Science.gov

Sample records for nebula photo-dissociation region

  1. Evolution of PAHs in PhotoDissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM). Observations have shown that the characteristics of PAHs (sizes, abundances) vary in PhotoDissociation Regions (PDRs), likely reflecting processing by the strong UV radiation field. We propose to measure the variation of the PAH size and abundance as a function of the physical conditions in the PDRs associated with the larger Orion Nebula and the reflection nebula, NGC 2023. These two nebulae have been extensively studied and the physical conditions (incident radiation field and density) have been well characterized and are known to vary with position. We will image these nebulae in the 3.3 and 11.2 micron PAH features using FLITECAM and FORCAST. The large field of view and the good sensitivity of these two instruments make this program unique to SOFIA. Both bands are CH modes (stretching and out-of-plane bending) and originate in neutral PAHs. The ratio of these two bands is a good measure of the size of the emitting PAHs. In this way, we can trace the variation in the PAH size. Combining the SOFIA data with Spitzer/IRAC and Herschel/PACS data, we can determine the integrated intensity of the PAH bands relative to the dust emission, which is a direct measure of the PAH-to-dust ratio. We can then relate the PAH size and abundance to the local physical conditions, and determine the role of top-down chemistry in the chemical composition of PDRs.

  2. [C II] 158 μm and [N II] 205 μm emission from IC 342. Disentangling the emission from ionized and photo-dissociated regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röllig, M.; Simon, R.; Güsten, R.; Stutzki, J.; Israel, F. P.; Jacobs, K.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Atomic fine-structure line emission is a major cooling process in the interstellar medium (ISM). In particular the [C II] 158 μm line is one of the dominant cooling lines in photon-dominated regions (PDRs). However, it is not confined to PDRs but can also originate from the ionized gas closely surrounding young massive stars. The proportion of the [C II] emission from H II regions relative to that from PDRs can vary significantly. Aims: We investigate the question of how much of the [C II] emission in the nucleus of the nearby spiral galaxy IC 342 is contributed by PDRs and by the ionized gas. We examine the spatial variations of starburst/PDR activity and study the correlation of the [C II] line with the [N II] 205 μm emission line coming exclusively from the H II regions. Methods: We present small maps of [C II] 158 μm and [N II] 205 μm lines recently observed with the GREAT receiver on board SOFIA. We present different methods to utilize the superior spatial and spectral resolution of our new data to infer information on how the gas kinematics in the nuclear region influence the observed line profiles. In particular we present a super-resolution method to derive how unresolved, kinematically correlated structures in the beam contribute to the observed line shapes. Results: We find that the emission coming from the ionized gas shows a kinematic component in addition to the general Doppler signature of the molecular gas. We interpret this as the signature of two bi-polar lobes of ionized gas expanding out of the galactic plane. We then show how this requires an adaptation of our understanding of the geometrical structure of the nucleus of IC 342. Examining the starburst activity we find ratios I( [C II] ) /I(12CO(1-0)) between 400 and 1800 in energy units. Applying predictions from numerical models of H II and PDR regions to derive the contribution from the ionized phase to the total [C II] emission we find that 35-90% of the observed [C II] intensity

  3. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  4. Stability of Small Grains in HII Regions and Reflection Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Gauthier, T. N., III; Cawlfield, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed IRAS data to assess the relative amounts of small and large grains in HII regions and reflection nebulae. Our most important finding is that no evidence for small grain destruction is seen in reflection nebulae, even for [high] values of the radiation energy density at which significant grain destruction apparently occurs in HII regions. This suggests that it is not only the total radiant energy density but also the energy per photon which determines the stability of small grains in astrophysical environments.

  5. High dispersion observations of selected regions in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeshaar, G. O.; Harvel, C. A.; Mallama, A. D.; Perry, P. M.; Thompson, R. W.; Turnrose, B.

    High resolution spectral observations were made of several regions of the Orion Nebula near theta (2) Ori A using the IUE. The positions were selected using a moderate spatial resolution map from a previous low dispersion IUE survery of this section of the nebula. With the SWP and LWR cameras, 28 pectra were obtained of the bright bar, three Taylor-Munch cloudlets, and several surrounding locations. Emission lines of He, C, N, O, Mg, and Si allow a characterization of these cloudlets and of the gas in and around the bar. Small aperture observations provide radial velocity information for the ultraviolet emission of these features. These data show ionization variations from region to region and are suggestive of stellar wind interactions between the cloudlets and theta(2) Ori A.

  6. The Extended Region Around the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows NGC 3242, a planetary nebula frequently referred to as 'Jupiter's Ghost.'

    The unfortunate name of 'planetary nebula' for this class of celestial object is a historical legacy credited to William Herschel during the 18th century a time when telescopes where small and objects like these, at least the central region, looked very similar to gas-giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter. In fact, NGC 3242 has no relation to Jupiter or any other planet.

    Telescopes and their detectors have dramatically improved over the past few centuries. Our understanding of what planetary nebulae truly are has improved accordingly.

    When stars with a mass similar to our sun approach the end of their lives by exhausting supplies of hydrogen and helium fuel in their cores, they swell up into cool red-giant stars. In a last gasp before death, they expel the layers of gas in their outer atmosphere. This exposes the core of the dying star, a dense hot ball of carbon and oxygen called a white dwarf. The white dwarf is so hot that it shines very brightly in the ultraviolet. The ultraviolet light from the white dwarf, in turn, ionizes the gaseous material expelled by the star causing it to glow. A planetary nebula is really the death of a low-mass star.

    Although low-mass stars like our sun live for billions of years, planetary nebulae only last for about ten thousand years. As the central white dwarf quickly cools and the ultraviolet light dwindles, the surrounding gas also cools and fades.

    In this image of NGC 3242 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the extended region around the planetary nebula is shown in dramatic detail. The small circular white and blue area at the center of the image is the well-known portion of the famous planetary nebula. The precise origin and composition of the extended wispy white features is not known for certain. It is most likely material ejected during the star's red

  7. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  8. The Eagle Nebula: a spectral template for star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Boulanger, Francois; Carey, Sean; Compiegne, Mathieu; Dwek, Eli; Habart, Emilie; Indebetouw, Remy; Montmerle, Thierry; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    IRAC and MIPS have revealed spectacular images of massive star forming regions in the Galaxy. These vivid illustrations of the interaction between the stars, through their winds and radiation, and their environment, made of gas and dust, still needs to be explained. The large scale picture of layered shells of gas components, is affected by the small scale interaction of stars with the clumpy medium that surrounds them. To understand spatial variations of physical conditions and dust properties on small scales, spectroscopic imaging observations are required on a nearby object. The iconic Eagle Nebula (M16) is one of the nearest and most observed star forming region of our Galaxy and as such, is a well suited template to obtain this missing data set. We thus propose a complete spectral map of the Eagle Nebula (M16) with the IRS/Long Low module (15-38 microns) and MIPS/SED mode (55-95 microns). Analysis of the dust emission, spectral features and continuum, and of the H2 and fine-structure gas lines within our models will provide us with constraints on the physical conditions (gas ionization state, pressure, radiation field) and dust properties (temperature, size distribution) at each position within the nebula. Only such a spatially and spectrally complete map will allow us to characterize small scale structure and dust evolution within the global context and understand the impact of small scale structure on the evolution of dusty star forming regions. This project takes advantage of the unique ability of IRS at obtaining sensitive spectral maps covering large areas.

  9. The Eagle Nebula Unveiled by the Spitzer/MIPSGAL Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Carey, S.; Boulanger, F.; Compiegne, M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Shenoy, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of structured diffuse infrared emission in MIPSGAL 24 microns Spitzer images of the Eagle Nebula that fills the wind-blown cavity of this massive star forming region. We combine the Spitzer data with ISO and MSX observations to present a spectral energy distribution of this emission and compare it to that of the famous Pillars of Creation. The SED peaks at 24 microns, tracing hotter dust than within the surrounding photo-dissociation regions (PDRs). We show that the emission from the Pillars of Creation is well reproduced by our dust model of PDRs powered by the NGC 6611 cluster radiation field while the inside shell requires an order of magnitude higher incident energy. We suggest several interpretations to explain such a discrepancy.

  10. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in the region of Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazev, A. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a pilot project of spectroscopic observations for planetary nebulae (PNe) and PN candidates in Canis Major, a sky region where the remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy cannibalized by the Milky Way may be located. The spectra of seven objects were taken while testing the SALT spectrograph (South African Astronomical Observatory). All elemental abundances have been obtained by the T e method, where the electron temperature is calculated directly using the measured weak auroral [OIII] λ 4363 Å and/or [NII] λ 5755 Å lines. We have measured the intensities of all the detected emission lines and determined the abundances of oxygen and several other elements (N, Ne, S, Cl, C, and He) in all PNe. The radial velocity for one PN has been measured for the first time and the velocities for all of the remaining PNe have been measured with a considerably better accuracy than that of the previously published ones. The elemental abundances for three PNe have been calculated for the first time and the accuracies of determining the abundances for three others have been improved. The measured heavy-element abundance ratios (S/O, Ne/O, Cl/O) are in good agreement with their typical values for HII regions. Among the PNe studied, ESO 428-05 is the first and so far the most likely candidate for belonging to the remnants of a possible dwarf galaxy disrupted by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way.

  11. THE SINTERING REGION OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES IN A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2011-07-10

    Icy grain aggregates are formed in the outer region of a protoplanetary nebula. The infall of these aggregates to the central star is due to gas drag, and their temperature increases as the infall proceeds. The icy molecules on the grain move to the neck where the grains get connected through sublimation and condensation of the molecules. This process is called sintering. As the sintering proceeds, the mechanical strength of the neck changes considerably, strongly affecting the collisional evolution of the aggregates. The timescale required for sintering is determined in this study, based on which the region where the sintering proceeds within a prescribed timescale is obtained. It is found that the region covers a substantial fraction of the protoplanetary nebula, and the location of the region depends on the temperature distribution inside the nebula. If the aggregate is stirred up and the temperature of the aggregate increases temporally, the sintering region spreads to the whole nebula.

  12. Deep ROSAT HRI observations of the Orion nebula region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We present results from three deep ROSAT high-resolution imager observations of the Orion Nebula star-forming region. The X-ray images contain over 1500 cataloged stars in a roughly 0.8 sq deg region centered on the Trapezium. In all, 389 distinct X-ray sources have been detected, at least two-thirds of which are associated with a single proper-motion cluster member. X-ray emission is detected from stars of all spectral types, from massive O- and B-type components of the Trapezium to the coolest, low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. In this paper we focus primarily on X-ray emission from the late-type PMS stars. Of the approximately 100 late-type cluster members with measured spectral types, approximately three-fourths have been detected; we have derived X-ray luminosity upper limits for the remaining stars. We found coronal X-ray emission turns on around spectral type F6, with the upper envelope of activity increasing with deceasing effective temperature. When plotted in an X-ray luminosity versus bolometric luminosity diagram, late-type PMS stars lie below a 'saturation' line corresponding to L(sub x)/L(sub bol) approximately 10(exp -3). For approximately solar-mass PMS stars, we find a median X-ray luminosity approximately 1 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s. The late G, K, and M stars exhibit nearly a two order of magnitude spread in X-ray luminosity and in L(sub x)/L(sub bol) at a given effective temperature. Plots of X-ray activity versus v sin i rotational velocity and rotational period appear to show no clear dependence of activity on rotation. However, because only a small fraction of late-type PMS stars in the Orion Nebula have measured v sin i or P(sub rot) and because of uncertainties in L(sub x) and L(sub x)/L(sub bol), we believe the data are not conclusive on this point. Light curves of the detected X-ray sources have revealed at least 10 strong X-ray flares with characteristic rise times greater than or approximately equal to 1 hr and decay times ranging from

  13. Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Reach, William

    2004-09-01

    The Trifid Nebula (M20) is a double-nebula, with a blue reflection nebula above a red ionized nebula, the latter being trisected by dark lanes. This observing program iamges the reflection and ionized nebulae and the dark lanes. The mid-infrared emission will trace the reflection nebula via aromatic hydrocarbon emissions and the dark lane via hot, small grains. Massive protostars have been detected in the dark lanes using submillimeter observations; the new mid-infrared observations will fully sample the lower-mass protostars. The Trifid is one of the youngest known HII regions, and the interaciton of its young, massive O-type star with its surrounding placental material is clearly affecting its ability to form new stars.

  14. A discussion of the H-alpha filamentary nebulae and galactic structure in the Cygnus region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, T. A.; Simonson, S. C., III

    1971-01-01

    From observation of the galactic structure in Cygnus, the system of filamentary nebulae was found to lie at a distance of roughly 1.5 kpc, in the same region as about half the thermal radio sources in Cygnus X, the supernova remnant near gamma Cygni, and the association Cygnus OB2, in the direction of which the X-ray source Cygnus XR-3 is observed. The source of excitation was probably the pulse of radiation from a supernova explosion, as proposed in the case of Gum nebula. However continuing excitation by early stars in the region of Cygnus X cannot be excluded.

  15. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Measurements Using NO2 approaches NO Photo-dissociation Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of instantaneous and mean streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer as well as a boundary layer undergoing laminar-to-turbulent transition were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A molecular tagging velocimetry technique consisting of a NO2 approaches?NO photo-dissociation reaction and two subsequent excitations of NO was used. The measurement of the transitional boundary layer velocity profiles was made downstream of a 1-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip along several lines lying within a streamwise measurement plane normal to the model surface and offset 6-mm from the model centerline. For laminar and transitional boundary layer measurements, the magnitudes of streamwise velocity fluctuations are compared. In the transitional boundary layer the fluctuations were, in general, 2-4 times larger than those in the laminar boundary layer. Of particular interest were fluctuations corresponding to a height of approximately 50% of the laminar boundary layer thickness having a magnitude of nearly 30% of the mean measured velocity. For comparison, the measured fluctuations in the laminar boundary layer were approximately 5% of the mean measured velocity at the same location. For the highest 10% signal-to-noise ratio data, average single-shot uncertainties using a 1 ?Es and 50 ?Es interframe delay were 115 m/s and 3 m/s, respectively. By averaging single-shot measurements of the transitional boundary layer, uncertainties in mean velocity as low as 39 m/s were obtained in the wind tunnel. The wall-normal and streamwise spatial resolutions were 0.14-mm (2 pixel) and 0.82-mm (11 pixels), respectively. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  16. Physical Conditions in Low Ionization Regions of the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, J. A.; Crotts, A.; DuFour, R. J.; Ferland, G. J.; Heathcote, S.; Hester, J. J.; Korista, K. T.; Martin, P. J.; ODell, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    We reexamine the spectroscopic underpinnings of recent claims that low ionization (O(I)) and (Fe(II)) lines from the Orion H(II) region are produced in a region where the iron-carrying grains have been destroyed and the electron density is surprisingly high. Our new HST and CTIO observations show that previous reported detections of(O(I)) lambda 5577 were strongly affected by telluric emission. Our line limits consistent with a moderate density (approx. 10(exp 4)/cu. cm photoionized gas. We show that a previously proposed model of the Orion H(II) region reproduces the observed (O(I)) and (Fe(II)) spectrum. These lines are fully consistent with formation in a moderate density dusty region.

  17. [Determination of total cyanides and sulfides in wastewater using ion chromatography coupled with ultraviolet photo-dissociation/gas-membrane diffusion].

    PubMed

    Lu, Keping

    2015-03-01

    An automated system for the determination of total cyanides and sulfides in wastewater has been developed using flow injection, ultraviolet (UV) photo-dissociation, gas-membrane diffusion, column trapping, ion chromatography separation and pulsed amperometric detection. When the sample was mixed with sulfuric acid and hypophosphorous acid medium containing the appropriate amount of sulfamic acid, ascorbic acid, EDTA and citric acid, metal-cyanide complexes such as Fe (CN)3-(6) can be photo-dissociated by 312 nm UV light, which results in hydrogen cyanide ( HCN) and similarly, sulfides release hydrogen sulfide (H2S). These products were diffused through a 0.45 µm hydrophobic porous polypropylene membrane and were then absorbed in the dilute NaOH solution, concentrated with a Metrosep A PCC 1 HC/4.0 column, separated on an IonPac AS7 column, and finally detected by the pulsed amperometric detector with Ag electrode. The total cyanides and sulfides were good linear in the range of 0.5-1,000 µg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.998 9 and 0.999 7 respectively. The recoveries were 93%-102% and the limits of detection were 0.5 µg/L for total cyanides and 1.0 µg/L for sulfides under the conditions of the sample volume of 100 µL and the signal to noise ratio of 5. The sample throughput of the system was six samples per hour. The results from this new method have been compared with the ones obtained with the standard method, which shows a good agreement.

  18. [Determination of total cyanides and sulfides in wastewater using ion chromatography coupled with ultraviolet photo-dissociation/gas-membrane diffusion].

    PubMed

    Lu, Keping

    2015-03-01

    An automated system for the determination of total cyanides and sulfides in wastewater has been developed using flow injection, ultraviolet (UV) photo-dissociation, gas-membrane diffusion, column trapping, ion chromatography separation and pulsed amperometric detection. When the sample was mixed with sulfuric acid and hypophosphorous acid medium containing the appropriate amount of sulfamic acid, ascorbic acid, EDTA and citric acid, metal-cyanide complexes such as Fe (CN)3-(6) can be photo-dissociated by 312 nm UV light, which results in hydrogen cyanide ( HCN) and similarly, sulfides release hydrogen sulfide (H2S). These products were diffused through a 0.45 µm hydrophobic porous polypropylene membrane and were then absorbed in the dilute NaOH solution, concentrated with a Metrosep A PCC 1 HC/4.0 column, separated on an IonPac AS7 column, and finally detected by the pulsed amperometric detector with Ag electrode. The total cyanides and sulfides were good linear in the range of 0.5-1,000 µg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.998 9 and 0.999 7 respectively. The recoveries were 93%-102% and the limits of detection were 0.5 µg/L for total cyanides and 1.0 µg/L for sulfides under the conditions of the sample volume of 100 µL and the signal to noise ratio of 5. The sample throughput of the system was six samples per hour. The results from this new method have been compared with the ones obtained with the standard method, which shows a good agreement. PMID:26182472

  19. Photometry of the central region of the Andromeda Nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, A.S.; Liutyi, V.M.

    1980-05-01

    The photoelectric U, B, V observations of the central region of M81 made in 166 fields at distances of 54-351 arcsec from the center are used to explain the structure of the central condensation of the galaxy. The surface-brightness isophotes can be fit by ellipses varying in axial ratio from 0.9 to 0.6 and in position angle from 70 to 45 deg. The central condensation may include a bar in the form of a triaxial ellipsoid the nucleus occupies an asymmetric position in this condensation, shifted by 22 arcsec northwest relative to the most distant U isophote at a 368 arcsec. The apparent eccentricity with respect to the outlying isophotes is caused by distribution of dust, as shown by the colorimetric B - V, U - B color-index profiles reflecting the dust in the central condensation of M31.

  20. RESOLVING THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE DISCREPANCIES IN H II REGIONS AND PLANETARY NEBULAE: {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.

    2012-06-20

    The measurement of electron temperatures and metallicities in H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) has-for several decades-presented a problem: results obtained using different techniques disagree. What is worse, they disagree consistently. There have been numerous attempts to explain these discrepancies, but none has provided a satisfactory solution to the problem. In this paper, we explore the possibility that electrons in H II regions and PNe depart from a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium energy distribution. We adopt a '{kappa}-distribution' for the electron energies. Such distributions are widely found in solar system plasmas, where they can be directly measured. This simple assumption is able to explain the temperature and metallicity discrepancies in H II regions and PNe arising from the different measurement techniques. We find that the energy distribution does not need to depart dramatically from an equilibrium distribution. From an examination of data from H II regions and PNe, it appears that {kappa} {approx}> 10 is sufficient to encompass nearly all objects. We argue that the kappa-distribution offers an important new insight into the physics of gaseous nebulae, both in the Milky Way and elsewhere, and one that promises significantly more accurate estimates of temperature and metallicity in these regions.

  1. Denser Sampling of the Rosette Nebula with Faraday Rotation Measurements: Improved Estimates of Magnetic Fields in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Allison H.; Spangler, Steven R.; Sink, Joseph R.; Brown, Shea; Mao, Sui Ann

    2016-04-01

    We report Faraday rotation measurements of 11 extragalactic radio sources with lines of sight through the Rosette Nebula, a prominent H ii region associated with the star cluster NGC 2244. The goal of these measurements is to better determine the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the nebula. We calculate the rotation measure (RM) through two methods, a least-squares fit to χ ({λ }2) and Rotation Measure Synthesis. In conjunction with our results from Savage et al., we find an excess RM due to the shell of the nebula of +40 to +1200 rad m‑2 above a background RM of +147 rad m‑2. We discuss two forms of a simple shell model intended to reproduce the magnitude of the observed RM as a function of distance from the center of the Rosette Nebula. The models represent different physical situations for the magnetic field within the shell of the nebula. The first assumes that there is an increase in the magnetic field strength and plasma density at the outer radius of the H ii region, such as would be produced by a strong magnetohydrodynamic shock wave. The second model assumes that any increase in the RM is due solely to an increase in the density, and the Galactic magnetic field is unaffected in the shell. We employ a Bayesian analysis to compare the two forms of the model. The results of this analysis were inconclusive, although the model without amplification of the interstellar magnetic field is weakly favored.

  2. Following the Water: the Evolution of Ice-forming Regions in the Early Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2006-01-01

    The abundances of water-vapor and water-ice during the first ten million years of the protoplanetary solar nebula are simulated using a new condensation/sublimation model. This study builds on a "snow line" model reported in ApJ 627 L153 (2005); it uses a simple phenomenological model where water vapor molecules evolve from solar atomic abundance and eventually condenses to ice at colder points in the nebula once the water-vapor partial pressure exceeds a value determined by the phase diagram for water. The synthesis of water vapor from elementary species is modeled with a chemical network consisting of about 400 species and 4000 reactions. The evolution of the icy zone (and its relative abundance of solid ice) is traced from a limited region in the early hotter disk to its final state at the time when the gas is expelled and a planetary system begins to form. Possible effects of this dynamic motion on disk chemistry and organic molecule formation are also described.

  3. Fast, Low-ionization Emission Regions of the Planetary Nebula M2-42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, A.; Parker, Q. A.; Steffen, W.

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved observations of the planetary nebula M2-42 (PN G008.2-04.8) obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope have revealed the remarkable features of bipolar collimated jets emerging from its main structure. Velocity-resolved channel maps derived from the [N ii] λ6584 emission line disentangle different morphological components of the nebula. This information is used to develop a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic model, which consists of an equatorial dense torus and a pair of asymmetric bipolar outflows. The expansion velocity of about 20 km s-1 is measured from the spectrum integrated over the main shell. However, the deprojected velocities of the jets are found to be in the range of 80-160 km s-1 with respect to the nebular center. It is found that the mean density of the collimated outflows, 595 ± 125 cm-3, is five times lower than that of the main shell, 3150 cm-3, whereas their singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur abundances are about three times higher than those determined from the dense shell. The results indicate that the features of the collimated jets are typical of fast, low-ionization emission regions.

  4. Revealing spectacular, young and sequential star forming regions of the Trifid Nebula with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2004-12-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of a young HII region, the Trifid Nebula (M20), reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, with recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stars illuminating the surrounding molecular clouds from which they formed and unveiling large scale filamentary dark clouds, which demonstrate a special evolutionary stage of HII regions. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Infrared emission is detected from the central O star complex, including the protoplanetary disks. Large populations of young stars including three dozen protostars (Classes I and 0) and over one hundred Class II pre-main sequence stars, are identified. The protostars are clustered along the filamentary dark lanes on western side of M20, which include the reflection nebula in the northern portion of the Trifid. Class II stars are distributed along the ionization front at the circular shape of HII regions. We suggest that the distribution of the protostars revealed by Spitzer is a result of sequential star formation triggered by the expansion of the young HII region of the Trifid Nebula along the filamentary dark clouds, where the massive stars tend to form in groups. The Spitzer images revealed clusters of protostars within the Class 0 objects, which were previously believed to be "starless" cores. These Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, now uncover the Class 0 protostars in infrared that are powering the SiO and CO outflows. Clusters of protostars are also detected from each of the continuum peaks TC3 and TC4, and some of these sources feature silicate absorption lines in their spectral energy distribution. The driving infrared source of a SiO outflow and submillimeter core TC1, near the exciting O star, is detected within a heated, infrared shell surrounding a dark, cold envelope. Lastly, the images also unveil three infrared sources lying along axis of the photoionized jet HH399 and

  5. Horsehead nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Rising from a sea of dust and gas like a giant seahorse, the Horsehead nebula is one of the most photographed objects in the sky. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a close-up look at this heavenly icon, revealing the cloud's intricate structure. This detailed view of the horse's head is being released to celebrate the orbiting observatory's eleventh anniversary. Produced by the Hubble Heritage Project, this picture is a testament to the Horsehead's popularity. Internet voters selected this object for the orbiting telescope to view.

    The Horsehead, also known as Barnard 33, is a cold, dark cloud of gas and dust, silhouetted against the bright nebula, IC 434. The bright area at the top left edge is a young star still embedded in its nursery of gas and dust. But radiation from this hot star is eroding the stellar nursery. The top of the nebula also is being sculpted by radiation from a massive star located out of Hubble's field of view.

    Only by chance does the nebula roughly resemble the head of a horse. Its unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. Located in the constellation Orion, the Horsehead is a cousin of the famous pillars of dust and gas known as the Eagle nebula. Both tower-like nebulas are cocoons of young stars.

    The Horsehead nebula lies just south of the bright star Zeta Orionis, which is easily visible to the unaided eye as the left-hand star in the line of three that form Orion's Belt. Amateur astronomers often use the Horsehead as a test of their observing skills; it is known as one of the more difficult objects to see visually in an amateur-sized telescope.

    The magnificent extent of the Horsehead is best appreciated in a new wide-field image of the nebula being released today by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, taken by Travis Rector with the National Science Foundation's 0.9 meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ.

