necessarily indicate an animal is in poor health. Then, we conduct a comprehensive review of all studies on "stress" in wild primates, including any study that examined environmental factors, the stress response, and/or fitness (or proxies for fitness). Remarkably, not a single primate study establishes a connection between all three. Finally, we provide several recommendations for future research in the field of primate behavioral endocrinology, primarily the need to move beyond identifying the factors that cause glucocorticoid secretion to additionally focus on the relationship between glucocorticoids and fitness. We believe that this is an important next step for research on stress physiology in primates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 78 FR 14558 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: A Generic Submission for Formative Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Generic Submission for Formative Research, Pretesting, and Customer Satisfaction of NCI's Communication and Education Resources (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork...: Nina Goodman, Public Health Advisor, Office of Communications and Education (OCE), NCI, NIH, 6116...

  8. 78 FR 20329 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: A Generic Submission for Formative Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Generic Submission for Formative Research, Pretesting, and Customer Satisfaction of NCI's Communication and Education Resources (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork..., Public Health Advisor, Office of Communications and Education (OCE), NCI, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd...

  9. A Delphi survey of research priorities and identified areas for collaborative research in health sector library and information services UK.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, M

    1999-09-01

    The survey aims were to determine research priorities in the Health Library and Information Services sector in the United Kingdom as to their perceived value for the professional and impact on user needs and to identify areas suitable for collaborative research. A 34-member panel consisting of the Chairs of professional groups, journal editors, educationalists, key organizations and representatives from the Health Libraries Group, Libraries for Nursing and University Health Science Libraries professional groups, participated in a three-round postal questionnaire survey using the Delphi Technique. Consensus was achieved for a final set of 20 research priorities. The priorities and their category groups are discussed in the context of (i) the current R&D scene, and (ii) the health information environment. Six developmental recommendations are provided.

  10. Clinically relevant variants identified in thoracic aortic aneurysm patients by research exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jeffrey A; Landis, Benjamin J; Shikany, Amy R; Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving subclinical and progressive dilation of the thoracic aorta, which can lead to life-threatening complications such as dissection or rupture. Genetic testing is important for risk stratification and identification of at risk family members, and clinically available genetic testing panels have been expanding rapidly. However, when past testing results are normal, there is little evidence to guide decision-making about the indications and timing to pursue additional clinical genetic testing. Results from research based genetic testing can help inform this process. Here we present 10 TAA patients who have a family history of disease and who enrolled in research-based exome testing. Nine of these ten patients had previous clinical genetic testing that did not identify the cause of disease. We sought to determine the number of rare variants in 23 known TAA associated genes identified by research-based exome testing. In total, we found 10 rare variants in six patients. Likely pathogenic variants included a TGFB2 variant in one patient and a SMAD3 variant in another. These variants have been reported previously in individuals with similar phenotypes. Variants of uncertain significance of particular interest included novel variants in MYLK and MFAP5, which were identified in a third patient. In total, clinically reportable rare variants were found in 6/10 (60%) patients, with at least 2/10 (20%) patients having likely pathogenic variants identified. These data indicate that consideration of re-testing is important in TAA patients with previous negative or inconclusive results. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Clinically Relevant Variants Identified in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Patients by Research Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Jeffrey A.; Landis, Benjamin J.; Shikany, Amy R.; Hinton, Robert B.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving subclinical and progressive dilation of the thoracic aorta, which can lead to life-threatening complications such as dissection or rupture. Genetic testing is important for risk stratification and identification of at risk family members, and clinically available genetic testing panels have been expanding rapidly. However, when past testing results are normal, there is little evidence to guide decision-making about the indications and timing to pursue additional clinical genetic testing. Results from research based genetic testing can help inform this process. Here we present 10 TAA patients who have a family history of disease and who enrolled in research-based exome testing. Nine of these ten patients had previous clinical genetic testing that did not identify the cause of disease. We sought to determine the number of rare variants in 23 known TAA associated genes identified by research-based exome testing. In total, we found 10 rare variants in six patients. Likely pathogenic variants included a TGFB2 variant in one patient and a SMAD3 variant in another. These variants have been reported previously in individuals with similar phenotypes. Variants of uncertain significance of particular interest included novel variants in MYLK and MFAP5, which were identified in a third patient. In total, clinically reportable rare variants were found in 6/10 (60%) patients, with at least 2/10 (20%) patients having likely pathogenic variants identified. These data indicate that consideration of re-testing is important in TAA patients with previous negative or inconclusive results. PMID:26854089

  12. A Qualitative Study of Motivations for Minority Recruitment in Cancer Clinical Trials Across Five NCI-Designated Cancer Centers.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Zachary R; Martin, Michelle; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Cook, Elise D; Konety, Badrinath; Vickers, Selwyn M; Chen, Moon S; Foaud, Mona N; Durant, Raegan W

    2016-11-08

    Minority enrollment in cancer clinical trials is traditionally low. In light of this fact, numerous studies have investigated barriers to recruitment and retention within minority populations. However, very little research has investigated the importance of clinicians' and researchers' motivations for minority recruitment in cancer clinical trials. Therefore, we sought to examine motivations for minority recruitment across four professional stakeholder groups (principal investigators, clinicians, research staff, and Cancer Center leaders) at five National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers. This study is based on the data from 91 qualitative interviews conducted across the five NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers to investigate stakeholders' motivations for minority recruitment in cancer clinical trials. Emergent themes include (a) minority recruitment increases generalizability of cancer clinical trials, (b) minority recruitment is motivated by social justice, (c) some institutions promote minority recruitment through the use of supplemental financial support, (d) federal funding requirements for minority inclusion in clinical research motivate investigators to focus on minority recruitment, and (e) some stakeholders favor a more race-neutral approach to participant recruitment rather than an emphasis on targeted minority recruitment. The perspectives of clinical and research stakeholders potentially inform the assessment of existing strategies and the development of new strategies to increase motivation for minority recruitment in cancer clinical trials.

  13. Using mixed methods to identify and answer clinically relevant research questions.

    PubMed

    Shneerson, Catherine L; Gale, Nicola K

    2015-06-01

    The need for mixed methods research in answering health care questions is becoming increasingly recognized because of the complexity of factors that affect health outcomes. In this article, we argue for the value of using a qualitatively driven mixed method approach for identifying and answering clinically relevant research questions. This argument is illustrated by findings from a study on the self-management practices of cancer survivors and the exploration of one particular clinically relevant finding about higher uptake of self-management in cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy treatment compared with those who have not. A cross-sectional study generated findings that formed the basis for the qualitative study, by informing the purposive sampling strategy and generating new qualitative research questions. Using a quantitative research component to supplement a qualitative study can enhance the generalizability and clinical relevance of the findings and produce detailed, contextualized, and rich answers to research questions that would be unachievable through quantitative or qualitative methods alone.

  14. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  15. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  16. Synergistic effects of the purine analog sulfinosine and curcumin on the multidrug resistant human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NCI-H460/R).

    PubMed

    Andjelkovic, Tijana; Pesic, Milica; Bankovic, Jasna; Tanic, Nikola; Markovic, Ivanka D; Ruzdijic, Sabera

    2008-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to a successful chemotherapy of lung cancer. We tested the potential of sulfinosine and curcumin, alone and in combination, for modulating MDR in the human resistant, non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NCI-H460/R). First, we determined the mutational status of the p53 gene in NCI-H460/R cells by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing and identified mutations which could at least partially contribute to the development of the MDR phenotype. The effects of sulfinosine and curcumin were studied, both separately and in combination, at the level of cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution and gene expression. Sulfinosine displayed dose-dependent growth inhibition in both resistant and control sensitive cell lines, whereas curcumin considerably inhibited their growth only at relatively high doses. When sulfinosine was combined with a low dose of curcumin the drugs exerted a synergistic cytotoxic effect in NCI-H460/R cells. The expression of MDR-related genes mdr1, gst-pi and topo IIalpha, was altered by sulfinosine and curcumin. The most pronounced effect was observed when the agents were applied together. Sulfinosine and curcumin caused perturbations in cell cycle distribution in the NCI-H460/R cell line. The combination of the two drugs induced a more pronounced cell cycle arrest in S and G(2)/M in NCI-H460/R cells. Our results show that sulfinosine and curcumin overcome MDR in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NSCLC), especially in combination despite the presence of a mutated p53 gene.

  17. Exome-driven characterization of the cancer cell lines at the proteome level: the NCI-60 case study.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Maria A; Karpov, Dmitry S; Ivanov, Mark V; Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail A; Chernobrovkin, Alexey L; Lobas, Anna A; Lisitsa, Andrey V; Archakov, Alexander I; Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Moshkovskii, Sergei A

    2014-12-05

    Cancer genome deviates significantly from the reference human genome, and thus a search against standard genome databases in cancer cell proteomics fails to identify cancer-specific protein variants. The goal of this Article is to combine high-throughput exome data [Abaan et al. Cancer Res. 2013] and shotgun proteomics analysis [Modhaddas Gholami et al. Cell Rep. 2013] for cancer cell lines from NCI-60 panel to demonstrate further that the cell lines can be effectively recognized using identified variant peptides. To achieve this goal, we generated a database containing mutant protein sequences of NCI-60 panel of cell lines. The proteome data were searched using Mascot and X!Tandem search engines against databases of both reference and mutant protein sequences. The identification quality was further controlled by calculating a fraction of variant peptides encoded by the own exome sequence for each cell line. We found that up to 92.2% peptides identified by both search engines are encoded by the own exome. Further, we used the identified variant peptides for cell line recognition. The results of the study demonstrate that proteome data supported by exome sequence information can be effectively used for distinguishing between different types of cancer cell lines.

  18. Applying methodological search filters to CAB abstracts to identify research for evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah Anne

    2002-10-01

    The study sought to determine whether methodological search strategies identified by Haynes et al. as most effective for locating information for evidence-based medicine in MEDLINE would be effective in locating information in CAB Abstracts for evidence-based veterinary medicine. Articles published in the year 2000 volumes of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association and Veterinary Record were manually examined and classified by format (original study, review, general article, conference report, decision analysis, case report) and purpose category (etiology, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment or prevention). Search strategies identified by Haynes et al. were then modified and run on the CAB Abstracts database. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by comparing results to the manual review of the literature. The author manually reviewed 390 articles, 289 articles of which were identified as original studies. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the search strategies were disappointing. The methodological search strategies developed by Haynes et al. for MEDLINE were not effective in locating literature for evidence-based veterinary practice in CAB Abstracts. A study examining methodological search strategies for identifying research for evidence-based veterinary practice in the CAB Abstracts database is necessary.

  19. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to support NCI Approved Clinical Trial Proposals from NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the NCI Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) for Investigator-Initiated Trials Utilizing CTEP IND agents in the ETCTN

    Cancer.gov

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to support NCI Approved Clinical Trial Proposals from NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the NCI Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) for Investigator-Initiated Trials Utilizing CTEP IND agents in the ETCTN

  20. A four-gene signature from NCI-60 cell line for survival prediction in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Yuan, Shinsheng; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Yu, Sung-Liang; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Hsu, Pin-Yen; Wu, Guani; Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Gee-Chen; Li, Ker-Chau; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2009-12-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of mortality in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Genes that can discriminate the invasion ability of cancer cells may become useful candidates for clinical outcome prediction. We identify invasion-associated genes through computational and laboratorial approach that supported this idea in NSCLC. We first conducted invasion assay to characterize the invasion abilities of NCI-60 lung cancer cell lines. We then systematically exploited NCI-60 microarray databases to identify invasion-associated genes that showed differential expression between the high and the low invasion cell line groups. Furthermore, using the microarray data of Duke lung cancer cohort (GSE 3141), invasion-associated genes with good survival prediction potentials were obtained. Finally, we validated the findings by conducting quantitative PCR assay on an in-house collected patient group (n = 69) and by using microarray data from two public western cohorts (n = 257 and 186). The invasion-associated four-gene signature (ANKRD49, LPHN1, RABAC1, and EGLN2) had significant prediction in three validation cohorts (P = 0.0184, 0.002, and 0.017, log-rank test). Moreover, we showed that four-gene signature was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 2.354, 1.480, and 1.670; P = 0.028, 0.014, and 0.033), independent of other clinical covariates, such as age, gender, and stage. The invasion-associated four-gene signature derived from NCI-60 lung cancer cell lines had good survival prediction power for NSCLC patients.

  1. Thermal management in heavy vehicles : a review identifying issues and research requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M. W.

    1999-01-15

    Thermal management in heavy vehicles is cross-cutting because it directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, engine/component life, driver comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and aerodynamics. It follows that thermal management is critical to the design of large (class 6-8) trucks, especially in optimizing for energy efficiency and emissions reduction. Heat rejection requirements are expected to increase, and it is industry's goal to develop new, innovative, high-performance cooling systems that occupy less space and are lightweight and cost-competitive. The state of the art in heavy vehicle thermal management is reviewed, and issues and research areas are identified.

  2. Genomic Research to Identify Novel Pathways in the Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Seamus C.; Kalea, Anastasia Z.; Holmes, Michael V.; Agu, Obi; Humphries, Steve E.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a large heritable component. There is a need to improve our understanding of AAA pathogenesis in order to develop novel treatment paradigms. Genomewide association studies have revolutionized research into the genetic variants that underpin the development of many complex diseases including AAA. This article reviews the progress that has been made to date in this regard, including mechanisms by which loci identified by GWAS may contribute to the development of AAA. It also highlights potential post-GWAS analytical strategies to improve our understanding of the disease further. PMID:22400124

  3. Breast cancer in women aging 35 years old and younger: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute (NCI) experience.

