Science.gov

Sample records for nci study demonstrates

  1. Analysis Plan: Study to Measure the Cost of CHAMPUS-Eligible Participants in Southwest Oncology Group NCI Cooperative Program Cancer Clinical Trials 1988-1996: Technical Report No. 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The National Cancer Institute’s Division of Cancer Treatment , Diagnosis, and Centers (DCTDC) has initiated effort to expand clinical trial...Defense (DOD) to allow patients who are beneficiaries of TRICAKE/CHAMPUS to participate in, and be reimbursed for, NCI-sponsored clinical cancer ... treatment trials. This study is a cancer demonstration project pilot study to evaluate the potential cost impact of the NCI/DOD agreement. The initial

  2. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  3. Exome-driven characterization of the cancer cell lines at the proteome level: the NCI-60 case study.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Maria A; Karpov, Dmitry S; Ivanov, Mark V; Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail A; Chernobrovkin, Alexey L; Lobas, Anna A; Lisitsa, Andrey V; Archakov, Alexander I; Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Moshkovskii, Sergei A

    2014-12-05

    Cancer genome deviates significantly from the reference human genome, and thus a search against standard genome databases in cancer cell proteomics fails to identify cancer-specific protein variants. The goal of this Article is to combine high-throughput exome data [Abaan et al. Cancer Res. 2013] and shotgun proteomics analysis [Modhaddas Gholami et al. Cell Rep. 2013] for cancer cell lines from NCI-60 panel to demonstrate further that the cell lines can be effectively recognized using identified variant peptides. To achieve this goal, we generated a database containing mutant protein sequences of NCI-60 panel of cell lines. The proteome data were searched using Mascot and X!Tandem search engines against databases of both reference and mutant protein sequences. The identification quality was further controlled by calculating a fraction of variant peptides encoded by the own exome sequence for each cell line. We found that up to 92.2% peptides identified by both search engines are encoded by the own exome. Further, we used the identified variant peptides for cell line recognition. The results of the study demonstrate that proteome data supported by exome sequence information can be effectively used for distinguishing between different types of cancer cell lines.

  4. NIOSH/NCI study of exposure to diesel exhaust in underground mines -- An industry perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, C.J.

    1999-07-01

    In 1992, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) initiated a study, funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), to evaluate the health effects, if any, involving underground miners exposure to diesel exhaust. An industry organization, the Methane Awareness Research Group (MARG) already in place to respond to gassy mine related issues, was redirected to work with diesel concerns. In 1995, NIOSH released a draft protocol and feasibility assessment, indicating its intent to initiate a study at 14 underground mines, some of which were operated by MARG members. After considerable debate on the study protocol, in-mine industrial hygiene studies were begun in December, 1997 and expected to end in early 1999.

  5. TBMS1 exerts its cytotoxicity in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells through nucleolar stress-induced p53/MDM2-dependent mechanism, a quantitative proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingying; Xie, Guobin; Xia, Ji; Su, Dan; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Fuquan; Xu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) exerts its anticancer effects by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism of its anti-tumor effects has not been fully elucidated, especially the signaling pathways involved in the early stage of TBMS1 stimulation. In this study, we employed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics approach and identified 439 proteins that exhibit significant differential expressions in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells upon exposure to TBMS1. Gene ontology and network analysis using DAVID and STRING on-line tools revealed that several nucleolar stress (ribosomal biogenesis) response proteins were differentially regulated by TBMS1. Functional validation demonstrated that TBMS1-induced NCI-H460 cell cytotoxicity involved nucleolar stress-induced p53/murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), mTOR, and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  6. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  7. Experimental studies of the Universal Chemical Key (UCK) algorithm on the NCI database of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Robert; Kasturi, Pavan; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Bing

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm called the Universal Chemical Key (UCK) algorithm that constructs a unique key for a molecular structure. The molecular structures are represented as undirected labeled graphs with the atoms representing the vertices of the graph and the bonds representing the edges. The algorithm was tested on 236,917 compounds obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database of chemical compounds. In this paper we present the algorithm,some examples and the experimental results on the NCI database. On the NCI database, the UCK algorithm provided distinct unique keys for chemicals with different molecular structures.

  8. Unravelling Protein-DNA Interactions at Molecular Level: A DFT and NCI Study.

    PubMed

    González, J; Baños, I; León, I; Contreras-García, J; Cocinero, E J; Lesarri, A; Fernández, J A; Millán, J

    2016-02-09

    Histone-DNA interactions were probed computationally at a molecular level, by characterizing the bimolecular clusters constituted by selected amino acid derivatives with polar (asparagine and glutamine), nonpolar (alanine, valine, and isoleucine), and charged (arginine) side chains and methylated pyrimidinic (1-methylcytosine and 1-methylthymine) and puric (9-methyladenine and 9-methylguanine) DNA bases. The computational approach combined different methodologies: a molecular mechanics (MMFFs forced field) conformational search and structural and vibrational density-functional calculations (M06-2X with double and triple-ζ Pople's basis sets). To dissect the interactions, intermolecular forces were analyzed with the Non-Covalent Interactions (NCI) analysis. The results for the 24 different clusters studied show a noticeable correlation between the calculated binding energies and the propensities for protein-DNA base interactions found in the literature. Such correlation holded even for the interaction of the selected amino acid derivatives with Watson and Crick pairs. Therefore, the balance between hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions (specially stacking) in the control of the final shape of the investigated amino acid-DNA base pairs seems to be well reproduced in dispersion-corrected DFT molecular models, reinforcing the idea that the specificity between the amino acids and the DNA bases play an important role in the regulation of DNA.

  9. Emergency Preparedness at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    Information to help prepare for an emergency. Includes resources for patients and health care providers to continue cancer care, NCI contacts for grantees, and resources to prepare and update NCI employees and contractors.

  10. Prognostic Value of Prepro-Gastrin Releasing Peptide in Lung Cancer Patients; NCI-Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafik, Nevine F; Rahoma, M; Elshimy, Reham A A; El kasem, Fatma M Abou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prior series investigated the expression of prepro-gastrin releasing peptide (prepro-GRP) in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. Our aim was to assess any prepro-GRP role as a prognostic factor for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and NSCLC and correlations with clinical presentation and treatment outcome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted during the time period from the beginning of January 2012 till the end of January 2014. Prepro-GRP expression was analysed using a nested RT-PCR assay in peripheral blood of 62 untreated lung cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, and 30 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. Results: Among the 62 lung cancer cases, there were 24 (38.7%) SCLC, and 38 (61.3%) NSCLC (10 squamous cell carcinomas, 12 adenocarcinomas, 11 large cell carcinomas, 4 undifferentiated carcinomas, and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma). Twenty six patients (41.9%) were prepro-GRP positive. Prepro-GRP expression was higher (58.3%) among SCLC patients compared to NSCLC (squamous cell carcinoma (15.4%), large cell carcinoma (36.4%), and adenocarcinoma (25%)). Mean OS among prepro-GRP negative cases was longer than that among preprogastrin positive cases (17.6 vs 14.9 months). The mean PFS durations among preprogastrin negative versus positive cases were 7.7 vs 4.6 months (p= 0.041). No difference in response to chemotherapy was identified between the groups (p=0.983). Conclusion: Prepro-GRP is suggested to be a useful prognostic marker for lung cancer patients, especially with the fast- growing, bad prognostic SCLC type. More studies should aim at detailed understanding of the mechanisms of prepro-GRP action and its use in monitoring the response to treatment in a larger cohort. PMID:28124884

  11. Prognostic Value of Prepro-Gastrin Releasing Peptide in Lung Cancer Patients; NCI-Prospective Study

    PubMed

    Shafik, Nevine F; Rahoma, m; Elshimy, Reham A A; M Abou El kasem, Fatma

    2016-12-01

    Background: Prior series investigated the expression of prepro-gastrin releasing peptide (prepro-GRP) in the peripheral blood of lung cancer patients. Our aim was to assess any prepro-GRP role as a prognostic factor for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and NSCLC and correlations with clinical presentation and treatment outcome. Methods: A prospective study was conducted during the time period from the beginning of January 2012 till the end of January 2014. Prepro-GRP expression was analysed using a nested RT-PCR assay in peripheral blood of 62 untreated lung cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University, and 30 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. Results: Among the 62 lung cancer cases, there were 24 (38.7%) SCLC, and 38 (61.3%) NSCLC (10 squamous cell carcinomas, 12 adenocarcinomas, 11 large cell carcinomas, 4 undifferentiated carcinomas, and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma). Twenty six patients (41.9%) were prepro-GRP positive. Prepro-GRP expression was higher (58.3%) among SCLC patients compared to NSCLC (squamous cell carcinoma (15.4%), large cell carcinoma (36.4%), and adenocarcinoma (25%)). Mean OS among prepro-GRP negative cases was longer than that among preprogastrin positive cases (17.6 vs 14.9 months). The mean PFS durations among preprogastrin negative versus positive cases were 7.7 vs 4.6 months (p= 0.041). No difference in response to chemotherapy was identified between the groups (p=0.983). Conclusion: Prepro-GRP is suggested to be a useful prognostic marker for lung cancer patients, especially with the fast- growing, bad prognostic SCLC type. More studies should aim at detailed understanding of the mechanisms of prepro-GRP action and its use in monitoring the response to treatment in a larger cohort. Creative Commons Attribution License

  12. NCI and FDA to Study Cancer Proteogenomics Together | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in proteogenomic regulatory science.  This will allow the agencies to share information that will accelerate the development of proteogenomic technologies and biomarkers, as it relates to precision medicine in cancer.

  13. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  14. Comparison of the ISU, NCI, MSM, and SPADE Methods for Estimating Usual Intake: A Simulation Study of Nutrients Consumed Daily.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Greice H C; Torman, Vanessa B L; Crispim, Sandra P; Dekkers, Arnold L M; Camey, Suzi A

    2016-03-15

    Various methods are available for estimating usual dietary intake distributions. Hence, there is a need for simulation studies to compare them. The methods Iowa State University (ISU), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Multiple Source Method (MSM) and Statistical Program to Assess Dietary Exposure (SPADE) were previously compared in another study, but some results were inconclusive due to the small number of replications used in the simulation. Seeking to overcome this limitation, the present study used 1000 simulated samples for 12 different scenarios to compare the accuracy of estimates yielded by the aforementioned methods. The focus is on scenarios that exhibited the most uncertainty in the conclusions of the mentioned study above, i.e., scenarios with small sample sizes, skewed intake distributions, and large ratios of the between- and within-person variances. Bias was used as a measure of accuracy. For scenarios with small sample sizes (n = 150), the ISU, MSM and SPADE methods generally achieved more accurate estimates than the NCI method, particularly for the 10th and 90th percentiles. The differences between methods became smaller with larger sample sizes (n = 300 and n = 500). With few exceptions, the methods were found to perform similarly.

  15. NCI & Division Obligations

    Cancer.gov

    Displays obligations for grants, contracts, training fellowships, intramural research, and management and support, including the number of grant awards, funding amounts, and percent of the total NCI budget.

  16. A Qualitative Study of Motivations for Minority Recruitment in Cancer Clinical Trials Across Five NCI-Designated Cancer Centers.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Zachary R; Martin, Michelle; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Cook, Elise D; Konety, Badrinath; Vickers, Selwyn M; Chen, Moon S; Foaud, Mona N; Durant, Raegan W

    2016-11-08

    Minority enrollment in cancer clinical trials is traditionally low. In light of this fact, numerous studies have investigated barriers to recruitment and retention within minority populations. However, very little research has investigated the importance of clinicians' and researchers' motivations for minority recruitment in cancer clinical trials. Therefore, we sought to examine motivations for minority recruitment across four professional stakeholder groups (principal investigators, clinicians, research staff, and Cancer Center leaders) at five National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers. This study is based on the data from 91 qualitative interviews conducted across the five NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers to investigate stakeholders' motivations for minority recruitment in cancer clinical trials. Emergent themes include (a) minority recruitment increases generalizability of cancer clinical trials, (b) minority recruitment is motivated by social justice, (c) some institutions promote minority recruitment through the use of supplemental financial support, (d) federal funding requirements for minority inclusion in clinical research motivate investigators to focus on minority recruitment, and (e) some stakeholders favor a more race-neutral approach to participant recruitment rather than an emphasis on targeted minority recruitment. The perspectives of clinical and research stakeholders potentially inform the assessment of existing strategies and the development of new strategies to increase motivation for minority recruitment in cancer clinical trials.

  17. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  18. NCI Contact Center

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI offers free, scientifically accurate, and easy-to-understand information on a range of cancer topics in English and Spanish. Get live help from compassionate information specialists at 1-800-4-CANCER.

  19. NCI at ASCO

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-designated cancer centers are being extensively represented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago this year with a large array of clinical trial results and findings.

  20. Review and evaluation of the NCI/NTP carcinogenesis bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Hottendorf, G.H.; Pachter, I.J.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of the carcinogenesis bioassay results obtained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) indicates that approximately one-half of the bioassays directed by both institutions were positive for carcinogenicity. The more recent 85 bioassays completed by NTP reveal a higher proportion of studies interpreted as demonstrating no evidence of carcinogenicity than represented in the initial 198 bioassays conducted by NCI. Of the 100 NCI bioassays that were not positive for carcinogenicity 3 (3%) were classified in the category of ''no evidence for carcinogenicity in two animal species.'' Of the 43 NTP bioassays that were not positive for carcinogenicity 36 (84%) were placed in the category of ''no carcinogenic effects.'' The reason for this shift from a 33:1 positive to negative ratio in the NCI bioassays to an approximately 1:1 ratio in the NTP bioassays appears to be a difference in interpretation of the adequacy of the testing. Uniform criteria for concluding that a bioassay is negative must be developed and the results of all existing and future carcinogenesis bioassays must be interpreted with these exclusive criteria. Other bioassay problems are explored, including the incomplete validation of the carcinogenesis bioassay protocol by confirmatory results with positive and negative reference agents, the apparent lack of bioavailability data for some orally administered negative compounds, the continued use of mouse hepatic neoplasia as a single discriminating parameter, the variability in the inter- and intrastudy incidence of spontaneous tumors, and the continued reliance on the maximum tolerated dose.

  1. NCI Visuals Online

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  2. Spatial-temporal analysis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the NCI-SEER NHL case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Exploring spatial-temporal patterns of disease incidence through cluster analysis identifies areas of significantly elevated or decreased risk, providing potential clues about disease risk factors. Little is known about the etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), or the latency period that might be relevant for environmental exposures, and there are no published spatial-temporal cluster studies of NHL. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study of NHL in four National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) centers: Detroit, Iowa, Los Angeles, and Seattle during 1998-2000. Using 20-year residential histories, we used generalized additive models adjusted for known risk factors to model spatially the probability that an individual had NHL and to identify clusters of elevated or decreased NHL risk. We evaluated models at five different time periods to explore the presence of clusters in a time frame of etiologic relevance. Results The best model fit was for residential locations 20 years prior to diagnosis in Detroit, Iowa, and Los Angeles. We found statistically significant areas of elevated risk of NHL in three of the four study areas (Detroit, Iowa, and Los Angeles) at a lag time of 20 years. The two areas of significantly elevated risk in the Los Angeles study area were detected only at a time lag of 20 years. Clusters in Detroit and Iowa were detected at several time points. Conclusions We found significant spatial clusters of NHL after allowing for disease latency and residential mobility. Our results show the importance of evaluating residential histories when studying spatial patterns of cancer. PMID:21718483

  3. NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

    Cancer.gov

    Extremely obese people have increased risks of dying from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three

  4. 76 FR 2253 - TRICARE; Coverage of National Cancer Institute (NCI) Sponsored Phase I Studies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ..., injected into the blood, or injected into the muscle), how often, and what dose is safe. DATES: Effective... evaluate how a new drug should be given (by mouth, injected into the blood, or injected into the muscle... evaluate how well the new drug works. Phase II studies usually focus on a particular type of cancer....

  5. Evaluation of a Supermarket Intervention: The NCI-Giant Food Eat for Health Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Blossom H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Based on a complex time series evaluation, a 2-year intervention in 40 supermarkets in Washington (DC) and Baltimore (Maryland) indicates that a nutrition education program could produce small but positive changes in consumers' food purchasing behavior. Limitations of the study and its implications for future evaluations are discussed. (SLD)

  6. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  7. Analysis of Environmental Chemical Mixtures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Gennings, Chris; Colt, Joanne S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Hartge, Patricia; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    , Wheeler DC. 2015. Analysis of environmental chemical mixtures and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study. Environ Health Perspect 123:965–970; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408630 PMID:25748701

  8. RADON MITIGATION STUDIES: NASHVILLE DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation demonstration project involving 14 houses in the Nashville, TN, area with indoor radon levels of 5.6-47.6 pCi/L, using a variety of techniques, designed to be the most cost effective methods possible to implement, and yet adequa...

  9. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  10. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  11. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  12. Screening mammography. A missed clinical opportunity Results of the NCI (National Cancer Institute) Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and national health interview survey studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-04

    Data from seven studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were used to determine current rates of breast cancer screening and to identify the characteristics of and reasons for women not being screened. All seven studies were population-based surveys of women aged 50 to 74 years without breast cancer. While over 90% of non-Hispanic white respondents had regular sources of medical care, 46% to 76% had a clinical breast examination within the previous year, and only 25% to 41% had a mammogram. Less educated and poorer women had fewer mammograms. The two most common reasons women gave for never having had a mammogram were that they did not known they needed it and that their physician had not recommended it. Many physicians may have overlooked the opportunity to recommend mammography for older women when performing a clinical breast examination and to educate their patients about the benefit of screening mammography.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the binding of iron(III) protoporphyrin IX to 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone via DFT-D3, MEP, QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL studies.

    PubMed

    Nkungli, Nyiang Kennet; Ghogomu, Julius Numbonui

    2017-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones display diverse pharmacological properties, including antimalarial activities. Their pharmacological activities have been studied in depth, but little of this research has focused on their antimalarial mode of action. To elucidate this antimalarial mechanism, we investigated the nature of the interactions between iron(III) protoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)PPIX) and the thione-thiol tautomers of 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (MAPTSC). Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3), the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), the noncovalent interaction (NCI) index, the electron localization function (ELF), the localized orbital locator (LOL), and thermodynamic calculations were employed in this work. Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding is expected to inhibit hemozoin formation, thereby preventing Fe(III)PPIX detoxification in plasmodia. Preliminary studies geared toward the identification of atomic binding sites in the thione-thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were carried out using molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps and conceptual DFT-based local reactivity indices. The thionic sulfur and the (2) N-azomethine nitrogen/thiol sulfur of, respectively, the thione and thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were identified as the most favorable nucleophilic sites for electrophilic attack. The negative values of the computed Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding energies, enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies are indicative of the existence and stability of Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes. MAPTSC-Fe(III) coordinate bonds and strong hydrogen bonds (N-H···O) between the NH2 group in MAPTSC and the C=O group in one propionate side chain of Fe(III)PPIX are crucial to Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding. QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL analyses revealed a subtle interplay of weak noncovalent interactions dominated by dispersive-like van der Waals interactions between Fe(III)PPIX and MAPTSC that stabilize the Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes.

  14. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's gateway for information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial, in which patients with advanced cancer are assigned to treatment arms based on the molecular profiles of their disease.

  15. NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) Trial

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's gateway for information about the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial, in which patients with advanced cancer are assigned to treatment arms based on the molecular profiles of their disease.

  16. Ardipusilloside I purified from Ardisia pusilla competitively binds VEGFR and induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Qu, Youle; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2010-06-01

    The present study was to evaluate the effects of Ardipusilloside I isolated from Ardisia pusilla on the growth, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) expression and apoptosis of NCI-H460 cell line by MTT, ELISA and flow cytometer, respectively. The docking assay between Ardipusilloside I and VEGFR was studied by Sybyl/Sketch module. The change of microstructure was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). DNA fragmentation was visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. The protein expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). A series of changes were observed in NCI-H460 cell treated by Ardipusilloside I, including microstructure, DNA fragmentation, protein expression of VEGFR, Bax and Bcl-2. The results showed Ardipusilloside I had a good docking with VEGFR and could inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of NCI-H460 cell in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was significantly stopped at the G(1) phase. Under electronic microscope, the morphology of NCI-H460 cell treated with Ardipusilloside I showed nuclear karyopycnosis, chromatin agglutination and typical apoptotic body. VEGFR and Bcl-2 expression were decreased and Bax expression was increased. In conclusion, all these results demonstrate that Ardipusilloside I has a good docking with VEGFR and has an inhibitory effect on growth of NCI-H460 cell and can induce its apoptosis.

  17. CXCL14 enhances proliferation and migration of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells overexpressing the glycoproteins containing heparan sulfate or sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Cho Rong; You, Dong-Joo; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Mi Jin; Lee, Cheolju; Oh, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Curie; Seong, Jae Young; Hwang, Jong-Ik

    2013-05-01

    CXCL14 is a chemokine family member that is involved in various cellular responses in addition to immune cell activation. Although constitutive CXCL14 expression in normal epithelial cells may help protect against infection by activating immune systems, its expression in cancer cells has raised controversy regarding its possible role in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms for this disparity remain unknown. Investigation of cellular CXCL14 binding properties might increase our understanding of the peptide's roles in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we found that CXCL14 binds to various cell types. Interestingly, binding to NCI-H460 cells was prevented by heparan sulfate and N-acetyl neuraminic acid. Next, we examined effect of CXCL14 binding in NCI-H460 and NCI-H23. CXCL14 enhanced proliferation and migration in NCI-H460 but had no effect on NCI-H23. A reporter gene assay with various transcription factor response elements revealed that only nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling was activated by CXCL14 in NCI-H460 cells, which was blocked by BAPTA-AM, TPCA-1, and brefeldin A. Exogenous expression of some glycoproteins such as syndecan-4, podoplanin, and CD43 in these cells enhanced CXCL14 binding and NF-κB activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CXCL14 binding to glycoproteins harboring heparan sulfate proteoglycans and sialic acids leads proliferation and migration of some cancer cells.

  18. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - NCI Alliance Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  19. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  20. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer funds the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers collectively with the NCI Cancer Training Center. Find out about the funded Centers, to date, that train our next generation of scientists in the field of Canc

  1. NCI Resource Room at AACR 2017

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers interested in meeting with their Program Directors should contact them ahead of AACR to arrange a time to meet at the NCI Resource Room. This space will be used for one-on-one consultations with NCI staff as well as small group meetings facilitated by the NCI.

  2. The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects: implications for cancer education.

    PubMed

    Kreps, Gary L; Gustafson, David; Salovey, Peter; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Wilbright, Wayne; Bright, Mary Anne; Muha, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported four innovative demonstration research projects, "The Digital Divide Pilot Projects," to test new strategies for disseminating health information via computer to vulnerable consumers. These projects involved active research collaborations between the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and regional cancer control researchers to field test new approaches for enhancing cancer communication in vulnerable communities. The projects were able to use computers to successfully disseminate relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations. These demonstration research projects suggested effective new strategies for using communication technologies to educate underserved populations about cancer prevention, control, and care.

  3. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  4. NCI-Frederick” Is Retired; Replaced with “NCI at Frederick” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer If you are used to using the term “NCI-Frederick” to identify your work location, please note that this name has been officially retired. This change was made to ensure consistency with the naming conventions used by other NCI locations, such as NCI at Shady Grove. Please be aware of the distinction between the terms “NCI at Frederick” and “the NCI Campus at Frederick,” as follows:

  5. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  6. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  7. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  8. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  9. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  10. Advanced Demonstration and Test Reactor Options Study

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Hill, R.; Gehin, J.; Gougar, Hans David; Strydom, Gerhard; Heidet, F.; Kinsey, J.; Grandy, Christopher; Qualls, A.; Brown, Nicholas; Powers, J.; Hoffman, E.; Croson, D.

    2017-01-01

    Global efforts to address climate change will require large-scale decarbonization of energy production in the United States and elsewhere. Nuclear power already provides 20% of electricity production in the United States (U.S.) and is increasing in countries undergoing rapid growth around the world. Because reliable, grid-stabilizing, low emission electricity generation, energy security, and energy resource diversity will be increasingly valued, nuclear power’s share of electricity production has a potential to grow. In addition, there are non electricity applications (e.g., process heat, desalination, hydrogen production) that could be better served by advanced nuclear systems. Thus, the timely development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced nuclear reactors could diversify the nuclear technologies available and offer attractive technology options to expand the impact of nuclear energy for electricity generation and non-electricity missions. The purpose of this planning study is to provide transparent and defensible technology options for a test and/or demonstration reactor(s) to be built to support public policy, innovation and long term commercialization within the context of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) broader commitment to pursuing an “all of the above” clean energy strategy and associated time lines. This planning study includes identification of the key features and timing needed for advanced test or demonstration reactors to support research, development, and technology demonstration leading to the commercialization of power plants built upon these advanced reactor platforms. This planning study is consistent with the Congressional language contained within the fiscal year 2015 appropriation that directed the DOE to conduct a planning study to evaluate “advanced reactor technology options, capabilities, and requirements within the context of national needs and public policy to support innovation in nuclear energy

  11. NCI-funded CCOP Study Shows Antidepressant Drug Relieves Painful Neuropathy from Chemotherapy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The antidepressant drug duloxetine, known commercially as Cymbalta, helped relieve painful numbness and tingling feelings caused by chemotherapy in 59 percent of patients, a new study finds. This is the first clinical trial to find an effective treatment for this pain. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of certain chemotherapy drugs. |

  12. Accrual Patterns for Clinical Studies Involving Quantitative Imaging: Results of an NCI Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Brenda F.; Aggarwal, Sameer; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Mountz, James M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Jones, Ella F.; Bodeker, Kellie L.; Buatti, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Patient accrual is essential for the success of oncology clinical trials. Recruitment for trials involving the development of quantitative imaging biomarkers may face different challenges than treatment trials. This study surveyed investigators and study personnel for evaluating accrual performance and perceived barriers to accrual and for soliciting solutions to these accrual challenges that are specific to quantitative imaging-based trials. Responses for 25 prospective studies were received from 12 sites. The median percent annual accrual attained was 94.5% (range, 3%–350%). The most commonly selected barrier to recruitment (n = 11/25, 44%) was that “patients decline participation,” followed by “too few eligible patients” (n = 10/25, 40%). In a forced choice for the single greatest recruitment challenge, “too few eligible patients” was the most common response (n = 8/25, 32%). Quantitative analysis and qualitative responses suggested that interactions among institutional, physician, and patient factors contributed to accrual success and challenges. Multidisciplinary collaboration in trial design and execution is essential to accrual success, with attention paid to ensuring and communicating potential trial benefits to enrolled and future patients. PMID:28127586

  13. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mansky, Patrick J.; Sannes, Timothy S.; Johnson, Laura Lee; Blackman, Marc R.; Grem, Jean L.; Swain, Sandra M.; Monahan, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts (mistletoe) are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM) and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC) evaluated: (1) safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD), (2) absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery, (3) formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab), (4) cytokine plasma concentrations, (5) clinical response, and (6) pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistletoe and fixed GEM dose in stage I and increasing doses of GEM with a fixed dose of mistletoe in stage II. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were grade (G) 3 nonhematologic and G4 hematologic events; MTD was reached with 2 DLTs in one dosage level. Response in stage IV ASC was assessed with descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses examined clinical response/survival and ANC recovery. Results. DLTs were G4 neutropenia, G4 thrombocytopenia, G4 acute renal failure, and G3 cellulitis, attributed to mistletoe. GEM 1380 mg/m2 and mistletoe 250 mg combined were the MTD. Of 44 patients, 24 developed nonneutropenic fever and flu-like syndrome. GEM pharmacokinetics were unaffected by mistletoe. All patients developed ML3 IgG antibodies. ANC showed a trend to increase between baseline and cycle 2 in stage I dose escalation. 6% of patients showed partial response, 42% stable disease. Median survival was 200 days. Compliance with mistletoe injections was high. Conclusion. GEM plus mistletoe is well tolerated. No botanical/drug interactions were observed. Clinical response is similar to GEM alone. PMID:24285980

  14. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) licenses the discoveries of NCI and nine other NIH Institutes so new technologies can be developed and commercialized, to convert them into public health benefits. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  15. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  16. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  17. An anthraquinone derivative from Luffa acutangula induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Vanajothi, Ramar; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of 1,8-dihydroxy-4-methylanthracene-9,10-dione (DHMA) isolated from the Luffa acutangula against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). Induction of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined through fluorescence microscopic technique. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis was carried out to detect the expression of pro-apoptotic (p53, p21, caspase-3, Bax, GADD45A, and ATM) and anti-apoptotic (NF-κB) proteins in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies also performed to predict the binding mechanism of DHMA with MDM2-p53 protein. The DHMA inhibited the cell viability of NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of about 50 µg/ml. It significantly reduced cell viability correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with ROS generation. The apoptotic cell death was further confirmed through dual staining and DNA fragmentation assay. DHMA significantly increased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein such as p53, p21, Bax, and caspase-3 but downregulated the expression of NF-κB in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies demonstrate that DHMA formed hydrogen bond interaction with key residues Trp26, Phe55 and Lys24 by which it disrupt the binding of p53 with MDM2 receptor. These findings suggested that DHMA induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 via a p53-dependent pathway. This the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing activity of DHMA from L. acutangula against NCI-H460 cell line. Therefore, DHMA has therapeutic potential for lung cancer treatment.