    This popular celestial target was the clear

  6. SPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF THE HUYGENS REGION OF THE ORION NEBULA, THE EXTENDED ORION NEBULA, AND M 43: SCATTERED LIGHT SYSTEMATICALLY DISTORTS CONDITIONS DERIVED FROM EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, C. R.; Harris, Jessica A. E-mail: jessica.a.harris@vanderbilt.ed

    2010-10-15

    We report on medium resolution spectrophotometry of the Orion Nebula region, including for the first time the Extended Orion Nebula (EON) and the nearby M 43. The 49 long-slit observations were divided into 99 smaller samples, which have allowed determinations of the amount of extinction, extinction-corrected H{beta} surface brightness, electron temperatures (from [S II], [N II], and [O III]), and electron densities (from [S II] and [Cl III]) throughout much of this complex region. We verify an earlier conclusion from a radio/optical study that beyond about 5' from {theta}{sup 1}Ori C local emission begins to be contaminated by scattering of light from the much brighter central Huygens region of M 42, and this scattered light component becomes dominant at large distances. This contamination means that the derived properties for the outer regions are not accurate. From comparison of the light from the dominant star in M 43 with the continuum of that nebula (which is almost entirely scattered starlight), it is determined that scattered light is enhanced in the blue, which can lead to observed Balmer line ratios that are theoretically impossible and erroneous electron temperatures. This blue scattering of emission lines is important even in the Huygens region because it means that at anything except very high spectroscopic resolution the observed lines are a blend of the original and scattered light, with shorter wavelength lines being artificially enhanced. This can lead to overestimates of the electron temperatures derived from the nebular and auroral line ratios of forbidden lines. This phenomenon is probably applicable to many other H II regions. We have been able to use extinction-insensitive line ratios, the extinction-corrected surface brightness in H{beta}, and the equivalent width of the continuum to create for the first time a three-dimensional model of the entire M 42, EON, and M 43 region. This is an irregular concave blister of ionized gas bounded on the

  7. Observations of the Monoceros SNR/Rosette nebula interacting region with the HEGRA system of IACTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Konopelko, A.; Fonseca, V.; HEGRA Collaboration

    2001-08-01

    The array of 5 imaging atmospheric ˇCerenkov telescopes (IACTs) deployed at La Palma of Canary Island, and operated by the HEGRA (High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy) collaboration, was used for the observations of the interaction region of the Monoceros SNR with the dense Rosette nebula for a total of about 120 hrs and 20 hrs in ONsource and OFF-source mode, respectively. At present the performance of the IACTs array reveals the energy threshold of 500 GeV and the angular resolution of 0.1° for γrays. Using the HEGRA system of IACTs of rather large field of view (4.3 degree in diameter), we have mapped the extended sky region of 2° × 2° associated with the Monoceros SNR/Rosette nebula and which is centered towards the hard spectrum X-ray point source SAX J0635+533. The EGRET unidentified source of diffuse γ-ray emission (3EG J0634+0521) observed in the energy range between 100 MeV 10 GeV, was effectively in the field of view of our present observations. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations and real data we have studied the response of the IACTs array over its 5 · 10-3 str field of view with respect to the cosmic rays and diffuse γ-ray emission. We have derived a normalization function which takes into account the slightly non uniform sensitivity to the γ-ray fluxes (with the variation of 10%) within the angular distance of 1 deg from the joint optical axis of the telescopes' array after the analysis by mean scaled Width. Here we present the result of the data analysis and its physical interpretation. Correspondence to: F. Lucarelli (Fabrizio.Lucarelli@mpi-hd.mpg.de)

  8. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Study of the Orion Nebula Cluster and BN/KL Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon; Feigelson, Eric D.; Broos, Patrick; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Pravdo, Steven H.; Townsley, Leisa; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2000-09-01

    About 1000 X-ray emitting young pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars distributed in mass from ~0.05 Msolar brown dwarfs to a ~50 Msolar O star are detected in an image of the Orion Nebula obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. This is the richest field of sources ever obtained in X-ray astronomy. Individual X-ray luminosities in the Orion Nebula cluster range from the sensitivity limit of 2×1028 ergs s-1 to ~1032 ergs s-1. ACIS sources include 85%-90% of V<20 stars, plus a lower but substantial fraction of deeply embedded stars with extinctions as high as AV~=60. The relationships between X-ray and other PMS stellar properties suggest that X-ray luminosity of lower-mass PMS stars depends more on mass, and possibly stellar rotation, than on bolometric luminosity, as widely reported. In a subsample of 17 unabsorbed stars with mass ~=1 Msolar, X-ray luminosities are constant at a high level around Lx~=2×1030 ergs s-1 for the first ~=2 Myr while descending the convective Hayashi track, but diverge during the 2-10 Myr phase with X-ray emission plummeting in some stars but remaining high in others. This behavior is consistent with the distribution of X-ray luminosities on the zero-age main sequence and with current theories of their rotational history and magnetic dynamos. The sources in the Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinman-Low region of massive star formation are discussed in detail. They include both unabsorbed and embedded low-mass members of the Orion Nebula cluster, the luminous infrared Source n, and a class of sources without optical or infrared counterparts that may be new magnetically active embedded PMS stars. Several X-ray sources are also variable radio emitters, an association often seen in magnetically active PMS stars. Faint X-ray emission is seen close to, but apparently not coincident with, the Becklin-Neugebauer object. Its nature is not clear.

  9. Spectacular Spitzer Images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a Young, Massive-Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, William T.; Lefloch, Bertrand; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2006-06-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, highlighting the nebula's special evolutionary stage. The images feature recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stellar objects, and a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed, and unveil large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. Multiple protostars are detected in the infrared, within the cold dust cores of TC3 and TC4, which were previously defined as Class 0. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~160 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify them into different evolutionary stages. The diagram also revealed a unique group of YSOs that are bright at 24 μm but have the spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8 μm. Despite expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars. The mid-infrared emission of the protostars can be fit by two temperatures of 150 and 400 K; the hot core region is probably optically thin in the mid-infrared regime, and the size of hot core is much smaller than that of the cold envelope. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive star in the TC3 cluster is located at the center of the cluster and at the bottom of the gravitational potential well.

  10. An atlas of emission line fluxes of planetary nebulae in the 1150-3200 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Mccracken, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Emission line fluxes for 28 planetary nebulae are presented. The nebulae were chosen to cover a wide range of excitation classes, apparent diameters, location in the sky, and types of central stars. All objects were observed in the low dispersion mode of the IUE spectrographs, using the large entrance aperture.

  11. THE EMISSION NEBULA Sh 2-174: A RADIO INVESTIGATION OF THE SURROUNDING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, R. R.; Kothes, R.; Geisbuesch, J.; Landecker, T. L.; Reich, W.

    2015-02-01

    Sh 2-174 is believed to be either a planetary nebula (PN) or ionized, ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present in this paper 1420 MHz polarization, 1420 MHz total intensity (Stokes-I), and neutral hydrogen (H I) images of the region around Sh 2-174. The radio images address not only the nature of the object, but also the history of the relationship between Sh 2-174 and its surrounding environment. The H I images show that Sh 2-174 sits presently at the center of a ∼1.°2 × ∼0.°4 cloud (with peak hydrogen density n {sub H} = 4 ± 2 cm{sup –3}). The Stokes-I image shows thermal-emission peaks (with electron densities n{sub e} = 11 ± 3 cm{sup –3}) coincident with the R-band optical nebula, as well as low-surface-brightness emission from an ionized ''halo'' around Sh 2-174 and from an ionized ''plateau'' extending southeast from the cloud. The polarization images reveal Faraday-rotation structures along the projected trajectory of Sh 2-174, including a high-contrast structure with ''arms'' that run precisely along the eastern edge of the H I cloud and a wide central region that merges with the downstream edge of Sh 2-174. The high-contrast structure is consistent with an ionized tail that has both early-epoch (before Sh 2-174 entered the cloud) and present-epoch (after Sh 2-174 entered the cloud) components. Furthermore, our rotation-measure analysis indicates that the ISM magnetic field is deflected at the leading edge of Sh 2-174. The downstream tail and upstream field deflection point to a PN-ISM interaction. Our estimated space velocity for the host white dwarf (GD 561) demonstrates that Sh 2-174 entered the cloud ∼27,000 yr ago, and gives a PN-ISM interaction timescale ≲ 2.0 × 10{sup 5} yr. We estimate an ambient magnetic field in the cloud of 11 ± 3 μG.

  12. The Emission Nebula Sh 2-174: A Radio Investigation of the Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, R. R.; Kothes, R.; Geisbuesch, J.; Reich, W.; Landecker, T. L.

    2015-02-01

    Sh 2-174 is believed to be either a planetary nebula (PN) or ionized, ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present in this paper 1420 MHz polarization, 1420 MHz total intensity (Stokes-I), and neutral hydrogen (H I) images of the region around Sh 2-174. The radio images address not only the nature of the object, but also the history of the relationship between Sh 2-174 and its surrounding environment. The H I images show that Sh 2-174 sits presently at the center of a ~1.°2 × ~0.°4 cloud (with peak hydrogen density n H = 4 ± 2 cm-3). The Stokes-I image shows thermal-emission peaks (with electron densities ne = 11 ± 3 cm-3) coincident with the R-band optical nebula, as well as low-surface-brightness emission from an ionized "halo" around Sh 2-174 and from an ionized "plateau" extending southeast from the cloud. The polarization images reveal Faraday-rotation structures along the projected trajectory of Sh 2-174, including a high-contrast structure with "arms" that run precisely along the eastern edge of the H I cloud and a wide central region that merges with the downstream edge of Sh 2-174. The high-contrast structure is consistent with an ionized tail that has both early-epoch (before Sh 2-174 entered the cloud) and present-epoch (after Sh 2-174 entered the cloud) components. Furthermore, our rotation-measure analysis indicates that the ISM magnetic field is deflected at the leading edge of Sh 2-174. The downstream tail and upstream field deflection point to a PN-ISM interaction. Our estimated space velocity for the host white dwarf (GD 561) demonstrates that Sh 2-174 entered the cloud ~27,000 yr ago, and gives a PN-ISM interaction timescale <~ 2.0 × 105 yr. We estimate an ambient magnetic field in the cloud of 11 ± 3 μG.

  13. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2005-07-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources ``Hot excess'' YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early protostars are

  14. Star Formation and Mysterious Hard X-Ray Emission in the Very Young HII Region, Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee

    2001-09-01

    The Trifid Nebula (M~20) is one of the best-known HII regions, ionized by a single O7.5 star, HD 164492. The Trifid was rediscovered as a dynamic, "pre-Orion" star forming region containing young stars undergoing violent mass ejections. The ROSAT image revealed strong emission from HD 164492 and a dozen X-ray sources. ASCA spectra of the O star show an unexpectedly hot (3 keV) component in addition to a cooler component from the O star atmosphere. We propose an ACIS-S observation of the Trifid Nebula for 60 ks. The sub arcsec image will resolve the O star from its immediate environment, and likely detect hundreds of low mass objects. We will examine the high-energy interaction between the wind from the O star and the dense ISM.

  15. The complete Einstein Observatory X-ray survey of the Orion Nebula region.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed archival Einstein Observatory images of a roughly 4.5 square degree region centered on the Orion Nebula. In all, 245 distinct X-ray sources have been detected in six High Resolution Imager (HRI) and 17 Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) observations. An optical database of over 2700 stars has been assembled to search for candidate counterparts to the X-ray sources. Roughly half the X-ray sources are identified with a single Orion Nebula cluster member. The 10 main-sequence O6-B5 cluster stars detected in Orion have X-ray activity levels comparable to field O and B stars. X-ray emission has also been detected in the direction of four main-sequence late-B and early-A type stars. Since the mechanisms producing X-rays in late-type coronae and early-type winds cannot operate in the late-B and early-A type atmospheres, we argue that the observed X-rays, with L(sub X) approximately = 3 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s, are probably produced in the coronae of unseen late-type binary companions. Over 100 X-ray sources have been associated with late-type pre-main sequence stars. The upper envelope of X-ray activity rises sharply from mid-F to late-G, with L(sub x)/L(sub bol) in the range 10(exp -4) to 2 x 10(exp -3) for stars later than approximately G7. We have looked for variability of the late-type cluster members on timescales of a day to a year and find that 1/4 of the stars show significantly variable X-ray emission. A handful of the late-type stars have published rotational periods and spectroscopic rotational velocities; however, we see no correlation between X-ray activity and rotation. Thus, for this sample of pre-main-sequence stars, the large dispersion in X-ray activity does not appear to be caused by the dispersion in rotation, in contrast with results obtained for low-mass main-sequence stars in the Pleiades and pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus-Auriga.

  16. Clown Face Nebula (NGC 2392)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula, also known as the Eskimo Nebula, in the constellation Gemini, position RA 07 h 29.2 m, dec. +20° 55'. It is bluish, 13'' in diameter, and of ninth magnitude, with a tenth-magnitude central star. The blue-green nebula's hazy outer regions are thought to resemble an Eskimo's hood or clown's ruff....

  17. Distinguishing between HII regions and planetary nebulae with Hi-GAL, WISE, MIPSGAL, and GLIMPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Zavagno, A.; Barlow, M. J.; García-Lario, P.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Context. H II regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) both emit at radio and infrared (IR) wavelengths, and angularly small H II regions can be mistaken for PNe. This problem of classification is most severe for H II regions in an early evolutionary stage, those that are extremely distant, or those that are both young and distant. Previous work has shown that H II regions and PNe can be separated based on their infrared colors. Aims: Using data from the Herschel Hi-GAL survey, as well as WISE and the Spitzer MIPSGAL and GLIMPSE surveys, we wish to establish characteristic IR colors that can be used to distinguish between H II regions and PNe. Methods: We perform aperture photometry measurements for a sample of 126 H II regions and 43 PNe at wavelengths from 8.0 μm to 500 μm. Results: We find that H II regions and PNe have distinct IR colors. The most robust discriminating color criteria are [F12/F8] < 0.3, [F160/F12] > 1.3, and [F160/F24] > 0.8 (or alternately [F160/F22] > 0.8), where the brackets indicate the log of the flux ratio. All three of these criteria are individually satisfied by over 98% of our sample of H II regions and by ~10% of our sample of PNe. Combinations of these colors are more robust in separating the two populations; for example all H II regions and no PNe satisfy [F12/F8] < 0.4 and [F160/F22] > 0.8. When applied to objects of unknown classification, these criteria prove useful in separating the two populations. The dispersion in color is relatively small for H II regions; this suggests that any evolution in these colors with time for H II regions must be relatively modest. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of H II regions can be separated into "warm" and "cold" components. The "cold" component is well-fit by a grey-body of temperature 25 K. The SEDs of nearly two-thirds of our sample of H II regions peak at 160 μm and one third peak at 70 μm. For PNe, 67% of the SEDs peak at 70 μm, 23% peak at either 22 μm or 24 μm, and 9% (two

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and molecular hydrogen in oxygen-rich planetary nebulae: the case of NGC 6720

    PubMed Central

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Evolved stars are primary sources for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dust grains. Their circumstellar chemistry is usually designated as either oxygen-rich or carbon-rich, although dual-dust chemistry objects, whose infrared spectra reveal both silicate- and carbon-dust features, are also known. The exact origin and nature of this dual-dust chemistry is not yet understood. Spitzer-IRS mid-infrared spectroscopic imaging of the nearby, oxygen-rich planetary nebula NGC 6720 reveals the presence of the 11.3 μm aromatic (PAH) emission band. It is attributed to emission from neutral PAHs, since no band is observed in the 7–8 μm range. The spatial distribution of PAHs is found to closely follow that of the warm clumpy molecular hydrogen emission. Emission from both neutral PAHs and warm H2 is likely to arise from photo-dissociation regions associated with dense knots that are located within the main ring. The presence of PAHs together with the previously derived high abundance of free carbon (relative to CO) suggest that the local conditions in an oxygen-rich environment can also become conducive to in-situ formation of large carbonaceous molecules, such as PAHs, via a bottom-up chemical pathway. In this scenario, the same stellar source can enrich the interstellar medium with both oxygen-rich dust and large carbonaceous molecules. PMID:26924856

  19. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20; see Figure 1) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources "Hot excess" YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be "starless" cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early

  20. AGILE detection of enhanced gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Striani, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; de Paris, G.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Sabatini, S.; Piano, G.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Pacciani, L.; Del Monte, E.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Lapshov, I.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Perotti, F.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Vercellone, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Picozza, P.; Morselli, A.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Giommi, P.; Santolamazza, P.; Lucarelli, F.; Colafrancesco, S.; Salotti, L.

    2010-09-01

    AGILE is detecting an increased gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the Crab Nebula. Integrating during the period 2010-09-19 00:10 UT to 2010-09-21 00:10 UT the AGILE-GRID detected enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (184.6, -6.0) +/- 0.4 (stat.) +/- 0.1 (syst.) deg, and flux F > 500 e-8 ph/cm2/sec above 100 MeV, corresponding to an excess with significance above 4.4 sigma with respect to the average flux from the Crab nebula (F = (220 +/- 15)e-8 ph/cm^2/sec, Pittori et al., 2009, A&A, 506, 1563).

  1. On the Nonthermal κ-distributed Electrons in Planetary Nebulae and H II Regions: The κ Index and Its Correlations with Other Nebular Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a suspicion arose that the free electrons in planetary nebulae (PNs) and H ii regions might have nonthermal energy distributions. In this scenario, a κ index is introduced to characterize the electron energy distributions, with smaller κ values indicating larger deviations from Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions. Assuming that this is the case, we determine the κ values for a sample of PNs and H ii regions by comparing the intensities of [O iii] collisionally excited lines and the hydrogen Balmer jump. We find the average κ indices of PNs and H ii regions to be 27 and 32, respectively. Correlations between the resultant κ values and various physical properties of the nebulae are examined to explore the potential origin of nonthermal electrons in photoionized gaseous nebulae. However, no positive result is obtained. Thus, the current analysis does not lend support to the idea that κ-distributed electrons are present in PNs and H ii regions.

  2. Trifid Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 14.8' x 20.0' on the sky, of the Trifid Nebula, aka Messier 20 and NGC 6514. The Trifid is only about 1.5 degrees northwest on the sky of the larger Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8) in the constellation Sagittarius, and is at a distance from us of 1.68 kpc (or 5477 light years), near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. It gets its name from its optical appearance, from three dark dust lanes that divide it. Like the Lagoon, much of the optical emission is dominated by the red light from hydrogen, forming an 'H II region' of ionized gas around the bright small cluster of hot stars just to the southeast of the image center; the rest of the emission is reflected blue light from these hot stars, primarily from the brightest one, HD 164492A. In the near-infrared we can see through much of the obscuring dust in the Trifid, including the name-giving dust lanes, but still see much of the bluish light reflected by the dust. In the 2MASS image, much of the dark dust is still seen, but also many more stars than are seen optically. The Trifid is less than 1 million years old, and young, massive still-forming stellar objects can be seen as well. Visit the Trifid and other Messier objects in the 2MASSier Object Gallery. Image mosaic by E. Kopan (IPAC).

  3. Photometric study of NGC 2023 in the 3500 A to 10000 A region - Confirmation of a near-IR emission process in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Kraiman, J. B.; Witt, A. N.

    1984-01-01

    A surface brightness study of the reflection nebula NGC 2023 covering the 3500-10,000 A wavelength region performed with uvby photoelectric photometry and BVRI imaging with a CCD detector is reported along with VRI photometry of a cluster of embedded red stars. The nebular radiation in the 3500-5500 A region is dust-scattered starlight originating in the star HD 37903. The embedded red stars are probably pre-main sequence stars. The nebular surface brightness in R and I exceeds that expected on the basis of a reasonable radiative transfer model by factors of two and more than three, respectively. The excess radiation is extended across the nebula in a manner similar to the scattered light. The extended red emission may be interpreted as the high-frequency extension of extended emission discovered by Sellgren, Werner, and Dinerstein (1983) in the 2-5 micron region in NGC 2023 and two other reflection nebulae.

  4. Doradus Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A panoramic view of a vast, sculpted area of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born has been captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/21 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of the fertile, star-forming 30 Doradus Nebula. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 (the large blue blob left of center), are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that incubate newborn stars.

    The 30 Doradus Nebula is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are signposts of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths formed about 2 million years ago.

    The stars in R136 produce intense 'stellar winds,' streams of material traveling at several million miles an hour. These winds push the gas away from the cluster and compress the inner regions of the surrounding gas and dust clouds (seen in the image as the pinkish material). The intense pressure triggers the collapse of parts of the clouds, producing a new star formation around the central cluster. Most stars in the nursery are not visible because they are still encased in cocoons of gas and dust.

    This mosaic image of 30 Doradus consists of five overlapping

  5. THE INTEGRATED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION OF THE CARINA NEBULA COMPARED TO OTHER MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Oey, M. S.; Pittard, Julian M.

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) has shown that the Carina Nebula displays bright, spatially-complex soft diffuse X-ray emission. Here, we 'sum up' the CCCP diffuse emission work by comparing the global morphology and spectrum of Carina's diffuse X-ray emission to other famous sites of massive star formation with pronounced diffuse X-ray emission: M17, NGC 3576, NGC 3603, and 30 Doradus. All spectral models require at least two diffuse thermal plasma components to achieve adequate spectral fits, a softer component with kT = 0.2-0.6 keV and a harder component with kT = 0.5-0.9 keV. In several cases these hot plasmas appear to be in a state of non-equilibrium ionization that may indicate recent and current strong shocks. A cavity north of the embedded giant H II region NGC 3576 is the only region studied here that exhibits hard diffuse X-ray emission; this emission appears to be nonthermal and is likely due to a recent cavity supernova, as evidenced by a previously-known pulsar and a newly-discovered pulsar wind nebula also seen in this cavity. All of these targets exhibit X-ray emission lines that are not well modeled by variable-abundance thermal plasmas and that might be attributed to charge exchange at the shock between the hot, tenuous, X-ray-emitting plasma and cold, dense molecular material; this is likely evidence for dust destruction at the many hot/cold interfaces that characterize massive star-forming regions.

  6. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  7. Irradiated interfaces in the Ara OB1, Carina, Eagle Nebula, and Cyg OB2 massive star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Palmer, J.; Cleeves, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Regions of massive star formation offer some of the best and most easily-observed examples of radiation hydrodynamics. Boundaries where fully-ionized H II regions transition to neutral/molecular photodissociation regions (PDRs) are of particular interest because marked temperature and density contrasts across the boundaries lead to evaporative flows and fluid dynamical instabilities that can evolve into spectacular pillar-like structures. When detached from their parent clouds, pillars become ionized globules that often harbor one or more young stars. H2 molecules at the interface between a PDR and an H II region absorb ultraviolet light from massive stars, and the resulting fluoresced infrared emission lines are an ideal way to trace this boundary independent of obscuring dust. This paper presents H2 images of four regions of massive star formation that illustrate different types of PDR boundaries. The Ara OB1 star formation region contains a striking long wall that has several wavy structures which are present in H2, but the emission is not particularly bright because the ambient UV fluxes are relatively low. In contrast, the Carina star formation region shows strong H2 fluorescence both along curved walls and at the edges of spectacular pillars that in some cases have become detached from their parent clouds. The less-spectacular but more well-known Eagle Nebula has two regions that have strong fluorescence in addition to its pillars. While somewhat older than the other regions, Cyg OB2 has the highest number of massive stars of the regions surveyed and contains many isolated, fluoresced globules that have head-tail morphologies which point towards the sources of ionizing radiation. These images provide a collection of potential astrophysical analogs that may relate to ablated interfaces observed in laser experiments of radiation hydrodynamics.

  8. A WIDE-FIELD NARROWBAND OPTICAL SURVEY OF THE BRAID NEBULA STAR FORMATION REGION IN CYGNUS OB7

    SciTech Connect

    Magakian, Tigran Yu.; Nikogossian, Elena H.; Movsessian, Tigran; Aspin, Colin; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Khanzadyan, Tigran; Smith, Michael D.; Mitchison, Sharon; Davis, Chris J.; Beck, Tracy L.; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald H. E-mail: elena@bao.sci.am E-mail: pyo@subaru.naoj.org E-mail: smm23@kent.ac.uk E-mail: c.davis@jach.hawaii.edu E-mail: gerald.schieven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2010-03-15

    We study the population of Herbig-Haro (HH) flows and jets in an area of Cygnus OB7 designated the Braid Nebula star formation region. This complex forms part of the L 1003 dark cloud, and hosts two FU Orionis (FUor)-like objects as well as several other active young stars. To trace outflow activity and to relate both known and newly discovered flows to young star hosts we intercompare new, deep, narrowband H{alpha} and [S II] optical images taken on the Subaru 8 m Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Our images show that there is considerable outflow and jet activity in this region suggesting the presence of an extensive young star population. We confirm that both of the FUor-like objects drive extensive HH flows and document further members of the flows in both objects. The L 1003 star formation complex is a highly kinematically active region with young stars in several different stages of evolution. We trace collimated outflows from numerous young stars although the origin of some HH objects remains elusive.

  9. A Tactile Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.; Mutchler, M.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy was once considered a science restricted to fully sighted participants. But in the past two decades, accessible books with large print/Braille and touchable pictures have brought astronomy and space science to the hands and mind's eye of students, regardless of their visual ability. A new universally-designed tactile image featuring the Hubble mosaic of the Carina Nebula is being presented at this conference. The original dataset was obtained with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) hydrogen-alpha filter in 2005. It became an instant icon after being infused with additional color information from ground-based CTIO data, and released as Hubble's 17th anniversary image. Our tactile Carina Nebula promotes multi-mode learning about the entire life-cycle of stars, which is dramatically illustrated in this Hubble mosaic. When combined with descriptive text in print and Braille, the visual and tactile components seamlessly reach both sighted and blind populations. Specific touchable features of the tactile image identify the shapes and orientations of objects in the Carina Nebula that include star-forming regions, jets, pillars, dark and light globules, star clusters, shocks/bubbles, the Keyhole Nebula, and stellar death (Eta Carinae). Visit our poster paper to touch the Carina Nebula!

  10. Butterfly Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) is back at work, capturing this image of the 'butterfly wing'- shaped nebula, NGC 2346. The nebula is about 2,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros. It represents the spectacular 'last gasp' of a binary star system at the nebula's center. The image was taken on March 6, 1997 as part of the recommissioning of the Hubble Space Telescope's previously installed scientific instruments following the successful servicing of the HST by NASA shuttle astronauts in February. WFPC2 was installed in HST during the servicing mission in 1993. At the center of the nebula lies a pair of stars that are so close together that they orbit around each other every 16 days. This is so close that, even with Hubble, the pair of stars cannot be resolved into its two components. One component of this binary is the hot core of a star that has ejected most of its outer layers, producing the surrounding nebula. Astronomers believe that this star, when it evolved and expanded to become a red giant, actually swallowed its companion star in an act of stellar cannibalism. The resulting interaction led to a spiraling together of the two stars, culminating in ejection of the outer layers of the red giant. Most of the outer layers were ejected into a dense disk, which can still be seen in the Hubble image, surrounding the central star. Later the hot star developed a fast stellar wind. This wind, blowing out into the surrounding disk, has inflated the large, wispy hourglass-shaped wings perpendicular to the disk. These wings produce the butterfly appearance when seen in projection. The total diameter of the nebula is about one-third of a light-year, or 2 trillion miles.

  11. Imaging Polarimetry of Protoplanetary and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarrott, S. M.; Scarrott, R. M. J.

    1995-11-01

    Imaging polarimetry maps are presented for a sample of bipolar proto-planetary and planetary nebulae (Frosty Leo, Roberts 22, Hen 401, MZ 3, NGC 2346, IC 4406 and J 320). Each of the highly polarized proto-planetary nebulae possesses a `polarization disc' which has been observed more frequently in nebulae associated with star forming regions. In order to account for the observed high levels of polarization in protoplanetary nebulae we consider the effects of a thin coating of a volatile material on refractory grains with an original size distribution typical of the interstellar medium. The planetary nebulae are seen in a mixture of reflected and emission light and their polarization patterns suggest that, in many instances, they are emission nebulae surrounded by an extensive envelope of reflection nebulosity. The origin of the skew-symmetry and ansae in the isophotal maps of proto-planetary and planetary nebulae are discussed in terms of binary stars and magnetic fields.

  12. Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed at Rice University related to NASA-Ames University consortium grant NCC2-5199 during the two year period 1996 September 1 through 1998 August 31. The research program, titled Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae, involved the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imagery and spectroscopy of the Orion Nebula and of the planetary nebulae NGC 6818 and NGC 6210. In addition, we analyzed infrared spectra of the Orion Nebula taken with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) The primary collaborators at NASA-Ames were Drs. R. H. Rubin, A. G. C. M. Tielens, S. W. J. Colgan, and S. D. Lord (Tielens & Lord has since changed institutions). Other collaborators include Drs. P. G. Martin (CITA, Toronto), G. J. Ferland (U. KY), J. A. Baldwin (CTIO, Chile), J. J. Hester (ASU), D. K. Walter (SCSU), and P. Harrington (U. MD). In addition to the Principal Investigator, Professor Reginald J. Dufour of the Department of Space Physics & Astronomy, the research also involved two students, Mr. Matthew Browning and Mr. Brent Buckalew. Mr. Browning will be graduating from Rice in 1999 May with a B.A. degree in Physics and Mr. Buckalew continues as a graduate student in our department, having recently received a NASA GSRP research fellowship (sponsored by Ames). The collaboration was very productive, with two refereed papers already appearing in the literature, several others in preparation, numerous meeting presentations and two press releases. Some of our research accomplishments are highlighted below. Attached to the report are copies of the two major publications. Note that this research continues to date and related extensions of it recently has been awarded time with the HST for 1999-2000.