    PubMed

    Darwish, A D; Helal, A M; Aly El-Din, N H; Solaiman, L L; Amin, A

    2017-02-01

    The aim is to identify the epidemiological and clinicopathological features associated with young breast cancer (BC) patients and to discuss factors affecting tumor recurrence and DFS. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on medical records from young females patients aged ≤35 years with pathologically confirmed primary breast cancer treated during 2008-2010 at NCI. Cases with non invasive cancer and non carcinoma histology are excluded. Of the 5408 cases diagnosed with breast cancer, 554 were young. Four hundred & fifty eight patients representing 9.2% were within our inclusion criteria. Almost half of the patients (45.9%) presented with stage III. Axillary nodes involvement was in 63.9%, 83.3% were grade 2. More than one quarter of tumors was hormone receptors negative (28.8%) & Her2 was over-expressed in 30%. Mastectomy was offered in 72% while conservative breast surgery in 26%, 69.2% received chemotherapy either adjuvant, neoadjuvant or both, 82.5% received adjuvant radiotherapy, 68.6% received hormonal therapy. Metastatic disease developed in 51.3%, with 31% having more than one site of metastases. After a median follow up period of 66 months, the median DFS of patients was 60 months. The median DFS was significantly shorter among patients with positive lymph nodes (P < 0.0001), ER negative disease (P = 0.045) and stage III disease (P < 0.0001). Breast cancer in young women is aggressive from the time of diagnosis. Our results provide baseline data of young BC in the Middle East & North Africa region; thus, contributing to future epidemiological and hospital-based researches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. One Health approach to identify research needs in bovine and human babesioses: workshop report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Babesia are emerging health threats to humans and animals in the United States. A collaborative effort of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and our environment, otherwise known as the One Health concept, was taken during a research workshop held in April 2009 to identify gaps in scientific knowledge regarding babesioses. The impetus for this analysis was the increased risk for outbreaks of bovine babesiosis, also known as Texas cattle fever, associated with the re-infestation of the U.S. by cattle fever ticks. Results The involvement of wildlife in the ecology of cattle fever ticks jeopardizes the ability of state and federal agencies to keep the national herd free of Texas cattle fever. Similarly, there has been a progressive increase in the number of cases of human babesiosis over the past 25 years due to an increase in the white-tailed deer population. Human babesiosis due to cattle-associated Babesia divergens and Babesia divergens-like organisms have begun to appear in residents of the United States. Research needs for human and bovine babesioses were identified and are presented herein. Conclusions The translation of this research is expected to provide veterinary and public health systems with the tools to mitigate the impact of bovine and human babesioses. However, economic, political, and social commitments are urgently required, including increased national funding for animal and human Babesia research, to prevent the re-establishment of cattle fever ticks and the increasing problem of human babesiosis in the United States. PMID:20377902

  5. Tobacco control recommendations identified by LGBT Atlantans in a community-based participatory research project.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Lawrence; Damarin, Amanda K; Marshall, Zack

    2014-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people are increasingly aware that disproportionately high smoking rates severely impact the health of their communities. Motivated to make a change, a group of LGBT community members, policymakers, and researchers from Atlanta carried out a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. This formative research study sought to identify recommendations for culturally relevant smoking prevention and cessation interventions that could improve the health of Atlanta's LGBT communities. Data presented here come from four focus groups with 36 participants and a community meeting with 30 participants. Among study participants, the most favored interventions were providing LGBT-specific cessation programs, raising awareness about LGBT smoking rates, and getting community venues to go smoke-free. Participants also suggested providing reduced-cost cessation products for low-income individuals, using LGBT "role models" to promote cessation, and ensuring that interventions reach all parts of the community. Findings reinforce insights from community-based research with other marginalized groups. Similarities include the importance of tailoring cessation programs for specific communities, the need to acknowledge differences within communities, and the significance of community spaces in shaping discussions of cessation. Further, this study highlights the need for heightened awareness. The Atlanta LGBT community is largely unaware that high smoking rates affect its health, and is unlikely to take collective action to address this problem until it is understood.

  6. Images of mental illness in the media: identifying gaps in the research.

    PubMed

    Stout, Patricia A; Villegas, Jorge; Jennings, Nancy A

    2004-01-01

    This article summarizes research published over the past decade and identifies areas where future research is needed to increase our knowledge of the media's role in fostering or reducing mental illness stigma. The following questions are addressed: (1) How is mental illness portrayed by the media? (2) How do media images of mental illness impact individuals' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors with regard to mental illness? (3) How can the media be used to reduce mental illness stigma? The review reveals a lack of recent research on the U.S. media and a need for precision in how mental illness and the media are defined for study. Research is needed that involves a broader range of media channels as well as more distinctions among different types of content within channels and a more detailed analysis of media images themselves. The largest gap to be addressed is the link between exposure to media images and mental illness stigma. Use of the media as a tool for change requires a better understanding of what messages are conveyed, how they are developed, and what role media content producers play in creating these messages.

  7. A reconsideration of the role of self-identified races in epidemiology and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Ludovica; Bacchini, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    A considerable number of studies in epidemiology and biomedicine investigate the etiology of complex diseases by considering (self-identified) race as a relevant variable and focusing on the differences in risk among racial groups in the United States; they extensively draw on a genetic hypothesis--viz. the hypothesis that differences in the risk of complex diseases among racial groups are largely due to genetic differences covarying with genetic ancestry--that appears highly problematic in the light of both current biological evidence and the theory of human genome evolution. Is this reason for dismissing self-identified races? No. An alternative promising use of self-identified races exists, and ironically is suggested by those studies that investigate the etiology of complex diseases without focusing on racial differences. These studies provide a large amount of empirical evidence supporting the primacy of the contribution of non-genetic as opposed to genetic factors to the risk of complex diseases. We show that differences in race--or, better, in racial self-identification--may be critically used as proxies for differences in risk-related exposomes and epigenomes in the context of the United States. Self-identified race is what we need to capture the complexity of the effects of present and past racism on people's health and investigate risk-related external and internal exposures, gene-environment interactions, and epigenetic events. In fact patterns of racial self-identifications on one side, and patterns of risk-related exposomes and epigenomes on the other side, constantly coevolve and tend to match each other. However, there is no guarantee that using self-identified races in epidemiology and biomedical research will be beneficial all things considered: special attention must be paid at balancing positive and negative consequences. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Using Market Research to Characterize College Students and Identify Potential Targets for Influencing Health Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Berg, Carla J; Ling, Pamela M; Guo, Hongfei; Windle, Michael; Thomas, Janet L; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; An, Lawrence C

    2010-12-01

    Marketing campaigns, such as those developed by the tobacco industry, are based on market research, which defines segments of a population by assessing psychographic characteristics (i.e., attitudes, interests). This study uses a similar approach to define market segments of college smokers, to examine differences in their health behaviors (smoking, drinking, binge drinking, exercise, diet), and to determine the validity of these segments. A total of 2,265 undergraduate students aged 18-25 years completed a 108-item online survey in fall 2008 assessing demographic, psychographic (i.e., attitudes, interests), and health-related variables. Among the 753 students reporting past 30-day smoking, cluster analysis was conducted using 21 psychographic questions and identified three market segments - Stoic Individualists, Responsible Traditionalists, and Thrill-Seeking Socializers. We found that segment membership was related to frequency of alcohol use, binge drinking, and limiting dietary fat. We then developed three messages targeting each segment and conducted message testing to validate the segments on a subset of 73 smokers representing each segment in spring 2009. As hypothesized, each segment indicated greater relevance and salience for their respective message. These findings indicate that identifying qualitatively different subgroups of young adults through market research may inform the development of engaging interventions and health campaigns targeting college students.

  9. Using Market Research to Characterize College Students and Identify Potential Targets for Influencing Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Carla J.; Ling, Pamela M.; Guo, Hongfei; Windle, Michael; Thomas, Janet L.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; An, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing campaigns, such as those developed by the tobacco industry, are based on market research, which defines segments of a population by assessing psychographic characteristics (i.e., attitudes, interests). This study uses a similar approach to define market segments of college smokers, to examine differences in their health behaviors (smoking, drinking, binge drinking, exercise, diet), and to determine the validity of these segments. A total of 2,265 undergraduate students aged 18–25 years completed a 108-item online survey in fall 2008 assessing demographic, psychographic (i.e., attitudes, interests), and health-related variables. Among the 753 students reporting past 30-day smoking, cluster analysis was conducted using 21 psychographic questions and identified three market segments – Stoic Individualists, Responsible Traditionalists, and Thrill-Seeking Socializers. We found that segment membership was related to frequency of alcohol use, binge drinking, and limiting dietary fat. We then developed three messages targeting each segment and conducted message testing to validate the segments on a subset of 73 smokers representing each segment in spring 2009. As hypothesized, each segment indicated greater relevance and salience for their respective message. These findings indicate that identifying qualitatively different subgroups of young adults through market research may inform the development of engaging interventions and health campaigns targeting college students. PMID:25264429

  10. Sharing and Reuse of Sensitive Data and Samples: Supporting Researchers in Identifying Ethical and Legal Requirements.

    PubMed

    Sariyar, Murat; Schluender, Irene; Smee, Carol; Suhr, Stephanie

    2015-08-01

    Availability of and access to data and biosamples are essential in medical and translational research, where their reuse and repurposing by the wider research community can maximize their value and accelerate discovery. However, sharing human-related data or samples is complicated by ethical, legal, and social sensitivities. The specific ethical and legal requirements linked to sensitive data are often unfamiliar to life science researchers who, faced with vast amounts of complex, fragmented, and sometimes even contradictory information, may not feel competent to navigate through it. In this case, the impulse may be not to share the data in order to safeguard against unintentional misuse. Consequently, helping data providers to identify relevant ethical and legal requirements and how they might address them is an essential and frequently neglected step in removing possible hurdles to data and sample sharing in the life sciences. Here, we describe the complex regulatory context and discuss relevant online tools-one which the authors co-developed-targeted at assisting providers of sensitive data or biosamples with ethical and legal questions. The main results are (1) that the different approaches of the tools assume different user needs and prior knowledge of ethical and legal requirements, affecting how a service is designed and its usefulness, (2) that there is much potential for collaboration between tool providers, and (3) that enriched annotations of services (e.g., update status, completeness of information, and disclaimers) would increase their value and facilitate quick assessment by users. Further, there is still work to do with respect to providing researchers using sensitive data or samples with truly 'useful' tools that do not require pre-existing, in-depth knowledge of legal and ethical requirements or time to delve into the details. Ultimately, separate resources, maintained by experts familiar with the respective fields of research, may be needed while

  11. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: identifying high priority future research needs.

    PubMed

    Gaynes, Bradley N; Christian, Robert; Saavedra, Lissette M; Wines, Roberta; Jonas, Daniel E; Viswanathan, Meera; Ellis, Alan R; Woodell, Carol; Carey, Timothy S

    2014-03-01

    With onset often occurring before 6 years of age, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves attention problems, impulsivity, overactivity, and sometimes disruptive behavior. Impairment usually persists into adulthood, with an estimated worldwide prevalence in adults of 2.5%. Existing gaps in evidence concerning ADHD hinder decision-making about treatment. This article describes and prioritizes future research needs for ADHD in three areas: treatment effectiveness for at-risk preschoolers; long-term treatment effectiveness; and variability in prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment.Using a recent systematic review concerning ADHD completed by a different evidence-based practice center as a foundation, we worked with a diverse group of 12 stakeholders, who represented researchers, funders, healthcare providers, patients, and families, to identify and prioritize research needs. From an initial list of 29 evidence gaps, we enumerated 8 high-priority research needs: a) accurate, brief standardized diagnosis and assessment; b) comparative effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic treatments for children under 6 years of age; c) comparative effectiveness of different combinations of psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments for children under 6 years of age; d) case identification and measurement of prevalence and outcomes; e) comparative effectiveness of psychosocial treatment alone versus pharmacologic and combination treatments for children under 6 years of age; f) comparative long-term treatment effectiveness for people 6 years of age and older; g) relative efficacy of specific psychosocial program components for children under 6 years of age; and h) identification of person-level effect modifiers for people 6 years of age and older. In this article, we describe these future research needs in detail and discuss study designs that could be used to address them.