  18. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  19. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin of victory in the 10-year series,” said Denny Dougherty, retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick. “The intensity of the annual competition has increased each year and has become...

  20. A1E inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bak, Yesol; Ham, Sunyoung; Baatartsogt, O; Jung, Seung Hyun; Choi, Kang-Duk; Han, Tae-Young; Han, Il-Young; Yoon, Do-Young

    2013-07-01

    It has been reported that extracts from Asian traditional/medical herbs possess therapeutic agents against cancers, metabolic diseases, inflammatory diseases, and other intractable diseases. In this study, we assessed the molecular mechanisms involved in the anticancer effects of A1E, the extract of Korean medicinal herbs. We examined the role of the cytotoxic and apoptotic pathways in the cancer chemopreventive activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines NCI-H460 and NCI-H1299. A1E inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H460 more efficiently than NCI-H1299 (p53(-/-)) cells. The apoptosis was detected by nuclear morphological changes, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, cell cycle analysis, western blot, RT-PCR, and measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential. A1E induced cellular morphological changes and nuclear condensation at 24 h in a dose-dependent manner. A1E also perturbed cell cycle progression at the sub-G1 stage and altered cell cycle regulatory factors in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, A1E inhibited the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB survival pathways, and it activated apoptotic intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. A1E increased the expression levels of members of the extrinsic death receptor complex FasL and FADD. In addition, A1E treatment induced cleavage of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), whereas the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were downregulated. A1E induced mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and cytochrome C release. Our results suggest that A1E induces apoptosis via activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways and inhibition of PI3K/Akt survival signaling pathways in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the potential of A1E as a novel chemotherapeutic agent in NSCLC.

  1. NCI at AACR 2016 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) will be participating at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, to be held April 16-20, 2016, in New Orleans at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Sessions Featuring NCI Staff An overview of the NCI-sponsored sessions and NCI experts presenting at AACR. |

  2. Dinutuximab (Unituxin™) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, NCI entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with United Therapeutics Corp., under which the company assumed responsibility for manufacturing dinutuximab and moving it through the steps required for regulatory approval.

  3. Emergency Services at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Despite precautions and preventive techniques, injuries and emergencies can happen at NCI at Frederick. When they occur, employees should call the same number as they would when they are off-campus: 911.

  4. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  5. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  6. Overview and Utilization of the NCI Thesaurus

    PubMed Central

    de Coronado, Sherri; Haber, Margaret; Hartel, Frank; Wright, Larry

    2004-01-01

    The NCI Thesaurus is a reference terminology covering areas of basic and clinical science, built with the goal of facilitating translational research in cancer. It contains nearly 110 000 terms in approximately 36000 concepts, partitioned in 20 subdomains, which include diseases, drugs, anatomy, genes, gene products, techniques, and biological processes, among others, all with a cancer-centric focus in content, and originally designed to support coding activities across the National Cancer Institute. Each concept represents a unit of meaning and contains a number of annotations, such as synonyms and preferred name, as well as annotations such as textual definitions and optional references to external authorities. In addition, concepts are modelled with description logic (DL) and defined by their relationships to other concepts; there are currently approximately 90 types of named relations declared in the terminology. The NCI Thesaurus is produced by the Enterprise Vocabulary Services project, a collaborative effort between the NCI Center for Bioinformatics and the NCI Office of Communications, and is part of the caCORE infrastructure stack (http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/NCICB/core). It can be accessed programmatically through the open caBIO API and browsed via the web (http://nciterms.nci.nih.gov). A history of editing changes is also accessible through the API. In addition, the Thesaurus is available for download in various file formats, including OWL, the web ontology language, to facilitate its utilization by others. PMID:18629178

  7. The NCI Thesaurus quality assurance life cycle.

    PubMed

    de Coronado, Sherri; Wright, Lawrence W; Fragoso, Gilberto; Haber, Margaret W; Hahn-Dantona, Elizabeth A; Hartel, Francis W; Quan, Sharon L; Safran, Tracy; Thomas, Nicole; Whiteman, Lori

    2009-06-01

    The National Cancer Institute Enterprise Vocabulary Services (NCI EVS) uses a wide range of quality assurance (QA) techniques to maintain and extend NCI Thesaurus (NCIt). NCIt is a reference terminology and biomedical ontology used in a growing number of NCI and other systems that extend from translational and basic research through clinical care to public information and administrative activities. Both automated and manual QA techniques are employed throughout the editing and publication cycle, which includes inserting and editing NCIt in NCI Metathesaurus. NCI EVS conducts its own additional periodic and ongoing content QA. External reviews, and extensive evaluation by and interaction with EVS partners and other users, have also played an important part in the QA process. There have always been tensions and compromises between meeting the needs of dependent systems and providing consistent and well-structured content; external QA and feedback have been important in identifying and addressing such issues. Currently, NCI EVS is exploring new approaches to broaden external participation in the terminology development and QA process.

  8. Characterization of osimertinib (AZD9291)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1975/OSIR cell line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Xia; Fong, Chi Man Vivienne; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-12-06

    Osimertinib (OSI, also known as AZD9291) is the newest FDA-approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR T790M mutation. However, resistance to OSI is likely to progress and the study of potential OSI-resistant mechanisms in advanced is necessary. Here, the OSI-resistant NCI-H1975/OSIR cells were established. After cells developed resistance to OSI, cell proliferation was decreased while cell migration and invasion were increased. The NCI-H1975/OSIR cells exhibited more resistance to gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, rociletinib, doxorubicin, and fluorouracil, meanwhile showing higher sensitivity to paclitaxel, when compared with NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, the NCI-H1975/OSIR cells did not display multidrug resistance phenotype. The activation and expression of EGFR were decreased after cells exhibited resistance. Compared with NCI-H1975 cells, the activation of ERK and AKT in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could not be significantly inhibited by OSI treatment. Navitoclax (ABT-263)-induced cell viability inhibition and apoptosis were more significant in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells than that in NCI-H1975 cells. Moreover, these effects of navitoclax in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could be reversed by pretreatment of Z-VAD-FMK. Collectively, loss of EGFR could pose as one of the OSI-resistant mechanisms and navitoclax might be the candidate drug for OSI-resistant NSCLC patients.

  9. Characterization of osimertinib (AZD9291)-resistant non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1975/OSIR cell line

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xia; Fong, Chi Man Vivienne; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Osimertinib (OSI, also known as AZD9291) is the newest FDA-approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR T790M mutation. However, resistance to OSI is likely to progress and the study of potential OSI-resistant mechanisms in advanced is necessary. Here, the OSI-resistant NCI-H1975/OSIR cells were established. After cells developed resistance to OSI, cell proliferation was decreased while cell migration and invasion were increased. The NCI-H1975/OSIR cells exhibited more resistance to gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, rociletinib, doxorubicin, and fluorouracil, meanwhile showing higher sensitivity to paclitaxel, when compared with NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, the NCI-H1975/OSIR cells did not display multidrug resistance phenotype. The activation and expression of EGFR were decreased after cells exhibited resistance. Compared with NCI-H1975 cells, the activation of ERK and AKT in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could not be significantly inhibited by OSI treatment. Navitoclax (ABT-263)-induced cell viability inhibition and apoptosis were more significant in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells than that in NCI-H1975 cells. Moreover, these effects of navitoclax in NCI-H1975/OSIR cells could be reversed by pretreatment of Z-VAD-FMK. Collectively, loss of EGFR could pose as one of the OSI-resistant mechanisms and navitoclax might be the candidate drug for OSI-resistant NSCLC patients. PMID:27835594

  10. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  11. Orbital construction demonstration study. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The supported construction base concept (no permanent habitation quarters) was explored. The studies concentrated on: (1) representative large structures that can only be tested in space, (2) definition of initial construction base (add-on to cover applications of facility), and (3) programmatic issues of schedule and cost, and mission plans.

  12. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  13. NCI's Distributed Geospatial Data Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larraondo, P. R.; Evans, B. J. K.; Antony, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth systems, environmental and geophysics datasets are an extremely valuable source of information about the state and evolution of the Earth. However, different disciplines and applications require this data to be post-processed in different ways before it can be used. For researchers experimenting with algorithms across large datasets or combining multiple data sets, the traditional approach to batch data processing and storing all the output for later analysis rapidly becomes unfeasible, and often requires additional work to publish for others to use. Recent developments on distributed computing using interactive access to significant cloud infrastructure opens the door for new ways of processing data on demand, hence alleviating the need for storage space for each individual copy of each product. The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has developed a highly distributed geospatial data server which supports interactive processing of large geospatial data products, including satellite Earth Observation data and global model data, using flexible user-defined functions. This system dynamically and efficiently distributes the required computations among cloud nodes and thus provides a scalable analysis capability. In many cases this completely alleviates the need to preprocess and store the data as products. This system presents a standards-compliant interface, allowing ready accessibility for users of the data. Typical data wrangling problems such as handling different file formats and data types, or harmonising the coordinate projections or temporal and spatial resolutions, can now be handled automatically by this service. The geospatial data server exposes functionality for specifying how the data should be aggregated and transformed. The resulting products can be served using several standards such as the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) or Web Feature Service (WFS), Open Street Map tiles, or raw binary arrays under

  14. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  15. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  16. NCI at Frederick Employees Honored at NCI Director’s Awards Program | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Nineteen staff members affiliated with NCI at Frederick or the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) were recognized at the 2014 NCI Director’s Award Ceremony for their outstanding contributions to advancing cancer research. The ceremony, held Dec. 1, took place at the NIH Natcher Conference Center, on the main campus in Bethesda.

  17. NCI at Frederick Employees Recognized at the 2013 NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer More than 60 NCI at Frederick government and contractor employees were recognized at the NCI Director’s Awards Ceremony on Nov. 14, held on the main NIH campus in Bethesda.

  18. Demethoxycurcumin-induced DNA Damage Decreases DNA Repair-associated Protein Expression Levels in NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Due; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-05-01

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) is a key component of Chinese medicine (Turmeric) and has been proven effective in killing various cancer cells. Its role in inducing cytotoxic effects in many cancer cells has been reported, but its role regarding DNA damage on lung cancer cells has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we demonstrated DMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using the Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively. Western blotting indicated that DMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DNA damage response), DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), and p53 (tumor suppressor protein). DMC activated phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we used confocal laser systems microscopy to examine the protein translocation. The results showed that DMC promotes the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X from the cytosol to the nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, DMC induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro.

  19. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  20. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  1. Three centered hydrogen bonds of the type C=O···H(N)···X-C in diphenyloxamide derivatives involving halogens and a rotating CF3 group: NMR, QTAIM, NCI and NBO studies.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipriya, A; Rama Chaudhari, Sachin; Shahi, Abhishek; Arunan, E; Suryaprakash, N

    2015-03-21

    The existence of three centered C=O···H(N)···X-C hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving organic fluorine and other halogens in diphenyloxamide derivatives has been explored by NMR spectroscopy and quantum theoretical studies. The three centered H-bond with the participation of a rotating CF3 group and the F···H-N intramolecular hydrogen bonds, a rare observation of its kind in organofluorine compounds, has been detected. It is also unambiguously established by a number of one and two dimensional NMR experiments, such as temperature perturbation, solvent titration, (15)N-(1)H HSQC, and (19)F-(1)H HOESY, and is also confirmed by theoretical calculations, such as quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non-covalent interaction (NCI).

  2. Organometallic Iridium(III) Anticancer Complexes with New Mechanisms of Action: NCI-60 Screening, Mitochondrial Targeting, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (IrIII) complexes [Ir(Cpx)(XY)Cl]+/0 (Cpx = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cpx ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cpx = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these IrIII complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic IrIII complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  3. Organometallic Iridium(III) anticancer complexes with new mechanisms of action: NCI-60 screening, mitochondrial targeting, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Qamar, Bushra; Liu, Zhe; Hands-Portman, Ian; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (Ir(III)) complexes [Ir(Cp(x))(XY)Cl](+/0) (Cp(x) = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cp(x) ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cp(x) = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these Ir(III) complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic Ir(III) complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands.

  4. An overview of the NCI precision medicine trials-NCI MATCH and MPACT.

    PubMed

    Do, Khanh; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Chen, Alice P

    2015-09-01

    The concept of oncogene addiction was first proposed by Weinstein in 2002, postulating that tumors rely on a single dominant mutation, the oncogenic "driver", for growth and survival. We have since come to realize that the genomic landscape of tumors is heterogeneous and more complex than previously thought. Advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics over the past decade have shifted treatment paradigms with regard to the development of molecular targeted therapeutics to identify and target the presumptive dominant lesion. As such, the decision of choosing targeted treatment strategies has become increasingly more reliant on the reporting of genomic screens of patients' tumor tissue. Whether this change in treatment paradigm will translate into improved clinical benefit, remains to be seen. To this end, the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched precision-based medicine trials to address this question. NCI Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH), a genomic pre-screening study, was designed to explore the efficacy of using targeted agents to target specific molecular aberrations and whether these same therapies have comparable activity across different tumor subtypes. Molecular Profiling-based Assignment of Cancer Therapy (MPACT), is a smaller, provocative trial designed to address whether targeting an oncogenic "driver" would be more efficacious than one not. The Exceptional Responders' initiative further aims to evaluate patients who have derived an unexpected durable benefit to these therapies, with retrospective analysis of their tumors to delineate potential predictive biomarkers which could predict response. The results of these trials will serve to help guide the field of precision medicine and personalized care.

  5. NCI ALMANAC Tool for Research on Cancer Drug Combinations

    Cancer.gov

    A Cancer Currents blog post on the NCI ALMANAC, a new resource that provides data showing how well pairs of FDA-approved cancer drugs performed in killing tumor cells from NCI-60 Human Tumor Cell Lines.

  6. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  7. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Cancer.gov

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  8. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  9. Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study by Nora M Eldredge ARL-SR-0311 February 2015...Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study Nora M Eldredge Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (WMRD) Laboratory Demonstration Study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. Cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines of modified flavonoids from Kaempferia parviflora.

    PubMed

    Yenjai, Chavi; Wanich, Suchana

    2010-05-01

    Flavones 1-4 isolated from Kaempferia parviflora were used for structural modification. Sixteen flavonoid derivatives, including four new derivatives, were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against KB and NCI-H187 cell lines. Flavanones 2a-4a demonstrated higher cytotoxic activity than the parent compounds. Cytotoxicity against KB cell line of oxime 1c was about 7 times higher than the ellipticine standard. Interestingly, oximes 1c and 2c exhibited highly potent cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 0.014 and 0.23 microM, respectively. Oximes 4c and 5c showed strong cytotoxicity against NCI-H187 cell line with IC(50) values of 4.04 and 2.32 microM, respectively. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  12. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  13. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  14. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Comprehensive List of Cancer-Related Genetic Variations of the NCI-60 Panel | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI-60 cell lines are the most frequently studied human tumor cell lines in cancer research. The panel of cell lines represents nine different types of cancer: breast, ovary, prostate, colon, lung, kidney, brain, leukemia, and melanoma. Originally developed to screen anticancer compounds by the NCI Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), the NCI-60 panel has generated the most extensive cancer pharmacology database worldwide. The 60 cell lines have also been extensively analyzed for their gene and microRNA expression levels, DNA mutation status, and DNA copy number variations. These findings have provided the groundwork for research centered on increasing our understanding of tumor biology and drug activity.

  16. Factors Influencing Patient Pathways for Receipt of Cancer Care at an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A.; Rodriguez, Elisa M.; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G.; Miller, Austin; Erwin, Deborah O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the field of oncology, increasing access to high quality care has been identified as a priority to reduce cancer disparities. Previous research reveals that the facilities where patients receive their cancer care have implications for cancer outcomes. However, there is little understanding of how patients decide where to seek cancer care. This study examined the factors that shape patients’ pathways to seek their cancer care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center (NCI-CCC), and differences in these factors by race, income and education. Methods In-depth interviews and survey questionnaires were administered to a random sample of 124 patients at one NCI-CCC in the Northeast US. In-depth interview data was first analyzed qualitatively to identify themes and patterns in patients’ pathways to receive their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Logistic Regression was used to examine if these pathways varied by patient race, income, and education. Results Two themes emerged: following the recommendation of a physician and following advice from social network members. Quantitative data analysis shows that patient pathways to care at an NCI-CCC varied by education and income. Patients with lower income and education most commonly sought their cancer care at an NCI-CCC due to the recommendation of a physician. Patients with higher income and education most commonly cited referral by a specialist physician or the advice of a social network member. There were no statistically significant differences in pathways to care by race. Conclusions Our findings show that most patients relied on physician recommendations or advice from a social network member in deciding to seek their cancer care at an NCI-CCC. Due to the role of physicians in shaping patients’ pathways to the NCI-CCC, initiatives that strengthen partnerships between NCI-CCCs and community physicians who serve underserved communities may improve access to NCI-CCCs. PMID

  17. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  18. U.S. EPA's Ultraviolet Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will give a background on USEPA's Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study. This will include regulatory background, science background, goals of the project, and ultimate expected outcome of the project. This presentation will preceed a panel discussion ...

  19. U.S. EPA's Ultraviolet Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will give a background on USEPA's Disinfection Technologies Demonstration Study. This will include regulatory background, science background, goals of the project, and ultimate expected outcome of the project. This presentation will preceed a panel discussion ...

  20. NCI/DCCPS R21 Program Announcements | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  1. NCI/DCCPS R03 Program Announcements | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  2. Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  3. Study on Inhibitory Effect of MaiMenDong Decoction and WeiJing Decoction Combination with Cisplatin on NCI-A549 Xenograft in Nude Mice and Its Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei; Jiang, Miao; Chen, Meijuan; Wang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Shiping; Zhou, Jing; Li, Ke; Sheng, Yan; Yin, Lian; Tang, Yuping; Ye, Lihong; Wu, Mianhua; Fu, Haian; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    MaiMenDong Decoction and WeiJing Decoction (Jin formula) is a traditional Chinese medication that consists of 8 medicinal plants, which recorded in the classical TCM literature Jin Kui Yao Lue and has been utilized in the treatment of lung diseases for hundreds of years in China. The present study aimed to determine the anti-tumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of Jin formula combined with cisplatin in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Xenograft model of NCI-A549 was established in Balb/c nude mice. Five groups, including normal, MOCK, Jin, cisplatin (DDP), and Jin+DDP were included in the study. We found that Jin formula ameliorated the body weight loss caused by DDP 15 days after drug administration. Moreover, the combination of Jin with DDP enhanced the anti-tumor function of DDP. Microarray analysis showed that Jin suppressed gene expression of certain pathways which regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Furthermore, DDP mainly decreased the gene expression level of angiogenesis associated factors, such as VEGFA, TGF-β and MMP-1. Moreover, co-treatment with Jin and DDP not only down-regulated Bcl-2 and E2F1, but also decreased the expression of MYC, MET, and MCAM. In addition, co-formula decreased the levels of p-AKT (thr308) and p-PTEN, increased Bax/Bcl-2 value, and resulted in apoptosis of tumor cells. Taken together, Jin+DDP significantly inhibited the growth of A549 cell transplanted solid tumor with slight side effect compared to the treatment by DDP only, and had a better effect than the Jin group. The mechanisms may be mainly associated with inactivation of PI3K/AKT pathway and apoptosis induction. PMID:28900482

  4. Cytotoxic Activities of Physalis minima L. Chloroform Extract on Human Lung Adenocarcinoma NCI-H23 Cell Lines by Induction of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ooi Kheng; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima L. is reputed for having anticancer property. In this study, the chloroform extract of this plant exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activities on NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell line at dose- and time-dependent manners (after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation). Analysis of cell-death mechanism demonstrated that the extract exerted apoptotic programed cell death in NCI-H23 cells with typical DNA fragmentation, which is a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. Morphological observation using transmission electron microscope (TEM) also displayed apoptotic characteristics in the treated cells, including clumping and margination of chromatins, followed by convolution of the nuclear and budding of the cells to produce membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. Different stages of apoptotic programed cell death as well as phosphatidylserine externalization were confirmed using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, acute exposure to the extract produced a significant regulation of c-myc, caspase-3 and p53 mRNA expression in this cell line. Due to its apoptotic effect on NCI-H23 cells, it is strongly suggested that the extract could be further developed as an anticancer drug.

  5. Cytotoxic Activities of Physalis minima L. Chloroform Extract on Human Lung Adenocarcinoma NCI-H23 Cell Lines by Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ooi Kheng; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2011-01-01

    Physalis minima L. is reputed for having anticancer property. In this study, the chloroform extract of this plant exhibited remarkable cytotoxic activities on NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell line at dose- and time-dependent manners (after 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation). Analysis of cell-death mechanism demonstrated that the extract exerted apoptotic programed cell death in NCI-H23 cells with typical DNA fragmentation, which is a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. Morphological observation using transmission electron microscope (TEM) also displayed apoptotic characteristics in the treated cells, including clumping and margination of chromatins, followed by convolution of the nuclear and budding of the cells to produce membrane-bound apoptotic bodies. Different stages of apoptotic programed cell death as well as phosphatidylserine externalization were confirmed using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, acute exposure to the extract produced a significant regulation of c-myc, caspase-3 and p53 mRNA expression in this cell line. Due to its apoptotic effect on NCI-H23 cells, it is strongly suggested that the extract could be further developed as an anticancer drug. PMID:19541726

  6. Role of autophagy in apoptosis induction by methylene chloride extracts of Mori cortex in NCI-H460 human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Eom, Hyun Sup; Kim, Gi-Young; Hyun, Jin Won; Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-06-01

    The root of Mori cortex has traditionally been used in Korea for the treatment of cutaneous inflammation, pulmonary asthma, and congestion for thousands of years. The present study was designed to validate the anticancer effects of methylene chloride extracts of the M. cortex root (MEMC) in NCI-H460 human lung carcinoma cells. Exposure to MEMC was found to result in growth inhibition by the induction of caspase‑dependent apoptosis in NCI-H460 cells, which correlated with upregulated expression of death receptor (DR)4, DR5 and FasL, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression, cleavage of Bid, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, autophagosomes, a characteristic finding of autophagy, and markers of autophagy, conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II and increased beclin-1 accumulation, were observed in MEMC-treated NCI-H460 cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or LC3B small interfering (siRNA) resulted in enhanced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that MEMC-induced autophagy functions as a suppressor of apoptosis. MEMC-induced autophagy was also blocked by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and catalase, indicating that H2O2 can regulate autophagy. Our data demonstrate that MEMC triggers both ROS-mediated autophagy and caspase-dependent apoptosis, and that autophagy plays a protective role against apoptotic cell death.

  7. Halaven® - eribulin mesylate (analog of halichondrin B) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Under a CRADA with NCI, Eisai Co. provided eribulin for NCI's preclinical development activities and to support NCI's Phase I clinical trials. Eisai ultimately took the product, Halaven®, to licensure.

  8. Case studies for GSHP demonstration projects in the US

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Im, Piljae

    2015-07-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act , twenty-six ground source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This article gives an overview of the case studies for six of the systems. These case studies evaluated efficiencies, energy savings, and costs of the demonstrated systems. In addition, it was found that more energy savings could be achieved if controls of GSHP system are improved.

  9. Case studies for GSHP demonstration projects in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Im, Piljae

    2015-07-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act , twenty-six ground source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This article gives an overview of the case studies for six of the systems. These case studies evaluated efficiencies, energy savings, and costs of the demonstrated systems. In addition, it was found that more energy savings could be achieved if controls of GSHP system are improved.

  10. A sense of urgency: Evaluating the link between clinical trial development time and the accrual performance of cancer therapy evaluation program (NCI-CTEP) sponsored studies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Steven K; Dietrich, Mary S; Dilts, David M

    2010-11-15

    Postactivation barriers to oncology clinical trial accruals are well documented; however, potential barriers prior to trial opening are not. We investigate one such barrier: trial development time. National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored trials for all therapeutic, nonpediatric phase I, I/II, II, and III studies activated between 2000 and 2004 were investigated for an 8-year period (n = 419). Successful trials were those achieving 100% of minimum accrual goal. Time to open a study was the calendar time from initial CTEP submission to trial activation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR), controlling for study phase and size of expected accruals. Among the CTEP-approved oncology trials, 37.9% (n = 221) failed to attain the minimum accrual goals, with 70.8% (n = 14) of phase III trials resulting in poor accrual. A total of 16,474 patients (42.5% of accruals) accrued to those studies were unable to achieve the projected minimum accrual goal. Trials requiring less than 12 months of development were significantly more likely to achieve accrual goals (OR, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.57, P = 0.003) than trials with the median development times of 12 to 18 months. Trials requiring a development time of greater than 24 months were significantly less likely to achieve accrual goals (OR, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.78; P = 0.011) than trials with the median development time. A large percentage of oncology clinical trials do not achieve minimum projected accruals. Trial development time appears to be one important predictor of the likelihood of successfully achieving the minimum accrual goals. ©2010 AACR.

  11. Dietary determinants of one-carbon metabolism and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: NCI-SEER case-control study, 1998-2000.

    PubMed

    Lim, U; Schenk, M; Kelemen, L E; Davis, S; Cozen, W; Hartge, P; Ward, M H; Stolzenberg-Solomon, R

    2005-11-15

    The role of dietary one-carbon determinants remains largely unexplored for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In a population-based case-control study of non-African-American adult (aged 20-74 years) women and men from four US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results study centers (Detroit, Michigan; Iowa; Los Angeles, California; and Seattle, Washington; 1998-2000), the authors examined folate; vitamins B2, B6, and B12; methionine; and a one-carbon antagonist, alcohol, in 425 incident NHL cases and 359 controls who completed a detailed food frequency questionnaire. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by using unconditional logistic regression. Higher intake of one-carbon determinants from food was associated with a lower risk of NHL, but that for only vitamin B6 (highest vs. lowest quartile: odds ratio = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.95; p trend = 0.01) and methionine (odds ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.76; p trend = 0.002) reached statistical significance. Folate from food was inversely associated with diffuse subtype (odds ratio = 0.47, 95% confidence interval: 0.23, 0.94; p trend = 0.03). The authors found no association between total (food plus supplement) vitamins and NHL. Nonusers of alcohol had an elevated NHL risk compared with users, and alcohol did not modify other nutrient-NHL associations. Findings suggest that one-carbon nutrients, particularly vitamin B6 and methionine, may be protective against NHL.

  12. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. Representing the NCI Thesaurus in OWL DL: Modeling tools help modeling languages

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Natalya F.; de Coronado, Sherri; Solbrig, Harold; Fragoso, Gilberto; Hartel, Frank W.; Musen, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Thesaurus is a biomedical reference ontology. The NCI Thesaurus is represented using Description Logic, more specifically Ontylog, a Description logic implemented by Apelon, Inc. We are exploring the use of the DL species of the Web Ontology Language (OWL DL)—a W3C recommended standard for ontology representation—instead of Ontylog for representing the NCI Thesaurus. We have studied the requirements for knowledge representation of the NCI Thesaurus, and considered how OWL DL (and its implementation in Protégé-OWL) satisfies these requirements. In this paper, we discuss the areas where OWL DL was sufficient for representing required components, where tool support that would hide some of the complexity and extra levels of indirection would be required, and where language expressiveness is not sufficient given the representation requirements. Because many of the knowledge-representation issues that we encountered are very similar to the issues in representing other biomedical terminologies and ontologies in general, we believe that the lessons that we learned and the approaches that we developed will prove useful and informative for other researchers. PMID:19789731

  14. Auditing the NCI thesaurus with semantic web technologies.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-11-06

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed.

  15. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  16. NCI at Frederick Contributes to Feds Feed Families | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Once again, NCI at Frederick participated in the annual Feds Feed Families event, which challenges federal workers to help knock out hunger with a food drive. This year, NIH collected 26,315 pounds of non-perishable goods, beating its goal of collecting 20,000 pounds. This includes over four tons of food that was collected at satellite locations, including NCI at Frederick. The food collected at NCI at Frederick was donated locally to the Frederick Rescue Mission. These donations help feed local families in need through the holiday season.

  17. A simple demonstration when studying the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Valery; Varaksina, Ekaterina

    2016-06-01

    The paper proposes a lecture experiment that can be demonstrated when studying the equivalence principle formulated by Albert Einstein. The demonstration consists of creating stroboscopic photographs of a ball moving along a parabola in Earth's gravitational field. In the first experiment, a camera is stationary relative to Earth's surface. In the second, the camera falls freely downwards with the ball, allowing students to see that the ball moves uniformly and rectilinearly relative to the frame of reference of the freely falling camera. The equivalence principle explains this result, as it is always possible to propose an inertial frame of reference for a small region of a gravitational field, where space-time effects of curvature are negligible.