  13. X-Ray Investigation of the Diffuse Emission around Plausible γ-Ray Emitting Pulsar Wind Nebulae in Kookaburra Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Bamba, Aya; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-05-01

    We report on the results from Suzaku X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV γ-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The Suzaku observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible pulsar wind nebula (PWN) Rabbit with elongated sizes of σX = 1farcm66 and σX = 1farcm49, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the γ-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the γ-ray peaks are 2farcm8 for PSR J1420-6048 and 4farcm5 for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with Γ = 1.7-2.3. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one-zone electron emission model as the first-order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimated as 3 μG and 2.5 μG, respectively. The X-ray spectral and spatial properties strongly support that both TeV sources are PWNe, in which electrons and positrons accelerated at termination shocks of the pulsar winds are losing their energies via the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering as they are transported outward.

  14. Numerical nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan

    2005-12-01

    The late stages of evolution of stars like our Sun are dominated by several episodes of violent mass loss. Space based observations of the resulting objects, known as Planetary Nebulae, show a bewildering array of highly symmetric shapes. The interplay between gasdynamics and radiative processes determines the morphological outcome of these objects, and numerical models for astrophysical gasdynamics have to incorporate these effects. This thesis presents new numerical techniques for carrying out high-resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Such calculations require parallelization of computer codes, and the use of state-of-the-art supercomputer technology. Numerical models in the context of the shaping of Planetary Nebulae are presented, providing insight into their origin and fate.

  15. A search for planetary Nebulae with the Sloan digital sky survey: the outer regions of M31

    SciTech Connect

    Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Grebel, Eva K.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Zucker, Daniel B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Snedden, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to identify planetary nebula (PN) candidates in imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This method exploits the SDSS's five-band sampling of emission lines in PN spectra, which results in a color signature distinct from that of other sources. Selection criteria based on this signature can be applied to nearby galaxies in which PNe appear as point sources. We applied these criteria to the whole area of M31 as scanned by the SDSS, selecting 167 PN candidates that are located in the outer regions of M31. The spectra of 80 selected candidates were then observed with the 2.2 m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory. These observations and cross-checks with literature data show that our method has a selection rate efficiency of about 90%, but the efficiency is different for the different groups of PN candidates. In the outer regions of M31, PNe trace different well-known morphological features like the Northern Spur, the NGC 205 Loop, the G1 Clump, etc. In general, the distribution of PNe in the outer region 8 < R < 20 kpc along the minor axis shows the {sup e}xtended disk{sup —}a rotationally supported low surface brightness structure with an exponential scale length of 3.21 ± 0.14 kpc and a total mass of ∼10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, which is equivalent to the mass of M33. We report the discovery of three PN candidates with projected locations in the center of Andromeda NE, a very low surface brightness giant stellar structure in the outer halo of M31. Two of the PNe were spectroscopically confirmed as genuine PNe. These two PNe are located at projected distances along the major axis of ∼48 Kpc and ∼41 Kpc from the center of M31 and are the most distant PNe in M31 found up to now. With the new PN data at hand we see the obvious kinematic connection between the continuation of the Giant Stream and the Northern Spur. We suggest that 20%-30% of the stars in the Northern Spur area may belong to the Giant Stream. In our data we also

  16. Stingray Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue).

  17. Ant nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A new Hubble Space Telescope image of a celestial object called the Ant Nebula may shed new light on the future demise of our Sun. The image is available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc .

    The nebula, imaged on July 20, 1997, and June 30, 1998, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, was observed by Drs. Raghvendra Sahai and John Trauger of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Bruce Balick of the University of Washington in Seattle; and Vincent Icke of Leiden University in the Netherlands. JPL designed and built the camera.

    The Ant Nebula, whose technical name is Mz3, resembles the head and thorax of an ant when observed with ground-based telescopes. The new Hubble image, with 10 times the resolution revealing 100 times more detail, shows the 'ant's' body as a pair of fiery lobes protruding from a dying, Sun- like star. The Ant Nebula is located between 3,000 and 6,000 light years from Earth in the southern constellation Norma.

    The image challenges old ideas about what happens to dying stars. This observation, along with other pictures of various remnants of dying stars called planetary nebulae, shows that our Sun's fate will probably be much more interesting, complex and dramatic than astronomers previously believed.

    Although the ejection of gas from the dying star in the Ant Nebula is violent, it does not show the chaos one might expect from an ordinary explosion, but instead shows symmetrical patterns. One possibility is that the central star has a closely orbiting companion whose gravitational tidal forces shape the outflowing gas. A second possibility is that as the dying star spins, its strong magnetic fields are wound up into complex shapes like spaghetti in an eggbeater. Electrically charged winds, much like those in our Sun's solar wind but millions of times denser and moving at speeds up to 1,000 kilometers per second (more than 600 miles per second) from the star, follow the twisted field lines on their way

  18. The Crab Nebula's progenitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.; Sugimoto, D.; Sparks, W. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Gull, T. R.; Miyaji, S.

    1982-01-01

    The initial mass of the Crab Nebula's progenitor star is estimated by comparing the observed nebular chemical abundances with detailed evolutionary calculations for 2.4- and 2.6-solar-mass helium cores of stars with masses of 8 to 10 solar masses. The results indicate that the mass of the Crab's progenitor was between the upper limit of about 8 solar masses for carbon deflagration and the lower limit of about 9.5 solar masses set by the dredge-up of the helium layer before the development of the helium-burning convective region. A scenario is outlined for the evolution of the progenitor star. It is suggested that the Crab Nebula was probably the product of an electron-capture supernova.

  19. Abundances of Planetary Nebula NGC 5315

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Beintema, D. A.; Koorneef, J.; Salas, J. Bernard; Feibelman, W. A.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISO and IUE spectra of the elliptical nebula NGC 5315 is presented. These spectra axe combined with the spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain a complete, extinction corrected, spectrum. The chemical composition of the nebulae is then calculated and compared to previous determinations. The HST Nicmos observations of the nebula in 3 emission lines are also presented. These observations are used to determine the helium abundance as a function of position in the nebula. A discussion is given of possible evolutionary effects.

  20. New insights into the physical state of gaseous nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peimbert, M.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of knowledge of H II regions, planetary nebulae and supernova remnants due to International Ultraviolet Explorer is examined. The more relevant aspects related to the physical conditions of gaseous nebulae are reviewed. The following properties of gaseous nebulae are discussed: (1) density and temperature distribution; (2) ionization structure; (3) chemical composition; (4) internal dust; and (5) shock velocity for supernova remnants. The CNO abundances of planetary nebulae are compared with stellar evolution models.

  1. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  2. The Reflection Nebula in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Just weeks after NASA astronauts repaired the Hubble Space Telescope in December 1999, the Hubble Heritage Project snapped this picture of NGC 1999, a nebula in the constellation Orion. The Heritage astronomers, in collaboration with scientists in Texas and Ireland, used Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) to obtain the color image. NGC 1999 is an example of a reflection nebula. Like fog around a street lamp, a reflection nebula shines only because the light from an imbedded source illuminates its dust; the nebula does not emit any visible light of its own. NGC 1999 lies close to the famous Orion Nebula, about 1,500 light-years from Earth, in a region of our Milky Way galaxy where new stars are being formed actively. NGC 1999 was discovered some two centuries ago by Sir William Herschel and his sister Caroline, and was cataloged later in the 19th century as object 1999 in the New General Catalogue. This data was collected in January 2000 by the Hubble Heritage Team with the collaboration of star-formation experts C. Robert O'Dell (Rice University), Thomas P. Ray (Dublin Institute for Advanced Study), and David Corcoran (University of Limerick).

  3. A model of Jupiter's sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model of Jupiter's S II emission nebula is developed on the basis of a complete treatment of electron-impact excitation of sulfur ions. Forbidden line emission from S II ions excited by electron collisions in the Jovian nebula is analyzed, and existing observations are interpreted using a simple model of an S II nebula which is uniform in depth. The results show that the depth of the nebula is 300,000 to 600,000 km, the electron density is about 3160 per cu cm, the electron temperature is approximately 25,000 K, and the S II concentration is roughly 79 ions per cu cm. It is noted that these plasma conditions are quite different from those reported for the same region on the basis of Pioneer 10 data, indicating that the S II nebula is a sporadic event. Io is suggested as the source of the sulfur.

  4. Revisiting the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    ESO/MPG 2.2m telescope at La Silla, to obtain very deep images of this region. ESO PR Photo 20/04 shows a false-colour composite of images obtained in four different wavebands (see technical information below). Among others, these observations allow the astronomers to measure the rates of mass that falls onto the young stars (the mass accretion rates) and to determine if it depends on the position of the stars in the cluster. If this were the case, it would indicate that the final stages of star formation are affected by the onset of ionising radiation from the most massive stars. From a preliminary study with the Hubble Space Telescope, the astronomers found that indeed the mass accretion rates are lower in the Orion Nebula Cluster than in other, more diffuse star-forming regions. The analysis of these new WFI images should allow confirmation of this hypothesis. The astronomers also obtained images of the Orion Nebula in several narrow-band filters corresponding to emission lines - hydrogen (Halpha), oxygen ([OIII]), and sulphur ([SII]) - enabling them to probe the morphology of the nebula in these prominent lines. It is rather obvious from the image that for example some regions are redder than others, providing the astronomers with important clues on the conditions prevailing in the nebula. In the next months, a large international collaboration also led by M. Robberto will use the Hubble Space Telescope to survey with unprecedented sensitivity (23-25 mag) and spatial resolution approximately 50% of the field imaged by the present WFI observations. The astronomers expect to discover and classify an unknown but substantial population of young double stars, low mass stars and brown dwarfs.

  5. 3-D Flyover Visualization of Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that explod...

  6. Wolf-Rayet nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the 1960s, it has been established that WR stars are massive stars at advanced evolutionary stages and that their surrounding nebulae result from the interactions between the stellar mass loss and the ambient interstellar medium. Surveys of WR nebulae have been made in the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds, and other nearby galaxies in the Local Group. Some WR nebulae exhibit He II λ4686 line emission, indicating stellar effective temperatures of 90 — 100 x 103 K. The shocked fast stellar winds from WR nebulae have been detected in soft X-rays, but theoretical models have not been able to reproduce the observed X-ray spectral properties. Elemental abundances of WR nebulae consisting of synthesized stellar material can constrain stellar evolution models, but high-dispersion spectra are needed to kinematically separate the expanding shell of a WR nebula and the background interstellar medium for accurate abundance analyses.

  7. CCD Photometry and Classification of Stars in the North America and Pelican Nebulae Region. IV. The Region of a Supposed Cluster Collinder 428

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laugalys, V.; Straižys, V.; Vrba, F. J.; Černis, K.; Kazlauskas, A.; Boyle, R. P.; Philip, A. G. Davis

    Magnitudes and color indices of 860 stars down to V = 16.7 mag in the seven-color Vilnius photometric system were obtained in the area of the suspected open cluster Collinder 428 in the North America Nebula. Spectral types, interstellar color excesses, extinctions and distances of stars were determined for 290 stars from the photometric data. The plot of extinction vs. distance gives the front edge of the dust cloud at 540 pc. We conclude that Collinder 428 is not a real star cluster.

  8. The size and shape of Gum's nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    The ionizing light of the supernova which produced the Gum nebula is now fossilized in the still live, though failing, H II region. The main body of the nebula suggests a hollow center or shell form, with a characteristic radius of about half the distance to the outlying fragments. The edges of the main body patches are typically sharp and often bright. The structure of the Gum nebula appears to be dependent on the event of ionization and possibly on the details of heating. It is not now an unstructured ambient medium, as it may have been before the recent ionization. Several hypotheses are presented for a structured ambient medium.

  9. PULSAR WIND NEBULAE WITH THICK TOROIDAL STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P. E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu

    2011-10-10

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroidal structure are G106.6+2.9 and G76.9+1.0. Their structure contrasts with young pulsar nebulae like the Crab Nebula and 3C 38, which show a more chaotic, filamentary structure in the synchrotron emission. In both situations, a torus-jet structure is present where the pulsar wind passes through a termination shock, indicating the flow is initially toroidal. We suggest that the difference is due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that operates when the outer boundary of the nebula is accelerating into freely expanding supernova ejecta. The instability gives rise to mixing in the Crab and related objects, but is not present in the nebulae with thick toroidal regions.

  10. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  11. The Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's new Spitzer Space Telescope, formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, has captured in stunning detail the spidery filaments and newborn stars of the Tarantula Nebula, a rich star-forming region also known as 30 Doradus. This cloud of glowing dust and gas is located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the nearest galaxy to our own Milky Way, and is visible primarily from the Southern Hemisphere. This image of an interstellar cauldron provides a snapshot of the complex physical processes and chemistry that govern the birth - and death - of stars.

    At the heart of the nebula is a compact cluster of stars, known as R136, which contains very massive and young stars. The brightest of these blue supergiant stars are up to 100 times more massive than the Sun, and are at least 100,000 times more luminous. These stars will live fast and die young, at least by astronomical standards, exhausting their nuclear fuel in a few million years.

    The Spitzer Space Telescope image was obtained with an infrared array camera that is sensitive to invisible infrared light at wavelengths that are about ten times longer than visible light. In this four-color composite, emission at 3.6 microns is depicted in blue, 4.5 microns in green, 5.8 microns in orange, and 8.0 microns in red. The image covers a region that is three-quarters the size of the full moon.

    The Spitzer observations penetrate the dust clouds throughout the Tarantula to reveal previously hidden sites of star formation. Within the luminescent nebula, many holes are also apparent. These voids are produced by highly energetic winds originating from the massive stars in the central star cluster. The structures at the edges of these voids are particularly interesting. Dense pillars of gas and dust, sculpted by the stellar radiation, denote the birthplace of future generations of stars.

    The Spitzer image provides information about the composition of the material at the edges of the voids. The surface layers

  12. Apparatus for extraction and separation of a preferentially photo-dissociated molecular isotope into positive and negative ions by means of an electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Molecules of one and the same isotope were preferentially photodissociated by a laser and an ultraviolet source, or by multiphoton absorption of laser radiation. The resultant ions were confined with a magnetic field, moved in opposite directions by an electric field, extracted from the photodissociation region by means of screening and accelerating grids, and collected in ducts.

  13. A KINEMATIC DISTANCE STUDY OF THE PLANETARY NEBULAE-SUPERNOVA REMNANT-H II REGION COMPLEX AT G35.6–0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Su, H. Q.; Torres, D. F.; Pedaletti, G. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2013-10-01

    Two possible planetary nebulae (PN G035.5–00.4 and IRAS 18551+0159), one newly re-identified supernova remnant (SNR G35.6–0.4), and one H II region (G35.6–0.5) form a line-of-sight-overlapping complex known as G35.6–0.5. We analyze 21 cm H I absorption spectra toward the complex to constrain the kinematic distances of these objects. PN G035.5–00.4 has a distance from 3.8 ± 0.4 kpc to 5.4 ± 0.7 kpc. IRAS 18551+0159 is at 4.3 ± 0.5 kpc. We discuss the distance for SNR 35.6–0.4, for which the previous estimate was 10.5 kpc, and find a plausible distance of 3.6 ± 0.4 kpc. The new distance of SNR G35.6–0.4 and the derived mass for the ∼55 km s{sup –1} CO molecular cloud can accommodate an association with HESS J1858+020. We also conclude that SNR G35.6–0.4 is unlikely to be associated with PSR J1857+0210 or PSR J1857+0212, which are projected onto the SNR area.

  14. Stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula, that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region.

  15. B fields in OB stars (BOB): The discovery of a magnetic field in a multiple system in the Trifid nebula, one of the youngest star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Fossati, L.; Carroll, T. A.; Castro, N.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.; Przybilla, N.; Schöller, M.; Oskinova, L. M.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Nieva, M.-F.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: Recent magnetic field surveys in O- and B-type stars revealed that about 10% of the core-hydrogen-burning massive stars host large-scale magnetic fields. The physical origin of these fields is highly debated. To identify and model the physical processes responsible for the generation of magnetic fields in massive stars, it is important to establish whether magnetic massive stars are found in very young star-forming regions or whether they are formed in close interacting binary systems. Methods: In the framework of our ESO Large Program, we carried out low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations with FORS 2 in 2013 April of the three most massive central stars in the Trifid nebula, HD 164492A, HD 164492C, and HD 164492D. These observations indicated a strong longitudinal magnetic field of about 500-600 G in the poorly studied component HD 164492C. To confirm this detection, we used HARPS in spectropolarimetric mode on two consecutive nights in 2013 June. Results: Our HARPS observations confirmed the longitudinal magnetic field in HD 164492C. Furthermore, the HARPS observations revealed that HD 164492C cannot be considered as a single star as it possesses one or two companions. The spectral appearance indicates that the primary is most likely of spectral type B1-B1.5 V. Since in both observing nights most spectral lines appear blended, it is currently unclear which components are magnetic. Long-term monitoring using high-resolution spectropolarimetry is necessary to separate the contribution of each component to the magnetic signal. Given the location of the system HD 164492C in one of the youngest star formation regions, this system can be considered as a Rosetta Stone for our understanding of the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. Based on observations obtained in the framework of the ESO Prg. 191.D-0255(A,B).

  16. The population of planetary nebulae and H II regions in M 81. A study of radial metallicity gradients and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, L.; Magrini, L.; Villaver, E.; Galli, D.

    2010-10-01

    Context. M 81 is an ideal laboratory to investigate the galactic chemical and dynamical evolution through the study of its young and old stellar populations. Aims: We analyze the chemical abundances of planetary nebulae and H ii regions in the M 81 disk for insight on galactic evolution, and compare it with that of other galaxies, including the Milky Way. Methods: We acquired Hectospec/MMT spectra of 39 PNe and 20 H ii regions, with 33 spectra viable for temperature and abundance analysis. Our PN observations represent the first PN spectra in M 81 ever published, while several H ii region spectra have been published before, although without a direct electron temperature determination. We determine elemental abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon in PNe and H ii regions, and determine their averages and radial gradients. Results: The average O/H ratio of PNe compared to that of the H ii regions indicates a general oxygen enrichment in M 81 in the last ~10 Gyr. The PN metallicity gradient in the disk of M 81 is Δlog(O/H)/ΔRG = -0.055 ± 0.02 dex/kpc. Neon and sulfur in PNe have a radial distribution similar to that of oxygen, with similar gradient slopes. If we combine our H ii sample with the one in the literature we find a possible mild evolution of the gradient slope, with results consistent with gradient steepening with time. Additional spectroscopy is needed to confirm this trend. There are no type I PNe in our M 81 sample, consistently with the observation of only the brightest bins of the PNLF, the galaxy metallicity, and the evolution of post-AGB shells. Conclusions: Both the young and the old populations of M 81 disclose shallow but detectable negative radial metallicity gradient, which could be slightly steeper for the young population, thus not excluding a mild gradients steepening with the time since galaxy formation. During its evolution M 81 has been producing oxygen; its total oxygen enrichment exceeds that of other nearby

  17. The Trifid Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the Trifid Nebula reveals a stellar nursery being torn apart by a nearby massive star. Embryonic stars are forming within an ill-fated cloud of dust and gas, which is destined to be eaten away by the glare from the massive neighbor. The cloud is about 8 light years away from the nebula' s central star. This stellar activity is a beautiful example of how the life cycle of stars like our Sun is intimately cornected with their more powerful siblings. Residing in the constellation Sagittarius, the Trifid Nebula is about 9,000 light years from Earth.

  18. Investigating CXOU J163802.6–471358: A new pulsar wind nebula in the norma region?

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Simone J.; Watson, Darach; Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first analysis of the extended source CXOU J163802.6–471358, which was discovered serendipitously during the Chandra X-ray survey of the Norma region of the Galactic spiral arms. The X-ray source exhibits a cometary appearance with a point source and an extended tail region. The complete source spectrum is fitted well with an absorbed power law model and jointly fitting the Chandra spectrum of the full source with one obtained from an archived XMM-Newton observation results in best fit parameters N {sub H} =1.5{sub −0.5}{sup +0.7}×10{sup 23} cm{sup −2} and Γ=1.1{sub −0.6}{sup +0.7} (90% confidence uncertainties). The unabsorbed luminosity of the full source is then L{sub X}∼4.8×10{sup 33}d{sub 10}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1} with d {sub 10} = d/10 kpc, where a distance of 10 kpc is a lower bound inferred from the large column density. The radio counterpart found for the source using data from the Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey epoch-2 shows an elongated tail offset from the X-ray emission. No infrared counterpart was found. The results are consistent with the source being a previously unknown pulsar driving a bow shock through the ambient medium.

  19. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  20. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  1. Lightning in the Protoplanetary Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning in the protoplanetary nebula has been proposed as a mechanism for creating meteoritic chondrules: enigmatic mm-sized silicate spheres formed in the nebula by the brief melting of cold precursors.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sturning image, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is an image of the center of the Omega Nebula. It is a hotbed of newly born stars wrapped in colorful blankets of glowing gas and cradled in an enormous cold, dark hydrogen cloud. The region of nebula shown in this photograph is about 3,500 times wider than our solar system. The nebula, also called M17 and the Swan Nebula, resides 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Swan Nebula is illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars, located just beyond the upper-right corner of the image. The powerful radiation from these stars evaporates and erodes the dense cloud of cold gas within which the stars formed. The blistered walls of the hollow cloud shine primarily in the blue, green, and red light emitted by excited atoms of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Particularly striking is the rose-like feature, seen to the right of center, which glows in the red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur. As the infant stars evaporate the surrounding cloud, they expose dense pockets of gas that may contain developing stars. One isolated pocket is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable feature jutting inward from the left edge of the image. The color image is constructed from four separate images taken in these filters: blue, near infrared, hydrogen alpha, and doubly ionized oxygen. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  3. THE DISCOVERY OF A LARGE Ly{alpha}+He II NEBULA AT z {approx} 1.67: A CANDIDATE LOW METALLICITY REGION?

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T. E-mail: dey@noao.edu

    2009-09-01

    We have discovered a {approx}45 kpc Ly{alpha} nebula (or Ly{alpha} 'blob') at z {approx} 1.67 which exhibits strong, spatially extended He II emission and very weak C IV and C III] emission. This is the first spatially extended Ly{alpha}+He II emitter observed and the lowest redshift Ly{alpha} blob yet found. Strong Ly{alpha} and He II{lambda}1640 emission in the absence of metal lines has been proposed as a unique observational signature of primordial galaxy formation (e.g., from gravitational cooling radiation or Population III star formation), but no convincing examples of spatially extended Ly{alpha}+He II emitters have surfaced either in Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxy surveys at high redshifts (z > 4) or in studies of Ly{alpha} nebulae at lower redshifts. From comparisons with photoionization models, we find that the observed line ratios in this nebula are consistent with low metallicity gas (Z {approx}< 10{sup -2}-10{sup -3} Z{sub sun}), but that this conclusion depends on the unknown ionization parameter of the system. The large He II equivalent width ({approx}37 {+-} 10 A) and the large He II/Ly{alpha} ratio (0.12 {+-} 0.04) suggest that the cloud is being illuminated by a hard ionizing continuum, either an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or very low metallicity stars, or perhaps powered by gravitational cooling radiation. Thus far there is no obvious sign of a powerful AGN in or near the system, so in order to power the nebula while remaining hidden from view even in the mid-infrared, the AGN would need to be heavily obscured. Despite the strong Ly{alpha}+He II emission, it is not yet clear what is the dominant power source for this nebula. The system therefore serves as an instructive example of how the complexities of true astrophysical sources will complicate matters when attempting to use a strong Ly{alpha}+He II signature as a unique tracer of primordial galaxy formation.

  4. The Eagle Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    These eerie, dark pillar-like structures are columns of cool interstellar hydrogen gas and dust that are also incubators for new stars. The pillars protrude from the interior wall of a dark molecular cloud like stalagmites from the floor of a cavern. They are part of the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' objects that aren't comets), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. Ultraviolet light is responsible for illuminating the convoluted surfaces of the columns and the ghostly streamers of gas boiling away from their surfaces, producing the dramatic visual effects that highlight the three dimensional nature of the clouds. The tallest pillar (left) is about a light-year long from base to tip. As the pillars themselves are slowly eroded away by the ultraviolet light, small globules of even denser gas buried within the pillars are uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs.' EGGs is an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules,' but it is also a word that describes what these objects are. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars, stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually, the stars themselves emerge from the EGGs as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms.

  5. [Fe II] 1.257 μm and He I 1.083 μm Emission in the Central Region of the Orion Nebula: H II Region, HH Flows, Jets, and Proplyds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Usuda, Tomonori; Sugai, Hajime; Suto, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Takeyama, Norihide; Aoki, Tetsuo; Mizutani, Kohei; Tanaka, Masuo

    2002-02-01

    The [Fe II] 1.257 μm and He I 1.083 μm emission lines were observed in the central 6'×8' region of the Orion Nebula, and their excitation in the photoionized H II region, HH flows, jets, and proplyds is investigated. Observations were carried out using the imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer MUSE at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 1.5 m infrared telescope, which provides a 4'×4' field of view and a spectral resolution λ/δλ of ~2000 at the observed wavelengths. The [Fe II] images exhibit (1) filamentary structures and diffuse emission, which presumably arise from ionization fronts of the photoionized H II region, and (2) a number of knots, some of which are newly identified. Centroidal velocities in most of the knots are negative relative to those in the ionization fronts by up to -60 km s-1, and observed line profiles in the bright knots exhibit blueshifted wings, agreeing with bow shock models. The He I 1.083 μm emission in the observed region is dominated by the photoionized H II region, and its distribution reflects the complicated nature of the excitation. The He I images also contain blueshifted emission from several HH flows and jets and redshifted emission associated with proplyds. Our results for the shocks suggest that the [Fe II] 1.257 μm and He I 1.083 μm emission reflects the ionization of the preshock gas: the [Fe II] 1.257 μm emission is prominent in shocks propagating in molecular/atomic gas, while the He I 1.083 μm is prominent in shocks in the photoionized H II region. Different line excitation in these shocks can be explained by the following physical properties and processes: (1) difference of the excitation energies from the ground state (1 and 20 eV for the [Fe II] and He I lines, respectively), (2) resonance scattering and collisional excitation from the metastable state, enhancing the He I 1.083 μm line in shocks in the photoionized H II region, (3) a large photoionization cross section of Fe+, causing the absence of

  6. Colors of reflection nebulae. I - Phase function effects in the Merope nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of color differences between reflection nebulae and their illuminating stars is reexamined in the light of developments of observational techniques, permitting accurate surface-brightness photometry over an expanded spectral region from the UV to the IR. Color-color diagrams for reflection nebulae can yield useful information about the wavelength dependence of the scattering properties of nebular dust without excessive sensitivity to the specific nebular geometry or the presence of multiple scattering, resulting in considerable savings in computational efforts. As an illustration, the color-difference method was applied to existing data for the Merope nebula, covering the spectral region 1550-5500 A. Strong evidence for a monotonically changing phase function of scattering at wavelengths less than or equal to 3500 A is found. The result is interpreted in the context of a plausible geometry for the Merope environment as providing support for a bimodal size distribution of nebular dust grains.

  7. Infrared studies of dust grains in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    IR reflection nebulae, regions of dust which are illuminated by nearby embedded sources, were observed in several regions of ongoing star formation. Near IR observation and theoretical modelling of the scattered light form IR reflection nebulae can provide information about the dust grain properties in star forming regions. IR reflection nebulae were modelled as plane parallel slabs assuming isotropically scattering grains. For the grain scattering properties, graphite and silicate grains were used with a power law grain size distribution. Among the free parameters of the model are the stellar luminosity and effective temperature, the optical depth of the nebula, and the extinction by foreground material. The typical results from this model are presented and discussed.

  8. Catalogues of planetary nebulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    Firstly, the general requirements concerning catalogues are studied for planetary nebulae, in particular concerning the objects to be included in a catalogue of PN, their denominations, followed by reflexions about the afterlife and comuterized versions of a catalogue. Then, the basic elements constituting a catalogue of PN are analyzed, and the available data are looked at each time.