  12. Sharing and Reuse of Sensitive Data and Samples: Supporting Researchers in Identifying Ethical and Legal Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Schluender, Irene; Smee, Carol; Suhr, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Availability of and access to data and biosamples are essential in medical and translational research, where their reuse and repurposing by the wider research community can maximize their value and accelerate discovery. However, sharing human-related data or samples is complicated by ethical, legal, and social sensitivities. The specific ethical and legal requirements linked to sensitive data are often unfamiliar to life science researchers who, faced with vast amounts of complex, fragmented, and sometimes even contradictory information, may not feel competent to navigate through it. In this case, the impulse may be not to share the data in order to safeguard against unintentional misuse. Consequently, helping data providers to identify relevant ethical and legal requirements and how they might address them is an essential and frequently neglected step in removing possible hurdles to data and sample sharing in the life sciences. Here, we describe the complex regulatory context and discuss relevant online tools—one which the authors co-developed—targeted at assisting providers of sensitive data or biosamples with ethical and legal questions. The main results are (1) that the different approaches of the tools assume different user needs and prior knowledge of ethical and legal requirements, affecting how a service is designed and its usefulness, (2) that there is much potential for collaboration between tool providers, and (3) that enriched annotations of services (e.g., update status, completeness of information, and disclaimers) would increase their value and facilitate quick assessment by users. Further, there is still work to do with respect to providing researchers using sensitive data or samples with truly ‘useful’ tools that do not require pre-existing, in-depth knowledge of legal and ethical requirements or time to delve into the details. Ultimately, separate resources, maintained by experts familiar with the respective fields of research, may be

  13. Virtual Screening of Specific Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Inhibitors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Database

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cong; Huang, Yan-Xin; Bao, Yong-Li; Sun, Lu-Guo; Wu, Yin; Yu, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Yu; Song, Zhen-Bo; Zheng, Li-Hua; Sun, Ying; Wang, Guan-Nan; Li, Yu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is an attractive drug target for cancer therapy and research on IGF1R inhibitors has had success in clinical trials. A particular challenge in the development of specific IGF1R inhibitors is interference from insulin receptor (IR), which has a nearly identical sequence. A few potent inhibitors that are selective for IGF1R have been discovered experimentally with the aid of computational methods. However, studies on the rapid identification of IGF1R-selective inhibitors using virtual screening and confidence-level inspections of ligands that show different interactions with IGF1R and IR in docking analysis are rare. In this study, we established virtual screening and binding-mode prediction workflows based on benchmark results of IGF1R and several kinase receptors with IGF1R-like structures. We used comprehensive analysis of the known complexes of IGF1R and IR with their binding ligands to screen specific IGF1R inhibitors. Using these workflows, 17 of 139,735 compounds in the NCI (National Cancer Institute) database were identified as potential specific inhibitors of IGF1R. Calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) with GROMACS were further conducted for three of the identified compounds to assess their binding affinity differences towards IGF1R and IR. PMID:23242155

  14. A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH STUDY OF THE EVOLUTION OF SYMPTOMS IN INDIVIDUALS IDENTIFIED AS PRODROMAL TO PSYCHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Cheryl; Davidson, Larry; Sills-Shahar, Rachel; Nickou, Connie; Malaspina, Dolores; Miller, Tandy; McGlashan, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Because schizophrenia is difficult to treat and exacts large personal and societal costs, there is an effort underway to identify adolescents and young adults at high risk for psychosis. Theory-derived criteria of subthreshold positive symptoms identify a “prodromal” or clinically at-risk population who have conversion rates to psychosis of 40 to 50% within one to two years. However, further characterization of the psychosis prodrome by qualitative research methods could increase the predictive value of the “prodromal” designation. We conducted open-ended interviews with 20 parents of prodromal adolescents that focused on changes observed. The narratives fell into two thematically distinct subgroups, identified as “declining” and “never normal.” The prodromal adolescents described as “declining” had a higher subsequent rate of conversion to psychosis than did the “never normal” group. Although preliminary, these results suggest that a trajectory of change in personality, relationships, and behavior from an essentially normal baseline may be consistent with increased risk for psychosis among prodromal adolescents. PMID:14686457

  15. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-01-06

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants.

  16. Experimental studies of the Universal Chemical Key (UCK) algorithm on the NCI database of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Robert; Kasturi, Pavan; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Bing

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm called the Universal Chemical Key (UCK) algorithm that constructs a unique key for a molecular structure. The molecular structures are represented as undirected labeled graphs with the atoms representing the vertices of the graph and the bonds representing the edges. The algorithm was tested on 236,917 compounds obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database of chemical compounds. In this paper we present the algorithm,some examples and the experimental results on the NCI database. On the NCI database, the UCK algorithm provided distinct unique keys for chemicals with different molecular structures.

  17. 77 FR 32116 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary..., engaged in research misconduct in research supported by National Cancer Institute (NCI), National...''). Specifically, Respondent committed research misconduct by knowingly and intentionally: Falsifying...

  18. Research Areas: Diagnosis

    Cancer.gov

    Accurate information derived from diagnostic tools is crucial for making decisions at all stages of cancer care. NCI supports research on the development of tests and imaging technologies that can provide specific information about an individual’s cancer.

  19. Nanotechnology in Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research has had a major impact on bringing novel nano-enabled solutions through the pre-clinical space. The strategic framework of this effort is presented here.

  20. An algorithm to identify rheumatoid arthritis in primary care: a Clinical Practice Research Datalink study

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Sara; Hider, Samantha L; Raza, Karim; Stack, Rebecca J; Hayward, Richard A; Mallen, Christian D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multisystem, inflammatory disorder associated with increased levels of morbidity and mortality. While much research into the condition is conducted in the secondary care setting, routinely collected primary care databases provide an important source of research data. This study aimed to update an algorithm to define RA that was previously developed and validated in the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Methods The original algorithm consisted of two criteria. Individuals meeting at least one were considered to have RA. Criterion 1: ≥1 RA Read code and a disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) without an alternative indication. Criterion 2: ≥2 RA Read codes, with at least one ‘strong’ code and no alternative diagnoses. Lists of codes for consultations and prescriptions were obtained from the authors of the original algorithm where these were available, or compiled based on the original description and clinical knowledge. 4161 people with a first Read code for RA between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012 were selected from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, successor to the GPRD), and the criteria applied. Results Code lists were updated for the introduction of new Read codes and biological DMARDs. 3577/4161 (86%) of people met the updated algorithm for RA, compared to 61% in the original development study. 62.8% of people fulfilled both Criterion 1 and Criterion 2. Conclusions Those wishing to define RA in the CPRD, should consider using this updated algorithm, rather than a single RA code, if they wish to identify only those who are most likely to have RA. PMID:26700281

  1. Towards a community effort to identify ethical principles for research in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    The hydrological community in Europe is growing rapidly in both size and, more importantly, scientific relevance and integrity. The Hydrological Sciences (HS) Division of EGU actively is promoting the above development by identifying research targets, stimulating the involvement of young scientists and managing a scientific open access journal based on a public peer review process. The management of the Division itself and the organisation of the General Assembly are carried out transparently, with the aim to seek an improved involvement of top and young scientists, with a bottom up approach. I believe the HS community is animated by a strong enthusiasm which, however, is not adequately supported by economical funding. In my opinion this is a major problem which HS should consider and discuss. The relevance of the societal and environmental problems dealt with by hydrologists, in a professional way and with exceptional scientific skills, is without doubt and therefore the limited amount of funding is not justified in practice. In my opinion, in order to refine the structure of the HS community, and promote its visibility, we should formally identify HS ethical principles for research in environmental science. The principles should highlight the role of hydrology as well as the ethical and scientific solidity of the HS community. Establishing ethical principles is even more important in view of the transparent approach HS is adopting for reviewing and publishing contributions and in view of the increasing need to transparently prove how public funding for research is administered. Establishing ethical principles for hydrology is not a trivial task. Hydrology is characterised by a relevant uncertainty in data, models and parameters. Hydrology is also relying on a large variety of approaches, ranging from statistical to physically based. The purpose of this poster is to present a collection of ethical principles for scientific research presented by the literature and

  2. Concept for linking de-identified biomedical research data using a study participant management system.

    PubMed

    Stahmann, Alexander; Bauer, Christian R K D; Schwanke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research projects show an increasing demand of large numbers of participants from different recruiting centers to achieve statistically significant results. The collected types of data are stored in distributed databases and are linked to the participant by different non-resolvable identifiers (layered pseudonyms) for de-identification. To ensure the quality of the gathered data, regular quality assurance analyses are required at each local center. Because of the distributed databases and layered pseudonyms the analyses can only be achieved manually. Therefore, the process is error-prone and laborious. The objective of this paper is to propose a solution concept to automate the manual process by using a local study participant management system. It orchestrates the process and enables the quality assurance analyses within a clinical data warehouse.

  3. [Ten years national research project "familial prostate cancer": problems in identifying risk families].

    PubMed

    Herkommer, K; Schmidt, C; Gschwend, J E

    2011-07-01

    The German national research project"familial prostate cancer" has been recruiting prostate cancer patients nationwide since 1999. In 2009, a comprehensive data analysis of the 25,065 families recruited was performed. Of these, 77.4% were identified as sporadic, 20.0% as familial and 2.6% as hereditary cases of prostate cancer. However, obtaining comprehensive, validated information about all relatives often fails. The high average age of the patients, the lower life expectancy in further generations and the low number of first-degree male relatives hampers the classification of sporadic, familial and hereditary cases. Consequently we describe here that in our database the identification of 100 hereditary cases requires a recruitment of more than 5,000 patients with their families. For 100 sporadic patients with 2 first-degree male relatives without a case history 1,250 patients are needed.

  4. Computer simulation models as tools for identifying research needs: A black duck population model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringelman, J.K.; Longcore, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Existing data on the mortality and production rates of the black duck (Anas rubripes) were used to construct a WATFIV computer simulation model. The yearly cycle was divided into 8 phases: hunting, wintering, reproductive, molt, post-molt, and juvenile dispersal mortality, and production from original and renesting attempts. The program computes population changes for sex and age classes during each phase. After completion of a standard simulation run with all variable default values in effect, a sensitivity analysis was conducted by changing each of 50 input variables, 1 at a time, to assess the responsiveness of the model to changes in each variable. Thirteen variables resulted in a substantial change in population level. Adult mortality factors were important during hunting and wintering phases. All production and mortality associated with original nesting attempts were sensitive, as was juvenile dispersal mortality. By identifying those factors which invoke the greatest population change, and providing an indication of the accuracy required in estimating these factors, the model helps to identify those variables which would be most profitable topics for future research.

  5. Advancing training to identify, intervene, and follow up with individuals at risk for suicide through research.

    PubMed

    Osteen, Philip J; Frey, Jodi J; Ko, Jungyai

    2014-09-01

    Research and training on suicide is critical given the fact that the majority of suicide deaths are preventable with accurate identification of risk and intervention by trained individuals. However, implementing and evaluating training is difficult because of the multiple factors involved, including, but not limited to, the heterogeneity of trainees, their diverse roles in suicide prevention, absence of clear guidelines for training content across settings, and limited methods for assessing outcomes. Here, three groups of trainees are discussed: community and professional gatekeepers and behavioral health providers. The roles each group plays in managing suicide risk and the training content it needs to be effective are addressed. A staged training approach is proposed, building on the core components of currently used suicide training: knowledge, attitudes, and skills/behaviors. Limitations of current assessment methods are identified and recommendations for alternative methods are provided. The article concludes with a discussion of next steps in moving the field forward, including overcoming challenges and identifying and engaging opportunities. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  7. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  8. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  9. Identification of a new restriction endonuclease R.NciII, from Neisseria cinerea.

    PubMed

    Piekarowicz, A

    1994-01-01

    Site-specific restriction endonuclease R. Nci II has been purified from Neisseria cinerea strain 32615. The enzyme recognizes the sequence 5' GATC 3' and its activity is inhibited by the presence of methylated adenine residue within the recognition sequence.

  10. Bibliometric Assessment of European and Sub-Saharan African Research Output on Poverty-Related and Neglected Infectious Diseases from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Breugelmans, J Gabrielle; Makanga, Michael M; Cardoso, Ana Lúcia V; Mathewson, Sophie B; Sheridan-Jones, Bethan R; Gurney, Karen A; Mgone, Charles S

    2015-08-01

    The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) is a partnership of European and sub-Saharan African countries that aims to accelerate the development of medical interventions against poverty-related diseases (PRDs). A bibliometric analysis was conducted to 1) measure research output from European and African researchers on PRDs, 2) describe collaboration patterns, and 3) assess the citation impact of clinical research funded by EDCTP. Disease-specific research publications were identified in Thomson Reuters Web of Science using search terms in titles, abstracts and keywords. Publication data, including citation counts, were extracted for 2003-2011. Analyses including output, share of global papers, normalised citation impact (NCI), and geographical distribution are presented. Data are presented as five-year moving averages. European EDCTP member countries accounted for ~33% of global research output in PRDs and sub-Saharan African countries for ~10% (2007-2011). Both regions contributed more to the global research output in malaria (43.4% and 22.2%, respectively). The overall number of PRD papers from sub-Saharan Africa increased markedly (>47%) since 2003, particularly for HIV/AIDS (102%) and tuberculosis (TB) (81%), and principally involving Southern and East Africa. For 2007-2011, European and sub-Saharan African research collaboration on PRDs was highly cited compared with the world average (NCI in brackets): HIV/AIDS 1.62 (NCI: 1.16), TB 2.11 (NCI: 1.06), malaria 1.81 (NCI: 1.22), and neglected infectious diseases 1.34 (NCI: 0.97). The NCI of EDCTP-funded papers for 2003-2011 was exceptionally high for HIV/AIDS (3.24), TB (4.08) and HIV/TB co-infection (5.10) compared with global research benchmarks (1.14, 1.05 and 1.35, respectively). The volume and citation impact of papers from sub-Saharan Africa has increased since 2003, as has collaborative research between Europe and sub-Saharan Africa. >90% of publications from EDCTP

