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Sample records for ndfe1-xrhx aso superconductor

  1. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the superconducting transition temperature and superfluid density of SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Lu, W.; Yang, J.; Yi, W.; Li, Z. C.; Zhang, C.; Ren, Z. A.; Che, G. C.; Sun, L. L.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, X. J.; Zhao, Z. X.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured magnetic susceptibility of iron pnictide superconductors SmFeAsO0.85 and PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO under hydrostatic pressure up to 1.15 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) deceases linearly and the Meissner signal size also decreases with increasing pressure for SmFeAsO0.85 . In contrast, the TC of PrFe0.925Co0.075AsO initially increases with pressure then saturates above ˜0.8GPa . Meanwhile its Meissner signal exhibits the similar pressure dependence. Our results indicate that the pressure dependences of TC and superfluid density in both systems are positively correlated which suggests that these quaternary iron-based superconductors are not conventional BCS ones.

  2. PREFACE: Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths (ASOS9) Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths (ASOS9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the first time since its inaugural meeting in Lund in 1983, the triennial international conference on Atomic Spectroscopy and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS) returned to Lund, Sweden. Lund has been a home to atomic spectroscopy since the time of Janne Rydberg, and included the pioneering work in laboratory and solar spectroscopy by Bengt Edlén, who presented the initial ASOS talk in 1983. The ninth ASOS was hosted by the Lund Observatory and Physics Department of Lund University, 7-10 August 2007, and was attended by 99 registrants. An encouraging sign for the field was the number of young researchers in attendance. This volume of Physica Scripta contains contributions from the invited presentations of the conference. For the first time, papers from the ASOS9 poster presentations have been made feely available online in a complementary volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. With these two volumes the character of ASOS9 is more evident, and together they serve as a review of the state of atomic spectroscopy for spectrum analysis and the determination of oscillator strengths and their applications. The goal of ASOS is to be a forum for atomic spectroscopy, where both the providers and the users of atomic data, which includes wavelengths, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths and line shape parameters, can meet to discuss recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques and their application to understanding the physical processes that are responsible for producing observed spectra. The applications mainly originate from the fields of astrophysics and plasma physics, which includes fusion energy and lighting research. The oral presentations, all but one of which are presented in this volume, provided an extensive synopsis of techniques currently in use and those that are being planned. New to ASOS9 was the extent to which techniques such as cold, trapped atoms and molecules and frequency combs are

  3. The Lyman-α Solar Telescope (LST) for the ASO-S mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    The Lyman-α (Lyα) Solar Telescope (LST) is one of the payloads for the proposed Space-Borne Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO-S). LST consists of a Solar Disk Imager (SDI) with a field-of-view (FOV) of 1.2 R⊙ (R⊙ = solar radius), a Solar Corona Imager (SCI) with an FOV of 1.1 - 2.5 R⊙, and a full-disk White-light Solar Telescope (WST) with the same FOV as the SDI, which also serves as the guiding telescope. The SCI is designed to work in the Lyα (121.6 nm) waveband and white-light (for polarization brightness observation), while the SDI will work in the Lyα waveband only. The WST works in both visible (for guide) and ultraviolet (for science) broadband. The LST will observe the Sun from disk-center up to 2.5 R⊙ for both solar flares and coronal mass ejections with high tempo-spatial resolution

  4. The Lyman-alpha Solar Telescope for the ASO-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui

    2015-08-01

    The Lyman-alpha Solar Telescope (LST) is one of the payloads for the proposed Space-Borne Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO-S). LST consists of a Solar Disk Imager (SDI) with a field-of-view (FOV) of 1.2 Rsun, a Solar Corona Imager (SCI) with an FOV of 1.1 - 2.5 Rsun, and a full-disk White-light Solar Telescope (WST) with an FOV of 1.2 Rsun, which also serves as the guiding telescope. The SCI is designed to work at the Lyman-alpha waveband and white-light, while the SDI will work at the Lyman-alpha waveband only. The WST works both in visible (for guide) and ultraviolet (for science) white-light. The LST will observe the Sun from disk-center up to 2.5 solar radii for both solar flares and coronal mass ejections. In this presentation, I will give an introduction to LST, including scientific objectives, science requirement, instrument design and current status.

  5. Superconductor developments

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, D.

    1989-04-05

    I will cover the technology of the new oxide supeconductors and how they might relate to the existing superconductors. Fermilab and the high energy physics community in general have had much to do with the development of the ''old'' superconductors. Bednorz and M/umlt u/ller must be credited with the idea of setting out on the search for the new superconductors.

  6. Coexistence of magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity in SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO seen in 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, G.; Demarco, M.; Chudyk, M.; Steiner, J.; Coffey, D.; Zeng, H.; Li, Y. K.; Cao, G. H.; Xu, Z. A.

    2011-08-01

    The Mössbauer spectra (MS) of powder samples of SmFe1-xCoxAsO (x = 0.0, 0.05, and 0.1) were measured in applied fields up to 9 T and at temperatures up to 298 K. SmFeAsO is magnetically ordered with TN = 137 K and has a hyperfine magnetic field of (4.98 ± 0.18) T at 4.2 K. In applied magnetic fields, the MS is consistent with a distribution of hyperfine magnetic fields of width Happlied+Hhyperfine. This arises because the angles between the direction of the ordered field in the crystallites making up the sample are randomly distributed about the direction of the applied field. The MS of the superconductors SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO (TC≃5 K) and SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO (TC≃17 K) are well described by a single peak from room temperature to 4.2 K indicating the absence of static magnetic order. However, the half width at half maximum, Γ, of the peak in SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO increases with decreasing temperature from its high temperature value, 0.13 mm/s at 25 K, to 0.25 mm/s at 10 K. No such temperature dependence is seen in SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO. We analyze this temperature dependence in terms of a fluctuating hyperfine magnetic field model whose frequency at 4.2 K is found to be ˜5-10 MHz, giving direct evidence of coexisting magnetic fluctuations and superconductivity at the interface in the phase diagram between the regions with magnetic and superconducting order. In a 5 T applied field, SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO is no longer superconducting; however, the temperature-dependent fluctuating magnetic field is still present and largely unchanged. The absence of fluctuations in superconducting SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO and their presence in superconducting SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO in zero applied field and in nonsuperconducting SmFe0.95Co0.05AsO at 5 T suggests that magnetic order is in competition with superconductivity in SmFe1-xCoxAsO.

  7. Implications of ASOS winds on regulatory dispersion modeling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.B.; Brower, R.P.

    1998-12-31

    With the advent of the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) throughout the United States during the 1990`s, an unprecedented level of meteorological data is now available. For the first time, observations of standard meteorological variables are available on a minute-by-minute basis. As a result, ASOS has tremendously increased the real-time data available for both weather forecasting and aviation purposes. However, the affect of the ASOS method of data collection on the dispersion modeling community is less clear. Because the hourly data now being reported at most stations across the country are being gathered in a fundamentally different way than previously, it is prudent to examine the differences between hourly meteorological observations gathered before and after ASOS. This paper scrutinizes wind speed and direction data gathered at Baltimore-Washington International Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport and quantifies the differences. Wind data are critical in determining the transport and dispersion of pollutant plumes. Relationships between manually gathered wind data and ASOS wind data are examined. Finally, potential ramifications on dispersion modeling applications are discussed.

  8. Organic superconductors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Gunzi; Yoshida, Yukihiro

    2011-06-01

    The present status of organic superconductors of charge-transfer (CT) type based on donor molecules is reviewed. Along with the superconducting phases of such materials and also of oxide superconductors, reside spin-ordered phases such as spin-density wave (SDW) and antiferromagnetic (AF) phases. We briefly describe the recent development of superconductors having a superconducting phase next to a spin-disorder state (quantum spin liquid state). In addition to the CT type superconductors, there are a few single-component superconductors under high pressure.

  9. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  10. The evaluation of ASOS for the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yersavich, Ann; Wheeler, Mark; Taylor, Gregory; Schumann, Robin; Manobianco, John

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) evaluation of the effectiveness and utility of the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) in terms of spaceflight operations and user requirements. In particular, the evaluation determines which of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) observation requirements can be satisfied by ASOS. This report also includes a summary of ASOS' background, current configuration and specifications, system performance, and the possible concepts of operations for use of ASOS at the SLF. This evaluation stems from a desire by the Air Force to determine if ASOS units could be used to reduce the cost of SLF meteorological observations.

  11. Rapid microwave synthesis of the iron arsenides NdFeAsO and NdFe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}AsO

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, Sean W.; Rachdi, Omar D.; Subramanian, M.A.

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: For the first time, a rapid method for synthesizing NdFeAsO and NdFe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}AsO is reported. This method uses 2.45 GHz microwave radiation and an additional microwave susceptor to drive the reaction. The superconducting properties NdFe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}AsO of microwave synthesized materials match well with those reported previously. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave assisted solid state synthesis of NdFeAsO and NdFe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}AsO is reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of high quality samples is achieved after 50 min microwave exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical properties of microwave samples match those prepared conventionally. -- Abstract: The future of iron pnictide superconductors in technology is still undecided. While these materials are now known to possess relatively high critical temperatures and critical magnetic fields, processing methods for these superconductors are still in the development stage. Recently we have been investigating possible ways to speed up the synthetic process for obtaining polycrystalline iron arsenide superconductors and other transition metal pnictides. Here we report the synthesis of NdFeAsO and NdFe{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}AsO in less than 1 h total exposure to microwave radiation using an additional microwave susceptor to surround the reaction ampoule. Structure and property measurements reveal the samples to be of high quality and superconducting when Co doped.

  12. Superconductor Composite

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, Stephen E.; Burlone, Dominick A.; Morgan; Carol W.

    1999-02-02

    A superconducting conductor fabricated from a plurality of wires, e.g., fine silver wires, coated with a superconducting powder. A process of applying superconducting powders to such wires, to the resulting coated wires and superconductors produced therefrom.

  13. Superconductor consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    A program to develop explosively shock consolidated monoliths of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/minus/x/ ceramic superconductors has been ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory since last year. Shock consolidation can produce a near 100% theoretical density, bulk superconductor that does not require a post anneal in oxygen. Shock compaction is also an excellent means of creating a good electrical contact weld between the ceramic superconductor and a metal such as copper. Elimination of the post anneal and low temperature shock welding of the cladding metal are unique advantages stemming from the shock compaction processing. Successful shock compaction processing will enable production of a wide variety of complex ceramic-superconductor forms tailored for specific defense application requirements. Shock compaction can be developed into industrial manufacturing processes. DuPont now makes diamond powder this way. Shock compacted superconductor billets can be used in applications where a solid superconductor form is required (e.g., magnetic bearings, bus bar for a niobium-tin FEL SMES, motor rotors, etc.), or they can be post processed by extrusion and other swaging processes to produce textured wires and tapes for electrical current carrying applications. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Superconductor consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudhammer, K. P.

    A program to develop explosively shock consolidated monoliths of YBa2Cu3O(sub 7-x) ceramic superconductors has been ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory since last year. Shock consolidation can produce a near 100 percent theoretical density, bulk superconductor that does not require a post anneal in oxygen. Shock compaction is also an excellent means of creating a good electrical contact weld between the ceramic superconductor and a metal such as copper. Elimination of the post anneal and low temperature shock welding of the cladding metal are unique advantages stemming from the shock compaction processing. Successful shock compaction processing will enable production of a wide variety of complex ceramic superconductor forms tailored for specific defense application requirements. Shock compaction can be developed into industrial manufacturing processes. Shock compacted superconductor billets can be used in applications where a solid superconductor form is required (e.g., magnetic bearings, bus bar for a niobium-tin FEL SMES, motor rotors, etc.) or they can be post processed by extrusion and other swaging processes to produce textured wires and tapes for electrical current carrying applications.

  15. Superconductor cable

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank; Marzahn, Erik

    2010-05-04

    A superconductor cable is described, having a superconductive flexible cable core (1) , which is laid in a cryostat (2, 3, 4), in which the cable core (1) runs in the cryostat (2, 3, 4) in the form of a wave or helix at room temperature.

  16. Organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jérome, D.

    1994-10-01

    The discovery of organic superconductors in 1980 was an happy conclusion of a search for high T c superconductors (although T c was modestly in the Kelvin range). The first generation of organic superconductors belonged to a large family of quasi-one-dimensional conducting cation radical salts. Most of them exhibit a wide range of new phenomena, including the competition between ground states, the influence of a magnetic field on the non ordered phase of a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas and the onset of spin density wave phases at high magnetic field with quantized Hall effect. The extensive study of the (TM) 2X series has shown that electron interactions are repulsive and of the order of the electron bandwidth. However, the nature of the ground states relies essentially on the balance between charge localisation boosted by the Umklapp scattering and the interchain hopping intergal. Second and third generation organic superconductors are two and three dimensional molecular conductors respectively with maximum T c of 12K (ET) 2X and 33 K (fullerides).

  17. Coseismic rupturing stopped by Aso volcano during the 2016 Mw 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan.

    PubMed

    Lin, A; Satsukawa, T; Wang, M; Mohammadi Asl, Z; Fueta, R; Nakajima, F

    2016-11-18

    Field investigations and seismic data show that the 16 April 2016 moment magnitude (Mw) 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake produced a ~40-kilometer-long surface rupture zone along the northeast-southwest-striking Hinagu-Futagawa strike-slip fault zone and newly identified faults on the western side of Aso caldera, Kyushu Island, Japan. The coseismic surface ruptures cut Aso caldera, including two volcanic cones inside it, but terminate therein. The data show that northeastward propagation of coseismic rupturing terminated in Aso caldera because of the presence of magma beneath the Aso volcanic cluster. The seismogenic faults of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake may require reassessment of the volcanic hazard in the vicinity of Aso volcano.

  18. Coseismic rupturing stopped by Aso volcano during the 2016 Mw 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A.; Satsukawa, T.; Wang, M.; Mohammadi Asl, Z.; Fueta, R.; Nakajima, F.

    2016-11-01

    Field investigations and seismic data show that the 16 April 2016 moment magnitude (Mw) 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake produced a ~40-kilometer-long surface rupture zone along the northeast-southwest-striking Hinagu-Futagawa strike-slip fault zone and newly identified faults on the western side of Aso caldera, Kyushu Island, Japan. The coseismic surface ruptures cut Aso caldera, including two volcanic cones inside it, but terminate therein. The data show that northeastward propagation of coseismic rupturing terminated in Aso caldera because of the presence of magma beneath the Aso volcanic cluster. The seismogenic faults of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake may require reassessment of the volcanic hazard in the vicinity of Aso volcano.

  19. Superconductor cable

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Darrell F.; Lake, Bill L.; Ballinger, Ronald G.

    1988-01-01

    A superconducting cable comprising an in-situ-formed type II superconductor, e.g. Nb.sub.3 Sn, in association with a stabilizing conductor both in heat transfer relationship with at least one passage adapted to carry liquified gaseous refrigerant. The conductor and said at least one passage are enclosed by a sheath comprising an alloy consisting essentially of about 49% nickel, about 4% chromium, about 3% niobium, about 1.4% titanium, about 1% aluminum, balance essentially iron.

  20. Chiral superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kallin, Catherine; Berlinsky, John

    2016-05-01

    Chiral superconductivity is a striking quantum phenomenon in which an unconventional superconductor spontaneously develops an angular momentum and lowers its free energy by eliminating nodes in the gap. It is a topologically non-trivial state and, as such, exhibits distinctive topological modes at surfaces and defects. In this paper we discuss the current theory and experimental results on chiral superconductors, focusing on two of the best-studied systems, Sr2RuO4, which is thought to be a chiral triplet p-wave superconductor, and UPt3, which has two low-temperature superconducting phases (in zero magnetic field), the lower of which is believed to be chiral triplet f-wave. Other systems that may exhibit chiral superconductivity are also discussed. Key signatures of chiral superconductivity are surface currents and chiral Majorana modes, Majorana states in vortex cores, and the possibility of half-flux quantum vortices in the case of triplet pairing. Experimental evidence for chiral superconductivity from μSR, NMR, strain, polar Kerr effect and Josephson tunneling experiments are discussed.

  1. Analysis of Fumarole Acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Yokoo, A.; Fee, D.; Huang, Y. C.; Yoshikawa, S.; Utsugi, M.; Minami, T.; Ohkura, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lowermost portion of large eruption columns is the momentum-driven, fluid flow portion known as a volcanic jet. The perturbation of the atmosphere from this region produces a sound known as jetting or jet noise. Recent work has shown that this volcanic jet noise produced by a volcano has similar characteristics as the sound from jet and rocket engines. The study of volcanic jet noise has gained much from laboratory jet engine studies; however, jet engines have been engineered to reduce noise thereby limiting their use as a comparison tool to the complex, ever-changing volcanic jet. Previous studies have noted that fumaroles produce jet noise without further detailed investigation. The goal of this work is to enhance our understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We aim to characterize the acoustic signature of fumaroles and evaluate if fumarolic jets scale to that of large volcanic jets. To investigate this, we deployed a 6-element acoustic array at two different locations along the edge of the crater wall at Aso Volcano, Japan from early July through mid-August 2015. Approximately two months before this deployment, the pyroclastic cone within Aso's crater partially collapsed into the vent. The cone was constructed during both ash venting and strombolian-style explosive activity in the last year. After the deployment, on July 13 a new small vent opened on the southwest flank of the pyroclastic cone. The vent is several meters in diameter and has consistent gas jetting which produces audible jet noise. To better capture the acoustic signature of the gas jetting we moved the array to the southwestern edge of the crater. The array is 230 meters from the vent and is positioned 54 degrees from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle usually not feasible in volcanic environments. Preliminary investigations suggest directionality at the source and the influence of topography along the propagation path as

  2. AgNa2Mo3O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Hamadi; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The title compound, silver disodium trimolybdenum(VI) nonaoxide arsenate, AgNa2Mo3O9AsO4, was prepared by a solid-state reaction at 808 K. The structure consists of an infinite (Mo3AsO13)n ribbon, parallel to the c axis, composed of AsO4 tetra­hedra and MoO6 octa­hedra sharing edges and corners. The Na and Ag ions partially occupy several independent close positions, with various occupancies, in the inter-ribbon space delimited by the one-dimensional framework. The composition was refined to Ag1.06(1)Na1.94(1)Mo3O9AsO4. PMID:22219728

  3. Superconductor cable

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE

    2009-12-15

    A superconductor cable includes a superconductive cable core (1) and a cryostat (2) enclosing the same. The cable core (1) has a superconductive conductor (3), an insulation (4) surrounding the same and a shielding (5) surrounding the insulation (4). A layer (3b) of a dielectric or semiconducting material is applied to a central element (3a) formed from a normally conducting material as a strand or tube and a layer (3c) of at least one wire or strip of superconductive material is placed helically on top. The central element (3a) and the layer (3c) are connected to each other in an electrically conducting manner at the ends of the cable core (1).

  4. Ferromagnetic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxley, Andrew D.

    2015-07-01

    The co-existence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism is of potential interest for spintronics and high magnetic field applications as well as a fascinating fundamental state of matter. The recent focus of research is on a family of ferromagnetic superconductors that are superconducting well below their Curie temperature, the first example of which was discovered in 2000. Although there is a 'standard' theoretical model for how magnetic pairing might bring about such a state, why it has only been seen in a few materials that at first sight appear to be very closely related has yet to be fully explained. This review covers the current state of knowledge of the magnetic and superconducting properties of these materials with emphasis on how they conform and differ from the behaviour expected from the 'standard' model and from each other.

  5. Raman microscopy of synthetic goudeyite (YCu6(AsO4)2(OH)6 x 3H2O).

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Weier, Matt; Martens, Wayde N

    2006-03-01

    Raman microscopy has been used to study the molecular structure of a synthetic goudeyite (YCu(6)(AsO(4))(3)(OH)(6) x 3H(2)O). These types of minerals have a porous framework similar to that of zeolites with a structure based upon (A(3+))(1-x)(A(2+))(x)Cu(6)(OH)(6)(AsO(4))(3-x)(AsO(3)OH)(x). Two sets of AsO stretching vibrations were found and assigned to the vibrational modes of AsO(4) and HAsO(4) units. Two Raman bands are observed in the region 885-915 and 867-870 cm(-1) region and are assigned to the AsO stretching vibrations of (HAsO(4))(2-) and (H(2)AsO(4))(-) units. The position of the bands indicates a C(2v) symmetry of the (H(2)AsO(4))(-) anion. Two bands are found at around 800 and 835 cm(-1) and are assigned to the stretching vibrations of uncomplexed (AsO(4))(3-) units. Bands are observed at around 435, 403 and 395 cm(-1) and are assigned to the nu(2) bending modes of the HAsO(4) (434 and 400 cm(-1)) and the AsO(4) groups (324 cm(-1)).

  6. Raman microscopy of synthetic goudeyite (YCu 6(AsO 4) 2(OH) 6·3H 2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Weier, Matt; Martens, Wayde N.

    2006-03-01

    Raman microscopy has been used to study the molecular structure of a synthetic goudeyite (YCu 6(AsO 4) 3(OH) 6·3H 2O). These types of minerals have a porous framework similar to that of zeolites with a structure based upon (A 3+) 1- x(A 2+) xCu 6(OH) 6(AsO 4) 3- x(AsO 3OH) x. Two sets of AsO stretching vibrations were found and assigned to the vibrational modes of AsO 4 and HAsO 4 units. Two Raman bands are observed in the region 885-915 and 867-870 cm -1 region and are assigned to the AsO stretching vibrations of (HAsO 4) 2- and (H 2AsO 4) - units. The position of the bands indicates a C 2v symmetry of the (H 2AsO 4) - anion. Two bands are found at around 800 and 835 cm -1 and are assigned to the stretching vibrations of uncomplexed (AsO 4) 3- units. Bands are observed at around 435, 403 and 395 cm -1 and are assigned to the ν2 bending modes of the HAsO 4 (434 and 400 cm -1) and the AsO 4 groups (324 cm -1).

  7. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel; Aoki, Yosuke; Borgstrom, Sven; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Geshi, Nobuo

    2017-05-01

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic phreatomagmatic eruptions associated with steady subsidence. We analyse the deformation of Aso using SAR images from 1993 to 2011 and compare it with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g. atmospheric effects, coherence loss, low signal-to-noise ratio), we observe a steady subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998, which suggests an overall contraction of a magmatic source below the caldera centre, from 4 to 5 km depth. We propose that the observed contraction may have been induced by the release of the magmatic fluids feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, such as at Aso. Our study underlines the importance of defining any eruptive potential also from deflating magmatic systems with open conduit.

  8. La variété β-NaMoO2(AsO4)

    PubMed Central

    Ben Hlila, Soumaya; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, sodium dioxidomolybdenum(VI) arsenate(V), β-NaMoO2AsO4, was prepared by solid-state reaction at 953 K. In the crystal structure, the AsO4 tetra­hedra and MoO6 octa­hedra (both with m symmetry) share corner atoms to form a three-dimensional framework that delimits cavities parallel to [010] where disordered six-coordinated sodium cations (half-occupation) are located. Structural relationships between the different orthoarsenates of the AMoO2AsO4 series (A = Ag, Li, Na, K and Rb) are discussed. PMID:21581739

  9. 78 FR 18314 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 169--Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC; Subzone 169A (Textile Fabric Adhesive Bandage Coating and Production); Sarasota... facility is used for the production of plastic and textile fabric adhesive bandages. ASO is also...

  10. ESR Study of Electron-Nuclear Dipolar Relaxation for AsO 44-Spin Probe in the Paraelectric Phase of KH 2AsO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakvin, B.; Merunka, D.

    1997-05-01

    Saturation behavior of allowed and forbidden ESR transition of AsO44-paramagnetic probe in KH2AsO4was studied in the wide temperature interval around the paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition,Tc. The ratios between forbidden and allowed line intensities were employed to deduce information on the electron-nuclear dipolar (END) relaxation mechanism. It was shown that a proton END relaxation mechanism exhibits an extremal temperature behavior in the paraelectric phase around 230 K. The extremal temperature behavior was described by employing a model of proton hopping along the O-H···O bonds around the paramagnetic centers, and the correlation time of this hopping was estimated in the wide temperature range in the paraelectric phase (150-330 K). The temperature dependence of effective proton distance from the neighbor oxygens was obtained, and it was discussed in terms of a localization of the spin density on these oxygens caused by charge inbalance in the As-O bonds in the ferroelectric phase.

  11. Magma plumbing system at the beginning of repeated caldera eruption: A case study on Aso-1 erupted about 270 ky ago from Aso caldera, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, I.; Hoshizumi, H.; Miyabuchi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the commencement of magma plumbing system of a polygenetic caldera, we started petrological study on the earliest eruptive product of Aso caldera, SW Japan. Aso caldera is one of the active volcano in Japan which have produced four stages (Aso-1, -2, -3, -4) of large-scale pyroclastic flow deposits 270 to 90 ky. ago. A suite of samples were collected from the bottom of Aso-1 pyroclastic flow deposit and from the underlying tephra layer (Ono et al., 1979). The tephra comprises more than 10 pumice fall units inter-layered by dark gray volcanic ash. For whole rock chemistry, coarser pumice fragments were separated. For mineral and glass chemistry, phenocrysts and glass particles were handpicked from the sieved 500-1000 um fractions under a binocular microscope. This fraction consist of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, variably vesiculated volcanic glass fragments, and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. They were analyzed using an electron micro-probe. The suite of samples are similar and major temporal change is the chemical composition of orthopyroxenes; those from upper horizon are relatively Mg rich. Anorthite content of plagioclase phenocryst is bimodal 49-53 mol. % (major) and 57-70 mol. % (minor). Silica content of matrix glass fall in a narrow range 68-70 wt. %. Temperature and oxygen fugacity were estimated to be 865-905 deg-C and FMQ+2 log unit, respectively, using ILMAT (Lepage, 2003). Pressure and water content of the magma are estimated to be 5-7 kbar and 0.5-1 wt. % H2O, respectively, using rhyolite-MELTS (Gualda et al., 2012) on the most undifferentiated tholeiitic basalt of Aso 4KC-03 (Hunter, 1998) to reproduce the observed composition of matrix glass (68-70 wt. % SiO2) and plagioclase (An 49-53 mol. %). The calcic plagioclase (An 57-70 mol. %), however, suggest that the basalt was initially hydrous and require magma degassing before the differentiation. If we assume degassing by magma convection in a conduit (Kazahaya et al., 1994), the

  12. A Comparison of Ceiling and Visibility Observation for NWS Manned Observation Sites and ASOS Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    Distribution Diagram ASOS Reports Snow (7.300 data points) . 2. . . . 2W2 E 100 ’- I -1 -50 . . .20 D ifeec ByCtgr jN-SS Fiur 442. cte n rqec...wind. Knowing only the objective result of aerosol scattering within a football size volume of air, gives no indication of what a pilot will encounter

  13. Effects of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes on the Aso volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Yasuhisa; Hasenaka, Toshiaki; Torii, Masayuki

    2017-05-01

    Large earthquakes occurred in the central part of Kumamoto Prefecture on April 14-16, 2016, causing severe damage to the northern segment of the Hinagu faults and the eastern segment of the Futagawa faults. Earthquake surface ruptures appeared along these faults and on the Aso volcanic edifice, which in turn generated landslides. We conducted landform change analysis of the central cones of Aso volcano by using satellite and aerial photographs. First, we categorized the topographical changes as surface scarps, arc-shaped cracks, and linear cracks. Field survey indicated that landslides caused the scarps and arc-shaped cracks, whereas faulting caused the linear cracks. We discovered a surface rupture concentration zone (RCZ) formed three ruptures bands with many surface ruptures and landslides extending from the west foot to the center of the Aso volcanic edifice. The magmatic volcanic vents that formed during the past 10,000 years are located along the north margin of the RCZ. Moreover, the distribution and dip of the core of rupture concentration zone correspond with the Nakadake craters. We conclude that a strong relationship exists between the volcanic vents and fault structures in the central cones of Aso volcano.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Gaia17aso and Gaia17asp transients confirmed by Euler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Roelens, M.; Semaan, T.; Palaversa, L.; Mowlavi, N.; Eyer, L.

    2017-03-01

    We report confirmation of Gaia Science Alerts transients Gaia17aso and Gaia17asp. Images were obtained through modified Gunn R band filter of the ECAM instrument installed on the Swiss 1.2m Euler telescope at La Silla, on 2017 March 21st - 22nd.

  15. K(MoO2)4O3(AsO4)

    PubMed Central

    Jouini, Raja; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    A new compound with a non-centrosymmetric structure, potassium tetra­kis­[dioxomolybdenum(IV)] arsenate trioxide, K(MoO2)4O3(AsO4), has been synthesized by a solid-state reaction. The [(MoO2)4O3(AsO4)]+ three-dimensional framework consists of single arsenate AsO4 tetra­hedra, MoO6 octa­hedra, MoO5 bipyramids and bi­octa­hedral units of edge-sharing Mo2O10 octa­hedra. The [Mo2O8]∞ octa­hedral chains running along the a-axis direction are connected through their corners to the AsO4 tetra­hedra, MoO6 octa­hedra and MoO5 bipyramids, so as to form large tunnels propagating along the a axis in which the K+ cations are located. This structure is compared with compounds containing M 2O10 (M = Mo, V, Fe) dimers and with those containing M 2O8 (M = V) chains. PMID:23794968

  16. Fine uniform filament superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Li, Qi; Roberts, Peter R.; Antaya, Peter D.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.; Hancock, Steven; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Garrant, Jennifer H.; Craven, Christopher A.

    2002-01-01

    A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

  17. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  18. Photothermal measurements of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, G.S.; Studenmund, W.R.; Fishman, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    A photothermal technique has been used to measure diffusion and critical temperature in high temperature superconductors. The technique is particularly suitable for determining material quality and inhomogeneity.

  19. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  20. Fusion of multi-temporal Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) lidar data for mountainous vegetation ecosystems studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz, A.; Painter, T. H.; Saatchi, S.; Bormann, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    Fusion of multi-temporal Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) lidar data for mountainous vegetation ecosystems studies The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), a coupled scanning lidar system and imaging spectrometer, to quantify the spatial distribution of snow volume and dynamics over mountains watersheds (Painter et al., 2015). To do this, ASO weekly over-flights mountainous areas during snowfall and snowmelt seasons. In addition, there are additional flights in snow-off conditions to calculate Digital Terrain Models (DTM). In this study, we focus on the reliability of ASO lidar data to characterize the 3D forest vegetation structure. The density of a single point cloud acquisition is of nearly 1 pt/m2, which is not optimal to properly characterize vegetation. However, ASO covers a given study site up to 14 times a year that enables computing a high-resolution point cloud by merging single acquisitions. In this study, we present a method to automatically register ASO multi-temporal lidar 3D point clouds. Although flight specifications do not change between acquisition dates, lidar datasets might have significant planimetric shifts due to inaccuracies in platform trajectory estimation introduced by the GPS system and drifts of the IMU. There are a large number of methodologies that address the problem of 3D data registration (Gressin et al., 2013). Briefly, they look for common primitive features in both datasets such as buildings corners, structures like electric poles, DTM breaklines or deformations. However, they are not suited for our experiment. First, single acquisition point clouds have low density that makes the extraction of primitive features difficult. Second, the landscape significantly changes between flights due to snowfall and snowmelt. Therefore, we developed a method to automatically register point clouds using tree apexes as keypoints because they are features that are supposed to experience little change

  1. Fabrication of high temperature superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Ma, Beihai; Li, Meiya

    2003-06-17

    A method of forming a biaxially aligned superconductor on a non-biaxially aligned substrate substantially chemically inert to the biaxially aligned superconductor comprising is disclosed. A non-biaxially aligned substrate chemically inert to the superconductor is provided and a biaxially aligned superconductor material is deposited directly on the non-biaxially aligned substrate. A method forming a plume of superconductor material and contacting the plume and the non-biaxially aligned substrate at an angle greater than 0.degree. and less than 90.degree. to deposit a biaxially aligned superconductor on the non-biaxially aligned substrate is also disclosed. Various superconductors and substrates are illustrated.

  2. K2V2O2(AsO4)2

    PubMed Central

    Belkhiri, Sabrina; Mezaoui, Djillali; Roisnel, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The vanadium oxide arsenate with formula K2V2O2(AsO4)2, dipotassium divanadium(IV) dioxide diarsenate, has been synthesized by solid-state reaction in an evacuated silica ampoule. Its structure is isotypic with K2V2O2(PO4)2. The framework is built up from corner-sharing VO6 octa­hedra and AsO4 tetra­hedra, creating an infinite [VAsO8]∞ chain running along the a- and c-axis directions. The K+ cations are located in hexa­gonal tunnels, which are delimited by the connection of the [VAsO8]∞ chains. PMID:22807696

  3. Structural features of two novel alluaudite-like arsenates Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5

    PubMed Central

    Stojanović, Jovica; Đorđević, Tamara; Karanović, Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Two new compounds, Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (1) and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (2), have been prepared hydrothermally. Their crystal structures consist of chains of edge-sharing M1O4(OH0.5)2, M1aO4(OH0.5)2, M2O5(OH0.5), and M2aO5(OH0.5) octahedra (M1, M1a = Zn, Cd; M2, M2a = Zn for 1, and M1, M1a = Mg, Cd; M2, M2a = Mg for 2) that are stacked parallel to (1 0 1) and are connected by the [(AsO4)0.5(AsO3(OH))0.5]2.5− and [(AsO4)0.5(AsO2(OH)2)0.5]2− tetrahedra. These chains produce two types of channels parallel to the c-axis. Cd atoms are located in channels 2, while in channels 1 are situated hydrogen atoms of OH groups. The infrared spectra clearly show the presence of broad O—H stretching and bending vibrations centred at 3236, 2392 1575 and 1396 cm−1 in (1), and 3210, 2379 1602 and 1310 cm−1 in (2). The O—H stretching frequency is in good agreement with O⋯O distances. Furthermore, structural characteristics of compounds with similar alluaudite-like structures were discussed. PMID:23471556

  4. Structural features of two novel alluaudite-like arsenates Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Jovica; Dorđević, Tamara; Karanović, Ljiljana

    2012-04-15

    Two new compounds, Cd1.16Zn2.34(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (1) and Cd0.74Mg2.76(AsO4)1.5(HAsO4)(H2AsO4)0.5 (2), have been prepared hydrothermally. Their crystal structures consist of chains of edge-sharing M1O4(OH0.5)2, M1aO4(OH0.5)2, M2O5(OH0.5), and M2aO5(OH0.5) octahedra (M1, M1a = Zn, Cd; M2, M2a = Zn for 1, and M1, M1a = Mg, Cd; M2, M2a = Mg for 2) that are stacked parallel to (1 0 1) and are connected by the [(AsO4)0.5(AsO3(OH))0.5](2.5-) and [(AsO4)0.5(AsO2(OH)2)0.5](2-) tetrahedra. These chains produce two types of channels parallel to the c-axis. Cd atoms are located in channels 2, while in channels 1 are situated hydrogen atoms of OH groups. The infrared spectra clearly show the presence of broad O-H stretching and bending vibrations centred at 3236, 2392 1575 and 1396 cm(-1) in (1), and 3210, 2379 1602 and 1310 cm(-1) in (2). The O-H stretching frequency is in good agreement with O⋯O distances. Furthermore, structural characteristics of compounds with similar alluaudite-like structures were discussed.

  5. Steady subsidence of a repeatedly erupting caldera through InSAR observations: Aso, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Adriano; Acocella, Valerio; Aoki, Yosuke; Ruch, Joël; Borgstrom, Sven; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Geshi, Nobuo

    2017-04-01

    The relation between unrest and eruption at calderas is still poorly understood. During the last 25 years, Aso caldera, Japan, shows minor episodic eruptions, mainly phreatic, associated with steady subsidence ( 1cm/yr) highlighted by levelling and GPS data. Here we analyse the ground deformations at Aso using InSAR data from different satellites (ERS 1-2, Envisat and ALOS) covering the period between 1993 - 2011 and compare it with the eruptive activity. Although the dataset suffers from limitations (e.g. coherence loss, atmospheric artefacts, low signal to noise ratio), we observe a clear subsidence signal from 1996 to 1998. We invert this signal with analytical models to evaluate the deformations source. Results suggest an overall contraction of a magmatic source between 4 and 5 km below the caldera centre. Available geophysical and and geochemical data suggest similar volumes of the contracting source and erupted material. The contraction may have been induced by the release of magmatic fluids, transferring a minor amount of magma and feeding the eruptions. If confirmed by further data, this hypothesis suggests that degassing processes play a crucial role in triggering minor eruptions within open conduit calderas, such as at Aso.

  6. Source properties of Strombolian explosions at Aso volcano, Japan, derived from seismic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Sudo, Yasuaki

    2017-07-01

    A new episode of Strombolian activity at Aso volcano, Japan began on 25 November 2014, causing ashfall and glowing emissions. A total of 100 seismic signals of explosive events, recorded during November 2014 to February 2015 by a short-period seismic station that was situated at a distance of 150 m from the crater, were investigated. They indicated a two-phase structure of the seismic waveforms. The seismic signals consisted of the initial phase of lower frequency and lower amplitude and the main phase of higher frequency and higher amplitude that allowed to propose a two-stage conceptual model of Strombolian explosions at Aso volcano. According to the model, the initial phase is generated by the vertical movement of the gas slug in the volcanic conduit before an explosion, and the main phase is generated by the subsequent explosion. In the framework of this model, the following seismic parameters of Strombolian Aso explosions were calculated: the power of the initial seismic phases as a measure of force governing the gas-slug movement to the surface, and the power of the main seismic phases as a measure of the energy of the eruption. Direct log-log dependence of the power of the main phase of the seismic signals on the power of initial seismic phases, obtained in the paper, indicates the dependence of the eruption energy on the magnitude of the force governing the movement of the gas slug before an explosion.

  7. Coupling iSnobal and ASO: Towards an Integrated Water Supply Toolbox for Water Resource Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, A. R.; Marks, D. G.; Havens, S.; Winstral, A. H.; Bormann, K. J.; Skiles, S. M.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013, airborne lidar surveys have been performed throughout the melt season at near-weekly intervals over the 1,400 km2 Tuolumne River Basin in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, with the goal of deriving high-resolution measurements of snow depth and reflectance for the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO). Since the beginning of the campaign, a distributed, physically-based snow model (iSnobal) has been used to estimate the spatial snow density distribution critical for providing accurate SWE products to water managers downstream. An important feature of iSnobal is the ability to stop and then restart using an initialization image constructed from the results of the prior time step. This work examines the effect of assimilating the ASO lidar-derived snow depths to guide the modeled density distribution, since precipitation has been found to be the most difficult parameter to distribute over large mountain basins. Results indicate that the initial model update for each winter is the most significant, with subsequent updates in the absence of severe spring storms having increasingly smaller impacts on the total modeled basin water storage. However, the unprecedented temporal resolution of the ASO lidar surveys provide new insight into the springtime evolution of a large basin snowpack and immensely improve melt timing predictions, which are becoming more and more vital for reservoir management in a changing climate.

  8. K0.8Ag0.2Nb4O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Rym; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, potassium silver tetra­niobium nona­oxide arsenate, K0.8Ag0.2Nb4O9AsO4, was prepared by a solid-state reaction at 1183 K. The structure consists of infinite (Nb2AsO14)n chains parallel to the b axis and cross-linked by corner sharing via pairs of edge-sharing octa­hedra. Each pair links together four infinite chains to form a three-dimensional framework. The K+ and Ag+ ions partially occupy several independent close positions in the inter­connected cavities delimited by the framework. K0.8Ag0.2Nb4O9AsO4 is likely to exhibit fast alkali-ion mobility and ion-exchange properties. The Wyckoff symbols of special positions are as follows: one Nb 8e, one Nb 8g, As 4c, two K 8f, one Ag 8f, one Ag 4c, one O 8g, one O 4c. PMID:21202442

  9. NaAg2Mo3O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Hamadi; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, sodium disilver arsenatotrimolybdate, Na0.93 (1)Ag2.07 (1)Mo3AsO13, was prepared by a solid-state reaction. In the crystal structure, isolated AsO4 tetra­hedra share corners with groups of three edge-sharing MoO6 octa­hedra. This arrangement leads to the formation of anionic 1 ∞[Mo3AsO13]n ribbons extending parallel to [100]. The three metal sites show occupational disorder by AgI and NaI cations, each with a different Ag:Na ratio. The metal cations are situated in the space between the ribbons and are surrounded by terminal O atoms of the ribbons in the form of distorted MO7 polyhedra (M = Ag, Na) for distances < 3.0 Å. The title compound shows weak ionic conductivity. Structural relationships between different compounds in the quaternary systems M–Sb–P–O, M–Nb–P–O and M–Mo–As–O (M is Ag or an alkali metal) are also discussed. PMID:21587345

  10. K0.78Na0.22MoO2AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Jouini, Raja; Bouzidi, Chahira; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, potassium sodium dioxidomolybden­um(VI) arsenate, K0.78Na0.22MoO2AsO4, was synthesized by a solid-state reaction route. The structure is built up from corner-sharing MoO6 octa­hedra and AsO4 tetra­hedra, creating infinite [MoAsO8]∞ chains running along the b-axis direction. As, Mo and all but one O atom are on special positions (4c) with m symmetry and K (occupancy 0.78) is on a position (4a) of -1 in the tunnels. The possible motion of the alkali cations has been investigated by means of the bond-valance sum (BVS) model. The simulation shows that the Na+ motion appears to be easier mainly along the b-axis direction. Structural relationships between the different compounds of the AMoO2AsO4 (A = Ag, Li, Na, K, Rb) series and MXO8 (M = V; X = P, As) chains are discussed. PMID:24109253

  11. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  12. Topological nonsymmorphic crystalline superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Ze; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Topological superconductors possess a nodeless superconducting gap in the bulk and gapless zero energy modes, known as "Majorana zero modes," at the boundary of a finite system. In this work, we introduce a new class of topological superconductors, which are protected by nonsymmorphic crystalline symmetry and thus dubbed "topological nonsymmorphic crystalline superconductors." We construct an explicit Bogoliubov-de Gennes type of model for this superconducting phase in the D class and show how Majorana zero modes in this model are protected by glide plane symmetry. Furthermore, we generalize the classification of topological nonsymmorphic crystalline superconductors to the classes with time reversal symmetry, including the DIII and BDI classes, in two dimensions. Our theory provides guidance to search for new topological superconducting materials with nonsymmorphic crystal structures.

  13. Topological Nonsymmorphic Crystalline Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Ze; Liu, Chao-Xing

    Topological superconductors possess a nodeless superconducting gap in the bulk and gapless zero energy modes, known as ``Majorana zero modes'', at the boundary of a finite system. In this work, we introduce a new class of topological superconductors, which are protected by nonsymmorphic crystalline symmetry and thus dubbed ``topological nonsymmorphic crystalline superconductors''. We construct an explicit Bogoliubov-de Gennes type of model for this superconducting phase in the D class and show how Majorana zero modes in this model are protected by glide symmetry. Furthermore, we generalize the classification of topological nonsymmorphic crystalline superconductors to the classes with time reversal symmetry, including the DIII and BDI classes, in two dimensions. Our theory provides a guidance to search for new topological superconducting materials with nonsymmorphic crystal structures.

  14. Topological superconductors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Ando, Yoichi

    2017-07-01

    This review elaborates pedagogically on the fundamental concept, basic theory, expected properties, and materials realizations of topological superconductors. The relation between topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions are explained, and the difference between dispersive Majorana fermions and a localized Majorana zero mode is emphasized. A variety of routes to topological superconductivity are explained with an emphasis on the roles of spin-orbit coupling. Present experimental situations and possible signatures of topological superconductivity are summarized with an emphasis on intrinsic topological superconductors.

  15. Layered nickel based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Filip; Bauer, Eric D; Park, Tuson; Kurita, Nobuyuki; Klimczuk, T; Movshovich, R; Thompson, J D; Sefat, A S; Mandrus, D

    2009-01-01

    We review the properties of Ni-based superconductors which contain Ni{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X=As, P, Bi, Si, Ge, B) planes, a common structural element to the recently discovered FeAs superconductors. We also compare the properties ofthe Ni-and Fe-based systems from a perspective ofelectronic structure as well as structure-property relations.

  16. Electrocaloric Refrigeration for Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    CO rH CO © . NBSIR 76-847 ELECTROCALORIC REFRIGERATION FOR SUPERCONDUCTORS Ray Radebaugh and J.D. Siegwarth Cryogenics Division Institute...June 30, 1975 NBSIR 76-847 ELECTROULORIC REFRIGERATION FOR SUPERCONDUCTORS Ray Radebaugh and J.D. Siegwarth Cryogenics Division L Institute for...Field at Low Temperatures, Rev. Sei. Instrum. 42, 571 (1971). 8. Lawless, W. N., Radebaugh , R., and Soulen, R. J., Studies of a Glass- Ceramic

  17. Topological superconductors: a review.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masatoshi; Ando, Yoichi

    2017-04-03

    This review elaborates pedagogically on the fundamental concept, basic theory, expected properties, and materials realizations of topological superconductors. The relation between topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions are explained, and the difference between dispersive Majorana fermions and a localized Majorana zero mode is emphasized. A variety of routes to topological superconductivity are explained with an emphasis on the roles of spin-orbit coupling. Present experimental situations and possible signatures of topological superconductivity are summarized with an emphasis on intrinsic topological superconductors.