  9. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  10. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  11. Infrared polarimetry of the NGC 6334 V bipolar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Okuda, Haruyuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Nagata, Tetsuya Kyoto Univ. )

    1990-03-01

    Exceptionally high degrees (up to about 100 percent) of polarization were observed in the L-prime band (3.8 microns) toward the NGC 6334 V bipolar nebula. The observed symmetric polarization pattern indicates that the nebula is a reflection nebula consisting of two lobes illuminated by a central obscured star. The distribution of polarization requires that one of the lobes consist of a lemon-shaped cavity which scatters light mainly at its surface, whereas a conical cavity model is appropriate for the other lobe. This asymmetry of the lobes is probably due to a density gradient in the ambient cloud material in this region. 17 refs.

  12. Science on NIF Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Heeter, Robert; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    For over fifteen years astronomers at the University of Maryland and scientists at LLNL have investigated the origin and dynamics of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds. Eagle Nebula is one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Science programs, and has been awarded two days of NIF shots to study the cometary model of pillar formation. The NIF shots will feature a new long-duration x-ray source prototyped at the Omega EP laser, in which multiple hohlraums mimicking a cluster of stars are driven with UV light in series for 10 ns each to create a 30 ns output x-ray pulse. The drive generates deeply nonlinear hydrodynamics in the Eagle science package, which consists of a dense layered plastic and foam core embedded in lower-density background foam. The scaled Omega EP shots validated the multi-hohlraum concept, showing that earlier time hohlraums do not degrade later time hohlraums by preheat or by ejecting ablated plumes that deflect the later beams. The Omega EP shots illuminated three 2.8 mm long by 1.4 mm diameter Cu hohlraums with 4.3 kJ per hohlraum. At NIF each hohlraum will be 4 mm long by 3 mm in diameter and will be driven with 80-100 kJ. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Solar nebula condensates and the composition of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of the volatile abundances in Halley's comet in terms of models for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula are discussed. Key ratios of the oxidized and reduced species of nitrogen and carbon are identified which tell something of the chemical history of the environment in which cometary grains accreted to form the nucleus. Isotopic abundances are also applied to this problem. It will be shown that the abundances of methane and carbon monoxide are consistent both with models of solar nebula chemistry and chemical processing on grains in star-forming regions. Ultimately, limitations of the current data set on molecular abundances in comets and star-forming regions prevent a definitive choice between the two. Processes important to the composition of outer solar system bodies are: (1) gas phase chemistry in the solar nebula; (2) imperfect mixing in the solar nebula; (3) condensation; (4) clathration; (5) adsorption; and (6) processing of interstellar material.

  14. Polarization observations of the nebula M 20 with filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchinnikov, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of polarization observations using six filters of five regions of the nebula M 20 and the star HD 164514 which is located behind the nebula. It is found that the degree of polarization in the continuum is higher than in the emission lines for three regions in the southern part of the nebula. The polarization is determined to arise due to the scattering of the radiation of the exciting star HD 164492 by dust particles (probably consisting mostly of dirty ice) in M 20. In the northern part of the nebula, it is shown that the nonspherical grains are probably oriented in such a way that their major axes are in a plane approximately perpendicular to the direction to the star HD 164492.

  15. Diffusive redistribution of water vapor in the solar nebula revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Stevenson and Lunine presented a model for enhancing the abundance of solid material in the region of the solar nebula at the water condensation point. This was used to provide a means to produce a much more rapid formation of Jupiter than the standard solar nebula models. However, they underestimated the drag induced sun-ward radial drift of the planetesimals of interest. Reanalysis reveals that these particles would spread over the inner solar system and might influence the formation of the asteroids.

  16. Trifid reflection nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Lynds, B.T.; Oneil, E.J. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    CCD frames of reflected starlight in the blue continuum, 4693 A, associated with the Trifid emission nebulae have been used to deduce the optical depth, albedo, and phase function of the dust grains. The northern component of the Trifid, centered on the supergiant HD 164514, apparently has grains of higher albedo than those associated with the southern O star HD 164492A. IRAS data add further arguments to the assumption that the northern reflection nebula is illuminated by the supergiant, and that the dust grains surrounding the O star have a higher grain temperature. The entire complex is probably part of the Sgr OB I association and the short lifetime of the association puts constraints on the manner in which the properties of the grains can be modified by associated young stars. 26 references.

  17. The Trifid reflection nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, Beverly T.; Oneil, Earl J., Jr.

    1986-11-01

    CCD frames of reflected starlight in the blue continuum, λ 4693, associated with the Trifid emission nebulae have been used to deduce the optical depth, albedo, and phase function of the dust grains. The northern component of the Trifid, centered on the supergiant HD 164514, apparently has grains of higher albedo than those associated with the southern O star HD 164492A. IRAS data add further arguments to the assumption that the northern reflection nebula is illuminated by the supergiant and that the dust grains surrounding the O star have a higher grain temperature. The entire complex is probably part of the Sgr OB I association and the short lifetime of the association puts constraints on the manner in which the properties of the grains can be modified by associated young stars.

  18. The Cat's Eye Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1,000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the star might be a double-star system. The suspected companion star also might be responsible for a pair of high-speed jets of gas that lie at right angles to this equatorial ring. If the companion were pulling in material from a neighboring star, jets escaping along the companion's rotation axis could be produced. These jets would explain several puzzling features along the periphery of the gas lobes. Like a stream of water hitting a sand pile, the jets compress gas ahead of them, creating the 'curlicue' features and bright arcs near the outer edge of the lobes. The twin jets are now pointing in different directions than these features. This suggests the jets are wobbling, or precessing, and turning on and off episodically. This color picture, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2, is a composite of three images taken at different wavelengths. (red, hydrogen-alpha; blue, neutral oxygen, 6300 angstroms; green, ionized nitrogen, 6584 angstroms). The image was taken on September 18, 1994. NGC 6543 is 3,000 light- years away in the northern constellation Draco. The term planetary nebula is a misnomer; dying stars create these cocoons when they lose outer layers of gas. The process has nothing to do with planet formation, which is predicted to happen early in a star's life.

  19. THE 'SPIROGRAPH' NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    THE 'SPIROGRAPH' NEBULA Glowing like a multi-faceted jewel, the planetary nebula IC 418 lies about 2,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lepus. This photograph is one of the latest from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. A planetary nebula represents the final stage in the evolution of a star similar to our Sun. The star at the center of IC 418 was a red giant a few thousand years ago, but then ejected its outer layers into space to form the nebula, which has now expanded to a diameter of about 0.1 light-year. The stellar remnant at the center is the hot core of the red giant, from which ultraviolet radiation floods out into the surrounding gas, causing it to fluoresce. Over the next several thousand years, the nebula will gradually disperse into space, and then the star will cool and fade away for billions of years as a white dwarf. Our own Sun is expected to undergo a similar fate, but fortunately this will not occur until some 5 billion years from now. The Hubble image of IC 418 is shown in a false-color representation, based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 exposures taken in February and September, 1999 through filters that isolate light from various chemical elements. Red shows emission from ionized nitrogen (the coolest gas in the nebula, located furthest from the hot nucleus), green shows emission from hydrogen, and blue traces the emission from ionized oxygen (the hottest gas, closest to the central star). The remarkable textures seen in the nebula are newly revealed by the Hubble telescope, and their origin is still uncertain. Credit: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: Dr. Raghvendra Sahai (JPL) and Dr. Arsen R. Hajian (USNO). EDITOR'S NOTE: For additional information, please contact Dr. Raghvendra Sahai, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, (phone) 818-354-0452, (fax) 818-393-9088, (e-mail) sahai@bb8.jpl

  20. The Gum nebula and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Brandt, J. C.; Stecher, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Papers were presented in conference sessions on the Gum nebula, the Vela X remnant, the hot stars gamma Velorum and zeta Puppis, the B associations in the Vela-Puppis complex, and pulsars. Ground-based optical and radio astronomy; rocket and satellite observations in the radio, visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray regions; and theoretical problems in the physical state of the interstellar medium, stellar evolution, and runaway star dynamics were considered.

  1. 'Peony Nebula' Star Settles for Silver Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Movie

    If our galaxy, the Milky Way, were to host its own version of the Olympics, the title for the brightest known star would go to a massive star called Eta Carina. However, a new runner-up now the second-brightest star in our galaxy has been discovered in the galaxy's dusty and frenzied interior. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the new silver medalist, circled in the inset above, in the central region of our Milky Way.

    Dubbed the 'Peony nebula' star, this blazing ball of gas shines with the equivalent light of 3.2 million suns. The reigning champ, Eta Carina, produces the equivalent of 4.7 million suns worth of light though astronomers say these estimates are uncertain, and it's possible that the Peony nebula star could be even brighter than Eta Carina.

    If the Peony star is so bright, why doesn't it stand out more in this view? The answer is dust. This star is located in a very dusty region jam packed with stars. In fact, there could be other super bright stars still hidden deep in the stellar crowd. Spitzer's infrared eyes allowed it to pierce the dust and assess the Peony nebula star's true brightness. Likewise, infrared data from the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope in Chile were integral in calculating the Peony nebula star's luminosity.

    The Peony nebula, which surrounds the Peony nebular star, is the reddish cloud of dust in and around the white circle.

    The movie begins by showing a stretch of the dusty and frenzied central region of our Milky Way galaxy. It then zooms in to reveal the 'Peony nebula' star the new second-brightest star in the Milky Way, discovered in part by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both

  2. Hubble's Variable Nebula (NGC 2261)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A reflection nebula in the constellation Monoceros, position RA 06 h 39.2 m, dec. +08° 44'. It is small (2' by 1') but of quite high surface brightness. The nebula's average magnitude is 10, but, as Edwin Hubble discovered in 1916, it varies in brightness, mirroring the variability of its illuminating star, R Monocerotis....

  3. VLT Images the Horsehead Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Summary A new, high-resolution colour image of one of the most photographed celestial objects, the famous "Horsehead Nebula" (IC 434) in Orion, has been produced from data stored in the VLT Science Archive. The original CCD frames were obtained in February 2000 with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope on Paranal (Chile). The comparatively large field-of-view of the FORS2 camera is optimally suited to show this extended object and its immediate surroundings in impressive detail. PR Photo 02a/02 : View of the full field around the Horsehead Nebula. PR Photo 02b/02 : Enlargement of a smaller area around the Horse's "mouth" A spectacular object ESO PR Photo 02a/02 ESO PR Photo 02a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 485 pix - 63k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 970 pix - 896k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1951 x 2366 pix - 4.7M] ESO PR Photo 02b/02 ESO PR Photo 02b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 501 pix - 91k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1002 pix - 888k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1139 x 1427 pix - 1.9M] Caption : PR Photo 02a/02 is a reproduction of a composite colour image of the Horsehead Nebula and its immediate surroundings. It is based on three exposures in the visual part of the spectrum with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m KUEYEN telescope at Paranal. PR Photo 02b/02 is an enlargement of a smaller area. Technical information about these photos is available below. PR Photo 02a/02 shows the famous "Horsehead Nebula" , which is situated in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Its official name is Barnard 33 and it is a dust protrusion in the southern region of the dense dust cloud Lynds 1630 , on the edge of the HII region IC 434 . The distance to the region is about 1400 light-years (430 pc). This beautiful colour image was produced from three images obtained with the multi-mode FORS2 instrument at the second VLT Unit Telescope ( KUEYEN ), some months after it had "First Light", cf. PR 17/99. The image files were extracted from the VLT Science Archive Facility and the

  4. The space density, environments, and physical properties of large Lyalpha nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Moire Kathleen Murphy

    Powerful forces are at work in giant Lya nebulae, a rare and mysterious population in the high redshift universe. Much like the spatially extended emission line halos around high redshift radio galaxies--but without the strong radio emission-- Lya nebulae (or Lya 'blobs') boast copious Lya emission (10^44 erg s -1 ), large sizes (~100 kpc), complex gas morphologies, and the company of numerous compact, star-forming galaxies, and may offer a window into dramatic episodes of massive galaxy formation. The small sample sizes and complex inner workings of Lya nebulae have limited progress on understanding the their space density, environments, and physical conditions. This thesis strives to answer fundamental questions about Lya nebulae and pave the way for understanding their role in the build up of massive galaxy systems. To address the frequency of collapse of these massive structures, we carried out the largest systematic Lya nebula survey to date and measured the Lya nebula space density. As an unbiased test of the environment of Lya nebulae, we studied the surroundings of a Lya nebula and confirmed that Lya nebulae reside preferentially in overdense regions. To disentangle the sources of ionization, we took a census of all the compact ionization sources within a large Lya nebula using high resolution imaging. Finally, we used photoionization modeling to put constraints on the physical conditions, the metallicity, and the sources of ionization within Lya nebulae. Future work will be able to build on this thesis by expanding the systematic search for Lya nebulae to other existing deep broad-band datasets, mapping the three-dimensional overdense structures in which Lya nebulae live out to >=50 (comoving) Mpc scales, and disentangling multiple sources of ionization within a larger sample of individual systems using deep optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and detailed photoionization modeling.

  5. HIGH-ACCURACY QUARTIC FORCE FIELD CALCULATIONS FOR THE SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS AND VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES OF 1{sup 1} A' l-C{sub 3}H{sup -}: A POSSIBLE LINK TO LINES OBSERVED IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA PHOTODISSOCIATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Crawford, T. Daniel

    2013-07-20

    It has been shown that rotational lines observed in the Horsehead nebula photodissociation region (PDR) are probably not caused by l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}, as was originally suggested. In the search for viable alternative candidate carriers, quartic force fields are employed here to provide highly accurate rotational constants, as well as fundamental vibrational frequencies, for another candidate carrier: 1 {sup 1} A' C{sub 3}H{sup -}. The ab initio computed spectroscopic constants provided in this work are, compared to those necessary to define the observed lines, as accurate as the computed spectroscopic constants for many of the known interstellar anions. Additionally, the computed D{sub eff} for C{sub 3}H{sup -} is three times closer to the D deduced from the observed Horsehead nebula lines relative to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}. As a result, 1 {sup 1} A' C{sub 3}H{sup -} is a more viable candidate for these observed rotational transitions. It has been previously proposed that at least C{sub 6}H{sup -} may be present in the Horsehead nebular PDR formed by way of radiative attachment through its dipole-bound excited state. C{sub 3}H{sup -} could form in a similar way through its dipole-bound state, but its valence excited state increases the number of relaxation pathways possible to reach the ground electronic state. In turn, the rate of formation for C{sub 3}H{sup -} could be greater than the rate of its destruction. C{sub 3}H{sup -} would be the seventh confirmed interstellar anion detected within the past decade and the first C{sub n}H{sup -} molecular anion with an odd n.

  6. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  7. Spectrometry of nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    2011-04-01

    Nebular emission lines are easy to observe, and their spectrum contains a lot of information. We explain the mechanisms of production of the emissions, and the relation between the intensity of the recombination and forbidden lines, and the physical parameters of the objects. A gallery of emission lines spectra is presented, and a rough analysis will clarify their differences. The case of Planetary Nebulae will be developed, in order to determine the extinction constant, the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature), the chemical abundances, and also the properties of the central star (temperature, mass, stellar wind velocity, age).

  8. Rotten Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Violent gas collisions that produced supersonic shock fronts in a dying star are seen in a new, detailed image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The picture, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Stars like our Sun will eventually die and expel most of their material outward into shells of gas and dust. These shells eventually form some of the most beautiful objects in the universe, called planetary nebulae.

    'This new image gives us a rare view of the early death throes of stars like our Sun. For the first time, we can see phenomena leading to the formation of planetary nebulae. Until now, this had only been predicted by theory, but had never been seen directly,' said Dr. Raghvendra Sahai, research scientist and member of the science team at JPL for the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2.

    The object is sometimes called the Rotten Egg Nebula, because it contains a lot of sulphur, which would produce an awful odor if one could smell in space. The object is also known as the Calabash Nebula or by the technical name OH231.8+4.2.

    The densest parts of the nebula are composed of material ejected recently by the central star and accelerated in opposite directions. This material, shown as yellow in the image, is zooming away at speeds up to one and a half million kilometers per hour (one million miles per hour). Most of the star's original mass is now contained in these bipolar gas structures.

    A team of Spanish and American astronomers used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study how the gas stream rams into the surrounding material, shown in blue. They believe that such interactions dominate the formation process in planetary nebulae. Due to the high speed of the gas, shock-fronts are formed on impact and heat the surrounding gas. Although computer calculations have predicted the existence and

  9. Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    M16 (the Eagle Nebula) is a striking star forming region, with a complex morphology of gas and dust sculpted by the massive stars in NGC 6611. Detailed studies of the famous ``elephant trunks'' dramatically increased our understanding of the massive star feedback into the parent molecular cloud. A rich young stellar population (2-3 Myr) has been identified, from massive O-stars down to substellar masses. Deep into the remnant molecular material, embedded protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and maser sources bear evidence of ongoing star formation in the nebula, possibly triggered by the massive cluster members. M 16 is a excellent template for the study of star formation under the hostile environment created by massive O-stars. This review aims at providing an observational overview not only of the young stellar population but also of the gas remnant of the star formation process.

  10. Direct photography of the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Roosen, R. G.; Thompson, J.; Ludden, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses a series of wide-angle photographs taken of the Gum Nebula in the traditional region including H-alpha with the aid of a 40-cm and an 80-cm lens in both the red and the green. The photographs support the large dimensions (75 deg in galactic longitude by 40 deg in galactic latitude) of the Gum Nebula suggested earlier, and the appearance is consistent with an origin due to photons from a supernova outburst. The relatively high-density gas has cooled and is visible on the red plates. The low-density gas has remained at a high temperature and may be visible as diffuse emission on the green plates.

  11. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 104 more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  12. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 10(exp 4) more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  13. Giant Hα Nebula Surrounding the Starburst Merger NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Ohyama, Youichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Tanaka, Hisashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2016-03-01

    We revealed the detailed structure of a vastly extended Hα-emitting nebula (“Hα nebula”) surrounding the starburst/merging galaxy NGC 6240 by deep narrow-band imaging observations with the Subaru Suprime-Cam. The extent of the nebula is ˜90 kpc in diameter and the total Hα luminosity amounts to LHα ≈ 1.6 × 1042 erg s-1. The volume filling factor and the mass of the warm ionized gas are ˜10-4-10-5 and ˜5 × 108 M⊙, respectively. The nebula has a complicated structure, which includes numerous filaments, loops, bubbles, and knots. We found that there is a tight spatial correlation between the Hα nebula and the extended soft-X-ray-emitting gas, both in large and small scales. The overall morphology of the nebula is dominated by filamentary structures radially extending from the center of the galaxy. A large-scale bipolar bubble extends along the minor axis of the main stellar disk. The morphology strongly suggests that the nebula was formed by intense outflows—superwinds—driven by starbursts. We also found three bright knots embedded in a looped filament of ionized gas that show head-tail morphologies in both emission-line and continuum, suggesting close interactions between the outflows and star-forming regions. Based on the morphology and surface brightness distribution of the Hα nebula, we propose the scenario that three major episodes of starburst/superwind activities, which were initiated ˜102 Myr ago, formed the extended ionized gas nebula of NGC 6240. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  14. Planetesimal Formation in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Mrad, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this talk we will address two distinct phases of planetesimal formation, each of which is fundamentally dependent upon the coupled interactions of particles and turbulent nebula gas. It has been shown both numerically and experimentally that 3-D (three dimensional) turbulence concentrates aerodynamically size-selected particles by orders of magnitude. In a previous review chapter we illustrated the initial predictions of Turbulent Concentration (TC) as applied to the solar nebula. We predicted the particle size which will be most effectively concentrated by turbulence; it is the particle which has a gas drag stopping time equal to the overturn time of the smallest (Kolmogorov scale) eddy. The primary uncertainty is the level of nebula turbulence, or Reynolds number Re, which can be expressed in terms of the standard nebula eddy viscosity parameter alpha = Rev(sub m)/cH, where v(sub m) is molecular viscosity, c is sound speed, and H is vertical scale height. Several studies, and observed lifetimes of circumstellar disks, have suggested that the level of nebula turbulence can be described by alpha = 10(exp -2) - 10(exp -4). There is some recent concern about how energy is provided to maintain this turbulence, but the issue remains open. We adopt a canonical minimum mass nebula with a range of alpha is greater than 0. We originally showed that chondrule-sized particles are selected for concentration in the terrestrial planet region if alpha = 10(exp -3) - 10(exp -4). In addition, Paque and Cuzzi found that the size distribution of chondrules is an excellent match for theoretical predictions. One then asks by what concentration factor C these particles can be concentrated; our early numerical results indicated an increase of C with alpha, and were supported by simple scaling arguments, but the extrapolation range was quite large and the predictions (C is approximately equal to 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) not unlikely) uncertain. The work presented here, which makes use of

  15. CRL 618: A Nascent Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafoya, D.; Loinard, L.; Fonfría, J. P.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Pech, G.

    2014-04-01

    CRL 618 is an object that exhibits characteristics of both AGB and post-AGB star. It also displays a spectacular array of bipolar lobes with a dense equatorial region, which makes it an excellent object to study the development of asymmetries in evolved stars. In the recent decades, an elliptical compact HII region located in the center of the nebula has been seen to be increasing in size and flux. This seems to be due to the ionization of the circumstellar envelope by the central star, and it would be indicating the beginning of the planetary nebula phase for CRL 618. We analyzed interferometric radio continuum data at ~5 and 22 GHz from observations carried out at seven epochs with the VLA. We traced the increase of the flux of the ionized region over a period of ~26 years. We measured the dimensions of the HII region directly from the brightness distribution images to determine the increase of its size over time. For one of the epochs we analyzed observations at six frequencies from which we estimated the electron density distribution. We carried out model calculations of the spectral energy distribution at two different epochs to corroborate our observational results. We found that the radio continuum flux and the size of the ionized region have been increasing monotonically in the last three decades. The size of the major axis of the HII region shows a dependance with frequency, which has been interpreted as a result of a gradient of the electron density in this direction. The growth of the HII region is due to the expansion of an ionized wind whose mass-loss rate increased continuously for a period of ~100 years until a few decades ago, when the mass-loss rate experienced a sudden decline. Our results indicate that the beginning of the ionization of the circumstellar envelope began around 1971, which marks the start of the planetary nebula phase of CRL 618.

  16. Infrared nebula in the Chamaeleon T association

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.D.; Henize, K.G.

    1983-11-01

    Data are tabulated for seven nebulae in the Chamaeleon T association. Three, which are large and clearly related to illuminating stars, appear to be typical reflection nebulae. Three are small wisps attached to stars and are probably cometary-type reflection nebulae. The remaining nebula is a triangular wisp having an unusually red spectral energy distribution and showing no illuminating star on visual wavelength photographs. The western tip of this nebula coincides closely with the position of a recently reported infrared source. The nebula is probably one lobe of a bipolar nebula.

  17. N44C nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Resembling the hair in Botticelli's famous portrait of the birth of Venus, an image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured softly glowing filaments streaming from hot young stars in a nearby nebula.

    The image, presented by the Hubble Heritage Project, was taken in 1996 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The image is available online at

    http://heritage.stsci.edu , http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/12 orhttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    On the top right of the image is a source of its artistic likeness, a network of nebulous filaments surrounding the Wolf-Rayet star. This type of rare star is characterized by an exceptionally vigorous 'wind' of charged particles. The shock of the wind colliding with the surrounding gas causes the gas to glow.

    The Wolf-Rayet star is part of N44C, a nebula of glowing hydrogen gas surrounding young stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Visible from the Southern Hemisphere, the Large Magellanic Cloud is a small companion galaxy to the Milky Way.

    What makes N44C peculiar is the temperature of the star that illuminates it. The most massive stars -- those that are 10 to 50 times more massive than the Sun -- have maximum temperatures of 30,000 to 50,000 degrees Celsius (54,000 to 90,000 degrees Fahrenheit). The temperature of this star is about 75,000 degrees Celsius (135,000 degrees Fahrenheit). This unusually high temperature may be due to a neutron star or black hole that occasionally produces X-rays but is now inactive.

    N44C is part of a larger complex that includes young, hot, massive stars, nebulae, and a 'superbubble' blown out by multiple supernova explosions. Part of the superbubble is seen in red at the very bottom left of the Hubble image.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard

  18. New portrait of Omega Nebula's glistening watercolours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    The Omega Nebula, sometimes called the Swan Nebula, is a dazzling stellar nursery located about 5500 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). An active star-forming region of gas and dust about 15 light-years across, the nebula has recently spawned a cluster of massive, hot stars. The intense light and strong winds from these hulking infants have carved remarkable filigree structures in the gas and dust. When seen through a small telescope the nebula has a shape that reminds some observers of the final letter of the Greek alphabet, omega, while others see a swan with its distinctive long, curved neck. Yet other nicknames for this evocative cosmic landmark include the Horseshoe and the Lobster Nebula. Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux discovered the nebula around 1745. The French comet hunter Charles Messier independently rediscovered it about twenty years later and included it as number 17 in his famous catalogue. In a small telescope, the Omega Nebula appears as an enigmatic ghostly bar of light set against the star fields of the Milky Way. Early observers were unsure whether this curiosity was really a cloud of gas or a remote cluster of stars too faint to be resolved. In 1866, William Huggins settled the debate when he confirmed the Omega Nebula to be a cloud of glowing gas, through the use of a new instrument, the astronomical spectrograph. In recent years, astronomers have discovered that the Omega Nebula is one of the youngest and most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way. Active star-birth started a few million years ago and continues through today. The brightly shining gas shown in this picture is just a blister erupting from the side of a much larger dark cloud of molecular gas. The dust that is so prominent in this picture comes from the remains of massive hot stars that have ended their brief lives and ejected material back into space, as well as the cosmic detritus from which future suns form. The

  19. Planetary nebulae. V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseking, F.

    1984-01-01

    The characterization of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN) using observations of their shells (SPN), is discussed. The observability, from earth and space, of the emission spectrum of a typical CSPN (represented by a 50,000-K blackbody) at a distance of several kpc is illustrated graphically. It is shown that the most important and intense portion of this spectrum, the Lyman quanta below 912 A, is absorbed by the interstellar medium, and specifically by the SPN itself. The method developed by Zanstra in 1927 to estimate the Lyman emission of the CSPN from the Balmer emission (or the optical He-recombination spectrum) of the SPN is explained. Recent satellite observations in the 100-300-nm range have confirmed the accuracy of the H and/or He Zanstra temperature as an estimate of CSPN effective temperature.

  20. The Great Crab Nebula Superflare

    NASA Video Gallery

    There are strange goings-on in the Crab Nebula. On April 12, 2011, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected the most powerful in a series of gamma-ray flares occurring somewhere within the s...

  1. Video Zoom into Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video opens with a backyard view of the nighttime sky centered on the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. We zoom into a vast donut-shaped feature called the Veil Nebula. It is the tattered expand...

  2. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Keppens, Rony

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we give a detailed account of the first three-dimensional (3D) relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of pulsar wind nebulae, with parameters most suitable for the Crab nebula. In contrast to the previous 2D simulations, we also consider pulsar winds with much stronger magnetization, up to σ ≃ few. The 3D models preserve the separation of the post-termination shock flow into the equatorial and polar components, but the polar jets are disrupted by the kink mode of the current driven instability and `dissolve' into the main body of the nebula after propagation of several shock radii. With the exception of the region near the termination shock, the 3D models do not exhibit the strong z-pinch configuration characteristic of the 1D and 2D models. Contrary to the expectations based on 1D analytical and semi-analytical models, the 3D solutions with highly magnetized pulsar winds still produce termination shocks with radii comparable to those deduced from the observations. The reason for this is not only the randomization of magnetic field observed in the 3D solutions, but also the magnetic dissipation inside the nebula. Assuming that the particle acceleration occurs only at the termination shock, we produced synthetic maps of the Crab nebula synchrotron emission. These maps retain most of the features revealed in the previous 2D simulations, including thin wisps and the inner knot. The polarization and variability of the inner knot is in a particularly good agreement with the observations of the Crab nebula and the overall polarization of the inner nebula is also reproduced quite well. However, the polar jet is not as bright as observed, suggesting that an additional particle acceleration, presumably related to the magnetic dissipation, has to be invoked.