  11. Bibliometric Assessment of European and Sub-Saharan African Research Output on Poverty-Related and Neglected Infectious Diseases from 2003 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Karen A.; Mgone, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) is a partnership of European and sub-Saharan African countries that aims to accelerate the development of medical interventions against poverty-related diseases (PRDs). A bibliometric analysis was conducted to 1) measure research output from European and African researchers on PRDs, 2) describe collaboration patterns, and 3) assess the citation impact of clinical research funded by EDCTP. Methodology/Principal Findings Disease-specific research publications were identified in Thomson Reuters Web of Science using search terms in titles, abstracts and keywords. Publication data, including citation counts, were extracted for 2003–2011. Analyses including output, share of global papers, normalised citation impact (NCI), and geographical distribution are presented. Data are presented as five-year moving averages. European EDCTP member countries accounted for ~33% of global research output in PRDs and sub-Saharan African countries for ~10% (2007–2011). Both regions contributed more to the global research output in malaria (43.4% and 22.2%, respectively). The overall number of PRD papers from sub-Saharan Africa increased markedly (>47%) since 2003, particularly for HIV/AIDS (102%) and tuberculosis (TB) (81%), and principally involving Southern and East Africa. For 2007–2011, European and sub-Saharan African research collaboration on PRDs was highly cited compared with the world average (NCI in brackets): HIV/AIDS 1.62 (NCI: 1.16), TB 2.11 (NCI: 1.06), malaria 1.81 (NCI: 1.22), and neglected infectious diseases 1.34 (NCI: 0.97). The NCI of EDCTP-funded papers for 2003–2011 was exceptionally high for HIV/AIDS (3.24), TB (4.08) and HIV/TB co-infection (5.10) compared with global research benchmarks (1.14, 1.05 and 1.35, respectively). Conclusions The volume and citation impact of papers from sub-Saharan Africa has increased since 2003, as has collaborative research between Europe and

  12. Strategies for identifying pregnancies in the automated medical records of the General Practice Research Database.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Janet R; Holford, Theodore R; Hall, Gillian C; Bracken, Michael B

    2004-11-01

    To develop a method for identifying the beginning and ending records of pregnancies in the automated medical records of the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). Women's records from 1991 to 1999 were searched for codes from 17 pregnancy marker and 7 pregnancy outcome categories. Using the retrieved records, all possible pregnancy marker-outcome combinations were formed per woman. For each combination, the difference in days between record event dates was calculated. Restrictions were applied to select the combination with the earliest pregnancy marker mapped to the first outcome for each pregnancy. Iterations of the algorithm identified multiple pregnancies per woman when present. The algorithm was evaluated by analyzing time between marker and outcome event dates of mapped pregnancies and by analyzing unmapped pregnancy markers and outcomes. A total of 297,082 pregnancies were identified: 80% by general practitioner (GP) visit codes as the earliest pregnancy marker and 14% by laboratory or procedure codes. Limiting pregnancies to one per woman aged 15-44 years yielded 209,266 pregnancies. Pregnancy mapping success was greater than 80%. Plotting the pregnancies by weeks from earliest pregnancy marker to outcome and by pregnancy marker category showed two peaks in the distribution: 2-3 weeks and 33 weeks. Arranging codes and time into algorithms provides a useful tool for pregnancy identification in databases whose size prohibits the audit of printed records. Evaluation of our algorithm confirmed a high degree of mapping success and a sensible time distribution from pregnancy marker to outcome. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Emerging contaminant degradation and removal in algal wastewater treatment ponds: Identifying the research gaps.

    PubMed

    Norvill, Zane N; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2016-08-05

    Whereas the fate of emerging contaminants (ECs) during 'conventional' and 'advanced' wastewater treatment (WWT) has been intensively studied, little research has been conducted on the algal WWT ponds commonly used in provincial areas. The long retention times and large surface areas exposed to light potentially allow more opportunities for EC removal to occur, but experimental evidence is lacking to enable definite predictions about EC fate across different algal WWT systems. This study reviews the mechanisms of EC hydrolysis, sorption, biodegradation, and photodegradation, applying available knowledge to the case of algal WWT. From this basis the review identifies three main areas that need more research due to the unique environmental and ecological conditions occurring in algal WWT ponds: i) the effect of diurnally fluctuating pH and dissolved oxygen upon removal mechanisms; ii) the influence of algae and algal biomass on biodegradation and sorption under relevant conditions; and iii) the significance of EC photodegradation in the presence of dissolved and suspended materials. Because of the high concentration of dissolved organics typically found in algal WWT ponds, most EC photodegradation likely occurs via indirect mechanisms rather than direct photolysis in these systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  15. College Graduate with NCI Internship Gains Experience, Carries Chemistry into Medicine | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    For Jennifer Marshall, the skills learned through an internship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick have prepared her for the next step of her life—medical school. Marshall, who will be attending the West Virginia University School of Medicine in the fall, spent three summers in NCI at Frederick’s Summer Internship Program expanding her love and passion for science and the medical field.

  16. TBMS1 exerts its cytotoxicity in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells through nucleolar stress-induced p53/MDM2-dependent mechanism, a quantitative proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingying; Xie, Guobin; Xia, Ji; Su, Dan; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Fuquan; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) exerts its anticancer effects by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism of its anti-tumor effects has not been fully elucidated, especially the signaling pathways involved in the early stage of TBMS1 stimulation. In this study, we employed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics approach and identified 439 proteins that exhibit significant differential expressions in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells upon exposure to TBMS1. Gene ontology and network analysis using DAVID and STRING on-line tools revealed that several nucleolar stress (ribosomal biogenesis) response proteins were differentially regulated by TBMS1. Functional validation demonstrated that TBMS1-induced NCI-H460 cell cytotoxicity involved nucleolar stress-induced p53/murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  17. Identifying structures, processes, resources and needs of research ethics committees in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Concerns have been expressed regarding the adequacy of ethics review systems in developing countries. Limited data are available regarding the structural and functional status of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) in the Middle East. The purpose of this study was to survey the existing RECs in Egypt to better understand their functioning status, perceived resource needs, and challenges. Methods We distributed a self-administered survey tool to Egyptian RECs to collect information on the following domains: general characteristics of the REC, membership composition, ethics training, workload, process of ethics review, perceived challenges to effective functioning, and financial and material resources. We used basic descriptive statistics to evaluate the quantitative data. Results We obtained responses from 67% (12/18) of the identified RECs. Most RECs (10/12) have standard operating procedures and many (7/12) have established policies to manage conflicts of interests. The average membership was 10.3 with a range from 7-19. The predominant member type was physicians (69.5% of all of the REC members) with little lay representation (13.7%). Most RECs met at least once/month and the average number of protocols reviewed per meeting was 3.8 with a range from 1-10. Almost three-quarters of the members from all of the 12 RECs indicated they received some formal training in ethics. Regarding resources, roughly half of the RECs have dedicated capital equipment (e.g., meeting room, computers, office furniture, etc); none of the RECs have a formal operating budget. Perceived challenges included the absence of national research ethics guidelines and national standards for RECs and lack of ongoing training of its members in research ethics. Conclusion Our study documents several areas of strengths and areas for improvements in the operations of Egyptian RECs. Regarding strengths, many of the existing RECs meet frequently, have a majority of members with prior training in

  18. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O’Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  19. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O'Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  20. Identifying and Fostering Productive Researchers. An Occasional Paper from ERIC at Stanford.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, W. Andrew

    What are the characteristics of successful students in research training programs and what are the characteristics of successful programs of this type? What are the characteristics of successful mature researchers and what research environments facilitate research of high quality and quantity? Since very little research deals directly with these…

  1. Bacterial vaginosis: identifying research gaps proceedings of a workshop sponsored by DHHS/NIH/NIAID.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Martin, David H; Watts, D Heather; Schulte, Joann; Sobel, Jack D; Hillier, Sharon L; Deal, Carolyn; Fredricks, David N

    2010-12-01

    The microbiota of the human vagina can affect the health of women, their fetuses, and newborns. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent form of vaginal infection in women of reproductive age, affecting 8% to 23%, and is the most common etiology of vaginal symptoms prompting women to seek medical care. While traditional cultivation has identified numerous BV-associated bacteria involved in these processes, recent advances in molecular biology have facilitated the detection and identification of bacteria without cultivation, some of which have not previously been described or well characterized. A more complete understanding of vaginal microbial populations resulting from the adoption of molecular tools may lead to better strategies to maintain healthy vaginal microbial communities-thus enhancing women's health-and will create opportunities to explore the role of novel bacteria in reproductive tract diseases. On November 19-20, 2008, the NIH convened a workshop of experts in the field of research and clinical practice related to BV in order to discuss how these new advances should be interpreted and applied to research in progress and collaborations between relevant disciplines. This paper summarizes the presentations of this workshop and outlines general recommendations arising from the related discussions. Future studies of BV and its associated adverse outcomes should determine if specific combinations of organisms are more pathogenic than others, and causally associated with different adverse events. Moreover, determination of causality will depend not only on more precise categorization of the vaginal microbiota, but also on variations in the host environment that may be associated with changes in bacterial communities over time. In this report, we offer suggestions and recommendations that we hope will facilitate conduct of consistent approaches to collaborative efforts towards advancing our understanding of the vaginal microbiota and its impact on human

  2. CRC/EORTC/NCI Joint Formulation Working Party: experiences in the formulation of investigational cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Beijnen, J. H.; Flora, K. P.; Halbert, G. W.; Henrar, R. E.; Slack, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    The pharmaceutical formulation of a new anti-tumour agent has often been perceived as the bottleneck in anti-cancer drug development. In order to increase the speed of this essential development step, the Cancer Research Campaign (CRC), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) agreed in 1987 to form the Joint Formulation Working Party (JFWP). The main goal of the JFWP is to facilitate the rapid progress of a new drug through pharmaceutical developmental to preclinical toxicology and subsequently to phase I clinical trial. Under the auspices of the JFWP around 50 new agents have been developed or are currently in development. In this report we present our formulation experiences since the establishment of the JFWP with a selected number of agents: aphidicolin glycinate, bryostatin 1, carmethizole, carzelesin, combretastatin A4, dabis maleate, disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine, E.O.9, 4-hydroxyanisole, pancratistatin, rhizoxin, Springer pro-drug, SRI 62-834, temozolomide, trimelamol and V489. The approaches used and problems presented may be of general interest to scientists in related fields and those considering submitting agents for development. PMID:7599054

  3. Detecting Role Errors in the Gene Hierarchy of the NCI Thesaurus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hua; Cohen, Barry; Halper, Michael; Oren, Marc; Perl, Yehoshua

    2008-01-01

    Gene terminologies are playing an increasingly important role in the ever-growing field of genomic research. While errors in large, complex terminologies are inevitable, gene terminologies are even more susceptible to them due to the rapid growth of genomic knowledge and the nature of its discovery. It is therefore very important to establish quality-assurance protocols for such genomic-knowledge repositories. Different kinds of terminologies oftentimes require auditing methodologies adapted to their particular structures. In light of this, an auditing methodology tailored to the characteristics of the NCI Thesaurus’s (NCIT’s) Gene hierarchy is presented. The Gene hierarchy is of particular interest to the NCIT’s designers due to the primary role of genomics in current cancer research. This multiphase methodology focuses on detecting role-errors, such as missing roles or roles with incorrect or incomplete target structures, occurring within that hierarchy. The methodology is based on two kinds of abstraction networks, called taxonomies, that highlight the role distribution among concepts within the IS-A (subsumption) hierarchy. These abstract views tend to highlight portions of the hierarchy having a higher concentration of errors. The errors found during an application of the methodology are reported. Hypotheses pertaining to the efficacy of our methodology are investigated. PMID:19221606

  4. Structural Biology and Molecular Applications Research

    Cancer.gov

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, research and development in this area focuses on enabling technologies, models, and methodologies to support basic and applied cancer research.

  5. AACR-NCI-EORTC - 27th International Symposium - Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics (November 5-9, 2015 - Boston, Massachusetts, USA).

    PubMed

    Carceller, V

    2015-11-01

    The 27th joint meeting of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute and the American Association of Cancer Research (EORTC-NCI-AACR) International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics was held this year in Boston. Approximately 3,000 international academics, scientists and pharmaceutical industry representatives discussed new discoveries in the field of molecular biology of cancer and presented the latest information on drug discovery, preclinical research, clinical research and target selection in oncology. This report summarizes data on advances in cancer drug discovery. Copyright 2015 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  6. Trophic transfer of microplastics in aquatic ecosystems: Identifying critical research needs.