  18. Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2000-01-01

    A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

  19. Diverse long Period tremors and their implications on degassing and heating inside Aso volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jieming; Song, Teh-Ru Alex

    2017-04-01

    Long-period tremors (LPTs) are frequently observed and documented in many active volcanoes around the world, Typically, LPTs are in the period range of 2-100 seconds and total duration of 300 seconds or less. In many instances, LPTs in different volcanic settings are repetitive, but time-invariant in their location, frequency content and waveform shape, suggesting a nondestructive source and providing critical insights into the fluid-dynamic processes operating inside a volcanic system. However, the diversities of LPTs in a single volcanic system are not necessarily well understood and they could potentially provide a clue on the interplay between volcanic degassing, magmatic heating and the style of upcoming eruption. To explore possible diverse LPT behavior in a volcanic system, we investigate LPTs in Aso-san, one of the most well studied and active volcanoes in the southwest Kyushu, Japan. We carry out systematic analysis of continuous seismic data (2010-2016) operated at V-net by NIED and Japan Meterogeolgical Agency (JMA) Volcanic Seismic Network, covering the interval where Aso-san experiences diverse behaviors, including long period of quiescence (2010-2013), phreatic eruption (2013-2014), Strombolian-type eruption (2014-2015) and phreatomagmatic eruption (2016). We use LPT waveforms identified in previous studies as templates and cross-correlate them against the entire dataset in the wavelet domain to construct LPTs catalog. However, LPTs with different phase, but similar frequency content and location are also retained to examine possible temporal changes in the characteristics of LPTs. Through waveform cross-correlation and stacking, we identify four types of LPTs that are located in close proximity as those identified in prior studies, but they display diverse waveform polarity and shape. We will present waveform semblance analysis and moment tensor inversion of these LPTs and discuss how their frequency, amplitude and energetics may be indicative of the

  20. Soil carbon stocks and carbon sequestration rates in seminatural grassland in Aso region, Kumamoto, Southern Japan.

    PubMed

    Toma, Yo; Clifton-Brown, John; Sugiyama, Shinji; Nakaboh, Makoto; Hatano, Ryusuke; Fernández, Fabián G; Ryan Stewart, J; Nishiwaki, Aya; Yamada, Toshihiko

    2013-06-01

    Global soil carbon (C) stocks account for approximately three times that found in the atmosphere. In the Aso mountain region of Southern Japan, seminatural grasslands have been maintained by annual harvests and/or burning for more than 1000 years. Quantification of soil C stocks and C sequestration rates in Aso mountain ecosystem is needed to make well-informed, land-use decisions to maximize C sinks while minimizing C emissions. Soil cores were collected from six sites within 200 km(2) (767-937 m asl.) from the surface down to the k-Ah layer established 7300 years ago by a volcanic eruption. The biological sources of the C stored in the Aso mountain ecosystem were investigated by combining C content at a number of sampling depths with age (using (14) C dating) and δ(13) C isotopic fractionation. Quantification of plant phytoliths at several depths was used to make basic reconstructions of past vegetation and was linked with C-sequestration rates. The mean total C stock of all six sites was 232 Mg C ha(-1) (28-417 Mg C ha(-1) ), which equates to a soil C sequestration rate of 32 kg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) over 7300 years. Mean soil C sequestration rates over 34, 50 and 100 years were estimated by an equation regressing soil C sequestration rate against soil C accumulation interval, which was modeled to be 618, 483 and 332 kg C ha(-1)  yr(-1) , respectively. Such data allows for a deeper understanding in how much C could be sequestered in Miscanthus grasslands at different time scales. In Aso, tribe Andropogoneae (especially Miscanthus and Schizoachyrium genera) and tribe Paniceae contributed between 64% and 100% of soil C based on δ(13) C abundance. We conclude that the seminatural, C4 -dominated grassland system serves as an important C sink, and worthy of future conservation. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  2. Lightning in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Vestgården, J I; Shantsev, D V; Galperin, Y M; Johansen, T H

    2012-01-01

    Crucially important for application of type-II superconductor films is the stability of the vortex matter--magnetic flux lines penetrating the material. If some vortices get detached from pinning centres, the energy dissipated by their motion will facilitate further depinning, and may trigger a massive electromagnetic breakdown. Up to now, the time-resolved behaviour of these ultra-fast events was essentially unknown. We report numerical simulation results revealing the detailed dynamics during breakdown as within nanoseconds it develops branching structures in the electromagnetic fields and temperature, with striking resemblance of atmospheric lightning. During a dendritic avalanche the superconductor is locally heated above its critical temperature, while electrical fields rise to several kV/m as the front propagates at instant speeds near up to 100 km/s. The numerical approach provides an efficient framework for understanding the ultra-fast coupled non-local dynamics of electromagnetic fields and dissipation in superconductor films.

  3. Domains in multiband superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.; Crisan, A.; Shirage, P. M.; Iyo, A.; Tokiwa, K.; Nishio, T.; Sundaresan, A.; Terada, N.

    2011-11-01

    Multiband superconductors can have several types of domains that are inhibited in conventional single-band superconductors. These domains are phase domains and chiral domains and their domain wall are an interband phase difference soliton. In a superconductor with an odd number of electronic bands (five or more) and with positive interband Josephson interactions, we find other types of domains with different interband phase differences. We call these domains configuration domains because pseudo-order parameters for each band are dispersed in the complex plain and several configurations, which have several local minima. Fractional vortices serve as hubs for phase difference solitons (configuration domain walls). The divergence of the number of configurations with local minima would pose a serious problem for the stability of superconductivity.

  4. FOREWORD: The 9th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2008-07-01

    For the first time since its inaugural meeting in Lund in 1983, the triennial international conference on Atomic Spectroscopy and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS) returned to Lund, Sweden. Lund has been a home to atomic spectroscopy since the time of Janne Rydberg, and included the pioneering work in laboratory and solar spectroscopy of Bengt Edlén, who presented the initial ASOS talk in 1983. The ninth ASOS was hosted by the Lund Observatory and the Physics Department of Lund University during from 8 to 10 August 2007 and was attended by nearly 100 registrants. An encouraging sign for the field was the number of young researchers in attendance. This volume contains the submitted contributions from the poster presentations of the conference, and represents approximately forty percent of the presented posters. A complementary volume of Physica Scripta provides the written transactions of the ASOS9 invited presentations. With these two volumes the character of ASOS9 is more fully evident, and they serve as a review of the state of atomic spectroscopy for spectrum analysis and the determination of oscillator strengths and their applications. The goal of ASOS is to be a forum for atomic spectroscopy where both the providers and users of atomic data, which includes wavelengths, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths, and line shape parameters, can meet to discuss recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques and their application to understanding the physical processes that are responsible for producing observed spectra. The applications mainly originate from the fields of astrophysics and plasma physics, the latter including fusion energy and lighting research. As a part of ASOS9 we were honored to celebrate the retirement of Professor Sveneric Johansson. At a special session on the spectroscopy of iron, which was conducted in his honor, he presented his insights into the Fe II term system and his most recent

  5. Spin superconductor in ferromagnetic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Zhao-Tan; Yu, Yue; Xie, X. C.

    2011-12-01

    We show a spin superconductor in ferromagnetic graphene as the counterpart to the charge superconductor in which a spin-polarized electron-hole pair plays the role of the spin 2(ℏ/2) “Cooper pair” with a neutral charge. We present a BCS-type theory for the spin superconductor. With the “London-type equations” of the super-spin-current density, we show the existence of an electric “Meissner effect” against a spatial varying electric field. We further study a spin superconductor/normal conductor/spin superconductor junction and predict a spin-current Josephson effect.

  6. A Rapid Turn-around, Scalable Big Data Processing Capability for the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) is an integrated LIDAR and Spectrometer measuring snow depth and rate of snow melt in the Sierra Nevadas, specifically, the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir, and the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado, amongst other sites. The ASO data was delivered to water resource managers from the California Department of Water Resources in under 24 hours from the time that the Twin Otter aircraft landed in Mammoth Lakes, CA to the time disks were plugged in to the ASO Mobile Compute System (MCS) deployed at the Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory (SNARL) near the airport. ASO performed weekly flights and each flight took between 500GB to 1 Terabyte of raw data, which was then processed from level 0 data products all the way to full level 4 maps of Snow Water Equivalent, albedo mosaics, and snow depth from LIDAR. These data were produced by Interactive Data analysis Language (IDL) algorithms which were then unobtrusively and automatically integrated into an Apache OODT and Apache Tika based Big Data processing system. Data movement was both electronic and physical including novel uses of LaCie 1 and 2 TeraByte (TB) data bricks and deployment in rugged terrain. The MCS was controlled remotely from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL) in Pasadena, California on behalf of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Communication was aided through the use of novel Internet Relay Chat (IRC) command and control mechanisms and through the use of the Notifico open source communication tools. This talk will describe the high powered, and light-weight Big Data processing system that we developed for ASO and its implications more broadly for airborne missions at NASA and throughout the government. The lessons learned from ASO show the potential to have a large impact in the development of Big Data processing systems in the years

  7. The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Demonstration Mission-3 and the Path Forward to a Broader ASO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. This talk presents results from the third Demonstration Mission that occurred during the intense California drought of spring 2015, a snow year far worse than the previously worst snow year on record of 2014, and an overview of the various analyses that are finally available due to the uniqueness of the ASO data. In 2015, ASO provided complete basin coverage for the Tuolumne, Merced, Lakes, Rush Creek, and Middle+South Forks of Kings River Basins in the California Sierra Nevada and the Upper Rio Grande, Conejos, and Uncompahgre Basins in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. ASO performed its first wintertime acquisitions in the Tuolumne Basin in response to water managers' needs to quantify SWE volume in what was already realized as dire conditions. Analyses show that with ASO data, river flows and reservoir inflows from the ASO acquisition date to 1 July can be estimated with uncertainties of less than 2%. These results provide enormous value in management operational flexibility for the diversity of needs, and provide strong scientific constraints on the physical processes controlling snowmelt runoff. Snowmelt runoff models are markedly better constrained due to the now accurate knowledge of the distribution of snow water equivalent. With the ASO high-resolution spectrometer and lidar data for a snow-free acquisition, we can determine surface classifications, vegetation heights, and river networks. These data allow runoff models to be accurately and rapidly developed with unprecedented accuracy. These data are now being used to constrain models of varying complexity. Finally, we discuss the path forward on expanding ASO to cover the entire Sierra Nevada and the

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of the vibrational spectra of sarkinite Mn2(AsO4)(OH) and adamite Zn2(AsO4)(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makreski, Petre; Jovanovski, Stefan; Pejov, Ljupco; Kloess, Gert; Hoebler, Hans-Joachim; Jovanovski, Gligor

    2013-09-01

    The arsenate hydroxyl-bearing minerals sarkinite and adamite were studied with vibrational spectroscopic (IR and Raman) and quantum theoretical methods. The observed IR bands in the higher (1100-600 cm-1) and especially lower (600-450 cm-1) frequency region of AsO4 vibrations could clearly discriminate between the studied analogues. The differences between their crystal structures are much pronounced in both IR and Raman OH-stretching regions. Namely, a single strong band is found in the case of orthorhombic adamite compared to four weaker bands observed in corresponding IR and Raman spectral regions of monoclinic sarkinite. Essentially all bands in the experimental spectra, collected at both room and liquid nitrogen temperature, were tentatively assigned. To support the tentative assignment of bands in the vibrational spectra of the mentioned minerals, periodic pseudopotential plane wave density functional theory calculations were carried out. Geometry optimizations of the 3D periodic systems included both optimizations of the atomic positions within the unit cell and of the unit cell itself. In most cases, the assignments were either supported or implied by the obtained theoretical data. It is worth mentioning that this is the first experimental and theoretical study of the vibrational spectra of the very-rare sarkinite mineral.

  9. Electrocaloric Refrigeration for Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-31

    AD-A008 852 ELECTROCALORIC REFRIGERATION FOR SUPERCONDUCTORS Ray Radebaugh , et al National Bureau of Standards...for the period ending December 31, 1974 < Prepared by Ray Radebaugh , W. N. Lawless, and J. D. Slegwarth Cryogenics Division National Bureau of

  10. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  11. Method for preparing superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgren, Shelley D.

    1976-01-01

    A superconductor having an equiaxed fine grain beta-tungsten crystalline structure found to have improved high field critical current densities is prepared by sputter-depositing superconductive material onto a substrate cooled to below 200.degree. C. and heat-treating the deposited material.

  12. Amelioration of diet-induced steatohepatitis in mice following combined therapy with ASO-Fsp27 and fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Rajamoorthi, Ananthi; Arias, Noemi; Basta, Jeannine; Lee, Richard G; Baldán, Ángel

    2017-09-05

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD progresses from benign steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis, and is linked to hepatocellular carcinoma. No targeted treatment is currently approved for NAFLD/NASH. We showed that fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27), a lipid droplet-associated protein that controls triglyceride turnover in the hepatocyte, is required for fasting- and diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in the liver. However, silencing Fsp27 with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) did not improve hepatosteatosis in genetic nor nutritional mouse models of obesity. Herein, we tested the therapeutic potential of ASO-Fsp27 when used in combination with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-trans-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet for 8 weeks to establish NASH, then kept on diet for 6 additional weeks while dosed with ASOs and fenofibrate, alone or in combination. Data show that ASO-Fsp27 and fenofibrate synergize to promote resistance to diet-induced obesity and hypertriglyceridemia, and to reverse hepatic steatosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis. This multifactorial improvement of liver disease noted when combining both drugs suggests that a course of treatment that includes both reduced FSP27 activity and activation of PPARα could provide therapeutic benefit to patients with NAFLD/NASH. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. 75 FR 59695 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Extension of Subzone; Aso LLC (Adhesive Bandage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 169--Manatee County, Florida; Extension of Subzone; Aso LLC... Zones Board (the Board) by the Manatee County Port Authority, grantee of FTZ 169, requesting to...

  14. Crustal magma pathway beneath Aso caldera inferred from three-dimensional electrical resistivity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Maki; Takakura, Shinichi; Matsushima, Nobuo; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Utsugi, Mitsuru

    2016-10-01

    At Naka-dake cone, Aso caldera, Japan, volcanic activity is raised cyclically, an example of which was a phreatomagmatic eruption in September 2015. Using a three-dimensional model of electrical resistivity, we identify a magma pathway from a series of northward dipping conductive anomalies in the upper crust beneath the caldera. Our resistivity model was created from magnetotelluric measurements conducted in November-December 2015; thus, it provides the latest information about magma reservoir geometry beneath the caldera. The center of the conductive anomalies shifts from the north of Naka-dake at depths >10 km toward Naka-dake, along with a decrease in anomaly depths. The melt fraction is estimated at 13-15% at 2 km depth. Moreover, these anomalies are spatially correlated with the locations of earthquake clusters, which are distributed within resistive blocks on the conductive anomalies in the northwest of Naka-dake but distributed at the resistive sides of resistivity boundaries in the northeast.

  15. "Fluctuoscopy" of Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, A. A.

    Study of fluctuation phenomena in superconductors (SCs) is the subject of great fundamental and practical importance. Understanding of their physics allowed to clear up the fundamental properties of SC state. Being predicted in 1968, one of the fluctuation effects, namely paraconductivity, was experimentally observed almost simultaneously. Since this time, fluctuations became a noticeable part of research in the field of superconductivity, and a variety of fluctuation effects have been discovered. The new wave of interest to fluctuations (FL) in superconductors was generated by the discovery of cuprate oxide superconductors (high-temperature superconductors, HTS), where, due to extremely short coherence length and low effective dimensionality of the electron system, superconductive fluctuations manifest themselves in a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, anomalous properties of the normal state of HTS were attributed by many theorists to strong FL in these systems. Being studied in the framework of the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory and, more extensively, in diagrammatic microscopic approach, SC FLs side by side with other quantum corrections (weak localization, etc.) became a new tool for investigation and characterization of such new systems as HTS, disordered electron systems, granular metals, Josephson structures, artificial super-lattices, etc. The characteristic feature of SC FL is their strong dependence on temperature and magnetic fields in the vicinity of phase transition. This allows one to definitely separate the fluctuation effects from other contributions and to use them as the source of information about the microscopic parameters of a material. By their origin, SC FLs are very sensitive to relaxation processes, which break phase coherence. This allows using them for versatile characterization of SC. Today, one can speak about the " fluctuoscopy" of superconductive systems. In review, we present the qualitative picture both of thermodynamic

  16. Analysis of gas jetting and fumarole acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Kathleen; Fee, David; Yokoo, Akihiko; Matoza, Robin S.; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-06-01

    The gas-thrust region of a large volcanic eruption column is predominately a momentum-driven, fluid flow process that perturbs the atmosphere and produces sound akin to noise from jet and rocket engines, termed ;jet noise;. We aim to enhance understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We characterize the acoustic signature of 2.5-meter wide vigorously jetting fumarole at Aso Volcano, Japan using a 5-element infrasound array located on the nearby crater. The fumarole opened on 13 July 2015 on the southwest flank of the partially collapsed pyroclastic cone within Aso Volcano's Naka-dake crater and had persistent gas jetting, which produced significant audible jet noise. The array was 220 m from the fumarole and 57.6° from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle not typically feasible in volcanic environments. Array processing is performed to distinguish fumarolic jet noise from wind. Highly correlated periods are characterized by sustained, low-amplitude signal with a 7-10 Hz spectral peak. Finite difference time domain method numerical modeling suggests the influence of topography near the vent and along the propagation path significantly affects the spectral content, complicating comparisons with laboratory jet noise. The fumarolic jet has a low estimated Mach number (0.3 to 0.4) and measured temperature of 260 °C. The Strouhal number for infrasound from volcanic jet flows and geysers is not known; thus we assume a peak Strouhal number of 0.19 based on pure-air laboratory jet experiments. This assumption leads to an estimated exit velocity of the fumarole of 79 to 132 m/s. Using published gas composition data from 2003 to 2009, the fumarolic vent area estimated from thermal infrared images, and estimated jet velocity, we estimate total volatile flux at 160-270 kg/s (14,000-23,000 t/d).

  17. Mineral and chemical variations within an ash-flow sheet from Aso caldera, Southwestern Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1967-01-01

    Although products of individual volcanic eruptions, especially voluminous ash-flow eruptions, have been considered among the best available samples of natural magmas, detailed petrographic and chemical study indicates that bulk compositions of unaltered Pleistocene ash-flow tuffs from Aso caldera, Japan, deviate significantly from original magmatic compositions. The last major ash-flow sheet from Aso caldera is as much as 150 meters thick and shows a general vertical compositional change from phenocryst-poor rhyodacite upward into phenocryst-rich trachyandesite; this change apparently reflects in inverse order a compositionally zoned magma chamber in which more silicic magma overlay more mafic magma. Details of these magmatic variations were obscured, however, by: (1) mixing of compositionally distinct batches of magma during upwelling in the vent, as indicated by layering and other heterogeneities within single pumice lumps; (2) mixing of particulate fragments-pumice lumps, ash, and phenocrysts-of varied compositions during emplacement, with the result that separate pumice lenses from a single small outcrop may have a compositional range nearly as great as the bulk-rook variation of the entire sheet; (3) density sorting of phenocrysts and ash during eruption and emplacement, resulting in systematic modal variations with distance from the caldera; (4) addition of xenocrysts, resulting in significant contamination and modification of proportions of crystals in the tuffs; and (5) ground-water leaching of glassy fractions during hydration after cooling. Similar complexities characterize ash-flow tuffs under study in southwestern Nevada and in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, and probably are widespread in other ash-flow fields as well. Caution and careful planning are required in study of the magmatic chemistry and phenocryst mineralogy of these rocks. ?? 1967 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Ambient-pressure organic superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jack M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

  19. Superconductor stability 90: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent developments in the field of stability of superconductors. The main topics dealt with are hydrodynamic phenomena in cable-in-conduit superconductors, namely, multiple stability, quench pressure, thermal expulsion, and thermal hydraulic quenchback, traveling normal zones in large, composite conductors, such as those intended for SMES, and the stability of vapor-cooled leads made of high-temperature superconductors. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  1. Fabrication of superconductor coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorris, S. E.; Dusek, J. T.; Picciolo, J. J.; Leu, H. J.; Singh, J. P.; Cazzato, A.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1989-10-01

    Small coils of superconducting YBa2Cu3O(7-x)(123) can be formed in the green state using a layered superconductor/insulator tape. In this approach, the insulator prevents contact between the turns of the coil during firing. The insulator must be chemically compatible with 123 during firing, and ideally should match 123 with respect to firing shrinkage and thermal expansion. Fabrication of small coils from the layered superconductor/insulator composites 123/Y2BaCuO5 and 123/BaCuO2 will be discussed. The issue of chemical compatibility will be addressed, and measurements of the firing shrinkage and thermal expansion will be presented for 123 and the two insulators Y2BaO5 and BaCuO2. In addition, the superconducting properties of 123 in the composites will be presented.

  2. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-09

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, in this paper, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Finally, our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  3. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; ...

    2016-08-09

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, in this paper, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details ofmore » the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Finally, our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.« less

  4. Periodically driven holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Jia; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2013-07-01

    As a first step towards our holographic investigation of the far-from-equilibrium physics of periodically driven systems at strong coupling, we explore the real time dynamics of holographic superconductor driven by a monochromatically alternating electric field with various frequencies. As a result, our holographic superconductor is driven to the final oscillating state, where the condensate is suppressed and the oscillation frequency is controlled by twice of the driving frequency. In particular, in the large frequency limit, the three distinct channels towards the final steady state are found, namely under damped to superconducting phase, over damped to superconducting and normal phase, which can be captured essentially by the low lying spectrum of quasi-normal modes in the time averaged approximation, reminiscent of the effective field theory perspective.

  5. CsAl(H(2)AsO(4))(2)(HAsO(4)): a new monoclinic protonated arsenate with decorated kröhnkite-like chains.

    PubMed

    Schwendtner, Karolina; Kolitsch, Uwe

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structure of hydrothermally synthesized caesium aluminium bis[dihydrogen arsenate(V)] hydrogen arsenate(V), CsAl(H(2)AsO(4))(2)(HAsO(4)), was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature. The compound represents a new structure type that is characterized by decorated kröhnkite-like [100] chains of corner-sharing AlO(6) octahedra and AsO(4) tetrahedra. Ten-coordinated Cs atoms are situated between the chains, which are interconnected by five different hydrogen bonds [O...O = 2.569 (4)-2.978 (4) A]. All atoms are in general positions. CsAl(H(2)AsO(4))(2)(HAsO(4)) is very closely related to CsGa(H(1.5)AsO(4))(2)(H(2)AsO(4)) and isotypic CsCr(H(1.5)AsO(4))(2)(H(2)AsO(4)).

  6. Stabilin-1 and Stabilin-2 are specific receptors for the cellular internalization of phosphorothioate-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colton M.; Donner, Aaron J.; Blank, Emma E.; Egger, Andrew W.; Kellar, Brianna M.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Seth, Punit P.; Harris, Edward N.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorothioate (PS)-modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have been extensively investigated over the past three decades as pharmacological and therapeutic agents. One second generation ASO, Kynamro™, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia and over 35 second generation PS ASOs are at various stages of clinical development. In this report, we show that the Stabilin class of scavenger receptors, which were not previously thought to bind DNA, do bind and internalize PS ASOs. With the use of primary cells from mouse and rat livers and recombinant cell lines each expressing Stabilin-1 and each isoform of Stabilin-2 (315-HARE and 190-HARE), we have determined that PS ASOs bind with high affinity and these receptors are responsible for bulk, clathrin-mediated endocytosis within the cell. Binding is primarily dependent on salt-bridge formation and correct folding of the intact protein receptor. Increased internalization rates also enhanced ASO potency for reducing expression of the non-coding RNA Malat-1, in Stabilin-expressing cell lines. A more thorough understanding of mechanisms by which ASOs are internalized in cells and their intracellular trafficking pathways will aid in the design of next generation antisense agents with improved therapeutic properties. PMID:26908652

  7. Processing of Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Josephson Edge Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical behavior of epitaxial superconductor-normal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson edge junctions is strongly affected by processing conditions. Ex-situ processes, utilizing photoresist and polyimide/photoresist mask layers, are employed for ion milling edges for junctions with Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide (YBCO) electrodes and primarily Co-doped YBCO interlayers.

  8. Processing of Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Josephson Edge Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinsasser, A. W.; Barner, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical behavior of epitaxial superconductor-normal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson edge junctions is strongly affected by processing conditions. Ex-situ processes, utilizing photoresist and polyimide/photoresist mask layers, are employed for ion milling edges for junctions with Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide (YBCO) electrodes and primarily Co-doped YBCO interlayers.

  9. Theory of heterotic superconductor-insulator-superconductor Josephson junctions between single- and multiple-gap superconductors.

    PubMed

    Ota, Yukihiro; Machida, Masahiko; Koyama, Tomio; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2009-06-12

    Using the functional integral method, we construct a theory of heterotic superconductor-insulator-superconductor Josephson junctions between one- and two-gap superconductors. The theory predicts the presence of in-phase and out-of-phase collective oscillation modes of superconducting phases. The former corresponds to the Josephson plasma mode whose frequency is drastically reduced for +/- s-wave symmetry, and the latter is a counterpart of Leggett's mode in Josephson junctions. We also reveal that the critical current and the Fraunhofer pattern strongly depend on the symmetry type of the two-gap superconductor.

  10. The susceptibility analysis of landslides induced by earthquake in Aso volcanic area, Japan, scoping the prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Kumamoto earthquake on April 16th 2016 in Kumamoto prefecture, Kyushu Island, Japan with intense seismic scale of M7.3 (maximum acceleration = 1316 gal in Aso volcanic region) yielded countless instances of landslide and debris flow that induced serious damages and causalities in the area, especially in the Aso volcanic mountain range. Hence, field investigation and numerical slope stability analysis were conducted to delve into the characteristics or the prediction factors of the landslides induced by this earthquake. For the numerical analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) and CSSDP (Critical Slip Surface analysis by Dynamic Programming theory based on limit equilibrium method) were applied to the landslide slopes with seismic acceleration observed. These numerical analysis methods can automatically detect the landslide slip surface which has minimum Fs (factor of safety). The various results and the information obtained through this investigation and analysis were integrated to predict the landslide susceptible slopes in volcanic area induced by earthquakes and rainfalls of their aftermath, considering geologic-geomorphologic features, geo-technical characteristics of the landslides and vegetation effects on the slope stability. Based on the FEM or CSSDP results, the landslides occurred in this earthquake at the mild gradient slope on the ridge have the safety factor of slope Fs=2.20 approximately (without rainfall nor earthquake, and Fs>=1.0 corresponds to stable slope without landslide) and 1.78 2.10 (with the most severe rainfall in the past) while they have approximately Fs=0.40 with the seismic forces in this earthquake (horizontal direction 818 gal, vertical direction -320 gal respectively, observed in the earthquake). It insists that only in case of earthquakes the landslide in volcanic sediment apt to occur at the mild gradient slopes as well as on the ridges with convex cross section. Consequently, the following results are obtained. 1) At volcanic

  11. Helical phases in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Raminder P. Kaur

    In conventional superconductors, the Cooper pairs are formed from quasiparticles with opposite momentum and spins because of the degeneracy of the quasiparticles under time reversal and inversion. The absence of any of these symmetries will have pronounced effects on superconducting states. Time reversal symmetry can be broken in the presence of magnetic impurities or by the application of a magnetic field. Similarly, the dislocation of crystal ions from their higher symmetric positions can cause broken inversion symmetry. We studied the effects of broken time reversal and inversion symmetries on unconventional superconductors, such as high temperature cuprates, Sr2RuO 4, and CePt3Si. In the cuprates, the superconducting state exists near the antiferromagnetic order. Sr2RuO4 and CePt3Si do not have spatial inversion, and the superconducting states coexist with magnetic order. In cuprates, the broken time reversal symmetry has been reported in the pseudogap phase which will effect the d-wave superconducting state of underdoped regime. On the basis of symmetry analysis we found that a mixture of spin-singlet and -triplet state, d+ip, which is shown to give rise to a helical superconducting phase. Consequences of this d+ip state on Josephson experiments are also discussed. Sr2RuO 4 is known to be another broken time reversal superconductor with spin triplet superconductivity. The widely believed superconducting state, the chiral p wave state, has been extensively studied through Ginzburg Landau theory, but the predictions for this state contradict some experimental observations like anisotropy in the upper critical field, and the existence of a second vortex state. We have formalize quasiclassical theory to find the origin of these contradictions, and also extended the theory to study other possible super-conducting states. Surprisingly, we find that a superconducting state corresponding to freely rotating in-plane d-vector explains the existing experimental results

  12. Antenna applications of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. C.

    1991-09-01

    The applicability of superconductors to antennas is examined. Potential implementations that are examined are superdirective arrays; electrically small antennas; tuning and matching of these two; high-gain millimeter-wavelength arrays; and kinetic inductance slow wave structures for array phasers and traveling wave array feeds. It is thought that superdirective arrays and small antennas will not benefit directly, but their tuning/matching networks will undergo major improvements. Miniaturization of antennas will not be aided, but much higher gain millimeter-wave arrays will be realizable. Kinetic inductance slow-wave lines appear advantageous for improved array phasers and time delay, as well as for traveling-wave array feeds.

  13. Hydrolytic conversion of AsO(-3)4 to HAsO(-2)4: a QMCF MD study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Hofer, Thomas S; Pribil, Andreas B; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2010-06-21

    A quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) study of AsO in water was carried out to gain insight into its conversion from the hydrated anion resulting in OH(-) ions and HAsO, which occurs on the scale of a few hundred femtoseconds. The OH(-) ion undergoes further proton exchange with water molecules, while HAsO is a stable species.

  14. Experimental and theoretical characterization of arsenite in water: insights into the coordination environment of As-O.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Solís, Alejandro; Mukopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2004-05-03

    Long-term exposure to arsenic in drinking water has been linked to cancer of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidney, nasal passages, liver, and prostate in humans. It is therefore important to understand the structural aspects of arsenic in water, as hydrated arsenic is most likely the initial form of the metalloid absorbed by cells. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical characterization of the coordination environment of hydrated arsenite. XANES analysis confirms As(III) is a stable redox form of the metalloid in solution. EXAFS analysis indicate, at neutral pH, arsenite has a nearest-neighbor coordination geometry of approximately 3 As-O bonds at an average bond length of 1.77 A, while at basic pH the nearest-neighbor coordination geometry shifts to a single short As-O bond at 1.69 A and two longer As-O bonds at 1.82 A. Long-range ligand scattering is present in all EXAFS samples; however, these data could not be fit with any degree of certainty. There is no XAS detectable interaction between As and antimony, suggesting they are not imported into cells as a multinuclear complex. XAS results were compared to a structural database of arsenite compounds to confirm that a 3 coordinate As-O complex for hydrated arsenite is the predominate species in solution. Finally, quantum chemical studies indicate arsenite in solution is solvated by 3 water molecules. These results indicate As(OH)3 as the most stable structure existing in solution at neutral pH; thus, ionic As transport does not appear to be involved in the cellular uptake process.

  15. Volcanic magma reservoir imaged as a low-density body beneath Aso volcano that terminated the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ayumu; Sumita, Tatsuya; Okubo, Yasukuni; Okuwaki, Ryo; Otsubo, Makoto; Uesawa, Shimpei; Yagi, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    We resolve the density structure of a possible magma reservoir beneath Aso, an active volcano on Kyushu Island, Japan, by inverting gravity data. In the context of the resolved structure, we discuss the relationship between the fault rupture of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake and Aso volcano. Low-density bodies were resolved beneath central Aso volcano using a three-dimensional inversion with an assumed density contrast of ±0.3 g/cm3. The resultant location of the southern low-density body is consistent with a magma reservoir reported in previous studies. No Kumamoto aftershocks occur in the southern low-density body; this aseismic anomaly may indicate a ductile feature due to high temperatures and/or the presence of partial melt. Comparisons of the location of the southern low-density body with rupture models of the mainshock, obtained from teleseismic waveform and InSAR data, suggest that the rupture terminus overlaps the southern low-density body. The ductile features of a magma reservoir could have terminated rupture propagation. On the other hand, a northern low-density body is resolved in the Asodani area, where evidence of current volcanic activity is scarce and aftershock activity is high. The northern low-density body might, therefore, be derived from a thick caldera fill in the Asodani area, or correspond to mush magma or a high-crystallinity magma reservoir that could be the remnant of an ancient intrusion.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Disposition and Pharmacology of a GalNAc3-conjugated ASO Targeting Human Lipoprotein (a) in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosie Z; Graham, Mark J; Post, Noah; Riney, Stan; Zanardi, Thomas; Hall, Shannon; Burkey, Jennifer; Shemesh, Colby S; Prakash, Thazha P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Geary, Richard S; Wang, Yanfeng; Henry, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Triantennary N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc3)-conjugated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have greatly improved potency via receptor-mediated uptake. In the present study, the in vivo pharmacology of a 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified ASO conjugated with GalNAc3 (ISIS 681257) together with its unmodified congener (ISIS 494372) targeting human apolipoprotein (a) (apo(a)), were studied in human LPA transgenic mice. Further, the disposition kinetics of ISIS 681257 was studied in CD-1 mice. ISIS 681257 demonstrated over 20-fold improvement in potency over ISIS 494372 as measured by liver apo(a) mRNA and plasma apo(a) protein levels. Following subcutaneous (SC) dosing, ISIS 681257 cleared rapidly from plasma and distributed to tissues. Intact ISIS 681257 was the major full-length oligonucleotide species in plasma. In tissues, however, GalNAc sugar moiety was rapidly metabolized and unconjugated ISIS 681257 accounted > 97% of the total exposure, which was then cleared slowly from tissues with a half-life of 7–8 days, similar to the half-life in plasma. ISIS 681257 is highly bound to plasma proteins (> 94% bound), which limited its urinary excretion. This study confirmed dose-dependent exposure to the parent drug ISIS 681257 in plasma and rapid conversion to unconjugated ASO in tissues. Safety data and the extended half-life support its further development and weekly dosing in phase 1 clinical studies. PMID:27138177

  17. K2[HCr2AsO10]: redetermination of phase II and the predicted structure of phase I.

    PubMed

    Weakley, T J R; Ylvisaker, E R; Yager, R J; Wu, P; Photinos, P; Abrahams, S C

    2004-12-01

    Our prediction that phase II of dipotassium hydrogen chromatoarsenate, K(2)[HCr(2)AsO(10)], is ferroelectric, based on the analysis of the atomic coordinates by Averbuch-Pouchot, Durif & Guitel [Acta Cryst. (1978), B34, 3725-3727], led to an independent redetermination of the structure using two separate crystals. The resulting improved accuracy allows the inference that the H atom is located in the hydrogen bonds of length 2.555 (5) angstroms which form between the terminal O atoms of shared AsO(3)OH tetrahedra in adjacent HCr(2)AsO(10)(2-) ions. The largest atomic displacement of 0.586 angstroms between phase II and the predicted paraelectric phase I is by these two O atoms. The H atoms form helices of radius approximately 0.60 A about the 3(1) or 3(2) axes. Normal probability analysis reveals systematic error in seven or more of the earlier atomic coordinates.

  18. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.

    1995-04-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB`s) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS`s) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS`s, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, the authors present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  19. Superconductors (History & Advanced Research)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2012-02-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. The next great milestone in understanding how matter behaves at extreme cold temperatures occurred in 1933. German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor. This is the principle on which the electric generator operates. But, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). In 1941 niobium-nitride was found to superconduct at 16 K. In 1953 vanadium-silicon displayed superconductive properties at 17.5 K. And, in 1962 scientists at Westinghouse developed the first commercial superconducting wire, an alloy of niobium and titanium (NbTi).

  20. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-04-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  1. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  2. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Koshelev, Alexei E.; Glatz, Andreas; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-K.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike illusive magnetic field lines in vacuum, magnetic vortices in superconductors are real physical strings, which interact with the sample surface, crystal structure defects, and with each other. We address the complex and poorly understood process of vortex cutting via a comprehensive set of magneto-optic experiments which allow us to visualize vortex patterns at magnetization of a nearly twin-free YBCO crystal by crossing magnetic fields of different orientations. We observe a pronounced anisotropy in the flux dynamics under crossing fields and the filamentation of induced supercurrents associated with the staircase vortex structure expected in layered cuprates, flux cutting effects, and angular vortex instabilities predicted for anisotropic superconductors. At some field angles, we find formation of the vortex domains following a type-I phase transition in the vortex state accompanied by an abrupt change in the vortex orientation. To clarify the vortex cutting scenario we performed time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, which confirmed formation of sharp vortex fronts observed in the experiment and revealed a left-handed helical instability responsible for the rotation of vortices. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  4. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  5. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  6. Materials design for new superconductors.

    PubMed

    Norman, M R

    2016-07-01

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed here, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.

  7. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  9. Materials design for new superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed here, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.

  10. Superconductor and magnet levitation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, K. B.; Postrekhin, Y. V.; Chu, W. K.

    2003-12-01

    This article reviews levitation devices using superconductors and magnets. Device concepts and their applications such as noncontact bearings, flywheels, and momentum wheels are discussed, following an exposition of the principles behind these devices. The basic magneto-mechanical phenomenon responsible for levitation in these devices is a result of flux pinning inherent in the interaction between a magnet and a type II superconductor, described and explained in this article by comparison with behavior expected of a perfect conductor or a nearly perfect conductor. The perfect conductor model is used to illustrate why there is a difference between the forces observed when the superconductor is cooled after or before the magnet is brought into position. The same model also establishes the principle that a resisting force or torque arises only in response to those motions of the magnet that changes the magnet field at the superconductor. A corollary of the converse, that no drag torque appears when an axisymmetric magnet levitated above a superconductor rotates, is the guiding concept in the design of superconductor magnet levitation bearings, which is the common component in a majority of levitation devices. The perfect conductor model is extended to a nearly perfect conductor to provide a qualitative understanding of the dissipative aspects such as creep and hysteresis in the interaction between magnets and superconductors. What all these entail in terms of forces, torques, and power loss is expounded further in the context of generic cases of a cylindrical permanent magnet levitated above a superconductor and a superconductor rotating in a transverse magnetic field. Then we proceed to compare the pros and cons of levitation bearings based on the first arrangement with conventional mechanical bearings and active magnetic bearings, and discuss how the weak points of the levitation bearing may be partially overcome. In the latter half, we examine designs of devices

  11. Experiments on Nanoscale Disordered Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zhenyi; Kouh, Taejoon; Stewart, Michael; Valles, James

    2003-03-01

    We are studying a quasi-two-dimensional system of nanoscale, superconducting grains (Pb) overlain by a normal metal (Ag), which can be described as an array of mesoscopic superconductor-normal-superconductor junctions. The Pb grains are smaller than the bulk Pb coherence volume and consequently, these arrays are expected to exhibit a superconductor to metal quantum phase transition [1]. Previous measurements of the decrease in critical temperature with increasing Ag thickness show clear deviations from the predictions of mean field theories of the proximity effect [2]. Our recent experiments on systems with even smaller Pb grains exhibit similar deviations. We will discuss these and our latest tunneling and transport results in terms of recent theories[1] and contrast them with the behavior of ultrathin, disordered films near the superconductor to insulator transition. [1] B.Spivak, A.Zyuzin, M.Hruska ,Phys. Rev. B. 64, 132502(2001) [2] Taejoon Kouh and James Valles Jr Breakdown of Cooper Limit Theory in Disordered Nanoscale Superconductor-Normal-Superconductor Arrays (cond-mat 0202104)

  12. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  13. Holographic correspondence in topological superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Giandomenico; Pachos, Jiannis K.

    2016-09-15

    We analytically derive a compatible family of effective field theories that uniquely describe topological superconductors in 3D, their 2D boundary and their 1D defect lines. We start by deriving the topological field theory of a 3D topological superconductor in class DIII, which is consistent with its symmetries. Then we identify the effective theory of a 2D topological superconductor in class D living on the gapped boundary of the 3D system. By employing the holographic correspondence we derive the effective chiral conformal field theory that describes the gapless modes living on the defect lines or effective boundary of the class D topological superconductor. We demonstrate that the chiral central charge is given in terms of the 3D winding number of the bulk which by its turn is equal to the Chern number of its gapped boundary.

  14. Manufacturing a Superconductor in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, John

    1989-01-01

    Described is the manufacture of a superconductor from a commercially available kit using equipment usually available in schools or easily obtainable. The construction is described in detail including equipment, materials, safety procedures, tolerances, and manufacture. (Author/CW)

  15. Manufacturing a Superconductor in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, John

    1989-01-01

    Described is the manufacture of a superconductor from a commercially available kit using equipment usually available in schools or easily obtainable. The construction is described in detail including equipment, materials, safety procedures, tolerances, and manufacture. (Author/CW)

  16. Electron spin susceptibility of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S.; Nazarov, Y.V.; Eliashberg, G.M.

    1985-03-10

    The effect of spin polarization due to the Meissner currents on the electron spin susceptibility of a superconductor is studied. This effect accounts for a susceptibility considerably stronger than that of a normal metal. The spin distribution is discussed.

  17. Processing of Mixed Oxide Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    UROUP SUB-GROUP High Temperature Superconductivity , critical current -- 7-- 0superconductor, ceramic, magnetism 20 ’ I 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...large intragrain currents and small intergrain currents . Magnetic separation works well for YBCO in liquid nitrogen. The technique can certainly be...between the intergrain and intragrain currents and that the short coherence length of oxide superconductors is not the main problem. The closest

  18. Multistrand superconductor cable

    DOEpatents

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconductor cable is produced by using strands which are preformed, prior to being wound into the cable, so that each strand has a variable cross section, with successive portions having a substantially round cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a rectangular cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a round cross section and so forth, in repetitive cycles along the length of the strand. The cable is wound and flattened so that the portions of rectangular cross section extend across the two flat sides of the cable at the strand angle. The portions of round cross section are bent at the edges of the flattened cable, so as to extend between the two flat sides. The rectangular portions of the strands slide easil

  19. Stability of holographic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamical stability of holographic superconductors. We first classify perturbations around black hole background solutions into vector and scalar sectors by means of a 2-dimensional rotational symmetry. We prove the stability of the vector sector by explicitly constructing the positive definite Hamiltonian. To reveal a mechanism for the stabilization of a superconducting phase, we construct a quadratic action for the scalar sector. From the action, we see the stability of black holes near a critical point is determined by the equation of motion for a charged scalar field. We show the effective mass of the charged scalar field in hairy black holes is always above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound near the critical point due to the backreaction of a gauge field. It implies the stability of the superconducting phase. We also argue that the stability continues away from the critical point.

  20. Aperiodic Weak Topological Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Fulga, I C; Pikulin, D I; Loring, T A

    2016-06-24

    Weak topological phases are usually described in terms of protection by the lattice translation symmetry. Their characterization explicitly relies on periodicity since weak invariants are expressed in terms of the momentum-space torus. We prove the compatibility of weak topological superconductors with aperiodic systems, such as quasicrystals. We go beyond usual descriptions of weak topological phases and introduce a novel, real-space formulation of the weak invariant, based on the Clifford pseudospectrum. A nontrivial value of this index implies a nontrivial bulk phase, which is robust against disorder and hosts localized zero-energy modes at the edge. Our recipe for determining the weak invariant is directly applicable to any finite-sized system, including disordered lattice models. This direct method enables a quantitative analysis of the level of disorder the topological protection can withstand.

  1. Stability of holographic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2010-10-01

    We study the dynamical stability of holographic superconductors. We first classify perturbations around black hole background solutions into vector and scalar sectors by means of a 2-dimensional rotational symmetry. We prove the stability of the vector sector by explicitly constructing the positive definite Hamiltonian. To reveal a mechanism for the stabilization of a superconducting phase, we construct a quadratic action for the scalar sector. From the action, we see the stability of black holes near a critical point is determined by the equation of motion for a charged scalar field. We show the effective mass of the charged scalar field in hairy black holes is always above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound near the critical point due to the backreaction of a gauge field. It implies the stability of the superconducting phase. We also argue that the stability continues away from the critical point.