  3. X-ray emission from Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.

    1998-09-01

    The Trifid Nebula is one of the best-studied astrophysical objects, a classical nebula of ionized gas from an O6V star glowing red light, and it is trisected by obscuring dust lanes. Our ROSAT/PSPC image for the first time reveals that the Trifid Nebula emits X-rays and its emitting region is ~ 7' diameter--as large as the HII region itself. %The only previously reported X-ray emission Three main X-ray peaks appear within ~ 4 pc diameter of diffuse emission, roughly spherical. The strongest peak has 2' size near the O star, but the centroid of the X-ray peak appears 25'' away from HD 164492. % which is larger than the PSPC point spread function. Thus the emission may be a shell surrounding the O star as observed in eta Carina, originating from the interaction of a stellar wind with a circumstellar shell. There are a few other X-ray peaks: along the northeastern dust lane and in the east, none of which coincide with any identified optical stars. The PSPC spectrum extracted from the entire Trifid nebula does not clearly distinguish between thermal, bremsstrahlung, and power-law models, due to lack of counts. However, all of these models imply the X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 2.4 keV) is greater than 0.2 - 3*E(34) ergs s(-1) . The diffuse emission is possibly thermal with a temperature of 0.3-1 keV, as in the other HII regions eta Carina and RCW 49. The strong stellar wind from an O star alone can inject an energy of ~ 10(36) ergs s(-1) into ISM; this energy can be converted to heat the ionized gas to X-ray temperature. While the global diffuse X-ray emitting region is similar to the optical HII region, the bright X-ray peaks coincide with the structures in the infrared, suggesting possible embedded stars and their interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  4. Utilitarian models of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Models of the primitive solar nebula based on a combination of theory, observations of T Tauri stars, and global conservation laws are presented. The models describe the motions of nebular gas, mixing of interstellar material during the formation of the nebula, and evolution of thermal structure in terms of several characteristic parameters. The parameters describe key aspects of the protosolar cloud (its rotation rate and collapse rate) and the nebula (its mass relative to the Sun, decay time, and density distribution). For most applications, the models are heuristic rather than predicted. Their purpose is to provide a realistic context for the interpretation of solar system data, and to distinquish those nebular characteristics that can be specified with confidence, independently of the assumtions of particular models, form those that are poorly constrained. It is demonstrated that nebular gas typically experienced large radial excursions during the evolution of the nebula and that both inward and outward mean radial velocities on the order of meters per second occured in the terrestrial planet region, with inward velocities predominant for most ofthe evolution. However, the time history of disk size, surface density, and radial velocities are sensitive to the total angular momentun of the protosolar cloud, which cannot be constrained by purely theoretical considerations.It is shown that a certain amount of 'formational' mixing of interstellar material was an inevitable consequenc of nebular mass and angular momentum transport during protostellar collapse, regardless of the specific transport mechanisms invloved. Even if the protosolar cloud was initially homogeneous, this mixing was important because it had the effect of mingling presolar material that had experienced different degrees of thermal processing during collapse and passage through the accertion shock. Nebular thermal structure is less sensitive to poorly constrained parameters than is dynamical

  5. Utilitarian models of the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1994-12-01

    Models of the primitive solar nebula based on a combination of theory, observations of T Tauri stars, and global conservation laws are presented. The models describe the motions of nebular gas, mixing of interstellar material during the formation of the nebula, and evolution of thermal structure in terms of several characteristic parameters. The parameters describe key aspects of the protosolar cloud (its rotation rate and collapse rate) and the nebula (its mass relative to the Sun, decay time, and density distribution). For most applications, the models are heuristic rather than predicted. Their purpose is to provide a realistic context for the interpretation of solar system data, and to distinquish those nebular characteristics that can be specified with confidence, independently of the assumtions of particular models, form those that are poorly constrained. It is demonstrated that nebular gas typically experienced large radial excursions during the evolution of the nebula and that both inward and outward mean radial velocities on the order of meters per second occured in the terrestrial planet region, with inward velocities predominant for most ofthe evolution. However, the time history of disk size, surface density, and radial velocities are sensitive to the total angular momentun of the protosolar cloud, which cannot be constrained by purely theoretical considerations.It is shown that a certain amount of 'formational' mixing of interstellar material was an inevitable consequenc of nebular mass and angular momentum transport during protostellar collapse, regardless of the specific transport mechanisms invloved. Even if the protosolar cloud was initially homogeneous, this mixing was important because it had the effect of mingling presolar material that had experienced different degrees of thermal processing during collapse and passage through the accertion shock. Nebular thermal structure is less sensitive to poorly constrained parameters than is dynamical

  6. The presence of internal dust in the nebulae M 20 and IC 5146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkovskij, D. A.

    1989-06-01

    Photographic observations of M 20 and IC 5146 were used to determine the radiation fluxes in the H-alpha spectral region and in two regions of the continuum. The observational data were introduced into a model of a nebula with internal dust which absorbs and scatters the radiation from the H II region and the central star. This made it possible to obtain probable estimates of the optical depth of the dust atmosphere of the nebula.

  7. Planetary nebulae and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to available published data on planetary nebulae (PN), some 40 objects largely concentrated towards the galactic center and anticenter regions were included. All were observed with the Lick 3(sup m) telescope and image tube scanner. Abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Cl, and Ar were determined by a procedure in which theoretical models were used to obtain ionization correction factors (ICF). Of the 106 PN, 66 are N-rich and 40 are N-poor. There appear to be no significant differences between the average compositions in the solar neighborhood and the average taken over the entire observable portion of the galaxy.

  8. The Gum Nebula and Related Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Proceedings of a symposium concerning the Gum Nebula (GN) and related topics are reported. Papers presented include: Colin Gum and the discovery of the GN; identification of the GN as the fossil Stromgren sphere of Vela X Supernova; size and shape of GN; formation of giant H-2 regions following supernova explosions; radio astronomy Explorer 1 observations of GN; cosmic ray effects in the GN; low intensity H beta emission from the interstellar medium; and how to recognize and analyze GN. Astronomical charts and diagrams are included.

  9. Far-UV Signature of Molecular Hydrogen in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, S.

    Recent observations of two planetary nebulae, NGC 6720 and NGC 7293 (the Ring and Helix Nebulae), find the peak in the near-infrared quadrupole vibrational transitions of H_2 to be coincident with the bright optical structure. Vibrational states of molecular hydrogen can be populated radiatively, following absorption and subsequent re-emission of far-UV photons or by thermal processes, such as shocks. Historically, there has been disagreement about the excitation mechanism of the molecular gas in planetary nebulae, and we propose to resolve these issues through FUSE observations. The electronic transitions responsible for the far-UV cascade of H_2 cannot be excited thermally, thus the detection of the fluorescent signature with FUSE would allow us to unambiguously determine the degree to which radiative excitation is responsible for the observed infrared emission. These observations would serve two purposes, clarifying the physical processes at work in NGC 6720 and 7293 while continuing our investigation of the far-UV characteristics of molecular hydrogen and dust in a range of environments. Planetary nebulae complement our existing program to observe reflection nebulae by exploring a new range of gas densities where a much harder ultraviolet radiation field is present. This diverse set of environments allows us to constrain models of the formation and destruction of molecular hydrogen in photodissociation regions.

  10. The spatial distribution of infrared radiation from visible reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luan, Ling; Werner, Michael W.; Dwek, Eli; Sellgren, Kris

    1989-01-01

    The emission at IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands of reflection nebulae is far in excess of that expected from the longer wavelength equilibrium thermal emission. The excess emission in the IRAS 12 micron band is a general phenomenon, seen in various components of interstellar medium such as IR cirrus clouds, H II regions, atomic and molecular clouds, and also normal spiral galaxies. This excess emission has been attributed to UV excited fluorescence in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or to the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small grains. Results are presented of studies of IRAS data on reflection nebulae selected from the van den Bergh reflection nebulae sample. Detailed scans of flux ratio and color temperature across the nebulae were obtained in order to study the spatial distribution of IR emission. A model was used to predict the spatial distribution of IR emission from dust grains illuminated by a B type star. The model was also used to explore the excitation of the IRAS 12 micron band emission as a function of stellar temperature. The model predictions are in good agreement with the analysis of reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with stellar temperature ranging from 21,000 down to 3,000 K.

  11. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Gregory S.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Cheng, Kwang P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Isensee, Joan E.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-08-01

    We obtained ultraviolet images of the Crab Nebula with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission in 1990 December. The UV continuum morphology of the Crab is generally similar to that in the optical region, but the wispy structures are less conspicuous in the UV and X-ray. UV line emission from the thermal filaments is not strong. UV spectral index maps with a resolution of 10 arcsecs show a significant gradient across the nebula, with the outer parts being redder, as expected from synchrotron losses. The location of the bluest synchrotron continuum does not coincide with the pulsar.

  12. Massive star-formation in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Perez-Martinez, S.; Cesarsky, D.

    1999-03-01

    The Trifid nebula is a young galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected using ISO and ground-based telescopes. The sources are massive (17 to 60 0.20em Modot) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense apparently still inactive cores to somewhat more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source which powers an optical jet. these observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation.

  13. HUBBLE'S PLANETARY NEBULA GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [Top left] - IC 3568 lies in the constellation Camelopardalis at a distance of about 9,000 light-years, and has a diameter of about 0.4 light-years (or about 800 times the diameter of our solar system). It is an example of a round planetary nebula. Note the bright inner shell and fainter, smooth, circular outer envelope. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Top center] - NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star (in the center of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2,200 light- years away in the constellation Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) and NASA [Top right ] - NGC 3918 is in the constellation Centaurus and is about 3,000 light-years from us. Its diameter is about 0.3 light-year. It shows a roughly spherical outer envelope but an elongated inner balloon inflated by a fast wind from the hot central star, which is starting to break out of the spherical envelope at the top and bottom of the image. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Bottom left] - Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat generated by fast winds causes

  14. THE TRIFID NEBULA: STELLAR SIBLING RIVALRY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    previously in the Eagle Nebula, another star-forming region photographed by Hubble. The stalk has survived because at its tip there is a knot of gas that is dense enough to resist being eaten away by the powerful radiation. Reflected starlight at the tip of the EGG may be due to light from the Trifid's central star, or from a young stellar object buried within the EGG. Similarly, a tiny spike of emission pointing outward from the EGG looks like a small stellar jet. Hubble astronomers are tentatively interpreting this jet as the last gasp from a star that was cut off from its supply lines 100,000 years ago. The images were taken Sept. 8, 1997 through filters that isolate emission from hydrogen atoms, ionized sulfur atoms, and doubly ionized oxygen atoms. The images were combined in a single color composite picture. While the resulting picture is not true color, it is suggestive of what a human eye might see. Credits: NASA and Jeff Hester (Arizona State University)

  15. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion Molecular Cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New observations of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 have been made from 1 to 100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry, and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near-infrared sources, IRS 1 and IRS 4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS 1 and IRS 4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far-infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS 1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS 1 can be characterized by L of 500 solar luminosities or less and T of roughly 1000 K. The near-infrared albedo of the grains in the IRS 1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  16. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion molecular cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y.; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New obervations of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 have been made from 1-100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near infrared sources, IRS1 and IRS4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS1 and IRS4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS1 can be characterized by L less than or equal to 500 Solar luminosities and T approx. 1000 K. The near infrared (1-5) micron albedo of the grains in the IRS1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  17. A search for planetary nebulae on the 'POSS'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengel, J.; Hartl, H.; Weinberger, R.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a search for new planetary nebulae on a quarter of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) E plates are reported. A total of 218 prints evenly scattered over all accessible galactic longitudes and latitudes was examined, in addition to the entire region between longitudes 33 and 213 deg and latitudes + or - 2 deg. Five objects satisfying the criteria of emission nebulosity characteristic of planetary nebulae and/or a central blue star were detected, as well as another three dozen very faint, roundish unlisted objects. The coordinates, dimensions, central star magnitudes, surfaces brightnesses, nebular magnitudes, volumes and estimated distances of the five probable planetary nebulae are presented, and it is noted that all but one of them are of considerably low surface brightness.

  18. Induced massive star formation in the trifid nebula?

    PubMed

    Cernicharo; Lefloch; Cox; Cesarsky; Esteban; Yusef-Zadeh; Mendez; Acosta-Pulido; Garcia Lopez RJ; Heras

    1998-10-16

    The Trifid nebula is a young (10(5) years) galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected with the infrared space observatory. The sources are massive (17 to 60 solar masses) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense, apparently still inactive cores to more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source that powers an optical jet. These observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation in the Trifid nebula. PMID:9774270

  19. Physics and chemistry of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lunine, J I

    1997-06-01

    The solar system is thought to have begun in a flattened disk of gas and dust referred to traditionally as the solar nebula. Such a construct seems to be a natural product of the collapse of dense parts of giant molecular clouds, the vast star-forming regions that pepper the Milky Way and other galaxies. Gravitational, magnetic and thermal forces within the solar nebula forced a gradual evolution of mass toward the center (where the sun formed) and angular momentum (borne by a small fraction of the mass) toward the outer more distant regions of the disk. This evolution was accompanied by heating and a strong temperature contrast from the hot, inner regions to the cold, more remote parts of the disk. The resulting chemistry in the disk determined the initial distribution of organic matter in the planets; most of the reduced carbon species, in condensed form, were located beyond the asteroid belt (the 'outer' solar system). The Earth could have received much of its inventory of pre-biological material from comets and other icy fragments of the process of planetary formation in the outer solar system.

  20. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  1. The Formation of a Planetary Nebula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Proposes a scenario to describe the formation of a planetary nebula, a cloud of gas surrounding a very hot compact star. Describes the nature of a planetary nebula, the number observed to date in the Milky Way Galaxy, and the results of research on a specific nebula. (MDH)

  2. The Trifid Nebula: Stellar Sibling Rivalry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A zoom into the Trifid Nebula starts with ground-based observations and ends with a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. Another HST image shows star formation in the nebula and the video concludes with a ground-based image of the Trifid Nebula.

  3. Convective solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirellesfilho, C.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    1994-01-01

    Analyzing turbulent flows with rotation, Dubrulle and Valdettaro have concluded that some new effects come into play and may modify the standard picture we have concerning turbulence. In that respect the value of the Rossby number is of crucial importance since it will determine the transition between regimes where rotation is or is not important. With rotation there will be a tendency to constrain the motion to the plane perpendicular to the rotation axis and as a consequence the horizontal scale will increase as compared to the longitudinal one, which means that the turnover time in this direction will increase. The net effect is that the energy cascade down process is hindered by rotation. As a matter of fact, when rotation is present one observes two cascades: an enstrophy (vorticity) cascade from large scales to small scales; and an inverse energy cascade from small scales to large scales. Since the first process is not efficient on transporting energy to the dissipation range, what we see is energy storage in the large structures at the expense of the small structures. This kind of behavior has been confirmed experimentally. For a very large gamma we obtain, in the inertial range, a spectrum of k(exp -3) instead of the usual Kilmogorov's k(exp -5/3) spectrum. In reality, when rotation is dominant, energy gets stored in inertial waves that propagate it essentially in the longitudinal direction. In that case, we can no longer assign just one viscosity to the fluid and, what is most important, the concept of viscosity loses its meaning since we no longer have local transport of energy. Such results, however, were derived considering a hot disk, in which opacity is mainly given by electron scattering. In the present work we have applied the formulation developed in the previous work for the description of the viscous-stage solar nebula.

  4. Forming Planets in the Hostile Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Can protoplanetary disks form and be maintained around low-mass stars in the harsh environment of a highly active, star-forming nebula? A recent study examines the Carina nebula to answer this question.Crowded ClustersStars are often born in clusters that contain both massive and low-mass stars. The most massive stars in these clusters emit far-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet light that irradiates the region around them, turning the surrounding area into a hostile environment for potential planet formation.Planet formation from protoplanetary disks typically requires timescales of at least 12 million years. Could the harsh radiation from massive stars destroy the protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars by photoevaporation before planets even have a chance to form?Artists impression of a protoplanetary disk. Such disks can be photoevaporated by harsh ultraviolet light from nearby massive stars, causing the disk to be destroyed before planets have a chance to form within them. [ESO/L. Calada]Turning ALMA Toward CarinaA perfect case study for exploring hostile environments is the Carina nebula, located about 7500 lightyears away and home to nearly 100 O-type stars as well as tens of thousands of lower-mass young stars. The Carina population is ~14 Myr old: old enough to form planets within protoplanetary disks, but also old enough that photoevaporation could already have wreaked havoc on those disks.Due to the dense stellar populations in Carinas clusters, this is a difficult region to explore, but the Atacama Large Millimeter-submillimeter Array (ALMA) is up to the task. In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Adal Mesa-Delgado (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) made use of ALMAs high spatial resolution to image four regions spaced throughout Carina, searching for protoplanetary disks.Detections and Non-DetectionsTwo evaporating gas globules in the Carina nebula, 104-593 and 105-600, that each contain a protoplanetary disk. The top panels are

  5. Molecular Hydrogen in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela K.; Baldridge, Sean; Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) have long played the role of laboratories for investigating atomic, molecular, dust and plasma physics, which have applications to diverse other astrophysical environments. In this presentation we will discuss clumpy structures within planetary nebulae that are the hosts to, and protectors of molecular gas in an otherwise forbidding ionized zone. We will present new observations of the molecular hydrogen emission from several PNe and discuss their implications for the formation, evolution and survival/demise of such molecular globules. The science behind dust and molecule formation and survival that apply to many other astronomical objects and places.

  6. Messier's nebulae and star clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. G.

    Charles Messier's Catalogue of nebulae and star clusters, published in 1784, marked the start of a new era of deep sky astronomy. Today, this tradition of observing galaxies and clusters is kept alive by serious amateur astronomers who study the objects of the deep sky. Nearly all the objects are visible in a small telescope. The author has revised his definitive version of Messier's Catalogue. His own observations and drawings, together with maps and diagrams, make this a valuable introduction to deep sky observing. Historical and astrophysical notes bring the science of these nebulae right up to date.

  7. Binarity and the Abundance Discrepancy Problem in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Romano L. M.; García-Rojas, Jorge; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    The discrepancy between abundances computed using optical recombination lines and collisionally excited lines is a major unresolved problem in nebular astrophysics. Here, we show that the largest abundance discrepancies are reached in planetary nebulae with close binary central stars. We illustrate this using deep spectroscopy of three nebulae with a post common-envelope (CE) binary star. Abell 46 and Ou 5 have O2+/H+ abundance discrepancy factors larger than 50, and as high as 300 in the inner regions of Abell 46. Abell 63 has a smaller discrepancy factor around 10, which is still above the typical values in ionized nebulae. Our spectroscopic analysis supports previous conclusions that, in addition to “standard” hot ({{T}e} ˜ 104 K) gas, there exists a colder ({{T}e} ˜ 103 K), ionized component that is highly enriched in heavy elements. These nebulae have low ionized masses, between 10-3 and 10-1 M⊙ depending on the adopted electron densities and temperatures. Since the much more massive red giant envelope is expected to be entirely ejected in the CE phase, the currently observed nebulae would be produced much later, during post-CE mass loss episodes when the envelope has already dispersed. These observations add constraints to the abundance discrepancy problem. We revise possible explanations. Some explanations are naturally linked to binarity such as, for instance, high-metallicity nova ejecta, but it is difficult at this stage to depict an evolutionary scenario consistent with all of the observed properties. We also introduce the hypothesis that these nebulae are the result of tidal destruction, accretion, and ejection of Jupiter-like planets.

  8. Monitoring the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo

    The VYSOS (Variable Young Stars Optical Survey) project has at its disposal five small telescopes: a 5-inch and a 20-inch robotic optical imaging telescope in Hawaii funded by the NSF, and a 6-inch robotic optical imaging telescope, a 32-inch robotic infrared imaging telescope, and a 60-inch optical spectroscopic telescope in Chile, funded and operated from Germany. Through an agreement between the leaders of the two sites (B. Reipurth and R. Chini), it has been decided to devote a significant fraction of time on these facilities to a large Key Project, conducting a massive monitoring survey of the Orion Nebula Cluster. The vast data streams are being reduced through automated customized pipelines. The applicant seeks funding to employ a postdoc and an undergraduate assistant to work at the University of Hawaii and collaborate on the analysis of the data. Virtually all young stars are variable, with a wide range of amplitudes and characteristic timescales. This is mainly due to accretion shocks as material from circumstellar disks fall onto the stars along magnetic funnel flows, but also giant star spots, magnetic flares, occultations by orbiting dust condensations, and eclipses by companions can modulate the light from the nascent star. It is increasingly recognized that the rather static view of pre-main sequence evolution that has prevailed for many years is misleading, and that time-dependent phenomena may hold the key to an understanding of the way young stars grow and their circumstellar environments evolve. The VYSOS project is designed to bring sophisticated modern techniques to bear on the long neglected problem of variability in young solar type stars. To interpret the observations they will be compared to sophisticated MHD models of circumstellar disks around young stars. The Orion Nebula Cluster is the nearest rich region of star formation, and numerous, albeit heterogeneous, studies exist of the cluster members. The present study will provide the first

  9. A Self-Perpetuating Catalyst for the Production of Complex Organic Molecules in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A.; Johnson, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. Many mechanisms may contribute to the total organic content in protostellar nebulae, ranging from organics formed via ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the cold dark clouds from which such nebulae collapse, to similar ion-molecule and atom-molecule reactions in the dark regions of the nebula far from the proto star, to gas phase reactions in sub-nebulae around growing giant planets and in the nebulae themselves. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. The Haber-Bosch catalytic reduction of N2 by hydrogen was thought to produce the reduced nitrogen found in meteorites. However, the clean iron metal surfaces that catalyze these reactions are easily poisoned via reaction with any number of molecules, including the very same complex organics that they produce and both reactions work more efficiently in the hot regions of the nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Although none work as well as pure iron grains, and all produce a wide range of organic products rather than just pure methane, these materials are not truly catalysts.

  10. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  11. The Eagle Nebula Science on NIF experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Heeter, Robert; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    The Eagle Nebula NIF experiment was one of nine selected for laser time through the Science on NIF program. The goal of this scale laboratory experiment is to study the dynamic evolution of distinctive structures in star forming regions of astrophysical molecular clouds such as the Pillars of the Eagle Nebula. That evolution is driven by photoionizing radiation from nearby stars. A critical aspect of the radiation is its very directional nature at the photoionization front. The long duration of the drive and its directionality can generate new classes of instabilities and dynamic flows at the front that may be responsible for the shapes of Pillars and other structures. The experiment will leverage and modify the existing NIF Radiation Transport platform, replacing the target at the back end of the halfraum with a collimating aperture, and extending the existing 20 ns drive to longer times, using a combination of gas fill and other new design features. The apertured, quasi-collimated drive will be used to drive a target placed 2 mm away from the aperture. The astrophysical background and the status of the experimental design will be presented.

  12. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L. E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.c

    2010-05-15

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}4959, {lambda}5007, H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}6548, {lambda}6584, and [S II] {lambda}6717, {lambda}6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [S II] {lambda}6717 /[S II] {lambda}6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  13. Optical line intensities in the Trifid nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Lynds, B.T.; Oneil, E.J. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Observations of the Trifid nebula (M20) obtained in H-alpha; He I (587.6 nm); and the forbidden lines of N II (658.3 nm), S II (671.6 and 673 nm), O III (500.7 nm), and O II (272.6 and 372.9 nm) using either the CIT long-slit spectrograph or a direct-mode CCD with narrow-band interference filters on the 92-cm telescope at KPNO are reported. The data are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail and a model is proposed to explain the scattering measurements. Findings discussed include a single central O7 V star with Teff = about 37,500 K, a dusty plasma ionized by this star, mean nebular electron density 150/cu cm, a central hole of radius 0.2 times that of the ionized zone, dust extending beyond the ionized region, overall temperature 7000-8000 K, filament temperatures up to 9000 K, dust optical depth 1.5 at H-beta, dust albedo 0.5, emission-nebula radius 2.8 pc, and total mass about 1700 solar mass (comprising 340 solar mass ionized material, about 800 solar mass unionized cloud material, and about 600 solar mass in an outer dust sphere). 18 references.

  14. Optical line intensities in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, B. T.; Oneil, E. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Observations of the Trifid nebula (M20) obtained in H-alpha; He I (587.6 nm); and the forbidden lines of N II (658.3 nm), S II (671.6 and 673 nm), O III (500.7 nm), and O II (272.6 and 372.9 nm) using either the CIT long-slit spectrograph or a direct-mode CCD with narrow-band interference filters on the 92-cm telescope at KPNO are reported. The data are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail and a model is proposed to explain the scattering measurements. Findings discussed include a single central O7 V star with Teff = about 37,500 K, a dusty plasma ionized by this star, mean nebular electron density 150/cu cm, a central hole of radius 0.2 times that of the ionized zone, dust extending beyond the ionized region, overall temperature 7000-8000 K, filament temperatures up to 9000 K, dust optical depth 1.5 at H-beta, dust albedo 0.5, emission-nebula radius 2.8 pc, and total mass about 1700 solar mass (comprising 340 solar mass ionized material, about 800 solar mass unionized cloud material, and about 600 solar mass in an outer dust sphere).

  15. Millimeter-wave Molecular Line Observations of the Tornado Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, and HCO+ with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = -14 km s-1 and +5 km s-1. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado "head" in the -14 km s-1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s-1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the -14 km s-1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s-1 cloud collided into the -14 km s-1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  16. X-Rays and Protostars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Corcoran, Michael F.; Chu, You-Hua; Reach, William T.

    2001-11-01

    The Trifid Nebula is a young H II region, recently rediscovered as a ``pre-Orion'' star-forming region, containing protostars undergoing violent mass ejections visible in optical jets as seen in images from the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. We report the first X-ray observations of the Trifid Nebula using ROSAT and ASCA. The ROSAT image shows a dozen X-ray sources, with the brightest X-ray source being the O7 star, HD 164492, which provides most of the ionization in the nebula. We also identify 85 T Tauri star and young, massive star candidates from near-infrared colors using the JHKs color-color diagram from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). Ten X-ray sources have counterpart near-infrared sources. The 2MASS stars and X-ray sources suggest there are potentially numerous protostars in the young H II region of the Trifid. ASCA moderate-resolution spectroscopy of the brightest source shows hard emission up to 10 keV with a clearly detected Fe K line. The best model fit is a two-temperature (T=1.2×106 K and 39×106 K) thermal model with additional warm absorbing media. The hotter component has an unusually high temperature for either an O star or an H II region; a typical Galactic H II region could not be the primary source for such hot temperature plasma and the Fe XXV line emission. We suggest that the hotter component originates in either the interaction of the wind with another object (a companion star or a dense region of the nebula) or from flares from deeply embedded young stars.

  17. X-rays and Protostars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Corcoran, M. F.; Chu, Y.-H.; Reach, W. T.

    2001-05-01

    The Trifid Nebula is a young HII region recently rediscovered as a ``pre-Orion" star forming region, containing protostars undergoing violent mass ejections visible in optical jets as seen in images from the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. We report the first X-ray observations of the Trifid nebula using ROSAT and ASCA. The ROSAT image shows a dozen X-ray sources, with the brightest X-ray source being the O7 star, HD 164492, which provides most of the ionization in the nebula. We also identify 85 T Tauri star and young, massive star candidates from near-infrared colors using the JHKs color-color diagram from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Ten X-ray sources have counterpart near-infrared sources. The 2MASS stars and X-ray sources suggest there are potentially numerous protostars in the young HII region of the Trifid. ASCA moderate resolution spectroscopy of the brightest source shows hard emission up to 10 keV with a clearly detected Fe K line. The best model fit is a two-temperature (T = 2.0x 106 K and 36 x 106 K) thermal model with additional warm absorbing media. The hotter component has an unusually high temperature for either an O star or an HII region; a typical Galactic HII region could not be the primary source for such hot temperature plasma and the Fe XXV line emission. We suggest that the hot component originates in either the interaction of the wind with another object (a companion star or a dense region of the nebula) or from flares from deeply embedded young stars.