  18. Demonstration Report: ESTCP UXO Discrimination Study ESTCP PROJECT # MM-0838

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika

    2010-02-15

    In 2003, the Defense Science Board observed: 'The problem is that instruments that can detect the buried UXOs also detect numerous scrap metal objects and other artifacts, which leads to an enormous amount of expensive digging. Typically 100 holes may be dug before a real UXO is unearthed! The Task Force assessment is that much of this wasteful digging can be eliminated by the use of more advanced technology instruments that exploit modern digital processing and advanced multi-mode sensors to achieve an improved level of discrimination of scrap from UXOs.' Significant progress has been made in discrimination technology. To date, testing of these approaches has been primarily limited to test sites with only limited application at live sites. Acceptance of discrimination technologies requires demonstration of system capabilities at real UXO sites under real world conditions. Any attempt to declare detected anomalies to be harmless and requiring no further investigation will require demonstration to regulators of not only individual technologies, but of an entire decision making process. This characterization study was be the second phase in what is expected to be a continuing effort that will span several years. The FY06 Defense Appropriation contained funding for the 'Development of Advanced, Sophisticated, Discrimination Technologies for UXO Cleanup' in the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). ESTCP responded by conducting a UXO Discrimination Study at the former Camp Sibert, AL. The results of this first demonstration were very encouraging. Although conditions were favorable at this site, a single target of interest (4.2-in mortar) and benign topography and geology, all of the classification approaches demonstrated were able to correctly identify a sizable fraction of the anomalies as arising from non-hazardous items that could be safely left in the ground. To build upon the success of the first phase of this study, ESTCP sponsored a

  19. Vascular dopamine receptors: Demonstration and characterization by in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Brodde, O E

    1982-07-26

    Substantial evidence has accumulated that in certain vascular beds dopamine produces its relaxant effect through stimulation of specific dopamine receptors. The goal of this review is to describe several in vitro models (perfused mesenteric vessels of the dog; renal, mesenteric, splenic, coronary and cerebral arterial strips of rabbits, dogs and cats; perfused kidney of the rat) recently developed to demonstrate such specific relaxations induced by dopamine and dopaminomimetics. On these models studies on structure-activity relationship for activation of the dopamine receptor resulted in the following order of potency for agonists: SK&F 38393 (partial agonist) greater than epinine greater than A-6, 7-DTN greater than or equal to dopamine greater than N, N-di-n-propyl-dopamine (partial agonist) greater than apomorphine (partial agonist). The dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, cis-alpha-flupenthixol, metoclopramide, droperidol and bulbocapnine were found to competitively antagonize dopamine induced relaxation. In addition, in two isolated organ systems (rabbit mesenteric artery, rat perfused kidney) stereospecificity of the vascular dopamine receptor was demonstrated with the isomers of butaclamol. With the development of several in vitro models demonstrating a specific antagonism against dopamine induced relaxation an important requirement for definition of a specific dopamine receptor if fulfilled according to classical pharmacological criteria. Thus, there can be do doubt on the existence of post-synaptic dopamine receptors mediating vasodilation in certain vascular tissues.

  20. Studies demonstrate modified T cells effective in treating blood-borne cancers

    Cancer.gov

    At the 2013 American Society of Hematology meeting in Dec. 2013, James Kochenderfer, M.D., NCI, presented findings from two clinical trials evaluating the use of genetically modified immune system T cells as cancer therapy. These reports represent import

  1. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  2. 2013 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  4. NCI scientists at forefront of new prostate cancer diagnostics

    Cancer.gov

    Introduction of the UroNav was the result of nearly a decade’s research and development, principally conducted at NCI. Resembling a stylized computer workstation on wheels, the system electronically fuses together pictures from magnetic resonance imaging

  5. Micatu Tissue Arrayer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI researcher recognized a critical need to create a low-cost, easy-to-use tissue microarrayer (TMA), an instrument used by researchers and pathologists to accurately examine tissue samples from patients.

  6. 2012 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2012 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  7. 2011 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2011 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  8. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Alliance in the News

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is conducting cutting-edge research using nanotechnology to transform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Read news stories and announcements below about the Alliance's multidisciplinary work.

  9. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  10. 2010 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2010 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  11. 2008 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2008 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  12. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  13. 2009 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    A 2009 archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  14. Published Research - NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer has published much exciting and impactful research over the years. Find here a list of all of these listed in PubMed and others across the field of Cancer Nanotechnology.

  15. 2014 FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP News Flashes

    Cancer.gov

    An archive of listserv announcements sent by the Epidemiology and Genetics Research Program to FRIENDS-OF-NCI-EGRP LISTSERV subscribers to communicate information about funding opportunities, grantsmanship issues, research resources, and other relevant news.

  16. NCI at ASCO: A brief overview on women's cancers

    Cancer.gov

    The 2014 annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago in June highlighted results from a number of NCI-supported and -sponsored clinical trial results in women’s cancers. Taken together, these results represent important advances

  17. GPU accelerated implementation of NCI calculations using promolecular density.

    PubMed

    Rubez, Gaëtan; Etancelin, Jean-Matthieu; Vigouroux, Xavier; Krajecki, Michael; Boisson, Jean-Charles; Hénon, Eric

    2017-05-30

    The NCI approach is a modern tool to reveal chemical noncovalent interactions. It is particularly attractive to describe ligand-protein binding. A custom implementation for NCI using promolecular density is presented. It is designed to leverage the computational power of NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators through the CUDA programming model. The code performances of three versions are examined on a test set of 144 systems. NCI calculations are particularly well suited to the GPU architecture, which reduces drastically the computational time. On a single compute node, the dual-GPU version leads to a 39-fold improvement for the biggest instance compared to the optimal OpenMP parallel run (C code, icc compiler) with 16 CPU cores. Energy consumption measurements carried out on both CPU and GPU NCI tests show that the GPU approach provides substantial energy savings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  19. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  20. Inactivated Tianjin strain, a novel genotype of Sendai virus, induces apoptosis in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep3B cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Han, Han; Wang, Bin; Shi, Liying

    2016-07-01

    The Sendai virus strain Tianjin is a novel genotype of the Sendai virus. In previous studies, ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus strain Tianjin (UV-Tianjin) demonstrated antitumor effects on human breast cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antitumor effects of UV-Tianjin on the human cervical carcinoma HeLa, human small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cell lines, and the possible underlying mechanisms of these antitumor effects. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment inhibited the proliferation of HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hoechst and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining indicated that UV-Tianjin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in all three cell lines with the most significant effect observed in the HeLa cell line. In the HeLa cell line, UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis was further confirmed by the disruption of the mitochondria membrane potential and the activation of caspases, as demonstrated by fluorescent cationic dye and colorimetric assays, respectively. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment resulted in significant upregulation of cytochrome c, apoptosis protease activating factor-1, Fas, Fas ligand and Fas-associated protein with death domain, and activated caspase-9, -8 and -3 in HeLa cells. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that UV-Tianjin exhibits anticancer activity in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cell lines via the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that in the HeLa cell line, intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways may be involved in UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis.

  1. Whirl Flutter Studies for a SSTOL Transport Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Hoffman, Krishna

    2004-01-01

    A proposed new class of aircraft - the Advanced Theater Transport (ATT) will combine strategic range and high payload with 'Super-STOL' (short take-off and landing) capability. It is also proposed to modify a YC-15 into a technology demonstrator with a 20-deg tilt wing; four, eight-bladed propellers; cross-shafted gearboxes and V-22 engines. These constitute a unique combination of design features that potentially affect performance, loads and whirl-mode stability (whirl flutter). NASA Ames Research Center is working with Boeing and Hamilton Sundstrand on technology challenges presented by the concept; the purpose of NASA involvement is to establish requirements for the demonstrator and for early design guidance, with emphasis on whirl flutter. CAMRAD II is being used to study the effects of various design features on whirl flutter, with special attention to areas where such features differ from existing aircraft, notably tiltrotors. Although the stability margins appear to be more than adequate, the concept requires significantly different analytical methods, principally including far more blade modes, than typically used for tiltrotors.

  2. Whirl Flutter Studies for a SSTOL Transport Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.; Hoffman, Krishna

    2004-01-01

    A proposed new class of aircraft - the Advanced Theater Transport (ATT) will combine strategic range and high payload with 'Super-STOL' (short take-off and landing) capability. It is also proposed to modify a YC-15 into a technology demonstrator with a 20-deg tilt wing; four, eight-bladed propellers; cross-shafted gearboxes and V-22 engines. These constitute a unique combination of design features that potentially affect performance, loads and whirl-mode stability (whirl flutter). NASA Ames Research Center is working with Boeing and Hamilton Sundstrand on technology challenges presented by the concept; the purpose of NASA involvement is to establish requirements for the demonstrator and for early design guidance, with emphasis on whirl flutter. CAMRAD II is being used to study the effects of various design features on whirl flutter, with special attention to areas where such features differ from existing aircraft, notably tiltrotors. Although the stability margins appear to be more than adequate, the concept requires significantly different analytical methods, principally including far more blade modes, than typically used for tiltrotors.

  3. A Chinaman's Chance in Civil Rights Demonstration: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Yawsoon

    A traffic incident in April of 1975 developed into an unprecedented civil rights demonstration by Chinese residents in New York City's Chinatown in May of that year. This paper attempts to trace the factors which led to this large scale demonstration and analyze the development of decision making in this case. The demonstration was the result of…

  4. The Use of Demonstrative Pronoun and Demonstrative Determiner "This" in Upper-Level Student Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rustipa, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Demonstrative "this" is worthy to investigate because of the role of "this" as a common cohesive device in academic writing. This study attempted to find out the variables underlying the realization of demonstrative "this" in graduate-student writing of Semarang State University, Indonesia. The data of the study were…

  5. A Semantic Study of German and Chinese Demonstratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores, analyzes, and compares the usage of German and Chinese demonstratives. Discourse and textual uses of the forms will be considered as well as their locative and temporal uses. I observe that in both languages the demonstratives can be used to refer to referents. However, they depart from the common assumption that…

  6. Orbital construction demonstration study. Volume 3: Requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive set of requirements that defines the objective, scope and configuration of the orbital test facility needed to demonstrate the necessary automated fabrication, construction and assembly technology is provided. In addition to the requirements for the orbital demonstration facility, a detailed list of experiment requirements is included for various areas of technology.

  7. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care.

  8. Deoxypodophyllotoxin triggers necroptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meijuan; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Duan, Huaqin; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Mi; Wang, Yun; Gao, Qin; Song, Yuming; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Luyong

    2013-10-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a naturally occurring microtubule destabilizer, inhibits tubulin polymerization and causes cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in tumor cells. However, the anti-tumor effect and specific mechanism of DPT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are still poorly understood. In this study, we determined the anti-tumor effect and potential mechanism of DPT in the NSCLC cell line, NCI-H460 (H460). First, we demonstrated that DPT significantly inhibits the proliferation of H460 cells in vitro and the growth of H460 xenografts in vivo. In further studies, DPT triggered necroptosis in H460 cells with the following characteristics: (I) necrotic cell death morphology; (II) autophagy; (III) loss of plasma membrane integrity; (IV) loss of mitochondria membrane potential; (V) elevation of reactive oxygen species levels; and (VI) specific inhibition of necroptosis via a small molecule, necrostatin-1. This study also revealed that DPT has a similar effect towards the drug-sensitive cancer cell line, H460, and the drug-resistant cell line, H460/Bcl-xL. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document the induction of necroptosis by a microtubule-targeting agent to circumvent cancer drug resistance, thereby providing a new potential choice for clinical cancer therapy, especially drug-resistant cancer therapy.

  9. Adoption study demonstrating two genetic pathways to drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Cadoret, R J; Yates, W R; Troughton, E; Woodworth, G; Stewart, M A

    1995-01-01

    Studies of adoptees have demonstrated that there are two genetic factors leading to alcohol abuse and/or dependence (abuse/dependence). In addition, environmental factors found in the adoptive family also predict alcohol abuse/dependency independently. One study has found evidence that a similar model of two genetic factors and independent adoptive family factors were involved in drug abuse. Our study was designed to test the hypothesis that genetic factors defined by alcohol abuse/dependency and anti-social personality disorder in biologic parents were etiologic in drug abuse/dependency and that psychiatric problems in adoptive parents were an additional factor associated with drug abuse/dependence. A sample of 95 male adoptees, separated at birth from their biologic parents, were followed up as adults to determine their psychiatric diagnosis and their substance use/abuse in a structured interview administered blind to biologic parent diagnoses. A high-risk, case-control design was used wherein half of the adoptees came from biologic parents known to be alcohol abuser/dependent and/or have antisocial personalities (diagnoses from hospital or prison records). These adoptees were matched for age, sex, and adoption agency to a control group of adoptees whose biologic parents were not found in the hospital and prison record search. Adoptive home environment was assessed by structured interviews, including psychiatric assessment of both adoptive parents. Data were analyzed by log-linear modeling, which showed evidence of two genetic pathways to drug abuse/dependency. One pathway went directly from a biologic parent's alcoholism to drug abuse/dependency. The second pathway was more circuitous, and started with anti-social personality disorder in the biologic parent and proceeded through intervening variables of adoptee aggressivity, conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and, eventually, ended in drug abuse/dependency. Environmental factors defined by

  10. Human habitation field study of the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaker, Harry L.; Archer, Ronald D.; Szabo, Richard; Twyford, Evan S.; Conlee, Carl S.; Howard, Robert L.

    2013-10-01

    Landing and supporting a permanent outpost on a planetary surface represents humankind's capability to expand its own horizons and challenge current technology. With this in mind, habitability of these structures becomes more essential given the longer durations of the missions. The purpose of this evaluation was to obtain preliminary human-in-the-loop performance data on the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) configuration during a 14-day simulated lunar exploration field trial and to apply this knowledge to further enhance the habitat's capabilities for forward designs. Human factors engineers at the NASA/Johnson Space Center's Habitability and Human Factors Branch recorded approximately 96 h of crew task performance with four work stations. Human factors measures used during this study included the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) and customized post questionnaires. Overall the volume for the PEM was considered acceptable by the crew; however; the habitat's individual work station volume was constrained when setting up the vehicle for operation, medical operations, and suit maintenance while general maintenance, logistical resupply, and geo science was considered acceptable. Crew workload for each station indicated resupply as being the lowest rated, with medical operations, general maintenance, and geo science tasks as being light, while suit maintenance was considered moderate and general vehicle setup being rated the highest. Stowage was an issue around the habitat with the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV) resupply stowage located in the center of the habitat as interfering with some work station volumes and activities. Ergonomics of the geo science station was considered a major issue, especially with the overhead touch screens.

  11. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors.

  12. Rubus coreanus Miquel extract causes apoptosis of doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Cancer cells can acquire an anticancer, drug-resistant phenotype following chemotherapy, which is tightly linked to cancer malignancy and patient survival rates. Therefore, the identification of options to treat chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells is an urgent requirement. Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) has long been used as a source of food. In addition, it has been reported that RCM has effective functions against particular diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In the present study, it was demonstrated that RCM extract caused the apoptotic cell death of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR‑RES ovarian cancer cells by phosphorylating c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK). The RCM‑mediated reduction of cell viability showed no synergism with doxorubicin. In addition, ellagic acid and quercetin, which are phytochemicals found in RCM, also caused apoptosis of the NCI/ADR‑RES cells. In subsequent investigations of the RCM‑altered signaling pathway, RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin were found to commonly induce the phosphorylation of JNK and AKT. Additionally, the inhibition of JNK with SP600125 repressed the apoptotic cell death induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, and the inhibition of JNK appeared to switch apoptosis to necrosis. JNK inhibition also reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, which was induced by RCM extract, ellagic acid and quercetin, suggesting that the phosphorylation of JNK is required for AKT phosphorylation in RCM‑, ellagic acid‑ or quercetin‑induced apoptotic cell death. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study led to the conclusion that RCM caused apoptosis of doxorubicin‑resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells via JNK phosphorylation, and suggested that RCM may be effective in the treatment of chemotherapy‑resistant cancer cells.

  13. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken.

  14. Use of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: A Ten Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Johnston, Helen; Varvell, Kevin; Robertson, Gordon; Hopkins, Andrew; Stewart, Chris; Cooper, Ian; Thornton, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) is designed for large lecture classes and,…

  15. Auditing the NCI Thesaurus with Semantic Web Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed. PMID:18999265

  16. Decontamination demonstration facility (D. D. F) modularization/mobility study

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility (D.D.F.).

  17. Orbital construction demonstration study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA), that can be used for technology growth and verification, and as the construction facility for a variety of large structures is presented. The OCDA design includes a large work platform, a rotating manipulator boom, a 250 kw solar array, and a core module of subsystems with a total mass of 37,093 kg, that can be assembled in three shuttle flights. An analysis of OCDA continued utility potential indicates that a shuttle tended platform with 250 kW of power can effectively be used to construct highly beneficial antenna systems and large demonstration articles that advance solar power satellite technologies. The construction of 100 m parabolic reflectors for use as a radiometer for measuring soil moisture and water salinity was found to be within the capabilities of OCDA concept. With 252 fixed beams for high population centers, and 16 scanning beams for rural areas, the antenna has the potential to significantly improve U.S. space based communications systems. The OCDA, that is slightly increased in size, was found adequate to build a large 2 MW solar array which, when coupled to a transmit antenna, demonstrate power transfer from space to ground.

  18. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  19. Keeping NCI at Frederick Pest-Free—Doug Vaughn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Nuisance critters and creepy crawlers aren’t a problem at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick, and that’s largely thanks to the efforts of Douglas Vaughn, the institution’s pest controller. Endearingly known to some staff as “Doug the Bug Guy,” Vaughn has been doing pest control for 39 years, 22 of which have been at NCI at Frederick. However, he doesn’t just handle bugs, and he isn’t the average exterminator.

  20. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  1. NCI at Frederick Receives a Royal Visit | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and NCI at Frederick recently had the honor of hosting Professor Dr. Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol of Thailand. Her Royal Highness has a special interest in scientific research related to the use of natural products for treating disease. The purpose of her visit was to discuss the work on natural products being undertaken at NCI at Frederick. Her Royal Highness attended talks by researchers from both the Molecular Targets Laboratory (MTL), CCR, and the Natural Products Branch (NPB), Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP), Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD).

  2. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  3. Curcumin induces apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells through ER stress and caspase cascade- and mitochondria-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Hwar; Hang, Liang-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Hung-Yi; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Jiun-Long; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Ko, Yang-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-06-01

    It has been reported that curcumin inhibited various types of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, mechanisms of curcumin-inhibited cell growth and -induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H460) still remain unclear. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with curcumin to determine its anticancer activity. Different concentrations of curcumin were used for different durations in NCI-H460 cells and the subsequent changes in the cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, mRNA and protein expressions were determined. Curcumin induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. After curcumin treatment, BAX and BAD were up-regulated, BCL-2, BCL-X(L) and XIAP were down-regulated. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular Ca(2+) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were increased in NCI-H460 cells after exposure to curcumin. These signals led to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) and culminated in caspase-3 activation. Curcumin-induced apoptosis was also stimulated through the FAS/caspase-8 (extrinsic) pathway and ER stress proteins, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) were activated in the NCI-H460 cells. Apoptotic cell death induced by curcumin was significantly reversed by pretreatment with ROS scavenger or caspase-8 inhibitor. Furthermore, the NCI-H460 cells tended to be arrested at the G(2)/M cell cycle stage after curcumin treatment and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) may be involved. In summary, curcumin exerts its anticancer effects on lung cancer NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest.

  4. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Nanotechnology Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports SUMMARY..., Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports, 0925-NEW...

  5. Inlet Trade Study for a Low-Boom Aircraft Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Slater, John W.; Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion integration for low-boom supersonic aircraft requires careful inlet selection, placement, and tailoring to achieve acceptable propulsive and aerodynamic performance, without compromising vehicle sonic boom loudness levels. In this investigation, an inward-turning streamline-traced and axisymmetric spike inlet are designed and independently installed on a conceptual low-boom supersonic demonstrator aircraft. The airframe was pre-shaped to achieve a target ground under-track loudness of 76.4 PLdB at cruise using an adjoint-based design optimization process. Aircraft and inlet performance characteristics were obtained by solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Isolated cruise inlet performance including total pressure recovery and distortion were computed and compared against installed inlet performance metrics. Evaluation of vehicle near-field pressure signatures, along with under- and off-track propagated loudness levels is also reported. Results indicate the integrated axisymmetric spike design offers higher inlet pressure recovery, lower fan distortion, and reduced sonic boom. The vehicle with streamline-traced inlet exhibits lower external wave drag, which translates to a higher lift-to-drag ratio and increased range capability.

  6. Partial Irrigation Feasibility Study and Demonstration Project, Phase IV Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Northwest Economic Association.

    1987-09-01

    This report deals with a three year study of the practice of partial irrigation. (Partial irrigation is defined as the deliberate underirrigation of a crop while maintaining or improving farm income.) Objective was to observe and document the use of this strategy on farms in the Columbia Basin. Wheat and corn were studied as candidates for partial irrigation. Potatoes were included only to better understand how irrigation practices in the Columbia Basin are influenced by this crop. The report begins with a review of the underlying theory of partial irrigation. The second section of the report details the procedures followed during the study. The third section, covering the results of the study, is presented in four parts. The first is a summary of the relevant data. The second consists of observations on the practice of partial irrigation. The results observed for wheat over the three years of the study are interpreted in terms of the theory outlined in the first section. The third part of the results section deals with case studies of the economic merits of the partial irrigation practices that were observed. 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. 2013 NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Annual Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  8. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Cancer.gov

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  9. Russian delegation visits NIH and NCI to discuss research collaboration

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Center for Global Health hosted a delegation from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research to discuss ongoing and future collaborations in cancer research. The delegation was accompanied by representatives from the US Embassy in Moscow and the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington DC.

  10. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  11. Help NCI at Frederick “Knock Out Hunger” | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI at Frederick is once again participating in the Feds Feed Families initiative, an annual food drive that addresses severe shortages of non-perishable items in food banks across D.C., Maryland, and Virginia during the summer months, when giving is at its lowest.

  12. 2013 NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Annual Bulletin

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  13. Apply for Cancer Control Grants | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences funds a large portfolio of grants and contracts. The portfolio currently includes approximately 800 grants valued at nearly $450 million. Here we provide a listing of funding opportunities that are currently accepting applications. Please visit this page regularly as new funding opportunities are added upon approval by NCI.

  14. Information for Our Partners | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY). | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  15. Novel Method Of Preparing Vaccines | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    This invention from the NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program describes methods to prepare vaccines for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods of preparing vaccines.

  16. Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge. The TTC recommends that you discuss the most favorable type of partnership with our Invention Development and Marketing Unit. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  17. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  18. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  19. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Training Funding

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer awards training grants to facilitate the training and education of the next generation of nanotechnology researchers. The grants also provide an opportunity for experienced researchers and established institutions to work together in sharing their knowledge to positively influence the future of nanotechnology.

  20. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making a unique, non-obvious, and useful discovery, NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  1. Environmental process improvement feasibility study and demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodger L.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the final product of an environmental study conducted by Western Commercial Space Center, Inc. under contract to Tennessee-Calspan Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research. The purpose of this investigation is to accurately document the current environmental and permitting processes associated with commercial space launch activity at Vandenberg AFB, and make recommendations to streamline those processes. The particular areas of interest focus on: identifying applicable Federal, state, and local laws, Department of Defense directives, and Air force regulations; defining the environmental process on Vandenberg AFB and how it relates with other agencies, including Federal and state regulatory agencies; and defining the air quality permit process. Study investigation results are applied to an example Pilot Space Launch Vehicle (PSLV) planning to launch from Vandenberg AFB. The PSLV space hardware is analyzed with respect to environmental and permitting issues associated with vehicle processing, facilities required (existing or new), and launch. The PSLV verified the earlier findings of the study and gave insight into streamlining recommendations.

  2. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  3. Transcriptomic landscape of Pueraria lobata demonstrates potential for phytochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rongchun; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Michimi; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi has a long and broad application in the treatment of disease. However, in the US and EU, it is treated as a notorious weed. The information to be gained from decoding the deep transcriptome profile would facilitate further research on P. lobata. In this study, more than 93 million fastq format reads were generated by Illumina’s next-generation sequencing approach using five types of P. lobata tissue, followed by CLC de novo assembly methods, ultimately yielding about 83,041 contigs in total. Then BLASTx similarity searches against the NCBI NR database and UniProtKB database were conducted. Once the duplicates among BLASTx hits were eliminated, ID mapping against the UniProt database was conducted online to retrieve Gene Ontology information. In search of the putative genes relevant to essential biosynthesis pathways, all 1,348 unique enzyme commission numbers were used to map pathways against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Enzymes related to the isoflavonoid and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways were focused for detailed investigation and subsequently, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted for biological validation. Metabolites of interest, puerarin and daidzin were studied by HPLC. The findings in this report may serve as a footstone for further research into this promising medicinal plant. PMID:26157443

  4. Transcriptomic landscape of Pueraria lobata demonstrates potential for phytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Han, Rongchun; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Michimi; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi has a long and broad application in the treatment of disease. However, in the US and EU, it is treated as a notorious weed. The information to be gained from decoding the deep transcriptome profile would facilitate further research on P. lobata. In this study, more than 93 million fastq format reads were generated by Illumina's next-generation sequencing approach using five types of P. lobata tissue, followed by CLC de novo assembly methods, ultimately yielding about 83,041 contigs in total. Then BLASTx similarity searches against the NCBI NR database and UniProtKB database were conducted. Once the duplicates among BLASTx hits were eliminated, ID mapping against the UniProt database was conducted online to retrieve Gene Ontology information. In search of the putative genes relevant to essential biosynthesis pathways, all 1,348 unique enzyme commission numbers were used to map pathways against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Enzymes related to the isoflavonoid and flavonoid biosynthesis pathways were focused for detailed investigation and subsequently, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was conducted for biological validation. Metabolites of interest, puerarin and daidzin were studied by HPLC. The findings in this report may serve as a footstone for further research into this promising medicinal plant.

  5. Webcams for Bird Detection and Monitoring: A Demonstration Study

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Willem W.; Vermeulen, Bart; Stuckens, Jan; Lhermitte, Stefaan; Van der Zande, Dimitry; Van Ranst, Marc; Coppin, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Better insights into bird migration can be a tool for assessing the spread of avian borne infections or ecological/climatologic issues reflected in deviating migration patterns. This paper evaluates whether low budget permanent cameras such as webcams can offer a valuable contribution to the reporting of migratory birds. An experimental design was set up to study the detection capability using objects of different size, color and velocity. The results of the experiment revealed the minimum size, maximum velocity and contrast of the objects required for detection by a standard webcam. Furthermore, a modular processing scheme was proposed to track and follow migratory birds in webcam recordings. Techniques such as motion detection by background subtraction, stereo vision and lens distortion were combined to form the foundation of the bird tracking algorithm. Additional research to integrate webcam networks, however, is needed and future research should enforce the potential of the processing scheme by exploring and testing alternatives of each individual module or processing step. PMID:22319308

  6. Coronagraphic phase diversity: performance study and laboratory demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Mugnier, L. M.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization (such as SPHERE on the European Very Large Telescope, GPI on Gemini North, or future instruments on Extremely Large Telescopes) is limited by uncorrected quasi-static aberrations. These aberrations create long-lived speckles in the scientific image plane, which can easily be mistaken for planets. Aims: Common adaptive optics systems require dedicated components to perform wave-front analysis. The ultimate wave-front measurement performance is thus limited by the unavoidable differential aberrations between the wave-front sensor and the scientific camera. To reach the level of detectivity required by high-contrast imaging, these differential aberrations must be estimated and compensated for. In this paper, we characterize and experimentally validate a wave-front sensing method that relies on focal-plane data. Methods: Our method, called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), is based on a Bayesian approach, and it consists in an extension of phase diversity to high-contrast imaging. It estimates the differential aberrations using only two focal-plane coronagraphic images recorded from the scientific camera itself. Results: We first present a thorough characterization of COFFEE's performance by means of numerical simulations. This characterization is then compared with an experimental validation of COFFEE using an in-house adaptive optics bench and an apodized Roddier & Roddier phase mask coronagraph. An excellent match between experimental results and the theoretical study is found. Lastly, we present a preliminary validation of COFFEE's ability to compensate for the aberrations upstream of a coronagraph.