  2. Interaction-induced singular Fermi surface in a high-temperature oxypnictide superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Charnukha, A.; Thirupathaiah, S.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Büchner, B.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Batlogg, B.; Yaresko, A. N.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    In the family of iron-based superconductors, LaFeAsO-type materials possess the simplest electronic structure due to their pronounced two-dimensionality. And yet they host superconductivity with the highest transition temperature Tc ≈ 55K. Early theoretical predictions of their electronic structure revealed multiple large circular portions of the Fermi surface with a very good geometrical overlap (nesting), believed to enhance the pairing interaction and thus superconductivity. The prevalence of such large circular features in the Fermi surface has since been associated with many other iron-based compounds and has grown to be generally accepted in the field. In this work we show that a prototypical compound of the 1111-type, SmFe0.92Co0.08AsO , is at odds with this description and possesses a distinctly different Fermi surface, which consists of two singular constructs formed by the edges of several bands, pulled to the Fermi level from the depths of the theoretically predicted band structure by strong electronic interactions. Such singularities dramatically affect the low-energy electronic properties of the material, including superconductivity. We further argue that occurrence of these singularities correlates with the maximum superconducting transition temperature attainable in each material class over the entire family of iron-based superconductors. PMID:25997611

  3. Interaction-induced singular Fermi surface in a high-temperature oxypnictide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Charnukha, A; Thirupathaiah, S; Zabolotnyy, V B; Büchner, B; Zhigadlo, N D; Batlogg, B; Yaresko, A N; Borisenko, S V

    2015-05-21

    In the family of iron-based superconductors, LaFeAsO-type materials possess the simplest electronic structure due to their pronounced two-dimensionality. And yet they host superconductivity with the highest transition temperature Tc ≈ 55K. Early theoretical predictions of their electronic structure revealed multiple large circular portions of the Fermi surface with a very good geometrical overlap (nesting), believed to enhance the pairing interaction and thus superconductivity. The prevalence of such large circular features in the Fermi surface has since been associated with many other iron-based compounds and has grown to be generally accepted in the field. In this work we show that a prototypical compound of the 1111-type, SmFe(0.92)Co(0.08)AsO , is at odds with this description and possesses a distinctly different Fermi surface, which consists of two singular constructs formed by the edges of several bands, pulled to the Fermi level from the depths of the theoretically predicted band structure by strong electronic interactions. Such singularities dramatically affect the low-energy electronic properties of the material, including superconductivity. We further argue that occurrence of these singularities correlates with the maximum superconducting transition temperature attainable in each material class over the entire family of iron-based superconductors.

  4. Magnetostatics of superconductors without an inversion center

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S.; Nazarov, Y.V.; Eliashberg, G.M.

    1985-05-10

    The penetration of a magnetic field into a London superconductor without an inversion center is analyzed. The magnetization produced in the Meissner layer corresponds to a magnetic-induction jump at the superconductor surface.

  5. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet-superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed.

  6. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  7. Crustal deformation associated with the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake and its effect on the magma system of Aso volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Taku; Fujita, Eisuke; Ueda, Hideki

    2016-11-01

    An MJMA6.5 earthquake (foreshock) and MJMA7.3 earthquake (mainshock) struck Kumamoto Prefecture on April 14, 2016, and April 16, 2016. To evaluate the effect of crustal deformation due to the earthquake on the Aso magma system, we detected crustal deformation using InSAR and GNSS. From InSAR analysis, we detected large crustal deformations along the Hinagu Fault, the Futagawa Fault, and the northeast extension of the latter fault. It extended to more than 50 km, and the maximum slant-range change exceeded 1 m. Although the obtained crustal deformation was approximately explained by the right-lateral strike-slip on the fault, its details could not be explained by such simple faulting. Additionally, we found complex surface deformation west of the Aso caldera rim, suggesting that shallow fault slips occurred in many known and unknown faults associated with the earthquake. Most of the crustal deformation could be reasonably explained by four rectangle faults located along the Futagawa Fault, in the northeast extension of the Futagawa Fault, alongside the Hinagu Fault, and in the eastern part of the Futagawa Fault. The first three of faults have high dip angles and right-lateral slip. The other was a fault with a low dip angle that branched from the shallow depth of the fault along the Futagawa Fault. The normal-dip right-lateral slip was estimated for this segment. Based on the estimated fault model, we calculated the displacement and stress field around the Aso volcano by the finite-element method (FEM) to evaluate the effects on the Aso magma system. In this calculation, we assumed a spherical soft medium located at a 6-km depth beneath the area south of the Kusasenri region as the magma system and considered only static effects. The result shows complex distributions of displacements and stresses, but we can notice the following significant points. (1) The spherical magma system deformed to an ellipsoid, and the total volume was slightly increased, less than 1%. (2

  8. Superconductivity in SmFe1-xMxASO (M = Co, Rh, Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yan-Peng; Wang, Lei; Gao, Zhao-Shun; Wang, Don-Liang; Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ma, Yan-Wei

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we report the comparative study of superconductivity by 3d (Co), 4d (Rh), 5d (Ir) element doping in SmFeAsO. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the material has formed the ZrCuSiAs-type structure with a space group P4/nmm. It is found that the antiferromagnetic spin-density-wave (SDW) order in the parent compounds is rapidly suppressed by Co, Rh, and Ir doping, and superconductivity emerges. The diamagnetism, consistent with the R-T data, conforms to the bulk superconductivity in our SmFe1-xMxAsO (M=Co, Rh, Ir) samples. Co, Rh and Ir locate in the same column in the periodic table of the elements but have different electronic band structure, so a comparative study would add more ingredients to the underlying physics of iron-based superconductors.

  9. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  10. Physics and chemistry of layered chalcogenide superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, Keita; Takano, Yoshihiko; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Structural and physical properties of layered chalcogenide superconductors are summarized. In particular, we review the remarkable properties of the Fe-chalcogenide superconductors, FeSe and FeTe-based materials. Furthermore, we introduce the recently discovered BiS2-based layered superconductors and discuss their prospects. PMID:27877516

  11. Fluidized landslides induced by extreme rainfall along basaltic caldera cliff of Mt. Aso in July 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Matsushi, Yuki; Furuya, Gen; Saito, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    In the end of the rainy season of 2012, a extreme rainfall affected western Japan in July and induced hundreds of fluidized landslides claiming casualties of more than 20. Measured trigger precipitation was recorded by the nearby ground-based station of the AMeDAS network (Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System)as about 80 mm/h for consecutive 4 hours. Analysis of Radar-Raingauge Analyzed Precipitation-operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency showed landslide affected area almost coincided with the ones of heavier precipitation. Most of the landslides took place along the outer caldera rim and flank of the central cone of Mt. Aso, a basaltic active volcano. Most of the landslides slid on the boundary of strongly weathered soils, which used to be new volcanic accretion materials. Outstanding features of these landslides are: (1) This area had been affected by similar heavy rainfall decades ago, however, again a number of landslides took place in the nearby past scars; (2) Many of the soil slide bodies are shallow less than 5 meters deep and possibly immediately transformed into debris flows or mud flows and traveled long distance to reach the downslope communities; (3) Visual observation of the sources showed the high possibility that some of the slides were apparently induced by liquefaction. Similar cases were reported of past 2 landslide disasters in Japan. This strongly suggests that excessive rainfall can trigger numerous mud flows of unexpected reach. We conducted close field study at a typical soil slide - mud flow site. It originally initiated as debris or soil slide on a thin steep bedding plane of about 34 degrees consisting of coarser accretion materials. Needle penetration test showed comparatively weaker strength in the layer. It is underlain by a layer of finer materials. Such a higher permeability contrast could contribute to higher susceptibility of excess pore pressure generation. We took soil samples from the vicinity of sliding

  12. Superconductors: The long road ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Foner, S.; Orlando, T.P.

    1988-02-01

    Before the discovery of high-temperature superconductors, progress in superconductivity was measured by quite small increases in critical temperature, often of less than one degree. Today, there is no reason to believe that the dramatic leaps in critical temperature inaugurated by superconducting ceramics are over. Researchers may find new high-temperature superconducting materials with less severe technical limitations than the ceramics we know today. And if the day ever comes when a superconductor can be reliably manufactured to operate effectively at room temperature, then superconductors will be incorporated in a broad range of everyday household devices - motors, appliances, even children's toys - with a large consumer market. High-temperature superconductors may also cause us to extensively revise our traditional theories about how superconductivity works. Should it run out that superconductivity in ceramics involves new physical mechanisms, then these mechanisms could lead to applications never considered before. The recent discoveries have already reinvigorated superconductivity research. What was once largely the domain of a relatively small group of scientists has become a genuinely multidisciplinary realm. Now physicists, materials scientists, chemists, metallurgists, ceramists, and solid-state electronics engineers are all focusing on superconductivity. The cross-fertilization of these disciplines should contribute to further discoveries of importance to the practical application of superconductors.

  13. Crystal growth and crystal structures of six novel phases in the Mn/As/O/Cl(Br) system, as well as magnetic properties of α-Mn3(AsO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Matthias; Kremer, Reinhard K.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical vapour transport reactions (900 °C → 820 °C, Cl2 or Br2 as transport agent) of in situ formed Mn3(AsO4)2 yielded the orthoarsenates(V) α-Mn3(AsO4)2 and β-Mn3(AsO4)2 as well as the oxoarsenate(V) halide compounds Mn7(AsO4)4Cl2, Mn11(AsO4)7Cl, Mn11(AsO4)7Br and Mn5(AsO4)3Cl. The crystal structures of all six phases were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. The crystal structures of α-and β-Mn3(AsO4)2 are isotypic with the corresponding phosphate phases γ- and α-Mn3(PO4)2, respectively, and are reported here for the first time. A comparative discussion with other structures of general composition M3(AsO4)2 (М = Mg; divalent first-row transition metal) is given. The unique crystal structures of Mn7(AsO4)4Cl2 and that of the two isotypic Mn11(AsO4)7X (X = Cl, Br) structures are composed of two [MnO5] polyhedra, two [MnO4Cl2] polyhedra (one with site symmetry 1 bar), two AsO4 tetrahedra, and one [MnO5] polyhedron, three [MnO6] octahedra (one with site symmetry.m.), one [MnO4X], one [MnO5X] polyhedron and four AsO4 tetrahedra, respectively. The various polyhedra of the three arsenate(V) halides are condensed into three-dimensional framework structures by corner- and edge-sharing. Mn5(AsO4)3Cl adopts the chloroapatite structure. The magnetic and thermal properties of pure polycrystalline samples of a-Mn3(AsO4)2 were investigated in more detail. The magnetic susceptibility proves all Mn atoms to be in the oxidation state +2 yielding an effective magnetic moment per Mn atom of 5.9 μB. Long-range antiferromagnetic ordering is observed below 8.2 K consistent with the negative Curie-Weiss temperature of -50 K derived from the high temperature susceptibility data. Chemical vapour transport reactions of in situ formed Mn3(AsO4)2 using Cl2 or Br2 as transport agents led to crystal growth of six phases structurally determined for the first time: α-Mn3(AsO4)2, β-Mn3(AsO4)2, Mn7(AsO4)4Cl2, Mn11(AsO4)7Cl, Mn11(AsO4)7Br and Mn5(AsO4)3Cl.

  14. Multistrand superconductor cable

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Albert R.

    1985-01-01

    Improved multistrand Rutherford-type superconductor cable is produced by using strands which are preformed, prior to being wound into the cable, so that each strand has a variable cross section, with successive portions having a substantially round cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a rectangular cross section, a transitional oval cross section, a round cross section and so forth, in repetitive cycles along the length of the strand. The cable is wound and flattened so that the portions of rectangular cross section extend across the two flat sides of the cable at the strand angle. The portions of round cross section are bent at the edges of the flattened cable, so as to extend between the two flat sides. The rectangular portions of the strands slide easily over one another, so as to facilitate flexing and bending of the cable, while also minimizing the possibility of causing damage to the strands by such flexing or bending. Moreover, the improved cable substantially maintains its compactness and cross-sectional shape when the cable is flexed or bent.

  15. Tunneling in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar

    2002-03-01

    It has been said that Thomas Edison's greatest invention was that of the "Research Laboratory" as a social institution. My greatest discovery was when I learned at 29 years of age that it was possible to work in such an institution and get paid for doing research. I had become interested in physics, gotten a job at General Electric Research Laboratory and found a great mentor in John C. Fischer, who besides instructing me in physics told me that sooner or later we all would become historians of science. I guess for me that time is now, because I have been asked to tell you about my second greatest discovery: Tunneling in superconductors. My great fortune was to be at the right place at the right time, where I had access to outstanding and helpful (not necessary an oxymoron) physicists. Hopefully I will be able to convey to you some of the fun and excitement of that area in this recollection. If you become real interested you may find a written version in my Nobel Prize talk: "Electron Tunneling and Superconductivity" Les Prix Nobel en 1973 or Science 183, 1253-1258 1974 or Reviews of Modern Physics 46 (2), 245-250 1974

  16. Torque magnetometry in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu

    This thesis describes torque magnetometry studies on unconventional superconductors. Torque magnetometry measures the anisotropic magnetization of samples by recording their torque signals in a tilted magnetic field. Applied to superconductors, this method provides a reliable way to measure the field dependence of magnetization with high resolution under extreme conditions: DC magnetic fields from zero to 45.2 T, and temperature from 300 mK to 300K. The results can be used to determine many important parameters, such as the upper critical field H c2, the superconducting condensation energy, the onset temperature of diamagnetic signals, and so on. We carried out the torque magnetometry measurements on unconventional superconductors---high Tc superconductors and the p-wave superconductor Sr2RuO4---and uncovered new features that do not exist in conventional BCS superconductors. In high Tc superconductors, our torque magnetometry studies focus on the properties of the vortex liquid state. First, by comparing the observed magnetization curves with the Nernst effect results in Bi 2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta, we confirm that the unusually large Nernst effect signals originate from the surviving vortex liquid state above Tc. Second, the M-H curves near the critical temperature Tc suggest that the nature of the transition is the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Near Tc, the magnetization response at low field is strongly nonlinear, and the T dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-field limit approaches the predicted curve from the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Third, the measurements in intense magnetic field up to 45 T reveal the unusual, weak T-dependence of Hc2. These observations strongly support the existence of the vortex liquid state above Tc. The superconducting state is destroyed by the phase fluctuation of the pair condensate, while the pair condensate keeps its amplitude above T c. Further studies in single-layered high Tc superconductors reveal more

  17. Materials design for new superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M. R.

    2016-05-23

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed in this paper, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.

  18. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  19. Materials design for new superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Norman, M. R.

    2016-05-23

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed in this paper,more » with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.« less

  20. Resolving thermoelectric "paradox" in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Connor D; Matrozova, Ekaterina A; Petrashov, Victor T

    2016-02-01

    For almost a century, thermoelectricity in superconductors has been one of the most intriguing topics in physics. During its early stages in the 1920s, the mere existence of thermoelectric effects in superconductors was questioned. In 1944, it was demonstrated that the effects may occur in inhomogeneous superconductors. Theoretical breakthrough followed in the 1970s, when the generation of a measurable thermoelectric magnetic flux in superconducting loops was predicted; however, a major crisis developed when experiments showed puzzling discrepancies with the theory. Moreover, different experiments were inconsistent with each other. This led to a stalemate in bringing theory and experiment into agreement. With this work, we resolve this stalemate, thus solving this long-standing "paradox," and open prospects for exploration of novel thermoelectric phenomena predicted recently.

  1. Heat transport in nonuniform superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Caroline; Vorontsov, Anton B.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate electronic energy transport in inhomogeneous superconductors using a fully self-consistent nonequilibrium quasiclassical Keldysh approach. We develop a general theory and apply it to a superconductor with an order parameter that forms domain walls of the type encountered in the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state. The heat transport in the presence of a domain wall is inherently anisotropic and nonlocal. The bound states in the nonuniform region play a crucial role and control heat transport in several ways: (i) they modify the spectrum of quasiparticle states and result in Andreev reflection processes and (ii) they hybridize with the impurity band and produce a local transport environment with properties very different from those in a uniform superconductor. As a result of this interplay, heat transport becomes highly sensitive to temperature, magnetic field, and disorder. For strongly scattering impurities, we find that the transport across domain walls at low temperatures is considerably more efficient than in the uniform superconducting state.

  2. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2002-01-01

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  3. Apparatus for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    2001-01-01

    A process and apparatus for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor comprising a layer of said superconducting precursor powder between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor is then heat treated to establish the superconducting phase of said superconductor precursor powder.

  4. Topological surface states in nodal superconductors.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Andreas P; Brydon, Philip M R

    2015-06-24

    Topological superconductors have become a subject of intense research due to their potential use for technical applications in device fabrication and quantum information. Besides fully gapped superconductors, unconventional superconductors with point or line nodes in their order parameter can also exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics. This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical understanding of nodal topological superconductors, with a focus on Weyl and noncentrosymmetric superconductors and their protected surface states. Using selected examples, we review the bulk topological properties of these systems, study different types of topological surface states, and examine their unusual properties. Furthermore, we survey some candidate materials for topological superconductivity and discuss different experimental signatures of topological surface states.

  5. Redetermination of eveite, Mn2AsO4(OH), based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbo W.; Stevenson, Ryan A.; Siegel, Alesha M.; Downs, Gordon W.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of eveite, ideally Mn2(AsO4)(OH) [dimanganese(II) arsenate(V) hydroxide], was refined from a single crystal selected from a co-type sample from Långban, Filipstad, Varmland, Sweden. Eveite, dimorphic with sarkinite, is structurally analogous with the important rock-forming mineral andalusite, Al2OSiO4, and belongs to the libethenite group. Its structure consists of chains of edge-sharing distorted [MnO4(OH)2] octa­hedra (..2 symmetry) extending parallel to [001]. These chains are cross-linked by isolated AsO4 tetra­hedra (..m symmetry) through corner-sharing, forming channels in which dimers of edge-sharing [MnO4(OH)] trigonal bipyramids (..m symmetry) are located. In contrast to the previous refinement from Weissenberg photographic data [Moore & Smyth (1968 ▶). Am. Mineral. 53, 1841–1845], all non-H atoms were refined with anisotropic displacement param­eters and the H atom was located. The distance of the donor and acceptor O atoms involved in hydrogen bonding is in agreement with Raman spectroscopic data. Examination of the Raman spectra for arsenate minerals in the libethenite group reveals that the position of the peak originating from the O—H stretching vibration shifts to lower wavenumbers from eveite, to adamite, zincolivenite, and olivenite. PMID:22199466

  6. Wyllieite-type Ag1.09Mn3.46(AsO4)3

    PubMed Central

    Frigui, Wafa; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Single crystals of wyllieite-type silver(I) manganese(II) tris­orthoarsenate(V), Ag1.09Mn3.46(AsO4)3, were grown by a solid-state reaction. The three-dimensional framework is made up from four Mn2+/Mn3+ cations surrounded octa­hedrally by O atoms. The MnO6 octa­hedra are linked through edge- and corner-sharing. Three independent AsO4 tetra­hedra are linked to the framework through common corners, delimiting channels along [100] in which two partly occupied Ag+ sites reside, one on an inversion centre and with an occupancy of 0.631 (4), the other on a general site and with an occupancy of 0.774 (3), both within distorted tetra­hedral environments. One of the Mn sites is also located on an inversion centre and is partly occupied, with an occupancy of 0.916 (5). Related compounds with alluaudite-type or rosemaryite-type structures are compared and discussed. PMID:22719272

  7. Na3Co2(AsO4)(As2O7): a new sodium cobalt arsenate

    PubMed Central

    Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Driss, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, tris­odium dicobalt arsenate diarsenate, Na3Co2AsO4As2O7, the two Co atoms, one of the two As and three of the seven O atoms lie on special positions, with site symmetries 2 and m for the Co, m for the As, and 2 and twice m for the O atoms. The two Na atoms are disordered over two general and special positions [occupancies 0.72 (3):0.28 (3) and 0.940 (6):0.060 (6), respectively]. The main structural feature is the association of the CoO6 octa­hedra in the ab plane, forming Co4O20 units, which are corner- and edge-connected via AsO4 and As2O7 arsenate groups, giving rise to a complex polyhedral connectivity with small tunnels, such as those running along the b- and c-axis directions, in which the Na+ ions reside. The structural model is validated by both bond-valence-sum and charge-distribution methods, and the distortion of the coordination polyhedra is analyzed by means of the effective coordination number. PMID:22807699

  8. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  9. Studies of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Narlikar, A. )

    1990-01-01

    With the pioneering discovery of high temperature superconductors in 1986 superconductivity has ceased to remain an area of mere academic curiosity and a preserve of a small community of low temperature physicists and cryogenists. Renouncing their cold confines freed from the grip of liquid helium, superconductors have stepped into the realm of high temperatures. The area has transformed into a rich field of intensive and highly competitive research, encompassing diverse disciplines such as: structural chemistry, ceramic engineering, metallurgy, solid state electronics, experimental and theoretical, and condensed matter physics.

  10. Multifilamentary niobium tin superconductor tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisbin, P. H.; Coles, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    In the method proposed for fabricating multifilamentary Nb3Sn tape, filamentary superconducting paths are produced in standard commercial superconductor tape by chemical milling of separator slots through the Nb3Sn layer. The multifilament configuration features a matrix of ten 1.2 mm wide parallel helical superconducting paths along the length of the tape. The paths are spaced 0.4 mm apart. Tapes tested as small pancake coils demonstrated the integrity and continuity of the matrix, and showed that critical current was sustained in direct proportion to retained superconductor.

  11. Semiconductor–superconductor optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouscher, Shlomi; Panna, Dmitry; Hayat, Alex

    2017-10-01

    Devices combining superconductors with semiconductors offer a wide range of applications, particularly in the growing field of quantum information processing. This is due to their ability to take advantage of both the extensive knowledge gathered in the field of semiconductors and the unique quantum properties of superconductors. This results in novel device concepts, such as structures generating and detecting entangled photon pairs as well as novel optical gain and laser realizations. In this review, we discuss the fundamental concepts and the underlying physical phenomena of superconductor–semiconductor optoelectronics as well as practical device implementations.

  12. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  13. High-throughput investigation in the synthesis of the alluaudite-type manganese arsenate: AgMn 3(AsO 4)(HAsO 4) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, N.; Bein, T.

    2003-09-01

    The application of high-throughput methods under hydrothermal conditions in the investigation of the system AgNO 3/Mn(NO 3) 2/H 3AsO 4 has led to the new manganese arsenate AgMn 3(AsO 4)(HAsO 4) 2 which is structurally related to the mineral alluaudite. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with a=12.397(2), b=12.707(2), c=6.8904(6) Å, β=113.57(1)°, V=994.8(2) Å 3, Z=4, R1=0.021, wR2=0.046.

  14. Nature of the superconductor-insulator transition in disordered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Meir, Yigal; Avishai, Yshai

    2007-10-18

    The interplay of superconductivity and disorder has intrigued scientists for several decades. Disorder is expected to enhance the electrical resistance of a system, whereas superconductivity is associated with a zero-resistance state. Although superconductivity has been predicted to persist even in the presence of disorder, experiments performed on thin films have demonstrated a transition from a superconducting to an insulating state with increasing disorder or magnetic field. The nature of this transition is still under debate, and the subject has become even more relevant with the realization that high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductors are intrinsically disordered. Here we present numerical simulations of the superconductor-insulator transition in two-dimensional disordered superconductors, starting from a microscopic description that includes thermal phase fluctuations. We demonstrate explicitly that disorder leads to the formation of islands where the superconducting order is high. For weak disorder, or high electron density, increasing the magnetic field results in the eventual vanishing of the amplitude of the superconducting order parameter, thereby forming an insulating state. On the other hand, at lower electron densities or higher disorder, increasing the magnetic field suppresses the correlations between the phases of the superconducting order parameter in different islands, giving rise to a different type of superconductor-insulator transition. One of the important predictions of this work is that in the regime of high disorder, there are still superconducting islands in the sample, even on the insulating side of the transition. This result, which is consistent with experiments, explains the recently observed huge magneto-resistance peak in disordered thin films and may be relevant to the observation of 'the pseudogap phenomenon' in underdoped high-T(c) superconductors.

  15. Skewness and Kurtosis of the Switching Current Distribution in Superconductor-Graphene-Superconductor Junctions and Superconductor-Nanowire-Superconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Andrew; Aref, Thomas; Coskun, Ulas; Weinberg, Phillip; Levchenko, Alex; Vakaryuk, Victor; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2013-03-01

    We study statistical properties of the switching current in superconductor-graphene-superconductor proximity junctions and superconductor-nanowire-superconductor devices. The fluctuations of the switching current are related to Little's phase slips, generated by thermal and quantum fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. The study focuses on higher moments of the statistical probability distributions of the switching current. Namely we study the skewness, which defines the asymmetry of the distribution, and kurtosis, which is a measure of the ``peakedness.'' The skewness is defined as sk= m3 /m23 / 2 where m2 is the second moment of the distribution, called the variance, and m3 is the third moment. Kurtosis is defined as kur= m4 /m22 , where m4 is the fourth moment of the distribution. It is known that for Gaussian distributions sk=0 and kur=3. On our devices we find, in most cases, sk ~ -1 and kur ~ 5. These results are in agreement with numerical simulations as well as an analytic model. Finally we present preliminary experimental results for a two-nanowire device. We have found that the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis of the switching current distributions in these devices vary periodically with magnetic field.

  16. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  17. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  18. Update on copper oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cava, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    The early high-{Tc} superconductors Ba{sub 2}YCu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} remain the most studied for their potential application. The number and variety of new copper oxide superconductors discovered since 1986 is remarkable. Although physicists like to take credit for the superconductivity revolution, it is really a revolution in new materials. New materials of continually increasing complexity have driven the field forward since its beginning. It is no accident that the chemically simplest copper oxide superconductors were discovered first. Higher {Tc} values have been caused by the rapid growth in general knowledge in the material community of the empirical factors necessary for the occurrence of high-{Tc} superconductivity. The growth is based on improving chemical understanding of previous discoveries. The chemical understanding and complexity of cuprate superconductors continue to increase. The appearance in 1993 of mercury-based materials has further raised {Tc} values.

  19. Superconductors: An Emerging Power Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    eter of 4.5 m for a conventional motor). Substantial ac synchronous motors have been demonstrated by Siemens (400 kW), Rockwell (750 kW) and...rpm motor has been demonstrated by American Superconductor and Alstom , and a 36.5 MW motor is under development. 3.2.2. Generators Superconducting

  20. Exploration and monitoring geothermal activity using Landsat ETM + images. A case study at Aso volcanic area in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mia, Md. Bodruddoza; Nishijima, Jun; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Thermal activity monitoring in and around active volcanic areas using remote sensing is an essential part of volcanology nowadays. Three identical approaches were used for thermal activity exploration at Aso volcanic area in Japan using Landsat ETM + images. First, the conventional methods for hydrothermal alteration mapping were applied to find the most active thermal region after exploring geothermal indicator minerals. Second, we found some thermally highly anomalous regions around Nakadake crater using land surface temperature estimation. Then, the Stefan-Boltzmann equation was used for estimating and also monitoring radiative heat flux (RHF) from the most active region of about 8 km2 in and around Nakadake crater in the central part of the Aso volcano. To fulfill the required parameter in the Stefan-Boltzmann equation for radiative heat flux, the NDVI (Normalized differential vegetation index) method was used for spectral emissivity, and the mono-window algorithm was used for land surface temperature of this study area. The NDVI value was used to divide land-cover in the study area into four types: water, bare ground, mixed and vegetated land. The bare land was found within the most active region. Vegetation coverage area showed an inverse relationship with total RHF in this study as health of thermally stressed vegetation supports this relationship. The spatial distribution of spectral emissivity ranged from 0.94 to 0.99 in our study. Land surface temperature was estimated using a mono-window algorithm and was highest LST in 2008 and lowest in 2011. The results of RHF showed that the highest pixel RHF was found to be about 296 W/m2 in 2008. Total RHF was obtained of about 607 MW in 2002 and the lowest was about 354 MW in 2008. The RHF anomaly area was found the highest in 2002 and was lowest in 2011. The highest total heat discharge rate (HDR) obtained about 3918 MW in 2002 and lowest total HDR about 2289 MW in 2008 from this study area. But in the case of

  1. [Hg 5O 2(OH) 4][(UO 2) 2(AsO 4) 2]: A complex mercury(II) uranyl arsenate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaqin; Jiang, Kai; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Under mild hydrothermal conditions UO 2(NO 3) 2·6H 2O, Hg 2(NO 3) 2·2H 2O, and Na 2HAsO 4·7H 2O react to form [Hg 5O 2(OH) 4][(UO 2) 2(AsO 4) 2] (HgUAs-1). Single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that HgUAs-1 possesses a pseudo-layered structure consisting of two types of layers: ∞2[HgO(OH)4] and ∞2[(UO)2(AsO)2]. The ∞2[HgO(OH)4] layers are complex, and contain three crystallographically unique Hg centers. The coordination environments and bond-valence sum calculations indicate that the Hg centers are divalent. The ∞2[(UO)2(AsO)2] layers belong to the Johannite topological family. The ∞2[HgO(OH)4] and ∞2[(UO)2(AsO)2] layers are linked to each other through μ2-O bridges that include Hg⋯O=U=O interactions.

  2. Coordination of Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) Science Working Group (SWG) for the study of instrument accommodation and operational requirements on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to coordinate the activities of the Science Working Group (SWG) of the Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) for the study of instruments accommodation and operation requirements on board space station. In order to facilitate the progress of the objective, two conferences were organized, together with two small group discussions.

  3. Electronic properties of highly-active Ag3AsO4 photocatalyst and its band gap modulation: an insight from hybrid-density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Reunchan, Pakpoom; Boonchun, Adisak; Umezawa, Naoto

    2016-08-17

    The electronic structures of highly active Ag-based oxide photocatalysts Ag3AsO4 and Ag3PO4 are studied by hybrid-density functional calculations. It is revealed that Ag3AsO4 and Ag3PO4 are indirect band gap semiconductors. The Hartree-Fock mixing parameters are fitted for experimental band gaps of Ag3AsO4 (1.88 eV) and Ag3PO4 (2.43 eV). The smaller electron effective mass and the lower valence band edge of Ag3AsO4 are likely to be responsible for the superior photocatalytic oxidation reaction to Ag3PO4. The comparable lattice constant and analogous crystal structure between the two materials allow the opportunities of fine-tuning the band gap of Ag3AsxP1-xO4 using a solid-solution approach. The development of Ag3AsxP1-xO4 should be promising for the discovery of novel visible-light sensitized photocatalysts.

  4. Nekodake stratovolcano formed at the edge of caldera before the huge pyroclastic eruptions of Aso, Japan: petrological constraints on magma supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Hasenaka, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic activities prior to caldera-forming eruptions give important constraints on the magma supply system leading to catastrophic eruptions. Nekodake volcano located in the eastern end of Aso Caldera, Central Kyushu, Japan, was considered to have been active during the post-caldera period. However, the stratigraphic relations and radiometric ages suggest that the Nekodake volcano was active during the caldera forming periods, Aso-1, Aso-2, Aso-3 and Aso-4 pyroclastic flows. In the history of the activities of the Aso volcano, there are some parasitic eruptive activities between pyroclastic flows. However, the relationship between those activities and the pyroclastic flow eruptions is not clear. The purpose of this study is to clarify the petrological relation between magmas of the Nekodake volcano and those of Aso pyroclastic flows. We investigated geological features of the Nekodake volcano, and conducted whole rock chemical analysis and the petrographical description of the volcanic products of Nekodake. We classified the Nekodake volcanic products into four groups from phenocryst assemblage, and two groups from the chemical composition. We found a correlation between petrographical groups and compositional groups. For example, incompatible elements are abundant in olivine group (olivine + 2 pyroxene + plagioclases). Nekodake volcanic products and the caldera-forming products show contrasting differentiation trends on the Harker diagrams. MgO, Al2O3, and CaO contents are high and TiO2, P2O5, and Fe2O3 are low in Nekodake products compared with those in caldera-forming products. Incompatible elements of Nekodake volcanic products show characteristically lower values (K20:0. 6 wt.% - 1.5 wt.%, Rb: 14.2 - 50.0 ppm, Zr: 90.7 ppm -129.2 ppm) than those of caldera-forming products (K20: 1.2 wt.%- 5.0 wt.%, Rb: 21.2 - 165.0 ppm, Zr: 93.76 ppm -321.0 ppm). These data show that the magma reservoir of Nekodake volcano and that of the gigantic pyroclastic eruptions are

  5. Transatrial access for left atrial pressure (LAP) monitoring line placement in arterial switch operation (ASO) in neonates.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohammad Irfan; Hamid, Mohammad; Amanullah, Muneer; Ahsan, Khalid

    2013-11-01

    Left Atrial pressure monitoring is a useful and accurate method to guide Left ventricle filling in the patients who undergo Arterial switch operation for transposition of great arteries. We have used a different technique in three TGA patients for LA pressure monitoring line placement. After cleaning and draping,right internal jugular vein (rt IJV) located through 22G venous cannula, guide wire was put in followed by sliding the 22G x 8cm vygon arterial catheter over the guide wire into the right atrium that was directed transatrially into LA by the operating surgeon during atrial septum repair. The catheter was secured by silk on the neck and dressed with transparent dressing and was kept for a period of 48-72 hrs. LA pressure monitoring is helpful in anticipating LV dysfunction in ASO.

  6. Li3Al(MoO2)2O2(AsO4)2

    PubMed Central

    Hajji, Mounir; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of trilithium(I) aluminium(III) bis­[dioxidomolybdenum(VI)] dioxide bis­[arsenate(V)], Li3AlMo2As2O14, have been prepared by solid-state reaction at 788 K. The structure consists of AsO4 tetra­hedra, AlO6 octa­hedra and Mo2O10 groups sharing corners to form a three-dimensional framework containing channels running respectively along the [100] and [010] directions, where the Li+ ions are located. This structure is compared with compounds having (MX 2O12)n chains (M = Mo, Al and X = P, As) and others containing M 2O10 (M = Mo, Fe) dimers. PMID:21582037

  7. K0.12Na0.54Ag0.34Nb4O9AsO4

    PubMed Central

    Chérif, Saïda Fatma; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Potassium sodium silver tetra­niobium nona­oxide arsenate, K0.12Na0.54Ag0.34Nb4AsO13, synthesized by solid-state reaction at 1123 K, adopts a three-dimensional framework delimiting tunnels running along [001] in which occupationally disordered sodium, silver, and potassium ions are located. Of the 11 atoms in the asymmetric unit (two Nb, one As, one Ag, one K, one Na and fiveO), nine are located on special positions: one Nb and the K, Ag, Na and two O atoms are situated on mirror planes, the other Nb is on a twofold rotation axis, and the As atom and one O atom are on sites of m2m symmetry. PMID:21522808

  8. Design for a Superconductor Discovery Engine (SCODEngine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O. Paul

    2010-03-01

    One of the grand challenges of superconductivity is achieving a paradigm shift from discovery by serendipity to discovery by design. Periodic Table-based Maps that involve electronegativity, valence electrons and atomic number that correlate with superconducting transition temperature can be used to design novel superconductors. Combining these maps with experimental databases on superconductors, databases of crystal structures and integrating material design software engine, we can re-design many known superconductor families and predict novel systems. By adding search engine technology with a ``knowledge discovery engine'', we produce a superconductor discovery engine (SCODEngine). The SCODEngine enables us to discover novel superconductors with the accelerated speed of a Google search. We have produced a primitive SCODEngine that may revolutionize novel superconductor search and discovery.

  9. Eruption mechanism as inferred from geomagnetic changes with special attention to the 1989 1990 activity of Aso volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu

    1993-06-01

    Geomagnetic changes associated with the volcanic activity of Aso volcano were detected with a dense network of continuously recording proton-precession magnetometers during the period from June 1989 to June 1990. Magnetic date clearly indicate that changes in the magnetization within the volcano are most probably caused by temperature changes. This activity can be divided into five stages, which are characterized by magnetization and demagnetization of the volcano. These magnetic changes with durations of a few months are definitely correlated with some typical volcanic events at the crater as well as the volcanic tremor activity. The demagnetization stage appears when the vent is covered by a water pool or the volcanic activity is enhanced. The magnetization stage follows the opening of a vent and several large explosions which make the vent permeable. The source of magnetic changes lies at a depth of about 200 m below the crater rim in the southwestern part of the active crater. Magnetic moments responsible for observed magnetic changes at stages 1, 2 and 4 are 3.4, -5.2 and -2.2 Wbm, respectively. The corresponding source volume is estimated as a single sphere of radius 40-50 m or a spherical shell of 100 m or so. An effective mechanism of rapid heating/cooling exists, which is ascribed to the interaction of groundwater and superheated vapor, i.e., a shallow hydrothermal system. This hydrothermal system driven by the surface cap of the vent, controls every feature of the eruptions at the final outlet of Aso volcano.

  10. ASoP (v1.0): a set of methods for analyzing scales of precipitation in general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Martin, Gill M.; Moise, Aurel

    2017-01-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) have been criticized for their failure to represent the observed scales of precipitation, particularly in the tropics where simulated daily rainfall is too light, too frequent and too persistent. Previous assessments have focused on temporally or spatially averaged precipitation, such as daily means or regional averages. These evaluations offer little actionable information for model developers, because the interactions between the resolved dynamics and parameterized physics that produce precipitation occur at the native gridscale and time step. We introduce a set of diagnostics (Analyzing Scales of Precipitation, version 1.0 - ASoP1) to compare the spatial and temporal scales of precipitation across GCMs and observations, which can be applied to data ranging from the gridscale and time step to regional and sub-monthly averages. ASoP1 measures the spectrum of precipitation intensity, temporal variability as a function of intensity and spatial and temporal coherence. When applied to time step, gridscale tropical precipitation from 10 GCMs, the diagnostics reveal that, far from the dreary persistent light rainfall implied by daily mean data, most models produce a broad range of time step intensities that span 1-100 mm day-1. Models show widely varying spatial and temporal scales of time step precipitation. Several GCMs show concerning quasi-random behavior that may influence and/or alter the spectrum of atmospheric waves. Averaging precipitation to a common spatial ( ≈ 600 km) or temporal (3 h) resolution substantially reduces variability among models, demonstrating that averaging hides a wealth of information about intrinsic model behavior. When compared against satellite-derived analyses at these scales, all models produce features that are too large and too persistent.

  11. Resonance tunneling of cooper pairs in a superconductor-polymer-superconductor josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Ionov, A. I.

    2013-05-15

    It is shown that the superconducting current flowing though a polymer in a superconductor-polymer-superconductor Josephson structure is due to resonant tunneling of Cooper pairs. The critical current and the thickness of the polymer in which the superconducting current is observed depend on the coherence length of a Cooper pair in the superconductor contacting the polymer.

  12. The mixed anion mineral parnauite Cu 9[(OH) 10|SO 4|(AsO 4) 2]·7H 2O—A Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Keeffe, Eloise C.

    2011-10-01

    The mixed anion mineral parnauite Cu 9[(OH) 10|SO 4|(AsO 4) 2]·7H 2O from two localities namely Cap Garonne Mine, Le Pradet, France and Majuba Hill mine, Pershing County, Nevada, USA has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectrum of the French sample is dominated by an intense band at 975 cm -1 assigned to the ν1 (SO 4) 2- symmetric stretching mode and Raman bands at 1077 and 1097 cm -1 may be attributed to the ν3 (SO 4) 2- antisymmetric stretching mode. Two Raman bands 1107 and 1126 cm -1 are assigned to carbonate CO 32- symmetric stretching bands and confirms the presence of carbonate in the structure of parnauite. The comparatively sharp band for the Pershing County mineral at 976 cm -1 is assigned to the ν1 (SO 4) 2- symmetric stretching mode and a broad spectral profile centered upon 1097 cm -1 is attributed to the ν3 (SO 4) 2- antisymmetric stretching mode. Two intense bands for the Pershing County mineral at 851 and 810 cm -1 are assigned to the ν1 (AsO 4) 3- symmetric stretching and ν3 (AsO 4) 3- antisymmetric stretching modes. Two Raman bands for the French mineral observed at 725 and 777 cm -1 are attributed to the ν3 (AsO 4) 3- antisymmetric stretching mode. For the French mineral, a low intensity Raman band is observed at 869 cm -1 and is assigned to the ν1 (AsO 4) 3- symmetric stretching vibration. Chemical composition of parnauite remains open and the question may be raised is parnauite a solid solution of two or more minerals such as a copper hydroxy-arsenate and a copper hydroxy sulphate.

  13. Current status of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamihara, Yoichi

    2012-03-01

    Current status of iron-based superconductors is summarized. Although short range magnetic ordering and magnetic phase separation of Fe are controversial, (long range) magnetic and electronic phase diagrams of iron based superconductors can be classified into two-type. Antiferromagnetic ordering of itinerant Fe does not coexist with superconducting phase of SmFeAsO1 - xFx. The very large H c2 of iron-based superconductors attract us to attempts at applications.

  14. Possible new edge barriers in polycrystalline superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belevtsov, L. V.

    2002-09-01

    We present a theoretical prediction of the new edge barriers for Abrikosov vortex penetration into polycrystalline superconductors. The traditional Bean-Livingston surface barrier is governed by the strength of the external field. Edge barriers in polycrystalline superconductors are also governed by the external field as well as by the anisotropy ratio, grain-coupling strength and grain size. We support our theory with concrete calculation of the critical current density in both high-Tc oxide and MgB2 superconductors.

  15. Surface Josephson Plasma Waves in Layered Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savel'Ev, Sergey; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2005-10-01

    We predict the existence of surface waves in layered superconductors in the THz frequency range, below the Josephson plasma frequency ωJ. This wave propagates along the vacuum-superconductor interface and dampens in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). This is the first prediction of propagating surface waves in any superconductor. These predicted surface Josephson plasma waves are important for different phenomena, including the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood’s anomalies) and a huge enhancement of the wave absorption (which can be used as a THz detector).

  16. Frontiers of organic conductors and superconductors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Gunzi; Yoshida, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    We review the development of conductive organic molecular assemblies including organic metals, superconductors, single component conductors, conductive films, conductors with a switching function, and new spin state (quantum spin liquid state). We emphasize the importance of the ionicity phase diagram for a variety of charge transfer systems to provide a strategy for the development of functional organic solids (Mott insulator, semiconductor, superconductor, metal, complex isomer, neutral-ionic system, alignment of chemical potentials, etc.). For organic (super)conductors, the electronic dimensionality of the solids is a key parameter and can be designed based on the self-aggregation ability of a molecule. We present characteristic structural and physical properties of organic superconductors.

  17. Suppression of superconductivity in mesoscopic superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sobnack, M B; Kusmartsev, F V

    2001-01-22

    We propose a new boundary-driven phase transition associated with vortex nucleation in mesoscopic superconductors (of size of the order of, or larger than, the penetration depth). We derive the rescaling equations and we show that boundary effects associated with vortex nucleation lower the conventional transition temperature in mesoscopic superconductors by an amount which is a function of the size of the superconductor. This result explains recent experiments in small superconductors where it was found that the transition temperature depends on the size of the system and is lower than the critical Berezinskĭ-Kosterlitz-Thouless temperature.

  18. Recent status of superconductors for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, A.F.

    1992-10-01

    A survey is given of superconductor wire and cable which has been or will be used for construction of dipole magnets for all of the large European and US superconducting accelerator rings. Included is a simplified view of the construction methods and operating requirements of an accelerator dipole magnet, with emphasis on required superconductor performance. The methods of fabricating Nb-Ti superconductors are described, including the critical parameters and materials requirements. The superconductor performance requirements are summarized in an effort to relate why these are important to accelerator designers. Some of the recently observed time dependent effects are covered briefly.

  19. Recent status of superconductors for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of superconductor wire and cable which has been or will be used for construction of dipole magnets for all of the large European and US superconducting accelerator rings. Included is a simplified view of the construction methods and operating requirements of an accelerator dipole magnet, with emphasis on required superconductor performance. The methods of fabricating Nb-Ti superconductors are described, including the critical parameters and materials requirements. The superconductor performance requirements are summarized in an effort to relate why these are important to accelerator designers. Some of the recently observed time dependent effects are covered briefly.

  20. Recent progress on carbon-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Goto, Hidenori; Hamao, Shino; Kambe, Takashi; Terao, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Saki; Zheng, Lu; Miao, Xiao; Okamoto, Hideki

    2016-08-24

    This article reviews new superconducting phases of carbon-based materials. During the past decade, new carbon-based superconductors have been extensively developed through the use of intercalation chemistry, electrostatic carrier doping, and surface-proving techniques. The superconducting transition temperature T c of these materials has been rapidly elevated, and the variety of superconductors has been increased. This review fully introduces graphite, graphene, and hydrocarbon superconductors and future perspectives of high-T c superconductors based on these materials, including present problems. Carbon-based superconductors show various types of interesting behavior, such as a positive pressure dependence of T c. At present, experimental information on superconductors is still insufficient, and theoretical treatment is also incomplete. In particular, experimental results are still lacking for graphene and hydrocarbon superconductors. Therefore, it is very important to review experimental results in detail and introduce theoretical approaches, for the sake of advances in condensed matter physics. Furthermore, the recent experimental results on hydrocarbon superconductors obtained by our group are also included in this article. Consequently, this review article may provide a hint to designing new carbon-based superconductors exhibiting higher T c and interesting physical features.

  1. Why only hole conductors can be superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    The conventional theory of superconductivity says that charge carriers in a metal that becomes superconducting can be either electrons or holes. I argue that this is incorrect. In order to satisfy conservation of mechanical momentum and of entropy of the universe in the superconductor to normal transition in the presence of a magnetic field it is necessary that the normal state charge carriers are holes. I will also review the empirical evidence in favor of the hypothesis that all superconductors are hole superconductors, and discuss the implications of this for the search for higher Tc superconductors.