  18. The planetary nebula NGC 6826

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    Monochromatic photographs have established the NGC 6826 nebula as the third member of a group of very rare triple-shell planetaries (Feibelman, 1971, 1974). Kaler (1974) also characterized NGC 6826 as a giant halo planetary. Numerous errors and confusing statements regarding its size, structure and stratification are discussed, and the correct dimensions of the nebula are reported: the inner ring is 12.7 arcsec x 8.7 arcsec (Feibelman, 1971); the outer ring is 27 arcsec x 24 arcsec according to Curtis (1918), 25.7 arcsec x 24.4 arcsec according to Feibelman (1971), and 36 arcsec x 36 arcsec according to Coleman et al. (1975). The halo measurements range in diameter from 110 arcsec (Duncan, 1937) to 130 arcsec (Kaler, 1974) to 142 arcsec (Millikan, 1974). Values for the distance of NGC 6826 range from 0.75-1.16 kpc (Cahn and Kaler, 1971) to 2.265 kpc (Cudworth, 1974).

  19. The western Veil nebula (Image)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenny, M.

    2009-12-01

    The western Veil nebula in Cygnus. 15-part mosaic by Mike Glenny, Gloucestershire, taken over several months mostly in the autumn of 2008. 200mm LX90/f10 autoguided, Meade UHC filter, 0.3xFR/FF, Canon 20Da DSLR. Exposures each typically 10x360 secs at ISO1600, processed in Registax4, PixInsight (for flat field correction) & Photoshop CS.

  20. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  1. Birth and early evolution of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.

    2000-06-01

    Birth and early evolution of planetary nebulae is described. The study of the young planetary nebula Hen 1357 (Stingray Nebula) with HST is discussed. The observed characteristics of few interesting PPNe and PNe are described. The presence of multiple arcs or rings, knots, jets, collimated and bipolar out flows and disks shows the complex nature of mass loss process during the AGB and post-AGB phases of evolution.

  2. Lyman Alpha Photochemistry in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the project "Lyman Alpha Photochemistry in the Solar Nebula" was to model photochemistry in the primitive solar nebula and the early solar systems. As part of the modeling, it was necessary to model the composition of the gas and dust accreted by the solar nebula. This final report contains a list of publications where the results of this project have been published.

  3. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA NATURE OF PM 1-242, PM 1-318, AND PM 1-333 AND MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, L. F.; Guerrero, M. A.; Pereira, C. B. E-mail: mar@iaa.es

    2009-05-15

    We present intermediate resolution long-slit spectra and narrowband H{alpha}, [N II], and [O III] images of PM 1-242, PM 318, and PM 1-333, three IRAS sources classified as possible planetary nebulae. The spectra show that the three objects are true planetary nebulae and allow us to study their physical properties; the images provide a detailed view of their morphology. PM 1-242 is a medium- to high-excitation (e.g., He II{lambda}4686/H{beta} {approx} 0.4; [N II]{lambda}6584/H{alpha} {approx} 0.3) planetary nebula with an elliptical shape containing [N II] enhanced point-symmetric arcs. An electron temperature [T {sub e}([S III])] of {approx} 10250 K and an electron density [N {sub e}([S II])] of {approx} 2300 cm{sup -3} are derived for PM 1-242. Abundance calculations suggest a large helium abundance (He/H {approx} 0.29) in PM 1-242. PM 1-318 is a high-excitation (He II{lambda}4686/H{beta} {approx} 1) planetary nebula with a ring-like inner shell containing two enhanced opposite regions, surrounded by a fainter round attached shell brighter in the light of [O III]. PM 1-333 is an extended planetary nebula with a high-excitation (He II{lambda}4686/H{beta} up to {approx} 0.9) patchy circular main body containing two low-excitation knotty arcs. A low N {sub e}([S II]) of {approx} 450 cm{sup -3} and T {sub e}([O III]) of {approx} 15000 K are derived for this nebula. Abundance calculations suggest that PM 1-333 is a type I planetary nebula. The lack of a sharp shell morphology, low electron density, and high excitation strongly suggest that PM 1-333 is an evolved planetary nebula. PM 1-333 also shows two low-ionization polar structures whose morphology and emission properties are reminiscent of collimated outflows. We compare PM 1-333 with other evolved planetary nebulae with collimated outflows and find that outflows among evolved planetary nebulae exhibit a large variety of properties, in accordance with these observed in younger planetary nebula.

  4. Multipolar structures in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2002-12-01

    In addition to the main nebular shells, planetary nebulae (PNe) are now known to possess secondary shell structures called crowns and haloes. These structures can be satisfactorily explained by coupled dynamical and stellar evolutionary models based on the interacting winds scenario. By introducing time-variability in the fast wind, these models also have some success in accounting for other microsctructures such as jets and FLIERs. A more surprising development has been the discovery of multipolar structures in PNe. A number of bipolar nebulae have been found to have 2 or 3 bipolar axes, sometimes superimposed with multiple 2-dimensional rings and concentric circular arcs. The existence of these features suggests that the fast wind may be changing in direction in addition to varying in magnitude. In this paper, we will summarize the current observations of multipolar nebulae and discuss their possible origins. This work is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and by a Killam Fellowship from the Canada Council for the Arts.

  5. Radial Migration of Phyllosilicates in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, F. J.; Lauretta, D. S.; Hood, L. L.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the high temperatures of the inner solar nebula (within approx. 3 AU) would not have allowed water to be incorporated into solids. However, the presence of water on the surface of Earth, as well as evidence for it on the surface of an early Mars imply that water was incorporated into solid bodies in this region. How this water was delivered to the solid bodies has yet to be identified. In this abstract we explore the possibility that hydrous minerals, such as phyllosilicates, formed somewhere in the asteroid belt region of the solar nebula or beyond, and then migrated inward where they would be accreted into larger bodies.

  6. Detection of submillimeter polarization in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-01-01

    Linear polarization of the submillimeter (270 micron) continuum radiation from two regions of Orion was observed: one centered on the Kleinmann-Low Nebula and one centered on the 400 micron peak 1.5' south of the nebula. The polarizations measured for these regions are P = (1.7 +/-0.4)% at phi = 23 deg +/-7 deg and P=(1.7 +/- 0.5)% at phi = 27 deg +/- 7 deg respectively. A 2(sigma) upper limit, P or = 1.6%, was found for the nebular W3(OH). The position angle at KL is orthogonal to that measured at 11 microns by Dyck and Beichman and at 11 and 20 microns by Knacke and Capps. The far-IR values for KL reported by Gull et. al. (approx 2%) and by Cudlip et al. (1 to 2% level) are consistent with the submillimeter results.

  7. Warm Dust around Hot Stars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cesarsky, D.; Demyk, K.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on mid-infrared observations of the central region in the Trifid nebula, carried out with ISOCAM in several broad-band filters and in the low-resolution spectroscopic mode provided by the Circular Variable Filter. Analysis of the emission indicates the presence of a hot dust component (500-1000 K) and a warm dust component at lower temperatures (150-200 K) around several members of the cluster exciting the HII region and other stars undetected at optical wavelengths. Complementary VLA observations suggest that the mid-IR emission could arise from the a dust cocoon or a circumstellar disk, evaporated under the ionization of the central source and the exciting star of the nebula. In several sources the 9.7 micron silicate band is seen in emission. Around one young stellar source we found the presence of crystalline silicates in the circumstellar dust.

  8. Disks around hot stars in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cesarsky, D.; Demyk, K.; Rodriguez, L. F.

    2001-03-01

    We report on mid-IR observations of the central region in the Trifid nebula, carried out with ISOCAM in several broad-band infrared filters and in the low resolution spectroscopic mode provided by the circular variable filter. Analysis of the emission indicates the presence of a hot dust component (500 to 1000 K) and a warm dust component at lower temperatures (~ 150-200 K) around several members of the cluster exciting the H II region, and other stars undetected at optical wavelengths. Complementary VLA observations suggest that the mid-IR emission could arise from a dust cocoon or a circumstellar disk, evaporated under the ionization of the central source and the exciting star of the nebula. In several sources the 9.7 kern 0.20em mu m silicate band is seen in emission. One young stellar source shows indications of crystalline silicates in the circumstellar dust.

  9. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  10. Planetary Nebulae with Supporting IR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    We present new HST/WFPC2 imagery for the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6818. Observations were made in line filters F437N, F487N, F502N, and F656N plus continuum filter F547M. The primary goal was to develop a high spatial resolution (approx. 0.1 in.) map of the intrinsic line ratio [O III] 4363/5007 and thereby evaluate the electron temperature (T(sub e)) and the mean-square T(sub e) variation (t(sup 2) across the PN. In this process we developed an extinction map from the F487N (H(beta)) and F656N (H(alpha)) images by comparing the observed line ratios in each pixel to the theoretical ratio and computing a c(H(beta)) map which was used to correct the observed 4363/5007 ratios for reddening. We also adjust for the continuum contribution to the line filter data. We present color-coded pictures of the reddening (c(H(beta))) map, the [O III] T(sub e) map, as well as our determinations of t(sup 2). The T(sub e) map shows a decline from approx. 14000 K in the inner regions to approx. 11000 K at the outer edge. Such a radial T(sub e) gradient is expected for a high-excitation nebula with a prominent He(++) zone such as NGC 6818. A composite of images taken in 3 filters (F656N, red; F487N, blue; and F502N, [O III] 5007, green) shows a roughly spherical outer envelope as well as a brighter vase-shaped interior "bubble". There is a prominent orifice to the North and a smaller one to the South, along the major axis, possibly caused by a blow-out from a fast wind. This nebula has an appearance remarkably similar to that of the PN NGC 3918 previously imaged with HST by H. Bond. We note from the continuum images (F547M) two stars in the nebular field that are fainter than the prominent central star; these are roughly 2-4 sec. N and NE of the central star. Further study is needed to establish whether or not there may be a physical association of either star with the central star.

  11. MULTIPLE GENERATIONS OF STARS IN THE TARANTULA NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula -- that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Note for your calendar; Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  12. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE COLDEST PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE: THE BOOMERANG NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Huggins, P. J.; Nyman, L.-Å.; Gonidakis, I.

    2013-11-10

    The Boomerang Nebula is the coldest known object in the universe, and an extreme member of the class of pre-planetary nebulae, objects which represent a short-lived transitional phase between the asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebula evolutionary stages. Previous single-dish CO (J = 1-0) observations (with a 45'' beam) showed that the high-speed outflow in this object has cooled to a temperature significantly below the temperature of the cosmic background radiation. Here we report the first observations of the Boomerang Nebula with ALMA in the CO J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 lines to resolve the structure of this ultra-cold nebula. We find a central hourglass-shaped nebula surrounded by a patchy, but roughly round, cold high-velocity outflow. We compare the ALMA data with visible-light images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and confirm that the limb-brightened bipolar lobes seen in these data represent hollow cavities with dense walls of molecular gas and dust producing both the molecular-emission-line and scattered-light structures seen at millimeter and visible wavelengths. The large diffuse biconical shape of the nebula seen in the visible wavelength range is likely due to preferential illumination of the cold, high-velocity outflow. We find a compact source of millimeter-wave continuum in the nebular waist—these data, together with sensitive upper limits on the radio continuum using observations with ATCA, indicate the presence of a substantial mass of very large (millimeter-sized) grains in the waist of the nebula. Another unanticipated result is the detection of CO emission regions beyond the ultra-cold region which indicate the re-warming of the cold gas, most likely due to photoelectric grain heating.

  13. ISO Spectroscopy of Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the chemical properties of the dust shells around protoplanetary nebulae (PPNs) through a study of their short-wavelength (6-45 micron) infrared spectra. PPNs are evolved stars in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula stages. Spectral features in the 10 to 20 gm region indicate the chemical nature (oxygen- or carbon-rich), and the strengths of the features relate to the physical properties of the shells. A few bright carbon-rich PPNs have been observed to show PAH features and an unidentified 21 micron emission feature. We used the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to observe a sample of IRAS sources that have the expected properties of PPNs and for which we have accurate positions. Some of these have optical counterparts (proposal SWSPPN01) and some do not (SWSPPN02). We had previously observed these from the ground with near-infrared photometry and, for those with visible counterparts, visible photometry and spectroscopy, which we have combined with these new ISO data in the interpretation of the spectra. We have completed a study of the unidentified emission feature at 21 micron in eight sources. We find the shape of the feature to be the same in all of the sources, with no evidence of any substructure. The ratio of the emission peak to continuum ranges from 0.13 to 1.30. We have completed a study of seven PPNs and two other carbon-rich objects for which we had obtained ISO 2-45 micron observations. The unidentified emission features at 21 and 30 micron were detected in six sources, including four new detections of the 30 micron feature. This previously unresolved 30 micron feature was resolved and found to consist of a broad feature peaking at 27.2 micron (the "30 micron" feature) and a narrower feature peaking at 25.5 micron (the "26 micron" feature). This new 26 micron feature is detected in eight sources and is particularly strong in IRAS Z02229+6208 and 16594-4656. The unidentified

  14. Interstellar Organics, the Solar Nebula, and Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium inventory of organic material (Pendleton et al. 1994, Pe 2002) was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed. This provided the feedstock for the fo planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Saturn's satellites Phoeb open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cass Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saturn. VIMS spectral maps of Phoebe's surface reveal a complex consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon (CH2, CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 µm). Phoebe is the source encircling Saturn, and from which particles (5-20 µm size) spiral inward toward Saturn. They encounter Iapetus and Hyperion wh blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aroma abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, com carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2013). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis o itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 4, which is larger than the value found in the di as Phoebe is a primitive body that formed in the outer regions of the solar nebula and has preserved some of the original nebula inv understanding the content and degree of processing of that nebular material. There are other Phoebe-like TNOs that are presently b in the organic spectral region, but JWST will open that possibility for a number of objects. We now need to explore and understand organic-bearing Solar System material to the solar nebula and the inventory of ISM materials incorporated therein.

  15. Owl Nebula (M97, NGC 3587)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula in the constellation Ursa Major, position RA 11 h 14.8 m, dec. +55° 01'. The Owl is 3' across and gets its name from two adjacent dark patches that have the appearance of large eyes. The nebula is eleventh magnitude, and the central star is a faint magnitude 16....

  16. Trifid Nebula (M20, NGC 6514)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An emission nebula in the constellation Sagittarius, position RA 18 h 02.6 m, dec. -23° 02'. It is of ninth magnitude, with quite a high surface brightness, and measures 29' by 27'. It surrounds the multiple star HN 40, the light of whose brightest members energize the nebula. The Trifid gets its name from dark lanes that trisect it....

  17. Using Planetary Nebulae to Teach Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, Karen B.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed an interactive website, "Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra," (www.williams.edu/Astronomy/research/PN/nebulae/) that contains high-quality optical-to-near-infrared spectra, atlas information, and bibliographic references for more than 160 planetary nebulae that we have observed in the Milky Way Galaxy. To make the material more accessible to students, I have created three undergraduate-level exercises that explore physics-related aspects of planetary nebulae. "Emission Lines and Central Star Temperature” uses the presence or absence of emission lines from species with different ionization potentials to rank the temperatures of the exciting stars in a selection of nebulae. "Interstellar Reddening” uses the observed Balmer decrement in a sample of planetary nebulae at different Galactic latitudes to infer the distribution of interstellar dust in the Milky Way. Finally, "Determining the Gas Density in Planetary Nebulae,” which I will focus on here, uses the observed intensity ratio of the 6717 Å and 6731 Å emission lines from singly ionized sulfur to determine the electron density in the nebular gas. These exercises demonstrate that planetary nebula spectra are useful real-world examples illustrating a variety of physical principles, including the behavior of blackbodies, wavelength-dependent particle scattering, recombination-line ratios, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics.

  18. The Spatial Distribution of Carbon Dust in the Early Solar Nebula and the Carbon Content of Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, H.-P.; Trieloff, M.

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation and pyrolysis processes in the chemically active regions of the Solar Nebula are considered that are responsible for the destruction of the pristine carbon inherited from the ISM and its conversion to hydrocarbons and ultimately to CO.

  19. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The Carina Nebula is one of thc youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for approx.30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum. consistent with kT approx.130 eV blackbody radiation with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a, approx. 10(exp 6)-year-old neutron star housed in the Carina Nebula. Current star formation theory does not suggest that the progenitor of the neutron star and massive stars in the Carina Nebula, in particular (eta)Car, are coeval. This result demonstrates that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two major episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star would be responsible for remnants of high energy activity seen in multiple wavelengths.

  20. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Strohmayer, Tod; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2009-04-01

    The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ~30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with kT ~ 128 eV blackbody radiation with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that it is a ~106 year old neutron star housed in the Carina Nebula. Current star formation theory does not suggest that the progenitors of the neutron star and massive stars in the Carina Nebula, in particular η Car, are coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two major episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for remnants of high-energy activity seen in multiple wavelengths.

  1. The Orion Nebula in the Far-Infrared: FIFI-LS/SOFIA Mapped the PDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Randolf

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Nebula is the closest massive star forming region allowing us to study the physical conditions in such a region with high spatial resolution. We used the far infrared integral-field spectrometer, FIFI-LS, on-board the airborne observatory SOFIA to study the atomic and molecular gas in the Orion Nebula at medium spectral resolution. The large maps in several fine structure lines obtained with FIFI-LS cover the nebula from the BN/KL-object in the west to the bar in the south-east and gull feature in north-east. The fine structure lines can be used as a diagnostic for the physical conditions of the photon-dominated region (PDR), the interface between the HII-region and the molecular cloud.

  2. PAH and H2 emission in the Ring Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the Spitzer IRS (Infra Red Spectrograph) detection of mid-infrared polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and H2 associated with dense knots in the ring of the “oxygen-rich” (C/O∼⃒0.6-0.8) planetary nebula (PN) NGC6720 (Ring Nebula). We explored a further three oxygen-rich extended PNe with similar dataset available. These turned out to be non-detection of PAHs, although two of these do contain H2 emission knots. The presence of PAHs is discussed in the context of a bottom-up formation mechanism, in which first small hydrocarbons, and later PAHs, are formed in warm dense knots inside the ionised regions of PNe.

  3. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1983-03-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair lambda4724, 4726, [Ca V] lambda5309, [Fe V] lambda4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially "normal" helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  4. The violent interstellar medium associated with the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, C.; Paul, J. A.; Pettini, M.

    1982-06-01

    The physical conditions and chemical composition of the interstellar medium in line to HD 93205, an O3V star in the Great Carina Nebula, were studied, using UV spectra. The two main high velocity components show different relative abundance patterns. The red shifted component shows no depletion. For the blue shifted component, the relative abundance pattern seems difficult to explain in terms of elements locked into grains. Its composition is attributed to mixing with freshly synthetized material ejected by a recent supernova explosion. One low velocity component is identified with the normal interstellar gas in the disk of the Galaxy. In this component, column densities of interstellar CIV and SiIV, free from contamination by circumstellar material, were measured. The other low velocity component is identified with the approaching part of the expanding ionized nebula around the Carina OB associations. It consists of a dense HII region in which the two conspicuous OI fine structure lines originate.

  5. Near-Infrared Polarimetry of the Eagle Nebula (M 16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, Koji; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Hough, James H.; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nakajima, Yasushi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagashima, Chie; Kato, Daisuke; Fukuda, Naoya

    2007-06-01

    We carried out deep and wide (˜ 8 × 8) JHKs imaging polarimetry in the southern region of the Eagle Nebula (M 16). The polarization intensity map reveals that two YSOs with near-IR reflection nebulae are located at the tips of two famous molecular pillars (Pillars 1 and 2) facing toward the exciting stars of M 16. The centrosymmetric polarization pattern are consistent with those around Class I objects having circumstellar envelopes, confirming that star formation is now taking place at the two tips of the pillars under the influence of UV radiation from the exciting stars. Polarization measurements of point sources show that magnetic fields are aligned along some of the pillars, but in a direction that is quite different to the global structure in M 16.

  6. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair λ4724, 4726, [Ca V] λ5309, [Fe V] λ4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially “normal” helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  7. External Photoevaporation of the Solar Nebula: Jupiter's Noble Gas Enrichments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (~3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H2. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H2, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (lsim 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot & Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions <~ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot & Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ~0.1 M ⊕ of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  8. EXTERNAL PHOTOEVAPORATION OF THE SOLAR NEBULA: JUPITER's NOBLE GAS ENRICHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Monga, Nikhil; Desch, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We present a model explaining the elemental enrichments in Jupiter's atmosphere, particularly the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe. While He, Ne, and O are depleted, seven other elements show similar enrichments (∼3 times solar, relative to H). Being volatile, Ar is difficult to fractionate from H{sub 2}. We argue that external photoevaporation by far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from nearby massive stars removed H{sub 2}, He, and Ne from the solar nebula, but Ar and other species were retained because photoevaporation occurred at large heliocentric distances where temperatures were cold enough (≲ 30 K) to trap them in amorphous water ice. As the solar nebula lost H, it became relatively and uniformly enriched in other species. Our model improves on the similar model of Guillot and Hueso. We recognize that cold temperatures alone do not trap volatiles; continuous water vapor production is also necessary. We demonstrate that FUV fluxes that photoevaporated the disk generated sufficient water vapor in regions ≲ 30 K to trap gas-phase species in amorphous water ice in solar proportions. We find more efficient chemical fractionation in the outer disk: whereas the model of Guillot and Hueso predicts a factor of three enrichment when only <2% of the disk mass remains, we find the same enrichments when 30% of the disk mass remains. Finally, we predict the presence of ∼0.1 M {sub ⊕} of water vapor in the outer solar nebula and protoplanetary disks in H II regions.

  9. EXTENDED HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE VELA PULSAR WIND NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Mattana, F.; Terrier, R.; Zurita Heras, J. A.; Goetz, D.; Caballero, I.; Soldi, S.; Schanne, S.; Ponti, G.; Falanga, M.; Renaud, M.

    2011-12-10

    The nebula powered by the Vela pulsar is one of the best examples of an evolved pulsar wind nebula, allowing access to the particle injection history and the interaction with the supernova ejecta. We report on the INTEGRAL discovery of extended emission above 18 keV from the Vela nebula. The northern side has no known counterparts and it appears larger and more significant than the southern one, which is in turn partially coincident with the cocoon, the soft X-ray, and TeV filament toward the center of the remnant. We also present the spectrum of the Vela nebula in the 18-400 keV energy range as measured by IBIS/ISGRI and SPI on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The apparent discrepancy between IBIS/ISGRI, SPI, and previous measurements is understood in terms of the point-spread function, supporting the hypothesis of a nebula more diffuse than previously thought. A break at {approx}25 keV is found in the spectrum within 6' from the pulsar after including the Suzaku XIS data. Interpreted as a cooling break, this points out that the inner nebula is composed of electrons injected in the last {approx}2000 years. Broadband modeling also implies a magnetic field higher than 10 {mu}G in this region. Finally, we discuss the nature of the northern emission, which might be due to fresh particles injected after the passage of the reverse shock.

  10. Observations of the planetary nebula RWT 152 with OSIRIS/GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Olguín, L.; Solano, E.; Ulla, A.

    2016-11-01

    RWT 152 is one of the few known planetary nebulae with an sdO central star. We present subarcsecond red tunable filter Hα imaging and intermediate-resolution, long-slit spectroscopy of RWT 152 obtained with OSIRIS/GTC (Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy/Gran Telescopio Canarias) with the goal of analysing its properties. The Hα image reveals a bipolar nebula with a bright equatorial region and multiple bubbles in the main lobes. A faint circular halo surrounds the main nebula. The nebular spectra reveal a very low excitation nebula with weak emission lines from H+, He+ and double-ionized metals, and absence of emission lines from neutral and single-ionized metals, except for an extremely faint [N II] λ6584 emission line. These spectra may be explained if RWT 152 is a density-bounded planetary nebula. Low nebular chemical abundances of S, O, Ar, N and Ne are obtained in RWT 152, which, together with the derived high peculiar velocity (˜ 92-131 km s-1), indicate that this object is a halo planetary nebula. The available data are consistent with RWT 152 evolving from a low-mass progenitor (˜1 M⊙) formed in a metal-poor environment.

  11. The [Fe IV] Discrepancy: Constraining the Iron Abundances in Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Mónica; Rubin, Robert H.

    2005-06-01

    We study the current discrepancy between the model-predicted and measured concentrations of Fe++ and Fe+3 in ionized nebulae. We calculate a set of photoionization models, updated with the atomic data relevant to the problem, and compare their results with those derived for the available nebulae where both [Fe III] and [Fe IV] lines have been measured. Our new model results are closer to the measured values than the results of previous calculations, but a discrepancy remains. This discrepancy translates into an uncertainty in the derived Fe abundances of a factor of up to ~4. We explore the possible causes of this discrepancy and find that errors in the Fe atomic data may be the most likely explanation. The discrepancy can be fully accounted for by any of the following changes: (1) an increase by a factor of ~10 in the recombination rate (radiative plus dielectronic, or charge transfer) for Fe+3, (2) an increase by a factor of 2-3 in the effective collision strengths for Fe++, or (3) a decrease by a factor of 2-3 in the effective collision strengths for Fe+3. We derive the Fe abundances implied by these three explanations and use the results to constrain the degree of depletion of Fe in our sample nebulae. The Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae are found to have high depletion factors, with less than 5% of their Fe atoms in the gas phase. The extragalactic H II regions (LMC 30 Doradus, SMC N88A, and SBS 0335-052) have somewhat lower depletions. The metal-deficient blue compact galaxy SBS 0335-052 could have from 13% to 40% of Fe in the gas phase. The depletions derived for the different objects define a trend of increasing depletion at higher metallicities.

  12. Detection of shocked atomic gas in the Kleinmann-Low nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M.; Crawford, M. K.; Genzel, R.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Townes, C. H.; Watson, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    The 63 micrometer (3)p(1)-(3)P(2) fine structure line emission of neutral atomic oxygen at the center of the Orion nebula with a resolution of 30" is presented. There are three main emission peaks. One is associated with the region of strongest thermal radio continuum radiation close to the Trapezium cluster, and probably arises at the interface between the HII region and the dense Orion molecular cloud. The other two line emission peaks, associated with the Kleinmann Low nebula, are similar in both distribution and velocity to those of the 2 micrometer S(1) line of molecular hydrogen and of the high velocity wings of rotational CO emission. The OI emission from the KL nebula can be produced in the shocked gas associated with the mass outflows in this region and is an important coolant of the shocked gas.

  13. Detection of shocked atomic gas in the Kleinmann-Low nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Crawford, M. K.; Genzel, R.; Townes, C. H.; Watson, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The 63 micrometer (3)P(1)-(3)P(2) fine structure line emission of neutral atomic oxygen at the center of the Orion nebula with a resolution of 30'' is presented. There are three main emission peaks. One is associated with the region of strongest thermal radio continuum radiation close to the Trapezium cluster, and probably arises at the interface between the H II region and the dense Orion molecular cloud. The other two line emission peaks, associated with the Kleinmann-Low nebula, are similar in both distribution and velocity to those of the 2 micrometer S(1) line of molecular hydrogen and of the high velocity wings of rotational CO emission. The OI emission from the KL nebula can be produced in the shocked gas associated with the mass outflows in this region and is an important coolant of the shocked gas.

  14. Spectroscopy of the ringlike nebula toward the open cluster NGC 3572

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noumaru, Junichi; Ogura, Katsuo

    1993-11-01

    Low-dispersion spectroscopy has been obtained for the ringlike nebula which Phelps and Janes (1991) found in the direction of the young open cluster NGC 3572 and suspected as a planetary nebula. Some nearby nebulosities have also been observed. Analyses of these data indicate that all of them, including the NGC 3572 ring, are H II regions. Morphological considerations of the region show that the nearby nebulosities are bright rims which are associated with the H II region BBW 342 and are partly hidden by the obscuring matter lying on this side. The NGC 3572 ring could be of the same nature. However, as the alternative interpretation, it could be a ring nebula (probably a wind-blown bubble) around a massive star (WR/Of star or LBV).