    PubMed

    Au, Sarah Y; Lee, Cindy M; Weinstein, John E; van den Hurk, Peter; Klaine, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the process of trophic transfer of microplastics, it is important to consider various abiotic and biotic factors involved in their ingestion, egestion, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification. Toward this end, a review of the literature on microplastics has been conducted to identify factors influencing their uptake and absorption; their residence times in organisms and bioaccumulation; the physical effects of their aggregation in gastrointestinal tracts; and their potential to act as vectors for the transfer of other contaminants. Limited field evidence from higher trophic level organisms in a variety of habitats suggests that trophic transfer of microplastics may be a common phenomenon and occurs concurrently with direct ingestion. Critical research needs include standardizing methods of field characterization of microplastics, quantifying uptake and depuration rates in organisms at different trophic levels, quantifying the influence that microplastics have on the uptake and/or depuration of environmental contaminants among different trophic levels, and investigating the potential for biomagnification of microplastic-associated chemicals. More integrated approaches involving computational modeling are required to fully assess trophic transfer of microplastics. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:505-509. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  7. Researcher-Identified and Emergent Predictors of Pupil Control Ideologies: A Canadian Beginning Teacher Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rideout, Glenn; Windle, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to identify the direction of pupil control ideology (PCI) shifts during participants' beginning teaching years, and (b) to identify a broader range of "emergent" (participant-identified) predictors of PCI that beginning teachers saw as accounting for the tendency for their classroom learning…

  8. Trends in Research on Energy Balance Supported by the National Cancer Institute

    PubMed Central

    Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Siddiqi, Sameer M.; Berrigan, David A.; Ross, Sharon A.; Nebeling, Linda C.; Dowling, Emily C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the body of research linking energy balance to the incidence, development, progression and treatment of cancer has grown substantially. No prior NIH portfolio analyses have focused on energy balance within one institute. This portfolio analysis describes the growth of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant research on energy balance–related conditions and behaviors from 2004 to 2010 following the release of an NCI research priority statement in 2003 on energy balance and cancer-related research. Energy-balance grants from fiscal years (FY) 2004 to 2010 were identified using multiple search terms and analyzed between calendar years 2008 and 2010. Study characteristics related to cancer site, design, population and energy-balance area (physical activity, diet, and weight) were abstracted. From FY2004 to FY2010, the NCI awarded 269 energy balance–relevant grants totaling $518 million. In FY2010, 4.2% of NCI’s total research project grants budget was allocated to energy-balance research, compared to 2.1% in FY2004. The NCI more than doubled support for investigator-initiated research project grants (R01), and increased support for cooperative agreement (U01, U54) and exploratory research (R21) grants. In the portfolio, research examining energy-balance areas in combination accounted for 41.6%, and observational and interventional studies were equally represented (38.3% and 37.2%, respectively). Breast cancer was the most commonly studied cancer. Inclusion of minorities rose, and funding specific to cancer survivors more than doubled. From FY2004 to FY2010, NCI’s investment in energy-balance and related health behavior research showed growth in funding and diversity of mechanisms, topics and disciplines—growth that reflects new directions in this field. PMID:23498109

  9. Graduate Education to Facilitate Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration: Identifying Individual Competencies and Developmental Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Valerie Ciocca

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research collaborations (IDRC) are considered essential for addressing the most complex global community problems concerning science, health, education, energy, the environment, and society. In spite of technological advances, supportive funding, and even researcher proclivity to collaborate, these complex interdisciplinary…

  10. IDENTIFYING HIGH PRIORITY EXPOSURE RESEARCH SUPPORTING THE EPA ASBESTOS ACTION PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Asbestos Action Plan outlines areas, including two exposure assessment areas, where research is needed to reduce uncertainties in current asbestos risk assessments. Scientists from the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) recently conducted survey and literature ...

  11. Graduate Education to Facilitate Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration: Identifying Individual Competencies and Developmental Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Valerie Ciocca

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research collaborations (IDRC) are considered essential for addressing the most complex global community problems concerning science, health, education, energy, the environment, and society. In spite of technological advances, supportive funding, and even researcher proclivity to collaborate, these complex interdisciplinary…

  12. PANCREATITIS - DIABETES - PANCREATIC CANCER: Summary of an NIDDK-NCI Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Dana K.; Andren-Sandberg, Åke; Duell, Eric J.; Goggins, Michael; Korc, Murray; Petersen, Gloria M.; Smith, Jill P.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2013-01-01

    A workshop sponsored by the NIDDK and the NCI on “Pancreatitis-Diabetes-Pancreatic Cancer” focused on the risk factors of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and diabetes mellitus (DM) on the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Sessions were held on a) an overview of the problem of PDAC, b) CP as a risk factor for PDAC, c) DM as a risk factor for PDAC, d) pancreatogenic, or type 3c DM (T3cDM), e) genomic associations of CP, DM, and PDAC, f) surveillance of high-risk populations and early detection of PDAC, and g) effects of DM treatment on PDAC. Recent data and current understandings of the mechanisms of CP- and DM-associated factors on PDAC development were discussed, and a detailed review of the possible risks of DM treatment on the development of PDAC was provided by representatives from academia, industry, and the Food and Drug Administration. The current status of possible biomarkers of PDAC and surveillance strategies for high-risk populations were discussed, and the gaps in knowledge and opportunities for further research were elucidated. A broad spectrum of expertise of the speakers and discussants provided an unusually productive workshop, the highlights of which are summarized in the accompanying article. PMID:24152948

  13. Identifying Themes for Research-Based Development of Pedagogy and Guidance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jääskelä, Päivikki; Nissilä, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The high value accorded to the research-based development of education in higher education communities means that researchers in the field have an important role in determining the foci of such efforts. However, it is important to ask whether higher education research is providing answers that satisfy practical educational needs. In this study,…

  14. Identifying Themes for Research-Based Development of Pedagogy and Guidance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jääskelä, Päivikki; Nissilä, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The high value accorded to the research-based development of education in higher education communities means that researchers in the field have an important role in determining the foci of such efforts. However, it is important to ask whether higher education research is providing answers that satisfy practical educational needs. In this study,…

  15. Characterization of osimertinib (AZD9291)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1975/OSIR cell line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Xia; Fong, Chi Man Vivienne; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-12-06

    Osimertinib (OSI, also known as AZD9291) is the newest FDA-approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR T790M mutation. However, resistance to OSI is likely to progress and the study of potential OSI-resistant mechanisms in advanced is necessary. Here, the OSI-resistant NCI-H1975/OSIR cells were established. After cells developed resistance to OSI, cell proliferation was decreased while cell migration and invasion were increased. The NCI-H1975/OSIR cells exhibited more resistance to gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, rociletinib, doxorubicin, and fluorouracil, meanwhile showing higher sensitivity to paclitaxel, when compared with NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, the NCI-H1975/OSIR cells did not display multidrug resistance phenotype. The activation and expression of EGFR were decreased after cells exhibited resistance. Compared with NCI-H1975 cells, the activation of ERK and AKT in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could not be significantly inhibited by OSI treatment. Navitoclax (ABT-263)-induced cell viability inhibition and apoptosis were more significant in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells than that in NCI-H1975 cells. Moreover, these effects of navitoclax in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could be reversed by pretreatment of Z-VAD-FMK. Collectively, loss of EGFR could pose as one of the OSI-resistant mechanisms and navitoclax might be the candidate drug for OSI-resistant NSCLC patients.

  16. Characterization of osimertinib (AZD9291)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1975/OSIR cell line

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xia; Fong, Chi Man Vivienne; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Osimertinib (OSI, also known as AZD9291) is the newest FDA-approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR T790M mutation. However, resistance to OSI is likely to progress and the study of potential OSI-resistant mechanisms in advanced is necessary. Here, the OSI-resistant NCI-H1975/OSIR cells were established. After cells developed resistance to OSI, cell proliferation was decreased while cell migration and invasion were increased. The NCI-H1975/OSIR cells exhibited more resistance to gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, rociletinib, doxorubicin, and fluorouracil, meanwhile showing higher sensitivity to paclitaxel, when compared with NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, the NCI-H1975/OSIR cells did not display multidrug resistance phenotype. The activation and expression of EGFR were decreased after cells exhibited resistance. Compared with NCI-H1975 cells, the activation of ERK and AKT in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could not be significantly inhibited by OSI treatment. Navitoclax (ABT-263)-induced cell viability inhibition and apoptosis were more significant in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells than that in NCI-H1975 cells. Moreover, these effects of navitoclax in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could be reversed by pretreatment of Z-VAD-FMK. Collectively, loss of EGFR could pose as one of the OSI-resistant mechanisms and navitoclax might be the candidate drug for OSI-resistant NSCLC patients. PMID:27835594

  17. Measuring the impact of methodological research: a framework and methods to identify evidence of impact.

    PubMed

    Brueton, Valerie C; Vale, Claire L; Choodari-Oskooei, Babak; Jinks, Rachel; Tierney, Jayne F

    2014-11-27

    Providing evidence of impact highlights the benefits of medical research to society. Such evidence is increasingly requested by research funders and commonly relies on citation analysis. However, other indicators may be more informative. Although frameworks to demonstrate the impact of clinical research have been reported, no complementary framework exists for methodological research. Therefore, we assessed the impact of methodological research projects conducted or completed between 2009 and 2012 at the UK Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit Hub for Trials Methodology Research Hub, with a view to developing an appropriate framework. Various approaches to the collection of data on research impact were employed. Citation rates were obtained using Web of Science (http://www.webofknowledge.com/) and analyzed descriptively. Semistructured interviews were conducted to obtain information on the rates of different types of research output that indicated impact for each project. Results were then pooled across all projects. Finally, email queries pertaining to methodology projects were collected retrospectively and their content analyzed. Simple citation analysis established the citation rates per year since publication for 74 methodological publications; however, further detailed analysis revealed more about the potential influence of these citations. Interviews that spanned 20 individual research projects demonstrated a variety of types of impact not otherwise collated, for example, applications and further developments of the research; release of software and provision of guidance materials to facilitate uptake; formation of new collaborations and broad dissemination. Finally, 194 email queries relating to 6 methodological projects were received from 170 individuals across 23 countries. They provided further evidence that the methodologies were impacting on research and research practice, both nationally and internationally. We have used the information

  18. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  19. Sensitivity of NCI-H292 human lung mucoepidermoid cells for respiratory and other human viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Castells, E; Banks, G G; Bryan, J A; McEwen, C T

    1993-01-01

    NCI-H292 mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells from human lungs were shown in an earlier report to be a fully adequate substitute for primary rhesus monkey kidney (MK) cells for the isolation and propagation of the human paramyxoviruses. Although sensitivity for ortho- and paramyxoviruses was the principal reason for using MK cells, the cells were also sensitive to many other viruses, which constituted another important value of MK cells. That MK cells supported the initial isolation and growth of so many respiratory viruses made it a mandatory cell type for any clinical laboratory. We therefore felt it was imperative to evaluate the virus spectrum of NCI-H292 cells, which are being used as a substitute for MK cells in many laboratories. In the present report, we show that NCI-H292 cells are sensitive for vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, adenoviruses, BK polyomavirus, reoviruses, measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, some strains of influenza virus type A, most enteroviruses, and rhinoviruses, in addition to the parainfluenza and mumps viruses originally reported. Furthermore, these viruses replicate in NCI-H292 cells to the same virus and antigen titers and at the same speed of replication as they do in their usually preferred cells. The NCI-H292 cells are therefore an excellent substitute for MK cells in terms of laboratory safety, ease of availability, paramyxovirus isolation, and broad virus spectrum but cannot substitute for MK cells for the isolation of influenza viruses. Images PMID:8314992

  20. Epigenetic research in cancer epidemiology: trends, opportunities, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh; Rogers, Scott; Divi, Rao L; Schully, Sheri D; Nelson, Stefanie; Joseph Su, L; Ross, Sharon A; Pilch, Susan; Winn, Deborah M; Khoury, Muin J

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetics is emerging as an important field in cancer epidemiology that promises to provide insights into gene regulation and facilitate cancer control throughout the cancer care continuum. Increasingly, investigators are incorporating epigenetic analysis into the studies of etiology and outcomes. To understand current progress and trends in the inclusion of epigenetics in cancer epidemiology, we evaluated the published literature and the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported research grant awards in this field to identify trends in epigenetics research. We present a summary of the epidemiologic studies in NCI's grant portfolio (from January 2005 through December 2012) and in the scientific literature published during the same period, irrespective of support from the NCI. Blood cells and tumor tissue were the most commonly used biospecimens in these studies, although buccal cells, cervical cells, sputum, and stool samples were also used. DNA methylation profiling was the focus of the majority of studies, but several studies also measured microRNA profiles. We illustrate here the current status of epidemiologic studies that are evaluating epigenetic changes in large populations. The incorporation of epigenomic assessments in cancer epidemiology studies has and is likely to continue to provide important insights into the field of cancer research.

  1. Self-Directed Learning and Schooling: Identifying Pertinent Theories and Illustrative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skager, Rodney

    1979-01-01

    Six theoretical positions on human learning are identified as relevant to the development of self-direction: modeling; reinforcement; curiosity motivation; competency motivation; attribution theory and personal causation; and humanism. Four approaches to educational practice associated with self-direction are identified: experimental learning;…

  2. Readability of Online Patient Educational Resources Found on NCI-Designated Cancer Center Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Stephen A; Francis, David; Hullett, Craig R; Morris, Zachary S; Fisher, Michael M; Brower, Jeffrey V; Bradley, Kristin A; Anderson, Bethany M; Bassetti, Michael F; Kimple, Randall J

    2016-06-01

    The NIH and Department of Health & Human Services recommend online patient information (OPI) be written at a sixth grade level. We used a panel of readability analyses to assess OPI from NCI-Designated Cancer Center (NCIDCC) Web sites. Cancer.gov was used to identify 68 NCIDCC Web sites from which we collected both general OPI and OPI specific to breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers. This text was analyzed by 10 commonly used readability tests: the New Dale-Chall Readability Formula, Flesch Reading Ease scale, Flesch-Kinaid Grade Level, FORCAST scale, Fry Readability Graph, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook test, Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook index, New Fog Count, Raygor Readability Estimate Graph, and Coleman-Liau Index. We tested the hypothesis that the readability of NCIDCC OPI was written at the sixth grade level. Secondary analyses were performed to compare readability of OPI between comprehensive and noncomprehensive centers, by region, and to OPI produced by the American Cancer Society (ACS). A mean of 30,507 words from 40 comprehensive and 18 noncomprehensive NCIDCCs was analyzed (7 nonclinical and 3 without appropriate OPI were excluded). Using a composite grade level score, the mean readability score of 12.46 (ie, college level: 95% CI, 12.13-12.79) was significantly greater than the target grade level of 6 (middle-school: P<.001). No difference between comprehensive and noncomprehensive centers was identified. Regional differences were identified in 4 of the 10 readability metrics (P<.05). ACS OPI provides easier language, at the seventh to ninth grade level, across all tests (P<.01). OPI from NCIDCC Web sites is more complex than recommended for the average patient. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  3. Improving the performance of interorganizational networks for preventing chronic disease: identifying and acting on research needs.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Taylor, Martin; Best, Allan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the role of interorganizational networks in chronic disease prevention and an action research agenda for promoting understanding and improvement. Through a model of engaged scholarship, leaders with expertise and experience in chronic disease prevention networks helped shape research directions focused on network value, governance, and evolution. The guiding principles for facilitating this research include applying existing knowledge, developing network-appropriate methods and measures, creating structural change, promoting an impact orientation, and fostering cultural change.