  7. Dysregulation of FURIN by prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 in lung epithelial NCI-H292 cells.

    PubMed

    Brant, Kelly A; Leikauf, George D

    2014-03-01

    Because proprotein convertases (PCSKs) activate growth factors and matrix metalloproteinase, these enzymes have been implicated in non-small cell lung cancer tumor progression and aggressiveness. Previous studies indicate that one PCSK member, FURIN is overexpressed in NSCLC, but little is known regarding the mechanisms driving PCSKs expression during malignant change. We sought to determine whether prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (prostaglandin G/H synthase and cyclooxygenase) (PTGS2) (aka COX2), whose expression is also frequently increased in NSCLC, differentially regulates PCSK expression and activity between normal (NHBE) and NSCLC epithelial cells (NCI-H292, NCI-H441, A549). NSCLC cells exhibit significantly greater cell-associated and secreted PCSK activity as compared with NHBE. The heightened activity is consistent with increased FURIN, PCSK4, and PCSK6 protein in the NCSLC cells. Inhibition of PTGS2 activity using NS-398 and siRNA decreased FURIN mRNA, protein, activity along with cell proliferation in NCI-H292 cells but not NHBE cells. NSCLC also expressed elevated levels of the transcription factor E2F1. When NCI-H292 cells were transfected with E2F1 siRNA, both PTGS2 expression and PCSK activity were attenuated, arguing a pivotal role for E2F1 in the differential regulation of PCSKs by PTGS2. Our results highlight a novel role for PTGS2 in NSCLC and may provide a mechanism, whereby PTGS2 inhibitors suppress lung cancer cell growth.

  8. New NCI-N87-derived human gastric epithelial line after human telomerase catalytic subunit over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva-Pava, Kathy; Navabi, Nazanin; Skoog, Emma C; Lindén, Sara K; Oleastro, Mónica; Roxo-Rosa, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish a cellular model correctly mimicking the gastric epithelium to overcome the limitation in the study of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: Aiming to overcome this limitation, clones of the heterogenic cancer-derived NCI-N87 cell line were isolated, by stably-transducing it with the human telomerase reverse-transcriptase (hTERT) catalytic subunit gene. The clones were first characterized regarding their cell growth pattern and phenotype. For that we measured the clones’ adherence properties, expression of cell-cell junctions’ markers (ZO-1 and E-cadherin) and ability to generate a sustained transepithelial electrical resistance. The gastric properties of the clones, concerning expression of mucins, zymogens and glycan contents, were then evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining, Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and PAS/Alcian Blue-staining, immunocytochemistry and Western blot. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of the hTERT-expressing gastric cell line for H. pylori research, by performing co-culture assays and measuring the IL-8 secretion, by ELISA, upon infection with two H. pylori strains differing in virulence. RESULTS: Compared with the parental cell line, the most promising NCI-hTERT-derived clones (CL5 and CL6) were composed of cells with homogenous phenotype, presented higher relative telomerase activities, better adhesion properties, ability to be maintained in culture for longer periods after confluency, and were more efficient in PAS-reactive mucins secretion. Both clones were shown to produce high amounts of MUC1, MUC2 and MUC13. NCI-hTERT-CL5 mucins were shown to be decorated with blood group H type 2 (BG-H), Lewis-x (Lex), Ley and Lea and, in a less extent, with BG-A antigens, but the former two antigens were not detected in the NCI-hTERT-CL6. None of the clones exhibited detectable levels of MUC6 nor sialylated Lex and Lea glycans. Entailing good gastric properties, both NCI-hTERT-clones were found to produce

  9. Oncofertility resources at NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Clayman, Marla L; Harper, Maya M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Reinecke, Joyce; Shah, Shivani

    2013-12-01

    NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers (CCCs) set the standard for providing exemplary patient care. Quality cancer care includes discussions about fertility and referrals to fertility specialists for patients at risk for sterility. This study sought to determine what fertility preservation (FP) resources are available in CCCs and how well those are integrated into patient care. Leaders at each CCC received a letter requesting a short telephone interview with individuals who could provide information about the institution's FP resources. A semi-structured interview guide was used and responses were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. Interviews were conducted with 30 of the 39 CCCs that see adult patients (77%). The remaining institutions included 4 nonresponders, 3 that referred the interviewers to childhood cancer survivorship clinics, 1 that refused, and 1 that could not identify any FP resources. Participants were primarily affiliated with reproductive endocrinology (n=15) or hematology/oncology divisions (n=10). Institutional policies regarding consistent provision of FP information were rare (n=4), although most sites (n=20) either had some services on-site or had referral programs (n=8). However, only 13 had some experimental services, such as ovarian tissue cryopreservation. Respondents reported barriers to provision of FP, including oncologists' identification of patients at risk, low referral rates, and perceptions of patient prognosis. Only 8 (27%) sites had staff with time dedicated to FP. CCCs vary widely in implementing FP-recommended practice to their patients. CCCs are positioned to provide exemplary oncofertility care, but most need to better integrate FP information and referral into practice.

  10. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  11. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  12. NCI at Frederick Scientific Library Reintroduces Scientific Publications Database | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A 20-year-old database of scientific publications by NCI at Frederick, FNLCR, and affiliated employees has gotten a significant facelift. Maintained by the Scientific Library, the redesigned database—which is linked from each of the Scientific Library’s web pages—offers features that were not available in previous versions, such as additional search limits and non-traditional metrics for scholarly and scientific publishing known as altmetrics.

  13. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  14. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    Cancer.gov

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  15. Susan Koogle Marks 40+ Years at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer In 1973, Susan Koogle commuted from Washington County to a small data processing company in Arlington, Va. When gas prices spiked from 25 to 54 cents a gallon, she began to look for a job closer to home. That’s when she came to work at NCI at Frederick, and in December 2013, she marked her 40th year with the facility.

  16. Like a Good Neighbor, NCI-Frederick Is There | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The main campus of the National Cancer Institute at Frederick is an island of sorts: 68 acres of land that was once part of Fort Detrick. Accessing NCI property means passing through the Fort Detrick gates and crossing the post. While the campus is surrounded by the military installation, is protected by NIH police, and doesn’t allow the use of tobacco products, it is not a part of the military.

  17. NCI investment in nanotechnology: achievements and challenges for the future.

    PubMed

    Dickherber, Anthony; Morris, Stephanie A; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers an exceptional and unique opportunity for developing a new generation of tools addressing persistent challenges to progress in cancer research and clinical care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recognizes this potential, which is why it invests roughly $150 M per year in nanobiotechnology training, research and development. By exploiting the various capacities of nanomaterials, the range of nanoscale vectors and probes potentially available suggests much is possible for precisely investigating, manipulating, and targeting the mechanisms of cancer across the full spectrum of research and clinical care. NCI has played a key role among federal R&D agencies in recognizing early the value of nanobiotechnology in medicine and committing to its development as well as providing training support for new investigators in the field. These investments have allowed many in the research community to pursue breakthrough capabilities that have already yielded broad benefits. Presented here is an overview of how NCI has made these investments with some consideration of how it will continue to work with this research community to pursue paradigm-changing innovations that offer relief from the burdens of cancer.

  18. LPS Cooperates with Poly-L-Arginine to Promote IL-6 and IL-8 Release via the JNK Signaling Pathway in NCI-H292 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Bing; Wu, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Sheng-Quan; Wu, Hui-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herein, we aimed to study the mechanism whereby poly-L-arginine (PLA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can synergistically induce the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 in NCI-H292 cells. Methods. NCI-H292 cells were divided into control, PLA, LPS, and PLA+LPS groups. At various time points, the phosphorylation of JNK in each group was measured by western blotting. Additionally, the productions of IL-6 and IL-8 were assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The effects of SP600125, an inhibitor of the JNK pathway, on the increase of p-JNK, IL-6, and IL-8 were also studied. Results. Our results showed that either PLA or LPS treatment alone can significantly increase the phosphorylation level of JNK in NCI-H292 cells. Of interest was the combined use of PLA and LPS that has a synergistic effect on the phosphorylation of JNK, as well as synergistically inducing the release of IL-6 and IL-8 in NCI-H292 cells. Furthermore, SP600125 significantly inhibited the activation of JNK signal, as well as reducing the productions of IL-6 and IL-8 in response to PLA+LPS stimulation. Conclusions. The JNK signaling pathway contributes to the release of IL-6 and IL-8, which is stimulated by the synergistic actions of PLA+LPS in NCI-H292 cells. PMID:28116315

  19. Collaboration Opportunities with the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) at NCI | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute has developed the Cancer Human Biobank (caHUB), which is a unique infrastructure for collecting biospecimens for the purpose of conducting biospecimen research. Biospecimens from the BPV program will be made available to collaborators with the capability to perform molecular analysis as part of a collaborative research agreement with the NCI-BBRB.

  20. The NCI-60 Methylome and Its Integration into CellMiner.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Sunshine, Margot; Rajapakse, Vinodh; Luna, Augustin; Kohn, Kurt W; Stevenson, Holly; Wang, Yonghong; Heyn, Holger; Nogales, Vanesa; Moran, Sebastian; Goldstein, David J; Doroshow, James H; Meltzer, Paul S; Esteller, Manel; Pommier, Yves

    2017-02-01

    A unique resource for systems pharmacology and genomic studies is the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel, which provides data for the largest publicly available library of compounds with cytotoxic activity (∼21,000 compounds), including 108 FDA-approved and 70 clinical trial drugs as well as genomic data, including whole-exome sequencing, gene and miRNA transcripts, DNA copy number, and protein levels. Here, we provide the first readily usable genome-wide DNA methylation database for the NCI-60, including 485,577 probes from the Infinium HumanMethylation450k BeadChip array, which yielded DNA methylation signatures for 17,559 genes integrated into our open access CellMiner version 2.0 (https://discover.nci.nih.gov/cellminer). Among new insights, transcript versus DNA methylation correlations revealed the epithelial/mesenchymal gene functional category as being influenced most heavily by methylation. DNA methylation and copy number integration with transcript levels yielded an assessment of their relative influence for 15,798 genes, including tumor suppressor, mitochondrial, and mismatch repair genes. Four forms of molecular data were combined, providing rationale for microsatellite instability for 8 of the 9 cell lines in which it occurred. Individual cell line analyses showed global methylome patterns with overall methylation levels ranging from 17% to 84%. A six-gene model, including PARP1, EP300, KDM5C, SMARCB1, and UHRF1 matched this pattern. In addition, promoter methylation of two translationally relevant genes, Schlafen 11 (SLFN11) and methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), served as indicators of therapeutic resistance or susceptibility, respectively. Overall, our database provides a resource of pharmacologic data that can reinforce known therapeutic strategies and identify novel drugs and drug targets across multiple cancer types. Cancer Res; 77(3); 601-12. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  2. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  3. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  4. Ongoing Use of Data and Specimens from NCI Sponsored Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials in the Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Minasian, Lori; Tangen, Catherine M.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Large cancer prevention trials provide opportunities to collect a wide array of data and biospecimens at study entry and longitudinally, for a healthy, aging population without cancer. This provides an opportunity to use pre-diagnostic data and specimens to evaluate hypotheses about the initial development of cancer. This paper reports on strides made by, and future possibilities for, the use of accessible biorepositories developed from precisely annotated samples obtained through large-scale National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer prevention clinical trials conducted by the NCI Cooperative Groups. These large cancer prevention studies, which have enrolled over 80,000 volunteers, continue to contribute to our understanding of cancer development more than 10 years after they were closed. PMID:26433556

  5. Metformin synergistically enhances antiproliferative effects of cisplatin and etoposide in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Guimarães, Isabella dos Santos; Madeira, Klesia Pirola; Daltoé, Renata Dalmaschio; Silva, Ian Victor; Rangel, Leticia Batista Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of combining conventional antineoplastic drugs (cisplatin and etoposide) with metformin in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the NCI-H460 cell line, in order to develop new therapeutic options with high efficacy and low toxicity. METHODS: We used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and calculated the combination index for the drugs studied. RESULTS: We found that the use of metformin as monotherapy reduced the metabolic viability of the cell line studied. Combining metformin with cisplatin or etoposide produced a synergistic effect and was more effective than was the use of cisplatin or etoposide as monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin, due to its independent effects on liver kinase B1, had antiproliferative effects on the NCI-H460 cell line. When metformin was combined with cisplatin or etoposide, the cell death rate was even higher. PMID:24473757

  6. Phase II study of Cilengitide (EMD 121974, NSC 707544) in patients with non-metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer, NCI-6735. A study by the DOD/PCF Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Ajjai; Slovin, Susan; Daignault, Stephanie; Carducci, Michael; DiPaola, Robert; Pienta, Ken; Agus, David; Cooney, Kathleen; Chen, Alice; Smith, David C.; Hussain, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Background Integrins mediate invasion and angiogenesis in prostate cancer bone metastases. We conducted a phase II study of Cilengitide, a selective antagonist of αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, in non-metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer with rising PSA. Methods Patients were observed for 4 weeks with PSA monitoring, and then treated with 2,000 mg IV of cilengitide twice weekly until toxicity/progression. PSA, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) were monitored each cycle with imaging performed every 3 cycles. Primary end point was PSA decline by ≥ 50%. Secondary endpoints were safety, PSA slope, time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), CTCs, CECs and gene expression. Results 16 pts were enrolled; 13 were eligible with median age 65.5 years, baseline PSA 8.4 ng/mL and median Gleason sum 7. Median of 3 cycles was administered. Treatment was well tolerated with 2 grade 3 toxicities and no grade 4 toxicities. There were no PSA responses; 11 patients progressed by PSA after 3 cycles. Median TTP was 1.8 months and median OS has not been reached. Median pre- and on-treatment PSA slopes were 1.1 and 1.8 ng/mL/month. Baseline CTCs were detected in 1/9 patients. CTC increased (0 to 1; 2 pts), remained at 0 (2 pts) or decreased (23 to 0; 1 patient) at progression. Baseline median CEC was 26 (0–61) and at progression, 47 (15–148). Low cell counts precluded gene expression studies. Conclusions Cilengitide was well tolerated but had no detectable clinical activity. CTCs are of questionable utility in non-metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:21049281

  7. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  8. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  9. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  10. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  11. Before You Collaborate, You Should Partner with NCI TTC | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Jeffrey W. Thomas, Contributing Writers As the fall and winter seasons progress, you may be attending more scientific conferences, where you may find a number of opportunities for research collaborations. To assist your lab in reaching its research goals through collaborations, the staff of the National Cancer Institute Technology Transfer Center (NCI TTC) can guide you through a tool box of agreements you may need for protecting your intellectual property (IP) and effectively managing your collaboration. 

  12. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  13. NCI at Frederick Employees Sew for Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The R&W Club Frederick hosted a sewing party on Feb. 18 to give employees a chance to help sew pillowcases for children hospitalized for illnesses and cancer treatments. The nonprofit organization ConKerr Cancer provides the pillowcases to children across the country. Melissa Porter, administrative manager, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick, and vice chair of the R&W Club Frederick, said the event went well. While the turnout was lower than expected, 27 pillowcases were completed, she said.

  14. Cantharidin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein levels in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    Cantharidin is one of the major compounds from mylabris and it has cytotoxic effects in many different types of human cancer cells. Previously, we found that cantharidin induced cell death through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells. However, cantharidin-affected DNA damage, repair, and associated protein levels in NCI-H460 cells have not been examined. In this study, we determined whether cantharidin induced DNA damage and condensation and altered levels of proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. Incubation of NCI-H460 cells with 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 μM of cantharidin caused a longer DNA migration smear (comet tail). Cantharidin also increased DNA condensation. These effects were dose-dependent. Cantharidin (5, 10, and 15 μM) treatment of NCI-H460 cells reduced protein levels of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA-1), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1). Protein translocation of p-p53, p-H2A.X (S140), and MDC1 from cytoplasm to nucleus was induced by cantharidin in NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, this study showed that cantharidin caused DNA damage and inhibited levels of DNA repair-associated proteins. These effects may contribute to cantharidin-induced cell death in vitro.

  15. NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to

  16. Enhanced Missing Proteins Detection in NCI60 Cell Lines Using an Integrative Search Engine Approach.

    PubMed

    Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Garin-Muga, Alba; Prieto, Gorka; Bejarano, Bartolomé; Marcilla, Miguel; Marín-Vicente, Consuelo; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Casal, J Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Corrales, Fernando J; Segura, Victor

    2017-10-11

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) aims deciphering the complete map of the human proteome. In the past few years, significant efforts of the HPP teams have been dedicated to the experimental detection of the missing proteins, which lack reliable mass spectrometry evidence of their existence. In this endeavor, an in depth analysis of shotgun experiments might represent a valuable resource to select a biological matrix in design validation experiments. In this work, we used all the proteomic experiments from the NCI60 cell lines and applied an integrative approach based on the results obtained from Comet, Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem. This workflow benefits from the complementarity of these search engines to increase the proteome coverage. Five missing proteins C-HPP guidelines compliant were identified, although further validation is needed. Moreover, 165 missing proteins were detected with only one unique peptide, and their functional analysis supported their participation in cellular pathways as was also proposed in other studies. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the gene expression levels and the proteomic identifications from the common cell lines between the NCI60 and the CCLE project to suggest alternatives for further validation of missing protein observations.

  17. Effects of Cx43 gene modification on the proliferation and migration of the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226.

    PubMed

    Zang, J-P; Wei, R

    2015-10-27

    In this study, the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226 was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pBudCE4.1_Cx43 to explore the role of the Cx43 gene in cell growth, cell cycle, and tumor migration. pBudCE4.1-Cx43 was transfected into human lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H226 cells using Lipofectamine TM2000. The mRNA and protein expressions of Cx43 in the transfected cells were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The cell-cell communication was detected using the scratch dye tracer method and the cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The CCK-8 proliferation, scratch healing, and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of the Cx43 gene transfection on the proliferation, migration, and invasive abilities of NCI-H226 cells. Cx43 mRNA and protein expressions and the fluorescence intensity in the scratch healing test were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control and blank groups (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively). The CCK-8 proliferation assay and the scratch healing experiment revealed significantly inhibited NCI-H226 cell proliferation (especially 72 h after incubation) and cell migration, respectively, in the experimental group, compared to the control and blank groups (P < 0.001 and <0.05, respectively). The transwell chamber test showed a statistically significant decrease in the invasive ability of NCI-H226 cells in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Therefore, Cx43 gene transfection could inhibit the migration of human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226, thereby inhibiting tumor cell proliferation.

  18. Facilitating informed decision making about breast cancer risk and genetic counseling among women calling the NCI's Cancer Information Service.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne M; Fleisher, Linda; Roussi, Pagona; Buzaglo, Joanne S; Schnoll, Robert; Slater, Elyse; Raysor, Susan; Popa-Mabe, Melania

    2005-01-01

    Despite increased interest among the public in breast cancer genetic risk and genetic testing, there are limited services to help women make informed decisions about genetic testing. This study, conducted with female callers (N = 279) to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Atlantic Region Cancer Information Service (CIS), developed and evaluated a theory-based, educational intervention designed to increase callers' understanding of the following: (a) the kinds of information required to determine inherited risk; (b) their own personal family history of cancer; and (c) the benefits and limitations of genetic testing. Callers requesting information about breast/ovarian cancer risk, risk assessment services, and genetic testing were randomized to either: (1) standard care or (2) an educational intervention. Results show that the educational intervention reduced intention to obtain genetic testing among women at average risk and increased intention among high-risk women at 6 months. In addition, high monitors, who typically attend to and seek information, demonstrated greater increases in knowledge and perceived risk over the 6-month interval than low monitors, who typically are distracted from information. These findings suggest that theoretically designed interventions can be effective in helping women understand their cancer risk and appropriate risk assessment options and can be implemented successfully within a service program like the CIS.

  19. Inhibition of proliferation, VEGF secretion of human neuroendocrine tumor cell line NCI-H727 by an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sacewicz, Małgorzata; Lawnicka, Hanna; Siejka, Agnieszka; Stepień, Tomasz; Krupiński, Roman; Komorowski, Jan; Stepień, Henryk

    2008-09-08

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) can stimulate not only growth hormone (GH) secretion by anterior pituitary gland but also proliferation of many cancer cell lines in vitro and in xenografts tumor models in vivo. Several antagonists of GH-RH have been shown to inhibit several cancer growths, but the role of GH-RH antagonists in the regulation of neuroendocrine cancers cell proliferation and tumor progression remains obscure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of JV-1-36 (synthetic GH-RH antagonist) on proliferation and VEGF secretion by human neuroendocrine lung non-small cell carcinoma (NCI-H727) using cell culture model. The in vitro effect of JV-1-36 on the proliferation of NCI-H727 cells was assessed by the measurement of BrdU incorporation by colorimetric immunoassay. The presence of VEGF and membrane GH-RH receptors on the surface of H727 cells were visualized by immunocytochemistry using specific anti-GH-RH receptor antibody directed to the carboxy-terminal region. VEGF secretion to the cell cultures supernatants was assessed by ELISA methods. Immunoreactive cell membrane GH-RH receptors and VEGF-immunopositive cytoplasmatic granules were clearly confined on the surface of nearly all cancer cells. JV-1-36 at the concentration of 10(-6)-10(-10)M significantly inhibited growth of H727 cells, compared with untreated controls. In H727 cells, the antiproliferative JV-1-36 effect was associated with a dose-dependent reduction of VEGF secretion. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the strong evidence for the antiproliferative action of GH-RH antagonist JV-1-36 for the NCI-H727 cells. In addition the suppression of VEGF secretion by H727 cells might contribute, at least in part, to the antitumor action of GH-RH antagonists.

  20. Matrine suppresses invasion and metastasis of NCI-H1299 cells by enhancing microRNA-133a expression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hehe; Zhao, Xixi; Qu, Jinkun; Zhang, Jia; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Matrine has been proved to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of human lung cancer cells. However, less studies involved in evaluating the effects and mechanism of matrine in cell migration and invasion of lung cancer. This study was aim to investigate the involvement of miR-133a in matrine’s anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in lung cancer. MTT assay was used to assess the inhibition of proliferation effects of matrine in NCI-H1299 cells. Migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H1299 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. Expression of miR-133a was detected by real-time PCR. Anti-miR technique was applied to inhibit miR-133a in matrine treated HCI-H1299 cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. As results, matrine treatment significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of NCI-H1299 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied by significantly elevation of miR-133a expression. However, matrine failed to inhibit the metastatic ability when cells transfected with anti-miR-133a. Matrine treatment also suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. The inhibitory effects of matrine on activation of EGFR pathway were also reversed by anti-miR-133a transfection in NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, matrine inhibited the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cell by elevating expression of miR-133a which further suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:26379863

  1. Matrine suppresses invasion and metastasis of NCI-H1299 cells by enhancing microRNA-133a expression.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hehe; Zhao, Xixi; Qu, Jinkun; Zhang, Jia; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Matrine has been proved to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of human lung cancer cells. However, less studies involved in evaluating the effects and mechanism of matrine in cell migration and invasion of lung cancer. This study was aim to investigate the involvement of miR-133a in matrine's anti-invasion and anti-metastasis in lung cancer. MTT assay was used to assess the inhibition of proliferation effects of matrine in NCI-H1299 cells. Migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H1299 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. Expression of miR-133a was detected by real-time PCR. Anti-miR technique was applied to inhibit miR-133a in matrine treated HCI-H1299 cells. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. As results, matrine treatment significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of NCI-H1299 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied by significantly elevation of miR-133a expression. However, matrine failed to inhibit the metastatic ability when cells transfected with anti-miR-133a. Matrine treatment also suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway. The inhibitory effects of matrine on activation of EGFR pathway were also reversed by anti-miR-133a transfection in NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, matrine inhibited the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cell by elevating expression of miR-133a which further suppressed activation of EGFR/Akt/MMP-9 pathway.

  2. Quantification of pyrethroids in environmental samples using NCI-GC-MS with stable isotope analogue standards.

    PubMed

    Koch, Del A; Clark, Kevin; Tessier, Daniel M

    2013-03-13

    Stable isotope internal standards are useful in correcting for matrix effects and instrumental variability when environmental samples such as wastewaters and biosolids are analyzed by mass spectral methods. This paper reports the use of deuterium-labeled analogues of eight pyrethroid insecticides to improve accuracy for the analysis of environmental samples by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (NCI-GC-MS). Data for the analysis of effluent water from wastewater treatment facilities are presented which demonstrate that the method is rugged and capable of achieving limits of quantification (LOQs) as low as 0.5 ng/L (ppt), with individual recoveries within the range of 81-94% for those compounds with minimal control background concentrations. In addition, an alternate use of the deuterium-labeled standards is proposed for the determination of method recoveries at low levels that would normally have been precluded due to background pyrethroid levels present in environmental samples being used for control fortifications.

  3. NCI Start-Up 2.0: An Evaluation Option License Program | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Start-Up Evaluation Option License minimizes barriers to entry faced by start-up companies that seek to license NIH technologies. The license encourages and supports the commercial development of early-stage technologies developed in the NIH Intramural Research Program. While the NIH has been quite flexible in structuring licenses for the benefit of start-up companies, one of the goals of the NIH Start-up License program is to further reduce the time and capital to negotiate and finalize an exclusive license agreement. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  4. Mitotane exhibits dual effects on steroidogenic enzymes gene transcription under basal and cAMP-stimulating microenvironments in NCI-H295 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Pu, Hsiao-Fung

    2012-08-16

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an extremely rare and aggressive endocrine malignancy with a poor prognosis. The most common symptom of ACC is hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), which has the highest mortality. Mitotane is used as a steroidogenesis inhibitor for Cushing's syndrome or as a chemical adrenalectomy drug for ACC. Mitotane induces adrenal cortex necrosis, mitochondrial membrane impairment, and irreversible binding to CYP proteins. In this study, we explored the molecular effect of mitotane on steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical cancer NCI-H295 cells. Mitotane (10-40μM) inhibited basal and cAMP-induced cortisol secretion but did not cause cell death. Mitotane exhibited an inhibitory effect on the basal expression of StAR and P450scc protein. Furthermore, 40μM of mitotane significantly diminished StAR, CYP11A1 and CYP21 mRNA expression. HSD3B2 and CYP17 seem to be insensitive to mitotane. The stimulatory effects of mitotane on CYP11B1 were more remarkable than its inhibitory effects. In contrast, the activation of cAMP signaling strongly elevated the expression of all these genes. Mitotane (40μM) almost completely neutralized this positive effect and returned 8-Br-cAMP-induced StAR, CYP11A1, CYP17 and CYP21 mRNA to control levels. After cAMP activation, mitotane did not change the levels of CYP11B1 mRNA. The present study demonstrates that mitotane can inhibit cortisol biosynthesis due to a non-specific interference with the gene transcription of steroidogenic enzymes under both basal and 8-Br-cAMP-activated conditions in NCI-H295 cells. We also identified that StAR and CYP11A1 key enzymes that participate in the rate-limiting step of steroidogenesis, were more sensitive to mitotane. In addition, the biphasic effect of mitotane on CYP11B1 was also elucidated.

  5. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  6. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget... comments in writing, request more information on the proposed project, or to obtain a copy of the data... National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance...

  7. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  8. Rep. Delaney Learns about Breast Cancer Research at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Rep. John Delaney (D-Md., 6th District) visited the NCI Campus at Frederick on October 21 to learn more about the research that scientists at NCI at Frederick are doing on breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

  9. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  10. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI) Summary: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the... Program (CTRP) Database. Type of Information Collection Request: REVISION of currently approved collection... developing an electronic resource, the NCI Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database, to serve as...

  11. High Resolution Copy Number Variation Data in the NCI-60 Cancer Cell Lines from Whole Genome Microarrays Accessible through CellMiner

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sudhir; Pommier, Yves; Sunshine, Margot; Weinstein, John N.; Reinhold, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful technique for detecting gene copy number variation. It is generally considered to be robust and convenient since it measures DNA rather than RNA. In the current study, we combine copy number estimates from four different platforms (Agilent 44 K, NimbleGen 385 K, Affymetrix 500 K and Illumina Human1Mv1_C) to compute a reliable, high-resolution, easy to understand output for the measure of copy number changes in the 60 cancer cells of the NCI-DTP (the NCI-60). We then relate the results to gene expression. We explain how to access that database using our CellMiner web-tool and provide an example of the ease of comparison with transcript expression, whole exome sequencing, microRNA expression and response to 20,000 drugs and other chemical compounds. We then demonstrate how the data can be analyzed integratively with transcript expression data for the whole genome (26,065 genes). Comparison of copy number and expression levels shows an overall medium high correlation (median r = 0.247), with significantly higher correlations (median r = 0.408) for the known tumor suppressor genes. That observation is consistent with the hypothesis that gene loss is an important mechanism for tumor suppressor inactivation. An integrated analysis of concurrent DNA copy number and gene expression change is presented. Limiting attention to focal DNA gains or losses, we identify and reveal novel candidate tumor suppressors with matching alterations in transcript level. PMID:24670534

  12. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  13. Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This booklet, ETV Program Case Studies: Demonstrating Program Outcomes, Volume III contains two case studies, addressing verified environmental technologies for decentalized wastewater treatment and converting animal waste to energy. Each case study contains a brief description ...