  15. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This colorful photo shows a ground-based image of the entire Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion witnessed over 900 years ago. The nebula, which is 10 light-years across, is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. The green, yellow and red filaments concentrated toward the edges of the nebula are remnants of the star that were ejected into space by the explosion. At the center of the Crab Nebula lies the Crab Pulsar -- the collapsed core of the exploded star. The Crab Pulsar is a rapidly rotating neutron star -- an object only about six miles across, but containing more mass than our Sun. As it rotates at a rate of 30 times per second the Crab Pulsar's powerful magnetic field sweeps around, accelerating particles, and whipping them out into the nebula at speeds close to that of light. The blue glow in the inner part of the nebula -- light emitted by energetic electrons as they spiral through the Crab's magnetic field -- is powered by the Crab Pulsar. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  16. Stellar Evolution from AGB to Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2008-10-01

    Planetary nebulae are formed by an interacting winds process where the remnant of the AGB wind is compressed and accelerated by a later-developed fast wind from the central star. One-dimensional dynamical models have successfully explained the multi-shell (bubble, shell, crown, haloes) structures and the kinematics of planetary nebulae. However, the origin of the diverse asymmetric morphology of planetary nebulae is still not understood. Recent observations in the visible, infrared, and the submillimeter have suggested that the AGB mass loss becomes aspherical in the very late stages, forming an expanding torus around the star. A fast, highly collimated wind then emerges in the polar directions and carves out a cavity in the AGB envelope to form a bipolar nebula. Newly discovered structures such as concentric arcs, 2-D rings, multiple lobes, and point-symmetric structures suggest that both the slow and fast winds may have temporal and directional variations, and precession can play a role in the shaping of planetary nebulae. In this paper, we review the latest observations of planetary nebulae and proto-planetary nebulae and discuss the various physical mechanisms (rotation, binary, magnetic field, etc) that could lead to the observed morphologies.

  17. Reconstruction and visualization of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Magnor, Marcus; Kindlmann, Gordon; Hansen, Charles; Duric, Neb

    2005-01-01

    From our terrestrially confined viewpoint, the actual three-dimensional shape of distant astronomical objects is, in general, very challenging to determine. For one class of astronomical objects, however, spatial structure can be recovered from conventional 2D images alone. So-called planetary nebulae (PNe) exhibit pronounced symmetry characteristics that come about due to fundamental physical processes. Making use of this symmetry constraint, we present a technique to automatically recover the axisymmetric structure of many planetary nebulae from photographs. With GPU-based volume rendering driving a nonlinear optimization, we estimate the nebula's local emission density as a function of its radial and axial coordinates and we recover the orientation of the nebula relative to Earth. The optimization refines the nebula model and its orientation by minimizing the differences between the rendered image and the original astronomical image. The resulting model allows creating realistic 3D visualizations of these nebulae, for example, for planetarium shows and other educational purposes. In addition, the recovered spatial distribution of the emissive gas can help astrophysicists gain deeper insight into the formation processes of planetary nebulae.

  18. Reconstruction and visualization of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Magnor, Marcus; Kindlmann, Gordon; Hansen, Charles; Duric, Neb

    2005-01-01

    From our terrestrially confined viewpoint, the actual three-dimensional shape of distant astronomical objects is, in general, very challenging to determine. For one class of astronomical objects, however, spatial structure can be recovered from conventional 2D images alone. So-called planetary nebulae (PNe) exhibit pronounced symmetry characteristics that come about due to fundamental physical processes. Making use of this symmetry constraint, we present a technique to automatically recover the axisymmetric structure of many planetary nebulae from photographs. With GPU-based volume rendering driving a nonlinear optimization, we estimate the nebula's local emission density as a function of its radial and axial coordinates and we recover the orientation of the nebula relative to Earth. The optimization refines the nebula model and its orientation by minimizing the differences between the rendered image and the original astronomical image. The resulting model allows creating realistic 3D visualizations of these nebulae, for example, for planetarium shows and other educational purposes. In addition, the recovered spatial distribution of the emissive gas can help astrophysicists gain deeper insight into the formation processes of planetary nebulae. PMID:16144246

  19. Processing NASA Earth Science Data on Nebula Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Aijun; Pham, Long; Kempler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three applications were successfully migrated to Nebula, including S4PM, AIRS L1/L2 algorithms, and Giovanni MAPSS. Nebula has some advantages compared with local machines (e.g. performance, cost, scalability, bundling, etc.). Nebula still faces some challenges (e.g. stability, object storage, networking, etc.). Migrating applications to Nebula is feasible but time consuming. Lessons learned from our Nebula experience will benefit future Cloud Computing efforts at GES DISC.

  20. THE ROTTEN EGG NEBULA A PLANETARY NEBULA IN THE MAKING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The object shown in these NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images is a remarkable example of a star going through death throes just as it dramatically transforms itself from a normal red giant star into a planetary nebula. This process happens so quickly that such objects are quite rare, even though astronomers believe that most stars like the Sun will eventually go through such a phase. This star, with the prosaic name of OH231.8+4.2, is seen in these infrared pictures blowing out gas and dust in two opposite directions. So much dust has been cast off and now surrounds the star that it cannot be seen directly, only its starlight that is reflected off the dust. The flow of gas is very fast, with a velocity up to 450,000 mph (700,000 km/h). With extreme clarity, these Hubble Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) images reveal that the fast-moving gas and dust are being collimated into several thin streamers (on the right) and a jet-like structure (on the left), which can be seen extending away from the centers of both pictures. On the right, wisps of material in jet-like streamers appear to strike some dense blobs of gas. This interaction must produce strong shock waves in the gas. The pictures represent two views of the object. The color image is a composite of four images taken with different NICMOS infrared filters on March 28, 1998. It shows that the physical properties of the material, both composition and temperature, vary significantly throughout the outflowing material. The black-and-white image was taken with one NICMOS infrared filter. That image is able to show more clearly the faint detail and structure in the nebula than can be achieved with the color composites. Observations by radio astronomers have found many unusual molecules in the gas around this star, including many containing sulfur, such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. These sulfur compounds are believed to be produced in the shock waves passing through the gas

  1. The Nebula around the Luminous Blue Variable WRAY 15-751 as seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvatira-Nakou, C.; Hutsemekers, D.; Royer, P.; Naze, Y.; Magain, P.; Exter, K.; Waelkens, C.; Groenewegen, M.

    2013-06-01

    To understand the evolution of massive stars it is crucial to study the nebulae associated to Luminous Blue Variables which can reveal the star mass-loss history. We obtained far-infrared Herschel PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula associated with the Luminous Blue Variable star WRAY 15-751. These images revealed a second nebula, bigger and cooler, lying in an empty cavity that probably delineates the remnant of the O-star bubble formed when the star was on the Main Sequence. The dust mass and temperature were derived from the modeling of the far-infrared SED. The analysis of the emission line spectrum revealed that the main nebula consists of a region of photoionised gas surrounded by a thin photodissociation region. Both regions are mixed with dust. The calculated C, N, O abundances, together with the estimated mass-loss rate, show that the nebula was ejected from the star during a Red Supergiant phase. This is compatible with the latest evolutionary tracks for a ~40 Mo star with little rotation.

  2. Mixing and Transport in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2003-01-01

    models of marginally gravitationally unstable disks to study the preservation of isotopic heterogeneity in evolving protoplanetary disks. Such heterogeneity might arise from the infall onto the disk s surface of solids processed in the X-wind region of the disk, or derived from stellar nucleosynthesis and injected by R-T fingers. The technique used consists of solving a color equation, identical to the gas continuity equation, which follows the time evolution in three space dimensions of an arbitrarily placed initial color field, i.e., a dye inserted the disk. The models show that significant concentrations of color could persist for time periods of about a thousand years or more, even in the most dynamically active region of such a disk. Such a time period might be long enough for solids to coagulate and grow to significant sizes while retaining the isotopic signature of their birth region in the nebula.

  3. Search for continuous fluorescence in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.; Witt, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    Photometric and spectrophotometric observations have been made of the reflection nebulae NGC 1435, NGC 2068, NGC 7023, and IC 1287 in an attempt to detect continuous fluorescence by dust grains. Several effects of importance for observations of such faint objects are discussed, including instrumental light scattering, a photographic effect, and a time-delay effect which can occur if the illuminating star is a spectrum variable. It is found that continuous fluorescence by interstellar grains is not likely to exist and that it cannot account for more than 10% of the total surface brightness of these reflection nebulae. No evidence of diffuse interstellar features is found in the spectra of these nebulae.

  4. Pre-Orion Cores in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, Bertrand; Cernicharo, José

    2000-12-01

    The Trifid Nebula is a young H II region undergoing a burst of star formation. This article reports on far-infrared and millimeter continuum and line observations of several massive and bright protostellar sources in the vicinity of the exciting star of the nebula, just behind the ionization front. These objects are probably young protostars (class 0) and are associated with very massive cores (M~8-90 Msolar) powering young energetic outflows. Analysis of the far-infrared emission in the 45-200 μm range from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) LWS data shows that they are embedded in cold dense material. Inspection of their physical properties suggest that they are similar to the dust protostellar cores observed in Orion, although at an earlier evolutionary ``pre-Orion'' stage. The cores are embedded in a compressed layer of dense gas. Based on comparison with the models, we find that the cores could have formed from the fragmentation of the layer and that the birth of the protostars was triggered by the expansion of the Trifid Nebula.

  5. Far-ultraviolet imagery of the Barnard Loop Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    An electrographic Schmidt camera carried on a sounding rocket has yielded far-ultraviolet (1050-2000 A and 1230-2000 A) images of the Barnard Loop Nebula and of the general background in the Orion region due to scattering of ultraviolet starlight by interstellar dust particles. The total intensity in the Barnard Loop region agrees well with OAO-2 measurements, but the discrete Loop structure contributes only some 15% of the total. The measurements are consistent with a relatively high albedo for the dust grains in the far-ultraviolet.

  6. Eagle Nebula Flaunts its Infrared Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Figure 3

    This set of images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Eagle nebula in different hues of infrared light. Each view tells a different tale. The left picture shows lots of stars and dusty structures with clarity. Dusty molecules found on Earth called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produce most of the red; gas is green and stars are blue.

    The middle view is packed with drama, because it tells astronomers that a star in this region violently erupted, or went supernova, heating surrounding dust (orange). This view also reveals that the hot dust is shell shaped, another indication that a star exploded.

    The final picture highlights the contrast between the hot, supernova-heated dust (green) and the cooler dust making up the region's dusty star-forming clouds and towers (red, blue and purple).

    The left image is a composite of infrared light with the following wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); 5.8 microns (orange); and 8 microns (red). The right image includes longer infrared wavelengths, and is a composite of light of 4.5 to 8.0 microns (blue); 24 microns (green); and 70 microns (red). The middle image is made up solely of 24-micron light.

  7. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-10

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, {sup 13}CO, and HCO{sup +} with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V{sub LSR} = –14 km s{sup –1} and +5 km s{sup –1}. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud collided into the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  8. Planetary nebulae and their mimics: The MASH-MEN Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissay, Rozenn; Parker, Quentin A.; Frew, David J.; Bojicic, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The total number of true, likely and possible planetary nebulae (PN) now known in the Milky Way is about 3000, approximately twice the number known a decade ago. The new discoveries are a legacy of the recent availability of wide-field, narrowband imaging surveys, primarily in the light of Hα. The two most important are the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS Hα survey SHS and the Isaac Newton photometric Hα survey IPHAS, which are responsible for most of the new discoveries. A serious problem with previous PN catalogs is that several different kinds of astrophysical objects are able to mimic PN in some of their observed properties leading to significant contamination. These objects include H~II regions and Strömgren zones around young O/B stars, reflection nebulae, Wolf-Rayet ejecta, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro objects, young stellar objects, B[e] stars, symbiotic stars and outflows, late-type stars, cataclysmic variables, low redshift emission-line galaxies, and even image/detector flaws. PN catalogs such as the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg Hα Planetary Nebula catalog (MASH) have been carefully vetted to remove these mimics using the wealth of new wide-field multi-wavelength data and our 100% follow-up spectroscopy to produce a compilation of new PN discoveries of high purity. During this process significant numbers of PN mimics have been identified. The aim of this project is to compile these MASH rejects into a catalog of Miscellaneous Emission Nebulae (MEN) and to highlight the most unusual and interesting examples. A new global analysis of these MEN objects is underway before publishing the MEN catalog online categorizing objects by type together with their spectra and multi-wavelength images.

  9. Improved Probing of the Rosette Nebula Superbubble with Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Allison H.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper Savage et al. 2013, ApJ 765, 42, we reported the results of our investigation of the super bubble associated with the Rosette Nebula (NGC 2244). We made linear polarization measurements of 23 extra-galactic radio sources whose lines of sight passed through or close to the Rosette Nebula. The observations were made at frequencies of 4.4GHz, 4.9GHz, and 7.6GHz using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We measured an excess rotation measure (RM) of 50-750 rad m-2 for sources whose lines of sight passed through the nebula. We compared our data with two simple plasma models that can reproduce the magnitude and sign of the measured RM. We argued that one of these models, a wind-blown bubble with an outer shock, better represented our data. However, distinguishing between these models requires measurements on more lines of sight. In NRAO project 12A-039, we observed 11 additional radio sources whose lines of sight pass through the shell of the Rosette Nebula to supplement the previous measurements and to further constrain the simple shell models. The 2012 observations cover two 1.024 GHz bands centered at 4.85GHz and 7.25GHz, with sixteen 128MHz sub-bands. This receiver configuration potentially allows for sixteen measurements of the polarization position angle across the sub-bands, which is a vast improvement over the three polarization position angle measurements of the previous data. We report preliminary results of Faraday rotation measurements for these 11 new lines of sight. We also describe similar Faraday rotation observations of the HII region W4/IC1805 undertaken in NRAO program 13A-035. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grant AST09-07911 and ATM09-56901 from the National Science Foundation.

  10. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  11. The spectrophotometry and chemical composition of the oxygen-poor bipolar nebula NGC 6164-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.; Parker, Robert A. R.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents new ground-based and IUE spectrophotometry of several positions in NGC 6164-5 surrounding the Population I Of star HD 148937. Electron temperatures, densities, and abundances are derived for the various positions in the nebula using spectral line information. For all of the regions observed, Ne/H is depleted by an amount comparable to O/H, while S/H and Ar/H have normal values. The results suggest that the nebula consists partly of material ejected from inner shell-burning regions of the Of star. In effect, HD 148937 is older and more advanced than what was previously thought.

  12. The Eagle Nebula on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Cooper, Amy; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Pound, Marc

    2011-10-01

    In one of the eight Science on NIF campaigns, dynamics of molecular clouds such as the Eagle Nebula will be studied in scaled laboratory astrophysics experiments, focusing on new hydrodynamic stabilities of ablation fronts induced by strong directionality of a sustained radiation drive, and on the formation of cometary structures as a model for the famous Eagle Pillars. The NIF Radiation Transport Platform will be adapted to drive a foam target stood off several mm from the halfraum to simulate a molecular cloud illuminated by a distant O-type star, with the drive collimated by an aperture. Pulses of length 20-100 ns generating effective radiation temperatures of 100 eV are being sought. Design of the experiment, theory of the directional radiation instabilities, and supporting astrophysical modeling will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Planetary nebulae and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Newly defined characteristics of planetary nebulae (PN) derived from analysis of a photometric survey of 57 PN are reported. The data were combined with measurements of 27 other PN made since 1918 and were found to indicate core masses ranging from 0.55-1.0 solar mass. N/O elemental abundance ratios observed were correlated with the planetary nuclei masses, and were in direct proportion. IUE data on PN that overlapped a large part of the survey indicated that the PN in the galactic disk are more massive than PN in the halo. It is suggested that PN evolve into white dwarfs, a hypothesis supported by astrometric solutions for three nearby visual binaries featuring white dwarfs with well-determined masses. It is noted, however, that PN with masses exceeding one solar mass have been sighted in the Magellanic Clouds.

  14. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that

  15. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that

  16. BY POPULAR DEMAND: HUBBLE OBSERVES THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Rising from a sea of dust and gas like a giant seahorse, the Horsehead nebula is one of the most photographed objects in the sky. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a close-up look at this heavenly icon, revealing the cloud's intricate structure. This detailed view of the horse's head is being released to celebrate the orbiting observatory's eleventh anniversary. Produced by the Hubble Heritage Project, this picture is a testament to the Horsehead's popularity. Internet voters selected this object for the orbiting telescope to view. The Horsehead, also known as Barnard 33, is a cold, dark cloud of gas and dust, silhouetted against the bright nebula, IC 434. The bright area at the top left edge is a young star still embedded in its nursery of gas and dust. But radiation from this hot star is eroding the stellar nursery. The top of the nebula also is being sculpted by radiation from a massive star located out of Hubble's field of view. Only by chance does the nebula roughly resemble the head of a horse. Its unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. Located in the constellation Orion, the Horsehead is a cousin of the famous pillars of dust and gas known as the Eagle nebula. Both tower-like nebulas are cocoons of young stars. The Horsehead nebula lies just south of the bright star Zeta Orionis, which is easily visible to the unaided eye as the left-hand star in the line of three that form Orion's Belt. Amateur astronomers often use the Horsehead as a test of their observing skills; it is known as one of the more difficult objects to see visually in an amateur-sized telescope. The magnificent extent of the Horsehead is best appreciated in a new wide-field image of the nebula being released today by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, taken by Travis Rector with the National Science Foundation's 0.9 meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ. This popular celestial target was the clear winner among more

  17. Herschel imaging and spectroscopy of the nebula around the luminous blue variable star WRAY 15-751

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvatira-Nakou, C.; Hutsemékers, D.; Royer, P.; Nazé, Y.; Magain, P.; Exter, K.; Waelkens, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2013-09-01

    We have obtained far-infrared Herschel-PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebular environment of the luminous blue variable (LBV) WRAY 15-751. The far-infrared images clearly show that the main, dusty nebula is a shell of radius 0.5 pc and width 0.35 pc extending outside the Hα nebula. Furthermore, these images reveal a second, bigger and fainter dust nebula that is observed for the first time. Both nebulae lie in an empty cavity, very likely the remnant of the O-star wind bubble formed when the star was on the main sequence. The kinematic ages of the nebulae are calculated to be about 2 × 104 and 8 × 104 years, and we estimated that each nebula contains ~0.05 M⊙ of dust. Modeling of the inner nebula indicates a Fe-rich dust. The far-infrared spectrum of the main nebula revealed forbidden emission lines coming from ionized and neutral gas. Our study shows that the main nebula consists of a shell of ionized gas surrounded by a thin photodissociation region illuminated by an "average" early-B star. We derive the abundance ratios N/O = 1.0 ± 0.4 and C/O = 0.4 ± 0.2, which indicate a mild N/O enrichment. From both the ionized and neutral gas components we estimate that the inner shell contains 1.7 ± 0.6 M⊙ of gas. Assuming a similar dust-to-gas ratio for the outer nebula, the total mass ejected by WRAY 15-751 amounts to 4 ± 2 M⊙. The measured abundances, masses and kinematic ages of the nebulae were used to constrain the evolution of the star and the epoch at which the nebulae were ejected. Our results point to an ejection of the nebulae during the red super-giant (RSG) evolutionary phase of an ~40 M⊙ star. The multiple shells around the star suggest that the mass-loss was not a continuous ejection but rather a series of episodes of extreme mass-loss. Our measurements are compatible with the recent evolutionary tracks computed for an ~40 M⊙ star with little rotation. They support the O-BSG-RSG-YSG-LBV filiation and the idea that high

  18. Herschel observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvatira-Nakou, C.; Hutsemékers, D.; Royer, P.; Waelkens, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Barlow, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Infrared Herschel imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124 have been obtained along with optical imaging observations. The infrared images reveal a clumpy dusty nebula that extends up to 1 pc. The comparison with the optical images shows that the ionized gas nebula coincides with the dust nebula, the dust and the gas being mixed together. A photodissociation region is revealed from the infrared spectroscopic analysis. The analysis of the infrared spectrum of the nebula, where forbidden emission lines of ionized elements were detected, showed that the nebula consists of mildly processed material with the calculated abundance number ratios being N/O = 1.0 ± 0.5 and C/O = 0.46 ± 0.27. Based on a radiative transfer model, the dust mass of the nebula was estimated to be 0.22 M⊙ with a population of large grains being necessary to reproduce the observations. The comparison of the mass-loss rate and the abundance ratios to theoretical models of stellar evolution led to the conclusion that the nebular ejection took place during a RSG/YSG evolutionary phase of a central star with an initial mass of 32 M⊙. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Based in part on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  19. Formation of solid materials in the preplanetary nebula and the composition of chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Izakov, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    On the basis of the model of the formation of the preplanetary nebula as an accretion disk during the formation of the sun, the hypothesis is proposed that a significant fraction of the solid materials of the preplanetary nebula was formed by the successive condensation of the components of the gas of solar composition during its motion from the hot, dense region near the protosun to the periphery of the nebula into regions of ever decreasing values of temperature and pressure. The hypothesis removes the contradiction materials and the presence of traces of high-temperature phenomena in chondrite materials and the conclusion that there were never high temperature in the preplanetary nebula at distances of 2-4 AU from the sun, where meteorites encountering the earth originate, and also explains a number of properties of chondrites. It follows from this hypothesis that the mass and angular momentum of the nebula were close to their minimum possible values and that the loss of the nebular gas had already begun at the final stage of its formation.

  20. The origin of the argonium emission discovered in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Felix; Barlow, Mike; Viti, Serena

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the origin of the argonium (ArH+) emission discovered by Herschel in the Crab Nebula (Barlow et al. 2013). The argonium molecule is believed to be formed principally by the reaction of singly ionised argon (Ar+) with molecular hydrogen (H2), and to be destroyed by reactions with H2 and UV photons. For the case of the argonium ground state absorption lines seen by Herschel along several interstellar sightlines (Schilke et al. 2014), those authors argued that the presence of H2 in both the formation and destruction mechanisms means that ArH+ must form in largely atomic interstellar hydrogen clouds containing only trace amounts of H2. However, In the case of the Crab Nebula the observed argonium emission might originate either from transition regions containing both Ar+ and H2, or alternatively from inside the Crab Nebula's H2 knots into which X-ray photons or charged particles from the pulsar wind nebula have penetrated to produce Ar+ and other ions. We report the results of our numerical studies that have used a combination of photoionisation and photodissociation region codes to investigate these alternative scenarios for producing ArH+ in the Crab Nebula.

  1. The Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D.; Gotthelf, E.; Halpern, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations of the pulsar separated by one month to search for morphological changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a morphology remarkably similar to the torus-like structure observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. The flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75 %; the 3 sigma limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer torus; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propogation velocity is ~0.5c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright, arc-shaped X-ray wisps are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind which is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula which comprises the post-shock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter of the Vela pulsar wind is required to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B ~ 4 x 10-4G.

  2. Several evolutionary channels for bright planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, Michael G.; McCall, Marshall L.

    2016-08-01

    The populations of bright planetary nebulae in the discs of spirals appear to differ in their spectral properties from those in ellipticals and the bulges of spirals. The bright planetary nebulae from the bulge of the Milky Way are entirely compatible with those observed in the discs of spiral galaxies. The similarity might be explained if the bulge of the Milky Way evolved secularly from the disc, in which case the bulge should be regarded as a pseudo-bulge.

  3. Chemical composition of gaseous nebula NGC 6302.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1978-01-01

    The irregular emission nebula NGC 6302 exhibits a rich spectrum of lines ranging in excitation from [NI] to [FeVII]. An assessment of available spectroscopic data, covering a large intensity range, indicates excess of helium and nitrogen as compared with average planetary nebulae, but deficiencies in iron and calcium. These metals are presumably tied up in solid grains, as suggested by Shields for iron in NGC 7027. PMID:16592476

  4. Properties of young clusters near reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1983-01-01

    Near infrared observations in the reflection nebulae NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068 are used to study clusters of young stars found associated with these nebulae. At least 30% to 60% of these stars are pre-main sequence objects, as indicated by their infrared excesses, hydrogen line emission, or irregular variability. The spatial distributions and observed luminosity functions of these young open clusters are derived, and the inferred mass function and star formation efficiencies are discussed.

  5. Embedded Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger I.; Smith, Bradford A.; Hester, J. Jeff

    2002-05-01

    M16 (=NGC 6611), the Eagle Nebula, is a well-studied region of star formation and the source of a widely recognized Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. High spatial resolution infrared observations with the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) on HST reveal the detailed morphology of two embedded star formation regions that are heavily obscured at optical wavelengths. It is striking that only limited portions of the visually obscured areas are opaque at 2.2 μm. Although the optical images imply substantial columns of material, the infrared images show only isolated clumps of dense gas and dust. Rather than being an active factory of star production, only a few regions are capable of sustaining current star formation. Most of the volume in the columns may be molecular gas and dust, protected by capstones of dense dust. Two active regions of star formation are located at the tips of the optical northern and central large ``elephant trunk'' features shown in the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images. They are embedded in two capstones of infrared opaque material that contains and trails behind the sources. Although the presence of these sources was evident in previous observations at the same and longer wavelengths, the NICMOS images provide a high-resolution picture of their morphology. Two bright stars appear at the tip of the southern column and may be the result of recent star formation at the top of that column. These observations suggest that the epoch of star formation in M16 may be near its endpoint.

  6. Molecular excitation in the Eagle nebula's fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, F.; Leurini, S.; Hieret, C.; Menten, K. M.; Philipp, S. D.; Güsten, R.; Schilke, P.; Nyman, L.-Å.

    2006-08-01

    Context: .The M 16 nebula is a relatively nearby Hii region, powered by O stars from the open cluster NGC 6611, which borders to a Giant Molecular Cloud. Radiation from these hot stars has sculpted columns of dense obscuring material on a few arcmin scales. The interface between these pillars and the hot ionised medium provides a textbook example of a Photodissociation Region (PDR). Aims: .To constrain the physical conditions of the atomic and molecular material with submillimeter spectroscopic observations. Methods: .We used the APEX submillimeter telescope to map a ˜ 3'×3' region in the CO J= 3-2, 4-3 and 7-6 rotational lines, and a subregion in atomic carbon lines. We also observed C18O(3-2) and CO(7-6) with longer integrations on five peaks found in the CO(3-2) map. The large scale structure of the pillars is derived from the molecular lines' emission distribution. We estimate the magnitude of the velocity gradient at the tips of the pillars and use LVG modelling to constrain their densities and temperatures. Excitation temperatures and carbon column densities are derived from the atomic carbon lines. Results: .The atomic carbon lines are optically thin and excitation temperatures are of order 60 K to 100 K, well consistent with observations of other Hii region-molecular cloud interfaces. We derive somewhat lower temperatures from the CO line ratios, of order 40 K. The Ci/CO ratio is around 0.1 at the fingers tips.