  2. Giant ultrafast Kerr effect in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Charles W.; Fraser, Kieran A.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    We study the ultrafast Kerr effect and high-harmonic generation in superconductors by formulating a model for a time-varying electromagnetic pulse normally incident on a thin-film superconductor. It is found that superconductors exhibit exceptionally large χ(3 ) due to the progressive destruction of Cooper pairs, and display high-harmonic generation at low incident intensities, and the highest nonlinear susceptibility of all known materials in the THz regime. Our theory opens up avenues for accessible analytical and numerical studies of the ultrafast dynamics of superconductors.

  3. Oxygen diffusion in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.; Rothman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Superconducting properties of the cuprate superconductors depend on the oxygen content of the material; the diffusion of oxygen is thus an important process in the fabrication and application of these materials. This article reviews studies of the diffusion of oxygen in La{sub 2}{sub {minus}}{sub {times}}Sr{sub {times}}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}}{delta}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}, and the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub n}{sub {minus}}{sub 1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2}{sub +}{sub 4} (n = 1, and 2) superconductors, and attempt to elucidate the atomic mechanisms responsible.

  4. Generic properties of layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    A wide variety of layered materials have been found to be superconducting. Among these are graphite intercalation donor compounds, transition metal dichalcogenides, intercalated transition metal dichalcogenides, organic layered superconductors, artificial superlattices, and the cuprates. The normal state properties of all of these compounds are very similar, due to the fact that they all have well-defined Fermi surfaces, and quasi-linear in-plane resistivities at high temperatures. At lower temperatures, charge- or spin-density waves are common in these systems. With the exception of the graphite intercalation compounds, all of the fayered superconductors are type-II, and generally highly anisotropic in their superconducting properties. Dimensional crossover from anisotropic bulk to thin film behavior is common to many of these materials.

  5. Topological properties of ferromagnetic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Alfred K. C.; Raghu, S.

    2016-04-01

    A variety of heavy fermion superconductors, such as UCoGe, UGe2, and URhGe exhibit a striking coexistence of bulk ferromagnetism and superconductivity. In the first two materials, the magnetic moment decreases with pressure, and vanishes at a ferromagnetic quantum critical point (qcp). Remarkably, the superconductivity in UCoGe varies smoothly with pressure across the qcp and exists in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic regimes. We argue that in UCoGe, spin-orbit interactions stabilize a time-reversal invariant odd-parity superconductor in the high pressure paramagnetic regime. Based on a simple phenomenological model, we predict that the transition from the paramagnetic normal state to the phase where superconductivity and ferromagnetism coexist is a first-order transition.

  6. Topological properties of ferromagnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Alfred K. C.; Raghu, S.

    2016-04-27

    Here, a variety of heavy fermion superconductors, such as UCoGe, UGe2, and URhGe exhibit a striking coexistence of bulk ferromagnetism and superconductivity. In the first two materials, the magnetic moment decreases with pressure, and vanishes at a ferromagnetic quantum critical point (qcp). Remarkably, the superconductivity in UCoGe varies smoothly with pressure across the qcp and exists in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic regimes. We argue that in UCoGe, spin-orbit interactions stabilize a time-reversal invariant odd-parity superconductor in the high pressure paramagnetic regime. Based on a simple phenomenological model, we predict that the transition from the paramagnetic normal state to themore » phase where superconductivity and ferromagnetism coexist is a first-order transition.« less

  7. Plastic energies in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, N.K.; Moore, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    We estimate the energy cost associated with two pancake vortices colliding in a layered superconductor. It is argued that this energy sets the plastics energy scale and is the analogue of the crossing energy for vortices in the continuum case. The starting point of the calculation is the Lawrence-Doniach version of the Ginzburg-Landau free energy for type-II superconductors. The magnetic fields considered are along the {ital c} direction and assumed to be sufficiently high that the lowest Landau-level approximation is valid. For Bi-2212, where it is known that layering is very important, the results are radically different from what would have been obtained using a three-dimensional anisotropic continuum model. We then use the plastic energy for Bi-2212 to successfully explain recent results from Hellerqvist {ital et} {ital al}. on its longitudinal resistance.

  8. Topological properties of ferromagnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Alfred K. C.; Raghu, S.

    2016-04-27

    Here, a variety of heavy fermion superconductors, such as UCoGe, UGe2, and URhGe exhibit a striking coexistence of bulk ferromagnetism and superconductivity. In the first two materials, the magnetic moment decreases with pressure, and vanishes at a ferromagnetic quantum critical point (qcp). Remarkably, the superconductivity in UCoGe varies smoothly with pressure across the qcp and exists in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic regimes. We argue that in UCoGe, spin-orbit interactions stabilize a time-reversal invariant odd-parity superconductor in the high pressure paramagnetic regime. Based on a simple phenomenological model, we predict that the transition from the paramagnetic normal state to the phase where superconductivity and ferromagnetism coexist is a first-order transition.

  9. Topological properties of ferromagnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Alfred K. C.; Raghu, S.

    2016-04-27

    Here, a variety of heavy fermion superconductors, such as UCoGe, UGe2, and URhGe exhibit a striking coexistence of bulk ferromagnetism and superconductivity. In the first two materials, the magnetic moment decreases with pressure, and vanishes at a ferromagnetic quantum critical point (qcp). Remarkably, the superconductivity in UCoGe varies smoothly with pressure across the qcp and exists in both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic regimes. We argue that in UCoGe, spin-orbit interactions stabilize a time-reversal invariant odd-parity superconductor in the high pressure paramagnetic regime. Based on a simple phenomenological model, we predict that the transition from the paramagnetic normal state to the phase where superconductivity and ferromagnetism coexist is a first-order transition.

  10. Holographic superconductors with Weyl corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Davood; Raza, Muhammad; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-10-01

    A quick review on the analytical aspects of holographic superconductors (HSCs) with Weyl corrections has been presented. Mainly, we focus on matching method and variational approaches. Different types of such HSC have been investigated — s-wave, p-wave and Stúckelberg ones. We also review the fundamental construction of a p-wave type, in which the non-Abelian gauge field is coupled to the Weyl tensor. The results are compared from numerics to analytical results.

  11. High-Temperature Ceramic Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-15

    magnetic susceptibility, Meissner effect and specific heat. Task 4 is an investigation of superconductor ceramic processing. Most of the important... effect of the additional heater on the microstructure is shown in Fig. 11. As the upper micrograph shows, hardly any alignment was induced with a single... effect in cal field,7 H 1 = 𔃻o In K/41TA 2, and magnetic field pene- limiting the current-carrying capability of the ceramic tration length, A. The

  12. Fault current limiters using superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, W. T.; Power, A.

    Fault current limiters on power systems are to reduce damage by heating and electromechanical forces, to alleviate duty on switchgear used to clear the fault, and to mitigate disturbance to unfaulted parts of the system. A basic scheme involves a super-resistor which is a superconductor being driven to high resistance when fault current flows either when current is high during a cycle of a.c. or, if the temperature of the superconductive material rises, for the full cycle. Current may be commuted from superconductor to an impedance in parallel, thus reducing the energy dispersed at low temperature and saving refrigeration. In a super-shorted transformer the ambient temperature primary carries the power system current; the superconductive secondary goes to a resistive condition when excessive currents flow in the primary. A super-transformer has the advantage of not needing current leads from high temperature to low temperature; it behaves as a parallel super-resistor and inductor. The supertransductor with a superconductive d.c. bias winding is large and has small effect on the rate of fall of current at current zero; it does little to alleviate duty on switchgear but does reduce heating and electromechanical forces. It is fully active after a fault has been cleared. Other schemes depend on rapid recooling of the superconductor to achieve this.

  13. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  14. High temperature superconductors: A technological revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate the Meissner effect through magnetic levitation, to demonstrate one application of the Meissner effect, the low friction magnetic rotation bearing, and to demonstrate magnetic flux penetration and the Type II nature of ceramic superconductors via the stacking of the superconductor disks. Experimental equipment and procedures are described.

  15. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.

    1995-04-25

    A composition and method are disclosed of preparing YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T{sub c}. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  16. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1995-01-01

    A composition and method of preparing YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T.sub.c. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  17. Technological Evolution of High Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH...AND SUBTITLE TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jordan R. White 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Jordan R. White Lieutenant

  18. High temperature superconductors: A technological revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate the Meissner effect through magnetic levitation, to demonstrate one application of the Meissner effect, the low friction magnetic rotation bearing, and to demonstrate magnetic flux penetration and the Type II nature of ceramic superconductors via the stacking of the superconductor disks. Experimental equipment and procedures are described.

  19. Magnetization of anisotropic Type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.

    1989-04-10

    Peculiarities of magnetization of anisotropic type II superconductors are of considerable interest in view of the discovery of high-T/sub c/ superconductors characterized by strongly asymmetric layered structure. Specifics of the penetration of magnetic flux into an anisotropic type II superconductor were discussed in the literature. This analysis gave the distribution of induction in an isolated vortex, its energy, and critical magnetic field H/sub c1/. However, the magnetization curve of anisotropic superconductors was not considered. This paper deals with the magnetic moment of uniaxial London superconductor in the interval H/sub c1/ /le/ H/sub 0/ << H/sub c2/, where H/sub 0/ is the external magnetic field strength.

  20. Majorana Fermions and Topology in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Topological superconductors are novel classes of quantum condensed phases, characterized by topologically nontrivial structures of Cooper pairing states. On the surfaces of samples and in vortex cores of topological superconductors, Majorana fermions, which are particles identified with their own anti-particles, appear as Bogoliubov quasiparticles. The existence and stability of Majorana fermions are ensured by bulk topological invariants constrained by the symmetries of the systems. Majorana fermions in topological superconductors obey a new type of quantum statistics referred to as non-Abelian statistics, which is distinct from bose and fermi statistics, and can be utilized for application to topological quantum computation. Also, Majorana fermions give rise to various exotic phenomena such as "fractionalization", non-local correlation, and "teleportation". A pedagogical review of these subjects is presented. We also discuss interaction effects on topological classification of superconductors, and the basic properties of Weyl superconductors.

  1. Growth of superconducting NdFe0.88Co0.12AsO films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and post arsenic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales-Mendoza, I.; Bartolo-Pèrez, P.; Sánchez-Reséndiz, V. M.; Gallardo-Hernández, S.; Conde-Gallardo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and post-deposition arsenic diffusion processes were successfully employed to grow superconducting NdFe0.88Co0.12AsO thin films. First, by employing iron, cobalt and neodymium metal-organic precursors, a precursor film is grown by MOCVD on (001)-oriented LaAlO3 substrates. Subsequently, the arsenic is incorporated during an annealing of these precursor films in the presence of a NdFe0.9Co0.1AsO pellet. The chemical composition and crystallographic results indicate the formation of the cobalt-doped NdFeAsO polycrystalline phase. The secondary ion mass spectroscopy indicates a homogeneous arsenic diffusion process. The resistance and magnetization measurements as a function of temperature indicate a superconducting transition ˜15 \\text{K} .

  2. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  3. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  4. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  5. Superconductor lunar telescopes --Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R.; Shore, S.; Oliversen, R.; Stolarik, J.; Segal, K.; Hojaji, H.

    1994-01-01

    We propose a new type of telescope designed specifically for the lunar environment of high vacuum and low temperature. Large area UV-Visible-IR telescope arrays can be built with ultra-light-weight replica optics. High T(sub c) superconductors provide support, steering, and positioning. Advantages of this approach are light-weight payload compatible with existing launch vehicles, configurable large area optical arrays, no excavation or heavy construction, and frictionless electronically controlled mechanisms. We have built a prototype and will be demonstarting some of its working characteristics.

  6. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  7. Superconductor lunar telescopes --Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R.; Shore, S.; Oliversen, R.; Stolarik, J.; Segal, K.; Hojaji, H.

    1994-01-01

    We propose a new type of telescope designed specifically for the lunar environment of high vacuum and low temperature. Large area UV-Visible-IR telescope arrays can be built with ultra-light-weight replica optics. High T(sub c) superconductors provide support, steering, and positioning. Advantages of this approach are light-weight payload compatible with existing launch vehicles, configurable large area optical arrays, no excavation or heavy construction, and frictionless electronically controlled mechanisms. We have built a prototype and will be demonstarting some of its working characteristics.

  8. Holographic superconductors with hyperscaling violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, ZhongYing

    2013-09-01

    We investigate holographic superconductors in asympototically geometries with hyperscaling violation. The mass of the scalar field decouples from the UV dimension of the dual scalar operator and can be chosen as negative as we want, without disturbing the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We first numerically find that the scalar condenses below a critical temperature and a gap opens in the real part of the conductivity, indicating the onset of superconductivity. We further analytically explore the effects of the hyperscaling violation on the superconducting transition temperature. We find that the critical temperature increases with the increasing of hyperscaling violation.

  9. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  10. Noncentrosymmetric superconductors in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    We study the fermionic boundary modes (Andreev bound states) in a time-reversal invariant one-dimensional superconductor. In the presence of a substrate, spatial inversion symmetry is broken and the electronic properties are strongly affected by an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling. We assume an arbitrary even number of nondegenerate bands crossing the Fermi level. We show that there is only one possible pairing symmetry in one dimension, an analog of s -wave pairing. The zero-energy Andreev bound states are present if the sign of the gap function in an odd number of the bands is different from all other bands.

  11. Non-tectonic liquefaction-induced large surface displacements in the Aso Valley, Japan, caused by the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, revealed by ALOS-2 SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Morishita, Yu; Nakano, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tomokazu; Yarai, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    We constructed and analyzed full 3-D ground surface displacement field associated with the 2016 Kumamoto (Japan) earthquake using satellite radar images from ALOS-2. Displacements reflect not only tectonic crustal deformation caused by main earthquake faults but also non-tectonic surface deformations. The largest deformations in the earthquake sequence were found in the Aso Valley, along the NW outer rim of the Mt. Aso caldera. Large, independent surface deformations occurred in three areas with diameters of 500 m-2 km in the Aso Valley, and each area was horizontally displaced by more than 2 m to the NNW. These areas are underlain by thick lake-bottom deposits of saturated silt with low penetration resistance. As the direction of the displacements was parallel to the ground slope in each area, the strong seismic motion of the earthquake most probably induced liquefaction in the lake-bottom deposits and the ground surface slid horizontally along the slope on the liquefied silt. Because the areas of the large displacements are closely related to the thickness and shape of the lake-bottom deposits, amplification of the seismic wave in these deposits likely contributed to the liquefaction. A seismograph installed at the Aso Valley recorded co-seismic movement within several seconds of the main shock, indicating a possibility of the strong seismic motion amplifying the horizontal displacement of this area. On the SSE side of the deformed areas, numerous graben-like ruptures developed. As these ruptures are caused by surface tension during the large horizontal displacement, they are not earthquake fault traces and the process of this deformation is non-tectonic.

  12. A new method for As(V) removal from waters by precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl on Pb-activated zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manecki, Maciej; Buszkiewicz, Urszula

    2016-04-01

    A new method for removal of arsenate AsO43- ions from aqueous solutions is proposed. The principle of the method stems from precipitation of very insoluble crystalline lead arsenate apatite (mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl) induced by bringing in contact Pb-activated zeolite and As-contaminated water in the presence of Cl-. Zeolite is activated by sorption of Pb2+ followed by washing with water to remove the excess of Pb and to desorbe weakly adsorbed ions. Lead adsorbed on zeolite is bound strong enough to prevent desorption by water but weak enough to undergo desorption induced by heterogeneous precipitation of mimetite nanocrystals on the surface of zeolite. The experiment consisted of two steps. In the first step, aliquots of 0.5 g of natural clinoptilolite zeolite (from Zeocem a.s., Bystré, Slovak Republic) were reacted with 40 mL of solutions containing 20, 100, 500, and 2000 mg Pb/L (pH =4.5; reaction for 30 minutes followed by centrifugation). The amount of Pb sorbed was calculated from the drop of Pb concentration in solution. Centrifuged zeolite was washed three times by mixing with 10 mL of DDI water, followed by centrifugation. No Pb was detected in the water after second washing. Wet pulp resulting from this stage was exposed to solutions containing 70 mg/L Cl- and various concentrations of AsO43- (2 and 100 mg As/L; pH=4). Complete removal of As was observed for 2 mg As/L solutions mixed with zeolite-20 and zeolite-100. The precipitation of mimetite Pb5(AsO4)3Cl in the form of hexagonal crystals ca. 0.25 μm in size was observed using SEM/EDS. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319.

  13. In silico and in vitro evaluation of exonic and intronic off-target effects form a critical element of therapeutic ASO gapmer optimization

    PubMed Central

    Kamola, Piotr J.; Kitson, Jeremy D. A.; Turner, Gemma; Maratou, Klio; Eriksson, Sofie; Panjwani, Aliza; Warnock, Linda C.; Douillard Guilloux, Gaelle A.; Moores, Kitty; Koppe, Emma L.; Wixted, William E.; Wilson, Paul A.; Gooderham, Nigel J.; Gant, Timothy W.; Clark, Kenneth L.; Hughes, Stephen A.; Edbrooke, Mark R.; Parry, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    With many safety and technical limitations partly mitigated through chemical modifications, antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are gaining recognition as therapeutic entities. The increase in potency realized by ‘third generation chemistries’ may, however, simultaneously increase affinity to unintended targets with partial sequence complementarity. However, putative hybridization-dependent off-target effects (OTEs), a risk historically regarded as low, are not being adequately investigated. Here we show an unexpectedly high OTEs confirmation rate during screening of fully phosphorothioated (PS)-LNA gapmer ASOs designed against the BACH1 transcript. We demonstrate in vitro mRNA and protein knockdown of off-targets with a wide range of mismatch (MM) and gap patterns. Furthermore, with RNase H1 activity residing within the nucleus, hybridization predicted against intronic regions of pre-mRNAs was tested and confirmed. This dramatically increased ASO-binding landscape together with relatively high potency of such interactions translates into a considerable safety concern. We show here that with base pairing-driven target recognition it is possible to predict the putative off-targets and address the liability during lead design and optimization phases. Moreover, in silico analysis performed against both primary as well as spliced transcripts will be invaluable in elucidating the mechanism behind the hepatoxicity observed with some LNA-modified gapmers. PMID:26338776

  14. Raman spectroscopy of the multi-anion mineral schlossmacherite (H 3O,Ca)Al 3(AsO 4,PO 4,SO 4) 2(OH) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei

    2012-02-01

    The mineral schlossmacherite (H 3O,Ca)Al 3(AsO 4,PO 4,SO 4) 2(OH) 6, a multi-cation-multi-anion mineral of the beudantite mineral subgroup has been characterised by Raman spectroscopy. The mineral and related minerals functions as a heavy metal collector and is often amorphous or poorly crystalline, such that XRD identification is difficult. The Raman spectra are dominated by an intense band at 864 cm -1, assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of the AsO 43- anion. Raman bands at 809 and 819 cm -1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching mode of AsO 43-. The sulphate anion is characterised by bands at 1000 cm -1 ( ν1), and at 1031, 1082 and 1139 cm -1 ( ν3). Two sets of bands in the OH stretching region are observed: firstly between 2800 and 3000 cm -1 with bands observed at 2850, 2868, 2918 cm -1 and secondly between 3300 and 3600 with bands observed at 3363, 3382, 3410, 3449 and 3537 cm -1. These bands enabled the calculation of hydrogen bond distances and show a wide range of H-bond distances.

  15. Application of Sawdust modified with m-DMDHEU/Choline chloride for the removal of CrO4 2- and H2AsO4 - in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, N. T.; Quan, P. T.; Sang, P. H. P.

    2017-06-01

    This article studies the use of acacia auriculiformis wood sawdust modified with 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-bis (methoxymethyl) imidazolidin-2-one (m-DMDHEU) and choline chloride for separating CrO4 2- and H2AsO4 - ions in water. NaOH 0.2N/ethanol 70° solution was used to remove lignin from the raw material, the material was then immersed in m-DMDHEU/choline chloride aqueous solution for 24 hours, after that the material was activated at 140oC for one hour. The ability to adsorb and exchange ions of the material was examined using solutions containing CrO4 2- and H2AsO4 - ions in different conditions. The results suggested that the ability to separate CrO4 2- and H2AsO4 - ions of the modified material was better than that of anion resin at pH = 7.0; the chromate adsorption capacity was the highest in acidic condition; the presence of arsenate (V) anions had no effect on the ability to remove chromate. Lastly, the modified material was used to treat water samples containing concentrations of arsenic similar to groundwater in several arsenic-contaminated areas of Vietnam.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of the multi-anion mineral schlossmacherite (H3O,Ca)Al3(AsO4,PO4,SO4)2(OH)6.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Palmer, Sara J; Xi, Yunfei

    2012-02-15

    The mineral schlossmacherite (H(3)O,Ca)Al(3)(AsO(4),PO(4),SO(4))(2)(OH)(6), a multi-cation-multi-anion mineral of the beudantite mineral subgroup has been characterised by Raman spectroscopy. The mineral and related minerals functions as a heavy metal collector and is often amorphous or poorly crystalline, such that XRD identification is difficult. The Raman spectra are dominated by an intense band at 864cm(-1), assigned to the symmetric stretching mode of the AsO(4)(3-) anion. Raman bands at 809 and 819cm(-1) are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching mode of AsO(4)(3-). The sulphate anion is characterised by bands at 1000cm(-1) (ν(1)), and at 1031, 1082 and 1139cm(-1) (ν(3)). Two sets of bands in the OH stretching region are observed: firstly between 2800 and 3000cm(-1) with bands observed at 2850, 2868, 2918cm(-1) and secondly between 3300 and 3600 with bands observed at 3363, 3382, 3410, 3449 and 3537cm(-1). These bands enabled the calculation of hydrogen bond distances and show a wide range of H-bond distances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Origin and mode of emplacement of lithic-rich breccias at Aso Volcano, Japan: Geological, paleomagnetic, and petrological reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kuniyuki; Uno, Koji; Shinmura, Taro; Miyoshi, Masaya; Kanamaru, Tatsuo; Inokuchi, Hiroo

    2014-04-01

    Takajosan breccia rocks are distributed around the southwestern caldera rim of the Aso Volcano in Japan. They are characterized by coarse lithic breccias with a pumiceous matrix. The proximal coarse lithic breccias are divided into the lower massive unit and the upper stratified unit. The lower massive lithic breccias tend to transform laterally into tuff breccias and pumiceous lapilli tuffs. Paleomagnetic results showed that all of the deposits were deposited at high temperatures of 175-560 °C. This was also supported by geological characteristics such as spatter clasts, clasts with a bread-crust texture, and weakly welded parts. These features clearly show that the deposits originated from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). The dense lithic-rich lithofacies, low vesicularity of pumice, lack of plinian fall deposits, and radial distribution indicate that the deposits were derived from boil-over PDCs rather than plinian column-collapse PDCs. The SiO2 contents of the matrix glasses of the proximal lower massive breccia showed a progressive decrease from the bottom toward the upper part. We interpret that this chemical variation corresponds to chemical zonation of the magma chamber. This indicates that the massive deposits aggraded progressively from the base upwards (progressive aggradation), rather than through en masse freezing. The vertical lithofacies changes of the proximal breccias from the lower massive to the upper stratified units indicate that a sustained current in a quasi-steady state switched to an unsteady current with the progression of the volcanic activity.

  18. Redetermination of the cubic struvite analogue Cs[Mg(OH2)6](AsO4)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to the previous refinement from photographic data [Ferrari et al. (1955 ▶). Gazz. Chim. Ital. 84, 169–174], the present redetermination of the title compound, caesium hexa­aqua­magnesium arsenate(V), revealed the Cs atom to be on Wyckoff position 4d instead of Wyckoff position 4b of space group F 3m. The structure can be derived from the halite structure. The centres of the complex [Mg(OH2)6] octa­hedra and the AsO4 tetra­hedra (both with 3m symmetry) are on the respective Na and Cl positions. The building units are connected to each other by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The Cs+ cations (3m symmetry) are located in the voids of this arrangement and exhibit a regular cubocta­hedral 12-coordination to the O atoms of the water mol­ecules. The O atom bonded to As has 2mm site symmetry (Wyckoff position 24f) and the water-mol­ecule O atom has m site symmetry (Wyckoff position 48h). PMID:21581464

  19. Low-velocity zones in the crust beneath Aso caldera, Kyushu, Japan, derived from receiver function analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yuki; Ohkura, Takahiro; Shibutani, Takuo; Hirahara, Kazuro; Yoshikawa, Shin; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Aso volcano, in central Kyushu Island in southwest Japan, has a large caldera (18 × 25 km) that formed by the ejection of more than 600 km3 of deposits 89 thousand years ago. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic waveform data obtained from densely distributed stations in and around the caldera. We estimated the crustal S wave velocity structure from the receiver functions by using genetic algorithm inversion. We detected a low-velocity zone (Vs > 2.2 km/s) at a depth of 8-15 km beneath the eastern flank of the central cones. A sill-like deformation source has been detected at a depth of 15.5 km by analyses of GPS data, and a swarm of low-frequency earthquakes exists at depths of 15-25 km just beneath this low-velocity zone. Magma may be newly generated and accumulated in this low-velocity zone as a result of hot intrusions coming from beneath it. Except for the region beneath the eastern flank of the central cones, a second low-velocity zone (Vs > 1.9 km/s) extends in and around the caldera at a depth of 15-23 km, although phenomena representing intrusions have not been detected below it. From the estimated velocity structure, these low-velocity zones are interpreted to contain a maximum of 15% melt or 30% water.

  20. Two-band superconductor magnesium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X. X.

    2008-11-01

    This review focuses on the most important features of the 40 K superconductor MgB2—the weakly interacting multiple bands (the σ and π bands) and the distinct multiple superconducting energy gaps (the σ and π gaps). Even though the pairing mechanism of superconductor MgB2 is the conventional electron-phonon coupling, the prominent influence of the two bands and two gaps on its properties sets it apart from other superconductors. It leads to markedly different behaviors in upper critical field, vortex structure, magnetoresistance and many other superconducting and normal-state properties in MgB2 from single-band superconductors. Further, it gives rise to new physics that does not exist in single-band superconductors, such as the internal Josephson effects between the two order parameters. These unique phenomena depend sensitively on scattering inside and between the two bands, and the intraband and interband scattering can be modified by chemical substitution and irradiation. MgB2 has brought unprecedented attention to two-band superconductivity, which has been found to exist in other old and new superconductors. The legacy of MgB2 will be long lasting because of this, as well as the lessons it teaches in terms of the search for new phonon-mediated higher Tc superconductors.

  1. Method to improve superconductor cable

    DOEpatents

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08

    A method is disclosed of making a stranded superconductor cable having improved flexing and bending characteristics. In such method, a plurality of superconductor strands are helically wound around a cylindrical portion of a mandrel which tapers along a transitional portion to a flat end portion. The helically wound strands form a multistrand hollow cable which is partially flattened by pressure rollers as the cable travels along the transitional portion. The partially flattened cable is impacted with repeated hammer blows as the hollow cable travels along the flat end portion. The hammer blows flatten both the internal and the external surfaces of the strands. The cable is fully flattened and compacted by two sets of pressure rollers which engage the flat sides and the edges of the cable after it has traveled away from the flat end portion of the mandrel. The flattened internal surfaces slide easily over one another when the cable is flexed or bent so that there is very little possibility that the cable will be damaged by the necessary flexing and bending required to wind the cable into magnet coils.

  2. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  3. Superconductor bearings, flywheels and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Floegel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Goebel, B.; Wippich, D.; Schirrmeister, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of high temperature superconductors (HTS) and of bulk superconducting magnet devices, their use in bearings, in flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) and linear transport magnetic levitation (Maglev) systems. We report and review the concepts of multi-seeded REBCO bulk superconductor fabrication. The multi-grain bulks increase the averaged trapped magnetic flux density up to 40% compared to single-grain assembly in large-scale applications. HTS magnetic bearings with permanent magnet (PM) excitation were studied and scaled up to maximum forces of 10 kN axially and 4.5 kN radially. We examine the technology of the high-gradient magnetic bearing concept and verify it experimentally. A large HTS bearing is tested for stabilizing a 600 kg rotor of a 5 kWh/250 kW flywheel system. The flywheel rotor tests show the requirement for additional damping. Our compact flywheel system is compared with similar HTS-FESS projects. A small-scale compact YBCO bearing with in situ Stirling cryocooler is constructed and investigated for mobile applications. Next we show a successfully developed modular linear Maglev system for magnetic train operation. Each module levitates 0.25t at 10 mm distance during one-day operation without refilling LN2. More than 30 vacuum cryostats containing multi-seeded YBCO blocks are fabricated and are tested now in Germany, China and Brazil.

  4. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  5. Highly crystalline 2D superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yu; Nojima, Tsutomu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in materials fabrication have enabled the manufacturing of ordered 2D electron systems, such as heterogeneous interfaces, atomic layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy, exfoliated thin flakes and field-effect devices. These 2D electron systems are highly crystalline, and some of them, despite their single-layer thickness, exhibit a sheet resistance more than an order of magnitude lower than that of conventional amorphous or granular thin films. In this Review, we explore recent developments in the field of highly crystalline 2D superconductors and highlight the unprecedented physical properties of these systems. In particular, we explore the quantum metallic state (or possible metallic ground state), the quantum Griffiths phase observed in out-of-plane magnetic fields and the superconducting state maintained in anomalously large in-plane magnetic fields. These phenomena are examined in the context of weakened disorder and/or broken spatial inversion symmetry. We conclude with a discussion of how these unconventional properties make highly crystalline 2D systems promising platforms for the exploration of new quantum physics and high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Losses of Superconductor Journal Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Hull, J. R.; Han, S. C.; Jeong, N. H.; Oh, J. M.; Sung, T. H.

    2004-06-01

    A high-temperature superconductor (HTS) journal bearing was studied for rotational loss. Two HTS bearings support the rotor at top and bottom. The rotor weight is 4 kg and the length is about 300 mm. Both the top and bottom bearings have two permanent magnet (PM) rings with an iron pole piece separating them. Each HTS journal bearing is composed of six pieces of superconductor blocks of size 35×25×10 mm. The HTS blocks are encased in a cryochamber through which liquid nitrogen flows. The inner spool of the cryochamber is made from G-10 to reduce eddy current loss, and the rest of the cryochamber is stainless steel. The magnetic field from the PM rings is < 10 mT on the stainless part. The rotational drag was measured over the same speed range at several chamber pressures. Results indicate that a chamber pressure of 0.4 mtorr is sufficiently low to minimize windage loss, and the 10 mT design criterion for the magnetic field on the stainless part of the cryochamber is too high.

  7. Electronic transport in unconventional superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    The author investigates the electron transport coefficients in unconventional superconductors at low temperatures, where charge and heat transport are dominated by electron scattering from random lattice defects. He discusses the features of the pairing symmetry, Fermi surface, and excitation spectrum which are reflected in the low temperature heat transport. For temperatures {kappa}{sub B}T {approx_lt} {gamma} {much_lt} {Delta}{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the bandwidth of impurity induced Andreev states, certain eigenvalues become universal, i.e., independent of the impurity concentration and phase shift. Deep in the superconducting phase ({kappa}{sub B}T {approx_lt} {gamma}) the Wiedemann-Franz law, with Sommerfeld`s value of the Lorenz number, is recovered. He compares the results for theoretical models of unconventional superconductivity in high-{Tc} and heavy fermion superconductors with experiment. The findings show that impurities are a sensitive probe of the low-energy excitation spectrum, and that the zero-temperature limit of the transport coefficients provides an important test of the order parameter symmetry.

  8. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  9. Circuit Theory of Unconventional Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Kashiwaya, S.

    2003-04-01

    We extend the circuit theory of superconductivity to cover transport and proximity effect in mesoscopic systems that contain unconventional superconductor junctions. The approach fully accounts for zero-energy Andreev bound states forming at the surface of unconventional superconductors. As a simple application, we investigate the transport properties of a diffusive normal metal in series with a d-wave superconductor junction. We reveal the competition between the formation of Andreev bound states and proximity effect that depends on the crystal orientation of the junction interface.

  10. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, Stephen E.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Prorok, Barton C.; Lanagan, Michael T.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1995-01-01

    An article and method of manufacture of (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor.

  11. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, S.E.; Poeppel, R.B.; Prorok, B.C.; Lanagan, M.T.; Maroni, V.A.

    1995-11-21

    An article and method of manufacture (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor are disclosed. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. 5 figs.

  12. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 k) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  13. Pressure effects in the isoelectronic REFe0.85Ir0.15AsO system.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Beatrice; Di Castro, Daniele; Hanfland, Michael; Boby, Joseph; Vercesi, Cristiano; Mozzati, M Cristina; Weyeneth, Stephen; Keller, Hugo; Khasanov, Rustem; Drathen, Christina; Dore, Paolo; Postorino, Paolo; Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-03-16

    The effect of chemical and hydrostatic pressure has been studied systematically in a selected system belonging to the 1111 family of iron pnictide high-temperature superconductors. The results show a surprising similarity between the trend of critical temperature vs hydrostatic pressure for isoelectronic samples with different rare earths (RE) on the RE site and samples of the SmFeAsO(1-x)F(x) series with different doping levels. These results open new questions about the underlying mechanism for superconductivity in iron pnictides.

  14. NEW APPROACHES: High temperature superconductor levitation motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Shukor, R.; Lee, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    We show how it is possible to construct a high temperature superconductor levitation motor in an introductory physics laboratory. It is suitable for classroom demonstration and uses a simple yet efficient cooling method.

  15. Resistance domain in type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1980-01-05

    We show that traveling domains with a finite resistance can exist in type II superconductors in the presence of a transport current. An experiment in which this effect generates an alternating electric field and current is proposed.

  16. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  17. Josephson current between p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takehito; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexander; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2006-10-01

    Josephson current in p-wave superconductor/diffusive normal metal (DN)/p-wave superconductor junctions is calculated by solving the Usadel equation under the Nazarov's boundary condition extended to unconventional superconductors by changing the heights of the insulating barriers at the interfaces, the magnitudes of the resistance in DN, and the angles between the normal to the interface and the lobe directions of p-wave pair potentials. It is shown that the magnitude of the Josephson current strongly depends on the lobe directions of the p-wave pair potentials and the resulting magnitude of the Josephson current is large compared to that in the s-wave superconducting junctions due to the formation of the resonant states peculiar to p-wave superconductors.

  18. Current-driven plasma instabilities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kempa, K.; Cen, J.; Bakshi, P.

    1989-02-01

    We examine here the possibility of current-driven plasma instabilities in superconductors in two temperature regimes. At low temperatures (Tapprox. =0) an instability can be generated in a layered system. Near the critical temperature (Tapprox. =T/sub c/) an instability can occur in a single superconductor for sufficiently large drifts which might be achievable in the new high-T/sub c/ materials. These instabilities offer possibilities for new radiation-source device applications.

  19. NSSEFF Designing New Higher Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0083 NSSEFF - DESIGINING NEW HIGHER TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Meigan Aronson THE RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE UNIVERSITY OF... NEW YORK WEE 5510 FRK MEL LIB STONY BROOK, NY 117940001 04/13/2017 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. Air Force...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NSSEFF - DESIGINING NEW HIGHER TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0191 5c

  20. Transpiration characteristics of forests and shrubland under land cover change within the large caldera of Mt. Aso, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Y.; Inoue, A.; Maruyama, A.

    2013-12-01

    Grassland within a caldera of Mt. Aso has been maintained for fertilizer production from grasses and cattle feeding. Due to the changes in the agricultural and social structure since 1950's, a large part of the grassland was converted to plantations or abandoned to shrublands. Because vegetations of different plant functional types differ in evapotranspiration; ET, a research project was launched to examine the effects of the ongoing land use change on the ET within the caldera, and consequently affect the surface and groundwater discharge of the region. As the part of the project, transpiration rate; E of the major 3 forest types were investigated using sap flow measurements. Based on the measured data, stomatal conductance; Gs was inversely calculated and its response to the environmental factors was modeled using Jarvis-type equation in order to estimate ET of a given part of the caldera based on the plant functional type and the weather data. The selected forests were conifer plantation, deciduous broadleaved plantation and shrubland, which were installed with sap flow sensors to calculate stand-level transpiration rate. Sap flux; Js did not show clear differences among sites despite the large differences in sapwood area. In early summer solar radiation was limited to low levels due to frequent rainfall events and therefore, Js was the function of solar radiation rather than other environmental factors, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil water content. Gs was well regressed with the vapor pressure deficit and solar radiation. The estimated E based on Gs model and the weather data was 0.3-1.2 mm day-1 for each site and was comparable to the E of grassland in other study sites. Results suggested that transpiration rate in growing was not different between vegetations but its annual value are thought to differ due to the different phenology.

  1. Simultaneous constraint and phase conversion processing of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qi; Thompson, Elliott D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Hellstrom, Eric E.; Larbalestier, David C.; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Parrell, Jeffrey A.; Reeves, Jodi L.

    2003-04-29

    A method of making an oxide superconductor article includes subjecting an oxide superconductor precursor to a texturing operation to orient grains of the oxide superconductor precursor to obtain a highly textured precursor; and converting the textured oxide superconducting precursor into an oxide superconductor, while simultaneously applying a force to the precursor which at least matches the expansion force experienced by the precursor during phase conversion to the oxide superconductor. The density and the degree of texture of the oxide superconductor precursor are retained during phase conversion. The constraining force may be applied isostatically.

  2. Entropy balance in holographic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Pourhasan, Razieh

    2012-07-01

    In systems undergoing second order phase transitions, the temperature integral of the specific heat over temperature from zero to the critical temperature is the same in both the normal and ordered phases. This entropy balance relates the critical temperature to the distribution of degrees of freedom in the normal and ordered states. Quantum criticality and fractionalization can imply an increased number of low energy degrees of freedom in both the normal and ordered states. We explore the rôle of entropy balance in holographic models of superconductivity, focussing on the interplay between quantum criticality and superconductivity. We consider models with and without a ground state entropy density in the normal phase; the latter models are a new class of holographic superconductors. We explain how a normal phase entropy density manifests itself in the stable superconducting phase.

  3. Quantum rotor in nanostructured superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Milošević, M. V.; Covaci, L.; Jankó, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its apparent simplicity, the idealized model of a particle constrained to move on a circle has intriguing dynamic properties and immediate experimental relevance. While a rotor is rather easy to set up classically, the quantum regime is harder to realize and investigate. Here we demonstrate that the quantum dynamics of quasiparticles in certain classes of nanostructured superconductors can be mapped onto a quantum rotor. Furthermore, we provide a straightforward experimental procedure to convert this nanoscale superconducting rotor into a regular or inverted quantum pendulum with tunable gravitational field, inertia, and drive. We detail how these novel states can be detected via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The proposed experiments will provide insights into quantum dynamics and quantum chaos. PMID:24686241

  4. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb/sub 3/Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb/sub 3/Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown.

  5. Electrical resistivity of composite superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. H.; Lee, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to its superconducting properties, a superconductor is usually characterized by poor thermal conductivity and relatively high electrical resistivity in the normal state. To remedy this situation a study of superconducting properties of Cu-rich CU-Nb wires prepared by directionally solidified and cold-rolled technique was conducted. Some of the specimens were prepared by melting, directional solidification and diffusing in Tin. A total of 12 wire specimens was tested. Each specimen was analyzed by plotting experimental data into the following curves: the graph of the residual resistivity as a function of the specimen current at 4.3 K; and the graph of the electrical resistivity as a function of the temperature at a constant current.

  6. Topological insulators and superconductors from string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2010-10-15

    Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and superconductors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the {theta} term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond noninteracting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

  7. Search for Majorana fermions in topological superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Shi, Xiaoyan; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Klem, John Frederick

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project is to search for Majorana fermions (a new quantum particle) in a topological superconductor (a new quantum matter achieved in a topological insulator proximitized by an s-wave superconductor). Majorana fermions (MFs) are electron-like particles that are their own anti-particles. MFs are shown to obey non-Abelian statistics and, thus, can be harnessed to make a fault-resistant topological quantum computer. With the arrival of topological insulators, novel schemes to create MFs have been proposed in hybrid systems by combining a topological insulator with a conventional superconductor. In this LDRD project, we will follow the theoretical proposals to search for MFs in one-dimensional (1D) topological superconductors. 1D topological superconductor will be created inside of a quantum point contact (with the metal pinch-off gates made of conventional s-wave superconductors such as niobium) in a two-dimensional topological insulator (such as inverted type-II InAs/GaSb heterostructure).

  8. Superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio A.

    1977-02-01

    The structural quality of niobium germanide as a high-transition-temperature superconducting material is substantially improved by the presence of about 5 at. % oxygen. Niobium germanide having this oxygen content may readily be prepared as a bulk coating bonded to a metallic substrate by chemical vapor deposition techniques.

  9. Performance of ceramic superconductors in magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirtley, James L., Jr.; Downer, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are large-scale applications of magnet technology, quite similar in certain ways to synchronous machinery. They require substantial flux density over relatively large volumes of space. Large flux density is required to have satisfactory force density. Satisfactory dynamic response requires that magnetic circuit permeances not be too large, implying large air gaps. Superconductors, which offer large magnetomotive forces and high flux density in low permeance circuits, appear to be desirable in these situations. Flux densities substantially in excess of those possible with iron can be produced, and no ferromagnetic material is required. Thus the inductance of active coils can be made low, indicating good dynamic response of the bearing system. The principal difficulty in using superconductors is, of course, the deep cryogenic temperatures at which they must operate. Because of the difficulties in working with liquid helium, the possibility of superconductors which can be operated in liquid nitrogen is thought to extend the number and range of applications of superconductivity. Critical temperatures of about 98 degrees Kelvin were demonstrated in a class of materials which are, in fact, ceramics. Quite a bit of public attention was attracted to these new materials. There is a difficulty with the ceramic superconducting materials which were developed to date. Current densities sufficient for use in large-scale applications have not been demonstrated. In order to be useful, superconductors must be capable of carrying substantial currents in the presence of large magnetic fields. The possible use of ceramic superconductors in magnetic bearings is investigated and discussed and requirements that must be achieved by superconductors operating at liquid nitrogen temperatures to make their use comparable with niobium-titanium superconductors operating at liquid helium temperatures are identified.

  10. Performance of ceramic superconductors in magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, James L., Jr.; Downer, James R.

    Magnetic bearings are large-scale applications of magnet technology, quite similar in certain ways to synchronous machinery. They require substantial flux density over relatively large volumes of space. Large flux density is required to have satisfactory force density. Satisfactory dynamic response requires that magnetic circuit permeances not be too large, implying large air gaps. Superconductors, which offer large magnetomotive forces and high flux density in low permeance circuits, appear to be desirable in these situations. Flux densities substantially in excess of those possible with iron can be produced, and no ferromagnetic material is required. Thus the inductance of active coils can be made low, indicating good dynamic response of the bearing system. The principal difficulty in using superconductors is, of course, the deep cryogenic temperatures at which they must operate. Because of the difficulties in working with liquid helium, the possibility of superconductors which can be operated in liquid nitrogen is thought to extend the number and range of applications of superconductivity. Critical temperatures of about 98 degrees Kelvin were demonstrated in a class of materials which are, in fact, ceramics. Quite a bit of public attention was attracted to these new materials. There is a difficulty with the ceramic superconducting materials which were developed to date. Current densities sufficient for use in large-scale applications have not been demonstrated. In order to be useful, superconductors must be capable of carrying substantial currents in the presence of large magnetic fields. The possible use of ceramic superconductors in magnetic bearings is investigated and discussed and requirements that must be achieved by superconductors operating at liquid nitrogen temperatures to make their use comparable with niobium-titanium superconductors operating at liquid helium temperatures are identified.

  11. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  12. Electron tunneling and point contact Andreev reflection studies of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wenqing

    The energy gap is the most fundamental property of a superconductor. Electron tunneling spectroscopy and point contact spectroscopy (PCS) are powerful techniques for studying the density of states and energy gap features of superconductors. Two different superconducting systems, multiband superconductor MgB2 and proximity induced topological superconductor NbSe2/Bi 2Se3 heterostructures were studied using either quasiparticle tunneling in planar tunnel junctions or PCS in this work. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Stop of magnetic flux movement in levitating superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyak, B. M.; Zakharov, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    A phenomenon of magnetic relaxation stopping in a levitating superconductor was studied. It was experimentally shown that magnetic flux creep (diffusion of flux lines to regions with lower vortex density) is absent in magnetic suspension of the superconductor. Magnetic relaxation arises, when a rigid constraint that fixes a position of the superconductor relative to a magnet is imposed on a levitating object. It is assumed that oscillations of magnetic structure, which is due to free oscillations of the levitating superconductor, stop magnetic relaxation.

  14. Fracturing during ductile-brittle transition and development of flow banding in the Takanoobane Rhyolite lava of Aso volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.