  14. Improving global data infrastructures for more effective and scalable analysis of Earth and environmental data: the Australian NCI NERDIP Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Wyborn, Lesley; Druken, Kelsey; Richards, Clare; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Rozas Larraondo, Pablo; Steer, Adam; Smillie, Jon

    2017-04-01

    different disciplines and research communities to invoke new forms of analysis and discovery in an increasingly complex data-rich environment. Driven by the heterogeneity of Earth and environmental datasets, NCI developed a Data Quality/Data Assurance Strategy to ensure consistency is maintained within and across all datasets, as well as functionality testing to ensure smooth interoperability between products, tools, and services. This is particularly so for collections that contain data generated from multiple data acquisition campaigns, often using instruments and models that have evolved over time. By implementing the NCI Data Quality Strategy we have seen progressive improvement in the integration and quality of the datasets across the different subject domains, and through this, the ease by which the users can access data from this major data infrastructure. By both adhering to international standards and also contributing to extensions of these standards, data from the NCI NERDIP platform can be federated with data from other globally distributed data repositories and infrastructures. The NCI approach builds on our experience working with the astronomy and climate science communities, which have been internationally coordinating such interoperability standards within their disciplines for some years. The results of our work so far demonstrate more could be done in the Earth science, solid earth and environmental communities, particularly through establishing better linkages between international/national community efforts such as EPOS, ENVRIplus, EarthCube, AuScope and the Research Data Alliance.

  15. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  16. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  17. Time, Concentration, and pH-Dependent Transport and Uptake of Anthocyanins in a Human Gastric Epithelial (NCI-N87) Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Atnip, Allison A.; Sigurdson, Gregory T.; Bomser, Joshua; Giusti, M. Mónica

    2017-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the largest class of water soluble plant pigments and a common part of the human diet. They may have many potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and cardioprotective activities. However, anthocyanin metabolism is not well understood. Studies suggest that anthocyanins absorption may occur in the stomach, in which the acidic pH favors anthocyanin stability. A gastric epithelial cell line (NCI-N87) has been used to study the behavior of anthocyanins at a pH range of 3.0–7.4. This work examines the effects of time (0–3 h), concentration (50–1500 µM), and pH (3.0, 5.0, 7.4) on the transport and uptake of anthocyanins using NCI-N87 cells. Anthocyanins were transported from the apical to basolateral side of NCI-N87 cells in time and dose dependent manners. Over the treatment time of 3 h the rate of transport increased, especially with higher anthocyanin concentrations. The non-linear rate of transport may suggest an active mechanism for the transport of anthocyanins across the NCI-N87 monolayer. At apical pH 3.0, higher anthocyanin transport was observed compared to pH 5.0 and 7.4. Reduced transport of anthocyanins was found to occur at apical pH 5.0. PMID:28218720

  18. P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to support NCI Approved Clinical Trial Proposals from NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the NCI Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) for Investigator-Initiated Trials Utilizing CTEP IND agents in the ETCTN

    Cancer.gov

    P30 Cancer Center Support Grant Administrative Supplements to support NCI Approved Clinical Trial Proposals from NCI-designated Cancer Centers not affiliated with the NCI Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ETCTN) for Investigator-Initiated Trials Utilizing CTEP IND agents in the ETCTN

  19. Lipid-soluble ginseng extract induces apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moo Rim; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Kiho; Lee, Sung Dong; Hyun, Dong-Hoon; In, Man-Jin; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Dong Chung

    2011-06-01

    This study was performed to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of a lipid-soluble ginseng extract (LSGE) by analyzing induction of apoptosis and arrest of cell cycle progression using the NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell line. Proliferation of NCI-H460 cells was potently inhibited by LSGE in a dose-dependent manner. The cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in NCI-H460 cells was induced by LSGE. The percentage of G0/G1 phase cells significantly increased, while that of S phase cells decreased after treatment with LSGE. The expression levels of cyclin-dependent kinase2 (CDK2), CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D3 and cyclin E related to G0/G1 cells progression were also altered by LSGE. In addition, LSGE-induced cell death occurred through apoptosis, which was accompanied by increasing the activity of caspases including caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3. Consistent with enhancement of caspase activity, LSGE increased protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). These apoptotic effects of LSGE were inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. These findings indicate that LSGE inhibits NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell growth by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and induction of caspase-mediated apoptosis.

  20. Azelnidipine inhibits aldosterone synthesis and secretion in human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Tsuyoshi; Ikeda, Keiichi; Takada, Yuko; Inada, Yuri; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko

    2009-03-01

    Blockade of a mineralocorticoid receptor is a clinically useful approach to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of azelnidipine, a unique dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel blocker, on aldosterone production in the human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R. Azelnidipine inhibited angiotensin II- and KCl-induced expression of steroid 11beta-hydroxylase, steroid 18-hydroxylase, and the alpha1H subunit of the T-type Ca(2+) channel, and suppressed steroid biosynthesis in H295R cells by the same amount as efonidipine. On the basis of these findings, azelnidipine appears to suppress steroid biosynthesis in H295R cells beyond the blockade of L-type calcium channels.

  1. Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study: Exploring Library Networking in Remote, Disadvantaged Areas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Henry C.; And Others

    The Virgin Islands Demonstration Library Network Study (VIDLNS) seeks to determine whether the development of either local or regional library networks would be the key to optimal organization of small library collections in isolated areas. This report describes the research and demonstration components of the exploratory phase of the project: (1)…

  2. Family Literacy Lasts. The NFER Follow-up Study of the Basic Skills Agency's Demonstration Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Greg; Gorman, Tom; Harman, John; Hutchison, Dougal; Kinder, Kay; Moor, Helen; Wilkin, Anne

    The benefits of family literacy programs for children were examined in a 1997 follow-up study in which 154 parents and 237 children who had participated in a family literacy demonstration program in 1994-1995 were interviewed along with the teachers of a subsample of the children and the demonstration program coordinators. The demonstration…

  3. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  4. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  5. Integrating constitutive gene expression and chemoactivity: mining the NCI60 anticancer screen.

    PubMed

    Covell, David G

    2012-01-01

    Studies into the genetic origins of tumor cell chemoactivity pose significant challenges to bioinformatic mining efforts. Connections between measures of gene expression and chemoactivity have the potential to identify clinical biomarkers of compound response, cellular pathways important to efficacy and potential toxicities; all vital to anticancer drug development. An investigation has been conducted that jointly explores tumor-cell constitutive NCI60 gene expression profiles and small-molecule NCI60 growth inhibition chemoactivity profiles, viewed from novel applications of self-organizing maps (SOMs) and pathway-centric analyses of gene expressions, to identify subsets of over- and under-expressed pathway genes that discriminate chemo-sensitive and chemo-insensitive tumor cell types. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is used to quantify the accuracy of discriminating genes to predict tumor cell chemoactivity. LDA results find 15% higher prediction accuracies, using ∼30% fewer genes, for pathway-derived discriminating genes when compared to genes derived using conventional gene expression-chemoactivity correlations. The proposed pathway-centric data mining procedure was used to derive discriminating genes for ten well-known compounds. Discriminating genes were further evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to reveal a cellular genetic landscape, comprised of small numbers of key over and under expressed on- and off-target pathway genes, as important for a compound's tumor cell chemoactivity. Literature-based validations are provided as support for chemo-important pathways derived from this procedure. Qualitatively similar results are found when using gene expression measurements derived from different microarray platforms. The data used in this analysis is available at http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/andhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/geo (GPL96, GSE32474).

  6. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  7. Synergistic effects of the purine analog sulfinosine and curcumin on the multidrug resistant human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NCI-H460/R).

    PubMed

    Andjelkovic, Tijana; Pesic, Milica; Bankovic, Jasna; Tanic, Nikola; Markovic, Ivanka D; Ruzdijic, Sabera

    2008-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to a successful chemotherapy of lung cancer. We tested the potential of sulfinosine and curcumin, alone and in combination, for modulating MDR in the human resistant, non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NCI-H460/R). First, we determined the mutational status of the p53 gene in NCI-H460/R cells by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing and identified mutations which could at least partially contribute to the development of the MDR phenotype. The effects of sulfinosine and curcumin were studied, both separately and in combination, at the level of cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution and gene expression. Sulfinosine displayed dose-dependent growth inhibition in both resistant and control sensitive cell lines, whereas curcumin considerably inhibited their growth only at relatively high doses. When sulfinosine was combined with a low dose of curcumin the drugs exerted a synergistic cytotoxic effect in NCI-H460/R cells. The expression of MDR-related genes mdr1, gst-pi and topo IIalpha, was altered by sulfinosine and curcumin. The most pronounced effect was observed when the agents were applied together. Sulfinosine and curcumin caused perturbations in cell cycle distribution in the NCI-H460/R cell line. The combination of the two drugs induced a more pronounced cell cycle arrest in S and G(2)/M in NCI-H460/R cells. Our results show that sulfinosine and curcumin overcome MDR in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NSCLC), especially in combination despite the presence of a mutated p53 gene.

  8. The Eight-Year Study: From Evaluative Research to Demonstration Project, 1930-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    From 1932 to 1940, the Progressive Education Association (PEA) conducted its Eight-Year Study. At first, the study appeared to be a poorly funded comparison of two groups of students in secondary schools. During the last four years, as more financial support became available, the Eight-Year Study became a broadly based demonstration of a wide…

  9. Inhibition of protein kinase C α/βII and activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mediate glycyrrhetinic acid induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Ko, Hyun-suk; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Jung Hyo; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Chulwoo; Kim, Jai-eun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-02-15

    Though glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) from Glycyrrhiza glabra was known to exert antioxidant, antifilarial, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects, the antitumor mechanism of GA was not clearly elucidated in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs). Thus, in the present study, the underlying apoptotic mechanism of GA was examined in NCI-H460 NSCLCCs. GA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 and A549 non-small lung cancer cells. Also, GA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells. Consistently, GA cleaved poly (ADP-ribosyl) polymerase (PARP), caspase 9/3, attenuated the expression of Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E in NCI-H460 cells. Interestingly, GA attenuated the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) α/βII and extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) as well as activated the phosphorylation of PKC δ and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in NCI-H460 cells. Conversely, PKC promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed the cleavages of caspase 3 and PARP induced by GA in NCI-H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that GA induces apoptosis via inhibition of PKC α/βII and activation of JNK in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  10. NIH Institutes and Centers Served by TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    TTC services the NCI Intramural Research laboratories as well as nine other NIH institutes a range of services--NIDA, NIA, NIMHD, NICHD, NLM, CIT, NCCIH, Clinical Center, NEI. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  11. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  12. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  13. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR), National...

  14. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 9, 2012.

  15. NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 11, 2014.

  16. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  17. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  18. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  19. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  20. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  1. Identification of a new restriction endonuclease R.NciII, from Neisseria cinerea.

    PubMed

    Piekarowicz, A

    1994-01-01

    Site-specific restriction endonuclease R. Nci II has been purified from Neisseria cinerea strain 32615. The enzyme recognizes the sequence 5' GATC 3' and its activity is inhibited by the presence of methylated adenine residue within the recognition sequence.

  2. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Cancer.gov

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  3. NCI Study Identifies Essential Genes For Cancer Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Information OppNet NIDB NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research Institutes at NIH List of Institutes, Centers & ... The NIH Almanac NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health ® Impact of NIH Research You are here Home » News & ...

  4. College Graduate with NCI Internship Gains Experience, Carries Chemistry into Medicine | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    For Jennifer Marshall, the skills learned through an internship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick have prepared her for the next step of her life—medical school. Marshall, who will be attending the West Virginia University School of Medicine in the fall, spent three summers in NCI at Frederick’s Summer Internship Program expanding her love and passion for science and the medical field.

  5. Road surface erosion on the Jackson Demonstration State Forest: results of a pilot study

    Treesearch

    Brian Barrett; Rosemary Kosaka; David. Tomberlin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of a 3 year pilot study of surface erosion on forest roads in the Jackson Demonstration State Forest in California’s coastal redwood region. Ten road segments representing a range of surface, grade, and ditch conditions were selected for the study. At each segment, settling basins with tipping buckets were installed to measure...

  6. Test Validation for Scientific Understanding: Two Demonstrations of an Approach to Studying Predictor-Criterion Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulakos, Elaine D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrated that measures of predictor constructs had predictably different patterns of correlations with different criteria. In study of Navy recruiters (N=267), individual personality scales had significantly different relationships with three different rating criteria. In study with Army enlisted soldiers (N=8,642), cognitive ability and…

  7. A terminological and ontological analysis of the NCI Thesaurus.

    PubMed

    Ceusters, W; Smith, B; Goldberg, L

    2005-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Thesaurus is described by its authors as "a biomedical vocabulary that provides consistent, unambiguous codes and definitions for concepts used in cancer research" and which "exhibits ontology-like properties in its construction and use". We performed a qualitative analysis of the Thesaurus in order to assess its conformity with principles of good practice in terminology and ontology design. We used both the on-line browsable version of the Thesaurus and its OWL-representation (version 04.08b, released on August 2, 2004), measuring each in light of the requirements put forward in relevant ISO terminology standards and in light of ontological principles advanced in the recent literature. We found many mistakes and inconsistencies with respect to the term-formation principles used, the underlying knowledge representation system, and missing or inappropriately assigned verbal and formal definitions. Version 04.08b of the NCI Thesaurus suffers from the same broad range of problems that have been observed in other biomedical terminologies. For its further development, we recommend the use of a more principled approach that allows the Thesaurus to be tested not just for internal consistency but also for its degree of correspondence to that part of reality which it is designed to represent.

  8. Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: Mechanisms and Opportunities to Mitigate. Report of an NCI Workshop, September 19, 2016.

    PubMed

    Citrin, Deborah E; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Walker, Amanda J; Freeman, Michael L; Eke, Iris; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Arankalayil, Molykutty J; Cohen, Eric P; Wilkins, Ruth C; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Anscher, Mitchell S; Movsas, Benjamin; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C; Mendonca, Marc S; Wynn, Thomas A; Coleman, C Norman

    2017-07-01

    A workshop entitled "Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: Mechanisms and Opportunities to Mitigate" (held in Rockville, MD, September 19, 2016) was organized by the Radiation Research Program and Radiation Oncology Branch of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), to identify critical research areas and directions that will advance the understanding of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) and accelerate the development of strategies to mitigate or treat it. Experts in radiation biology, radiation oncology and related fields met to identify and prioritize the key areas for future research and clinical translation. The consensus was that several known and newly identified targets can prevent or mitigate RIF in pre-clinical models. Further, basic and translational research and focused clinical trials are needed to identify optimal agents and strategies for therapeutic use. It was felt that optimally designed preclinical models are needed to better study biomarkers that predict for development of RIF, as well as to understand when effective therapies need to be initiated in relationship to manifestation of injury. Integrating appropriate endpoints and defining efficacy in clinical trials testing treatment of RIF were felt to be critical to demonstrating efficacy. The objective of this meeting report is to (a) highlight the significance of RIF in a global context, (b) summarize recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms of RIF, (c) discuss opportunities for pharmacological mitigation, intervention and modulation of specific molecular pathways, (d) consider the design of optimal clinical trials for mitigation and treatment and (e) outline key regulatory nonprescriptive frameworks for approval.

  9. A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.; Yen, P.; Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01

    This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.

  10. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Prephase A Government Point-of-Departure Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, J. A.; Addona, B. M.; Gwaltney, D. A.; Holt, K. A.; Hopkins, R. C.; Matis, J. A.; McRight, P. S.; Popp, C. G.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Thomas, H. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to define a point-of-departure prephase A mission concept for the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer technology demonstration mission to be conducted by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The mission concept includes identification of the cryogenic propellant management technologies to be demonstrated, definition of a representative mission timeline, and definition of a viable flight system design concept. The resulting mission concept will serve as a point of departure for evaluating alternative mission concepts and synthesizing the results of industry- defined mission concepts developed under the OCT contracted studies

  11. Case Study for the ARRA-funded GSHP Demonstration at University at Albany

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Malhotra, Mini; Xiong, Zeyu

    2015-03-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects—a distributed GSHP system at a new 500-bed apartment-style student residence hall at the University at Albany. This case study is based on the analysis of detailed design documents, measured performance data, published catalog data of heat pump equipment, and actual construction costs. Simulations with a calibrated computer model are performed for both the demonstrated GSHP system and a baseline heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) system to determine the energy savings and other related benefits achieved by the GSHP system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, as well as the pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the demonstrated GSHP system compared with the baseline HVAC system. This case study also identifies opportunities for improving the operational efficiency of the demonstrated GSHP system.

  12. A Correlational Study Examining Demonstrated Emotional Intelligence and Perceptions of School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Chris James

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative study with a correlational design, this research investigated whether certified teachers' ratings of their school leader's demonstrated emotional intelligence behaviors correlated with the teacher's perceptions of school climate. A sample of 42 graduate and post baccalaureate students from a Mid-Atlantic region college accessed a…

  13. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  14. Fire vs. Metal: A Laboratory Study Demonstrating Microbial Responses to Soil Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromberger, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Incubation studies are traditionally used in soil microbiology laboratory classes to demonstrate microbial respiration and N mineralization-immobilization processes. Sometimes these exercises are done to calculate a N balance in N fertilizer-amended soils. However, examining microbial responses to environmental perturbations would appeal to soil…

  15. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  16. A Correlational Study Examining Demonstrated Emotional Intelligence and Perceptions of School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Chris James

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative study with a correlational design, this research investigated whether certified teachers' ratings of their school leader's demonstrated emotional intelligence behaviors correlated with the teacher's perceptions of school climate. A sample of 42 graduate and post baccalaureate students from a Mid-Atlantic region college accessed a…

  17. Fire vs. Metal: A Laboratory Study Demonstrating Microbial Responses to Soil Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromberger, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Incubation studies are traditionally used in soil microbiology laboratory classes to demonstrate microbial respiration and N mineralization-immobilization processes. Sometimes these exercises are done to calculate a N balance in N fertilizer-amended soils. However, examining microbial responses to environmental perturbations would appeal to soil…

  18. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-12-30

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design.

  19. Drug Transporter Protein Quantification of Immortalized Human Lung Cell Lines Derived from Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells (Calu-3 and BEAS2-B), Bronchiolar-Alveolar Cells (NCI-H292 and NCI-H441), and Alveolar Type II-like Cells (A549) by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Suzuki, Shinobu; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of drug transport in the human lung is an important issue in pulmonary drug discovery and development. For this purpose, there is an increasing interest in immortalized lung cell lines as alternatives to primary cultured lung cells. We recently reported the protein expression in human lung tissues and pulmonary epithelial cells in primary culture, (Sakamoto A, Matsumaru T, Yamamura N, Uchida Y, Tachikawa M, Ohtsuki S, Terasaki T. 2013. J Pharm Sci 102(9):3395-3406) whereas comprehensive quantification of protein expressions in immortalized lung cell lines is sparse. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the drug transporter protein expression of five commercially available immortalized lung cell lines derived from tracheobronchial cells (Calu-3 and BEAS2-B), bronchiolar-alveolar cells (NCI-H292 and NCI-H441), and alveolar type II cells (A549), by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based approaches. Among transporters detected, breast cancer-resistance protein in Calu-3, NCI-H292, NCI-H441, and A549 and OCTN2 in BEAS2-B showed the highest protein expression. Compared with data from our previous study,(Sakamoto A, Matsumaru T, Yamamura N, Uchida Y, Tachikawa M, Ohtsuki S, Terasaki T. 2013. J Pharm Sci 102(9):3395-3406) NCI-H441 was the most similar with primary lung cells from all regions in terms of protein expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter 1 (OCTN1). In conclusion, the protein expression profiles of transporters in five immortalized lung cell lines were determined, and these findings may contribute to a better understanding of drug transport in immortalized lung cell lines.

  20. 77 FR 12598 - Notice Correction; A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on... international hospital-based case-control study of lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI)'' was submitted with...

  1. Decursin in Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) Enhances Doxorubicin Chemosensitivity in NCI/ADR-RES Ovarian Cancer Cells via Inhibition of P-glycoprotein Expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Cho, Sung-Gook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kim, Min Soo; Moon, Seung Hee; Kim, Il Hwan; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN, Korean Dang-gui) is traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. Here, we investigated multidrug-resistant phenotype-reversal activities of AGN and its compounds (decursin, ferulic acid, and nodakenin) in doxorubicin-resistant NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cells. Our results showed that a combination of doxorubicin with either AGN or decursin inhibited a proliferation of NCI/ADR-RES cells. These combinations increased the number of cells at sub-G1 phase when cells were stained with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. We also found that these combinations activated caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 and increased cleaved PARP level. Moreover, an inhibition of P-glycoprotein expression by either AGN or decursin resulted in a reduction of its activity in NCI/ADR-RES cells. Therefore, our data demonstrate that decursin in AGN inhibits doxorubicin-resistant ovarian cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in the presence of doxorubicin via blocking P-glycoprotein expression. Therefore, AGN would be a potentially novel treatment option for multidrug-resistant tumors by sensitizing to anticancer agents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O’Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  3. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O'Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  4. Anticancer activity of SAHA, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, in NCI-H460 human large-cell lung carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Yu, Dandan; Wu, Hongge; Liu, Hongli; Zhou, Hongxia; Gu, Runxia; Zhang, Ruiguang; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Gang

    2014-02-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a potent pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, has been clinically approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). SAHA has also been shown to exert a variety of anticancer activities in many other types of tumors, however, few studies have been reported in large-cell lung carcinoma (LCC). Our study aimed to investigate the potential antitumor effects of SAHA on LCC cells. Here, we report that SAHA was able to inhibit the proliferation of the LCC cell line NCI-H460 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, induced cell apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, decreased AKT and ERK phosphorylation, inhibited the expression of pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF, HIF-1α) in vitro, and suppressed tumor progression in an NCI-H460 cell nude mouse xenograft model in vivo. These results indicate that SAHA can exert its strong antitumor effects in LCC patient.

  5. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  6. Fenretinide targets the side population in myeloma cell line NCI-H929 and potentiates the efficacy of antimyeloma with bortezomib and dexamethasone regimen.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenqing; Du, Juan; Du, Yanzhi; Pu, Honglei; Liu, Shuyan; He, Jie; Zhang, Ji; Hou, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Side population (SP) cells, a subset of enriched tumor initiating cells, have been demonstrated to have stem cell-like properties in multiple myeloma (MM) by us as well as other previous studies. A lack of agents targeting tumor initiating cells, however, represents a challenge in the treatment of MM. Previously, fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, has been shown to exert effect on leukemic stem cells, but its actions against myeloma stem-like cells are still unknown. In this study, the effects of fenretinide on myeloma stem-like cells characteristic was comprehensively examined in SP and non-SP (MP) cells of NCI-H929 cell sorted by flow cytometry-based on Hoechst 33342 stain. We find that fenretinide is capable of eradicating MM SP and MP cells, but not normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide alone exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on MM SP cells, as well as in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone. In particular, SP cells were highly sensitive to fenretinide, and in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in colony formation and apoptosis assays. Accordingly, the apparent fenretinide-induced-apoptosis was linked to the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that targets tumor initiating cells and may be a promising therapeutic agent in MM treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensitivity of NCI-H292 human lung mucoepidermoid cells for respiratory and other human viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Castells, E; Banks, G G; Bryan, J A; McEwen, C T

    1993-01-01

    NCI-H292 mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells from human lungs were shown in an earlier report to be a fully adequate substitute for primary rhesus monkey kidney (MK) cells for the isolation and propagation of the human paramyxoviruses. Although sensitivity for ortho- and paramyxoviruses was the principal reason for using MK cells, the cells were also sensitive to many other viruses, which constituted another important value of MK cells. That MK cells supported the initial isolation and growth of so many respiratory viruses made it a mandatory cell type for any clinical laboratory. We therefore felt it was imperative to evaluate the virus spectrum of NCI-H292 cells, which are being used as a substitute for MK cells in many laboratories. In the present report, we show that NCI-H292 cells are sensitive for vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, adenoviruses, BK polyomavirus, reoviruses, measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, some strains of influenza virus type A, most enteroviruses, and rhinoviruses, in addition to the parainfluenza and mumps viruses originally reported. Furthermore, these viruses replicate in NCI-H292 cells to the same virus and antigen titers and at the same speed of replication as they do in their usually preferred cells. The NCI-H292 cells are therefore an excellent substitute for MK cells in terms of laboratory safety, ease of availability, paramyxovirus isolation, and broad virus spectrum but cannot substitute for MK cells for the isolation of influenza viruses. Images PMID:8314992

  8. Pharmacologically directed strategies in academic anticancer drug discovery based on the European NCI compounds initiative.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hans R; Govaerts, Anne-Sophie; Fichtner, Iduna; Burtles, Sally; Westwell, Andrew D; Peters, Godefridus J

    2017-07-11

    The European NCI compounds programme, a joint initiative of the EORTC Research Branch, Cancer Research Campaign and the US National Cancer Institute, was initiated in 1993. The objective was to help the NCI in reducing the backlog of in vivo testing of potential anticancer compounds, synthesised in Europe that emerged from the NCI in vitro 60-cell screen. Over a period of more than twenty years the EORTC-Cancer Research Campaign panel reviewed ∼2000 compounds of which 95 were selected for further evaluation. Selected compounds were stepwise developed with clear go/no go decision points using a pharmacologically directed programme. This approach eliminated quickly compounds with unsuitable pharmacological properties. A few compounds went into Phase I clinical evaluation. The lessons learned and many of the principles outlined in the paper can easily be applied to current and future drug discovery and development programmes. Changes in the review panel, restrictions regarding numbers and types of compounds tested in the NCI in vitro screen and the appearance of targeted agents led to the discontinuation of the European NCI programme in 2017 and its transformation into an academic platform of excellence for anticancer drug discovery and development within the EORTC-PAMM group. This group remains open for advice and collaboration with interested parties in the field of cancer pharmacology.

  9. Elder Mediation in Theory and Practice: Study Results From a National Caregiver Mediation Demonstration Project

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Mediation is a process through which a third party facilitates discussion among disputing parties to help them identify interests and ideally reach an amicable solution. Elder mediation is a growing subspecialty to address conflicts involving older adults, primarily involving caregiving or finances. Mediation is theorized to empower participants but critics argue that it can exacerbate power imbalances among parties and coerce consensus. These contested claims are examined through study of a national caregiver mediation demonstration project. Study implications underscore the importance of gerontological social work expertise to ensure the empowerment of vulnerable older adults in mediation sessions. PMID:23767767

  10. Elder mediation in theory and practice: study results from a national caregiver mediation demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Mediation is a process through which a third party facilitates discussion among disputing parties to help them identify interests and ideally reach an amicable solution. Elder mediation is a growing subspecialty to address conflicts involving older adults, primarily involving caregiving or finances. Mediation is theorized to empower participants but critics argue that it can exacerbate power imbalances among parties and coerce consensus. These contested claims are examined through study of a national caregiver mediation demonstration project. Study implications underscore the importance of gerontological social work expertise to ensure the empowerment of vulnerable older adults in mediation sessions.

  11. Natural gas conservation through throttling: a demonstration study. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Currens, V C; Edwards, R G

    1982-07-01

    A total of 12 homes in Lexington, Kentucky participated in a demonstration project to investigate the possible energy savings associated with a gas throttling technique applied to residential gas furnaces. In a prior study, two homes utilized the throttling technique during the winter of 1980-81 and indicated an average savings of 9% attributable to gas throttling. Results from the current demonstration project, conducted during the winter of 1981-82, showed an average savings of 7.2% resulting from the use of throttling. It is therefore, indicated that, on average, use of this simple technique can increase residential gas furnace efficiencies by approximately 8% without any sacrifice in indoor comfort, i.e. without a change in indoor temperature.

  12. Dynamic modeling and validation of a lignocellulosic enzymatic hydrolysis process--a demonstration scale study.

    PubMed

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis process is one of the key steps in second generation biofuel production. After being thermally pretreated, the lignocellulosic material is liquefied by enzymes prior to fermentation. The scope of this paper is to evaluate a dynamic model of the hydrolysis process on a demonstration scale reactor. The following novel features are included: the application of the Convection-Diffusion-Reaction equation to a hydrolysis reactor to assess transport and mixing effects; the extension of a competitive kinetic model with enzymatic pH dependency and hemicellulose hydrolysis; a comprehensive pH model; and viscosity estimations during the course of reaction. The model is evaluated against real data extracted from a demonstration scale biorefinery throughout several days of operation. All measurements are within predictions uncertainty and, therefore, the model constitutes a valuable tool to support process optimization, performance monitoring, diagnosis and process control at full-scale studies.

  13. Complex modes of bonding: NCI/ELI-D vs. DORI surface analyses of hapticities and hydrogen-hydrogen contacts in zincocene related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebs, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Atoms-in-molecules (AIM) topology is prone to wrong/ambiguous bond assignments (lacking bond critical points) in areas of low electron densities (ED), e.g. for hydrogen-hydrogen contacts, and flat density gradients, e.g. for metal-ring contacts (hapticities), both in experimental and computed ED. Within this study, two ED-derived bonding indicators are applied to a set of zincocene related compounds: non-covalent interactions (NCI) surfaces are combined with electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) surfaces and compared to density overlap regions indicator (DORI) surfaces. Both methods (NCI/ELI-D, DORI) result in spatial deconvolution of covalent and non-covalent interactions and unravel weak interactions not observed in the AIM topology.