  4. Case study: a patient-clinician collaboration that identified and prioritized evidence gaps and stimulated research development.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Brian S; Grant, Adrian M; Glazener, Cathryn M A

    2013-05-01

    To assess the effect of a research prioritization partnership that aimed to influence the research agenda relating to urinary incontinence (UI). Research often neglects important gaps in existing evidence so that decisions must be made about treatments without reliable evidence of their effectiveness. In 2007-2009, a United Kingdom partnership of eight patient and 13 clinician organizations identified and prioritized gaps in the evidence that affect everyday decisions about treatment of UI. The top 10 prioritized research questions were published and reported to research funders in 2009. A year later, new research or funding applications relating to the prioritized topics were identified through reviews of research databases and consultation with funding organizations, elements of the research community, and organizations that participated in the partnership. Since dissemination of the prioritized topics, five studies are known to have been funded, three in development; five new systematic reviews are under way, one is being updated; five questions are under consideration by a national research commissioning body. The partnership successfully developed and used a methodology for identification and prioritization of research needs through patient-clinician consensus. Prioritization through consensus can be effective in informing the development of clinically useful research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identifying the Priorities and Practices of Virtual School Educators Using Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kara; Dana, Nancy Fichtman; Wolkenhauer, Rachel; Krell, Desi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the nature of thirty virtual educators' action research questions during a yearlong action research professional development experience within a large, state-funded virtual school. Virtual educators included instructional personnel (i.e., individuals responsible for teaching virtual courses) and noninstructional personnel…

  6. Identifying Faculty Types Using Peer Ratings of Teaching, Research, and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer, John

    1991-01-01

    A study classified 90 full-time tenure-track faculty in 1 university into 5 discrete types based on teaching, research, and service. Types include all-stars, teachers and good citizens, researchers, teachers, and uninvolved. This mix of types is seen as resulting from past administrative decisions and helps shape future decisions. (Author/MSE)

  7. Identifying Evidence-Based Special Education Interventions from Single-Subject Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jennifer; Sugai, George

    2013-01-01

    Special educators are required to use evidence-based academic and behavioral interventions in their classrooms (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). No rigorous and comprehensive database currently exists to support educators. Within the field of special education, single-subject research is the primary research methodology (Horner, Carr, Halle,…

  8. Identifying the Priorities and Practices of Virtual School Educators Using Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Kara; Dana, Nancy Fichtman; Wolkenhauer, Rachel; Krell, Desi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the nature of thirty virtual educators' action research questions during a yearlong action research professional development experience within a large, state-funded virtual school. Virtual educators included instructional personnel (i.e., individuals responsible for teaching virtual courses) and noninstructional personnel…

  9. Identifying research needs for improved management of social impacts in wilderness recreation

    Treesearch

    Gordon R. Cessford

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the social impact research and information needs derived from a workshop of over 50 recreation management staff in the New Zealand Department of Conservation. The overall objective was to establish the basis for developing a research plan underpinning social impact management. After scoping the diversity of social impact issues, the workshop...

  10. National efforts to identify research issues related to prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas R

    2004-02-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), including low back and upper extremity disorders, represent one of the greatest work-related health concerns facing industrialized nations. Recently, two national groups were charged with developing research agendas aimed at increasing our knowledge of the prevention of these disorders. The first agenda, developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's (NIOSH) National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) MSD team, was based on input from several hundred practitioners and safety and health experts representing industry, labor, and academia. The second agenda, developed by the National Research Council (NRC) and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) National Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace, was based on input from leading researchers in the fields of medicine, information science, and ergonomics. This paper summarizes the findings of the two groups and compares the two research agendas.

  11. Principal components analysis to identify influences on research communication and engagement during an environmental disaster

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Charlene A; Moore, Colleen F; Kuntz, Sandra W; Weinert, Clarann; Hernandez, Tanis; Black, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To discern community attitudes towards research engagement in Libby, Montana, the only Superfund site for which a public health emergency has been declared. Study design Survey study of convenience samples of residents near the Libby, Montana Superfund site. Participants Residents of the Libby, Montana area were recruited from a local retail establishment (N=120, survey 1) or a community event (N=127, survey 2). Measures Two surveys were developed in consultation with a Community Advisory Panel. Results Principal components of survey 1 showed four dimensions of community members' attitudes towards research engagement: (1) researcher communication and contributions to the community, (2) identity and affiliation of the researchers requesting participation, (3) potential personal barriers, including data confidentiality, painful or invasive procedures and effects on health insurance and (4) research benefits for the community, oneself or family. The score on the first factor was positively related to desire to participate in research (r=0.31, p=0.01). Scores on factors 2 and 3 were higher for those with diagnosis of asbestos-related disease (ARD) in the family (Cohen's d=0.41, 0.57). Survey 2 also found more positive attitudes towards research when a family member had ARD (Cohen's d=0.48). Conclusions Principal components analysis shows different dimensions of attitudes towards research engagement. The different dimensions are related to community members' desire to be invited to participate in research, awareness of past research in the community and having been screened or diagnosed with a health condition related to the Superfund contaminant. PMID:27507235

  12. DCB - DNA and Chromosome Aberrations Research

    Cancer.gov

    Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Biology's research portfolio, this research area is focused on making clear the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis and mechanisms of chemical and physical carcinogenesis.

  13. About the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    Epidemiology is the scientific study of the causes and distribution of disease in populations. NCI-funded epidemiology research is conducted through research at institutions in the United States and internationally.

  14. Student Poster Days Showcase Young Researchers | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Student interns presented their research to the NCI at Frederick community during the annual Student Poster Days event, held in the Building 549 lobby and the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) atrium over two days.

  15. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  16. Cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines of modified flavonoids from Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Yenjai, Chavi; Wanich, Suchana

    2010-05-01

    Flavones 1-4 isolated from Kaempferia parviflora were used for structural modification. Sixteen flavonoid derivatives, including four new derivatives, were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines. Flavanones 2a-4a demonstrated higher cytotoxic activity than the parent compounds. Cytotoxicity against KB cell line of oxime 1c was about 7 times higher than the ellipticine standard. Interestingly, oximes 1c and 2c exhibited highly potent cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 0.014 and 0.23 microM, respectively. Oximes 4c and 5c showed strong cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 4.04 and 2.32 microM, respectively. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-05-11

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors.

  18. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Hiriscau, Elisabeta Ioana; Stingelin-Giles, Nicola; Wasserman, Danuta; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI) was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors. PMID:27187425

  19. New Pathologies of Skin Disorders Identified from the History of Perspiration Research.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    This chapter introduces the history of perspiration research and the latest perspiration research findings. Many investigators worldwide, particularly those in Japan, have carried forward globally leading studies on perspiration. This chapter will introduce the history of studies on the physiology of perspiration and perspiration research by classifying it in three stages, namely the early, maturation, and development stages, with a focus on Japanese researchers who have played active roles in each stage. In particular, I will introduce two historical physiologists in detail, Dr. Yasu Kuno, a former professor of Nagoya University, who dramatically revealed the physiology of perspiration in the early and maturation stages, and Dr. Kenzo Sato, a former professor of the University of Iowa. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Philosophy of science: how to identify the potential research for the day after tomorrow?

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2004-06-25

    We were asked to participate in a workshop to assist the European Commission on how to choose financial support for high-potential, basic research projects that can give new scientific breakthroughs and thus contribute significantly to the positive development of society, industry, and economy for the day after tomorrow. At this workshop, we analyzed the problem in some detail using experience from our own research on the global quality of life. We would suggest that the most promising projects have the following characteristics: (1) they are led by a brilliant researcher who considers his/her research to be "sweet science", who wants to explain the anomalies of his/her field of science, and who lives in a nonmainstream scientific paradigm; (2) they are deeply engaged in the philosophical problems of their research field, they are searching eagerly for a new understanding and a new theory, giving new tools for measurement and creating change, and results are taken as feedback on all levels from tool to theory and philosophy; (3) they are focused on the key point(s), which is an essential feature of the universe that creates global change if intervened upon. At the NEST Pathfinder 2005 Topic Identification Workshop, Brussels 28 May 2004 entitled "Measuring the Impossible", we advised the European Commission Research Directorate to allocate funds for projects focusing on the state of consciousness--how to understand it, how to map it, and how to develop it.

  1. Identifying Indicators of Progress in Thermal Spray Research Using Bibliometrics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.-T.; Khor, K. A.; Yu, L.-G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the research publications on thermal spray in the period of 1985-2015 using the data from Web of Science, Scopus and SciVal®. Bibliometrics analysis was employed to elucidate the country and institution distribution in various thermal spray research areas and to characterize the trends of topic change and technology progress. Results show that China, USA, Japan, Germany, India and France were the top countries in thermal spray research, and Xi'an Jiaotong University, Universite de Technologie Belfort-Montbeliard, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, ETH Zurich, National Research Council of Canada, University of Limoges were among the top institutions that had high scholarly research output during 2005-2015. The terms of the titles, keywords and abstracts of the publications were analyzed by the Latent Dirichlet Allocation model and visually mapped using the VOSviewer software to reveal the progress of thermal spray technology. It is found that thermal barrier coating was consistently the main research area in thermal spray, and high-velocity oxy-fuel spray and cold spray developed rapidly in the last 10 years.

  2. Using CellMiner 1.6 for Systems Pharmacology and Genomic Analysis of the NCI-60

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, William C.; Sunshine, Margot; Varma, Sudhir; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The NCI-60 cancer cell line panel provides a premier model for data integration and systems pharmacology being the largest publicly available database of anticancer drug activity,, genomic, molecular, and phenotypic data. It comprises gene expression (25,722 transcripts), microRNAs (360 miRNAs), whole genome DNA copy number (23,413 genes), whole exome sequencing (variants for 16,568 genes), protein levels (94 genes), and cytotoxic activity (20,861 compounds). Included are 158 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and 79 that are in clinical trials. To improve data accessibility to bioinformaticists and non-bioinformaticists alike, we have developed the CellMiner web-based tools. Here we describe the newest CellMiner version, including integration of novel databases and tools associated with whole exome sequencing and protein expression, and review the tools. Included are i) “Cell line signature” for DNA, RNA, protein and drugs, ii) “Cross correlations” for up to 150 input genes, microRNAs, and compounds in a single query, iii) “Pattern comparison” to identify connections among drugs, gene expression, genomic variants, microRNA and protein expressions, iv) “Genetic variation versus drug visualization” to identify potential new drug:gene DNA variant relationships, and v) “Genetic variant summation”, designed to provide a synopsis of mutational burden on any pathway or gene group for up to 150 genes. Together, these tools allow users to flexibly query the NCI-60 data for potential relationships between genomic, molecular and pharmacological parameters in a manner specific to the user’s area of expertise. Examples for both gain- (RAS) and loss- (PTEN) of-function alterations are provided. PMID:26048278

  3. The NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform to Support the Analysis of Petascale Environmental Data Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Pugh, T.; Wyborn, L. A.; Porter, D.; Allen, C.; Smillie, J.; Antony, J.; Trenham, C.; Evans, B. J.; Beckett, D.; Erwin, T.; King, E.; Hodge, J.; Woodcock, R.; Fraser, R.; Lescinsky, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has co-located a priority set of national data assets within a HPC research platform. This powerful in-situ computational platform has been created to help serve and analyse the massive amounts of data across the spectrum of environmental collections - in particular the climate, observational data and geoscientific domains. This paper examines the infrastructure, innovation and opportunity for this significant research platform. NCI currently manages nationally significant data collections (10+ PB) categorised as 1) earth system sciences, climate and weather model data assets and products, 2) earth and marine observations and products, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystem, 5) water management and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social science and biosciences. The data is largely sourced from the NCI partners (who include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. By co-locating these large valuable data assets, new opportunities have arisen by harmonising the data collections, making a powerful transdisciplinary research platformThe data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. New scientific software, cloud-scale techniques, server-side visualisation and data services have been harnessed and integrated into the platform, so that analysis is performed seamlessly across the traditional boundaries of the underlying data domains. Characterisation of the techniques along with performance profiling ensures scalability of each software component, all of which can either be enhanced or replaced through future improvements. A Development-to-Operations (DevOps) framework has also been implemented to manage the scale of the software complexity alone. This ensures that

  4. Study designs for effectiveness and translation research :identifying trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Shawna L; DeVinney, Barbara J; Fine, Lawrence J; Green, Lawrence W; Dougherty, Denise

    2007-08-01

    Practitioners and policymakers need credible evidence of effectiveness to justify allocating resources to complex, expensive health programs. Investigators, however, face challenges in designing sound effectiveness and translation research with relevance for "real-world" settings. Research experts and federal and foundation funders (n= approximately 120) prepared for and participated in a symposium, held May 4-5, 2004, to weigh the strengths, limitations, and trade-offs between alternate designs for studying the effectiveness and translation of complex, multilevel health interventions. Symposium attendees acknowledged that research phases (hypothesis generating, efficacy, effectiveness, translation) are iterative and cyclical, not linear, since research in advanced phases may reveal unanswered questions in earlier phases. Research questions thus always need to drive the choice of study design. When randomization and experimental control are feasible, participants noted that the randomized controlled trial with individual random assignment remains the gold standard for safeguarding internal validity. Attendees highlighted trade-offs of randomized controlled trial variants, quasi-experimental designs, and natural experiments for use when randomization or experimental control or both are impossible or inadequately address external validity. Participants discussed enhancements to all designs to increase confidence in causal inference while accommodating greater external validity. Since no single study can establish causality, participants encouraged replication of studies and triangulation using different study designs. Participants also recommended participatory research approaches for building population relevance, acceptability, and usefulness. Consideration of the study design choices, trade-offs, and enhancements discussed here can guide the design, funding, completion, and publication of appropriate policy- and practice-oriented effectiveness and translational

  5. Research Donor Program Needs Your Help to Advance Cancer and AIDS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI at Frederick employees have a unique opportunity to contribute directly to cancer and AIDS research by donating blood, saliva, and other samples through the Research Donor Program (RDP). Donors are compensated for their time, which is typically between 10 and 30 minutes. The RDP, which is administered by Occupational Health Services (OHS), Leidos Biomedical Research, provides samples from healthy donors for use in in vitro research conducted at NCI at Frederick and Fort Detrick. Samples are provided anonymously to researchers.