    2014-12-01

    Flow banding, which is characterized by deformation of highly vesicular part, is ubiquitously observed in rhyolite lavas. To explore the origin of the highly vesicular part, we examined Takanoobane rhyolite lava (TR lava) in Aso caldera, Japan, which effused at 51+/-5 ka (Matsumoto et al., 1991). The highly vesicular parts characterized by ductile deformation are well developed in the central crystalline layer, at which the parts tend to be flattened with an increasing of distance from the source. The part develops into flow bands. The highly vesicular parts are also recognized around fractures that developed perpendicular to the flow direction, and adjacent to phenocrysts. The highly vesicular part is composed of cavities with mainly <100 μm in diameter. Microscopic observation and the SEM image show that the cavities have ragged walls characterized by the protrusion of groundmass crystals and phenocrysts. Smith et al. (2001) described such cavities in detail using three silicic lavas in Japan, and proposed that the cavities were formed by failure of the magma by flow during ductile-brittle transition. The authors described the fracturing mechanism as cavitation, and considered that groundmass adjacent to phenocryst also appears to act as a site of strong cavitation because of the steep strain gradient between deforming matrix and non-deforming phenocrysts. The similarity of the textures means that the highly vesicular part in TR lava was also formed by cavitation during ductile-brittle transition. The part would be deformed and flattened with progression of lava deformation. We analyzed the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to estimate the deformation style of TR lava. The results show that the highly vesicular part was deformed by pure shear strain. We established the following model for the development of flow banding. In TR lava, the highly vesicular parts were formed by failure of the magma during ductile-brittle transition during and/or after lava

  15. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  16. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M R V L; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya M; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Caviglia, Andrea D

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  17. Conductance spectroscopy of topological superconductor wire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, F.; Brydon, Philip; Sau, Jay

    We study the zero-temperature transport properties of one-dimensional normal metal-superconductor (NS) junctions with topological superconductors across their topological transitions. Working within the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) formalism generalized for topological NS junctions, we analytically calculate the differential conductance for tunneling into two models of a topological superconductor: a spinless intrinsic p-wave superconductor and a spin-orbit-coupled s-wave superconductor in a Zeeman field. The zero-bias conductance takes nonuniversal values in the nontopological phase while it is robustly quantized at 2e2 / h in the topological regime. Despite this quantization at zero voltage, the zero-bias conductance only develops a peak (or a local maximum) as a function of voltage for sufficiently large interfacial barrier strength, or certain parameter regimes of spin-orbit coupling strength. Our calculated BTK conductance also shows that the conductance is finite inside the superconducting gap region because of the finite barrier transparency, providing a possible mechanism for the observed ``soft gap'' feature in the experimental studies. Work is done in collaboration with Sankar Das Sarma and supported by Microsoft Q, LPS-CMTC, and JQI-NSF-PFC.

  18. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  19. The color of polarization in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, H. A.; Osofsky, M. S.; Lechter, W. L.; Pande, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for the identification of individual anisotropic grains in a heterogeneous and opaque material involves the observation of grain color in reflected light through crossed polarizers (color of polarization). Such colors are generally characteristic of particular phases. When grains of many members of the class of hole carrier cuprate superconductors are so viewed at room temperature with a 'daylight' source, a characteristic color of polarization is observed. This color was studied in many of these cuprate superconductors and a strong correlation was found between color and the existence of superconductivity. Two members were also examined of the electron cuprate superconductors and it was found that they possess the same color of polarization as the hole carrier cuprate superconductors so far examined. The commonality of the characteristic color regardless of charge carrier indicates that the presence of this color is independent of carrier type. The correlation of this color with the existence of superconductivity in the cuprate superconductors suggests that the origin of the color relates to the origin of superconductivity. Photometric techniques are also discussed.

  20. ASO: Antistreptolysin O titer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or glomerulonephritis , a form of kidney disease Caused rheumatic fever in a person with signs and symptoms The ... and/or go untreated, however, complications ( sequelae ), namely rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis, can develop in some people, especially ...

  1. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  2. High T(sub c) superconductors: Will they replace helium temperature superconductors for magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael A.

    1988-07-01

    During the last two years, the maximum zero resistance critical temperature for superconductors has risen from 23 K to temperatures above 120 K. This paper presents a sober view of the usefulness of the high T sub c materials for generating magnetic fields in superconducting devices. The high T sub c materials are compared to conventional niobium titanium superconductors in the following areas: critical current density, adiabatic and dynamic stability, normal region propagation velocity, burn out integral, energy per unit volume to quench and the maximum cryogenic stability current density. A look at the whole picture suggests that for most superconducting magnet applications, conventional conductors would be the superconductors of choice for magnets.

  3. Pair symmetry conversion in driven multiband superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2017-06-01

    It was recently shown that odd-frequency superconducting pair amplitudes can be induced in conventional superconductors subjected to a spatially nonuniform time-dependent drive. It has also been shown that, in the presence of interband scattering, multiband superconductors will possess bulk odd-frequency superconducting pair amplitudes. In this work we build on these previous results to demonstrate that by subjecting a multiband superconductor with interband scattering to a time-dependent drive, even-frequency pair amplitudes can be converted to odd-frequency pair amplitudes and vice versa. We will discuss the physical conditions under which these pair symmetry conversions can be achieved and possible experimental signatures of their presence.

  4. Transverse acousto-electric effect in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipavský, P.; Koláček, J.; Lin, P.-J.

    2016-06-01

    We formulate a theory based on the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory and Newtonian vortex dynamics to study the transverse acousto-electric response of a type-II superconductor with Abrikosov vortex lattice. When exposed to a transverse acoustic wave, Cooper pairs emerge from the moving atomic lattice and moving electrons. As in the Tolman-Stewart effect in a normal metal, an electromagnetic field is radiated from the superconductor. We adapt the equilibrium-based TDGL theory to this non-equilibrium system by using a floating condensation kernel. Due to the interaction between normal and superconducting components, the radiated electric field as a function of magnetic field attains a maximum value occurring below the upper critical magnetic field. This local increase in electric field has weak temperature dependence and is suppressed by the presence of impurities in the superconductor.

  5. High-temperature superconductor antenna investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasack, Vincent G.

    1990-01-01

    The use of superconductors to increase antenna radiation efficiency and gain is examined. Although the gain of all normal-metal antennas can be increased through the use of superconductors, some structures have greater potential for practical improvement than others. Some structures suffer a great degradation in bandwidth when replaced with superconductors, while for others the improvement in efficiency is trivial due to the minimal contribution of the conductor loss mechanism to the total losses, or the already high efficiency of the structure. The following antennas and related structures are discussed: electrically small antennas, impedance matching of antennas, microstrip antennas, microwave and millimeter-wave antenna arrays, and superdirective arrays. The greatest potential practical improvements occur for large microwave and millimeter-wave arrays and the impedance matching of antennas.

  6. High-temperature superconductor antenna investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasack, Vincent G.

    1990-10-01

    The use of superconductors to increase antenna radiation efficiency and gain is examined. Although the gain of all normal-metal antennas can be increased through the use of superconductors, some structures have greater potential for practical improvement than others. Some structures suffer a great degradation in bandwidth when replaced with superconductors, while for others the improvement in efficiency is trivial due to the minimal contribution of the conductor loss mechanism to the total losses, or the already high efficiency of the structure. The following antennas and related structures are discussed: electrically small antennas, impedance matching of antennas, microstrip antennas, microwave and millimeter-wave antenna arrays, and superdirective arrays. The greatest potential practical improvements occur for large microwave and millimeter-wave arrays and the impedance matching of antennas.

  7. High-temperature superconductor antenna investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasack, Vincent G.

    1990-01-01

    The use of superconductors to increase antenna radiation efficiency and gain is examined. Although the gain of all normal-metal antennas can be increased through the use of superconductors, some structures have greater potential for practical improvement than others. Some structures suffer a great degradation in bandwidth when replaced with superconductors, while for others the improvement in efficiency is trivial due to the minimal contribution of the conductor loss mechanism to the total losses, or the already high efficiency of the structure. The following antennas and related structures are discussed: electrically small antennas, impedance matching of antennas, microstrip antennas, microwave and millimeter-wave antenna arrays, and superdirective arrays. The greatest potential practical improvements occur for large microwave and millimeter-wave arrays and the impedance matching of antennas.

  8. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  9. New Material Requirements for Superconductor Grid Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozemoff, A. P.

    Superconductor ac and dc cables, fault current limiters and wind turbine generators offer solutions to key challenges in modernizing electric power infrastructure around the world. High critical current Jc is an essential requirement for the practical commercial operation of such systems. High temperature superconductor (HTS) wires have met the basic Jc requirements, and some initial systems have been successfully installed in the power grid. From an applications perspective, further progress in increasing the superconductor critical temperature Tc and critical current Jc could open up an even broader impact. However, thermal fluctuations and the resulting flux creep depress critical current, creating a trade-off between higher temperature and higher critical current. The origins of this trade-off are discussed. The YBCO material used in today's second generation HTS wires strikes a good compromise between these competing effects, and because of the flux creep problem, applications needs call for further research to be focused more on increasing Jc than on increasing Tc.

  10. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Kullberg, Marc L.

    1993-01-01

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

  11. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

    1993-04-13

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal ZrO[sub 2] particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K[sub IC]). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5] (211) on the ZrO[sub 2] particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO[sub 2] coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K[sub IC] of 4.5 MPa(m)[sup 0.5].

  12. Charge and spin transport in mesoscopic superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, M J; Hübler, F; Kolenda, S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Non-equilibrium charge transport in superconductors has been investigated intensely in the 1970s and 1980s, mostly in the vicinity of the critical temperature. Much less attention has been paid to low temperatures and the role of the quasiparticle spin. Results: We report here on nonlocal transport in superconductor hybrid structures at very low temperatures. By comparing the nonlocal conductance obtained by using ferromagnetic and normal-metal detectors, we discriminate charge and spin degrees of freedom. We observe spin injection and long-range transport of pure, chargeless spin currents in the regime of large Zeeman splitting. We elucidate charge and spin transport by comparison to theoretical models. Conclusion: The observed long-range chargeless spin transport opens a new path to manipulate and utilize the quasiparticle spin in superconductor nanostructures. PMID:24605283

  13. Practical superconductor development for electrical power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.

    1991-10-01

    Development of useful high-critical-temperature (high-{Tc}) superconductors requires synthesis of superconducting compounds; fabrication of wires, tapes, and films from these compounds; production of composite structures that incorporate stabilizers or insulators; and design and testing of efficient components. This report describes technical progress of research and development efforts aimed at producing superconducting components based on the Y-Ba-Cu, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu oxides systems. Topics discussed are synthesis and heat treatment of high-{Tc} superconductors, formation of monolithic and composite wires and tapes, superconductor/metal connectors, characterization of structures and superconducting and mechanical properties, and fabrication and properties of thin films. Collaborations with industry and academia are also documented. 10 figs.

  14. Practical superconductor development for electrical power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.

    1992-10-01

    Development of useful high-critical-temperature (high-[Tc]) superconductors requires synthesis of superconducting compounds; fabrication of wires, tapes, and films from these compounds; production of composite structures that incorporate stabilizers or insulators; and design and testing of efficient components. This report describes the technical progress of research and development efforts aimed at producing superconducting components that are based on the Y-Ba-Cu, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu, and (TI,Pb)-(Ba,Sr)-Ca-Cu oxide systems. Topics discussed are synthesis and heat treatment of high-[Tc] superconductors, formation of monolithic and composite wires and tapes, superconductor/metal connectors, characterization of structures and superconducting and mechanical properties, fabrication and properties of thin films, and development of prototype components. Collaborations with industry and academia are documented.

  15. Chemistry of high-temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Sleight, A W

    1988-12-23

    Spectacular advances in superconductors have taken place in the past two years. The upper temperature for superconductivity has risen from 23 K to 122 K, and there is reason to believe that the ascent is still ongoing. The materials causing this excitement are oxides. Those oxides that superconduct at the highest temperatures contain copper-oxygen sheets; however, other elements such as bismuth and thallium play a key role in this new class of superconductors. These superconductors are attracting attention because of the possibility of a wide range of applications and because the science is fascinating. A material that passes an electrical current with virtually no loss is more remarkable when this occurs at 120 K instead of 20 K.

  16. Resolving thermoelectric “paradox” in superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, Connor D.; Matrozova, Ekaterina A.; Petrashov, Victor T.

    2016-01-01

    For almost a century, thermoelectricity in superconductors has been one of the most intriguing topics in physics. During its early stages in the 1920s, the mere existence of thermoelectric effects in superconductors was questioned. In 1944, it was demonstrated that the effects may occur in inhomogeneous superconductors. Theoretical breakthrough followed in the 1970s, when the generation of a measurable thermoelectric magnetic flux in superconducting loops was predicted; however, a major crisis developed when experiments showed puzzling discrepancies with the theory. Moreover, different experiments were inconsistent with each other. This led to a stalemate in bringing theory and experiment into agreement. With this work, we resolve this stalemate, thus solving this long-standing “paradox,” and open prospects for exploration of novel thermoelectric phenomena predicted recently. PMID:26933688

  17. Anomalous Josephson effect in noncentrosymmetric superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jun-Feng

    2016-03-01

    We reveal the underlying physics of the anomalous Josephson effect in a magnetic Josephson junction between two noncentrosymmetric superconductors. The key point is that the two effective superconducting gaps provide two sets of Andreev bound states which carry two supercurrents with different amplitudes. When the magnetization direction of the ferromagnet is suitably chosen, the two supercurrents experience opposite phase shifts from the conventional sinusoidal current-phase relation. Then the total Josephson current results in a continuously tunable ground-state phase difference by adjusting the ferromagnet parameters and the triplet-singlet ratio of noncentrosymmetric superconductors. The emergence of anomalous Josephson current can definitely confirm the existence of triplet pairing and the ground-state phase difference serves as a tool to determine the triplet-singlet ratio of noncentrosymmetric superconductors.

  18. A Raman spectroscopic study of the arsenate mineral chenevixite Cu2Fe23+(AsO4)2(OH)4ṡH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Lana, Cristiano; Xi, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the mineral chenevixite from Manto Cuba Mine, San Pedro de Cachiyuyo District, Inca de Oro, Chañaral Province, Atacama Region, Chile, using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and vibrational spectroscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis shows a homogeneous composition, with predominance of As, Fe, Al, Cu, Fe and Cu. Minor amounts of Si were also observed. Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has been used to assess the molecular structure of the arsenate minerals chenevixite. Characteristic Raman and infrared bands of the (AsO4)3- stretching and bending vibrations are identified and described. The observation of multiple bands in the (AsO4)3- bending region offers support for the loss of symmetry of the arsenate anion in the structure of chenevixite. Raman bands attributable to the OH stretching vibrations of water and hydroxyl units were analysed. Estimates of the hydrogen bond distances were made based upon the OH stretching wavenumbers.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure, electrical properties, and sodium transport pathways of the new arsenate Na4Co7(AsO4)6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Smida, Youssef; Marzouki, Riadh; Georges, Samuel; Kutteh, Ramzi; Avdeev, Maxim; Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi

    2016-07-01

    A new sodium cobalt (II) arsenate Na4Co7(AsO4)6 has been synthesized by a solid-state reaction and its crystal structure determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/m, with a=10.7098(9) Å, b=14.7837(9) Å, c=6.6845(7) Å, and β=105.545(9)°. The structure is described as a three-dimensional framework built up of corner-edge sharing CoO6, CoO4 and AsO4 polyhedra, with interconnecting channels along [100] in which the Na+ cations are located. The densest ceramics with relative density of 94% was obtained by ball milling and optimization of sintering temperature, and its microstructure characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of the ceramics were studied over a temperature interval from 280 °C to 560 °C using the complex impedance spectroscopy over the range of 13 MHz-5 Hz. The ionic bulk conductivity value of the sample at 360 °C is 2.51 10-5 S cm-1 and the measured activation energy is Ea=1 eV. The sodium migration pathways in the crystal structure were investigated computationally using the bond valence site energy (BVSE) model and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  20. A Raman spectroscopic study of the arsenate mineral chenevixite Cu2Fe2(3+)(AsO4)2(OH)4⋅H2O.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Lana, Cristiano; Xi, Yunfei

    2015-01-25

    We have studied the mineral chenevixite from Manto Cuba Mine, San Pedro de Cachiyuyo District, Inca de Oro, Chañaral Province, Atacama Region, Chile, using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and vibrational spectroscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis shows a homogeneous composition, with predominance of As, Fe, Al, Cu, Fe and Cu. Minor amounts of Si were also observed. Raman spectroscopy complimented with infrared spectroscopy has been used to assess the molecular structure of the arsenate minerals chenevixite. Characteristic Raman and infrared bands of the (AsO4)(3-) stretching and bending vibrations are identified and described. The observation of multiple bands in the (AsO4)(3-) bending region offers support for the loss of symmetry of the arsenate anion in the structure of chenevixite. Raman bands attributable to the OH stretching vibrations of water and hydroxyl units were analysed. Estimates of the hydrogen bond distances were made based upon the OH stretching wavenumbers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Surface texturing of superconductors by controlled oxygen pressure

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Nan; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Dorris, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of manufacture of a textured layer of a high temperature superconductor on a substrate. The method involves providing an untextured high temperature superconductor material having a characteristic ambient pressure peritectic melting point, heating the superconductor to a temperature below the peritectic temperature, establishing a reduced pO.sub.2 atmosphere below ambient pressure causing reduction of the peritectic melting point to a reduced temperature which causes melting from an exposed surface of the superconductor and raising pressure of the reduced pO.sub.2 atmosphere to cause solidification of the molten superconductor in a textured surface layer.

  2. Surface texturing of superconductors by controlled oxygen pressure

    DOEpatents

    Chen, N.; Goretta, K.C.; Dorris, S.E.

    1999-01-05

    A method of manufacture of a textured layer of a high temperature superconductor on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing an untextured high temperature superconductor material having a characteristic ambient pressure peritectic melting point, heating the superconductor to a temperature below the peritectic temperature, establishing a reduced pO{sub 2} atmosphere below ambient pressure causing reduction of the peritectic melting point to a reduced temperature which causes melting from an exposed surface of the superconductor and raising pressure of the reduced pO{sub 2} atmosphere to cause solidification of the molten superconductor in a textured surface layer. 8 figs.

  3. Thermomagnetic phenomena in the mixed state of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meilikhov, E. Z.

    1995-01-01

    Galvano- and thermomagnetic-phenomena in high temperature superconductors, based on kinetic coefficients, are discussed, along with a connection between the electric field and the heat flow in superconductor mixed state. The relationship that determines the transport coefficients of high temperature superconductors in the mixed state based on Seebeck and Nernst effects is developed. It is shown that this relationship is true for a whole transition region of the resistive mixed state of a superconductor. Peltier, Ettingshausen and Righi-Leduc effects associated with heat conductivity as related to high temperature superconductors are also addressed.

  4. Superfluid response in heavy fermion superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yin; Zhang, Lan; Shao, Can; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by a recent London penetration depth measurement [H. Kim, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 027003 (2015)] and novel composite pairing scenario [O. Erten, R. Flint, and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 027002 (2015)] of the Yb-doped heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn5, we revisit the issue of superfluid response in the microscopic heavy fermion lattice model. However, from the literature, an explicit expression for the superfluid response function in heavy fermion superconductors is rare. In this paper, we investigate the superfluid density response function in the celebrated Kondo-Heisenberg model. To be specific, we derive the corresponding formalism from an effective fermionic large- N mean-field pairing Hamiltonian whose pairing interaction is assumed to originate from the effective local antiferromagnetic exchange interaction. Interestingly, we find that the physically correct, temperature-dependent superfluid density formula can only be obtained if the external electromagnetic field is directly coupled to the heavy fermion quasi-particle rather than the bare conduction electron or local moment. Such a unique feature emphasizes the key role of the Kondo-screening-renormalized heavy quasi-particle for low-temperature/energy thermodynamics and transport behaviors. As an important application, the theoretical result is compared to an experimental measurement in heavy fermion superconductors CeCoIn5 and Yb-doped Ce1- x Yb x CoIn5 with fairly good agreement and the transition of the pairing symmetry in the latter material is explained as a simple doping effect. In addition, the requisite formalism for the commonly encountered nonmagnetic impurity and non-local electrodynamic effect are developed. Inspired by the success in explaining classic 115-series heavy fermion superconductors, we expect the present theory will be applied to understand other heavy fermion superconductors such as CeCu2Si2 and more generic multi-band superconductors.

  5. Vortex core size in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharchuk, I.; Belova, P.; Safonchik, M.; Traito, K. B.; Lähderanta, E.

    2013-01-01

    Influence of the order parameter symmetries on the cutoff parameter ξh and vortex core size ξ2 (the distance from the vortex center at which the current density reaches the maximum value) in the mixed state are investigated in the framework of Eilenberger theory for unconventional superconductors. The cutoff parameter determines the field distribution in the generalized London equation obtained as a projection of the quasiclassical theory. It is used for the fitting of the μSR and small-angle neutron scattering experimental data. Anisotropic dx2-y2 and isotropic s±-wave superconducting pairings are studied. These pairing symmetries can be realized in iron pnictide superconductors. Conventional s++ pairing mediated electron-phonon interaction is also considered. Temperature, field, and impurity scattering dependences of ξh/ξc2 are obtained. It is found that normalized ξ2/ξc2(B /Bc2) dependence is increasing with pair breaking impurity scattering (interband scattering for s±-wave and intraband impurity scattering for d-wave superconductors). Here, ξc2 is the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length determined from the relation Bc2=Φ0/2πξc22, where Bc2 is an upper critical field and Φ0 is a flux quantum. Two types of ξ2/ξc2(B /Bc2) dependences are obtained for s± superconductors. It has minimum at low temperatures and small impurity scattering transforming in monotonously decreasing function at strong scattering and high temperatures. The second kind of this dependence was also found for d-wave superconductors at intermediate and high temperatures. In contrast, impurity scattering results in decreasing of ξ2/ξc2 field dependence in s++ superconductors.

  6. Vibrational spectra of Te(OH) 6.2NH 4H 2AsO 4 and Te(OH) 6.2(NH 4) 2HAsO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haresh, R.; Rajagopal, P.; Aruldhas, G.; Keresztury, Gabor

    1992-10-01

    IR and Raman spectra of Te(OH) 6.2NH 4H 2AsO 4.(NH 4) 2HAsO 4 (compound I) and Te(OH) 6.2(NH 4) 2HAsO 4 (compound II) are recorded and analysed. The symmetry of different groups and the vibrational interaction between them are discussed. The observed spectra suggest the existence of HAsO 2-4 in II and coexistence of HAsO 2-4 and H 2AsO -4 in I. The ammonium ion is found to execute hindered rotation in the lattice in both the compounds.

  7. High temperature crystalline superconductors from crystallized glasses

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Donglu

    1992-01-01

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor from an amorphous phase. The method involves preparing a starting material of a composition of Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 Ox or Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.4 Cu.sub.5 Ox, forming an amorphous phase of the composition and heat treating the amorphous phase for particular time and temperature ranges to achieve a single phase high temperature superconductor.

  8. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  9. Order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantz, N. W. M.; Stoof, H. T. C.; Vandoren, S.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effect of order parameter fluctuations in the holographic superconductor. In particular, following an introduction to the concept of intrinsic dynamics and its implementation within holographic models, we compute the intrinsic spectral functions of the order parameter in both the normal and the superconducting phase, using a fully backreacted bulk geometry. We also present a vector-like large-N version of the Ginzburg–Landau model that accurately describes our long-wavelength results in both phases. Our results indicate that the holographic superconductor describes a relativistic multi-component superfluid in the universal regime of the BEC–BCS crossover.

  10. Superconductors and methods of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Brukl, C.E.; Minkoff, L.A.

    1990-12-04

    This paper discusses an improvement in the method of making a magnetically anisotropic bulk high- temperature superconductor. It comprises the steps providing particles including metals, at least one magnetically susceptible lanthanide, and an oxygen constituent in admixture with one another as the constituents of the superconductor and consolidating the constituents by compacting the particles and sintering the compacted particles. The improvement comprises the step of applying a magnetic field to the particles during the consolidating step. The particles being magnetically anisotropic and magnetically susceptible during the consolidating step. The magnetic field is effective to substantially align the particles in the consolidating step.

  11. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J.-X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  12. Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Scanlan, Ronald M.

    1988-01-01

    An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  13. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. In addition, successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  14. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J.-X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called "115" strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true "materials by design" remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  15. Anisotropic superconductors in tilted magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Glatz, A.; Koshelev, A. E.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.

    2015-06-01

    We present images of magnetic flux structures in a single crystal of YBa2Cu3O7-d during remagnetization by fields tilted from the basal plane of the crystal. Depending on the magnitude and angle of the applied field we observe anisotropic flux penetration along and across the in-plane field component and emergence of vortex instabilities resulting in modulated flux distributions. We associate the observed patterns with flux cutting effects and with tilted vortex structures intrinsic for layered superconductors. Time dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations show preferential vortex motion across the c-axis and reveal the flux structure evolution in anisotropic superconductors under tilted magnetic fields.

  16. Iron chalcogenide superconductors at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hechang; Wang, Kefeng; Hu, Rongwei; Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Bozin, Emil S; Petrovic, Cedomir

    2012-01-01

    Iron chalcogenide superconductors have become one of the most investigated superconducting materials in recent years due to high upper critical fields, competing interactions and complex electronic and magnetic phase diagrams. The structural complexity, defects and atomic site occupancies significantly affect the normal and superconducting states in these compounds. In this work we review the vortex behavior, critical current density and high magnetic field pair-breaking mechanism in iron chalcogenide superconductors. We also point to relevant structural features and normal-state properties. PMID:27877518

  17. Electrical connection structure for a superconductor element

    DOEpatents

    Lallouet, Nicolas; Maguire, James

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical connection structure for a superconductor element cooled by a cryogenic fluid and connected to an electrical bushing, which bushing passes successively through an enclosure at an intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and the temperature of the cryogenic fluid, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, said bushing projecting outside the ambient temperature enclosure. According to the invention, said intermediate enclosure is filled at least in part with a solid material of low thermal conductivity, such as a polyurethane foam or a cellular glass foam. The invention is applicable to connecting a superconductor cable at cryogenic temperature to a device for equipment at ambient temperature.

  18. Anomalous Andreev bound state in noncentrosymmetric superconductors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukio; Mizuno, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takehito; Yada, Keiji; Sato, Masatoshi

    2010-08-27

    We study edge states of noncentrosymmetric superconductors where spin-singlet d-wave pairing mixes with spin-triplet p (or f)-wave one by spin-orbit coupling. For d(xy)-wave pairing, the obtained Andreev bound state has an anomalous dispersion as compared to conventional helical edge modes. A unique topologically protected time-reversal invariant Majorana bound state appears at the edge. The charge conductance in the noncentrosymmetric superconductor junctions reflects the anomalous structures of the dispersions, particularly the time-reversal invariant Majorana bound state is manifested as a zero bias conductance peak.

  19. Converting a topologically trivial superconductor into a chiral topological superconductor via diluted magnetic doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Xiao, Di; Chang, Kai; Shen, Shun-Qing; Zhang, Zhenyu

    We employ two complementary theoretical approaches to explore the feasibility of altering the topological properties of two-dimensional Rashba spin-orbit coupled superconductors by proper introduction of magnetic disorders. First, using the self-consistent Born approximation, we show that a topologically trivial superconductor can be driven into a chiral topological superconductor upon diluted doping of isolated magnetic disorders, which gradually narrow, close, and reopen the quasi-particle gap of the paired electrons in a nontrivial manner. Such a topological phase transition is further characterized by the change in the corresponding topological invariant. The central predictions made here are then confirmed using the complementary numerical approach by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations self-consistently within a tight-binding model. We also discuss the validity of the present model studies in connection with existing experimental findings. Collectively, the present study offers appealing new schemes for potential experimental realization of topological superconductors. Supported by NSF of China.

  20. Giant supercurrent states in a superconductor-InAs/GaSb-superconductor junction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoyan Pan, W.; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Yu, Wenlong; Jiang, Zhigang; Andrei Bernevig, B.

    2015-10-07

    Superconductivity in topological materials has attracted a great deal of interest in both electron physics and material sciences since the theoretical predictions that Majorana fermions can be realized in topological superconductors. Topological superconductivity could be realized in a type II, band-inverted, InAs/GaSb quantum well if it is in proximity to a conventional superconductor. Here, we report observations of the proximity effect induced giant supercurrent states in an InAs/GaSb bilayer system that is sandwiched between two superconducting tantalum electrodes to form a superconductor-InAs/GaSb-superconductor junction. Electron transport results show that the supercurrent states can be preserved in a surprisingly large temperature-magnetic field (T – H) parameter space. In addition, the evolution of differential resistance in T and H reveals an interesting superconducting gap structure.

  1. Josephson effect in low-capacitance superconductor--normal-metal--superconductor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauernschmitt, R.; Siewert, J.; Nazarov, Y.V.; Odintsov, A.A. )

    1994-02-01

    The transport properties of a small superconductor--normal-metal--superconducting tunnel junction can be controlled by a gate electrode coupled capacitively to the central island. We evaluate the critical Josephson current [ital I][sub [ital c

  2. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, James R.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus

    1999-01-01

    Considerable effort has been concentrated on the synthesis and characterization of high T(sub c) oxide superconducting materials. The YBaCuO system has received the most intense study, as this material has shown promise for the application of both thin film and bulk materials. There are many problems with the application of bulk materials- weak links, poor connectivity, small coherence length, oxygen content and control, environmental reactivity, phase stability, incongruent melting behavior, grain boundary contamination, brittle mechanical behavior, and flux creep. The extent to which these problems are intrinsic or associated with processing is the subject of controversy. This study seeks to understand solidification processing of these materials, and to use this knowledge for alternative processing strategies, which, at the very least, will improve the understanding of bulk material properties and deficiencies. In general, the phase diagram studies of the YBaCuO system have concentrated on solid state reactions and on the Y2BaCuO(x) + liquid yields YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) peritectic reaction. Little information is available on the complete melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of these materials. In addition, rare earth substitutions such as Nd and Gd affect the liquidus and phase relations. These materials have promising applications, but lack of information on the high temperature phase relations has hampered research. In general, the understanding of undercooling and solidification of high temperature oxide systems lags behind the science of these phenomena in metallic systems. Therefore, this research investigates the fundamental melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of oxide superconductors with an emphasis on improving ground based synthesis of these materials.

  3. Dynamics of interfaces in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, A.T. )

    1994-08-01

    The dynamics of an interface between the normal and superconducting phases under nonstationary external conditions is studied within the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations of superconductivity, modified to include thermal fluctuations. An equation of motion for the interface is derived in two steps. First, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a diffusion equation for the magnetic field in the normal phase, with nonlinear boundary conditions at the interface. These boundary conditions are a continuity equation which relates the gradient of the field at the interface to the normal velocity of the interface and a modified Gibbs-Thomson boundary condition for the field at the interface. Second, the boundary integral method is used to integrate out the magnetic field in favor of an equation of motion for the interface. This equation of motion, which is highly nonlinear and nonlocal, exhibits a diffusive instability (the Mullins-Sekerka instability) when the superconducting phase expands into the normal phase (i.e., when the external field is reduced below the critical field). In the limit of infinite diffusion constant the equation of motion becomes local in time and can be derived variationally from a static energy functional which includes the bulk-free energy difference between the two phases, the interfacial energy, and a long range self-interaction of the interface of the Biot-Savart form. In this limit the dynamics is identical to the interfacial dynamics of ferrofluid domains recently proposed by S.A. Langer et al. As shown by these authors, the Biot-Savart interaction leads to mechanical instabilities of the interface, resulting in highly branched labyrinthine patterns. The application of these ideas to the study of labyrinthine patterns in the intermediate state of type-I superconductors is briefly discussed. 29 refs.

  4. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  5. Iron-based superconductors: Unity or diversity?

    SciTech Connect

    Kivelson, S. A.

    2010-02-24

    Superconductivity is among the most fascinating properties that a material can show. On the fundamental level, it represents a direct, macroscopic manifestation of coherent quantum mechanical behaviour, and its potential practical importance is almost unlimited, especially if new superconductors can be synthesized or discovered with still higher transition temperatures, Tc.

  6. Stripe phases in high-temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Emery, V J; Kivelson, S A; Tranquada, J M

    1999-08-03

    Stripe phases are predicted and observed to occur in a class of strongly correlated materials describable as doped antiferromagnets, of which the copper-oxide superconductors are the most prominent representatives. The existence of stripe correlations necessitates the development of new principles for describing charge transport and especially superconductivity in these materials.

  7. Deformation of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.; Miller, D.J.; Chen, N.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Jimenez-Melendo, M.; De Arellano-Lopez, A.R.

    1994-08-01

    Of the many families of high-temperature superconductors, only the properties of those discovered prior to 1989 - Y-Ba-Cu-O, Tl-Ba(Sr)-Ca-Cu-O, and Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O - have been studied extensively. Deformation tests have been performed on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (Y-123), YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub x} (Y-124), TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (Bi-2223). The tests have revealed that plasticity is generally limited in these compounds and that the rate-controlling diffusional kinetics for creep are very slow. Nevertheless, hot forming has proved to be quite successful for fabrication of bulk high-temperature superconductors, so long as deformation rates are low or large hydrostatic stresses are applied. Steady-state creep data have proved to be useful in designing optimal heat treatments for superconductors and in support of more-fundamental diffusion experiments. The high-temperature superconductors are highly complex oxides, and it is a challenge to understand their deformation responses. In this paper, results of interest and operant creep mechanisms will be reviewed.

  8. Stripe phases in high-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Emery, V. J.; Kivelson, S. A.; Tranquada, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Stripe phases are predicted and observed to occur in a class of strongly correlated materials describable as doped antiferromagnets, of which the copper-oxide superconductors are the most prominent representatives. The existence of stripe correlations necessitates the development of new principles for describing charge transport and especially superconductivity in these materials. PMID:10430848

  9. Stripe Phases in High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, V. J.; Kivelson, S. A.; Tranquada, J. M.

    1999-08-01

    Stripe phases are predicted and observed to occur in a class of strongly correlated materials describable as doped antiferromagnets, of which the copper-oxide superconductors are the most prominent representatives. The existence of stripe correlations necessitates the development of new principles for describing charge transport and especially superconductivity in these materials.

  10. Excitations in Topological Superfluids and Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao

    In this thesis I present the theoretical work on Fermionic surface states, and %the bulk Bosonic collective excitations in topological superfluids and superconductors. Broken symmetries %Bulk-edge correspondence in topological condensed matter systems have implications for the spectrum of Fermionic excitations confined on surfaces or topological defects. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  11. Superconductor-coated carbon fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Statek, L.C.; Bennett, W.F.; Schulz, D.A.

    1990-12-04

    This patent describes superconducting composites made from ceramic-type superconductors coated onto a low resistivity carbon fiber selected from those high strength fibers which have an ultrahigh modulus and high thermal conductivity. Flexible conductors of several different structures made from such composites are described as well as other useful forms of the composites.

  12. Monoclinic structure of hydroxylpyromorphite Pb10(PO4)6(OH)2 - hydroxylmimetite Pb10(AsO4)6(OH)2 solid solution series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giera, Alicja; Manecki, Maciej; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Zelek, Sylwia; Rakovan, John; Bajda, Tomasz; Marchlewski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Seven samples of hydroxyl analogues of pyromorphite-mimetite solid solutions series were synthesized from aqueous solutions at 80° C in a computer-controlled chemistate: 200 mL aqueous solutions of 0.05M Pb(NO3)2 and 0.03M KH2AsO4 and/or KH2PO4 were dosed with a 0.25 mL/min rate to a glass beaker, which initially contained 100 mL of distilled water. Constant pH of 8 was maintained using 2M KOH. The syntheses yielded homogeneous fine-grained white precipitates composition of which was close to theoretical Pb10[(PO4)6-x(AsO4)x](OH)2, where x = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. High-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data were obtained in transmission geometry at the beamline 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, USA). The structure Rietveld refinements based on starting parameters of either hexagonal hydroxylpyromorphite or monoclinic mimetite-M were performed using GSAS+EXPGUI software. Apatite usually crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system with the space group P63/m. For the first time, however, the lowering of the hexagonal to monoclinic crystal symmetry was observed in the hydroxyl variety of pyromorphite-mimetite solid solution series. This is indicated by better fitting of the modeled monoclinic structure to the experimental data. The same is not the case for analogous calcium hydroxylapatite series Ca5(PO4)3OH - Ca5(AsO4)3OH (Lee et al. 2009). Systematical linear increase of unit cell parameters is observed with As substitution from a=9.88, b=19.75, and c=7.43 for Pb10(PO4)6(OH)2 to a=10.23, b=20.32, and c=7.51 for Pb10(AsO4)6(OH)2. A strong pseudohexagonal character (γ ≈ 120° and b ≈ 2a) of the analyzed monoclinic phases was established. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319 and partially by Polish NCN grant No 2011/01/M/ST10/06999. Lee Y.J., Stephens P.W., Tang Y., Li W., Philips B.L., Parise J.B., Reeder R.J., 2009. Arsenate substitution in hydroxylapatite: Structural characterization

  13. Recrystallization of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzoudis, Dimitris

    1996-05-09

    Currently one of the most widely used high Tc superconductors is the Bi-based compounds Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oz and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Oz (known as BSCCO 2212 and 2223 compounds) with Tc values of about 85 K and 110 K respectively. Lengths of high performance conductors ranging from 100 to 1000 m long are routinely fabricated and some test magnets have been wound. An additional difficulty here is that although Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 phases exist over a wide range of stoichiometries, neither has been prepared in phase-pure form. So far the most successful method of constructing reliable and robust wires or tapes is the so called powder-in-tube (PIT) technique [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] in which oxide powder of the appropriate stoichiometry and phase content is placed inside a metal tube, deformed into the desired geometry (round wire or flat tape), and annealed to produce the desired superconducting properties. Intermediate anneals are often incorporated between successive deformation steps. Silver is the metal used in this process because it is the most compatible with the reacting phase. In all of the commercial processes for BSCCO, Ag seems to play a special catalytic role promoting the growth of high performance aligned grains that grow in the first few micrometers near the Ag/BSCCO interface. Adjacent to the Ag, the grain alignment is more perfect and the current density is higher than in the center of the tape. It is known that Ag lowers the melting point of several of the phases but the detailed mechanism for growth of these high performance grains is not clearly understood. The purpose of this work is to study the nucleation and growth of the high performance material at this interface.

  14. Isotope and multiband effects in layered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Keller, Hugo

    2012-06-13

    In this review we consider three classes of superconductors, namely cuprate superconductors, MgB(2) and the new Fe based superconductors. All of these three systems are layered materials and multiband compounds. Their pairing mechanisms are under discussion with the exception of MgB(2), which is widely accepted to be a 'conventional' electron-phonon interaction mediated superconductor, but extending the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory to account for multiband effects. Cuprates and Fe based superconductors have higher superconducting transition temperatures and more complex structures. Superconductivity is doping dependent in these material classes unlike in MgB(2) which, as a pure compound, has the highest values of T(c) and a rapid suppression of superconductivity with doping takes place. In all three material classes isotope effects have been observed, including exotic ones in the cuprates, and controversial ones in the Fe based materials. Before the area of high-temperature superconductivity, isotope effects on T(c) were the signature for phonon mediated superconductivity-even when deviations from the BCS value to smaller values were observed. Since the discovery of high T(c) materials this is no longer evident since competing mechanisms might exist and other mediating pairing interactions are discussed which are of purely electronic origin. In this work we will compare the three different material classes and especially discuss the experimentally observed isotope effects of all three systems and present a rather general analysis of them. Furthermore, we will concentrate on multiband signatures which are not generally accepted in cuprates even though they are manifest in various experiments, the evidence for those in MgB(2), and indications for them in the Fe based compounds. Mostly we will consider experimental data, but when possible also discuss theoretical models which are suited to explain the data.

  15. [The arsenate Na3Fe2(AsO4) 3: structural study at low temperature and simulation of conduction properties of alkaline cations].

    PubMed

    Ouerfelli, Najoua; Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Mazza, Daniele; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of the low-temperature garnet-like form of trisodium diiron(III) triarsenate, Na(3)Fe(2)(AsO(4))(3), exhibits a three-dimensional framework with small tunnels running along the [111] direction, in which the Na(+) cations are located. This study demonstrates the structural origins of the different ionic conductivities of the low- and high-temperature forms. Sodium conduction properties are simulated by means of the bond-valence-sum (BVS) model; the correlations between the low- and high-temperature crystal structures are discussed. The As, Fe and Na atoms lie on special positions (Wyckoff symbols 24d, 16a and 24c, respectively).

  16. Effect of glycine substitution on the ferroelectric phase of betaine arsenate [(CH 3) 3NCH 2COO·H 3AsO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekola, T.; Ribeiro, J. L.; Klöpperpieper, A.

    2011-09-01

    The present work reports an experimental investigation on the influence of glycine (NH 2CH 2COOH) substitution in the polar properties and the critical dynamics of the molecular ferroelectric betaine arsenate, (CH 3) 3NCH 2COO·H 3AsO 4. The dielectric dispersion (20 Hz<ν<3 MHz) and the thermally induced displacement currents are investigated in detail over the extended Curie region of the system (130 K< T<100 K). The results obtained for a single crystal with nominal glycine content of 20% are analyzed, compared with those obtained for pure betaine arsenate and discussed within the scope of a phenomenological Landau model previously used to describe a system with competing ferroelectric and structural instabilities.

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Superconductors with Exotic Symmetries FOCUS ON SUPERCONDUCTORS WITH EXOTIC SYMMETRIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. Maurice; Sigrist, Manfred; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2009-05-01

    Superconductors can usefully be divided into two classes, those that are well described by the classic Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory and its extensions and those which require a different microscopic description. The BCS theory of superconductivity solved the long standing mystery of this spectacular phenomenon and described all superconductors that were known when it was formulated in the 1950s. The key ingredient is an attractive interaction generated by the exchange of phonons between electrons which overcomes a Coulomb repulsion weakened by screening, to give a net attractive force on the low energy scale. In this case the simplest s-wave pairing always maximises the energy gain. There were speculations a little later that other types of electron pairing could be possible, but it took a quarter of a century until the first signs of superconductors with different and exotic pairing appeared. In the intervening thirty years many superconductors with exotic pairing have been and continue to be discovered and the study of their superconductivity has grown into a major subfield of condensed matter physics today. The importance of these exotic superconductors with unconventional symmetry is that their pairing is of electronic origin. As a result they are freed from the restrictions of low transition temperatures that go along with the phonon driven conventional superconductors. However in two of the main classes of the exotic superconductors, namely heavy fermion and organic superconductors, the intrinsic energy scales are very small leading to low temperature scales. The third class contains the small number of superconducting transition metal compounds with exotic pairing symmetry. The most studied of these are the high-Tc cuprates, the newly discovered iron pnictides and strontium ruthenate which is closely related to superfluid 3He. Although the basic electronic structure of these materials is well understood, the origin of the pairing is more complex

  18. Processing of YBCO superconductors for improved levitation force

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Zhong, W.

    1993-05-01

    One objective of the ANL superconductor program is to develop improved processing methods for production of YBCO superconductors with higher levitation forces suitable for low-friction, superconductor/permanent-magnet bearings and flywheel-energy-storage applications. From the standpoint of these applications, melt-processed bulk YBCO superconductors are of considerable interest. Levitation force and flux-pinning properties depend on microstructural features of the superconductors. We have added several chemical species to YBCO to alter the microstructure and have used a seeding technique to induce crystallization during melt processing. In this paper, we discuss the effects of various process parameters, additives, and a seeding technique on the properties of melt-processed bulk YBCO samples and compare the results with solid-state-sintered superconductors.

  19. Shiba chains of scalar impurities on unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, Titus; Yazdani, A.; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2016-03-01

    We show that a chain of nonmagnetic impurities deposited on a fully gapped two- or three-dimensional superconductor can become a topological one-dimensional superconductor with protected Majorana bound states at its end. A prerequisite is that the pairing potential of the underlying superconductor breaks the spin-rotation symmetry, as it is generically the case in systems with strong spin-orbit coupling. We illustrate this mechanism for a spinless triplet-superconductor (px+i py ) and a time-reversal symmetric Rashba superconductor with a mixture of singlet and triplet pairing. For the latter, we show that the impurity chain can be topologically nontrivial even if the underlying superconductor is topologically trivial.