  14. Concentration of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Increasing evidence also supports their involvement in the development of certain lung, colon and prostate cancers. Methods In this study we systemically surveyed endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in each of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, which include human breast, central nerve system, colon, ovarian, prostate, kidney and non-small cell lung cancers, as well as melanomas and leukemia. The absolute abundances of these metabolites were measured using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method that has been previously utilized for biological fluids such as serum and urine. Results Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites were found in all NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and some were substantially elevated and exceeded the levels found in well known estrogen-dependent and estrogen receptor-positive tumor cells such as MCF-7 and T-47D. While estrogens were expected to be present at high levels in cell lines representing the female reproductive system (that is, breast and ovarian), other cell lines, such as leukemia and colon, also contained very high levels of these steroid hormones. The leukemia cell line RMPI-8226 contained the highest levels of estrone (182.06 pg/106 cells) and 17β-estradiol (753.45 pg/106 cells). In comparison, the ovarian cancer cell line with the highest levels of these estrogens contained only 19.79 and 139.32 pg/106 cells of estrone and 17β-estradiol, respectively. The highest levels of estrone and 17β-estradiol in breast cancer cell lines were only 8.45 and 87.37 pg/106 cells in BT-549 and T-47D cells, respectively. Conclusions The data provided evidence for the presence of significant amounts of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in cell lines not commonly associated with these steroid hormones. This broad discovery of

  15. Fostering young children's interest in numeracy through demonstration of its value: the Footsteps Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliver, Yeshe

    2017-07-01

    Children's early mathematical abilities are fundamental to their later academic achievement. An interest in mathematics in the early years is likely to establish a positive attitude to later mathematical learning, hopefully sustaining continued interest in mathematics and mathematical learning. Approaches to early mathematics teaching in the early years, however, are typically adult-initiated, which may fail to capture children's interest. Given the importance of children's motivation and sustained interest, the study described here strove to spark children's interests in mathematical problems in everyday life. The study sought to determine if children would incorporate more numeracy-related concepts into their free play if exposed to adult demonstrations of age-appropriate numeracy activities such as patterning. For at least 15 min three times weekly, participating children's parents and educators demonstrated numeracy problem-solving nearby, while children engaged in other activities. Demonstrations were thought to ascribe social value to the problem-solving activities. If children became interested in participating, adults told them to wait until the demonstrations finished, further indicating social value. Results show these children chose to play with numeracy-related activities in their free play time at preschool significantly more than children in a control group. These results suggest that seeking to foster children's interest in mathematics through child-initiated play, rather than prescribing adult-initiated mathematics activities, may be an important means of laying the foundation for lifelong mathematics learning. Ascribing social value to numeracy applications is proposed as a new approach to teaching mathematics in the early years.

  16. Use of a wastepaper demonstration study to promote life cycle assessment in Taiwan, ROC

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, M.S.; Ho, C.T.; Lu, M.C.; Yang, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    With the advent of ISO 14000 series standards, LCA has becoming an ever important tool for environmental management. To facilitate its industries and products to establish the baselines for environmental management, the ROC government is funding an aggressive project to introduce LCA methodology and databases, establish local LCI databases, and also to promote the use of LCA in industry and public decision making process. A waste paper recycling demonstration study, the first of its kind in Taiwan, is currently undertaken as a means of LCA technology adaptation. Generic Taiwan-based LCI data for the transportation and energy sectors will be established. LCI data will also be established for the pulp and paper and other industries such as computer/electronics and pharmaceutical industry gradually. The action plan for the promotion of LCA in Taiwan as well as findings and conclusions from the demonstration study will be presented. Also presented will be the experience in problem solving during the execution of this study. The results of this study shall be able to provide both the industry and government agencies a technical basis in determining the recycling policy and usage of local waste paper in the industrial paper manufacturing processes.

  17. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  18. Comparative Delamination Study to Demonstrate the Impact of Container Quality and Nature of Buffer System.

    PubMed

    Rothaar, Uwe; Klause, Michaela; Hladik, Bernhard

    Delamination of flakes in glass containers used for primary drug packaging has become a serious quality concern in recent years. Because glass delamination typically occurs weeks/months after filling and there are a variety of container, processing and drug formulation factors that contribute to glass delamination, it is recommended according to USP <1660> (1) to conduct suitable container/drug product compatibility tests. Such predictive studies should give results that allow a graduated assessment for increasing risk of delamination that can be used to detect early stages of this phenomenon and to help to select appropriate container/formulation systems to proactively prevent delamination instead of just monitoring for the presence/absence of flakes. This work demonstrates the capability of a container compatibility testing approach by determining the impact of three different model buffer/solution systems (citrate, phosphate and sodium bicarbonate) with the delamination behavior of two different types of 2 mL glass vials, standard quality and delamination controlled quality. Vials of each type were filled and stored up to 48 weeks at 40 °C. Using a USP <1660>-compatible package of different analytical methods clearly demonstrates the significant influence of both vial quality and chemistry of the content on glass delamination propensity.LAY ABSTRACT The detachment of flakes from the inner surface of a glass container-also referred to as delamination-has become a serious quality concern over the last years for the pharmaceutical industry. Chapter <1660> of the United Stated Pharmacopeia therefore recommends performing predictive screening studies with the drug formulation and the glass container to evaluate the risk of delamination in an early stage of the drug development. Predictive screening studies have been performed with three different representative buffer/solution and glass vials of two different quality steps (standard and delamination controlled). The

  19. URSULA2 computer program. Volume 2. Applications (sensitivity studies and demonstration calculations). Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, L.W.; Marchland, E.O.; Singhal, A.K.; Spalding, D.B.

    1980-01-01

    The URSULA2 computer program has been developed for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of steam generators for PWR nuclear power plants. It computes three-dimensional distributions of velocity, pressure, enthalpy, etc., in the shell of the generator, and the distributions of primary-fluid temperature within the tubes. The code is applicable to both steady and unsteady flows and is equiped with three physical models: the equal velocity homogeneous model, a slip (or two-fluid) model, and an algebraic slip model. Applications, sensitivity studies, and demonstration calculations are presented.

  20. Nurse mentoring study demonstrates a magnetic work environment: predictors of mentoring benefits among pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Gavriloff, Carrie L; Weese, Meghan M

    2011-04-01

    This descriptive, correlational research study applied a business mentoring model, the Mutual Benefits Model (M. G. Zey, 1991), to explore relationships among mentoring quality, mentoring quantity, mentoring type, length of employment, and mentoring benefits among pediatric staff nurse protégés in a single Midwestern, Magnet-designated, freestanding children's hospital. Results support the hypothesis that the linear combination of quality of mentoring and length of employment explained 40% of the variance in mentoring benefits, more than any one factor alone (R=.63, p=.01). Nurse mentoring, conceptually and experientially, demonstrates the Magnet model components and provides implications for the Magnet Journey. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  5. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  6. Cantharidin Impairs Cell Migration and Invasion of Human Lung Cancer NCI-H460 Cells via UPA and MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yu, Chien-Chih; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Bau, DA-Tian; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-11-01

    Cantharidin (CTD), a component of natural mylabris (Mylabris phalerata Pallas), has been shown to have biological activities and induce cell death in many human cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CTD on cell migration and invasion of NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells. Cell viability was examined and results indicated that CTD decreased the percentage of viable cells in dose-dependent manners. CTD inhibited cell migration and invasion in dose-dependent manners. Gelatin zymography analysis was used to measure the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/-9) and the results indicated that CTD inhibited the enzymatic activities of MMP-2/-9 of NCI-H460 cells. Western blotting was used to examine the protein expression of NCI-H460 cells after incubation with CTD and the results showed that CTD decreased the expression of MMP-2/-9, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Ras homolog gene family, member A (Rho A), phospho-protein kinase B (AKT) (Thr308)(p-AKT(308)), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (p-ERK1/2), phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (p-p38), phospho c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (p-JNK1/2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and urokinase plasminogen activator (UPA). Furthermore, confocal laser microscopy was used to confirm that CTD suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65, but did not significantly affect protein kinase C (PKC) translocation in NCI-H460 cells. Based on those observations, we suggest that CTD may be used as a novel anticancer metastasis agent for lung cancer in the future.

  7. Initial Development and Pilot Study Design of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations for ASTRO 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwortz, Andria C.; French, D. A; Gutierrez, Joseph V; Sanchez, Richard L; Slater, Timothy F.; Tatge, Coty

    2014-06-01

    Interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs) have repeatedly shown to be effective tools for improving student achievement in the context of learning physics. As a first step toward systematic development of interactive lecture demonstrations in ASTRO 101, the introductory astronomy survey course, a systematic review of education research, describing educational computer simulations (ECSs) reveals that initial development requires a targeted study of how ASTRO 101 students respond to ECSs in the non-science majoring undergraduate lecture setting. In this project we have adopted the process by which ILDs were designed, pilot-tested, and successfully implemented in the context of physics teaching (Sokoloff & Thornton, 1997; Sokoloff & Thornton, 2004). We have designed the initial pilot-test set of ASTRO 101 ILD instructional materials relying heavily on ECSs. Both an instructor’s manual and a preliminary classroom-ready student workbook have been developed, and we are implementing a pilot study to explore their effectiveness in communicating scientific content, and the extent to which they might enhance students’ knowledge of and perception about astronomy and science in general. The study design uses a pre-/post-test quasi-experimental study design measuring students’ normalized gain scores, calculated as per Hake (1998) and Prather (2009), using a slightly modified version of S. Slater’s (2011) Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST combined with other instruments. The results of this initial study will guide the iterative development of ASTRO 101 ILDs that are intended to both be effective at enhancing student achievement and easy for instructors to successfully implement.

  8. Demonstration of the effectiveness and acceptability of self-study module use in residency education.

    PubMed

    Yeazel, Mark W; Center, Bruce A

    2004-02-01

    Educators face increasing challenges to promote lifelong learning skills, to include new content areas in an already full curriculum and to maximize limited resources for curriculum implementation. Self-study modules (hereafter modules) offer potential solutions. Three modules on preventive medicine topics were evaluated in Family Medicine residencies. A retrospective pre-/post-test of a resident's ability to meet the module's objectives was used for evaluation. Additionally, residents rated the appropriateness and acceptability of the modules, their preference for 13 methods of learning, and completed a multiple-choice knowledge test. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of modules at multiple levels of evaluation in accordance with a modified version of Kirkpatrick's hierarchy of levels of evaluation. Residents found the modules to be acceptable and useful. Significant gains were seen in residents' abilities to meet objectives. The multiple-choice knowledge test was used to demonstrate mastery of the module materials at an appropriate performance level for future practitioners. Module use was in the top five choices of preferred learning methods. No correlation was seen between residents' preference for learning using modules and educational outcomes. Modules are an effective and acceptable learning method for residents. Even those who prefer other learning methods show improved educational outcomes.

  9. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  10. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  11. EHS and FME Lend Their Expertise to NCI Campus Refurbishment Project | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    In October 2015, the NCI executive officer and the director of NCI’s Office of Space and Facilities Management (OSFM) announced a wide-ranging refurbishment plan for NCI at Frederick. Since then, a project team comprising members from the Office of Scientific Operations, the Management Operations Support Branch, OSFM, the Center for Cancer Research, the Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) directorate, and the Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) directorate have met regularly with the laboratory groups affected by the refurbishment plan. Read more...

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  15. Comparison of HeLa-I, HEp-2 and NCI-H292 cell lines for the isolation of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV).

    PubMed

    Perini, Ana Priscila; Barbosa, Maria Luisa; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; de Moraes, Claudia Trigo Pedroso; Gillio, Alfredo E; Hens, Noeli; Stewien, Klaus E; Durigon, Edison L

    2007-12-01

    Generally, laboratory diagnosis of viral respiratory infections utilizes virus isolation in cell culture and immunofluorescence assays. In this study, three cell lines (HEp-2, NCI-H292 and HeLa-I) were used for HRSV isolation of strains obtained from patients admitted at HU-USP with respiratory tract disease. HRSV was isolated in 46% (37) of 80 specimens inoculated in HeLa-I, 48% (39) in HEp-2, and 36.3% (29) in NCI-H292. Immunofluorescence was considered the gold standard and yielded 53% positive (43). The results from both methods combined had better sensitivity (73.2%) compared to either method alone. Comparing results between the cell lines with HEp-2 cells as the benchmark, the greatest sensitivity (72.2%) was observed in HeLa-I. This data shows that HeLa-I is adequate for HRSV isolation, giving results similar to the HEp-2 cells. The combined use of the HEp-2, HeLa-I and NCI-H292 cells improve the detection of HRSV.

  16. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of the combination of a benzofuroxan derivate and sorafenib on NCI-H460 human large cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Alexandre de Azevedo, Ricardo; Salomon, Maria Alejandra Clavijo; Jorge, Salomão Dória; Levy, Débora; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo; Rodrigues, Cecília Pessoa; Pizzo, Célia Regina; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent and lethal human cancer in the world. Because is still an unsolved health issue, new compounds or therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Furoxans are presented as potentials candidates for lung cancer treatment. Accordingly, we evaluated the efficacy of a benzofuroxan derivative, BFD-22, alone and combined with sorafenib against NCI-H460 cell line. We showed that BFD-22 has cytotoxic effects on the NCI-H460 cells. Importantly, the Combination Index (CI) evaluation revels that BFD-22 combined with sorafenib has a stronger cytotoxic effect. In addition, the combination induces apoptosis through extrinsic pathway, leading to TRAIL-R1/DR4-triggered apoptosis. Furthermore, BFD-22 combined with sorafenib increases ROS production and simultaneously reduces perlecan expression in the NCI-H460 cells. In accordance, tumor cells were arrested in the S-phase, and these anti-proliferative effects also inhibit cell migration. This is the first study reporting an advantage of BFD-22 combined with sorafenib as a new therapeutic strategy in the fight against lung cancer.

  17. Induction of DNA damage by deguelin is mediated through reducing DNA repair genes in human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bin-Chuan; Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Ko, Yang-Ching; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-04-01

    It has been shown that deguelin, one of the compounds of rotenoids from flavonoid family, induced cytotoxic effects through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many types of human cancer cell lines, but deguelin-affected DNA damage and repair gene expression (mRNA) are not clarified yet. We investigated the effects of deguelin on DNA damage and associated gene expression in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells in vitro. DNA damage was assayed by using the comet assay and DNA gel electrophoresis and the results indicated that NCI-H460 cells treated with 0, 50, 250 and 500 nM deguelin led to a longer DNA migration smear based on the single cell electrophoresis and DNA fragmentation occurred based on the examination of DNA gel electrophoresis. DNA damage and repair gene expression (mRNA) were evaluated by using real-time PCR assay and the results indicated that 50 and 250 nM deguelin for a 24-h exposure in NCI-H460 cells, decreased the gene levels of breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) mRNA expressions. Collectively, the present study showed that deguelin caused DNA damage and inhibited DNA damage and repair gene expressions, which might be due to deguelin-inhibited cell growth in vitro.

  18. [Exploration and demonstration study on drug combination from clinical real world].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-ming; Wang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Drug combination is extensive in the clinical real world,which is an important part and the inherent requirements of the post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The key issues and technology include multi-domain and multi-disciplinary such as the rationality, efficacy and safety evaluation of combination drug starting from clinical real world, study on component in vivo and mechanism of combination drug, the risk/benefit assessment and cost-benefit evaluation of combination drug and so on. The topic has been studied as clinical demonstration on combination therapy of variety of diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, insomnia, depression, hepatitis, herpes zoster, psoriasis and ectopic pregnancy. Meanwhile, multi-disciplinary dynamic innovation alliance of clinical drug combination has been presented, which can promote the academic development and improving service ability and level of TCM.

  19. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute Past Issues / Winter ... a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone or iPad that uses proven quit ...

  20. NCI Scientists Create New Assay, Identify Novel Therapeutic Compounds, and Take Places on Front Lines of Cancer Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A team of scientists and specialists from NCI at Frederick, NCI at Bethesda, the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, and Data Management Services, Inc., has developed the first method for identifying natural products that could increase the effectiveness of camptothecin-based cancer treatments.

  1. 78 FR 69428 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork... estimated public burden and associated response time, should be directed to the: Office of Management and... Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI), 0925- 0624, Expiration Date 12/31/2013, REVISION, National Cancer...

  2. A study of hazardous air pollutants at the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCD Program is a joint effort between government and industry to develop a new generation of coal utilization processes. In 1986, the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power (AEP), was awarded cofunding through the CCT program for the Tidd Pressure Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC) Demonstration Plant located in Brilliant, Ohio. The Tidd PFBC unit began operation in 1990 and was later selected as a test site for an advanced particle filtration (APF) system designed for hot gas particulate removal. The APF system was sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) through their Hot Gas Cleanup Research and Development Program. A complementary goal of the DOE CCT and METC R&D programs has always been to demonstrate the environmental acceptability of these emerging technologies. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) have focused that commitment toward evaluating the fate of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with advanced coal-based and hot gas cleanup technologies. Radian Corporation was contacted by AEP to perform this assessment of HAPs at the Tidd PFBC demonstration plant. The objective of this study is to assess the major input, process, and emission streams at Plant Tidd for the HAPs identified in Title III of the CAAA. Four flue gas stream locations were tested: ESP inlet, ESP outlet, APF inlet, and APF outlet. Other process streams sampled were raw coal, coal paste, sorbent, bed ash, cyclone ash, individual ESP hopper ash, APF ash, and service water. Samples were analyzed for trace elements, minor and major elements, anions, volatile organic compounds, dioxin/furan compounds, ammonia, cyanide, formaldehyde, and semivolatile organic compounds. The particle size distribution in the ESP inlet and outlet gas streams and collected ash from individual ESP hoppers was also determined.

  3. Demonstrating efficacy in preclinical studies of cellular therapies for spinal cord injury - how much is enough?

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Soril, Lesley J J; Bacon, Mark; Beattie, Michael S; Blesch, Armin; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Dunlop, Sarah A; Fehlings, Michael G; Ferguson, Adam R; Hill, Caitlin E; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Lu, Paul; McDonald, John W; Müller, Hans W; Oudega, Martin; Rosenzweig, Ephron S; Reier, Paul J; Silver, Jerry; Sykova, Eva; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Guest, James D; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2013-10-01

    Cellular therapies represent a novel treatment approach for spinal cord injury (SCI), with many different cellular substrates showing promise in preclinical animal models of SCI. Considerable interest therefore exists to translate such cellular interventions into human clinical trials. Balanced against the urgency for clinical translation is the desire to establish the robustness of a cellular therapy's efficacy in preclinical studies, thereby optimizing its chances of succeeding in human trials. Uncertainty exists, however, on the extent to which a therapy needs to demonstrate efficacy in the preclinical setting in order to justify the initiation of a lengthy, expensive, and potentially risky clinical trial. The purpose of this initiative was to seek perspectives on the level of evidence required in experimental studies of cellular therapies before proceeding with clinical trials of SCI. We conducted a survey of 27 SCI researchers actively involved in either preclinical and/or clinical research of cellular interventions for SCI, and then held a focus group meeting to facilitate more in-depth discussion around a number of translational issues. These included: the use of animal models, the use of injury models and mechanisms, the window for demonstrating efficacy, independent replication, defining "relevant, meaningful efficacy" in preclinical studies, and the expectation of therapeutic benefits for cellular interventions. Here we present the key findings from both the survey and focus group meeting in order to summarize and underscore the areas of consensus and disagreement amongst the sampled researchers. It is anticipated that the knowledge generated from this initiative will help to incite future scientific discussions and expert guidelines towards translation of a cell therapy for persons with SCI.

  4. Nitrogen removal assessment through nitrification rates and media biofilm accumulation in an IFAS process demonstration study.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Thomas, Wes; Schafran, Gary; Bott, Charles; Rutherford, Bob; Waltrip, David

    2011-12-15

    An IFAS demonstration study was conducted at the 76,000 m(3)/day (20MGD) James River Wastewater Treatment Plant (JRTP) located in Newport News, Virginia by converting one fully-aerobic conventional aeration basin with dedicated secondary clarification to a 7041 m(3)/day (8404 m(3)/day max month) IFAS train in a modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) configuration. During the study, biomass concentrations on the biofilm carriers were monitored (weekly) as well as nitrogen species concentrations in the IFAS reactor to quantify the nitrogen transformations occurring within the demonstration tank. In a related effort, nitrification kinetics for ammonia and nitrite oxidizing bacteria were monitored on a weekly basis for IFAS media alone, IFAS process mixed liquor without media, and IFAS mixed liquor and media together in an effort to identify the location of nitrification activity (i.e. on the media or in the suspended culture) in the IFAS process. Biomass quantity on the media was generally observed to be inversely related to temperature except during a period when an auxiliary carbon source contaminated with fungi was introduced. Both ammonia oxidizing and nitrite oxidizing bacterial activity were elevated on the carriers compared to the suspended culture (AOB(media): 4.97 mgNOx/gMLSS/hr; AOB(suspended): 1.72 mgNOx/gMLSS/hr; NOB(media): 7.55 mgNOx/gMLSS/hr; NOB(suspended): 0.82 mgNOx/gMLSS/hr) during all periods of the study. In-basin nitrification rates calculated based on nitrogen profiling efforts averaged 0.90 mgNOx/m(2)/day which was in good agreement with the average of 0.89 mgNOx/m(2)/day for IFAS mixed liquor and media from batch testing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Feasibility Study of Electrodynamic Tether Technology Demonstration on H-II Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Toru; Tsuijita, Daisuke; Uchiyama, Takashi; Harada, Masayuki; Kawamoto, Satomi; Ohkawa, Yasushi; Inoue, Koichi

    2013-09-01

    Space debris has been steadily increasing. Cascading effect caused by the collision between the objects would worsen the situation further. To ensure the safety of future space activities, aggressive measures to reduce debris is needed. Since density of debris in the region of 800 km to 1500 km altitude is particularly high, the occurrence of cascade event can be a major obstacle for activities in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). To avoid this situation, JAXA is investigating a service system to capture a defunct satellite and remove it from this "crowded" orbit to waste orbit. Conventional propulsion system, which requires much propellant, is inefficient for this application. JAXA has been investigating to use of ElectroDynamic Tether (EDT) propulsion system. By using the interaction with the Earth magnetic field, EDT can generate a sufficient thrust for orbit transfer over a realistic time period. JAXA is now investigating to demonstrate EDT technology on-orbit and H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), JAXA's unmanned cargo transfer spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS), is a potential candidate of hosted vehicle. This paper will present HTV's active deorbit design in first, and also present result of feasibility study of JAXA's first attempt of EDT on-orbit demonstration on the HTV.

  6. The Quality Improvement Demonstration Study: An example of evidence-based policy-making in practice

    PubMed Central

    Shimkhada, Riti; Peabody, John W; Quimbo, Stella A; Solon, Orville

    2008-01-01

    Background Randomized trials have long been the gold-standard for evaluating clinical practice. There is growing recognition that rigorous studies are similarly needed to assess the effects of policy. However, these studies are rarely conducted. We report on the Quality Improvement Demonstration Study (QIDS), an example of a large randomized policy experiment, introduced and conducted in a scientific manner to evaluate the impact of large-scale governmental policy interventions. Methods In 1999 the Philippine government proposed sweeping reforms in the National Health Sector Reform Agenda. We recognized the unique opportunity to conduct a social experiment. Our ongoing goal has been to generate results that inform health policy. Early on we concentrated on developing a multi-institutional collaborative effort. The QIDS team then developed hypotheses that specifically evaluated the impact of two policy reforms on both the delivery of care and long-term health status in children. We formed an experimental design by randomizing matched blocks of three communities into one of the two policy interventions plus a control group. Based on the reform agenda, one arm of the experiment provided expanded insurance coverage for children; the other introduced performance-based payments to hospitals and physicians. Data were collected in household, hospital-based patient exit, and facility surveys, as well as clinical vignettes, which were used to assess physician practice. Delivery of services and health status were evaluated at baseline and after the interventions were put in place using difference-in-difference estimation. Results We found and addressed numerous challenges conducting this study, namely: formalizing the experimental design using the existing health infrastructure; securing funding to do research coincident with the policy reforms; recognizing biases and designing the study to account for these; putting in place a broad data collection effort to account for

  7. International Interlaboratory Digital PCR Study Demonstrating High Reproducibility for the Measurement of a Rare Sequence Variant.

    PubMed

    Whale, Alexandra S; Devonshire, Alison S; Karlin-Neumann, George; Regan, Jack; Javier, Leanne; Cowen, Simon; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Ana; Jones, Gerwyn M; Redshaw, Nicholas; Beck, Julia; Berger, Andreas W; Combaret, Valérie; Dahl Kjersgaard, Nina; Davis, Lisa; Fina, Frederic; Forshew, Tim; Fredslund Andersen, Rikke; Galbiati, Silvia; González Hernández, Álvaro; Haynes, Charles A; Janku, Filip; Lacave, Roger; Lee, Justin; Mistry, Vilas; Pender, Alexandra; Pradines, Anne; Proudhon, Charlotte; Saal, Lao H; Stieglitz, Elliot; Ulrich, Bryan; Foy, Carole A; Parkes, Helen; Tzonev, Svilen; Huggett, Jim F

    2017-02-07

    This study tested the claim that digital PCR (dPCR) can offer highly reproducible quantitative measurements in disparate laboratories. Twenty-one laboratories measured four blinded samples containing different quantities of a KRAS fragment encoding G12D, an important genetic marker for guiding therapy of certain cancers. This marker is challenging to quantify reproducibly using quantitative PCR (qPCR) or next generation sequencing (NGS) due to the presence of competing wild type sequences and the need for calibration. Using dPCR, 18 laboratories were able to quantify the G12D marker within 12% of each other in all samples. Three laboratories appeared to measure consistently outlying results; however, proper application of a follow-up analysis recommendation rectified their data. Our findings show that dPCR has demonstrable reproducibility across a large number of laboratories without calibration. This could enable the reproducible application of molecular stratification to guide therapy and, potentially, for molecular diagnostics.

  8. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-Based Science Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Croskey, C. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Houser, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Mach, D. M.; Mitchell, J. D.; Stoneburner, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)- based project that investigated thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES was conducted to investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and to validate satellite-based lightning measurements. In addition, as part of the NASA sponsored UAV-based science demonstration program, this project provided a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES employed the Altus II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload included electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES contributed important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) provided cloud-top perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the Altus was flown near, and when possible, over (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time that allowed investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. An innovative real time weather system was used to identify and vector the aircraft to selected thunderstorms and safely fly around these storms, while, at the same time monitor the weather near our base of operations. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations that included radar (Miami and Key West WSRBD, NASA NPOL), satellite imagery, and lightning (NALDN and Los Alamos EDOT) enable the UAV measurements to be more completely

  9. Bioremediation demonstration on Kwajalein Island: Site characterization and on-site biotreatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.; Korte, N.E.; Pickering, D.A. ); Phelps, T.J. )

    1991-09-01

    An environmental study was conducted during February 1991 on Kwajalein Island, a US Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) Base in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI). This study was undertaken for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) acting in behalf of USAKA. The purpose of the study was to determine if selected locations for new construction on Kwajalein Island were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons as suspected and, if so, whether bioremediation appeared to be a feasible technology for environmental restoration. Two different sites were evaluated: (1) the site planned freshwater production facility and (2) a site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank. Within the proposed construction zone for the freshwater production facility (a.k.a desalination plant), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) where either absent or at low levels. Characterization data for another potential construction site adjacent to an aboveground diesel fuel storage tank southeast of the old diesel power plant revealed high concentrations of diesel fuel in the soil and groundwater beneath the site. Results of this investigation indicate that there are petroleum-contaminated soils on Kwajalein Island and bioremediation appears to be a viable environmental restoration technique. Further experimentation and field demonstration are required to determine the design and operating conditions that provide for optimum biodegradation and restoration of the petroleum-contaminated soils. 17 refs., 7 figs., 26 figs.

  10. Baca geothermal demonstration project baseline ecosystem studies of cooling tower emission effects

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, P.; Osterling, R.; Price, D.; Westermeier, J.

    1981-03-01

    Results of baseline studies for boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine in vegetation and soil near the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant are provided for the 1980 sampling season. Preliminary results of visual vegetation assessments and population density studies of soil invertebrate fauna are also provided. Foliage samples were collected for chemical analysis on a total of 17 plots on 5 transects. Two to five plant species were sampled at each plot. Samples were collected in June-July and September. Soil samples were collected at each plot during September. Visual vegetation inspections were conducted along each transect. Eighty-eight soil samples were collected for soil invertebrate studies. Boron, arsenic, mercury, and fluorine levels in vegetation were within normal range for natural vegetation and crops. Concentrations of soil arsenic and mercury were comparable to foliage concentrations. Boron concentrations were lower in soil than in foliage, whereas soil fluorine concentrations were considerably higher than foliage concentrations. With the exception of heavy insect infestations in June-July, no vegetation abnormalities were noted. Preliminary soil invertebrate analysis indicated an overall arthropod density of approximately 100,000/m/sup 2/ which appears within the normal range encountered in forest and meadow soil.