  6. Research Donor Program Needs Your Help to Advance Cancer and AIDS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI at Frederick employees have a unique opportunity to contribute directly to cancer and AIDS research by donating blood, saliva, and other samples through the Research Donor Program (RDP). Donors are compensated for their time, which is typically between 10 and 30 minutes. The RDP, which is administered by Occupational Health Services (OHS), Leidos Biomedical Research, provides samples from healthy donors for use in in vitro research conducted at NCI at Frederick and Fort Detrick. Samples are provided anonymously to researchers.

  7. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute Past Issues / Winter ... a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone or iPad that uses proven quit ...

  8. 78 FR 69428 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork... estimated public burden and associated response time, should be directed to the: Office of Management and... Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI), 0925- 0624, Expiration Date 12/31/2013, REVISION, National Cancer...

  9. Identifying critical issues in recreation planning and management: improving the management-research partnership

    Treesearch

    John H. Schomaker; David W. Lime

    1988-01-01

    The "nominal group" process is a proven technique to systematically arrive at a consensus about critical information needs in recreation planning and management. Using this process, 41 managers who attended a 1983 conference on river management identified 114 specific information needs grouped under 11 general questions. Clearly, some concerns of...

  10. Oil Palm Research in Context: Identifying the Need for Biodiversity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Foster, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Oil palm cultivation is frequently cited as a major threat to tropical biodiversity as it is centered on some of the world's most biodiverse regions. In this report, Web of Science was used to find papers on oil palm published since 1970, which were assigned to different subject categories to visualize their research focus. Recent years have seen a broadening in the scope of research, with a slight growth in publications on the environment and a dramatic increase in those on biofuel. Despite this, less than 1% of publications are related to biodiversity and species conservation. In the context of global vegetable oil markets, palm oil and soyabean account for over 60% of production but are the subject of less than 10% of research. Much more work must be done to establish the impacts of habitat conversion to oil palm plantation on biodiversity. Results from such studies are crucial for informing conservation strategies and ensuring sustainable management of plantations. PMID:18270566

  11. Oil palm research in context: identifying the need for biodiversity assessment.

    PubMed

    Turner, Edgar C; Snaddon, Jake L; Fayle, Tom M; Foster, William A

    2008-02-13

    Oil palm cultivation is frequently cited as a major threat to tropical biodiversity as it is centered on some of the world's most biodiverse regions. In this report, Web of Science was used to find papers on oil palm published since 1970, which were assigned to different subject categories to visualize their research focus. Recent years have seen a broadening in the scope of research, with a slight growth in publications on the environment and a dramatic increase in those on biofuel. Despite this, less than 1% of publications are related to biodiversity and species conservation. In the context of global vegetable oil markets, palm oil and soyabean account for over 60% of production but are the subject of less than 10% of research. Much more work must be done to establish the impacts of habitat conversion to oil palm plantation on biodiversity. Results from such studies are crucial for informing conservation strategies and ensuring sustainable management of plantations.

  12. Disaggregated data and beyond: future queries in cancer control research.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Bao; Chawla, Neetu; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2014-11-01

    The goal of health equity requires the collection and reporting of disaggregated data in underrepresented populations such as Asian American (AA) and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) communities. A recent Department of Health and Human Services report outlines the necessity for disaggregated data, which would offer communities, providers, and planners better tools to address health problems. In a recent collaboration, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and several registries published a series of articles tracking cancer incidence data on AA and NHOPI communities using data from the NCI's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The findings indicate a need for concentrated focus and planning for the next stages of cancer prevention and control for AA and NHOPI subpopulations. In this article, we provide (i) the context for the perpetuation of the model minority myth as well as historical and sociocultural factors that have shaped health and disease for AA and NHOPI subgroups; (ii) potential strategies for research and public health policy for AA and NHOPI groups using subpopulation-based approaches while addressing challenges and limitations; and (iii) a portfolio analysis of currently funded projects within the NCI/DCCPS to identify gaps and areas of potential research.

  13. California Levee Risk, Now and in the Future:Identifying Research and Tool Development Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R L; Hanemann, M; Farber, D

    2006-11-28

    The Center for Catastrophic Risk Management (CCRM) and the California Center for Environmental Law and Policy (CCELP) at UC Berkeley and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) joined together to cosponsor a workshop to define research requirements to mitigate the hazards facing the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Levee system. The Workshop was intended to provide a forum to (1) Report assessments of current vulnerabilities facing the levees, such as structural failure, seismic loading, flooding, terrorism; (2) Consider longer term challenges such as climate change, sea level rise; and (3) Define research requirements to fill gaps in knowledge and reduce uncertainties in hazard assessments.

  14. Generating Researcher Networks with Identified Persons on a Semantic Service Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hanmin; Lee, Mikyoung; Kim, Pyung; Lee, Seungwoo

    This paper describes a Semantic Web-based method to acquire researcher networks by means of identification scheme, ontology, and reasoning. Three steps are required to realize it; resolving co-references, finding experts, and generating researcher networks. We adopt OntoFrame as an underlying semantic service platform and apply reasoning to make direct relations between far-off classes in ontology schema. 453,124 Elsevier journal articles with metadata and full-text documents in information technology and biomedical domains have been loaded and served on the platform as a test set.

  15. Keep people informed or leave them alone? A suggested tool for identifying research participants who rightly want only limited information.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, S; Helgesson, G

    2005-11-01

    People taking part in research vary in the extent to which they understand information concerning their participation. Since they may choose to limit the time and effort spent on such information, lack of understanding is not necessarily an ethical problem. Researchers who notice a lack of understanding are in the quandary of not knowing whether this is due to flaws in the information process or to participants' deliberate choices. We argue that the two explanations call for different responses.A tool for identifying those research participants who want limited information is presented. This consists of a restricted number of questions about trust in and appraisal of research, priority of time and privacy, and perception of a duty to participate. It is argued that an important group of participants who purposely lack understanding of the study can be identified with this tool. Some limitations to this approach are also discussed.

  16. Keep people informed or leave them alone? A suggested tool for identifying research participants who rightly want only limited information

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, S; Helgesson, G

    2005-01-01

    People taking part in research vary in the extent to which they understand information concerning their participation. Since they may choose to limit the time and effort spent on such information, lack of understanding is not necessarily an ethical problem. Researchers who notice a lack of understanding are in the quandary of not knowing whether this is due to flaws in the information process or to participants' deliberate choices. We argue that the two explanations call for different responses. A tool for identifying those research participants who want limited information is presented. This consists of a restricted number of questions about trust in and appraisal of research, priority of time and privacy, and perception of a duty to participate. It is argued that an important group of participants who purposely lack understanding of the study can be identified with this tool. Some limitations to this approach are also discussed. PMID:16269568

  17. The Social Network Map as an Instrument for Identifying Social Relations in Deaf Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintermair, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Social support has shown itself to be an important factor in many areas in regard to mental health development and conservation. Numerous empirical findings also document its significance in various areas of research into deafness. Questionnaires are only one means of gathering information when we are trying to gain access to the social networks…

  18. Weighting issues in recreation research and in identifying support for resource conservation management alternatives

    Treesearch

    Amy L. Sheaffer; Jay Beaman; Joseph T. O' Leary; Rebecca L. Williams; Doran M. Mason

    2001-01-01

    Sampling for research in recreation settings in an ongoing challenge. Often certain groups of users are more likely to be sampled. It is important in measuring public support for resource conservation and in understanding use of natural resources for recreation to evaluate issues of bias in survey methodologies. Important methodological issues emerged from a statewide...

  19. Collocations in Corpus-Based Language Learning Research: Identifying, Comparing, and Interpreting the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gablasova, Dana; Brezina, Vaclav; McEnery, Tony

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of collocations in language learning research (LLR). Collocations, as units of formulaic language, are becoming prominent in our understanding of language learning and use; however, while the number of corpus-based LLR studies of collocations is growing, there is still a need for a deeper understanding of factors…

  20. One Health Approach to Identify Research Needs in Bovine and Human Babesioses: Workshop Report

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia are emerging health threats to humans and animals in the United States. A collaborative effort of multiple disciplines to attain optimal health for people, animals and our environment, otherwise known as the One Health concept, was taken during a research workshop held in April 2009 to iden...

  1. Facing the Consequences: Identifying the Limitations of How We Categorize People in Research and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallat, Cynthia; Steele, Carolyn

    1999-01-01

    Provides examples of current work in social science disciplines that address the policy research argument that understanding the impact of changes in human numbers on social and cultural life requires moving beyond current standards of empirical categories. Discusses enumeration categories suggested by the United Nations. (SLD)

  2. Identifying the Gaps between Biodefense Researchers, Public Health, and Clinical Practice in a Rural Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Fleet-Green, Jessica M.; Chen, Frederick M.; House, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It is essential for health care professionals to be prepared for a bioterrorist attack or other public health emergency. We sought to determine how well biodefense and emerging infectious disease research information was being disseminated to rural health care providers, first responders, and public health officials. Methods:…

  3. Maximizing Research and Development Resources: Identifying and Testing "Load-Bearing Conditions" for Educational Technology Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iriti, Jennifer; Bickel, William; Schunn, Christian; Stein, Mary Kay

    2016-01-01

    Education innovations often have a complicated set of assumptions about the contexts in which they are implemented, which may not be explicit. Education technology innovations in particular may have additional technical and cultural assumptions. As a result, education technology research and development efforts as well as scaling efforts can be…

  4. Comparison of Nonoverlap Methods for Identifying Treatment Effect in Single-Subject Experimental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih; Snyder, Patricia; Pasia, Cathleen

    2014-01-01

    Debate is occurring about which result interpretation aides focused on examining the experimental effect should be used in single-subject experimental research. In this study, we examined seven nonoverlap methods and compared results using each method to judgments of two visual analysts. The data sources for the present study were 36 studies…

  5. Newly-Identified Fragile Sites Push Stressed Cells toward Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The genomes of cancer cells are often riddled with chromosomal alterations such as amplifications, deletions, and even translocations, where a piece of one chromosome breaks off and attaches to another. Understanding how these changes arise can give researchers new insights into the process of cancer development.