  20. Theoretical study of pair density wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhichao

    In conventional superconductors, the Cooper pairs are formed from quasiparticles. We explore another type of superconducting state, a pair density wave (PDW) order, which spontaneously breaks some of the translational and point group symmetries. In a PDW superconductor, the order parameter is a periodic function of the center-of-mass coordinate, and the spatial average value of the superconducting order parameter vanishes. In the early 1960s, following the success of the BCS theory of superconductivity, Fulde and Ferrell and Larkin and Ovchinnikov (FFLO) developed theories of inhomogeneous superconducting states. Because of this Zeeman splitting in a magnetic field, the Cooper pairs having a nonzero center-of-mass momentum are more stable than the normal pairing, leading to the FFLO state. Experiments suggest possible occurrence of the FFLO state in the heavy-fermion compound CeCoIn5, and in quasi-low-dimensional organic superconductors. FFLO phases have also been argued to be of importance in understanding ultracold atomic Fermi gases and in the formation of color superconductivity in high density quark matter. In all Fermi superfluids known at the present time, Cooper pairs are composed of particles with spin 1/2. The spin component of a pair wave function can be characterized by its total spin S = 0 (singlet) and S = 1 (triplet). In the discovered broken inversion superconductors CePt3Si, Li2Pt3B, and Li2Pd3B, the magnetic field leads to novel inhomogeneous superconducting states, namely the helical phase and the multiple-q phase. Its order parameter exhibits periodicity similar to FFLO phase, and the consequences of both phases are same: the enhancement of transition temperature as a function of magnetic field. We have studied the PDW phases in broken parity superconductors with vortices included. By studying PDW vortex states, we find the usual Abrikosov vortex solution is unstable against a new solution with fractional vortex pairs. We have also studied the

  1. Higgs mode in electric-field-induced superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Tomio

    2014-08-01

    We develop a theory for the Higgs (gap-amplitude) mode excitation in electric-field-induced (EFI) superconductors. The Higgs mode can be excited directly by an oscillating electric field in EFI superconductors since the gap value depends sensitively on the external electric field that induces superconducting carriers. The mass of the Higgs mode in EFI superconductors does not coincide with the threshold energy of pair-breaking two-particle excitations.

  2. Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud& #x27; ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

    2013-05-28

    Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

  3. Conductance of d-wave superconductor/normal metal/d-wave superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesin, Dmytro; Andreev, Anton; Spivak, Boris

    2008-03-01

    We develop a theory of the low-temperature conductance of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor junctions in which the superconductors have d-wave pairing symmetry. We show that at low temperatures the conductance of the junction is determined by the inelastic relaxation time of quasiparticles in the bulk of d-wave superconductors, GDND√&(d)circ;ɛ. Thus it greatly exceeds the conductance of the normal metal part of the junction, which is controlled by the elastic mean free path. This dependence of GDND on the inelastic relaxation time should be contrasted with that of the low-temperature conductance of the junction in the case of the s- wave superconductor leads, GSNS. In the latter case the conductance is proportional to the first power of the inelastic electron relaxation time in the normal metal part of the junction, GSNSτɛ^(n) [1]. [1] S. V. Lempitskii, Sov. Phys. JETP 58, 624 (1983); U. Gunsenheimer and A. D. Zaikin, Phys. Rev. B50, 6317 (1994); F. Zhou and B. Spivak, JETP Lett. 65, 369 (1997).

  4. Method and apparatus to trigger superconductors in current limiting devices

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Xing; Hazelton, Drew Willard; Walker, Michael Stephen

    2004-10-26

    A method and apparatus for magnetically triggering a superconductor in a superconducting fault current limiter to transition from a superconducting state to a resistive state. The triggering is achieved by employing current-carrying trigger coil or foil on either or both the inner diameter and outer diameter of a superconductor. The current-carrying coil or foil generates a magnetic field with sufficient strength and the superconductor is disposed within essentially uniform magnetic field region. For superconductor in a tubular-configured form, an additional magnetic field can be generated by placing current-carrying wire or foil inside the tube and along the center axial line.

  5. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  6. Determination of spin polarization using an unconventional iron superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Gifford, J. A.; Chen, B. B.; Zhang, J.; ...

    2016-11-21

    Here, an unconventional iron superconductor, SmO0.7F0.3FeAs, has been utilized to determine the spin polarization and temperature dependence of a highly spin-polarized material, La0.67Sr0.33MnO3, with Andreev reflection spectroscopy. The polarization value obtained is the same as that determined using a conventional superconductor Pb but the temperature dependence of the spin polarization can be measured up to 52 K, a temperature range, which is several times wider than that using a typical conventional superconductor. The result excludes spin-parallel triplet pairing in the iron superconductor.

  7. Ferrite-superconductor devices for advanced microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, G.F.; Oates, D.E.; Temme, D.H.; Weiss, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Microwave devices comprising magnetized ferrite in contact with superconductor circuits designed to eliminate magnetic field penetration of the superconductor have demonstrated phase shift without significant conduction losses. The device structures are adaptable to low- or high-{Tc} superconductors. A nonoptimized design of a ferrite phase shifter that employs niobium or YBCO meanderlines has produced over 1,000 degrees of differential phase shift with a figure of merit exceeding 1,000 degrees/dB at X band. By combining superconductor meanderline sections with alternating T junctions on a ferrite substrate in a configuration with three-fold symmetry, a low-loss three-port switching circulator has been demonstrated.

  8. Ordering dynamics in type-II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-12-01

    We use analytic and numerical methods to analyze the dynamics of vortices following the quench of a type-II superconductor under the application of an external magnetic field. In three dimensions, in the absence of a field, the spacing between vortices scales with time t with an exponent phi=0.414+/-0.01, in a thin sheet of a superconductor, the scaling exponent is phi=0.294+/-0.01. When an external magnetic field h is applied, the vortices are confined with respect to the length scale of the Abrikosov lattice, leading to a crossover between the power-law scaling length scale and the lattice length scale. From this we suggest a one-parameter scaling of r with h and r that is consistent with numerical data.

  9. Method for fabrication of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Ma, Beihai; Miller, Dean

    2009-07-14

    A layered article of manufacture and a method of manufacturing same is disclosed. A substrate has a biaxially textured MgO crystalline layer having the c-axes thereof inclined with respect to the plane of the substrate deposited thereon. A layer of one or more of YSZ or Y.sub.2O.sub.3 and then a layer of CeO.sub.2 is deposited on the MgO. A crystalline superconductor layer with the c-axes thereof normal to the plane of the substrate is deposited on the CeO.sub.2 layer. Deposition of the MgO layer on the substrate is by the inclined substrate deposition method developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Preferably, the MgO has the c-axes thereof inclined with respect to the normal to the substrate in the range of from about 10.degree. to about 40.degree. and YBCO superconductors are used.

  10. Heterostructures of Topological Insulators and Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lababidi, Mahmoud

    Topological insulators (TI), such as Bi2Se 3, are a new class of quantum materials discovered recently. They are insulating in the bulk but can conduct on the surfaces. The robust surface states of three-dimensional strong TIs form a unique two-dimensional system of massless electrons, known as a helical metal, with a linear energy-momentum dispersion and spin-momentum locking. While these surface modes alone have spurred great interest, their interaction with superconductors (S) in close proximity has opened up opportunities to engineer topological superconductivity using TI-S heterostructures. This thesis is a microscopic, self-consistent theoretical investigation of the interplay between TI and superconductors. Three types of TI-based heterostructures with increasing complexity are studied in detail. We first present a detailed study of the coupling between a metal and a topological insulator. We compute the spin-active scattering matrix for electrons coming from the metal incident on the metal-TI interface. We find that there exists a critical incident angle, where perfect spin-flip occurs as the incoming electron is reflected. We discuss the origin of this phenomena and its potential implications in spintronics. We then compute the local spectrum at the metal-TI interface, and examine its evolution from the tunneling limit (bad contact) to the strong coupling limit (good contact). The calculations are done using two complementary approaches; in a continuum model based on a k·p Hamiltonian a wave function matching approach is taken and the lattice model requires the use of lattice Green's functions. The study of metal-TI interface lays the foundation for our subsequent theory of S-TI interface. Next we carry out microscopic, self-consistent calculations of the superconducting order parameter and pairing correlations near a S-TI interface, where S is an s-wave superconductor. We discuss the suppression of the order parameter by the topological insulator and

  11. Unconventional Disorder Effects in Correlated Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Gastiasoro, Maria N; Bernardini, Fabio; Andersen, Brian M

    2016-12-16

    We study the effects of disorder on unconventional superconductors in the presence of correlations, and explore a novel correlated disorder paradigm dominated by strong deviations from standard Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory due to generation of local bound states and cooperative impurity behavior driven by Coulomb interactions. Specifically we explain under which circumstances magnetic disorder acts as a strong poison destroying high-T_{c} superconductivity at the sub-1% level, and when nonmagnetic disorder, counterintuitively, hardly affects the unconventional superconducting state while concomitantly inducing an inhomogeneous full-volume magnetic phase. Recent experimental studies of Fe-based superconductors have discovered that such unusual disorder behavior seems to be indeed present in those systems.

  12. Magnetoelectric coupling in superconductor-helimagnet heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil M. D.

    2017-04-01

    The Ginzburg-Landau free energy of a conventional superconductor coupled to a helimagnet is microscopically derived using functional field integral techniques. We show that the spin texture leads to a Lifshitz invariant in the free energy, which couples the momentum density of the superconducting condensate to the magnetization of the helimagnet. For helimagnets with a conical texture, the Lifshitz invariant yields a spatial modulation of the superconducting phase along the helical wave vector of the magnetic texture. Based on self-consistent numerical calculations, we verify the theoretical formalism by investigating a superconductor that contains a helical Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) chain. We demonstrate that the texture-induced magnetoelectric coupling produces a strong supercurrent along the YSR chain, which induces a detectable magnetic field.

  13. Transport in ferromagnet/superconductor spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, Evan; Valls, Oriol T.

    2017-02-01

    We consider charge transport properties in realistic, fabricable, ferromagnet/superconductor spin valves having a layered structure F1/N /F2/S , where F1 and F2 denote the ferromagnets, S the superconductor, and N the normal-metal spacer usually inserted in actual devices. Our calculation is fully self-consistent, as required to ensure that conservation laws are satisfied. We include the effects of scattering at all the interfaces. We obtain results for the device conductance G , as a function of bias voltage, for all values of the angle ϕ between the magnetizations of the F1 and F2 layers and a range of realistic values for the material and geometrical parameters in the sample. We discuss, in the context of our results for G , the relative influence of all parameters on the spin valve properties. We also study the spin current and the corresponding spin-transfer torque in F1/F2/S structures.

  14. Biot-Savart correlations in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Kumar; Oganesyan, Vadim; Sondhi, Shivaji

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the superconductor to normal phase transition in an infinite layered type-II superconductor in the limit where Josephson coupling between layers is negligible. We model each plane as a neutral gas of thermally excited pancake vortices and assume the Biot-Savart interaction between vortices is the dominant mechanism for coupling the layers. Using the real-space renormalization group, we demonstrate that the transition in this model is a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition driven by the unbinding of pancake vortices. We study the high temperature phase using a Debye-Huckel type mean field theory. We find that while the long range interaction leads to correlations between the planes, the screening within the individual layers is not significantly different from an isolated two-dimensional system. This overall picture places some claims expressed in the literature on a more secure analytical footing and also resolves some conflicting views. Experimental implications will be discussed.

  15. Symmetry and topology of noncentrosymmetric superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Samokhin, K.V.

    2015-08-15

    We present a detailed analysis of the pairing symmetry and the order parameter topology in superconductors without centre of inversion. Strong spin–orbit coupling of electrons with the crystal lattice leads to a large splitting of the Bloch bands, which makes it necessary to use a multiband description of superconductivity. We identify stable superconducting states and derive the Bogoliubov–de Gennes Hamiltonian, which determines the spectrum of fermionic quasiparticles. To develop a topological classification of the superconducting states we introduce two different types of topological invariants, the Chern numbers and the Maurer–Cartan invariants, and apply them to three-dimensional noncentrosymmetric superconductors, both with and without time reversal symmetry breaking.

  16. Commercialization of ceramic superconductor composite wires

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, G.N.; Carter, W.L. )

    1993-07-01

    Recent advances in the development of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) composite wires demonstrate an increasingly realistic potential for commercial applications, such as power transmission cables, motors, and superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems. Successful commercialization requires the development of manufacturing technologies that can produce high-performance, low-cost HTS wires. The achievement of this goal has been occurring through an understanding of the basic relationships between the processing, properties, and microstructures of complex ceramic superconductors. Remarkable results have already been demonstrated with the oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) process. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of OPIT-processed HTS composite wires and prototype products fabricated from these wires.

  17. Energy gap structure of layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.H.; Klemm, R.A.

    1993-11-01

    We report the energy gap structure and density-of-states (DOS) of a model layered superconductor with one superconducting layer and one normal layer in a unit cell along the c-axis. In the physically interesting parameter range where the interlayer hopping strengths of the quasiparticles are comparable to the critical temperature, the peaks in the DOS curve do not correspond to the order parameter (OP) of the superconducting layer, but depend on the OP and the band dispersion in the c-direction in a complex manner. In contrast to a BCS superconductor, the DOS of layered systems have logarithmic singularities. Our simulated tunneling characteristics bear close resemblance to experimental results.

  18. Vortex phase separation in mesoscopic superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Iaroshenko, O.; Rybalko, V.; Vinokur, V. M.; Berlyand, L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that in mesoscopic type II superconductors with the lateral size commensurate with London penetration depth, the ground state of vortices pinned by homogeneously distributed columnar defects can form a hierarchical nested domain structure. Each domain is characterized by an average number of vortices trapped at a single pinning site within a given domain. Our study marks a radical departure from the current understanding of the ground state in disordered macroscopic systems and provides an insight into the interplay between disorder, vortex-vortex interaction, and confinement within finite system size. The observed vortex phase segregation implies the existence of the soliton solution for the vortex density in the finite superconductors and establishes a new class of nonlinear systems that exhibit the soliton phenomenon.

  19. Asymmetric Ferromagnet-Superconductor-Ferromagnet Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cadden-Zimansky, P.; Bazaliy, Ya.B.; Litvak, L.M.; Jiang, J.S.; Pearson, J.; Gu, J.Y.; You, Chun-Yeol; Beasley, M.R.; Bader, S.D.

    2011-11-04

    In layered ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagnet F{sub 1} /S/F{sub 2} structures, the critical temperature T{sub c} of the superconductors depends on the magnetic orientation of the ferromagnetic layers F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} relative to each other. So far, the experimentally observed magnitude of change in T{sub c} for structures utilizing weak ferromagnets has been 2 orders of magnitude smaller than is expected from calculations. We theoretically show that such a discrepancy can result from the asymmetry of F/S boundaries, and we test this possibility by performing experiments on structures where F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} are independently varied. Our experimental results indicate that asymmetric boundaries are not the source of the discrepancy. If boundary asymmetry is causing the suppressed magnitude of T{sub c} changes, it may only be possible to detect in structures with thinner ferromagnetic layers.

  20. Neutron stars as type-I superconductors.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Kirk B W; Metlitski, Max A; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R

    2004-04-16

    In a recent paper by Link, it was pointed out that the standard picture of the neutron star core composed of a mixture of a neutron superfluid and a proton type-II superconductor is inconsistent with observations of a long period precession in isolated pulsars. In the following we will show that an appropriate treatment of the interacting two-component superfluid (made of neutron and proton Cooper pairs), when the structure of proton vortices is strongly modified, may dramatically change the standard picture, resulting in a type-I superconductor. In this case the magnetic field is expelled from the superconducting regions of the neutron star, leading to the formation of the intermediate state when alternating domains of superconducting matter and normal matter coexist.

  1. Electrical bushing for a superconductor element

    DOEpatents

    Mirebeau, Pierre; Lallouet, Nicolas; Delplace, Sebastien; Lapierre, Regis

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical bushing serving to make a connection at ambient temperature to a superconductor element situated in an enclosure at cryogenic temperature. The electrical bushing passes successively through an enclosure at intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and cryogenic temperature, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, and it comprises a central electrical conductor surrounded by an electrically insulating sheath. According to the invention, an electrically conductive screen connected to ground potential surrounds the insulating sheath over a section that extends from the end of the bushing that is in contact with the enclosure at cryogenic temperature at least as far as the junction between the enclosure at intermediate temperature and the enclosure at ambient temperature. The invention is more particularly applicable to making a connection to a superconductor cable.

  2. A Fifth Force: Generalized through Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    The connection between the Biefield-Brown Effect, the recent repeat of the 1902 Trouton-Noble (TN) experiments, and the gravity shielding experiments was explored. This connection is visualized through high capacitive electron concentrations. From this connection, a theory is proposed that connects mass energy to gravity and a fifth force. The theory called the Gravi-Atomic Energy theory presents two new terms: Gravi-atomic energy and quantum vacuum pressure (QVP). Gravi-atomic energy is defined as the radiated mass energy, which acts on vacuum energy to create a QVP about a mass, resulting in gravity and the fifth force. The QVP emission from a superconductor was discussed followed by the description of a test for QVP from a superconductor using a Cavendish balance.

  3. High Tc superconductors - Composite wire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Sherwood, R. C.; van Dover, R. B.; Tiefel, T. H.; Johnson, D. W., Jr.

    1987-07-01

    The fabrication of fine-wire, composite superconductors consisting of a high-conductivity normal metal shell, such as Ag or Cu/Ni/Au, and a superconducting core of Ba2YCu3O oxide is described. The functions of the normal metal shell and the importance of using the proper diffusion barrier metals are discussed. A resistivity-temperature curve for the composite wire Ag/Ba2YCu3O7 is examined, and the compound inside the finished wire is analyzed using X-ray diffraction. It is observed that the zero-field critical current density of the wire at 77 K is about 175 A/sq cm and the superconducting core is continuous and retains phase composition after wire drawing and heat treatment. The supplying of oxygen to the core of the long wire during heat treatments is studied. The data reveal that it is possible to process ceramic superconductors into a desirable composite wire form.

  4. Method for preparing superconductors ceramic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Akinc, M.; Celikkaya, A.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes a process of forming a superconductor ceramic of the formula: YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital x}} wherein x is from about 6.5 to bout 7.2. It comprises: heating a solid phase copper salt selected from the group of copper acetate and copper nitrate and solid phase barium hydroxide to a temperature high enough to form a meltphase; and adding to the melt a salt, hydroxide or oxide as a source of yttrium with stirring to provide a substantially homogeneous mixture, the quantities of each of said copper salt, barium hydroxide and yttrium source being sufficient to yield a Y:Ba:Cu ratio of about 1:2:3; and calcining the substantially homogeneous mixture of temperatures of from about 750{degrees} C. to about 1000{degrees} C. to form said superconductor ceramic.

  5. Surface superconductivity of short coherence length superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Yang, T. J.

    1994-09-01

    Based on the theory of Valls et al. for short coherence length superconductors, de Gennes' boundary theory for conventional superconductors with ξ 0≫ K-1F may be modified. We solve the G-L equation exactly under zero magnetic field for various temperatures. The order parameter Ψ( x) is not depleted but enhanced near the surface. We also obtain some interesting results: Tc will be enhanced by contracting of the thickness of a superconducting film. The nucleation field Hc3 ( T)∝( Tcb- T) near Tcb; and H c3(T)∝(T c-T) {1}/{2} near Tc. The critical current in SIS Josephson junctions Jc( T)∝( Tc- T)+√ 2 τ0( T0- T) for T< Tcb; and Jc( T)∝( Tc- T) for Tcb≤ T< Tc.

  6. Proximity effects in ferromagnet-superconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halterman, Klaus Byron

    I present an extensive theoretical investigation of the proximity effects that occur in ferromagnet/superconductor systems. I use a numerical method to solve self consistently the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations in the continuum. I obtain the pair amplitude and the local density of states (DOS), and use these results to extract the relevant lengths characterizing both the leakage of superconductivity into the magnet and to study spin splitting induced in the superconductor. These phenomena are investigated as a function of parameters such as temperature, magnet polarization, interfacial scattering, sample size and Fermi wave vector mismatch, all of which turn out to have an important influence on the results. These comprehensive results should help characterize and analyze future data, and are shown to be in agreement with existing experiments.

  7. Unconventional Disorder Effects in Correlated Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastiasoro, Maria N.; Bernardini, Fabio; Andersen, Brian M.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of disorder on unconventional superconductors in the presence of correlations, and explore a novel correlated disorder paradigm dominated by strong deviations from standard Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory due to generation of local bound states and cooperative impurity behavior driven by Coulomb interactions. Specifically we explain under which circumstances magnetic disorder acts as a strong poison destroying high-Tc superconductivity at the sub-1% level, and when nonmagnetic disorder, counterintuitively, hardly affects the unconventional superconducting state while concomitantly inducing an inhomogeneous full-volume magnetic phase. Recent experimental studies of Fe-based superconductors have discovered that such unusual disorder behavior seems to be indeed present in those systems.

  8. Mg6.75(OH)3(H0.166AsO4)3(HAsO4), a member of the M 1- xM′6(OH)3(H2x/3AsO4)3(HAsO4) family (M,M′ = Co; Ni)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In the structure of the title compound, magnesium hydroxide hydrogenarsenate (6.75/3/4), two different Mg2+ ions, one located on a site with symmetry 3m. (occupancy 3/4) and one on a general position, as well as two different AsO3(OH) tetra­hedra (symmetry .m. with partial occupancy for the H atom for one, and symmetry 3m. with full occupancy for the H atom for the other) and one OH− ion (site symmetry .m.) are present. Both Mg2+ ions are octa­hedrally surrounded by O atoms. The MgO6 octa­hedra belonging to the partially occupied Mg2+ sites share faces, forming chains along [001]. The other type of MgO6 octa­hedra share corners and faces under formation of strands parallel to [001] whereby individual strands are linked through common corner atoms. The two types of AsO3(OH) tetra­hedra inter­link the strands and the chains, building up a three-dimensional framework resembling that of the mineral dumortierite. The OH groups were assigned on basis of bond-valence calculations and crystal chemical considerations. PMID:23723752

  9. Substrates For High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed hot-dipping process prepares materials well suited to serve as substrates for high-temperature superconductors. Makes it possible to produce substrates combining properties needed for given application, such as flexibility, strength, long grains, and <001> crystal orientation. Properties favor growth of superconductive films carrying high current and fabricated in variety of useful shapes. Used in making solar cells, described in "Hot-Dipped Metal Films as Epitaxial Substrates" (NPO-15904).

  10. Topology of two-band superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Iyo, A.; Tokiwa, K.; Watanabe, T.; Crisan, A.; Sundaresan, A.; Terada, N.

    2010-12-01

    Two-band superconductivity has a topology different from that in single-band superconductivity. The topology is not always stabilized in an infinitely homogeneous sample. The morphology, grain shape, and pattern of the device (topology of the superconducting materials) is effective in stabilizing the topology. In this report, we discuss a vortex having a small magnetic flux but a large winding number as one plausible topology in a two-band superconductor.

  11. A Road Towards High Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    issue in trying to make useful high temperature superconductors is obviously to discover superconductivity at higher temperatures. But there is also...behavior of the cuprates under applied fields can be made by using an unconventional pinning mechanism directly based on the Bond Contraction...Pairing (BCP) mechanism proposed by Deutscher and de Gennes. In the second part a new mechanism for superconductivity that we may have uncovered in

  12. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  13. Magnetic impurities in spin-split superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gerven Oei, W.-V.; Tanasković, D.; Žitko, R.

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid semiconductor-superconductor quantum dot devices are tunable physical realizations of quantum impurity models for a magnetic impurity in a superconducting host. The binding energy of the localized subgap Shiba states is set by the gate voltages and external magnetic field. In this work we discuss the effects of the Zeeman spin splitting, which is generically present both in the quantum dot and in the (thin-film) superconductor. The unequal g factors in semiconductor and superconductor materials result in respective Zeeman splittings of different magnitude. We consider both classical and quantum impurities. In the first case we analytically study the spectral function and the subgap states. The energy of bound states depends on the spin-splitting of the Bogoliubov quasiparticle bands as a simple rigid shift. For the case of collinear magnetization of impurity and host, the Shiba resonance of a given spin polarization remains unperturbed when it overlaps with the branch of the quasiparticle excitations of the opposite spin polarization. In the quantum case, we employ numerical renormalization group calculations to study the effect of the Zeeman field for different values of the g factors of the impurity and of the superconductor. We find that in general the critical magnetic field for the singlet-doublet transition changes nonmonotonically as a function of the superconducting gap, demonstrating the existence of two different transition mechanisms: Zeeman splitting of Shiba states or gap closure due to Zeeman splitting of Bogoliubov states. We also study how in the presence of spin-orbit coupling, modeled as an additional noncollinear component of the magnetic field at the impurity site, the Shiba resonance overlapping with the quasiparticle continuum of the opposite spin gradually broadens and then merges with the continuum.

  14. Atomic Engineering of Superconductors by Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    Ngai, Y. Segal, F. Walker, C. Ahn, K. Moler. Scanning SQUID susceptometry of a paramagnetic superconductor, Physical Review B, (06 2012): 224518...metal-insulator transition temperature and explains the observed phase diagram renormalization. Scanning SQUID susceptometry of LaNiO3 films In addition...phases occurs on microscopic length scales. We performed scanning superconducting quantum interference device ( SQUID ) susceptometry on LaNiO3 films

  15. Semiconductor/High-Tc-Superconductor Hybrid ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid integrated circuits (ICs) containing both Si-based semiconducting and YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-x) superconducting circuit elements on sapphire substrates developed. Help to prevent diffusion of Cu from superconductors into semiconductors. These hybrid ICs combine superconducting and semiconducting features unavailable in superconducting or semiconducting circuitry alone. For example, complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) readout and memory devices integrated with fast-switching Josephson-junction super-conducting logic devices and zero-resistance interconnections.

  16. Semiconductor/High-Tc-Superconductor Hybrid ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid integrated circuits (ICs) containing both Si-based semiconducting and YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-x) superconducting circuit elements on sapphire substrates developed. Help to prevent diffusion of Cu from superconductors into semiconductors. These hybrid ICs combine superconducting and semiconducting features unavailable in superconducting or semiconducting circuitry alone. For example, complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) readout and memory devices integrated with fast-switching Josephson-junction super-conducting logic devices and zero-resistance interconnections.

  17. Flywheel energy storage with superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer; Hull, John R.

    1993-01-01

    A flywheel having superconductor bearings has a lower drag to lift ratio that translates to an improvement of a factor of ten in the rotational decay rate. The lower drag results from the lower dissipation of melt-processed YBCO, improved uniformity of the permanent magnet portion of the bearings, operation in a different range of vacuum pressure from that taught by the art, and greater separation distance from the rotating members of conductive materials.

  18. Spray-Deposited Superconductor/Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Tran, Sang Q.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1993-01-01

    Coatings that exhibit the Meissner effect formed at relatively low temperature. High-temperature-superconductor/polymer coatings that exhibit Meissner effect deposited onto components in variety of shapes and materials. Simple, readily available equipment needed in coating process, mean coatings produced economically. Coatings used to keep magnetic fields away from electronic circuits in such cryogenic applications as magnetic resonance imaging and detection of infrared, and in magnetic suspensions to provide levitation and/or damping of vibrations.

  19. Protection considerations for force-cooled superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper treats some hydrodynamic aspects of protecting magnets wound with force-cooled superconductors, namely, the rise in internal pressure and the forceful expulsion of helium during a quench. Two initial conditions are considered: an entire hydraulic path going normal all at once, and an initially small but nonrecovering normal zone. Formulas are given for the quench pressure and expulsion velocity in both cases and are compared with available experimental data.

  20. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. Anil; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Ming Fang

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and (2) to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices - obvious advantages versus practical difficulties - needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models - a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B) - shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance - conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant - will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T

  1. Partial Meissner effect in superconductors with twins

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.L.; Mints, R.G. )

    1988-11-01

    Superconductivity of twinning planes, arising at critical temperature T/sub c/ exceeding the bulk point T/sub co/, may prove to be important for the understanding of the properties of high-temperature superconductors with well-developed twinning structure. This paper shows that regardless of a specific mechanism of superconductivity, twins at T/sub c/>T/sub co/ act as seeds for the growth of metastable superconducting domains whose order parameter phases differ by {pi}.

  2. Electronic Properties of High-Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    presented at the International Superconductor Applications Convention, San Francisco, 1989 (unpublished). SJ. %I. Tranquada , S. 2M. Heald, A. R. Moodenbaugh...Lett. 62, 102 (1989). 151 J. M. Tranquada , D. E. Cox, WV. Kunnmann, H. Moudden, G. Shirane, %I. Suenaga, P. Zolliker, D. Vaknin, S. K. Sinha, M. S...Alvarez, A. J. Jacobson, and D. C. Johnston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 136 (1988); J. M. Tranquada , A. H. Nioudden, A. 1. Goldman, P. Zolliker, D. E. Cox, G

  3. Spray-Deposited Superconductor/Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Tran, Sang Q.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1993-01-01

    Coatings that exhibit the Meissner effect formed at relatively low temperature. High-temperature-superconductor/polymer coatings that exhibit Meissner effect deposited onto components in variety of shapes and materials. Simple, readily available equipment needed in coating process, mean coatings produced economically. Coatings used to keep magnetic fields away from electronic circuits in such cryogenic applications as magnetic resonance imaging and detection of infrared, and in magnetic suspensions to provide levitation and/or damping of vibrations.

  4. Magnetic-Flux-Compression Cooling Using Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Donald M.; Israelsson, Ulf E.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-flux-compression refrigeration system produces final-stage temperatures below 4.2 K. More efficient than mechanical and sorption refrigerators at temperatures in this range. Weighs less than comparable liquid-helium-cooled superconducting magnetic refrigeration systems operating below 4.2 K. Magnetic-flux-compression cooling stage combines advantages of newly discovered superconductors with those of cooling by magnetization and demagnetization of paramagnetic salts.

  5. Upper Critical Field of a Percolating Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutscher, G.; Grave, I.; Alexander, S.

    1982-05-01

    The upper critical field Hc2 of the random percolating superconductor InGe has been measured as a function of the metal volume fraction x. Near the percolation threshold xc, Hc2 diverges with a critical exponent which is significantly smaller than that of the normal-state resistivity. An interpretation of this behavior is proposed in terms of the properties of the infinite cluster.

  6. Superconductor Digital Electronics: -- Current Status, Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Two major applications of superconductor electronics: communications and supercomputing will be presented. These areas hold a significant promise of a large impact on electronics state-of-the-art for the defense and commercial markets stemming from the fundamental advantages of superconductivity: simultaneous high speed and low power, lossless interconnect, natural quantization, and high sensitivity. The availability of relatively small cryocoolers lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled superconductor electronic systems. These fundamental advantages enabled a novel Digital-RF architecture - a disruptive technological approach changing wireless communications, radar, and surveillance system architectures dramatically. Practical results were achieved for Digital-RF systems in which wide-band, multi-band radio frequency signals are directly digitized and digital domain is expanded throughout the entire system. Digital-RF systems combine digital and mixed signal integrated circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, superconductor analog filter circuits, and semiconductor post-processing circuits. The demonstrated cryocooled Digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals, enabling multi-net data links, and performing signal acquisition from HF to L-band with 30 GHz clock frequencies. In supercomputing, superconductivity leads to the highest energy efficiencies per operation. Superconductor technology based on manipulation and ballistic transfer of magnetic flux quanta provides a superior low-power alternative to CMOS and other charge-transfer based device technologies. The fundamental energy consumption in SFQ circuits defined by flux quanta energy 2 x 10-19 J. Recently, a novel energy-efficient zero-static-power SFQ technology, eSFQ/ERSFQ was invented, which retains all advantages of standard RSFQ circuits: high-speed, dc power, internal memory. The

  7. Chemical stability of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the available studies on the chemical stability of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) in various environments was made. The La(1.8)Ba(0.2)CuO4 HTS is unstable in the presence of H2O, CO2, and CO. The YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor is highly susceptible to degradation in different environments, especially water. The La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO4 and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O HTS are relatively less reactive than the YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Processing of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) HTS in purified oxygen, rather than in air, using high purity noncarbon containing starting materials is recommended. Exposure of this HTS to the ambient atmosphere should also be avoided at all stages during processing and storage. Devices and components made out of these oxide superconductors would have to be protected with an impermeable coating of a polymer, glass, or metal to avoid deterioration during use.

  8. electric dipole superconductor in bilayer exciton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Qing-Dong; Bao, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, X. C.

    Recently, it was reported that the bilayer exciton systems could exhibit many new phenomena, including the large bilayer counterflow conductivity, the Coulomb drag, etc. These phenomena imply the formation of exciton condensate superfluid state. On the other hand, it is now well known that the superconductor is the condensate superfluid state of the Cooper pairs, which can be viewed as electric monopoles. In other words, the superconductor state is the electric monopole condensate superfluid state. Thus, one may wonder whether there exists electric dipole superfluid state. In this talk, we point out that the exciton in a bilayer system can be considered as a charge neutral electric dipole. And we derive the London-type and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations of electric dipole superconductivity. From these equations, we discover the Meissner-type effect (against spatial variation of magnetic fields), and the dipole current Josephson effect. The frequency in the AC Josephson effect of the dipole current is equal to that in the normal (monopole) superconductor. These results can provide direct evidence for the formation of exciton superfluid state in the bilayer systems and pave new ways to obtain the electric dipole current. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by NBRP of China (2012CB921303 and 2015CB921102) and NSF-China under Grants Nos. 11274364 and 11574007.

  9. Charge of a quasiparticle in a superconductor.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Yuval; Cohen, Yonatan; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Haim, Arbel; Rieder, Maria-Theresa; Heiblum, Moty; Mahalu, Diana; Shtrikman, Hadas

    2016-02-16

    Nonlinear charge transport in superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions has a unique signature in the shuttled charge quantum between the two superconductors. In the zero-bias limit Cooper pairs, each with twice the electron charge, carry the Josephson current. An applied bias VSD leads to multiple Andreev reflections (MAR), which in the limit of weak tunneling probability should lead to integer multiples of the electron charge ne traversing the junction, with n integer larger than 2Δ/eVSD and Δ the superconducting order parameter. Exceptionally, just above the gap eVSD ≥ 2Δ, with Andreev reflections suppressed, one would expect the current to be carried by partitioned quasiparticles, each with energy-dependent charge, being a superposition of an electron and a hole. Using shot-noise measurements in an SIS junction induced in an InAs nanowire (with noise proportional to the partitioned charge), we first observed quantization of the partitioned charge q = e*/e = n, with n = 1-4, thus reaffirming the validity of our charge interpretation. Concentrating next on the bias region eVSD ~ 2Δ, we found a reproducible and clear dip in the extracted charge to q ~ 0.6, which, after excluding other possibilities, we attribute to the partitioned quasiparticle charge. Such dip is supported by numerical simulations of our SIS structure.

  10. Avoided valence transition in a plutonium superconductor.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, B J; Shekhter, Arkady; McDonald, Ross D; Betts, Jon B; Mitchell, J N; Tobash, P H; Mielke, C H; Bauer, E D; Migliori, Albert

    2015-03-17

    The d and f electrons in correlated metals are often neither fully localized around their host nuclei nor fully itinerant. This localized/itinerant duality underlies the correlated electronic states of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors and the heavy-fermion intermetallics and is nowhere more apparent than in the 5f valence electrons of plutonium. Here, we report the full set of symmetry-resolved elastic moduli of PuCoGa5--the highest Tc superconductor of the heavy fermions (Tc = 18.5 K)--and find that the bulk modulus softens anomalously over a wide range in temperature above Tc. The elastic symmetry channel in which this softening occurs is characteristic of a valence instability--therefore, we identify the elastic softening with fluctuations of the plutonium 5f mixed-valence state. These valence fluctuations disappear when the superconducting gap opens at Tc, suggesting that electrons near the Fermi surface play an essential role in the mixed-valence physics of this system and that PuCoGa5 avoids a valence transition by entering the superconducting state. The lack of magnetism in PuCoGa5 has made it difficult to reconcile with most other heavy-fermion superconductors, where superconductivity is generally believed to be mediated by magnetic fluctuations. Our observations suggest that valence fluctuations play a critical role in the unusually high Tc of PuCoGa5.

  11. Topology of nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Ken; Sato, Masatoshi; Gomi, Kiyonori

    2016-05-01

    Topological classification in our previous paper [K. Shiozaki and M. Sato, Phys. Rev. B 90, 165114 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.165114] is extended to nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors. Using the twisted equivariant K theory, we complete the classification of topological crystalline insulators and superconductors in the presence of additional order-two nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries. The order-two nonsymmorphic space groups include half-lattice translation with Z2 flip, glide, twofold screw, and their magnetic space groups. We find that the topological periodic table shows modulo-2 periodicity in the number of flipped coordinates under the order-two nonsymmorphic space group. It is pointed out that the nonsymmorphic space groups allow Z2 topological phases even in the absence of time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries. Furthermore, the coexistence of the nonsymmorphic space group with time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries provides novel Z4 topological phases, which have not been realized in ordinary topological insulators and superconductors. We present model Hamiltonians of these new topological phases and analytic expressions of the Z2 and Z4 topological invariants. The half-lattice translation with Z2 spin flip and glide symmetry are compatible with the existence of boundaries, leading to topological surface gapless modes protected by the order-two nonsymmorphic symmetries. We also discuss unique features of these gapless surface modes.

  12. Electronic Raman Response in Disordered Unconventional Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereaux, Thomas

    1998-03-01

    Due to the strong symmetry dependence of the observed Raman spectra in all high Tc compounds, i.e., the characteristic features of light scattering for different incident and scattered polarization orientations, electronic Raman scattering in unconventional superconductors has grown to be of considerable interest in light of identifying the symmetry of the energy gap and ultimately, the mechanism of superconductivity in high temperature superconductors. I review the theory of the effects of impurities on the Raman response of unconventional superconductors with a view towards understanding the role polarization plays in determining the order parameter symmetry in the cuprates.(T. P. Devereaux, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 4313 (1995) (T. P. Devereaux and A. P. Kampf, Int. Journ. Mod. Phys. B 11), 2093 (1997) Signatures of the effects of disorder on the low frequency and low temperature behavior of the Raman spectra obtained for different polarizations will be discussed in relation to the magnitude and phase of the energy gap. Extensions of the theory to include anisotropic impurity scattering and inelastic spin fluctuation scattering will be discussed. Good agreement of the theory with the data on optimally- and overdoped-samples will be shown, although discrepancies remain.

  13. Superconductor Digital-RF Receiver Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhanov, Oleg A.; Kirichenko, Dmitri; Vernik, Igor V.; Filippov, Timur V.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Webber, Robert; Dotsenko, Vladimir; Talalaevskii, Andrei; Tang, Jia Cao; Sahu, Anubhav; Shevchenko, Pavel; Miller, Robert; Kaplan, Steven B.; Sarwana, Saad; Gupta, Deepnarayan

    Digital superconductor electronics has been experiencing rapid maturation with the emergence of smaller-scale, lower-cost communications applications which became the major technology drivers. These applications are primarily in the area of wireless communications, radar, and surveillance as well as in imaging and sensor systems. In these areas, the fundamental advantages of superconductivity translate into system benefits through novel Digital-RF architectures with direct digitization of wide band, high frequency radio frequency (RF) signals. At the same time the availability of relatively small 4K cryocoolers has lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled digital electronic systems. Recently, we have achieved a major breakthrough in the development, demonstration, and successful delivery of the cryocooled superconductor digital-RF receivers directly digitizing signals in a broad range from kilohertz to gigahertz. These essentially hybrid-technology systems combine a variety of superconductor and semiconductor technologies packaged with two-stage commercial cryocoolers: cryogenic Nb mixed-signal and digital circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, room-temperature amplifiers, FPGA processing and control circuitry. The demonstrated cryocooled digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals in X-band and performing signal acquisition in HF to L-band at ˜30GHz clock frequencies.

  14. Synthesizing new, high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Claire; Aronson, Meigan

    2015-03-01

    Currently, there is no accepted theory behind type-II, high-temperature superconductors, but there is a distinct relationship between anti-ferromagnetism and superconductivity. Our research focuses on synthesizing new superconducting materials by observing the link between atomic structure and magnetic moments of anti-ferromagnetic compounds and attempting to reproduce the molecular physics of these known materials in new compounds. Consider the square-planar arrangement of the transition metal Fe in the Fe-pnictide superconductors of the ZrCuSiAs ``11 11'' and the ThCr2Si2 ``122'' structure types. We believe that the physics behind this superconductor, where Fe has d6 valence electrons, contributes to the superconducting state, not the presence of Fe itself. For this reason, we are synthesizing materials containing neighboring transition metals, like Mn and Co, combined with other elements in similar crystal lattice arrangements, having ionization properties that hopefully impose d6 valence electrons on the transition metals. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  15. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J. D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations around an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point (QCP) are believed to lead to unconventional superconductivity and in some cases to high-temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1−xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high-temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a particularly suitable system to study how the quantum critical fluctuations affect the superconducting state. Here we show that the proximity of the QCP yields unexpected anomalies in the superconducting critical fields. We find that both the lower and upper critical fields do not follow the behaviour, predicted by conventional theory, resulting from the observed mass enhancement near the QCP. Our results imply that the energy of superconducting vortices is enhanced, possibly due to a microscopic mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realized in quantum critical superconductors. PMID:25477044

  16. Avoided valence transition in a plutonium superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, B. J.; Shekhter, Arkady; McDonald, Ross D.; Betts, Jon B.; Mitchell, J. N.; Tobash, P. H.; Mielke, C. H.; Bauer, E. D.; Migliori, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The d and f electrons in correlated metals are often neither fully localized around their host nuclei nor fully itinerant. This localized/itinerant duality underlies the correlated electronic states of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors and the heavy-fermion intermetallics and is nowhere more apparent than in the 5f valence electrons of plutonium. Here, we report the full set of symmetry-resolved elastic moduli of PuCoGa5—the highest Tc superconductor of the heavy fermions (Tc = 18.5 K)—and find that the bulk modulus softens anomalously over a wide range in temperature above Tc. The elastic symmetry channel in which this softening occurs is characteristic of a valence instability—therefore, we identify the elastic softening with fluctuations of the plutonium 5f mixed-valence state. These valence fluctuations disappear when the superconducting gap opens at Tc, suggesting that electrons near the Fermi surface play an essential role in the mixed-valence physics of this system and that PuCoGa5 avoids a valence transition by entering the superconducting state. The lack of magnetism in PuCoGa5 has made it difficult to reconcile with most other heavy-fermion superconductors, where superconductivity is generally believed to be mediated by magnetic fluctuations. Our observations suggest that valence fluctuations play a critical role in the unusually high Tc of PuCoGa5. PMID:25737548

  17. Holographic disorder driven superconductor-metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areán, D.; Pando Zayas, L. A.; Landea, I. Salazar; Scardicchio, A.

    2016-11-01

    We implement the effects of disorder on a holographic superconductor by introducing a random chemical potential on the boundary. We demonstrate explicitly that increasing disorder leads to the formation of islands where the superconducting order is enhanced and subsequently to the transition to a metal. We study the behavior of the superfluid density and of the conductivity as a function of the strength of disorder. We find explanations for various marked features in the conductivities in terms of hydrodynamic quasinormal modes of the holographic superconductors. These identifications plus a particular disorder-dependent spectral weight shift in the conductivity point to a signature of the Higgs mode in the context of disordered holographic superconductors. We observe that the behavior of the order parameter close to the transition is not mean-field type as in the clean case; rather we find robust agreement with exp (-A |T -Tc|-ν), with ν =1.03 ±0.02 for this disorder-driven smeared transition.

  18. The missing angular momentum of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2008-06-01

    We point out that the Meissner effect, the process by which a superconductor expels magnetic field from its interior, represents an unsolved puzzle within the London-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theoretical framework used to describe the physics of conventional superconductors, because it appears to give rise to non-conservation of angular momentum. Possible ways to avoid this inconsistency within the conventional theory of superconductivity are argued to be far-fetched. Consequently, we argue that unless/until a consistent explanation is put forth, the existence of the Meissner effect represents an anomaly that casts doubt on the validity of the conventional framework. Instead, we point out that three elements of the unconventional theory of hole superconductivity (that are not part of the conventional theory) allow for a consistent explanation of the Meissner effect, namely: (i) that the charge distribution in superconductors is macroscopically inhomogeneous, (ii) that superconducting electrons reside in mesoscopic orbits of radius 2λL (λL = London penetration depth), and (iii) that spin-orbit coupling plays an essential role in superconductivity.

  19. Characterization of bulk superconductors through EBSD methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Koblischka-Veneva, A.

    2003-10-01

    The application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique to bulk high- Tc superconductors is presented and reviewed. Due to the ceramic nature and the complex crystallographic unit cells of the perovskite-type high- Tc superconductors, the EBSD analysis is not yet as common as it deserves. We have successfully performed EBSD analysis on a variety of high- Tc compounds and samples including polycrystalline YBCO (pure and doped by alkali metals), melt-textured YBCO, thin and thick films of YBCO; the “green phase” Y 2BaCuO 5, thin film and melt-textured NdBa 2Cu 3O x and Bi-2212 single crystals and tapes. It is shown that the surface preparation of the samples is crucial due to the small information depth (up to 100 nm) of the EBSD technique. High quality Kikuchi patterns are the requirement in order to enable the automated EBSD mapping, which yields phase distributions, individual grain orientations and the misorientation angle distribution. The results can be presented in form of mappings, as charts, and as pole figures. These informations are required for a better understanding of the growth mechanism(s) of bulk high- Tc superconductors intended for applications.