  11. A thorough QTc study demonstrates that olmesartan medoxomil does not prolong the QTc interval

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Nobuko; O'Reilly, Terry E.; Lee, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two studies (ROADMAP and ORIENT) evaluating the renoprotective effects of olmesartan medoxomil (OM) in patients with type 2 diabetes suggested OM is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. We conducted a thorough QTc study to evaluate the effects of OM on cardiac repolarization. A randomized, double‐blind, phase 1 study was conducted per E14 Guidance to assess the effects of single doses of OM therapeutic dose (40 mg), OM supratherapeutic dose (160 mg), placebo, or moxifloxacin (MOXI; 400 mg) on QTc in 56 healthy subjects. The primary endpoint was the baseline‐adjusted, placebo‐corrected QTc interval using Fridericia's formula (ΔΔQTcF) for OM and MOXI. Assay sensitivity was concluded if lower limit of 1‐sided 95%CI > 5 milliseconds of ΔΔQTcF for MOXI. No threshold pharmacologic effect for OM was concluded if upper limit of 1‐sided 95%CI <10 milliseconds for ΔΔQTcF at any timepoint. Pharmacokinetics, ECGs, and safety were assessed. Assay sensitivity was demonstrated. The largest upper limit of the 1‐sided 95%CI for ΔΔQTcF was <5 milliseconds for OM. No clinically significant changes were observed in ECGs. Pharmacokinetics and safety profile were consistent with previous data. Therapeutic and supratherapeutic OM doses had no clinically significant effect on cardiac repolarization and were well tolerated. PMID:26239632

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  14. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  18. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  19. Case Study for the ARRA-Funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Ball State University

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing; Henderson, Jr., Hugh

    2016-12-01

    With funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 ground-source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected in 2009 to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. One of the selected demonstration projects is a district central GSHP system installed at Ball State University (BSU) in Muncie, IN. Prior to implementing the district GSHP system, 47 major buildings in BSU were served by a central steam plant with four coal-fired and three natural-gas-fired steam boilers. Cooling was provided by five water-cooled centrifugal chillers at the District Energy Station South (DESS). The new district GSHP system replaced the existing coal-fired steam boilers and conventional water-cooled chillers. It uses ground-coupled heat recovery (HR) chillers to meet the simultaneous heating and cooling demands of the campus. The actual performance of the GSHP system was analyzed based on available measured data from August 2015 through July 2016, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. Since Phase 1 was funded in part by the ARRA grant, it is the focus of this case study. The annual energy consumption of the GSHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional water-cooled chiller and natural-gas-fired boiler system, both of which meet the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE 90.1-2013). The comparison was made to determine source energy savings, energy cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the GSHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the GSHP system. The following sections summarize the results of the analysis, the lessons learned, and recommendations for improvement

  20. 78 FR 53763 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and... comments in writing, or request more information on the proposed project, contact: Michael Montello, Cancer... Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the...

  1. HIV Conference to Be Held on October 21 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program Conference on “Virus Structure: Putting the Pieces Together” will be held at NCI at Frederick on October 21, 2014, from 1:00 to 5:45 p.m. in the Conference Center auditorium, Building 549.

  2. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  3. NCI's Proteome Characterization Centers Announced | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). CPTAC is a comprehensive, coordinated team effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows.

  4. Treatment of Prostate Cancer using Anti-androgen Small Molecules | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize a new class of small molecules for the treatment of prostate cancer. General information on co-development research collaborations, can be found on our web site (http://ttc.nci.nih.gov/forms).

  5. NCI and the Chinese National Cancer Center pursue new collaborations in cancer research

    Cancer.gov

    CGH Director, Dr. Ted Trimble, and East Asia Program Director, Dr. Ann Chao, traveled to Beijing with Mr. Matthew Brown from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Global Affairs to attend the Joint Meeting of the NCC and the U.S. NCI.

  6. (Update) HIV Conference to Be Held on February 25 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program (HIV DRP), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), will hold a conference on “Host Factors and Cofactors in HIV Infection” at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) campus in Frederick, Md., on Feb. 25, from 1:00 to 5:35 p.m.

  7. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  8. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through February 5, 2016.

  9. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 12, 2013.

  10. NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) cancer information summaries: history, editorial processes, influence, and reach.

    PubMed

    Manrow, Richard E; Beckwith, Margaret; Johnson, Lenora E

    2014-03-01

    In the National Cancer Act of 1971, the Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) was given a mandate to "Collect, analyze, and disseminate all data useful in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer, including the establishment of an International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) to collect, catalog, store, and disseminate insofar as feasible the results of cancer research undertaken in any country for the use of any person involved in cancer research in any country" (National Cancer Act of 1971, S 1828, 92nd Congress, 1st Sess (1971)). In subsequent legislation, the audience for NCI's information dissemination activities was expanded to include physicians and other healthcare professionals, patients and their families, and the general public, in addition to cancer researchers. The Institute's response to these legislative requirements was to create what is now known as the Physician Data Query (PDQ®) cancer information database. From its beginnings in 1977 as a database of NCI-sponsored cancer clinical trials, PDQ has grown to include extensive information about cancer treatment, screening, prevention, supportive and palliative care, genetics, drugs, and more. Herein, we describe the history, editorial processes, influence, and global reach of one component of the PDQ database, namely its evidence-based cancer information summaries for health professionals. These summaries are widely recognized as important cancer information and education resources, and they further serve as foundational documents for the development of other cancer information products by NCI and other organizations.

  11. HIV Conference to Be Held on October 21 at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The HIV Drug Resistance Program Conference on “Virus Structure: Putting the Pieces Together” will be held at NCI at Frederick on October 21, 2014, from 1:00 to 5:45 p.m. in the Conference Center auditorium, Building 549.

  12. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  13. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  14. Reducing Friction: An Update on the NCIP Open Development Initiative - NCI BioMedical Informatics Blog

    Cancer.gov

    NCIP has migrated 132 repositories from the NCI subversion repository to our public NCIP GitHub channel with the goal of facilitating third party contributions to the existing code base. Within the GitHub environment, we are advocating use of the GitHub “fork and pull” model.

  15. 75 FR 61763 - Submission of OMB Review; Comment Request; Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... (NCI), as a sponsor of investigational drug trials, has the responsibility to assure the FDA that investigators in its clinical trials program are maintaining systems for drug accountability. In order to... compliance for patient safety and protections. Frequency of Response: Approximately 16 times per year...

  16. Think Tank: Identifying and Creating the Next Generation of Community-Based Cancer Prevention Studies | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    In late 2015, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention convened cancer prevention research experts and stakeholders to discuss the current state of cancer prevention research, identify key prevention research priorities for the NCI, and identify studies that could be conducted within the NCI Community Oncology Research Program. Read the Cancer Prevention Research journal article (PDF, 532KB). |

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  1. A review of NCI's extramural grant portfolio: identifying opportunities for future research in genes and environment in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghazarian, Armen A; Simonds, Naoko I; Bennett, Kelly; Pimentel, Camilla B; Ellison, Gary L; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Schully, Sheri D; Mechanic, Leah E

    2013-04-01

    Genetic and environmental factors jointly influence cancer risk. The NIH has made the study of gene-environment (GxE) interactions a research priority since the year 2000. To assess the current status of GxE research in cancer, we analyzed the extramural grant portfolio of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from Fiscal Years 2007 to 2009. Publications attributed to selected grants were also evaluated. From the 1,106 research grants identified in our portfolio analysis, a random sample of 450 grants (40%) was selected for data abstraction; of these, 147 (33%) were considered relevant. The most common cancer type was breast (20%, n = 29), followed by lymphoproliferative (10%, n = 14), colorectal (9%, n = 13), melanoma/other skin (9%, n = 13), and lung/upper aerodigestive tract (8%, n = 12) cancers. The majority of grants were studies of candidate genes (68%, n = 100) compared with genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (8%, n = 12). Approximately one-third studied environmental exposures categorized as energy balance (37%, n = 54) or drugs/treatment (29%, n = 43). From the 147 relevant grants, 108 publications classified as GxE or pharmacogenomic were identified. These publications were linked to 37 of the 147 grant applications (25%). The findings from our portfolio analysis suggest that GxE studies are concentrated in specific areas. There is room for investments in other aspects of GxE research, including, but not limited to developing alternative approaches to exposure assessment, broadening the spectrum of cancer types investigated, and conducting GxE within GWAS. This portfolio analysis provides a cross-sectional review of NCI support for GxE research in cancer.

  2. Competencies Demonstrated by Municipal Employees during Adaptation to Climate Change: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruneau, Diane; Kerry, Jackie; Blain, Sylvie; Evichnevetski, Evgueni; Deguire, Paul; Barbier, Pierre-Yves; Freiman, Viktor; Therrien, Jimmy; Langis, Joanne; Lang, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Since coastal communities are already subjected to the impacts of climate change, adaptation has become a necessity. This article presents competencies demonstrated by Canadian municipal employees during an adaptation process to sea level rise. To adapt, the participants demonstrated the following competencies: problem solving (highlighting…

  3. Competencies Demonstrated by Municipal Employees during Adaptation to Climate Change: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruneau, Diane; Kerry, Jackie; Blain, Sylvie; Evichnevetski, Evgueni; Deguire, Paul; Barbier, Pierre-Yves; Freiman, Viktor; Therrien, Jimmy; Langis, Joanne; Lang, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Since coastal communities are already subjected to the impacts of climate change, adaptation has become a necessity. This article presents competencies demonstrated by Canadian municipal employees during an adaptation process to sea level rise. To adapt, the participants demonstrated the following competencies: problem solving (highlighting…

  4. Building connections between datasets, researchers and publications at NCI using RD-Switchboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, L. A.; Wang, J.; Aryani, A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Barlow, M.

    2016-12-01

    Making research data connected, discoverable and reusable are some of the key enablers of the new data-intensive revolution in research. Using the Research Data Switchboard (RD-Switchboard) (http://www.rd-switchboard.org/) on the Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) data collections metadata catalogue, we show how connectivity graphs can provide a possible solution to machine-actionable literature searches to discover links between reseachers, publications and datasets (see http://rd-switchboard.nci.org.au). RD-Switchboard is an open and collaborative software solution initiated by the Data Description Registry Interoperability (DDRI) working group of the Research Data Alliance (RDA https://rd-alliance.org/groups/data-description-registry-interoperability.html). RD-Switchboard connects datasets on the basis of co-authorship or other collaboration arrangements, such as joint funding and grants. The connections among researchers, publications and datasets can help answer questions like "How many datasets published at NCI has being referenced in research journal articles and which articles?"; "How many researchers and institutes are connected to a given dataset?"; "What are derived data products depend on the source reference data at NCI, who generates those derived data products and who uses them?" Hence, NCI incorporated the RD-Switchboard software to help track and analyze the connectivity. The RD-Switchboard connection report provides the number of connections a dataset has - the more connections a dataset has, the higher the relevance it has within the research community. Through analyzing the connections to datasets, it is also possible to identify high value datasets to researchers and organisations, and help measure the impact that these datasets have had in the published literature.

  5. Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) Rendezvous Proximity Operations Design and Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J. J.; Roscoe, C.; Hawes, D. R.; Carrico, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The program encompasses the entire system evolution including system design, acquisition, satellite construction, launch, mission operations, and final disposal. The satellite is scheduled for launch in Fall 2015 with a 1-year mission lifetime. This paper provides a brief mission overview but will then focus on the current design and driving trade study results for the RPO mission specific processor and relevant ground software. The current design involves multiple on-board processors, each specifically tasked with providing mission critical capabilities. These capabilities range from attitude determination and control to image processing. The RPO system processor is responsible for absolute and relative navigation, maneuver planning, attitude commanding, and abort monitoring for mission safety. A low power processor running a Linux operating system has been selected for implementation. Navigation is one of the RPO processor's key tasks. This entails processing data obtained from the on-board GPS unit as well as the on-board imaging sensors. To do this, Kalman filters will be hosted on the processor to ingest and process measurements for maintenance of position and velocity estimates with associated uncertainties. While each satellite carries a GPS unit, it will be used sparsely to conserve power. As such, absolute navigation will mainly consist of propagating past known states, and relative navigation will be considered to be of greater importance. For relative observations

  6. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  7. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student…

  9. Increased insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) expression in small cell lung cancer and the effect of inhibition of IGF1R expression by RNAi on growth of human small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Lu, Pingfang; Liang, Zhu; Zhang, Zhanfei; Shi, Weicheng; Cai, Xiaobi; Chen, Chunyuan

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in tumourigenesis that may be an attractive target for anti-cancer treatment. In this study, the expression and clinical significance of IGF1R were investigated in serum and lung cancer tissues from small cell lung cancinoma (SCLC). We also compared the effect of IGF1R up-regulation and IGF1R inhibition on viability and apoptosis of NCI-H446 cells. We found the concentration of IGF1R in blood serum was significantly increased and positive IGF1R protein in cancer tissue was more prevalent in SCLC. A statistically significant correlation among IGF1R-positve tumors, lymph node metastasis and local invasion was discussed. Furthermore, IGF1R overexpression lead to an increase of cell survival and suppressed cell apoptosis, IGF1R silencing mediated by RNAi abrogate this response of NCI-H446 cells. Our results further demonstrated that the effects of these treatments may be assigned to the effective inhibition of lung cancer cells from Akt/P27(Kip1) pathway in IGF-1R signaling. These features may have important implications for future anti-IGF1R therapeutic approaches.

  10. Quantitative and empirical demonstration of the Matthew effect in a study of career longevity

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Jung, Woo-Sung; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The Matthew effect refers to the adage written some two-thousand years ago in the Gospel of St. Matthew: “For to all those who have, more will be given.” Even two millennia later, this idiom is used by sociologists to qualitatively describe the dynamics of individual progress and the interplay between status and reward. Quantitative studies of professional careers are traditionally limited by the difficulty in measuring progress and the lack of data on individual careers. However, in some professions, there are well-defined metrics that quantify career longevity, success, and prowess, which together contribute to the overall success rating for an individual employee. Here we demonstrate testable evidence of the age-old Matthew “rich get richer” effect, wherein the longevity and past success of an individual lead to a cumulative advantage in further developing his or her career. We develop an exactly solvable stochastic career progress model that quantitatively incorporates the Matthew effect and validate our model predictions for several competitive professions. We test our model on the careers of 400,000 scientists using data from six high-impact journals and further confirm our findings by testing the model on the careers of more than 20,000 athletes in four sports leagues. Our model highlights the importance of early career development, showing that many careers are stunted by the relative disadvantage associated with inexperience. PMID:21173276

  11. Study and Development of a Sub-Orbital Re-Entry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.

    The Italian and European Space Agencies are supporting a research programme, developed in Campania region by a cluster of industries, research institutes and universities, on a low-cost re-entry capsule, able to return payloads from the ISS to Earth and/or to perform short-duration scientific missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ballistic capsule is characterized by a deployable, disposable "umbrella-like" heat shield that allows relatively small dimensions at launch and a sufficient exposed surface area in re-entry conditions, reducing the ballistic coefficient and leading to acceptable heat fluxes, mechanical loads and final descent velocity. ESA is supporting a preliminary study to develop a flight demonstrator of the capsule to be embarked as a secondary payload onboard a sub-orbital sounding rocket. The deployable thermal protection system concept may be applied to future science and robotic exploration mission requiring planetary entry and, possibly also to missions in the framework of Human Space flight, requiring planetary entry or re-entry. The technology offers also an interesting potential for aerobraking, aerocapture and for de-orbiting. This paper summarizes the results of these activities, which are being more and more refined as the work proceeds, including the definition and analysis of the mission scenario, the aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, mechanical and structural analyses and the technical definition of avionics, instrumentation and main subsystems.

  12. Pilot study demonstrating effectiveness of targeted education to improve informed consent understanding in AIDS clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sohini; Lo, Bernard; Strauss, Ronald P; Eron, Joseph; Gifford, Allen L

    2011-11-01

    Assessing and improving informed consent understanding is equally important as obtaining consent from participants in clinical trial research, but developing interventions to target gaps in participants' informed consent understanding remains a challenge. We used a randomized controlled study design to pilot test an educational intervention to improve actual informed consent understanding of new enrollees in the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG). Questionnaires were administered to 24 enrollees to assess their baseline understanding on eight elements of informed consent associated with AIDS clinical trials. Enrollees who scored 18/21(85%) or less were randomly assigned to in-person, targeted education (intervention), or delayed education (control). Two follow-up assessments were administered. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed to determine intervention effectiveness in improving actual informed consent understanding over time. Actual understanding improved at the immediate post-intervention time point with a significant score difference of 2.5 when comparing the intervention and delayed groups. In addition, there was a significant score difference of 3.2 when comparing baseline to three-month follow-up for the two groups, suggesting a statistically significant intervention effect to improve actual understanding of the basic elements of informed consent. The findings demonstrated that one-time targeted education can improve actual informed consent understanding one week after the intervention, but retention of these concepts may require periodic monitoring to ensure comprehension throughout the course of a clinical trial.

  13. Design of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) study.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Elsie M; Blaine, Rachel E; Davison, Kirsten K; Gortmaker, Steven; Anand, Shikha; Falbe, Jennifer; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Perkins, Meghan; Giles, Catherine; Criss, Shaniece; Colchamiro, Rachel; Baidal, Jennifer Woo; Land, Thomas; Smith, Lauren

    2015-02-01

    Childhood obesity is highly prevalent, is associated with both short- and long-term adverse outcomes, disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minority and economically deprived children, and represents a major threat to public health. Among the most promising approaches for its prevention and management are multilevel, multisector strategies. The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study was a comprehensive, systematic intervention to prevent and reduce childhood obesity among low-income children ages 2-12 years in two selected cities in Massachusetts. Building on the Obesity Chronic Care Model, MA-CORD expanded a state public health department community-level obesity prevention initiative that incorporated evidence-based interventions in primary healthcare, the Women, Infants, and Children program, early care and education, schools/afterschool programs, as well as community-wide programs to improve food, beverage, physical activity (PA), and messaging environments. The study used a combination of pre- and post-time series and quasi-experimental designs to examine the extent to which the intervention resulted in changes in BMI, individual-level lifestyle behaviors, satisfaction with healthcare services, and quality of life among children, as well as changes in health policies, programs, and environments in the two intervention cities, compared to a comparison city. The intervention period was 2 years. MA-CORD will determine the extent to which a multisetting, multilevel intervention that integrates activities in primary care with broader public health interventions in schools, early care and education, and the community at large can improve children's dietary and PA behaviors and ultimately reduce obesity in low-income children.

  14. Design of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Rachel E.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven; Anand, Shikha; Falbe, Jennifer; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Perkins, Meghan; Giles, Catherine; Criss, Shaniece; Colchamiro, Rachel; Woo Baidal, Jennifer; Land, Thomas; Smith, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Childhood obesity is highly prevalent, is associated with both short- and long-term adverse outcomes, disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minority and economically deprived children, and represents a major threat to public health. Among the most promising approaches for its prevention and management are multilevel, multisector strategies. Methods/Design: The Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) Study was a comprehensive, systematic intervention to prevent and reduce childhood obesity among low-income children ages 2–12 years in two selected cities in Massachusetts. Building on the Obesity Chronic Care Model, MA-CORD expanded a state public health department community-level obesity prevention initiative that incorporated evidence-based interventions in primary healthcare, the Women, Infants, and Children program, early care and education, schools/afterschool programs, as well as community-wide programs to improve food, beverage, physical activity (PA), and messaging environments. The study used a combination of pre– and post–time series and quasi-experimental designs to examine the extent to which the intervention resulted in changes in BMI, individual-level lifestyle behaviors, satisfaction with healthcare services, and quality of life among children, as well as changes in health policies, programs, and environments in the two intervention cities, compared to a comparison city. The intervention period was 2 years. Conclusions: MA-CORD will determine the extent to which a multisetting, multilevel intervention that integrates activities in primary care with broader public health interventions in schools, early care and education, and the community at large can improve children's dietary and PA behaviors and ultimately reduce obesity in low-income children. PMID:25469676

  15. Caveolin-1 knockdown is associated with the metastasis and proliferation of human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Xue, Liyan; Du, Sha; Sun, Mingzhong; Hu, Jun; Hao, Lihong; Gong, Linlin; Yeh, Dongmei; Xiong, Hai; Shao, Shujuan

    2012-09-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV-1), one component of caveolae, involves in multiple cellular processes and signal transductions. We previously showed that the expression of CAV-1 gene in NCI-H446 cells inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell metastasis. Here we explore the function of CAV-1 on tumor growth and metastasis by using NCI-H460 in vitro. First, we established NCI-H460 cell line, which CAV-1 was stably knockdown. Then we investigated the effects of CAV-1 on the morphology, proliferation, cell cycle and metastasis potential for NCI-H460 cell by crystal violet stains, CCK-8, colony formation, flow cytometry, scratch-wound assay and transwell assay. Western blot was used to examine the expression changes of cyclin D1, PCNA, E-cadherin and β-catenin. Our results showed stable knockdown of CAV-1 inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H460 cells. Cell cycle of the transfected cells was arrested in G1/S phase and the expressions of cyclin D1 and PCNA protein were downregulated. Downregulation of CAV-1 promoted the migration and invasion abilities of NCI-H460 cells in vitro. The expression of β-catenin increased and the level of E-cadherin decreased. In summary, our findings provide experimental evidence that CAV-1 may function as a proproliferative and antimetastatic gene in NCI-H460 cell line.

  16. NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.

    SciTech Connect

    Newmiller, Jeff; Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2006-03-01

    The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

  17. Computational analysis of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric steroid profiling in NCI H295R cells following angiotensin II, forskolin and abiraterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Mangelis, Anastasios; Dieterich, Peter; Peitzsch, Mirko; Richter, Susan; Jühlen, Ramona; Hübner, Angela; Willenberg, Holger S; Deussen, Andreas; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones, which regulate a plethora of physiological functions, are produced via tightly controlled pathways. Investigations of these pathways, based on experimental data, can be facilitated by computational modeling for calculations of metabolic rate alterations. We therefore used a model system, based on mass balance and mass reaction equations, to kinetically evaluate adrenal steroidogenesis in human adrenal cortex-derived NCI H295R cells. For this purpose a panel of 10 steroids was measured by liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry. Time-dependent changes in cell incubate concentrations of steroids - including cortisol, aldosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and their precursors - were measured after incubation with angiotensin II, forskolin and abiraterone. Model parameters were estimated based on experimental data using weighted least square fitting. Time-dependent angiotensin II- and forskolin-induced changes were observed for incubate concentrations of precursor steroids with peaks that preceded maximal increases in aldosterone and cortisol. Inhibition of 17-alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase with abiraterone resulted in increases in upstream precursor steroids and decreases in downstream products. Derived model parameters, including rate constants of enzymatic processes, appropriately quantified observed and expected changes in metabolic pathways at multiple conversion steps. Our data demonstrate limitations of single time point measurements and the importance of assessing pathway dynamics in studies of adrenal cortical cell line steroidogenesis. Our analysis provides a framework for evaluation of steroidogenesis in adrenal cortical cell culture systems and demonstrates that computational modeling-derived estimates of kinetic parameters are an effective tool for describing perturbations in associated metabolic pathways.

  18. Assessing the condition of bayous and estuaries: Bayou Chico Gulf of Mexico demonstration study

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, K.; Acevedo, M.; Waller, T.; Kennedy, J.; Simons, J.; Mayer, F.; Lewis, M.; Walker, W.; Ammann, L.

    1995-12-31

    A demonstration study was conducted in May 1994 on Bayou Chico to assess the utility of various assessment and measurement endpoints in determining the condition of bayous and estuaries. Bayou Chico has water quality problems attributed to its low flushing rate and urban/industrial land use in its watershed. The sampling scheme assessed the within-sampling station and spatial variability of measurement endpoints. Fourteen sampling stations in Bayou Chico and 3 stations in Pensacola Bay were selected based on an intensified EMAP sampling grid. Time and space coordinated sampling was conducted for: sediment contaminants and properties, sediment toxicity, water quality, benthic infauna, zooplankton and phytoplankton populations. Fish and crabs were also collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers and organic chemical residues. Primary productivity was measured via the light bottle dark bottle oxygen method and via diurnal oxygen measurements made with continuous recording data sondes. Stream sites were evaluated for water and sediment quality, water and sediment toxicity, benthic invertebrates and fish. Watershed analyses included assessment of land use/landcover (via SPOT and TM images), soils, pollution sources (point and non-point) and hydrography. These data were coordinated via an Arc/Info GIS system for display and spatial analysis. 1994 survey data were used to parameterize environmental fate models such as SWMM (Storm Water Management Model), DYNHYD5 (WASP5 hydrodynamics model) and WASP5 (Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program) to make predictions about the dynamics and fate of chemical contaminants in Bayou Chico. This paper will present an overview, and report on the results in regards to within-site and spatial variability in Bayou Chico. Conclusions on the efficacy of the assessment and measurement endpoints in evaluating the condition (health) of Bayou Chico will be presented.

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  14. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  19. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  1. Demonstration of fundamental statistics by studying timing of electronics signals in a physics-based laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Shaun E.; Semkow, Thomas M.; Remling, David J.; Bradt, Clayton J.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed accessible methods to demonstrate fundamental statistics in several phenomena, in the context of teaching electronic signal processing in a physics-based college-level curriculum. A relationship between the exponential time-interval distribution and Poisson counting distribution for a Markov process with constant rate is derived in a novel way and demonstrated using nuclear counting. Negative binomial statistics is demonstrated as a model for overdispersion and justified by the effect of electronic noise in nuclear counting. The statistics of digital packets on a computer network are shown to be compatible with the fractal-point stochastic process leading to a power-law as well as generalized inverse Gaussian density distributions of time intervals between packets.

  2. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Fabricio G; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H G; Doroshow, James H; Reinhold, William C; Pommier, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Alterations of DNA repair genes in the NCI-60 cell lines and their predictive value for anticancer drug activity

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fabricio G.; Matuo, Renata; Tang, Sai-Wen; Rajapakse, Vinodh N.; Luna, Augustin; Sander, Chris; Varma, Sudhir; Simon, Paul H.G.; Doroshow, James H.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair (DNAR) genes is associated with genomic instability and cancer predisposition; it also makes cancer cells reliant on a reduced set of DNAR pathways to resist DNA-targeted therapy, which remains the core of the anticancer armamentarium. Because the landscape of DNAR defects across numerous types of cancers and its relation with drug activity have not been systematically examined, we took advantage of the unique drug and genomic databases of the US National Cancer Institute cancer cell lines (the NCI-60) to characterize 260 DNAR genes with respect to deleterious mutations and expression down-regulation; 169 genes exhibited a total of 549 function-affecting alterations, with 39 of them scoring as putative knockouts across 31 cell lines. Those mutations were compared to tumor samples from 12 studies of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). Based on this compendium of alterations, we determined which DNAR genomic alterations predicted drug response for 20,195 compounds present in the NCI-60 drug database. Among 242 DNA damaging agents, 202 showed associations with at least one DNAR genomic signature. In addition to SLFN11, the Fanconi anemia-scaffolding gene SLX4 (FANCP/BTBD12) stood out among the genes most significantly related with DNA synthesis and topoisomerase inhibitors. Depletion and complementation experiments validated the causal relationship between SLX4 defects and sensitivity to raltitrexed and cytarabine in addition to camptothecin. Therefore, we propose new rational uses for existing anticancer drugs based on a comprehensive analysis of DNAR genomic parameters. PMID:25758781

  4. A study on integrating surveys of terrestrial natural resources: The Oregon Demonstration Project

    Treesearch

    J. Jeffery Goebel; Hans T. Schreuder; Carol C. House; Paul H. Geissler; Anthony R. Olsen; William Williams

    1998-01-01

    An interagency project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating Federal surveys of terrestrial natural resources and offers a vision for that integration. At locations selected from forest inventory and analysis, National forest system Region 6, and national resources inventory surveys in a six-county area in Northern Oregon, experienced teams interpreted and made...

  5. Demonstrating Empathy: A Phenomenological Study of Instructional Designers Making Instructional Strategy Decisions for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vann, Linda S.

    2017-01-01

    Instructional designers are tasked with making instructional strategy decisions to facilitate achievement of learning outcomes as part of their professional responsibilities. While the instructional design process includes learner analysis, that analysis alone does not embody opportunities to assist instructional designers with demonstrations of…

  6. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. Definition of a flight demonstration involving an Automated Beam Builder and the building and assembling of large structures is presented.