  6. Maximizing Research and Development Resources: Identifying and Testing "Load-Bearing Conditions" for Educational Technology Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iriti, Jennifer; Bickel, William; Schunn, Christian; Stein, Mary Kay

    2016-01-01

    Education innovations often have a complicated set of assumptions about the contexts in which they are implemented, which may not be explicit. Education technology innovations in particular may have additional technical and cultural assumptions. As a result, education technology research and development efforts as well as scaling efforts can be…

  7. Storytelling by Adults Diagnosed with Terminal Illness: Narrative Identifying through Dialogical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Michael Paul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dialogical qualitative research study was to gain insight into the process of storytelling with adults diagnosed with terminal illness as a way of making meaning of their experiences and lives. The study was informed by the conceptual frameworks of story, storytelling, and story listening which are grounded in the theory of…

  8. Identifying the Gaps between Biodefense Researchers, Public Health, and Clinical Practice in a Rural Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Fleet-Green, Jessica M.; Chen, Frederick M.; House, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It is essential for health care professionals to be prepared for a bioterrorist attack or other public health emergency. We sought to determine how well biodefense and emerging infectious disease research information was being disseminated to rural health care providers, first responders, and public health officials. Methods:…

  9. Comparison of Nonoverlap Methods for Identifying Treatment Effect in Single-Subject Experimental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih; Snyder, Patricia; Pasia, Cathleen

    2014-01-01

    Debate is occurring about which result interpretation aides focused on examining the experimental effect should be used in single-subject experimental research. In this study, we examined seven nonoverlap methods and compared results using each method to judgments of two visual analysts. The data sources for the present study were 36 studies…

  10. Identifying clinical/translational research cohorts: ascertainment via querying an integrated multi-source database

    PubMed Central

    Hurdle, John F; Haroldsen, Stephen C; Hammer, Andrew; Spigle, Cindy; Fraser, Alison M; Mineau, Geraldine P; Courdy, Samir J

    2013-01-01

    Background Ascertainment of potential subjects has been a longstanding problem in clinical research. Various methods have been proposed, including using data in electronic health records. However, these methods typically suffer from scaling effects—some methods work well for large cohorts; others work for small cohorts only. Objective We propose a method that provides a simple identification of pre-research cohorts and relies on data available in most states in the USA: merged public health data sources. Materials and methods The Utah Population Database Limited query tool allows users to build complex queries that may span several types of health records, such as cancer registries, inpatient hospital discharges, and death certificates; in addition, these can be combined with family history information. The architectural approach incorporates several coding systems for medical information. It provides a front-end graphical user interface and enables researchers to build and run queries and view aggregate results. Multiple strategies have been incorporated to maintain confidentiality. Results This tool was rapidly adopted; since its release, 241 users representing a wide range of disciplines from 17 institutions have signed the user agreement and used the query tool. Three examples are discussed: pregnancy complications co-occurring with cardiovascular disease; spondyloarthritis; and breast cancer. Discussion and conclusions This query tool was designed to provide results as pre-research so that institutional review board approval would not be required. This architecture uses well-described technologies that should be within the reach of most institutions. PMID:23059733

  11. Identifying clinical/translational research cohorts: ascertainment via querying an integrated multi-source database.

    PubMed

    Hurdle, John F; Haroldsen, Stephen C; Hammer, Andrew; Spigle, Cindy; Fraser, Alison M; Mineau, Geraldine P; Courdy, Samir J

    2013-01-01

    Ascertainment of potential subjects has been a longstanding problem in clinical research. Various methods have been proposed, including using data in electronic health records. However, these methods typically suffer from scaling effects-some methods work well for large cohorts; others work for small cohorts only. We propose a method that provides a simple identification of pre-research cohorts and relies on data available in most states in the USA: merged public health data sources. The Utah Population Database Limited query tool allows users to build complex queries that may span several types of health records, such as cancer registries, inpatient hospital discharges, and death certificates; in addition, these can be combined with family history information. The architectural approach incorporates several coding systems for medical information. It provides a front-end graphical user interface and enables researchers to build and run queries and view aggregate results. Multiple strategies have been incorporated to maintain confidentiality. This tool was rapidly adopted; since its release, 241 users representing a wide range of disciplines from 17 institutions have signed the user agreement and used the query tool. Three examples are discussed: pregnancy complications co-occurring with cardiovascular disease; spondyloarthritis; and breast cancer. This query tool was designed to provide results as pre-research so that institutional review board approval would not be required. This architecture uses well-described technologies that should be within the reach of most institutions.

  12. Using the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Research Test and Integration Plan Wiki to Identify Synergistic Test Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Faber, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the aviation industry have recognized a need for developing a method to identify and combine resources to carry out research and testing more efficiently. The Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Research Test and Integration Plan (RTIP) Wiki is a tool that is used to visualize, plan, and accomplish collaborative research and testing. Synergistic test opportunities are developed using the RTIP Wiki, and include potential common resource testing that combines assets and personnel from NASA, industry, academia, and other government agencies. A research scenario is linked to the appropriate IVHM milestones and resources detailed in the wiki, reviewed by the research team members, and integrated into a collaborative test strategy. The scenario is then implemented by creating a test plan when appropriate and the research is performed. The benefits of performing collaborative research and testing are achieving higher Technology Readiness Level (TRL) test opportunities with little or no additional cost, improved quality of research, and increased communication among researchers. In addition to a description of the method of creating these joint research scenarios, examples of the successful development and implementation of cooperative research using the IVHM RTIP Wiki are given.

  13. Using dissemination research to identify optimal community settings for tailored breast cancer information kiosks.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Matthew W; Alcaraz, Kassandra I; Pfeiffer, Debra; Christopher, Kara

    2008-01-01

    Selecting appropriate community channels or settings for delivering evidence-based health promotion programs can be critical to successful dissemination. This article describes how five criteria--accessibility, opportunity, appropriateness, reach, and specificity--were applied in identifying and comparing seven community settings as host sites for a tailored breast cancer education computer kiosk for African American women. Data were gathered from 10,306 kiosk uses in 92 beauty salons, churches, neighborhood health centers, laundromats, social service agencies, health fairs, and public libraries between June 2003 and March 2007. Of the seven settings, only laundromats were found to provide both high reach (ie, frequent kiosk use) and high specificity (ie, a large proportion of users with no health insurance, unaware of where to get a mammogram, reporting no recent mammogram and barriers to getting one, and having little knowledge about breast cancer and mammography). Systematic, data-based evaluations of potential dissemination channels can help identify optimal settings for cancer control interventions.

  14. Identifying and Addressing Stakeholder Interests in Design Science Research: An Analysis Using Critical Systems Heuristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venable, John R.

    This paper utilises the Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH) framework developed by Werner Ulrich to critically consider the stakeholders and design goals that should be considered as relevant by researchers conducing Design Science Research (DSR). CSH provides a philosophically and theoretically grounded framework and means for critical consideration of the choices of stakeholders considered to be relevant to any system under design consideration. The paper recommends that legitimately undertaken DSR should include witnesses to represent the interests of the future consumers of the outcomes of DSR, i.e., the future clients, decision makers, professionals, and other non-included stakeholders in the future use of the solution technologies to be invented in DSR. The paper further discusses options for how witnesses might be included, who should be witnessed for and obstacles to implementing the recommendations.

  15. Photovoice in Kenya: Using a Community-Based Participatory Research Method to Identify Health Needs.

    PubMed

    Kingery, Francesca P; Naanyu, Violet; Allen, William; Patel, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    Photovoice, a community-based participatory research method, was utilized to delineate the health-related needs of a small rural community in Kenya. Within the Cherangany Constituency, 13 women were recruited and trained in digital photography and appropriate ethical conduct in photography (respect for privacy, consent, and confidentiality). Both individual and group interviews were conducted with the participants, and data were transcribed and analyzed for common themes by both the participants and the researcher. Common themes present in the photos were coded and prioritized in order of importance: (a) school fees, (b) water, (c) hospital fees, (d) sanitation, (e) orphans, (f) widows, (g) lack of jobs/capital, (h) disabilities, and (i) presence of disease. Data from this study will be utilized for (a) development of culturally competent health education, (b) site-specific education/training of incoming medical teams, and (c) informative meetings with local leaders regarding health and associated challenges. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Modeling a description logic vocabulary for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Frank W; de Coronado, Sherri; Dionne, Robert; Fragoso, Gilberto; Golbeck, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute has developed the NCI Thesaurus, a biomedical vocabulary for cancer research, covering terminology across a wide range of cancer research domains. A major design goal of the NCI Thesaurus is to facilitate translational research. We describe: the features of Ontylog, a description logic used to build NCI Thesaurus; our methodology for enhancing the terminology through collaboration between ontologists and domain experts, and for addressing certain real world challenges arising in modeling the Thesaurus; and finally, we describe the conversion of NCI Thesaurus from Ontylog into Web Ontology Language Lite. Ontylog has proven well suited for constructing big biomedical vocabularies. We have capitalized on the Ontylog constructs Kind and Role in the collaboration process described in this paper to facilitate communication between ontologists and domain experts. The artifacts and processes developed by NCI for collaboration may be useful in other biomedical terminology development efforts.

  17. Prognostic Value of Prepro-Gastrin Releasing Peptide in Lung Cancer Patients; NCI-Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafik, Nevine F; Rahoma, M; Elshimy, Reham A A; El kasem, Fatma M Abou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prior series investigated the expression of prepro-gastrin releasing peptide (prepro-GRP) in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. Our aim was to assess any prepro-GRP role as a prognostic factor for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and NSCLC and correlations with clinical presentation and treatment outcome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted during the time period from the beginning of January 2012 till the end of January 2014. Prepro-GRP expression was analysed using a nested RT-PCR assay in peripheral blood of 62 untreated lung cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, and 30 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. Results: Among the 62 lung cancer cases, there were 24 (38.7%) SCLC, and 38 (61.3%) NSCLC (10 squamous cell carcinomas, 12 adenocarcinomas, 11 large cell carcinomas, 4 undifferentiated carcinomas, and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma). Twenty six patients (41.9%) were prepro-GRP positive. Prepro-GRP expression was higher (58.3%) among SCLC patients compared to NSCLC (squamous cell carcinoma (15.4%), large cell carcinoma (36.4%), and adenocarcinoma (25%)). Mean OS among prepro-GRP negative cases was longer than that among preprogastrin positive cases (17.6 vs 14.9 months). The mean PFS durations among preprogastrin negative versus positive cases were 7.7 vs 4.6 months (p= 0.041). No difference in response to chemotherapy was identified between the groups (p=0.983). Conclusion: Prepro-GRP is suggested to be a useful prognostic marker for lung cancer patients, especially with the fast- growing, bad prognostic SCLC type. More studies should aim at detailed understanding of the mechanisms of prepro-GRP action and its use in monitoring the response to treatment in a larger cohort. PMID:28124884

  18. Prognostic Value of Prepro-Gastrin Releasing Peptide in Lung Cancer Patients; NCI-Prospective Study

    PubMed

    Shafik, Nevine F; Rahoma, m; Elshimy, Reham A A; M Abou El kasem, Fatma

    2016-12-01

    Background: Prior series investigated the expression of prepro-gastrin releasing peptide (prepro-GRP) in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. Our aim was to assess any prepro-GRP role as a prognostic factor for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and NSCLC and correlations with clinical presentation and treatment outcome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted during the time period from the beginning of January 2012 till the end of January 2014. Prepro-GRP expression was analysed using a nested RT-PCR assay in peripheral blood of 62 untreated lung cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, and 30 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. Results: Among the 62 lung cancer cases, there were 24 (38.7%) SCLC, and 38 (61.3%) NSCLC (10 squamous cell carcinomas, 12 adenocarcinomas, 11 large cell carcinomas, 4 undifferentiated carcinomas, and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma). Twenty six patients (41.9%) were prepro-GRP positive. Prepro-GRP expression was higher (58.3%) among SCLC patients compared to NSCLC (squamous cell carcinoma (15.4%), large cell carcinoma (36.4%), and adenocarcinoma (25%)). Mean OS among prepro-GRP negative cases was longer than that among preprogastrin positive cases (17.6 vs 14.9 months). The mean PFS durations among preprogastrin negative versus positive cases were 7.7 vs 4.6 months (p= 0.041). No difference in response to chemotherapy was identified between the groups (p=0.983). Conclusion: Prepro-GRP is suggested to be a useful prognostic marker for lung cancer patients, especially with the fast- growing, bad prognostic SCLC type. More studies should aim at detailed understanding of the mechanisms of prepro-GRP action and its use in monitoring the response to treatment in a larger cohort. Creative Commons Attribution License

  19. Recommendations from the iSBTc-SITC/FDA/NCI Workshop on Immunotherapy Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Britten, Cedrik M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Håkansson, Leif; Janetzki, Sylvia; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kleen, Thomas-Oliver; Lee, Peter P.; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T.; Maino, Vernon C.; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Pawelec, Graham; Potter, Douglas M.; Rivoltini, Licia; Salazar, Lupe G.; Schendel, Dolores J.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Song, Wenru; Stroncek, David F.; Tahara, Hideaki; Thurin, Magdalena; Trinchieri, Giorgio; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Marincola, Francesco; Khleif, Samir; Fox, Bernard A.; Disis, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate development of innovative immunotherapy approaches, especially for treatment concepts exploiting the potential benefits of personalized therapy, there is a need to develop and validate tools to identify patients who can benefit from immunotherapy. Despite substantial effort, we do not yet know which parameters of anti-tumor immunity to measure and which assays are optimal for those measurements. Experimental Design The iSBTc-SITC, FDA and NCI partnered to address these issues for immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we review the major challenges, give examples of approaches and solutions and present our recommendations. Results and Conclusions While specific immune parameters and assays are not yet validated, we recommend following standardized (accurate, precise and reproducible) protocols and use of functional assays for the primary immunologic readouts of a trial; consideration of central laboratories for immune monitoring of large, multi-institutional trials; and standardized testing of several phenotypic and functional potential potency assays specific to any cellular product. When reporting results, the full QA/QC performed, selected examples of truly representative raw data and assay performance characteristics should be included. Lastly, to promote broader analysis of multiple aspects of immunity, and gather data on variability, we recommend that in addition to cells and serum, that RNA and DNA samples be banked (under standardized conditions) for later testing. We also recommend that sufficient blood be drawn to allow for planned testing of the primary hypothesis being addressed in the trial, and that additional baseline and post-treatment blood is banked for testing novel hypotheses (or generating new hypotheses) that arise in the field. PMID:21558394

  20. Simplified Screening Approach Identifies Mutated Proteins Expressed in Patient Tumors | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is a very effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. In phase 2 clinical trials, up to 70 percent of patients with melanoma who received autologous TILs had considerable regressions of metastatic lesions. Recently, in another trial, 40 percent of patients treated had complete regressions of all measurable lesions lasting more than five years after treatment. Identifying antigens associated with TIL-mediated tumor regression has been a difficult task due to the diversity of these large lymphocyte populations and the complexity of current screening approaches.