  20. Holographic superconductor on Q-lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Liu, Peng; Niu, Chao; Wu, Jian-Pin; Xian, Zhuo-Yu

    2015-02-01

    We construct the simplest gravitational dual model of a superconductor on Q-lattices. We analyze the condition for the existence of a critical temperature at which the charged scalar field will condense. In contrast to the holographic superconductor on ionic lattices, the presence of Q-lattices will suppress the condensate of the scalar field and lower the critical temperature. In particular, when the Q-lattice background is dual to a deep insulating phase, the condensation would never occur for some small charges. Furthermore, we numerically compute the optical conductivity in the superconducting regime. It turns out that the presence of Q-lattice does not remove the pole in the imaginary part of the conductivity, ensuring the appearance of a delta function in the real part. We also evaluate the gap which in general depends on the charge of the scalar field as well as the Q-lattice parameters. Nevertheless, when the charge of the scalar field is relatively large and approaches the probe limit, the gap becomes universal with ω g ≃ 9 T c which is consistent with the result for conventional holographic superconductors.

  1. Fabrication of high-quality superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions on thin SiN membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Edouard; Jacobson, Brian R.; Hu, Qing

    1993-01-01

    We have successfully fabricated high-quality and high-current density superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junctions on freestanding thin silicon nitride (SIN) membranes. These devices can be used in a novel millimeter-wave and THz receiver system which is made using micromachining. The SIS junctions with planar antennas were fabricated first on a silicon wafer covered with a SiN membrane, the Si wafer underneath was then etched away using an anisotropic KOH etchant. The current-voltage characteristics of the SIS junctions remained unchanged after the whole process, and the junctions and the membrane survived thermal cycling.

  2. McMillan-Rowell Like Oscillations in a Superconductor-InAs/GaSb-Superconductor Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Yu, Wenlong; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Klem, John F.; Pan, Wei

    2015-08-04

    We fabricated a superconductor (Ta)-InAs/GaSb bilayer-superconductor (Ta) junction device that has a long mean free path and can preserve the wavelike properties of particles (electrons and holes) inside the junction. Differential conductance measurements were also carried out at low temperatures in this device, and McMillan-Rowell like oscillations (MROs) were observed. A much larger Fermi velocity, compared to that from Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, was obtained from the frequency of MROs. Possible mechanisms are discussed for this discrepancy.

  3. McMillan-Rowell like oscillations in a superconductor-InAs/GaSb-superconductor junction

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoyan Yu, Wenlong; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Pan, W.

    2015-08-03

    We have fabricated a superconductor (Ta)-InAs/GaSb bilayer-superconductor (Ta) junction device that has a long mean free path and can preserve the wavelike properties of particles (electrons and holes) inside the junction. Differential conductance measurements were carried out at low temperatures in this device, and McMillan-Rowell like oscillations (MROs) were observed. Surprisingly, a much larger Fermi velocity, compared to that from Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, was obtained from the frequency of MROs. Possible mechanisms are discussed for this discrepancy.

  4. McMillan-Rowell like oscillations in a superconductor-InAs/GaSb-superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Yu, Wenlong; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Pan, W.

    2015-08-01

    We have fabricated a superconductor (Ta)-InAs/GaSb bilayer-superconductor (Ta) junction device that has a long mean free path and can preserve the wavelike properties of particles (electrons and holes) inside the junction. Differential conductance measurements were carried out at low temperatures in this device, and McMillan-Rowell like oscillations (MROs) were observed. Surprisingly, a much larger Fermi velocity, compared to that from Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, was obtained from the frequency of MROs. Possible mechanisms are discussed for this discrepancy.

  5. Magnetic excitations in iron chalcogenide superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fujita, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering experiments in iron chalcogenide superconductors are reviewed to make a survey of the magnetic excitations in FeSe, FeSe1−xTex and alkali-metal-doped AxFe2−ySe2 (A = K, Rb, Cs, etc). In FeSe, the intimate relationship between the spin fluctuations and superconductivity can be seen universally for the variations in the off-stoichiometry, the Co-substitution and applied pressure. The isovalent compound FeTe has a magnetic ordering with different wave vector from that of other Fe-based magnetic materials. The transition temperature Tc of FeSe increases with Te substitution in FeSe1−xTex with small x, and decreases in the vicinity of the end member FeTe. The spin fluctuations are drastically modified by the Te substitution. In the vicinity of the end member FeTe, the low-energy part of the spin fluctuation is dominated by the wave vector of the ordered phase of FeTe; however, the reduction of Tc shows that it does not support superconductivity. The presence of same wave vector as that of other Fe-based superconductors in FeSe1−xTex and the observation of the resonance mode demonstrate that FeSe1−xTex belongs to the same group as most of other Fe-based superconductors in the entire range of x, where superconductivity is mediated by the spin fluctuations whose wave vector is the same as the nesting vector between the hole pockets and the electron pockets. On the other hand, the spin fluctuations differ for alkali-metal-doped AxFe2−ySe2 and FeSe or other Fe-based superconductors in their wave vector and strength in the low-energy part, most likely because of the different Fermi surfaces. The resonance mode with different wave vector suggests that AxFe2−ySe2 has an exceptional superconducting symmetry among Fe-based superconductors. PMID:27877515

  6. Magnetic excitations in iron chalcogenide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fujita, Masaki

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering experiments in iron chalcogenide superconductors are reviewed to make a survey of the magnetic excitations in FeSe, FeSe1-x Te x and alkali-metal-doped Ax Fe2-y Se2 (A = K, Rb, Cs, etc). In FeSe, the intimate relationship between the spin fluctuations and superconductivity can be seen universally for the variations in the off-stoichiometry, the Co-substitution and applied pressure. The isovalent compound FeTe has a magnetic ordering with different wave vector from that of other Fe-based magnetic materials. The transition temperature Tc of FeSe increases with Te substitution in FeSe1-x Te x with small x, and decreases in the vicinity of the end member FeTe. The spin fluctuations are drastically modified by the Te substitution. In the vicinity of the end member FeTe, the low-energy part of the spin fluctuation is dominated by the wave vector of the ordered phase of FeTe; however, the reduction of Tc shows that it does not support superconductivity. The presence of same wave vector as that of other Fe-based superconductors in FeSe1-x Te x and the observation of the resonance mode demonstrate that FeSe1-x Te x belongs to the same group as most of other Fe-based superconductors in the entire range of x, where superconductivity is mediated by the spin fluctuations whose wave vector is the same as the nesting vector between the hole pockets and the electron pockets. On the other hand, the spin fluctuations differ for alkali-metal-doped Ax Fe2-y Se2 and FeSe or other Fe-based superconductors in their wave vector and strength in the low-energy part, most likely because of the different Fermi surfaces. The resonance mode with different wave vector suggests that Ax Fe2-y Se2 has an exceptional superconducting symmetry among Fe-based superconductors.

  7. Size effects in the density of states in normal-metal{endash}superconductor and superconductor{endash}normal-metal{endash}superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Blaauboer, M.; Koperdraad, R.T.; Lodder, A.; Lenstra, D.

    1996-08-01

    The quasiparticle local density of states (LDOS) is studied in clean normal-metal{endash}superconductor (NS) and superconductor{endash}normal-metal{endash}superconductor (SNS) junctions with increasing transverse size, from quasi-one-dimensional to three-dimensional. It is shown that finite transverse dimensions are related to pronounced effects in the LDOS, such as fast oscillations superimposed on the quasiparticle interference oscillations (for NS) and additional peaks in the bound state spectrum in the subgap region (for SNS). Also, the validity of the Andreev approximation is discussed. It turns out to be an acceptable approximation in all situations tested. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Hilarionite, Fe{2/3+}(SO4)(AsO4)(OH) · 6H2O, a new supergene mineral from Lavrion, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, I. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Rusakov, V. S.; Belakovsky, D. I.; Turchkova, A. G.; Voudouris, P.; Magganas, A.; Katerinopoulos, A.

    2014-12-01

    A new mineral, hilarionite, ideally Fe{2/3+} (SO4)(AsO4)(OH) · 6H2O, has been found in the Hilarion Mine, Agios Konstantinos, Kamariza, Lavrion district, Attiki Prefecture, Greece. It was formed in the oxidation zone of a sulfide-rich orebody in association with goethite, gypsum, bukovskyite, jarosite, melanterite, chalcanthite, allophane, and azurite. Hilarionite occurs as light green (typically with an olive or grayish tint) to light yellowish green spherulites (up to 1 mm in size) and bunches of prismatic to acicular "individuals" up to 0.5 mm long that are in fact near-parallel or divergent aggregates of very thin, curved fibers up to 0.3 mm long and usually lesser than 2 μm thick. The luster is silky to vitreous. The Mohs' hardness is ca. 2. Hilarionite is ductile, its "individuals" are flexible and inelastic; fracture is uneven or splintery. D(meas) = 2.40(5), D(calc) = 2.486 g/cm3. IR spectrum shows the presence of arsenate and sulfate groups and H2O molecules in significant amounts. The Mössbauer spectrum indicates the presence of Fe3+ at two six-fold coordinated sites and the absence of Fe2+. Hilarionite is optically biaxial (+), α = 1.575(2), γ = 1.64(2), 2 V is large. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, average of 7 point analyses; H2O determined by modified Penfield method) is as follows, wt %: 0.03 MnO, 0.18 CuO, 0.17 ZnO, 33.83 Fe2O3, 0.22 P2O5, 18.92 As2O5, 22.19 SO3, 26.3 H2O, total is 101.82%. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 15 O is: (Fe{1.90/3+}Cu0.01Zn0.01)Σ1.92[(SO4)1.24(AsO4)0.74(PO4)0.01]Σ1.99(OH)1.01 · 6.03H2O. The X-ray powder diffraction data show close structural relationship of hilarionite and kaňkite, Fe{2/3+}(AsO4)2 · 7H2O. Hilarionite is monoclinic, space group C2/ m, Cm or C2, a = 18.53(4), b = 17.43(3), c = 7.56(1) Å, β = 94.06(15)°, V = 2436(3) Å3, Z = 8. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder diffraction pattern ( d, Å- I[ hkl]) are: 12.66-100[110], , 5.00-10[22l], , 4

  9. Spontaneous spinning of a magnet levitating over a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Hirsch, D. J.

    2003-11-01

    A permanent magnet levitating over a superconductor is found to spontaneously spin, overcoming resistance to air friction. We explain the physics behind this remarkable effect: it constitutes a simple heat engine that converts the difference in heat absorbed by different parts of the magnet into mechanical work, through the interaction between the magnet and the superconductor.

  10. Controlled levitation of a large magnet above superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Takamori, T.; Boland, J.J.; Dove, D.B. )

    1990-07-01

    The levitation of a permanent magnet over a type-II superconductor may be modified and controlled by the addition of a variable magnetic field to the magnet-superconductor system. Using this scheme, levitation of a magnet of significantly larger mass was established by the direct interaction of the additonal field with the levitating magnet.

  11. Creating superconductors with high critical temperature using copper fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelin, I. I.

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical studies on fabricating room-temperature superconductors are analyzed. A technique for obtaining such superconductors is proposed, based on results from previous experimental investigations. The described simple fabrication technology uses CuF2 copper fluoride and CuO copper oxide films.

  12. Proceedings of high-T sub c superconductors: Magnetic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.H.; Flom, Y.; Vezzoli, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1988 meeting on High-T{sub c} superconductors. Included are the following papers: Mechanism in high-T{sub c} superconductivity, Analysis of microwave surface resistance in high-T{sub c} superconductors, Patents and superconductivity.

  13. Characterization of composite high temperature superconductors for magnetic bearing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.; Lynds, L.; VanValzah, J.; Eaton, H. . Research Center); Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Basinger, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A study of high temperature superconductor composites for use in magnetic bearings applications is presented. Fabrication and characterization techniques are described. Magnetometry and mechanical force measurements are correlated with a particular emphasis on the role of superconductor particle size. Results are discussed in terms of fundamental limits of Meissner effect levitation. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Peltier effect in the mixed state of high- Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvenov, G. Yu.; Ryazanov, V. V.; Ustinov, A. V.; Huebener, R. P.

    1991-04-01

    The Peltier and Seebeck effects in the mixed state of high- Tc superconductors are proportional to the resistivity due to flux motion. Therefore, both effects also show the broadening of the transition regime characteristic for these superconductors. The origin of the Peltier effect is discussed in detail, and the validity of the Thomson relation is confirmed, as expected.

  15. System and method for quench protection of a superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Xianrui; Sivasubramaniam, Kiruba Haran; Bray, James William; Ryan, David Thomas

    2008-03-11

    A system and method for protecting a superconductor from a quench condition. A quench protection system is provided to protect the superconductor from damage due to a quench condition. The quench protection system comprises a voltage detector operable to detect voltage across the superconductor. The system also comprises a frequency filter coupled to the voltage detector. The frequency filter is operable to couple voltage signals to a control circuit that are representative of a rise in superconductor voltage caused by a quench condition and to block voltage signals that are not. The system is operable to detect whether a quench condition exists in the superconductor based on the voltage signal received via the frequency filter and to initiate a protective action in response.

  16. Status of high temperature superconductor development for accelerator magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirabayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    High temperature superconductors are still under development for various applications. As far as conductors for magnets are concerned, the development has just been started. Small coils wound by silver sheathed Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 oxide conductors have been reported by a few authors. Essential properties of high T(sub c) superconductors like pinning force, coherent length, intergrain coupling, weak link, thermal property, AC loss and mechanical strength are still not sufficiently understandable. In this talk, a review is given with comparison between the present achievement and the final requirement for high T(sub c) superconductors, which could be particularly used in accelerator magnets. Discussions on how to develop high T(sub c) superconductors for accelerator magnets are included with key parameters of essential properties. A proposal of how to make a prototype accelerator magnet with high T(sub c) superconductors with prospect for future development is also given.

  17. Precursor composites for oxygen dispersion hardened silver sheathed superconductor composites

    DOEpatents

    Podtburg, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    An oxide superconductor composite having improved texture and durability. The oxide superconductor composite includes an oxide superconductor phase substantially surrounded with/by a noble metal matrix, the noble metal matrix comprising a metal oxide in an amount effective to form metal oxide domains that increase hardness of the composite. The composite is characterized by a degree of texture at least 10% greater than a comparable oxide superconductor composite lacking metal oxide domains. An oxide superconducting composite may be prepared by oxidizing the precursor composite under conditions effective to form solute metal oxide domains within the silver matrix and to form a precursor oxide in the precursor alloy phase; subjecting the oxidized composite to a softening anneal under conditions effective to relieve stress within the noble metal phase; and converting the oxide precursor into an oxide superconductor.

  18. Precursor composites for oxygen dispersion hardened silver sheathed superconductor composites

    DOEpatents

    Podtburg, E.R.

    1999-06-22

    An oxide superconductor composite having improved texture and durability is disclosed. The oxide superconductor composite includes an oxide superconductor phase substantially surrounded with/by a noble metal matrix, the noble metal matrix comprising a metal oxide in an amount effective to form metal oxide domains that increase hardness of the composite. The composite is characterized by a degree of texture at least 10% greater than a comparable oxide superconductor composite lacking metal oxide domains. An oxide superconducting composite may be prepared by oxidizing the precursor composite under conditions effective to form solute metal oxide domains within the silver matrix and to form a precursor oxide in the precursor alloy phase; subjecting the oxidized composite to a softening anneal under conditions effective to relieve stress within the noble metal phase; and converting the oxide precursor into an oxide superconductor. 1 fig.

  19. Disappearance of nodal gap across the insulator-superconductor transition in a copper-oxide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingying; Meng, Jianqiao; Mou, Daixiang; He, Junfeng; Zhao, Lin; Wu, Yue; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; He, Shaolong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Lee, T K; Zhou, X J

    2013-01-01

    The parent compound of the copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors is a Mott insulator. Superconductivity is realized by doping an appropriate amount of charge carriers. How a Mott insulator transforms into a superconductor is crucial in understanding the unusual physical properties of high-temperature superconductors and the superconductivity mechanism. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on heavily underdoped Bi₂Sr₂-xLaxCuO(₆+δ) system. The electronic structure of the lightly doped samples exhibit a number of characteristics: existence of an energy gap along the nodal direction, d-wave-like anisotropic energy gap along the underlying Fermi surface, and coexistence of a coherence peak and a broad hump in the photoemission spectra. Our results reveal a clear insulator-superconductor transition at a critical doping level of ~0.10 where the nodal energy gap approaches zero, the three-dimensional antiferromagnetic order disappears, and superconductivity starts to emerge. These observations clearly signal a close connection between the nodal gap, antiferromagnetism and superconductivity.

  20. Interface superconductor with gap behaviour like a high-temperature superconductor.

    PubMed

    Richter, C; Boschker, H; Dietsche, W; Fillis-Tsirakis, E; Jany, R; Loder, F; Kourkoutis, L F; Muller, D A; Kirtley, J R; Schneider, C W; Mannhart, J

    2013-10-24

    The physics of the superconducting state in two-dimensional (2D) electron systems is relevant to understanding the high-transition-temperature copper oxide superconductors and for the development of future superconductors based on interface electron systems. But it is not yet understood how fundamental superconducting parameters, such as the spectral density of states, change when these superconducting electron systems are depleted of charge carriers. Here we use tunnel spectroscopy with planar junctions to measure the behaviour of the electronic spectral density of states as a function of carrier density, clarifying this issue experimentally. We chose the conducting LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface as the 2D superconductor, because this electron system can be tuned continuously with an electric gate field. We observed an energy gap of the order of 40 microelectronvolts in the density of states, whose shape is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconducting gap function. In contrast to the dome-shaped dependence of the critical temperature, the gap increases with charge carrier depletion in both the underdoped region and the overdoped region. These results are analogous to the pseudogap behaviour of the high-transition-temperature copper oxide superconductors and imply that the smooth continuation of the superconducting gap into pseudogap-like behaviour could be a general property of 2D superconductivity.

  1. A Double-Decker Levitation Experiment Using a Sandwich of Superconductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Anthony T.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Shows that the mutual repulsion that enables a superconductor to levitate a magnet and a magnet to levitate a superconductor can be combined into a single demonstration. Uses an overhead projector, two pellets of "1-2-3" superconductor, Nd-Fe-B magnets, liquid nitrogen, and paraffin. Offers superconductor preparation, hazards, and disposal…

  2. Method of manufacturing a high temperature superconductor with improved transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Siegel, Richard W.; Askew, Thomas R.

    2001-01-01

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor. A method of preparing a superconductor includes providing a powdered high temperature superconductor and a nanophase paramagnetic material. These components are combined to form a solid compacted mass with the paramagnetic material disposed on the grain boundaries of the polycrystaline high temperature superconductor.

  3. A Double-Decker Levitation Experiment Using a Sandwich of Superconductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Anthony T.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Shows that the mutual repulsion that enables a superconductor to levitate a magnet and a magnet to levitate a superconductor can be combined into a single demonstration. Uses an overhead projector, two pellets of "1-2-3" superconductor, Nd-Fe-B magnets, liquid nitrogen, and paraffin. Offers superconductor preparation, hazards, and disposal…

  4. Raman spectroscopy of the multi-anion mineral mallestigite Pb3Sb(5+)(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)6·3H2O: a mineral of archaeological significance.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Palmer, Sara J; Xi, Yunfei; Tan, Keqin

    2011-12-01

    Some minerals are formed which show poorly defined X-ray diffraction patterns. Vibrational spectroscopy offers one of the few methods for the assessment of the structure of the oxyanions in such minerals. Among this group of minerals is mallestigite with formula Pb(3)Sb(5+)(SO(4))(AsO(4))(OH)(6)·3H(2)O. The objective of this research is to determine the molecular structure of the mineral mallestigite using vibrational spectroscopy. Raman and infrared bands are attributed to the AsO(4)(3-), SO(4)(2-) and water stretching vibrations. Mallestigite is a mineral formed in ancient waste dumps such as occurs at Mallestiger, Carinthia, Austria and as such is a mineral of archaeological significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2015-03-01

    The concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x=0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with the uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x=0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.

  6. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada, John M.

    2014-11-22

    In this study, the concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x = 0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with the uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x = 0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.

  7. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Tranquada, John M.

    2014-11-22

    In this study, the concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x = 0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with themore » uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x = 0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.« less

  8. Nernst effect in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yayu

    This thesis presents a study of the Nernst effect in high temperature superconductors. The vortex Nernst measurements have been carried out on various high Tc cuprates to high magnetic fields. These results provide vital information about the properties and relations of the pseudogap phase and superconducting phase in high Tc superconductors. Our first finding is the existence of vortex-like excitations at temperatures much higher than Tc0, the zero filed transition temperature, in the underdoped cuprates. This result suggests that in the putative normal state of cuprates, although bulk Meissner effect is absent and resistivity looks normal, the amplitude of the Cooper pairing is still sizable. The transition at Tc0 is driven by the loss of long range phase coherence rather than the disappearance of superconducting condensate. The high field Nernst effect offers a reliable way to determine the upper critical field Hc2 of high Tc cuprates and many unusual properties are uncovered. For cuprates with relatively large hole density (x > 0.15), we found that H c2 is almost temperature independent for T < Tc0. This is in strong contrast to the Hc2 - T relation of conventional superconductors. Moreover, using a scaling analysis, we have demonstrated that H c2 increases with decreasing hole density x in this doping range, implying a stronger pairing potential at lower doping. In the severely underdoped regime (x < 0.12), some new features become apparent and they imply that the vortex Nernst signal is comprised of two distinct contributions. The first is from coherent regions with long range phase coherence and relatively low upper critical field, more like the superconducting phase; the second is from phase incoherent regions with much larger field scales, indicative of the pseudogap phase. As temperature rises, the superconducting phase gives weight to the pseudogap phase. Moreover, the upper critical field Hc2 of the superconducting phase scales with the onset

  9. Magnetic refrigeration using flux compression in superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using flux compression in high-temperature superconductors to produce the large time-varying magnetic fields required in a field cycled magnetic refrigerator operating between 20 K and 4 K is presently investigated. This paper describes the refrigerator concept and lists limitations and advantages in comparison with conventional refrigeration techniques. The maximum fields obtainable by flux compression in high-temperature supercoductor materials, as presently prepared, are too low to serve in such a refrigerator. However, reports exist of critical current values that are near usable levels for flux pumps in refrigerator applications.

  10. Quantum oscillations in superconductors in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdikov, Vladimir M.; Gvozdikova, Mariya V.

    2000-07-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm oscillations (ABO) of the free energy, the critical temperature, and the magnetic susceptibility in a stack of hollow mesoscopic cylinders are calculated. It is shown that sinusoidal (in flux) ABO crosses over to the parabolic Little-Parks oscillations (LPO) when the diameter of cylinders exceeds the coherence length. The exponential temperature behaviour of the magnetic susceptibility is like that found in Ag cylinders with thin Nb coating [Czech. J. Physics 46 (1996) 2317]. The formal analogy between oscillations of the free energy in the Aharonov-Bohm system in question and the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations (dHvAO) in layered superconductors is discussed.

  11. Paramagnetic excited vortex states in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Rodolpho Ribeiro; Doria, Mauro M.; Romaguera, Antonio R. de C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider excited vortex states, which are vortex states left inside a superconductor once the external applied magnetic field is switched off and whose energy is lower than of the normal state. We show that this state is paramagnetic and develop here a general method to obtain its Gibbs free energy through conformal mapping. The solution for any number of vortices in any cross-section geometry can be read off from the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. The method is based on the first-order equations used by Abrikosov to discover vortices.

  12. Magnetic pinning in superconductor-ferromagnet multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L. N.; Chudnovsky, E. M.; Maley, M. P.

    2000-05-01

    We argue that superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers of nanoscale period should exhibit strong pinning of vortices by the magnetic domain structure in magnetic fields below the coercive field when ferromagnetic layers exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The estimated maximum magnetic pinning energy for single vortex in such a system is about 100 times larger than the pinning energy by columnar defects. This pinning energy may provide critical currents as high as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} at high temperatures (but not very close to T{sub c}) at least in magnetic fields below 0.1 T. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Conductance Spectra in Graphene-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conductance spectra of a graphene ribbon and graphene-superconductor (G-S) junctions are investigated, using the tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green' function formalism. It is found that the quantized conductance related to graphene' edge-states is robust against perturbations in the model parameters for a graphene monolayer ribbon with the zigzag boundary. With appropriate model parameter of the spin-orbit interaction strength, a new bound state with odd-frequency symmetry is found in the G-S junction. An enhancement in the zero-energy conductance amplitude is followed.

  14. Edge current in a small chiral superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shu-Ichiro; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    We discuss a theoretical description of the edge current in a chiral superconductor. On the basis of the quasiclassical Green function formalism, we derive a useful expression of the chiral edge current which enable us to understand how Cooper pairs contribute to the electric current. We will show that the chiral edge current is carried by the combinations of two Cooper pairs belonging to different pairing symmetries. One Cooper pair belongs to the usual even-frequency pairing symmetry class. However, the other belongs to the odd-frequency symmetry class.

  15. Fermi-liquid theory for unconventional superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sauls, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    Fermi liquid theory is used to generate the Ginzburg-Landau free energy functionals for unconventional superconductors belonging to various representations. The parameters defining the GL functional depend on Fermi surface anisotropy, impurity scattering and the symmetry class of the pairing interaction. As applications the author considers the basic models for the multiple superconducting phases of UPt{sub 3}. An important prediction of the leading order Fermi liquid theory for the two-dimensional representations of the hexagonal symmetry group is that the zero-field equilibrium state exhibits spontaneously broken time-reversal symmetry.

  16. NEW APPROACHES: High temperature superconductors take off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the progress made towards real engineering applications of high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the ten years following the Nobel Prize winning discovery by Bednorz and Müller in August 1986. Examples include HTS wires and tapes for more efficient and powerful electric motors and for increasing the electrical power into the heart of modern cities, HTS permanent magnets for levitation, microwave filters for cellular telephone networks, SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) to monitor foetal heart and brain signals, and a new generation of superfast logic devices based on the flux quantum.

  17. Applications of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The development of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) can be broadly generalized into thin-film electronics, wire applications, and bulk applications. We consider bulk HTSs to include sintered or crystallized forms that do not take the geometry of filaments or tapes, and we discuss major applications for these materials. For the most part applications may be realized with the HTSs cooled to 77 K, and the properties of the bulk HTSs are often already sufficient for commercial use. A non-exhaustive list of applications for bulk HTSs includes trapped field magnets, hysteresis motors, magnetic shielding, current leads, and magnetic bearings. These applications are briefly discussed in this paper.

  18. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  19. Vortex Core Structure in Multilayered Rashba Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Yanase, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We numerically study the electronic structure of a single vortex in two dimensional superconducting bilayer systems within the range of the mean-field theory. The lack of local inversion symmetry in the system is taken into account through the layer dependent Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spatial profiles of the pair potential and the local quasiparticle density of states are calculated in the clean spin-singlet superconductor on the basis of the quasiclassical theory. In particular, we discuss the characteristic core structure in the pair-density wave state, which is spatially modulated exotic superconducting phase in a high magnetic field.

  20. Coulomb blockade in fractional topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghyun; Clarke, David J.; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2017-07-01

    We study charge transport through a floating mesoscopic superconductor coupled to counterpropagating fractional quantum Hall edges at filling fraction ν =2 /3 . We consider a superconducting island with finite charging energy and investigate its effect on transport through the device. We calculate conductance through such a system as a function of temperature and gate voltage applied to the superconducting island. We show that transport is strongly affected by the presence of parafermionic zero modes, leading at zero temperature to a zero-bias conductance quantized in units of ν e2/h independent of the applied gate voltage.

  1. Topological Insulators and Superconductors for Innovative Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-20

    is encapsulated in each Bi2Se3 block. This means that the “bulk” transport in this material is essentially a sum of 2D transport channels through all...superconductors. Preprint at http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.2686v2 (2009). 5. Ran, Y. Weak indices and dislocations in general topological band structures. Preprint at...bottom surfaces are coupled through the bulk [ 25 , 26 ] to form a single effective channel for the phase-coherent transport), and L Φ depends

  2. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  3. Localization of resistive domains in inhomogeneous superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of resistive domains due to the Joule heating in inhomogeneous superconductors with transport currents are studied. The equilibrium of a domain at an inhomogeneity of arbitrary type and with dimensions much smaller than the dimensions of the domain is investigated. It is shown that resistive domains can become localized at inhomogeneities. The temperature distribution in a domain and the current--voltage characteristic of the domain are determined. The stability of localized domains is discussed. It is shown that such domains give rise to a hysteresis in the destruction (recovery) of the superconductivity by the transport current.

  4. Applications of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.

    The development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) can be broadly generalized into thin-film electronics, wire applications, and bulk applications. We consider bulk HTS's to include sintered or crystallized forms that do not take the geometry of filaments or tapes, and we discuss major applications for these materials. For the most part applications may be realized with the HTS's cooled to 77 K, and the properties of the bulk HTS's are often already sufficient for commercial use. A non-exhaustive list of applications for bulk HTS's includes trapped field magnets, hysteresis motors, magnetic shielding, current leads, and magnetic bearings. These applications are briefly discussed in this paper.

  5. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-12-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  6. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterizations on new Fe sulphoarsenate hilarionite (Fe2((III))(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O): Implications for arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of mine area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, LiLe; Dong, Faqin; Frost, Ray L

    2017-01-05

    Hilarionite (Fe2 (SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O) is a new Fe sulphoarsenates mineral, which recently is found in the famous Lavrion ore district, Atliki Prefecture, Greece. The spectroscopic study of hilarionite enriches the data of arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of a mine area. The infrared and Raman means are used to characterize the molecular structure of this mineral. The IR bands at 875 and 905cm(-1) are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of AsO4(3-). The IR bands at 1021, 1086 and 1136cm(-1) correspond to the possible antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of SO4(2-). The Raman bands at 807, 843 and 875cm(-1) clearly show that arsenate components in the mineral structure, which are assigned to the symmetric stretching vibrations (ν1) of AsO4(3-) (807 and 843cm(-1)) and the antisymmetric vibration (ν3) (875cm(-1)). IR bands provide more sulfate information than Raman, which can be used as the basis to distinguish hilarionite from kaňkite. The powder XRD data shows that hilarionite has obvious differences with the mineral structure of kaňkite. The thermoanalysis and SEM-EDX results show that hilarionite has more sulfate than arsenate.

  7. Deuteron NMR study of dynamics and of coexistence of paraelectric and ferroelectric phases in Rb0.90(ND4)0.10D2AsO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.; Howell, Francis L.; Schmidt, V. Hugo

    1993-09-01

    The deuteron glass Rb1-x(ND4)xD2AsO4 (DRADA) is a mixed crystal of RbD2AsO4 (DRDA) and ND4D2AsO4 (DADA). Deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance has been performed on the acid and ammonium deuterons. The crystal studied has an ammonium concentration (x=0.10) that puts it in the coexistence region of the phase diagram. Line-shape measurements of the ammonium deuterons show the coexistence of the ferroelectric (FE) and paraelectric (PE) phases as the temperature is lowered below the ferroelectric-phase-transition temperature Tc. The acid deuteron line shape on the other hand is found to broaden as the temperature is reduced but is unaffected by the ferroelectric transition. Spin-lattice-relaxation measurements have been performed and the activation energies for the relaxation processes have been computed. The relaxation-rate anomaly for acid deuterons in the ferroelectric-transition range indicates a short correlation length for the FE phase in the coexistence region of the phase diagram.

  8. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic characterizations on new Fe sulphoarsenate hilarionite (Fe2(III)(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O): Implications for arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of mine area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; He, LiLe; Dong, Faqin; Frost, Ray L.

    2017-01-01

    Hilarionite (Fe2 (SO4)(AsO4)(OH)·6H2O) is a new Fe sulphoarsenates mineral, which recently is found in the famous Lavrion ore district, Atliki Prefecture, Greece. The spectroscopic study of hilarionite enriches the data of arsenic mineralogy in supergene environment of a mine area. The infrared and Raman means are used to characterize the molecular structure of this mineral. The IR bands at 875 and 905 cm- 1 are assigned to the antisymmetric stretching vibrations of AsO43 -. The IR bands at 1021, 1086 and 1136 cm- 1 correspond to the possible antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of SO42 -. The Raman bands at 807, 843 and 875 cm- 1 clearly show that arsenate components in the mineral structure, which are assigned to the symmetric stretching vibrations (ν1) of AsO43 - (807 and 843 cm- 1) and the antisymmetric vibration (ν3) (875 cm- 1). IR bands provide more sulfate information than Raman, which can be used as the basis to distinguish hilarionite from kaňkite. The powder XRD data shows that hilarionite has obvious differences with the mineral structure of kaňkite. The thermoanalysis and SEM-EDX results show that hilarionite has more sulfate than arsenate.

  9. Flux Pinning Properties and Magnetic Relaxation of Superconducting SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, J. C.; Sun, Y.; Ding, Y.; Yuan, F. F.; Liu, J. T.; Shi, Z. X.; Li, X. W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic Co ion doped SmFeAsO polycrystal was synthesized via solid-state reaction. Resistivity, SEM and magnetic hysteresis loops (MHLs) were measured to investigate magnetic properties of the sample. Critical current densities as well as the flux pinning forces densities were estimated from MHLs. This paper reports for the first time the research of superconducting MHLs as well as magnetic relaxation properties of SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO. Results suggest that: (i) A tail effect in the resistivity measurement together with the rapid decrease in critical current densities at low fields shows the evidence for granularity of the sample; (ii) The asymmetry of the MHLs may be caused by the Bean-Livingstone (BL) surface pinning or granular nature, and none of theoretical models are suitable to the scaling behaviors of flux pinning forces densities; (iii) The anomalous tendency of the temperature dependence of magnetic relaxation rate as well as the effective pinning energy were observed, which may be attributed to the competition between the bulk pinning and the BL surface pinning.

  10. Antiferromagnetic order and spin dynamics in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2015-07-01

    High-transition temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity in the iron pnictides or chalcogenides emerges from the suppression of the static antiferromagnetic order in their parent compounds, similar to copper oxide superconductors. This raises a fundamental question concerning the role of magnetism in the superconductivity of these materials. Neutron scattering, a powerful probe to study the magnetic order and spin dynamics, plays an essential role in determining the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity in high-Tc superconductors. The rapid development of modern neutron time-of-flight spectrometers allows a direct determination of the spin dynamical properties of iron-based superconductors throughout the entire Brillouin zone. In this paper, an overview is presented of the neutron scattering results on iron-based superconductors, focusing on the evolution of spin-excitation spectra as a function of electron and hole doping and isoelectronic substitution. Spin dynamical properties of iron-based superconductors are compared with those of copper oxide and heavy fermion superconductors and the common features of spin excitations in these three families of unconventional superconductors and their relationship with superconductivity are discussed.

  11. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  12. Thermal fluctuations in superconductor/ferromagnet nanostripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasti, U.; Parlato, L.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Taino, T.; Myoren, H.; Sobolewski, Roman; Pepe, G.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal fluctuations in hybrid superconductor/ferromagnetic NbN /NiCu bilayers, as well as in pure superconducting NbN, two-dimensional (2D), nanostripes, have been investigated in order to understand the origin of dark counts in superconducting nanostripes when operated as single-photon detectors in the temperature range from 4.2 to 8 K . In 2D superconductors, the dynamics of vortex motion play a significant role in the formation of a transient normal state, leading to dark-count events in current-biased nanostripes. By introducing a weak ferromagnetic overlayer on top of pure NbN, we managed to control the vortex dynamics, which subsequently enabled us to differentiate between several proposed theoretical models. In particular, a 6 -nm-thick NiCu film grown on top of 8 -nm-thick NbN nanostripes led to an enhanced critical current density in the resulting nanostructure, as well as significantly lowered fluctuation rates, as compared to pure NbN structures, leading to reduced dark counts. The enhancement of pinning in NbN /NiCu bilayers provided evidence that thermal excitations of single vortices (vortex hopping) near the edge of a 2D nanostripe were the dominant mechanism of the observed dark-count transients. On the other hand, in pure NbN the leading source of thermal fluctuations was the current-assisted thermal unbinding of vortex-antivortex pairs.

  13. Percolation effect in thick film superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sali, R.; Harsanyi, G.

    1994-12-31

    A thick film superconductor paste has been developed to study the properties of granulated superconductor materials, to observe the percolation effect and to confirm the theory of the conducting mechanism in the superconducting thick films. This paste was also applied to make a superconducting planar transformer. Due to high T{sub c} and advantageous current density properties the base of the paste was chosen to be of Bi(Pb)SrCaCuO system. For contacts a conventional Ag/Pt paste was used. The critical temperature of the samples were between 110 K and 115 K depending on the printed layer thickness. The critical current density at the boiling temperature of the liquid He- was between 200-300 A/cm{sup 2}. The R(T) and V(I) functions were measured with different parameters. The results of the measurements have confirmed the theory of conducting mechanism in the material. The percolation structure model has been built and described. As an application, a superconducting planar thick film transformer was planned and produced. Ten windings of the transformer were printed on one side of the alumina substrate and one winding was printed on the other side. The coupling between the two sides was possible through the substrate. The samples did not need special drying and firing parameters. After the preparation, the properties of the transformer were measured. The efficiency and the losses were determined. Finally, some fundamental advantages and problems of the process were discussed.

  14. Charge of a quasiparticle in a superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ronen, Yuval; Cohen, Yonatan; Kang, Jung-Hyun; Haim, Arbel; Rieder, Maria-Theresa; Heiblum, Moty; Mahalu, Diana; Shtrikman, Hadas

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear charge transport in superconductor–insulator–superconductor (SIS) Josephson junctions has a unique signature in the shuttled charge quantum between the two superconductors. In the zero-bias limit Cooper pairs, each with twice the electron charge, carry the Josephson current. An applied bias VSD leads to multiple Andreev reflections (MAR), which in the limit of weak tunneling probability should lead to integer multiples of the electron charge ne traversing the junction, with n integer larger than 2Δ/eVSD and Δ the superconducting order parameter. Exceptionally, just above the gap eVSD ≥ 2Δ, with Andreev reflections suppressed, one would expect the current to be carried by partitioned quasiparticles, each with energy-dependent charge, being a superposition of an electron and a hole. Using shot-noise measurements in an SIS junction induced in an InAs nanowire (with noise proportional to the partitioned charge), we first observed quantization of the partitioned charge q = e*/e=n, with n = 1–4, thus reaffirming the validity of our charge interpretation. Concentrating next on the bias region eVSD∼2Δ, we found a reproducible and clear dip in the extracted charge to q ∼0.6, which, after excluding other possibilities, we attribute to the partitioned quasiparticle charge. Such dip is supported by numerical simulations of our SIS structure. PMID:26831071

  15. Development of Strengthened Bundle High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Demko, J.A.; Tomsic, M.; Sinha, U.

    1997-12-31

    In the process of developing high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cables, it was found that mechanical strength of the superconducting tape is the most crucial property that needs to be improved. It is also desirable to increase the current carrying capacity of the conductor so that fewer layers are needed to make the kilo-amp class cables required for electric utility usage. A process has been developed by encapsulating a stack of Bi-2223/Ag tapes with a silver or non-silver sheath to form a strengthened bundle superconductor. This process was applied to HTS tapes made by the Continuous Tube Forming and Filling (CTFF) technique pursued by Plastronic Inc. and HTS tapes obtained from other manufacturers. Conductors with a bundle of 2 to 6 HTS tapes have been made. The bundled conductor is greatly strengthened by the non-silver sheath. No superconductor degradation as compared to the sum of the original critical currents of the individual tapes was seen on the finished conductors.

  16. Method for fabrication of high temperature superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Ma, Beihai; Miller, Dean

    2006-03-14

    A layered article of manufacture and a method of manufacturing same is disclosed. A substrate has a biaxially textured MgO crystalline layer having the c-axes thereof inclined with respect to the plane of the substrate deposited thereon. A layer of one or more of YSZ or Y2O3 and then a layer of CeO2 is deposited on the MgO. A crystalline superconductor layer with the c-axes thereof normal to the plane of the substrate is deposited on the CeO2 layer. Deposition of the MgO layer on the substrate is by the inclined substrate deposition method developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Preferably, the MgO has the c-axes thereof inclined with respect to the normal to the substrate in the range of from about 10.degree. to about 40.degree. and YBCO superconductors are used.

  17. Flux Patterns in Type-I Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, Alan T.

    1996-03-01

    When a thin film of a type-I superconductor is placed in a perpendicular magnetic field the demagnetizing fields preclude the establishment of the Meissner phase; instead, the sample accommodates the magnetic field by breaking up into a complex pattern of normal and superconducting domains, known as the intermediate state. Understanding the morphology of these nonequilibrium patterns requires understanding the dynamics of the normal/superconducting interfaces,(H. Frahm, S. Ullah, and A. T. Dorsey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66), 3067 (1991); A. T. Dorsey, Ann. Phys. 233, 248 (1994). as well as the energetics of the interfaces. In this talk I will review a recently developed current loop model of the intermediate state,(R. E. Goldstein, D. P. Jackson, A. T. Dorsey, preprint (1995).) in which the patterns are shown to arise from the competition between the long-range Biot-Savart interactions of the Meissner currents encircling each superconducting region and the superconducting-normal surface energy. The energy of a set of such domains is expressed as a nonlocal functional of the positions of their boundaries, and a simple gradient flow in configuration space yields branched flux domains qualitatively like those seen in experiment. Connections with pattern formation in magnetic fluids, amphiphilic monolayers, and type-II superconductors will be discussed.

  18. Demagnetisation by crossed fields in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Archie; Baghdadi, Mehdi; Patel, Anup; Zhou, Difan; Huang, K. Y.; Shi, Yunhua; Coombs, Tim

    2017-03-01

    A study has been made of the decay of the trapped magnetisation in superconductors when exposed to a crossed field. Numerical results have been compared with the theory of Brandt and Mikitik (2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 027002) which solves the problem for a thin strip superconductor. FlexPDE with the A formulation and COMSOL with the H formulation were both used. Simulations of a strip with a cross section aspect ratio of 20 showed good agreement with theory both for the case of a transverse field larger than the transverse penetration field and for one smaller. In the latter case the magnetisation saturates as predicted, however the simulations show a slow decay after many cycles. In the case of stacked YBCO tapes the movement of flux lines is very small and the effects of the reversible motion were investigated. This can decrease the decay initially for very thin decoupled tapes, but cause a steady decay after very large numbers of cycles. Simulations on stacked strips showed that the decay constant increased approximately linearly with the number of strips. When combined with the theory for one tape this can explain the very slow decay observed in previous experiments. Experimental results were qualitatively in agreement with theory and simulations but showed some discrepancies. However there are a number of differences between the experimental situation and theory so good agreement is not expected.

  19. Neutron scattering of iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shamoto, S; Wakimoto, S; Kodama, K.; Ishikado, Motoyuki; Christianson, Andrew D; Lumsden, Mark D; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Arai, Masatoshi; Kakurai, K.; Esaka, Fumitaka; Iyo, Akira; Kito, Hijiri; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy spin excitations have been studied on polycrystalline LaFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} samples by inelastic neutron scattering. The Q-integrated dynamical spin susceptibility {chi}{double_prime}({omega}) of the superconducting samples is found to be comparable to that of the magnetically ordered parent sample. On the other hand, {chi}{double_prime}({omega}) almost vanishes at x = 0.158, where the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} is suppressed to 7 K. In addition, {chi}{double_prime}({omega}) in optimally doped LaFeAsO{sub 0.918}F{sub 0.082} with T{sub c} = 29 K exhibits a spin resonance mode. The peak energy, E{sub res}, when scaled by k{sub B}T{sub c} is similar to the value of about 4.7 reported in other high-T{sub c} iron-based superconductors. This result suggests that there is intimate relationship between the dynamical spin susceptibility and high-T{sub c} superconductivity in iron-based superconductors, and is consistent with a nesting condition between Fermi surfaces at the {Gamma} and M points.

  20. Insulation system for high temperature superconductor cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. C.; Haight, A. E.; Bromberg, L.; Kano, K.

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale superconductor applications, like fusion magnets, require high-current capacity conductors to limit system inductance and peak operating voltage. Several cabling methods using high temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes are presently under development so that the unique high-field, high-current-density, high operating temperature characteristics of 2nd generation REBCO coated conductors can be utilized in next generation fusion devices. Large-scale magnets are generally epoxy impregnated to support and distribute electromagnetic stresses through the magnet volume. However, the present generation of REBCO coated conductors are prone to delamination when tensile stresses are applied to the broad surface of REBCO tapes; this can occur during epoxy cure, cooldown, or magnet energization. We present the development of an insulation system which effectively insulates HTS cabled conductors at high withstand voltage while simultaneously preventing the intrusion of the epoxy impregnant into the cable, eliminating degradation due to conductor delamination. We also describe a small-scale coil test program to demonstrate the cable insulation scheme and present preliminary test results.