  7. 2β, 3β, 23-trihydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-olic acid (TUA) isolated from Actinidia chinensis Radix inhibits NCI-H460 cell proliferation by decreasing NF-κB expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi-Lai; Li, Hong-Liang; Huang, Zhi-Qin; Chen, Yi-Jian; Liu, Ta-Si

    2015-10-05

    A natural ursolic compound, 2β, 3β, 23-trihydroxy-urs-12-ene-28-olic acid (TUA) was isolated from the root of Actinidia chinensis Planch (A. chinensis Radix). Since a large number of triterpenoid compound has marked anticancer effects toward various types of cancer cell lines in vitro, this study was carried out to investigate the anticancer effect of TUA in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs) and the underlying apoptotic mechanism of TUA was examined in NCI-H460 cell lines. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle were measured using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The activity of transcription factor NF-κB was determined by EMSA method. The expression of apoptosis- and proliferation-related proteins was determined by western blotting. The effect of TUA on NF-κB mRNA expression in NCI-H460 cells was detected by RT-PCR. TUA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 cells. Also, TUA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 cells. Such an effect was accompanied by p65 (NF-κB subunit) inactivation by an inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, and by inhibition of p65 mRNA expressions. Consistently Overall, our findings suggest that TUA induces apoptosis via inhibition of NF-κB (p65) expression level and activation of IκBα in NCI-H460 cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  8. Development of Criteria to Measure the Extent of Implementation and the Effectiveness of Demonstration in Vocational Education. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This document presents case studies of eight demonstration projects selected to assess the practicality and feasibility of a monograph for improving and measuring the impact of vocational education demonstration projects. An introduction provides background of the project that developed that monograph and information on the case studies, including…

  9. Case Study of The ARRA-Funded GSHP Demonstration at the Natural Sources Building, Montana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Mini; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-04-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 ground source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected in 2009 to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. One of the selected demonstration projects was proposed by Montana Tech of the University of Montana for a 56,000 sq ft, newly constructed, on-campus research facility – the Natural Resources Building (NRB) located in Butte, Montana. This demonstrated GSHP system consists of a 50 ton water-to-water heat pump and a closed-loop ground heat exchanger with two redundant 7.5 hp constant-speed pumps to use water in the nearby flooded mines as a heat source or heat sink. It works in conjunction with the originally installed steam HX and an aircooled chiller to provide space heating and cooling. It is coupled with the existing hot water and chilled water piping in the building and operates in the heating or cooling mode based on the outdoor air temperature. The ground loop pumps operate in conjunction with the existing pumps in the building hot and chilled water loops for the operation of the heat pump unit. The goal of this demonstration project is to validate the technical and economic feasibility of the demonstrated commercial-scale GSHP system in the region, and illustrate the feasibility of using mine waters as the heat sink and source for GSHP systems. Should the demonstration prove satisfactory and feasible, it will encourage similar GSHP applications using mine water, thus help save energy and reduce carbon emissions. The actual performance of the system is analyzed with available measured data for January through July 2014. The annual energy performance is predicted and compared with a baseline scenario, with the heating and cooling provided by the originally designed systems. The comparison is made in terms of energy savings, operating cost savings, cost-effectiveness, and environmental benefits. Finally

  10. Albemarle Sound demonstration study of the national monitoring network for US coastal waters and their tributaries

    Treesearch

    Michelle Moorman; Sharon Fitzgerald; Keith Loftin; Elizabeth Fensin

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) is implementing a demonstration project in the Albemarle Sound for the National Monitoring Network for U.S. coastal waters and their tributaries. The goal of the National Monitoring Network is to provide information about the health of our oceans and coastal ecosystems and inland influences on coastal waters for improved resource...

  11. NCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. Learn more...

  12. Two- and Three-Centered Hydrogen Bonds Involving Organic Fluorine Stabilize Conformations of Hydrazide Halo Derivatives: NMR, IR, QTAIM, NCI, and Theoretical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipriya, A; Suryaprakash, N

    2016-10-13

    The presence of two- and three-centered hydrogen bonds (HB) of the type H(N)···X-C and C═O···H(N)···X-C, respectively, involving organic fluorine in the synthesized hydrazide halo derivatives have been convincingly established by extensive multidimensional NMR studies. The stabilized conformation of the molecules involving two- and three-centered HBs derived by NMR studies have been further confirmed by density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations, such as quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), noncovalent interaction (NCI), and relaxed potential energy scan.

  13. Cytogenetic characterization of NCI-H69 and NCI-H69AR small cell lung cancer cell lines by spectral karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Salido, Marta; Arriola, Edurne; Carracedo, Alma; Cañadas, Israel; Rovira, Ana; Espinet, Blanca; Rojo, Federico; Arumi, Montse; Serrano, Sergi; Albanell, Joan; Sole, Francesc

    2009-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) shows an excellent sensitivity to chemotherapy, but commonly develops resistance after a few months. An early identification of a genomic marker in drug discovery may help to select patients who would respond to treatment in clinical trials. Herein, we characterized the parental NCI-H69 (sensitive) and NCI-H69AR (anthracycline-resistant) cell lines by G-banding and spectral karyotyping (SKY). In the H69 cell line, SKY allows us to redefine three alterations that are not well characterized by G-banding and to confirm seven. For H69AR, SKY redefined 10 chromosomal alterations and confirmed four observed by G-banding. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the amplification of the MYCN gene (dmin or hsr) in these two cell lines, although only the H69AR cell line showed MYCN amplification in the form of homogeneously staining regions. It should be noted that a new derivative chromosome appears in the H69AR cell line, a der(16)t(3;16;18;5;18), characterized by SKY as showing 18q amplification. Amplification of genes located in this region may correlate with resistance to anticancer therapies. We suggest that the 18q marker may have a broader application in SCLC. In conclusion, SKY provides a useful complementary technique to routine cytogenetics for the accurate characterization of SCLC cell lines and could provide some relevant information concerning regions involved in chemoresistance.

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first (useful as an introduction to kinetics) shows how the rate of a reaction is fast at first and then gradually decreases to zero when one reactant has been used up. The second is a gas density demonstration using 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane. (JN)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  8. 2007 EORTC-NCI-ASCO annual meeting: molecular markers in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lukan, C

    2008-01-01

    The recent EORTC-NCI-ASCO Annual Meeting on 'Molecular Markers in Cancer' was held on 15-17 November 2007 in Brussels, Belgium. It was the largest meeting to date and marked the first year in which the American Association of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) joined in the efforts of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in organizing this annual event. More than 300 clinicians, pathologists, laboratory scientists and representatives from regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry came together for three days of intense discussion, debate and reflection on the latest biomarker therapeutic discoveries, strategies and clinical applications. The poster discussion sessions featured 79 research abstracts. The three most outstanding abstracts, all authored by young female researchers, were selected for presentation during the main meeting sessions. Highlights of each scientific session are presented.

  9. Molecular mechanism of antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cell line.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Muhammad; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Farooq, Ahsana D; Rasheed, Huma; Mesaik, Ahmed M; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Channa, Iffat S; Khan, Salman A; Erukainure, Ochuko L

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. We investigated the molecular mechanism of antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cells by cell cycle, viability, cytokines, calcium ion and gene expression analysis. Acacia honey inhibited cells proliferation, arrested G0/G1 phase, stimulated cytokines, calcium ion release as well as suppressed p53 and Bcl-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. We proposed that the molecular mechanism of the antiproliferation potential of Acacia honey on NCI-H460 cell line is due to cell cycle arrest, stimulation of cytokines and calcium ion as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 and p53 genes.

  10. CGH and OCC Announce a New, Two-Year Funding Opportunity for NCI-designated Cancer Centers

    Cancer.gov

    CGH and OCC announce a new funding opportunity available from CGH for cancer prevention and control (CPC) researchers at NCI-designated cancer centers: Administrative Supplements to Promote Cancer Prevention and Control Research in Low and Middle Income Countries.

  11. Jean C. Zenklusen, M.S., Ph.D., Discusses the NCI Genomics Data Commons at AACR 2014 - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    At the AACR 2014 meeting, Dr. Jean C. Zenklusen, Director of The Cancer Genome Atlas Program Office, highlights the Genomics Data Commons, a harmonized data repository that will allow simultaneous access and analysis of NCI genomics data, including The Ca

  12. Feasibility Study of Integrating IDELIX’s Pliable Display Technology into the COPlanS Technology Demonstration Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-31

    Feasibility Study of Integrating IDELIX’s Pliable Display Technology into the COPlanS Technology Demonstration Software Issue Number: Version 1... Technology Demonstration Software 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...Collaborative Operations Planning System (COPlanS) technology demonstration software in the areas of collaboration and data visualization using IDELIX’s Pliable

  13. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) assays.  This community web-based repository for well-characterized quantitative proteomic assays currently consists of 456 unique peptide assays to 282 unique proteins and ser

  14. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). It will evaluate disparity issues and outcomes in cancer care delivery and treatments. |

  15. Analysis of Maryland Cancer Patient Participation in NCI Supported Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Ellison, Gary L.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and countylevel socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Patients and Methods Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2,240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. Results For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P < .05) in the percentage of black patients accrued onto cancer treatment trials. Logistic regression models uncovered different patterns of accrual for female patients and male patients on county-level socioeconomic factors. Conclusion Results highlight disparities in the accrual of Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved. PMID:18612153

  16. Analysis of Maryland Cancer Patient Participation in NCI Supported Cancer Treatment Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Ellison, Gary L.; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and countylevel socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Patients and Methods Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2,240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. Results For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P < .05) in the percentage of black patients accrued onto cancer treatment trials. Logistic regression models uncovered different patterns of accrual for female patients and male patients on county-level socioeconomic factors. Conclusion Results highlight disparities in the accrual of Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved. PMID:19711497

  17. Human Antibodies and Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Therapeutic | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer and Inflammation Program researchers developed multiple novel human anti-HIV-1 domain antibodies and their fusion proteins with two-domain or single-domain human soluble CD4 that can potentially be used alone or synergistically with other anti-HIV-1 antibodies and antiretroviral drugs as therapeutics and/or preventatives for infection by different HIV-1 strains. These are available for co-development and licensing.

  18. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures, Volume 2: Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure (LSS) technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. It is concluded that an LSS flight demonstration using an Automated Beam Builder and the orbiter as a construction base, could be performed in the 1983-1984 time period. The estimated cost is $24 million exclusive of shuttle launch costs. During the mission, a simple space platform could be constructed in-orbit to accommodate user requirements associated with earth viewing and materials exposure experiments needs.

  19. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  20. Identification of Two Nickel Ion-Induced Genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H2O2 concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H2O2, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  1. NCI60 Cancer Cell Line Panel Data and RNAi Analysis Help Identify EAF2 as a Modulator of Simvastatin and Lovastatin Response in HCT-116 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Sevtap; Azorsa, David O.; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Ibrahim-Zada, Irada; Gonzales, Irma M.; Arora, Shilpi; Henderson, Meredith C.; Choi, Yun Hee; Briollais, Laurent; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Tuzmen, Sukru

    2011-01-01

    Simvastatin and lovastatin are statins traditionally used for lowering serum cholesterol levels. However, there exists evidence indicating their potential chemotherapeutic characteristics in cancer. In this study, we used bioinformatic analysis of publicly available data in order to systematically identify the genes involved in resistance to cytotoxic effects of these two drugs in the NCI60 cell line panel. We used the pharmacological data available for all the NCI60 cell lines to classify simvastatin or lovastatin resistant and sensitive cell lines, respectively. Next, we performed whole-genome single marker case-control association tests for the lovastatin and simvastatin resistant and sensitive cells using their publicly available Affymetrix 125K SNP genomic data. The results were then evaluated using RNAi methodology. After correction of the p-values for multiple testing using False Discovery Rate, our results identified three genes (NRP1, COL13A1, MRPS31) and six genes (EAF2, ANK2, AKAP7, STEAP2, LPIN2, PARVB) associated with resistance to simvastatin and lovastatin, respectively. Functional validation using RNAi confirmed that silencing of EAF2 expression modulated the response of HCT-116 colon cancer cells to both statins. In summary, we have successfully utilized the publicly available data on the NCI60 cell lines to perform whole-genome association studies for simvastatin and lovastatin. Our results indicated genes involved in the cellular response to these statins and siRNA studies confirmed the role of the EAF2 in response to these drugs in HCT-116 colon cancer cells. PMID:21483694

  2. Lithium-Ion Battery Demonstrated for NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, William R.; Baldwin, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have attractive performance characteristics that are well suited to a number of NASA applications. These rechargeable batteries produce compact, lightweight energy-storage systems with excellent cycle life, high charge/discharge efficiency, and low self-discharge rate. NASA Glenn Research Center's Electrochemistry Branch designed and produced five lithium-ion battery packs configured to power the liquid-air backpack (LAB) on spacesuit simulators. The demonstration batteries incorporated advanced, NASA-developed electrolytes with enhanced low-temperature performance characteristics. The objectives of this effort were to (1) demonstrate practical battery performance under field-test conditions and (2) supply laboratory performance data under controlled laboratory conditions. Advanced electrolyte development is being conducted under the Exploration Technology Development Program by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Three field trials were successfully completed at Cinder Lake from September 10 to 12, 2007. Extravehicular activities of up to 1 hr and 50 min were supported, with residual battery capacity sufficient for 30 min of additional run time. Additional laboratory testing of batteries and cells is underway at Glenn s Electrochemical Branch.

  3. NCI Thesaurus: a semantic model integrating cancer-related clinical and molecular information.

    PubMed

    Sioutos, Nicholas; de Coronado, Sherri; Haber, Margaret W; Hartel, Frank W; Shaiu, Wen-Ling; Wright, Lawrence W

    2007-02-01

    Over the last 8 years, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched a major effort to integrate molecular and clinical cancer-related information within a unified biomedical informatics framework, with controlled terminology as its foundational layer. The NCI Thesaurus is the reference terminology underpinning these efforts. It is designed to meet the growing need for accurate, comprehensive, and shared terminology, covering topics including: cancers, findings, drugs, therapies, anatomy, genes, pathways, cellular and subcellular processes, proteins, and experimental organisms. The NCI Thesaurus provides a partial model of how these things relate to each other, responding to actual user needs and implemented in a deductive logic framework that can help maintain the integrity and extend the informational power of what is provided. This paper presents the semantic model for cancer diseases and its uses in integrating clinical and molecular knowledge, more briefly examines the models and uses for drug, biochemical pathway, and mouse terminology, and discusses limits of the current approach and directions for future work.

  4. CellMiner Companion: an interactive web application to explore CellMiner NCI-60 data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Gribskov, Michael; Hazbun, Tony R; Pascuzzi, Pete E

    2016-08-01

    The NCI-60 human tumor cell line panel is an invaluable resource for cancer researchers, providing drug sensitivity, molecular and phenotypic data for a range of cancer types. CellMiner is a web resource that provides tools for the acquisition and analysis of quality-controlled NCI-60 data. CellMiner supports queries of up to 150 drugs or genes, but the output is an Excel file for each drug or gene. This output format makes it difficult for researchers to explore the data from large queries. CellMiner Companion is a web application that facilitates the exploration and visualization of output from CellMiner, further increasing the accessibility of NCI-60 data. The web application is freely accessible at https://pul-bioinformatics.shinyapps.io/CellMinerCompanion The R source code can be downloaded at https://github.com/pepascuzzi/CellMinerCompanion.git ppascuzz@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 3D Models of the NCI60 Cell Lines for Screening Oncology Compounds.

    PubMed

    Selby, Mike; Delosh, Rene; Laudeman, Julie; Ogle, Chad; Reinhart, Russell; Silvers, Thomas; Lawrence, Scott; Kinders, Robert; Parchment, Ralph; Teicher, Beverly A; Evans, David M

    2017-03-01

    The NCI60 cell line panel screen includes 60 human tumor cell lines derived from nine tumor types that has been used over the past 20+ years to screen small molecules, biologics, and natural products for activity. Cells in monolayer culture in 96-well plates are exposed to compounds for 48 h, and Sulforhodamine B is used to determine cell viability. Data analysis tools such as COMPARE allow classification of compounds based on the pattern of cell line response. However, many compounds highly active in monolayer cell culture fail to show efficacy in vivo. Therefore, we explored 3D culture of the NCI60 panel as a strategy to improve the predictive accuracy of the screen. 3D cultures more closely resemble tumors than monolayer cultures with tighter cell-cell contact and nutrient and oxygen gradients between the periphery and the center. We optimized the NCI60 cell line panel for generating 3D spheroids of a prespecified diameter (300-500 µm) in ultra-low attachment (ULA) plates. Spheroids were classified into four categories based on imaging, and concentration response of select agents in 2D and 3D models is presented.

  6. Computational Challenges and Collaborative Projects in the NCI Quantitative Imaging Network.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Keyvan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Chenevert, Thomas L; Rubin, Daniel L; Sunderland, John J; Nordstrom, Robert J; Buatti, John; Hylton, Nola

    2016-12-01

    The Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) conducts research in development and validation of imaging tools and methods for predicting and evaluating clinical response to cancer therapy. Members of the network are involved in examining various imaging and image assessment parameters through network-wide cooperative projects. To more effectively use the cooperative power of the network in conducting computational challenges in benchmarking of tools and methods and collaborative projects in analytical assessment of imaging technologies, the QIN Challenge Task Force has developed policies and procedures to enhance the value of these activities by developing guidelines and leveraging NCI resources to help their administration and manage dissemination of results. Challenges and Collaborative Projects (CCPs) are further divided into technical and clinical CCPs. As the first NCI network to engage in CCPs, we anticipate a variety of CCPs to be conducted by QIN teams in the coming years. These will be aimed to benchmark advanced software tools for clinical decision support, explore new imaging biomarkers for therapeutic assessment, and establish consensus on a range of methods and protocols in support of the use of quantitative imaging to predict and assess response to cancer therapy.

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  4. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  6. Prototype demonstration studies of production of methane from municipal solid waste at Pompano Beach, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Faroog, S.; Daly, E.; Dasgupta, A.; Gerrish, M.P.; Sengupta, S.; Wong, K.F.

    1980-12-01

    A prototype demonstration plant for the production of methane from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in amounts up to 100 tons per day is built at Pompano Beach, Florida. The plant is capable of producing 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas per ton of municipal waste. Approximately half of the gas is methane, the other half CO/sub 2/ along with some trace gases. In this plant the raw municipal solid waste is shredded, ferrous metals removed magnetically and air classified to obtain an organic-rich light weight fraction, which is periodically mixed with sewage sludge and fed into the anaerobic digester. The processed effluent is filtered in a vacuum filter and the emerging filter cake is disposed on the nearby existing sanitary landfill. The filtrate is recirculated into the digester. Various gas, solid and liquid streams coming out of the digester are analyzed for physical, chemical and biological pollution parameters.

  7. The ping-pong cannon demonstration: Optical studies and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Richard; Stein, Keith

    2005-09-01

    This presentation describes the use of laser pulse photography, optical timing, pulsed Schlieren, and heterodyne interferometry to look more closely at the fluid dynamics of a recently popular lecture demonstration-the so-called ``ping-pong cannon.'' Optical diagnostic techniques have been applied to two types of these cannons, and led to greater knowledge of the kinematics of the accelerating ball, along with some insight into the exit mechanism and subsequent target interactions. Also will be described how a 1D numerical simulation allows visualization of shock wave formation within the tube during ball acceleration. Solutions of the Euler equation are obtained using the method of space-time finite elements, while the ball is tracked as an interface in the compressible fluid mesh. [Work supported in part by the MN NASA Space Grant and the Carlsen-Lewis Endowment of Bethel University.

  8. Multi-Lab EV Smart Grid Integration Requirements Study. Providing Guidance on Technology Development and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, T.; Meintz, A.; Hardy, K.; Chen, B.; Bohn, T.; Smart, J.; Scoffield, D.; Hovsapian, R.; Saxena, S.; MacDonald, J.; Kiliccote, S.; Kahl, K.; Pratt, R.

    2015-05-28

    The report begins with a discussion of the current state of the energy and transportation systems, followed by a summary of some VGI scenarios and opportunities. The current efforts to create foundational interface standards are detailed, and the requirements for enabling PEVs as a grid resource are presented. Existing technology demonstrations that include vehicle to grid functions are summarized. The report also includes a data-based discussion on the magnitude and variability of PEVs as a grid resource, followed by an overview of existing simulation tools that vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. can be used to explore the expansion of VGI to larger grid functions that might offer system and customer value. The document concludes with a summary of the requirements and potential action items that would support greater adoption of VGI.

  9. Synthesis and in vitro characterization of platinum(II) anticancer coordinates using FTIR spectroscopy and NCI COMPARE: A fast method for new compound discovery.

    PubMed

    Berger, Gilles; Leclercqz, Hélène; Derenne, Allison; Gelbcke, Michel; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Nève, Jean; Mathieu, Véronique; Dufrasne, François

    2014-07-01

    Platinum-based drugs have been used for several decades to treat various cancers successfully. Cisplatin is the original compound in this class; it cross-links DNA, resulting in cell cycle arrest and cell death via apoptosis. Cisplatin is effective against several tumor types but exhibits toxic side effects; in addition, tumors often develop resistance. An original in vitro approach is proposed to determine whether platinum-based research compounds are good candidates for further study by comparing them to marketed drugs using FTIR spectroscopy and the COMPARE analysis from the NCI. Both methods can produce fingerprints and highlight differences between the compounds, classifying the candidates and revealing promising derivatives.

  10. Improving Students' Study Habits by Demonstrating the Mnemonic Benefits of Semantic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugg, Julie M.; DeLosh, Edward L.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an in-class exercise that illustrates the advantage of semantic over nonsemantic study habits. The exercise includes a survey of students' current study strategies, followed by the presentation of an abbreviated version of Craik and Tulving's(1975) classic levels-of-processing experiment. We observed significant benefits of…

  11. Demonstration of a hermetic airborne ozone disinfection system: studies on E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, W J; Bahnfleth, W P; Striebig, B A; Whittam, T S

    2003-01-01

    An enclosed flow-through system using airborne ozone for disinfection and which removes the ozone with a catalytic converter was tested with a strain of Escherichia coli. Petri dishes containing the microorganisms were inserted in a chamber and exposed for 10-480 min to ozone concentrations between 4 and 20 ppm. Death rates in excess of 99.99% were achieved. Survival data is fitted to a two-stage curve with a shoulder based on the multihit target model. Ozone was removed from the exhaust air to nondetectable levels using a metal oxide based catalyst. The possibility of using ozone as an airborne disinfectant for internal building surfaces and catalytically removing the ozone on exhaust is demonstrated to be feasible. A model for the decay of Bacillus cereus under ozone exposure is proposed as an example for predicting the sterilization of buildings contaminated with anthrax. The potential for disinfecting airstreams and removing ozone to create breathable air is also implied by the results of this experiment.

  12. Building America Case Study: Demonstration House of Cold-Climate Solutions for Affordable Housing, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    Single family homes in urban areas that are available for renovation by nonprofit developers are often in rough shape (1MM to 2MM nationally). Budgeting has historically focused on improving homes to meet basic housing standards. A rising interest in the long-term impact of homeownership has introduced the need to balance basic needs with home performance. This demonstration project aims to help nonprofit affordable housing developers become familiar with three Building America performance measures, the installation processes, and impacts and benefits of each. A story and a half home in North Minneapolis, MN was presented by Urban Homeworks our local nonprofit partner. The team helped them install three researched upgrade measures: exterior roof insulation or 'overcoat,' exterior foundation insulation, or 'excavationless', and a combined space and water heating HVAC system or 'combi'. To maximize efficiency of application and to address budget issues, the Team worked with Urban Homeworks to identify ways to use volunteers and construction training programs to install the measures. An open invitation to visit the job site was extended to other nonprofit developers and industry partners to encourage dialog about the systems during live installation.

  13. Demonstration of digital radiographs by means of ink jet-printed paper copies: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Nilsson, J; Lyttkens, K; Andersson, B; Holmer, N G

    1992-11-01

    Different digital medical images have been printed on paper with a continuous ink jet printer, and the quality has been evaluated. The emphasis has been on digital chest radiographs from a computed radiography system. The ink jet printing technique is described as well as the handling of the image data from image source to printer. Different versions of paper prints and viewing conditions were compared to find the optimum alternative. The evaluation has been performed to maximize the quality of the paper images to make them conform with the corresponding film prints and monitor images as much as possible. The continuous ink jet technique offers high-quality prints on paper at a considerably lower cost per copy compared with the cost of a film print. With a future switch-over from diagnosing of digital images on film to diagnosing them on monitors, hard copies for demonstration purposes will occasionally be needed. This need can be filled by ink jet-printed paper copies.

  14. Behavioral studies on the enantiomers of butaclamol demonstrating absolute optical specificity for neuroleptic activity.

    PubMed

    Voith, K; Cummings, J R

    1976-08-01

    Butaclamol is a member of a new chemical class for which antipsychotic activity in humans has been demonstrated. Butaclamol, a racemate, has been resolved into its optical isomers and a separation of activities was found to occur between the (+) and (-) enantiomers. The present experiments show that at doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 mg/kg the (+) enantiomer abolished amphetamine-induced (a) stereotyped behavior and (b) rotational behavior in rats with unilateral lesions in the substantia nigra. It also inhibited the lever-pressing response in the continuous (Sidman) avoidance procedure, blocked discriminated avoidance behavior, and decreased ambulation and rearing in the open field. In contrast, the (-) enantiomer was devoid of behavioral activity at 100-500 times larger doses. At considerably higher doses (+)-butaclamol antagonized epinephrine-induced mortality. Again, the (-)-butaclamol was devoid of this activity as well. The significance of absolute optical specifity manifested by a neuroleptic drug is discussed in the light of dopaminergic and adrenergic mechanisms.

  15. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  16. Estradiol and progesterone-mediated regulation of P-gp in P-gp overexpressing cells (NCI-ADR-RES) and placental cells (JAR).

    PubMed

    Coles, Lisa D; Lee, Insong J; Voulalas, Pamela J; Eddington, Natalie D

    2009-01-01

    The effect of progesterone and estrogen treatment on the expression and function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was evaluated in JAR cells and a P-gp overexpressing cell line, NCI-ADR-RES. Western blot analysis and real-time Q-PCR were used to evaluate P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA expression respectively in the cells following incubation with progesterone (P4) and/or beta-estradiol (E2). Cellular uptake studies of the P-gp substrates, saquinavir and paclitaxel, were performed to evaluate function. Treatment with either E2 or P4 resulted in a significant increase in P-gp protein levels in the NCI-ADR-RES cells at concentrations of or greater than 100 nM or 10 nM, respectively. JAR cells also had increased levels of P-gp with 100 nM of P4 but were much more sensitive to E2 showing increased P-gp at a concentration of 1 nM. Furthermore, E2 or P4 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in cellular uptake of the P-gp substrates tested in these cells lines. Based on mRNA quantitation, a transient increase (2-fold) in MDR1 levels was observed at 8 h postincubation with either E2 or P4, while MDR1 levels remained high in the JAR cells treated with E2 for 72 h postincubation. The addition of actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor negated the increase in P-gp by P4 and E2. P4 and E2 increase P-gp expression and function in NCI-ADR-RES and JAR cells with the ERalpha-expressing cells (JAR) much more sensitive to E2. Furthermore, transcriptional regulation by E2 and P4 likely contributes to the modulation of P-gp levels.

  17. Bufalin Inhibits NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cell Metastasis In Vitro by Inhibiting MAPKs, MMPs, and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Hwar; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Yu, Fu-Shun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Bufalin, a component of Chan Su (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been known to have antitumor effects for thousands of years. In this study, we investigated its anti-metastasis effects on NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Under sub-lethal concentrations (from 25 up to 100 nM), bufalin significantly inhibits the invasion and migration nature of NCI-H460 cells that were measured by Matrigel Cell Migration Assay and Invasion System. Bufalin also suppressed the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which was examined by gelatin zymography methods. Western blotting revealed that bufalin depressed several key metastasis-related proteins, such as NF-κB, MMP-2, MMP-9, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), phosphorylated Akt, growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated p38, and phosphorylated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). As evidenced by immunostaining and the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), bufalin induced not only a decreased cytoplasmic NF-κB production, but also decreased its nuclear translocation. Several metastasis-related genes, including Rho-associated (Rho A), coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1), and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), were down-regulated after bufalin treatment. In conclusion, bufalin is effective in inhibiting the metastatic nature of NCI-H460 cells in low, sub-lethal concentrations. Such an effect involves many mechanisms including MMPs, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF-κB systems. Bufalin has a potential to evolve into an anti-metastasis drug for human lung cancer in the future.

  18. Demonstrating Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Richard DeLombard of NASA's Glenn Research Center, hands the relase line for the Microgravity Demonstrator to a visitor for her to start a short experiment showing the effects of microgravity on candle flames. Combustion physics will be a major line of investigation for NASA aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The Microgravity Demonstrator is frequently used at shows and schools to illustrate how phenomena change in microgravity. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF LOW COST, LOW BURDEN EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR USE IN LONGITUDINAL COHORT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large longitudinal cohort study designed to evaluate the association between children's exposures to environmental agents and health outcomes presents many challenges for exposure monitoring. Exposure of the child must be measured for multiple chemicals through multiple path...

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF LOW COST, LOW BURDEN EXPOSURE MONITORING STRATEGIES FOR USE IN LONGITUDINAL COHORT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large longitudinal cohort study designed to evaluate the association between children's exposures to environmental agents and health outcomes presents many challenges for exposure monitoring. Exposure of the child must be measured for multiple chemicals through multiple path...