  1. Fluctuations and disorder in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Gianni; Ivlev, Boris

    1994-02-01

    The special material parameters of the oxide superconductors lead to a dramatic increase of the importance of thermal and quantum fluctuations. The latter can be quantified by the Ginzburg number Gi = {[T c/ }/{H 2c(0)ɛξ 3(0)] 2/2 } and the quantum resistance Q u = {(e 2/ }/{h̵}) {[ϱN/}/{ɛξ(0)]}, where H c(0), ξ(0), and ϱ N denote the thermodynamic critical field, the planar coherence length (both linearly extrapolated to zero), and the planar normal resistivity. ɛ 2 = {m/}/{M} < 1 is the anisotropy parameter. In the high Tc's (specifically for YBCO) we have Gi ≅ 10 -2 and Qu ≅ 1 and thus these parameters are by orders of magnitude larger than in conventional low- Tc superconductors. The large fluctuations lead to the melting of the vortex lattice well below the upper critical field line. The inclusion of quenched disorder as parametrized by the critical current density ratio jc/ jo drastically changes the dynamic behavior of the vortex system ( jc and jo denote the depinning and depairing current densities). We discuss the equilibrium statistical mechanics (vortex lattice melting) and the dynamic behavior (creep) of the vortex system with a particular emphasis on the role of quantum fluctuations.

  2. Magnetic Excitations from Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, J. M.; Woo, H.; Perring, T. G.; Goka, H.; Gu, G. D.; Xu, G.; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.

    2004-03-01

    While it is generally believed that antiferromagnetic spin excitations play a significant role in the pairing mechanism of copper-oxide superconductors [1], the nature of the magnetic excitations themselves remains a matter of controversy. Recent measurements of the dispersion of spin excitations in superconducting YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x (YBCO) have attracted much attention. Here we present the results of comprehensive inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the momentum- and energy-dependent spectra of the magnetic fluctuations in La_0.875Ba_0.125CuO_4, which exhibits inhomogeneous, charge-stripe order. We will also point out universalities and differences in the magnetic excitation spectra compared to related charge-stripe ordered compounds and high-temperature superconductors, including La_2-xSr_xNiO4 and YBCO. JMT, HW, GDG and GX are supported by U.S. Department of Energy contract # DE-AC02-98CH1088 [1] J. Orenstein and A. J. Millis, Science 288, 468 (2000).

  3. Mesoscopic superconductor as a ballistic quantum switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2002-01-03

    Several key experiments have revealed a rich variety of vortex structures in mesoscopic superconductors in which only a few quanta of magnetic flux are trapped: these structures are polygon-like vortex 'molecules' and multi-quanta giant vortices. Ginzburg-Landau calculations confirmed second-order phase transitions between the giant vortex states and stable molecule-like configurations. Here we study theoretically the electronic structure and the related phase-coherent transport properties of such mesoscopic superconductor systems. The quasiparticle excitations in the vortices form coherent quantum-mechanical states that offer the possibility of controlling the phase-coherent transport through the sample by changing the number of trapped flux quanta and their configuration. The sample conductance measured in the direction of the applied magnetic field is determined by the transparency of multi-vortex configurations, which form a set of quantum channels. The transmission coefficient for each channel is controlled by multiple Andreev reflections within the vortex cores and at the sample edge. These interference phenomena result in a stepwise behaviour of the conductance as a function of the applied magnetic field, and we propose to exploit this effect to realize a vortex-based quantum switch where the magnetic field plays the role of the gate voltage.

  4. Kohn anomaly in phonon driven superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, M. P.; Chaudhury, R.

    2014-08-01

    Anomalies often occur in the physical world. Sometimes quite unexpectedly anomalies may give rise to new insight to an unrecognized phenomenon. In this paper we shall discuss about Kohn anomaly in a conventional phonon-driven superconductor by using a microscopic approach. Recently Aynajian et al.'s experiment showed a striking feature; the energy of phonon at a particular wave-vector is almost exactly equal to twice the energy of the superconducting gap. Although the phonon mechanism of superconductivity is well known for many conventional superconductors, as has been noted by Scalapino, the new experimental results reveal a genuine puzzle. In our recent work we have presented a detailed theoretical analysis with the help of microscopic calculations to unravel this mystery. We probe this aspect of phonon behaviour from the properties of electronic polarizability function in the superconducting phase of a Fermi liquid metal, leading to the appearance of a Kohn singularity. We show the crossover to the standard Kohn anomaly of the normal phase for temperatures above the transition temperature. Our analysis provides a nearly complete explanation of this new experimentally discovered phenomenon. This report is a shorter version of our recent work in JPCM.

  5. Advantageous grain boundaries in iron pnictide superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Katase, Takayoshi; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Tsukamoto, Akira; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Tanabe, Keiichi; Hosono, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    High critical temperature superconductors have zero power consumption and could be used to produce ideal electric power lines. The principal obstacle in fabricating superconducting wires and tapes is grain boundaries—the misalignment of crystalline orientations at grain boundaries, which is unavoidable for polycrystals, largely deteriorates critical current density. Here we report that high critical temperature iron pnictide superconductors have advantages over cuprates with respect to these grain boundary issues. The transport properties through well-defined bicrystal grain boundary junctions with various misorientation angles (θGB) were systematically investigated for cobalt-doped BaFe2As2 (BaFe2As2:Co) epitaxial films fabricated on bicrystal substrates. The critical current density through bicrystal grain boundary (JcBGB) remained high (>1 MA cm−2) and nearly constant up to a critical angle θc of ∼9°, which is substantially larger than the θc of ∼5° for YBa2Cu3O7–δ. Even at θGB>θc, the decay of JcBGB was much slower than that of YBa2Cu3O7–δ. PMID:21811238

  6. Flux-flow resistivity of three high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.S.; Evans, D.J.; Hull, J.R.; Seol, S.Y.

    1996-10-01

    Results of experiments on flux-flow resistivity (the relationship of voltage to current) of three high-temperature superconductors are described. The superconductors are a melt-cast BSCCO 2212 rod, a single filament BSCCO powder-in-tube (PIT) tape, and a multifilament PIT tape. The flux-flow resistivity of these superconductors was measured at three temperatures: 77 K (saturated liquid nitrogen), 87 K (saturated liquid argon), and 67 K (subcooled liquid nitrogen). Implications of the present results for practical applications are discussed.

  7. Silver sheathing of high-T sub c superconductor wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.T. ); Risch, G.A.; Poeppel, R.B.; Goretta, K.C. ); Danyluk, S. ); Herro, H.M. ); McGuire, M.J. Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL )

    1990-10-01

    The properties of Ag sheaths on high-temperature super-conductors are examined. Ag is chemically compatible with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Bi-based superconductors can be safely coprocessed with them. Residual stresses created by differences in thermal expansion coefficients are favorable and can be controlled by proper annealing. Although Ag forms low-resistance contact with high-temperature superconductors, it is not certain that effective cryogenic stabilization by Ag can occur at 77 K and above. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Observability of surface currents in p-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakurskiy, S. V.; Klenov, N. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu; Golubov, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    A general approach is formulated to describe spontaneous surface current distribution in a chiral p-wave superconductor. We use the quasiclassical Eilenberger formalism in the Ricatti parametrization to describe various types of the superconductor surface, including arbitrary roughness and metallic behavior of the surface layer. We calculate angle resolved distributions of the spontaneous surface currents and formulate the conditions of their observability. We argue that local measurements of these currents by muon spin rotation technique may provide an information on the underlying pairing symmetry in the bulk superconductor.

  9. Spectroscopy of magnetic excitations in magnetic superconductors using vortex motion.

    PubMed

    Bulaevskii, L N; Hruska, M; Maley, M P

    2005-11-11

    In magnetic superconductors a moving vortex lattice is accompanied by an ac magnetic field which leads to the generation of spin waves. At resonance conditions the dynamics of vortices in magnetic superconductors changes drastically, resulting in strong peaks in the dc I-V characteristics at voltages at which the washboard frequency of the vortex lattice matches the spin wave frequency omegaS(g), where g are the reciprocal vortex lattice vectors. We show that if the washboard frequency lies above the magnetic gap, measurement of the I-V characteristics provides a new method to obtain information on the spectrum of magnetic excitations in borocarbides and cuprate layered magnetic superconductors.

  10. The use of high temperature superconductors to levitate lunar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Beth A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to assist in the construction of a lunar telescope mirror model by conducting research on composite materials and other lightweight, rigid materials, and by determining how much weight can be levitated by available superconductors. It is believed that with the construction of four magnets suspended over four bulk superconductors (or vice versa), there should be no problems lifting a model mirror and stabilizing it at different positions. It may be necessary to increase the size and quality of the superconductors and/or magnets in order to achieve this.

  11. Superconductor disorder and strong proximity coupling effects in Majorana nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, William; Sau, Jay

    Topological superconductivity induced by proximity to a conventional superconductor is only robust against moderate disorder in the parent superconductor, and only when the energy scale of the interface coupling is much smaller than the parent gap. I present detailed calculations of proximity-induced superconductivity in one-dimensional, spin-orbit coupled, semiconductor nanowires when the parent superconductor disorder and interface coupling exceed this limit. This parameter regime is characterized by unique spectroscopic signatures on both sides of the external field tuned topological phase transition. This work is supported by LPS-MPO-CMTC, Microsoft Q, and JQI-NSF-PFC.

  12. Rotordynamic Characterization of a Hybrid Superconductor Magnet Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Ki B.; Xia, Zule H.; Cooley, Rodger; Fowler, Clay; Chu, Wei-Kan

    1996-01-01

    A hybrid superconductor magnet bearing uses magnetic forces between permanent magnets to provide lift and the flux pinning force between permanent magnets and superconductors to stabilize against instabilities intrinsic to the magnetic force between magnets. We have constructed a prototype kinetic energy storage system, using a hybrid superconductor magnet bearing to support a 42 lb. flywheel at the center. With five sensors on the periphery of the flywheel, we have monitored the position and attitude of the flywheel during its spin down. The results indicate low values of stiffnesses for the bearing. The implications of this and other consequences will be discussed.

  13. Electric field induced by vortex transport in percolation superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, Yu. I.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of fractal normal phase clusters on the electric field induced by the flow and creep of the magnetic flux in percolation superconductors has been considered. The current-voltage characteristics of such superconductors with allowance for the influence of the fractal dimension of cluster boundaries and the pinning barrier height have been obtained. The vortex dynamics in percolation superconductors with a fractal cluster structure in a viscous flow of the magnetic flux, the Anderson-Kim creep, and the collective flux creep has been analyzed. It has been discovered that the fractality of normal phase clusters reduces the electric field arising in the initial stage of the resistive transition.

  14. Study of the glass formation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William F.; Rolin, Terry

    1992-01-01

    A number of compositions of ceramic oxide high T(sub c) superconductors were elevated for their glass formation ability by means of rapid thermal analysis during quenching, optical, and electron microscopy of the quenched samples, and with subsequent DSC measurements. Correlations between experimental measurements and the methodical composition changes identified the formulations of superconductors that can easily form glass. The superconducting material was first formed as a glass; then, with subsequent devitrification, it was formed into a bulk crystalline superconductor by a series of processing methods.

  15. Effects of chiral helimagnets on vortex states in a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Saoto; Kato, Masaru; Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated vortex states in chiral helimagnet/superconductor bilayer systems under an applied external magnetic field {H}{appl}, using the Ginzburg-Landau equations. Effect of the chiral helimagnet on the superconductor is taken as a magnetic field {H}{CHM}, which is perpendicular to the superconductor and oscillates spatially. For {H}{appl}=0 and weak {H}{CHM}, there appear pairs of up- and down-vortices. Increasing {H}{appl}, down-vortices gradually disappear, and the number of up-vortices increases in the large magnetic field region. Then, up-vortices form parallel, triangular, or square structures.

  16. Microwave surface resistance of superconductors with grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawatari, Yasunori

    2005-02-01

    Microwave-field distribution, dissipation, and surface impedance are theoretically investigated for superconductors with laminar grain boundaries (GBs). In the present theory we adopt the two-fluid model for intragrain transport current in the grains, and the Josephson-junction model for intergrain tunneling current across GBs. Results show that the surface resistance Rs nonmonotonically depends on the critical current density Jcj at GB junctions, and Rs for superconductors with GBs can be smaller than the surface resistance Rs0 for ideal homogeneous superconductors without GBs.

  17. Superconductor-semiconductor hybrid devices, circuits, and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.; Hilbert, C.; Gibson, D.A.; Ghoshal, U.; Smith, L.N.

    1989-08-01

    The discovery of superconductors whose critical temperatures are above liquid nitrogen temperature has prompted considerable interest in hybrid superconducting-semiconducting electronics applications. This paper reviews the efforts to hybridize these technologies. Some of these efforts have already been demonstrated on a laboratory scale; others are at present just theoretical proposals. Hybridization is possible on the system, circuit, and device levels. The authors review studies of the applications of superconductors for interconnecting semiconductor systems and combining semiconductor and superconductor devices to enhance the performance of both digital and analog systems. Novel circuit combinations of superconducting and semiconducting devices are mentioned, as are proposal to combine these materials on the device level.

  18. Andreev spectra and subgap bound states in multiband superconductors.

    PubMed

    Golubov, A A; Brinkman, A; Tanaka, Yukio; Mazin, I I; Dolgov, O V

    2009-08-14

    A theory of Andreev conductance is formulated for junctions involving normal metals (N) and multiband superconductors (S) and applied to the case of superconductors with nodeless extended s(+/-)-wave order parameter symmetry, as possibly realized in the recently discovered ferropnictides. We find qualitative differences from tunneling into s-wave or d-wave superconductors that may help to identify such a state. First, interband interference leads to a suppression of Andreev reflection in the case of a highly transparent N/S interface and to a current deficit in the tunneling regime. Second, surface bound states may appear, both at zero and at nonzero energies.

  19. Andreev Reflection Study of the Superconductor Mo3Sb7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, V. M.; Rybaltchenko, L. F.; Khristenko, E. V.; Ishchenko, L. A.; Bukowski, Z.; Troć, R.

    2008-07-01

    The point-contact Andreev-reflection measurements on the new paramagnetic superconductor Mo3Sb7 were carried out. It was found that the order parameter Δ is strongly anisotropic varying over a very wide range depending on the contact orientation when the maximum Δmax exceeds at least 40 times the minimum Δmin in spite of the invariable Tc that cannot be typical of conventional superconductors. For these and other reasons we suggest that Mo3Sb7 is not a trivial BCS (s-wave) superconductor but rather has some unconventional pairing symmetry.

  20. Effects of electron irradiation on high temperature superconductors and contacts to high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caton, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of a new class of ceramic superconductors with transition temperatures above liquid nitrogen has opened the doors for exciting space applications. Energy storage, pointing maneuvers, magnetic shielding, and sensitive detection of electromagnetic radiation are some of the longer term possible applications. One near term application involves low electrical resistance, high thermal resistance connections between a detector operating at approximatly or equal to 4 and the electronics operating at approximatly or equal to 77 K. The new high temperature superconductors could accomplish this providing the necessary electrical connections to the ground plane while isolating the system thermally, thus prolonging the life of the mission. With such possibilities it is clearly of value to study the effects of radiation that would be experienced during a typical space mission. In this work we focused specifically on the effects of the electron radiation environment.

  1. Symmetry-Enforced Line Nodes in Unconventional Superconductors [Nodal-Line Superconductors and Band-Sticking

    DOE PAGES

    Micklitz, T.; Norman, M. R.

    2017-05-18

    We classify line nodes in superconductors with strong spin-orbit interactions and time-reversal symmetry, where the latter may include nonprimitive translations in the magnetic Brillouin zone to account for coexistence with antiferromagnetic order. We find four possible combinations of irreducible representations of the order parameter on high-symmetry planes, two of which allow for line nodes in pseudospin-triplet pairs and two that exclude conventional fully gapped pseudospin-singlet pairs. We show that the former can only be realized in the presence of band-sticking degeneracies, and we verify their topological stability using arguments based on Clifford algebra extensions. Lastly, our classification exhausts all possiblemore » symmetry protected line nodes in the presence of spin-orbit coupling and a (generalized) time-reversal symmetry. Implications for existing nonsymmorphic and antiferromagnetic superconductors are discussed.« less

  2. Observation of giant supercurrent states in a superconductor-InAs/GaSb-superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Yu, Wenlong; Jiang, Zhigang; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Pan, W.; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    We report observations of the proximity effect induced giant supercurrent states in an InAs/GaSb bilayer system that is sandwiched between two superconducting tantalum electrodes to form a superconductor-InAs/GaSb-superconductor junction. Electron transport results show that the supercurrent states can be preserved in a surprisingly large temperature-magnetic field (T-H) parameter space. In addition, the evolution of differential resistance in T and H reveals an interesting superconducting gap structure. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Statistical correlation for a three-terminal normal-metal superconductor superconductor hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Jian

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the particles in a beam of bosons obeying Bose-Einstein statistics tend to cluster (bunching effect), while the particles in a degenerate beam of fermions obeying Fermi-Dirac statistics expel each other (antibunching effect). Here we investigate the statistical correlation effect for a three-terminal normal-metal superconductor superconductor hybrid mesoscopic system. By using a nonequilibrium Green’s-function technique, we obtain a positive cross correlation when the external voltage is smaller than the gap energy, which demonstrates bosonic behavior. In the larger voltage limit, the cross correlation becomes negative due to the contribution of the quasiparticles. At large voltages, the oscillation between fermionic and bosonic behavior of cross correlation is also observed in the strong-coupling regime as one changes the position of the resonant levels.

  4. Superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor Josephson junction: From the dirty to the clean limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugach, N. G.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Goldobin, E.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2011-10-01

    The proximity effect and the Josephson current in a superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor junction are investigated within the framework of the quasiclassical Eilenberger equations. This investigation allows us to compare the dirty and the clean limits, to investigate an arbitrary impurity scattering, and to determine the applicability limits of the Usadel equations for such structures. The role of different types of the FS interface is analyzed. It is shown that the decay length ξ1 and the spatial oscillation period 2πξ2 of the Eilenberger function may exhibit a nonmonotonic dependence on the properties of the ferromagnetic layer such as exchange field or electron mean-free path. The results of our calculations are applied to the interpretation of experimentally observed dependencies of the critical current density on the ferromagnet thickness in Josephson junctions containing a Ni layer with an arbitrary scattering.

  5. Absorption of heat into a superconductor-normal metal-superconductor junction from a fluctuating environment.

    PubMed

    Voutilainen, J; Virtanen, P; Heikkilä, T T

    2012-08-10

    We study a diffusive superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor junction in an environment with intrinsic incoherent fluctuations which couple to the junction through an electromagnetic field. When the temperature of the junction differs from that of the environment, this coupling leads to an energy transfer between the two systems, taking the junction out of equilibrium. We describe this effect in the linear response regime and show that the change in the supercurrent induced by this coupling leads to qualitative changes in the current-phase relation and, for a certain range of parameters, an increase in the critical current of the junction. In addition to normal metals, similar effects can be expected also in other conducting weak links.

  6. Low-voltage current noise in long quantum superconductor/insulator/normal-metal/insulator/superconductor junctions.

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N. B.; Galperin, Y. M.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Helsinki Univ. Tech.; L.D. Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Univ. Oslo; A.F. Ioffe Physico-Tech. Inst. of Russian Academy of Sciences

    2007-01-01

    The current noise in long superconductor/insulator/normal-metal/insulator/superconductor junctions at low temperatures is sensitive to the population of the subgap states, which is far from equilibrium even at low bias voltages. A nonequilibrium distribution is established due to an interplay between voltage-driven interlevel Landau-Zener transitions and intralevel inelastic relaxation. The Fano factor (the ratio of the zero-frequency noise to the dc current) is enhanced drastically, being proportional to the number of times which a particle flies along the Andreev trajectory before it escapes from the level due to inelastic scattering. For weak Landau-Zener transitions, the enhancement is even larger due to a smaller dc current.

  7. Compact terahertz passive spectrometer with wideband superconductor-insulator-superconductor mixer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, K; Kohjiro, S; Yamada, T; Shimizu, N; Wakatsuki, A

    2012-02-01

    We developed a compact terahertz (THz) spectrometer with a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer, aiming to realize a portable and highly sensitive spectrometer to detect dangerous gases at disaster sites. The receiver cryostat which incorporates the SIS mixer and a small cryocooler except for a helium compressor has a weight of 27 kg and dimensions of 200 mm × 270 mm × 690 mm. In spite of the small cooling capacity of the cryocooler, the SIS mixer is successfully cooled lower than 4 K, and the temperature variation is suppressed for the sensitive measurement. By adopting a frequency sweeping system using photonic local oscillator, we demonstrated a spectroscopic measurement of CH(3)CN gas in 0.2-0.5 THz range.

  8. Experiments on non-equilibrium superconductor-normal metal-superconductor Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosser, Michael S.

    By controlling the distribution function within the normal metal of a superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction, one can reverse the supercurrent-phase relation in the normal wire, creating a pi-junction. This manipulation is done by injecting normal quasiparticle current into the wire, via one or more leads attached at the middle of the junction. Two experiments evolve from this concept. First, in a sample of four reservoirs, two normal and two superconducting, all connected by a wire cross of normal metal, one may inject current either antisymmetrically (AS) or symmetrically (S). In the AS case, current is injected into one normal lead and extracted from the other, creating normal current flow that does not interact with the supercurrent except at the junction. In the S case, current is injected into both normal leads and extracted from the superconductors. Theory predicts that, in the absence of electron energy relaxation in the normal part of the junction, these two situations should result in identical behavior of the Josephson junction. However, due to Joule heating, the S case shows a slightly larger maximum pi-current than the AS case. The second experiment considers a more subtle effect resulting from normal current being injected symmetrically into a SNS Josephson junction. One side of the SNS junction has both normal current and supercurrent flowing in the same direction while the other side has opposing current flows. This situation creates an effective energy gradient across the SNS junction that can appear in the distribution function of the normal wire. Using superconductor/insulator/normal metal tunnelling spectroscopy, it is possible to extract these changes to the distribution function.

  9. A novel heat engine for magnetizing superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, T. A.; Hong, Z.; Zhu, X.; Krabbes, G.

    2008-03-01

    The potential of bulk melt-processed YBCO single domains to trap significant magnetic fields (Tomita and Murakami 2003 Nature 421 517-20 Fuchs et al 2000 Appl. Phys. Lett. 76 2107-9) at cryogenic temperatures makes them particularly attractive for a variety of engineering applications including superconducting magnets, magnetic bearings and motors (Coombs et al 1999 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 9 968-71 Coombs et al 2005 IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 15 2312-5). It has already been shown that large fields can be obtained in single domain samples at 77 K. A range of possible applications exist in the design of high power density electric motors (Jiang et al 2006 Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 1164-8). Before such devices can be created a major problem needs to be overcome. Even though all of these devices use a superconductor in the role of a permanent magnet and even though the superconductor can trap potentially huge magnetic fields (greater than 10 T) the problem is how to induce the magnetic fields. There are four possible known methods: (1) cooling in field; (2) zero field cooling, followed by slowly applied field; (3) pulse magnetization; (4) flux pumping. Any of these methods could be used to magnetize the superconductor and this may be done either in situ or ex situ. Ideally the superconductors are magnetized in situ. There are several reasons for this: first, if the superconductors should become demagnetized through (i) flux creep, (ii) repeatedly applied perpendicular fields (Vanderbemden et al 2007 Phys. Rev. B 75 (17)) or (iii) by loss of cooling then they may be re-magnetized without the need to disassemble the machine; secondly, there are difficulties with handling very strongly magnetized material at cryogenic temperatures when assembling the machine; thirdly, ex situ methods would require the machine to be assembled both cold and pre-magnetized and would offer significant design difficulties. Until room temperature superconductors can be prepared, the

  10. Large Tunable Thermophase in Superconductor – Quantum Dot – Superconductor Josephson Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kleeorin, Yaakov; Meir, Yigal; Giazotto, Francesco; Dubi, Yonatan

    2016-01-01

    In spite of extended efforts, detecting thermoelectric effects in superconductors has proven to be a challenging task, due to the inherent superconducting particle-hole symmetry. Here we present a theoretical study of an experimentally attainable Superconductor – Quantum Dot – Superconductor (SC-QD-SC) Josephson Junction. Using Keldysh Green’s functions we derive the exact thermo-phase and thermal response of the junction, and demonstrate that such a junction has highly tunable thermoelectric properties and a significant thermal response. The origin of these effects is the QD energy level placed between the SCs, which breaks particle-hole symmetry in a gradual manner, allowing, in the presence of a temperature gradient, for gate controlled appearance of a superconducting thermo-phase. This thermo-phase increases up to a maximal value of ±π/2 after which thermovoltage is expected to develop. Our calculations are performed in realistic parameter regimes, and we suggest an experimental setup which could be used to verify our predictions. PMID:27734919

  11. Superconductor-graphene-superconductor Josephson junction in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Haiwen; Song, Juntao; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X. C.

    2017-07-01

    Using a nonequilibrium-Green-function method, we numerically studied the transport properties of a superconductor-graphene-superconductor Josephson junction hybrid system in the quantum Hall regime. Our numerical calculations show that there are two interference patterns of the critical current due to the unique band structure of graphene. One is caused by the usual intraband Andreev retroreflection process, and the other one is caused by the interband specular Andreev reflection process. In the Andreev retroreflection regime, chiral Andreev edge states are formed and a distinct supercurrent can be observed. The critical current displays an AB oscillation behavior and the period is approximately 2 Φ0=h /e . As for the specular Andreev refection process, the reflected holes are bent back to the reverse direction of the incident electrons and the supercurrent flows along both edges. It is similar to a superconductor ring Josephson junction and the period is Φ0=h /2 e . However, the critical current for the specular Andreev reflection process is very small and is unlikely to be observable in an experiment. Thus, we conclude that our numerical calculations are inconsistent to the experimental findings by Amet et al. [Science 352, 966 (2016), 10.1126/science.aad6203].

  12. Josephson current in a normal-metal nanowire coupled to a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisu, Hiromi; Lu, Bo; Taguchi, Katsuhisa; Golubov, Alexander A.; Tanaka, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    We consider a superconducting nanowire proximity coupled to a superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor (S/F/S) junction, where the magnetization penetrates into a superconducting segment in a nanowire decaying as ˜exp[-∣n/∣ ξ ] , where n is the site index and the ξ is the decay length. We tune chemical potential and spin-orbit coupling so that the topological superconducting regime hosting the Majorana fermion is realized for long ξ . We find that when ξ becomes shorter, zero energy state at the interface between a superconductor and a ferromagnet splits into two states at nonzero energy. Accordingly, the behavior of the Josephson current is drastically changed due to this "zero mode-nonzero mode crossover." By tuning the model parameters, we find an almost second-harmonic current-phase relation sin2 φ , where φ is the phase difference of the junction. Based on the analysis of Andreev bound state (ABS), we clarify that the current-phase relation is determined by coupling of the states within the energy gap. We find that the emergence of crossing points of ABS is a key ingredient to generate sin2 φ dependence in the current-phase relation. We further study both the energy and φ dependence of pair amplitudes in the ferromagnetic region. For large ξ , an odd-frequency spin-triplet s -wave component is dominant. The magnitude of the odd-frequency pair amplitude is enhanced at the energy level of ABS.

  13. Characterizing long-term radon concentration changes in a geothermal area for correlation with volcanic earthquakes and reservoir temperatures: A case study from Mt. Aso, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize in detail the temporal changes in Rn (radon-222) concentration in soil gases near fumaroles and clarify its correlation with volcanic earthquakes and temperatures in two geothermal reservoirs. Mt. Aso crater in southwest Japan, which has two reservoirs on its western side estimated by magnetotelluric survey to be at about 2 km in depth, was selected for this study. For the long-term survey, the α scintillation counter method was used weekly for 12.5 years at the three hot springs within a 2-km range. Rn concentrations were calculated using the CRAS method, a calculation method that considers radioactive equilibrium or nonequilibrium state of the soil gas. Rn concentrations generally showed similar fluctuation patterns among the sites. CRAS was used as a new indicator for evaluating the age of the soil gas. This age corresponds to the elapsed time determined from the generation of Rn based on the measurement of the numbers of atoms of Rn and its daughter 218Po at the start of measurement. In comparing the Rn data with the history of earthquakes in the Aso caldera, volcanic seismicity was identified as a major controlling factor in the sudden increase and decrease in Rn concentration as a function of age. For more precise detections of change, Rn concentrations were measured continuously at one site by pumping soil gas from a borehole and using an ionization chamber over 2.5 years. Five chemical components (He, H2, N2, CH4, and CO2) were then measured by gas chromatography at 1-week intervals. Because Rn concentrations are affected strongly by atmospheric temperatures, the residual components were obtained by subtracting the trend of the components from the original data. Chemical component data were used to estimate the temperature and pressure in the reservoir at the site; temperatures ranged from 229 to 280 °C, (average 265 °C, average pressure 80 MPa). Residual Rn concentrations showed a clear correlation with

  14. Pristine and intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard A.

    2015-07-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are quasi-two-dimensional layered compounds that exhibit strongly competing effects of charge-density wave (CDW) formation and superconductivity (SC). The weak van der Waals interlayer bonding between hexagonal layers of octahedral or trigonal prismatic TMD building blocks allows many polytypes to form. In the single layer 1 T polytype materials, one or more CDW states can form, but the pristine TMDs are not superconducting. The 2 H polytypes have two or more Fermi surfaces and saddle bands, allowing for dual orderings, which can be coexisting CDW and SC orderings, two SC gaps as in MgB2, two CDW gaps, and possibly even pseudogaps above the onset TCDW s of CDW orderings. Higher order polytypes allow for multiple CDW gaps and at least one superconducting gap. The CDW transitions TCDW s usually greatly exceed the superconducting transitions at their low Tc values, their orbital order parameters (OPs) are generally highly anisotropic and can even contain nodes, and the SC OPs can be greatly affected by their simultaneous presence. The properties of the CDWs ubiquitously seen in TMDs are remarkably similar to those of the pseudogaps seen in the high-Tc cuprates. In 2H-NbSe2, for example, the CDW renders its general s-wave SC OP orbital symmetry to be highly anisotropic and strongly reduces its Josephson coupling strength (IcRn) with the conventional SC, Pb. Hence, the pristine TMDs are highly "unconventional" in comparison with Pb, but are much more "conventional" than are the ferromagnetic superconductors such as URhGe. Applied pressure and intercalation generally suppress the TMD CDWs, allowing for enhanced SC formation, even in the 1 T polytype materials. The misfit intercalation compound (LaSe)1.14(NbSe2) and many 2 H -TMDs intercalated with organic Lewis base molecules, such as TaS2(pyridine)1/2, have completely incoherent c-axis transport, dimensional-crossover effects, and behave as stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions

  15. Electromagnetic properties of impure superconductors with pair-breaking processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, František; Hlubina, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Recently, a generic model was proposed for the single-particle properties of gapless superconductors with simultaneously present pair-conserving and pair-breaking impurity scatterings (the so-called Dynes superconductors). Here we calculate the optical conductivity of the Dynes superconductors. Our approach is applicable for all disorder strengths from the clean limit up to the dirty limit and for all relative ratios of the two types of scattering; nevertheless, the complexity of our description is equivalent to that of the widely used Mattis-Bardeen theory. We identify two optical fingerprints of the Dynes superconductors: (i) the presence of two absorption edges and (ii) finite absorption at vanishing frequencies even at the lowest temperatures. We demonstrate that the recent anomalous optical data on thin MoN films can be reasonably fitted by our theory.

  16. Factors affecting characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Three major factors affect the characterization of bulk high-temperature superconductors in terms of their levitation properties during interaction with permanent magnets. First, the appropriate parameter for the permanent magnet is internal magnetization, not the value of the magnetic field measured at the magnet`s surface. Second, although levitation force grows with superconductor thickness and surface area, for a given permanent magnet size, comparison of levitation force between samples is meaningful when minimum values are assigned to the superconductor size parameters. Finally, the effect of force creep must be considered when time-averaging the force measurements. In addition to levitational force, the coefficient of friction of a levitated rotating permanent magnet may be used to characterize the superconductor.

  17. The Discovery of a Class of High-Temperature Superconductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, K. Alex; Bednorz, J. Georg

    1987-01-01

    Describes the new class of oxide superconductors, the importance of these materials, and the concepts that led to its discovery. Summarizes the discovery itself and its early confirmation. Discusses the observation of a superconductive glass state in percolative samples. (TW)

  18. Thermodynamic Study of Energy Dissipation in Adiabatic Superconductor Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Because of its extremely high energy efficiency, adiabatic superconductor logic is one of the most promising candidates for the realization of a practical reversible computer. In a previous study, we proposed a logically and physically reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconductor logic, and numerically demonstrated reversible computing. In the numerical calculation, we assumed that the average energy dissipation at finite temperature corresponds to that at zero temperature. However, how the phase difference of a Josephson junction in adiabatic superconductor logic behaves at finite temperature is not yet well understood, and whether thermal noise can induce a nonadiabatic state change remains unclear. In the present study, we investigate energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic at finite temperature through numerical analyses using the Monte Carlo method. We investigate the average and standard deviation of the energy dissipation through both numerical calculation and analytical estimation. Finally, we discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for adiabatic switching operations.

  19. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1992-02-09

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  20. Proceedings of the physics and chemistry of oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Iye, Y.; Yasuoka, H.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the physics and chemistry of oxide superconductors. Topics covered include: materials; electronic states; spectroscopy; lattice properties; pressure effects; carrier dynamics; doping effects; spin dynamics; magnetism; strong correlation, and superconducting properties.

  1. The Discovery of a Class of High-Temperature Superconductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, K. Alex; Bednorz, J. Georg

    1987-01-01

    Describes the new class of oxide superconductors, the importance of these materials, and the concepts that led to its discovery. Summarizes the discovery itself and its early confirmation. Discusses the observation of a superconductive glass state in percolative samples. (TW)

  2. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1992-02-09

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  3. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1992-02-01

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  4. Chiral CP2 skyrmions in three-band superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, Julien; Carlström, Johan; Babaev, Egor; Speight, Martin

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that under certain conditions, three-component superconductors (and, in particular, three-band systems) allow stable topological defects different from vortices. We demonstrate the existence of these excitations, characterized by a CP2 topological invariant, in models for three-component superconductors with broken time-reversal symmetry. We term these topological defects “chiral GL(3) skyrmions,” where “chiral” refers to the fact that due to broken time-reversal symmetry, these defects come in inequivalent left- and right-handed versions. In certain cases, these objects are energetically cheaper than vortices and should be induced by an applied magnetic field. In other situations, these skyrmions are metastable states, which can be produced by a quench. Observation of these defects can signal broken time-reversal symmetry in three-band superconductors or in Josephson-coupled bilayers of s± and s-wave superconductors.

  5. Superconductivity in nonclassical superconductors as a periodical (oscillating) redox reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kostikova, G.P.; Korol`kov, D.V.; Kostikov, Yu.P.

    1995-10-20

    Comparison of the properties of high-temperature superconductors with those of chemical systems where a periodical (oscillating) redox reaction is realized suggests that the high-temperature superconducting of nonclassical superconductors (in particular, ternary oxides) results from activation of a periodical redox reaction within a single compounds containing heterovalent forms of each of two dissimilar elements. In this redox reaction, reversible converison of the corresponding heterovalent forms occur. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U.; Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments.

  7. Characteristics of an electromagnetic levitation system using a bulk superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Senba, A.; Kitahara, H.; Ohsaki, H.; Masada, E.

    1996-09-01

    It is beneficial to apply a high-Tc bulk superconductor as a large flux source to an electromagnetic levitation system, which needs large amounts of levitation force. The authors made an attractive-type electromagnetic levitation system using a hybrid magnet that mainly consisted of bulk superconductor and control coils to confirm the principle of the levitation, and obtained characteristics of its system by both experiment and numerical analysis with magnetic circuit calculation. This is applicable to maglev transportation systems.

  8. Inhomogeneities in single crystals of cuprate oxide superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorjani, K.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Adrian, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    The next stage in the evolution of experimental research on the high temperature superconductors will require high quality single crystals and epitaxially grown crystalline films. However, inhomogeneities and other defects are not uncommon in single crystals of cuprate oxide superconductors, so a corollary requirement will be a reliable method for judging the quality of these materials. The application of magnetically modulated resistance methods in this task is briefly described and illustrated.

  9. On the electrodynamics of Josephson effect in anisotropic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Specificities of Josephson effect electrodynamics in anisotropic superconductors are of considerable interest for the study of high temperature superconductors with strongly anisotropic layered structure. In this paper the authors give the calculation for the tunnel Josephson contact of an isolated vortex, the law of dispersion of its low-amplitude oscillations, the critical field H/sub cl/ for the penetration of magnetic flux, and the maximum current across a rectangular contact.

  10. Holographic superconductor developed in BTZ black hole background with backreactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqi; Pan, Qiyuan; Wang, Bin

    2011-08-01

    We develop a holographic superconductor in BTZ black hole background with backreactions. We investigate the influence of the backreaction on the condensation of the scalar hair and the dynamics of perturbation in the background spacetime. When the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound is approached, we argue that only one of two possible operators can reflect the real property of the condensation in the holographic superconductor. This argument is supported by the investigation in dynamics.

  11. Meissner effect in diffusive normal metal/superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takehito; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexander; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2005-10-01

    Meissner effect in the diffusive normal metal/insulator/s-wave superconductor junctions is studied in the presence of the magnetic impurities for various situations, where we have used the Usadel equation with Nazarov’s generalized boundary condition. It is shown that the susceptibility of the diffusive normal metal for s-wave superconductor is almost independent of the height of the insulating barrier at the interface.

  12. Current fluctuations in unconventional superconductor junctions with impurity scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tamura, Shun; Tanaka, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    The order parameter of bulk two-dimensional superconductors is classified as nodal if it vanishes for a direction in momentum space, or gapful if it does not. Each class can be topologically nontrivial if Andreev bound states are formed at the edges of the superconductor. Nonmagnetic impurities in the superconductor affect the formation of Andreev bound states and can drastically change the tunneling spectra for small voltages. Here, we investigate the mean current and its fluctuations for two-dimensional tunnel junctions between normal-metal and unconventional superconductors by solving the quasiclassical Eilenberger equation self-consistently, including the presence of nonmagnetic impurities in the superconductor. As the impurity strength increases, we find that superconductivity is suppressed for almost all order parameters since (i) at zero applied bias, the effective transferred charge calculated from the noise-current ratio tends to the electron charge e , and (ii) for finite bias, the current-voltage characteristics follows that of a normal-state junction. There are notable exceptions to this trend. First, gapful nontrivial (chiral) superconductors are very robust against impurity scattering due to the linear dispersion relation of their surface Andreev bound states. Second, for nodal nontrivial superconductors, only px-wave pairing is almost immune to the presence of impurities due to the emergence of odd-frequency s -wave Cooper pairs near the interface. Due to their anisotropic dependence on the wave vector, impurity scattering is an effective pair-breaking mechanism for the remaining nodal superconductors. All these behaviors are neatly captured by the noise-current ratio, providing a useful guide to find experimental signatures for unconventional superconductivity.

  13. Correction of magnetization sextupole and decapole in a 5 centimeter bore SSC dipole using passive superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    Higher multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor in four and five centimeter bore Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) superconducting dipole magnets have been observed. The use of passive superconductor to correct out the magnetization sextupole has been demonstrated on two dipoles built by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This reports shows how passive correction can be applied to the five centimeter SSC dipoles to remove sextupole and decapole caused by magnetization of the dipole superconductor. Two passive superconductor corrector options will be presented. The change in magnetization sextupole and decapole due to flux creep decay of the superconductor during injection can be partially compensated for using the passive superconductor. 9 refs; 5 figs.

  14. System and method for quench and over-current protection of superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Xianrui; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon; Sivasubramaniam, Kiruba Haran; Bray, James William; Ryan, David Thomas; Fogarty, James Michael; Steinbach, Albert Eugene

    2005-05-31

    A system and method for protecting a superconductor. The system may comprise a current sensor operable to detect a current flowing through the superconductor. The system may comprise a coolant temperature sensor operable to detect the temperature of a cryogenic coolant used to cool the superconductor to a superconductive state. The control circuit is operable to estimate the superconductor temperature based on the current flow and the coolant temperature. The system may also be operable to compare the estimated superconductor temperature to at least one threshold temperature and to initiate a corrective action when the superconductor temperature exceeds the at least one threshold temperature.

  15. Raman Scattering in HIGH-Tc Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Christian; Cardona, Manuel

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * Theory * Light scattering by phonons * Electronic scattering * Instrumentation * VIBRATIONAL ANALYSIS AND LATTICE DYNAMICS * Optical Modes of RBa2Cu3O7-δ * Symmetry analysis of the ěc{k} = 0 modes * Lattice dynamical calculation for RBa2Cu3O7 and RBa2Cu3O6 * The Bismuth and Thallium Compounds * The Zurich Superconductors * EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON RBa2Cu3O7-δ * Raman Scattering by Phonons * Single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-δ * Ceramic materials, impurity phases, and thin films * Oxygen deficiency * Isotope effect * Electronic scattering and the gap problem * Scattering by magnons * Bismuth and CuO2-Based Materials: Single-Crystal Spectra and Phonon Assignments * Thallium and CuO2 Based Materials * The Zurich Oxides * BRIEF COMPARISON WITH IR DATA * CONSEQUENCES CONCERNING THE MECHANISM OF HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND CONCLUSIONS * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  16. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III. (Editor); Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1991-01-01

    One of the areas concerned itself with the investigation of the phenomena involved in formulating and making in the laboratory new and better superconductor material with enhanced values of critical current and temperature. Of special interest were the chemistry, physical processes, and environment required to attain these enhanced desirable characteristics. The other area concerned itself with producing high temperature superconducting thin films by pulsed laser deposition techniques. Such films are potentially very useful in the detection of very low power signals. To perform this research high vacuum is required. In the course of this effort, older vacuum chambers were maintained and used. In addition, a new facility is being brought on line. This latter activity has been replete with the usual problems of bringing a new facility into service. Some of the problems are covered in the main body of this report.

  17. Magneto-optical imaging of exotic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Beek, C. J.; Losco, J.; Konczykowski, M.; Pari, P.; Shibauchi, T.; Shishido, H.; Matsuda, Y.

    2009-02-01

    We have constructed a novel compact cryostat for optical measurements at temperatures below 2 K. The desktop cryostat, small enough to be placed under the objective of a standard commercial polarized light microscope, functions in a single shot mode, with a five hour autonomy at 1.5 K. Central to its conception are four charcoal pumps for adsorption and desorption of He contained in a closed circuit, and novel thermal switches allowing for thermalization of the pumps and of the two 1 K pots. The latter are connected to the 1" diameter sample holder through braids. Sample access is immediate, through the simple removal of the optical windows. In this contribution, we shall present first results on magneto-optical imaging of flux penetration in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5.

  18. Underdoped superconducting cuprates as topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan-Ming; Xiang, Tao; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2014-09-01

    Superconductivity in copper oxide (cuprate) high-transition-temperature superconductors follows from the chemical doping of an antiferromagnetic insulating state. The consensus that the wavefunction of the superconducting carrier, the Cooper pair, has dx2-y2 symmetry has long been reached. This pairing symmetry implies the existence of nodes in the superconducting energy gap. Recently, a series of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments have revealed that deeply underdoped cuprates exhibit a particle-hole symmetric superconducting-like energy gap at the momentum-space locations where the dx2-y2 gap nodes are expected. Here we discuss the possibility that this phenomenon is caused by a fully gapped topological superconducting state that coexists with the antiferromagnetic order. If experimentally confirmed, this result will completely change our view of how exactly the high-temperature superconductivity state evolves from the insulating antiferromagnet.

  19. Method for forming ceramic materials, including superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Baney, R.H.; Bergstrom, D.F.; Justice, B.H.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a method for forming high temperature superconductors of the general formula Ln{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub (7 {minus} {ital d})}, Ln (7 {minus} d), where Ln is selected from the group consisting of yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), holmium (Ho), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), and lutetium (Lu), and d is less than .5. The method comprises forming a solution by dissolving compatible, pyrolyzable compounds of Ln, Ba and Cu in at least one organic solvent in a molar ratio of approximately 1:2:3, at least one of the pyrolyzable compounds being an iodide salt of one of the metals; evaporating the solvent to form a residue of the pyrolyzable compounds; pyrolyzing the residue in an oxygen containing environment to convert them to oxides.

  20. High temperature superconductors for magnetic suspension applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Cooley, R. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Chu, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) hold the promise for applications in magnetic levitation bearings, vibration damping, and torque coupling. Traditional magnetic suspension systems require active feedback and vibration controls in which power consumption and low frequency vibration are among the major engineering concerns. HTS materials have been demonstrated to be an enabling approach towards such problems due to their flux trapping properties. In our laboratory at TCSUH, we have been conducting a series of experiments to explore various mechanical applications using HTS. We have constructed a 30 lb. model flywheel levitated by a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB). We are also developing a levitated and vibration-dampled platform for high precision instrumentation. These applications would be ideal for space usages where ambient temperature is adequate for HTS to operate properly under greatly reduced cryogenic requirements. We will give a general overview of these potential applications and discuss the operating principles of the HTS devices we have developed.