  7. The Cocoon nebula and its ionizing star: do stellar and nebular abundances agree?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, J.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Esteban, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Main-sequence massive stars embedded in an H ii region should have the same chemical abundances as the surrounding nebular gas+dust. The Cocoon nebula (IC 5146), a close-by Galactic H ii region ionized by a narrow line B0.5 V single star (BD+46 3474), is an ideal target to compare nebular and stellar abundances in detail in the same Galactic region. Aims: We investigate the chemical content of oxygen and other elements in the Cocoon nebula from two different points of view: an empirical analysis of the nebular spectrum, and a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the associated early B-type star using state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere modeling. By comparing the stellar and nebular abundances, we aim to indirectly address the long-standing problem of the discrepancy found between abundances obtained from collisionally excited lines and optical recombination lines in photoionized nebulae. Methods: We collected long-slit spatially resolved spectroscopy of the Cocoon nebula and a high-resolution optical spectrum of the ionizing star. Standard nebular techniques along with updated atomic data were used to compute the physical conditions and gaseous abundances of O, N, and S in eight apertures extracted across a semidiameter of the nebula. We performed a self-consistent spectroscopic abundance analysis of BD+46 3474 based on the atmosphere code FASTWIND to determine the stellar parameters and Si, O, and N abundances. Results: The Cocoon nebula and its ionizing star, located at a distance of 800±80 pc, have a chemical composition very similar to the Orion nebula and other B-type stars in the solar vicinity. This result agrees with the high degree of homogeneity of the present-day composition of the solar neighborhood (up to 1.5 Kpc from the Sun) as derived from the study of the local cold-gas interstellar medium. The comparison of stellar and nebular collisionally excited line abundances in the Cocoon nebula indicates that O and N gas+dust nebular values agree

  8. Magnetic dissipation in the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic dissipation is frequently invoked as a way of powering the observed emission of relativistic flows in Gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. Pulsar Wind Nebulae provide closer to home cosmic laboratories which can be used to test the hypothesis. To this end, we reanalyze the observational data on the spindown power of the Crab pulsar, energetics of the Crab nebula and its magnetic field. We show that unless the magnetic inclination angle of the Crab pulsar is very close to 90 degrees the overall magnetization of the striped wind after total dissipation of its stripes is significantly higher than that deduced in the Kennel-Coroniti model and recent axisymmetric simulations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae. On the other hand, higher wind magnetization is in conflict with the observed low magnetic field of the Crab nebula, unless it is subject to efficient dissipation inside the nebula as well. For the likely inclination angle of 45 degrees the data require magnetic dissipation on the time-scale of about 80 years, which is short compared to the lifetime of the nebula but long compared to the time-scale of Crab's gamma-ray flares.

  9. Anatomy of the Photodissociation Region in the Orion Bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meixner, M. M.; vanderWerf, P. P.; Bregman, J.; Tauber, J. A.; Stutzki, J.; Rank, D.

    1993-01-01

    Much of the interstellar gas resides in photodissociation regions whose chemistry and energy balance is controlled by the flux of far-ultraviolet radiation upon them. These photons can ionize and dissociate molecules and heat the gas through the photoelectric effect working on dust grains. These regions have been extensively modeled theoretically, but detailed observational studies are few. Mapping of the prominent Orion Bar photo-dissociation region at wavelengths corresponding to the carbon-hydrogen stretching mode of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the 1-0 S(l) line of molecular hydrogen, and the J = 1-0 rotational line of carbon monoxide allows the penetration of the far-ultraviolet radiation into the cloud to be traced. The results strongly support the theoretical models and show conclusively that the incident far-ultraviolet radiation field, not shocks as has sometimes been proposed, is responsible for the emission in the Orion Bar.

  10. ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, Timothy J.; Katz, Andrea M.; Sibley, Adam R.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.; Uomoto, Alan

    2012-07-15

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters that transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in He II {lambda}4686, H{beta}, He I {lambda}5876, [O I] {lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731, [S III] {lambda}9069, and [C I] {lambda}{lambda}9823, 9850. We present both raw and flux-calibrated emission-line images. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO cycle, helium burning, carbon burning, and oxygen burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

  11. The Planetary Nebula System of M94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George; Feldmeier, John

    2006-02-01

    Our understanding of galaxy formation is severely limited by poorly known galaxy mass profiles. Rotation curves reveal dark matter halos around disk galaxies, but halo and visible disk mass profiles cannot be decoupled using rotation curves alone. Most analyses therefore rely on the ``maximal disk'' method that assumes the disk mass-to-light ratio (M/L) is constant with radius. Absorption-line spectroscopy has shown that the constant M/L hypothesis is reasonable in a galaxy's inner regions. However, only two galaxies have data more than ~ 1.5 scale lengths from their nuclei: M33 and M83. Planetary nebula (PN) velocity measurements over the central ~ 6 disk scale lengths in M33 indicate that the galaxy's disk M/L increases by a factor of ~ 5 radially outward. Preliminary PN results for M83 also suggest a varying disk M/L. We propose to study the distribution of disk mass in normal spiral galaxies by measuring the z-motions of PNe in nearby, face-on systems. Last year, we conducted an [O III] (lambda) 5007 survey of M94 with the WIYN telescope and discovered ~ 200 PN candidates. We now propose to use Hydra to measure the PN radial velocities so we may trace the system's disk surface-mass density over ~ 6 scale lengths, and thereby better constrain the radial profiles of the galaxy's dark halo.

  12. Double Engine for a Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    ESO has just released a stunning new image of a field of stars towards the constellation of Carina (the Keel). This striking view is ablaze with a flurry of stars of all colours and brightnesses, some of which are seen against a backdrop of clouds of dust and gas. One unusual star in the middle, HD 87643, has been extensively studied with several ESO telescopes, including the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Surrounded by a complex, extended nebula that is the result of previous violent ejections, the star has been shown to have a companion. Interactions in this double system, surrounded by a dusty disc, may be the engine fuelling the star's remarkable nebula. The new image, showing a very rich field of stars towards the Carina arm of the Milky Way, is centred on the star HD 87643, a member of the exotic class of B[e] stars [1]. It is part of a set of observations that provide astronomers with the best ever picture of a B[e] star. The image was obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the 2400-metre-high La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image shows beautifully the extended nebula of gas and dust that reflects the light from the star. The central star's wind appears to have shaped the nebula, leaving bright, ragged tendrils of gas and dust. A careful investigation of these features seems to indicate that there are regular ejections of matter from the star every 15 to 50 years. A team of astronomers, led by Florentin Millour, has studied the star HD 87643 in great detail, using several of ESO's telescopes. Apart from the WFI, the team also used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal. At the VLT, the astronomers used the NACO adaptive optics instrument, allowing them to obtain an image of the star free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. To probe the object further, the team then obtained an image with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The sheer range of this set of observations

  13. HUBBLE FINDS AN HOURGLASS NEBULA AROUND A DYING STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is an image of MyCn18, a young planetary nebula located about 8,000 light-years away, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This Hubble image reveals the true shape of MyCn18 to be an hourglass with an intricate pattern of 'etchings' in its walls. This picture has been composed from three separate images taken in the light of ionized nitrogen (represented by red), hydrogen (green), and doubly-ionized oxygen (blue). The results are of great interest because they shed new light on the poorly understood ejection of stellar matter which accompanies the slow death of Sun-like stars. In previous ground-based images, MyCn18 appears to be a pair of large outer rings with a smaller central one, but the fine details cannot be seen. According to one theory for the formation of planetary nebulae, the hourglass shape is produced by the expansion of a fast stellar wind within a slowly expanding cloud which is more dense near its equator than near its poles. What appears as a bright elliptical ring in the center, and at first sight might be mistaken for an equatorially dense region, is seen on closer inspection to be a potato shaped structure with a symmetry axis dramatically different from that of the larger hourglass. The hot star which has been thought to eject and illuminate the nebula, and therefore expected to lie at its center of symmetry, is clearly off center. Hence MyCn18, as revealed by Hubble, does not fulfill some crucial theoretical expectations. Hubble has also revealed other features in MyCn18 which are completely new and unexpected. For example, there is a pair of intersecting elliptical rings in the central region which appear to be the rims of a smaller hourglass. There are the intricate patterns of the etchings on the hourglass walls. The arc-like etchings could be the remnants of discrete shells ejected from the star when it was younger (e.g. as seen in the Egg Nebula), flow instabilities, or

  14. Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2001-07-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR B0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations separated by 1 month to search for changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a toroidal morphology remarkably similar to that observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. Between the two observations, taken ~3×105 s and ~3×106 s after the glitch, the flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75% the 3 σ limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <~10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer arc; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propagation velocity is >~0.7c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright X-ray arcs are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind that is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula comprising the postshock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter σ of the Vela pulsar wind is allowed to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B<=4×10-4 G. The inclination angle of the axis of the equatorial torus with respect to the line of sight is identical to that of the rotation axis of the pulsar as previously measured from the polarization of the radio pulse. The projection of the rotation axis on the sky may also be close to the direction of proper motion of the pulsar if previous radio measurements were confused by

  15. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Waller, William H.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Patten, Brian M.; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: william.waller@tufts.edu E-mail: bpatten@nsf.gov

    2009-03-15

    At {approx} 400 pc, the Horsehead Nebula (B33) is the closest radiatively sculpted pillar to the Sun, but the state and extent of star formation in this structure is not well understood. We present deep near-infrared (IRSF/SIRIUS JHK {sub S}) and mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) observations of the Horsehead Nebula to characterize the star-forming properties of this region and to assess the likelihood of triggered star formation. Infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are used to identify young stars based on infrared excess emission and positions to the right of the zero-age main sequence, respectively. Of the 45 sources detected at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, three bona fide and five candidate young stars are identified in this 7' x 7' region. Two bona fide young stars have flat infrared spectral energy distributions and are located at the western irradiated tip of the pillar. The spatial coincidence of the protostars at the leading edge of this elephant trunk is consistent with the radiation-driven implosion model of triggered star formation. There is no evidence, however, for sequential star formation within the immediate {approx} 1.'5 (0.17 pc) region from the cloud/H II region interface.

  16. Neutral carbon in the Egg Nebula (AFGL 2688)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C. A.; Keene, J.; Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.; Wooten, H. A.; Masson, C.; Frerking, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A search for sub-mm C I emission from seven stars that are surrounded by dense molecular gas shells led to the detection, in the case of the "Egg Nebula' (AFGL 2688), of an 0.9 K line implying a C I/CO value greater than 5. The material surrounding this star must be extremely carbon-rich, and it is suggested that the apparently greater extent of the C I emission region may be due to the effects of the galactic UV field on the shell's chemistry, as suggested by Huggins and Glassgold (1982).

  17. Far-ultraviolet imagery of the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two electrographic cameras carried on a sounding rocket have yielded useful-resolution far-ultraviolet (1000-2000 A) imagery of the Orion Nebula. The brightness distribution in the images is consistent with a primary source which is due to scattering of starlight by dust grains, although an emission-line contribution, particularly in the fainter outer regions, is not ruled out. The results are consistent with an albedo of the dust grains that is high in the far-ultraviolet and which increases toward shorter wavelengths below 1230 A.

  18. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  19. A New Model for Water Vapor/Ice Abundance in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2006-01-01

    Water is a unique substance in the protoplanetary nebula since both solid and gaseous phases coexist in large quantities. Quantitative estimates of their relative abundances are important parameters regarding the physical state of the nebula and planet formation processes. This new model is based on computing the chemical evolution of water molecules until its partial pressure is sufficient to pierce the vapor pressure curve for water. The point at which this occurs relative to its steady state values determines final gas/ice ratios. The wide range of temperatures and densities in typical protoplanetary disks result in a range of gadice ratios. It is found that although ice dominates the mid and far nebula, water vapor is predominant in the centerplane region of the near nebula and above the disk photosphere. An interesting near nebula effect is the appearance of a cloud of water ice at the temperature inversion elevation surrounded by vapor above and below. This work is partially supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute.

  20. A Study of Planetary Nebulae using the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    A planetary nebula is formed following an intermediate-mass (1-8 solar M) star's evolution off of the main sequence; it undergoes a phase of mass loss whereby the stellar envelope is ejected and the core is converted into a white dwarf. Planetary nebulae often display complex morphologies such as waists or torii, rings, collimated jet-like outflows, and bipolar symmetry, but exactly how these features form is unclear. To study how the distribution of dust in the interstellar medium affects their morphology, we utilize the Faint Object InfraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) to obtain well-resolved images of four planetary nebulae--NGC 7027, NGC 6543, M2-9, and the Frosty Leo Nebula--at wavelengths where they radiate most of their energy. We retrieve mid infrared images at wavelengths ranging from 6.3 to 37.1 micron for each of our targets. IDL (Interactive Data Language) is used to perform basic analysis. We select M2-9 to investigate further; analyzing cross sections of the southern lobe reveals a slight limb brightening effect. Modeling the dust distribution within the lobes reveals that the thickness of the lobe walls is higher than anticipated, or rather than surrounding a vacuum surrounds a low density region of tenuous dust. Further analysis of this and other planetary nebulae is needed before drawing more specific conclusions.

  1. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  2. THE RADIO-2 mm SPECTRAL INDEX OF THE CRAB NEBULA MEASURED WITH GISMO

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, R. G.; George, J. V.; Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Maher, S. F.; Moseley, S. H.; Sharp, E.; Wollack, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Irwin, K. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, T. M.; Kovacs, A.; Mason, B. S.; Navarro, S.; Sievers, A.; Sievers, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    We present results of 2 mm observations of the Crab Nebula, obtained using the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) bolometer camera on the IRAM 30 m telescope. Additional 3.3 mm observations with the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope are also presented. The integrated 2 mm flux density of the Crab Nebula provides no evidence for the emergence of a second synchrotron component that has been proposed. It is consistent with the radio power-law spectrum, extrapolated up to a break frequency of log ({nu}{sub b}[GHz]) = 2.84 {+-} 0.29 or {nu}{sub b} = 695{sup +651}{sub -336} GHz. The Crab Nebula is well resolved by the {approx}16.''7 beam (FWHM) of GISMO. Comparison to radio data at comparable spatial resolution enables us to confirm significant spatial variation of the spectral index between 21 cm and 2 mm. The main effect is a spectral flattening in the inner region of the Crab Nebula, correlated with the toroidal structure at the center of the nebula that is prominent in the near-IR through X-ray regime.

  3. Discovery of a Pulsar Wind Nebula Candidate in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We report on a discovery of a diffuse nebula containing a point-like source in the southern blowout region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, based on Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. The X-ray spectra from the nebula and the point-like source are well represented by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices of 2.2+/-0.1 and 1.6+/-0.2, respectively. The photon indices as well as the flux ratio of F(sub nebula)/F(sub point-like) approx. 4 lead us to propose that the system is a pulsar wind nebula, although pulsations have not yet been detected. If we attribute its origin to the Cygnus Loop supernova, then the 0.5-8 keV luminosity of the nebula is computed to be 2.1x10(exp 31)(d/540pc)(exp 2)ergss/2, where d is the distance to the Loop. This implies a spin-down loss-energy E approx. 2.6x10(exp 35)(d/540pc)(exp 2)ergs/s. The location of the neutron star candidate, approx.2deg away from the geometric center of the Loop, implies a high transverse velocity of approx.1850(theta/2deg)(d/540pc)(t/10kyr)/k/s assuming the currently accepted age of the Cygnus Loop.

  4. Symposium on the Orion Nebula to Honor Henry Draper, New York University, New York, NY, December 4, 5, 1981, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E. (Editor); Huggins, P. J. (Editor); Schucking, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on astronomical studies of the Orion Nebula covers molecular clouds in Orion, the use of the nebula's cloak as a model for gas super-shells around OB associations, optical and UV data concerning the nebula's physical conditions, the presence of atomic carbon in Orion, large scale distribution of far-IR and sub-mm line emission, star formation studies in the IR, gas dynamics in the circumstellar nebula of the Becklin-Neugebauer source, maser sources and far-IR CO line emission in Orion-KL, and synthesis maps of mm molecular lines. Also discussed are Orion's star distributions, core region nebular condensations, energetic molecular flows in star-forming cloud cores, IR observations of HH objects, compact continuum radio sources, the SiO maser, shock waves, and the chemical evolution of OB associations.

  5. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D; Czyzak, S J

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems. PMID:16592633

  6. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D; Czyzak, S J

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems.

  7. Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of previously presented photoelectric spectrophotometry of HII regions (emission-line diffuse nebulae) in the two Magellanic Clouds is carried out with the aid of theoretical nebular models, which are used primarily as interpolation devices. Some advantages and limitations of such theoretical models are discussed. A comparison of the finally obtained chemical compositions with those found by other observers shows generally a good agreement, suggesting that it is possible to obtain reliable chemical compositions from low excitation gaseous nebulae in our own galaxy as well as in distant stellar systems. PMID:16592633

  8. Detection of C60 and C70 in a young planetary nebula.

    PubMed

    Cami, Jan; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Peeters, Els; Malek, Sarah Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, a number of molecules and diverse dust features have been identified by astronomical observations in various environments. Most of the dust that determines the physical and chemical characteristics of the interstellar medium is formed in the outflows of asymptotic giant branch stars and is further processed when these objects become planetary nebulae. We studied the environment of Tc 1, a peculiar planetary nebula whose infrared spectrum shows emission from cold and neutral C60 and C70. The two molecules amount to a few percent of the available cosmic carbon in this region. This finding indicates that if the conditions are right, fullerenes can and do form efficiently in space.

  9. Near-infrared and ultraviolet spectrophotometry of the young planetary nebula Hubble 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Richard J.; Rossano, George S.; Erwin, Peter; Puetter, R. C.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    The young planetary nebula Hubble 12 is observed using near-IR and UV spectrophotometry. The brightness of the O I lines, which is greater than in any other planetary nebula yet measured, indicates that fluorescent excitation by stellar continuum is the principal mechanism generating these lines. Extinction, electron density, and electron temperature are determined using infrared measurements combined with UV data and published optical observations. The range in extinction, density, and temperature implies that, within the ionized region, pockets of emission with distinctly different conditions exist. Logarithmic abundances for helium, oxygen, and sulfur are presented.

  10. Rapid formation of Jupiter by diffuse redistribution of water vapor in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1988-01-01

    In the present, water-vapor diffusive redistribution and condensation model of solid material abundance enhancement in the solar nebula's Jupiter-formation region, the assumed turbulent nebula temperatures decrease inversely with radial distance from the center, and time-scales are set by turbulent viscosities. The length scale for condensation of diffusively-transported water vapor is about 0.4 AU, and the surface density of ice in the Jupiter-formation zone undergoes enhancement by a factor of as much as 75; this surface density enhancement is enough to precipitate the rapid accretion of planetesimals into a solid core.

  11. Size distribution of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvarov, Abdul; Allahverdiyev, Ahad

    2015-08-01

    Despite a very long history of investigations, the nature and origin of planetary nebulae (PNe) are not fully understood. It is obvious that the observational properties of PNe are influenced by the properties of the central star and the conditions in the environment. In this presentation in order to understand the effects of these components we have modeled the evolution of radio luminosity and the expansion of PNe in the framework of different hypothesis on the origin of these objects. In this we have used the observational data on the central stars and clustered this data into gourps with the similar parameters of the central stars. For the each of these groups of PNe we have built statistical dependences radio luminosity - diameter, number of PNe - diameter which are then compared to the modeled ones. Unfortunately, the comparison of simulations with observations did not allow us to choose between the known models of the evolution of the PN shell. However with the increase of statistics the approach considered in this presentation may become more productive.

  12. Zinc abundances of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    2014-07-01

    Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625 μm for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionization correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10 per cent or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be subsolar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.

  13. Probing galactic disks with planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.

    Our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution is severely limited by poorly known galaxy mass profiles. Flat rotation curves indicate the presence of dark matter in the outer regions of spirals and determine total galactic mass, but rotation curves alone cannot decouple the mass contribution of the dark halo from that of the disk. Thus astronomers typically assume a constant disk mass-to-light ratio ( M/L ) in models. While studies indicate that M/L is constant in the inner regions of spirals, nothing is known about the M/L of outer disks. To determine this quantity, one must measure the surface mass of a disk directly from the z -motions of its old disk stars. Planetary nebulae (PNe) are ideal test particles because they are: bright and abundant to >5 scale lengths ( h R ), representative of the old disk, relatively easy to distinguish from H II regions, and their velocities are measurable to ~2 kms - 1 with fiber-fed spectrographs. The first step, then, is to use narrow-band imaging to identify large (~100) samples of PNe in face-on spirals. The magnitudes of the PN samples also provide reliable distances to the galaxies themselves via the Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function (PNLF). I discovered 165, 153, 241, 150, 19, and 71 PNe in IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), NGC 5068, and NGC 6946, respectively, and determined distances of 3.5±0.3 Mpc, 8.6±0.3 Mpc, 4.8±0.1 Mpc, [Special characters omitted.] Mpc, [Special characters omitted.] Mpc and 6.1 ± 0.6 Mpc, which agree well with values in the literature. I also explored minor fluctuations in the PNLFs as a function of position in the galaxies. The next step is to perform follow-up spectroscopy to measure as many velocities as possible and yet also obtain a high precision. I used the Hydra multi-fiber spectrographs on the WIYN 3.5-m and CTIO Blanco 4-m telescopes, as well as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, to measure velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48

  14. A recent change in the brightness and form of the HH46 reflection nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    A several-fold increase in the surface brightness of the scattered light component of the southern Herbig-Haro object HH46 took place between January 1984 and May 1986. A more subtle change in the shape of the nebula also occurred in that a small region, formerly only prominent in the infrared, is now the brightest part of the reflection nebula in visible red light. The change is due either to a flaring of the adjacent but still invisible young stellar object or to a partial clearing of the dust which still surrounds it. In May 1987, the nebula still appeared bright suggesting that the change may be a long-term one.

  15. Spectrum and chemical analysis of the double-ring planetary nebula IC 1297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.; Keyes, Charles D.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1986-01-01

    The double-ring planetary nebula IC 1297 resembles NGC 7662 in appearance, although it is of much lower surface brightness. What is remarkable is the great strength of the dielectronic recombination O V line. Although this line is seen as a P Cygni feature in a number of planetary nebulae, it is in those instances accompanied by a strong continuum and other easily recognized features of stellar origin. No star is visible on CCD images of IC 1297. Optical region measurements are supplemented by IUE observations. The following logarithmic abundance values are found: log N(He) = 11.065; log N(forbidden C) = 8.6; log N(N) = 8.1; log N(O) = 8.74; log N(Ne) = 8.16; log N(S) = 7.0; log N(Cl) = 5.4; log N(Ar) = 6.2. The nebula shows no dramatic pattern of nucleogenesis events.

  16. Observation of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Grondin, M.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.

    2010-03-26

    The Crab Pulsar and Nebula are the remnants of the explosion of the supernova SN1054, which was observed by Chinese astronomers. Previously detected by EGRET, the Crab Pulsar and Nebula have been extensively observed in the gamma-ray energy band by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite. The data collected by the LAT during its early operation stage have allowed a detailed measurement of the fluxes and of the energy spectra of both sources. The pulsar spectrum is consistent with the EGRET measurement in the region below 1 GeV and is well described by a power law with exponential cutoff at a few GeV. The nebula spectrum is well modeled by a sum of two power laws, identified respectively as the falling edge of the synchrotron and the rising edge of the inverse Compton components, and is in agreement with the observations from Earth-based telescopes.

  17. The Hα surface brightness — radius plane as a diagnostic tool for photoionized nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.; Bojičić, Ivan S.; Parker, Quentin A.

    2016-07-01

    The Hα surface brightness - radius (SHα-r) relation is a robust distance indicator for planetary nebulae (PNe), further enhanced by different populations of PNe having distinct loci in SHα-r space. Other types of photoionized nebulae also plot in quite distinct regions in the SHa-r plane, allowing its use as a diagnostic tool. In particular, the nova shells and massive star ejecta (MSE) plot on relatively tight loci illustrating their evolutionary sequences. For the MSE, there is potential to develop a distance indicator for these objects, based on their trend in SHα-r space. As high-resolution, narrowband surveys of the nearest galaxies become more commonplace, the SHα-r plane is a potentially useful diagnostic tool to help identify the various ionized nebulae in these systems.

  18. Planetary Nebula Kinematics in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2011-02-01

    Look at a spiral; what do you see? Stars zooming `round in the galaxy! Their motions indicate total mass, but how much is DM, stars, and gas? Study motions in and out; first find monochromatic stars- that's my kind. Find us, get our velocities, then: determine disk mass! I'm a PN! Rotation curves indicate the total mass of spirals, but halo mass profiles cannot be decoupled from the visible disk mass using rotation curves alone. To break this disk-halo degeneracy, we have been using planetary nebulae (PNe) to measure the z-component of the stellar velocity dispersion in the disks of face-on spirals. These measurements of σ_z, coupled with straightforward assumptions, have yielded disk surface mass estimates over several scale lengths (h_R) in 6 spirals. We find that in the inner regions of galaxies (R < 3.5 h_R), the values of σ_z are consistent with those expected from a constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L), constant scale-height disk and this trend continues into the outer regions of M74 and IC 342. However, in M83 and M94, σ_z flattens and becomes constant with radius. We have interpreted this as evidence for satellite accretion with disk flaring, but an increasing disk M/L may also contribute to the behavior. To investigate this phenomenon more thoroughly, we are proposing to extend the survey of an additional galaxy, M101, to R > 8 h_R. Last year we imaged M101 with the wide-field Mosaic camera on the KPNO 4-m telescope. This proposal is to perform follow-up spectroscopy on ~240 PNe in M101 with WIYN/Hydra.

  19. Near infrared photography with a vacuum-cold camera. [Orion nebula observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossano, G. S.; Russell, R. W.; Cornett, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitized cooled plates have been obtained of the Orion nebula region and of Sh2-149 in the wavelength ranges 8000 A-9000 A and 9,000 A-11,000 A with a recently designed and constructed vacuum-cold camera. Sensitization procedures are described and the camera design is presented.

  20. Interstellar Organics, the Solar Nebula, and Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium inventory of organic material (Pendleton et al. 1994, Pendleton & Allamandola 2002) was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed. This provided the feedstock for the formation of the Sun, major planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Saturn's satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saurn. VIMS spaectral maps of PHoebe's surface reveal a complex organic spectral signature consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and alophatic hydrocarbon (CH2, CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 micrometers). Phoebe is the source of a huge debris ring encircling Saturn, and from which particles (approximately 5-20 micrometer size) spiral inward toward Saturn. They encounter Iapetus and Hperion where they mix with and blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aromatic CH is approximately 10 times as abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, comet particles, ad in carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2013). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis of Hyperion and Phoebe itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 approximately 4, which is larger than the value found in the diffuse ISM (approximately 2-2.5). In so far as Phoebe is a primitive body that formed in the outer regions of the solar nebula and has preserved some of the original nebula inventory, it can be key to understanding the content and degree of procesing of the nebular material. There are other Phoebe-like TNOs that are presently

  1. First Detections of Molecular Gas Associated with the Wolf-Rayet Ring Nebula NGC 3199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, A. P.

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents the first observations of molecular gas associated with the Wolf-Rayet ring nebula NGC 3199 around the WR star WR 18. This includes first observations of the molecules HCN, HCO+, CN, and HNC seen in any Wolf-Rayet ring nebula. Our observations immediately suggest the presence of high-density molecular gas (>104 cm-3) in the nebula with significant amounts of associated molecular gas, which is in the form of clumpy ejecta and/or interstellar material. Molecular CO gas was mapped across the optically bright portion of the nebula and out into the diffuse ionized component using the 12CO J=1-->0 line. CO gas is not seen within the optically bright rim of NGC 3199 but adjacent to it. The optical emission rim therefore appears to mark regions of photodissociation. Velocity components in the CO data are consistent with those seen in high-resolution optical spectra of the Hα line but extend beyond the visible emission. A prior suggestion of the formation of the nebula via a bow shock appears unlikely since Hipparcos measurements show the proper motion of WR 18 is almost at right angles to the direction required for the bow shock model. Instead, line splitting toward the north of the nebula suggests that a possible blowout of the Wolf-Rayet wind through surrounding ejecta may be responsible for some of the velocity features observed. Preliminary estimates of molecular abundances in the nebula seen toward the central star are significantly higher than for the interstellar medium and are similar to those in planetary nebulae, although CN is distinctly underabundant in comparison to the very high values found in many planetary nebulae. The abundances found are consistent with the idea that at least a portion of the molecular material is associated with ejecta from the central star. Based on observations collected at the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. The Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope

  2. Turbulent Concentration of MM-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scaled-Dependent Multiplier Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hartlep, Thomas; Weston, B.; Estremera, Shariff Kareem

    2014-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (asteroids and TNOs) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Here we focus on the asteroids where constituent particle (read "chondrule") sizes are observationally known; similar arguments will hold for TNOs, but the constituent particles in those regions will be smaller, or will be fluffy aggregates, and are unobserved. Traditional growth-bysticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] (or even a mm-cm-size barrier [2]) in turbulent nebulae, while nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids [3]. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, other obstacles are encountered through the 1-10km size range [4]. Another clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids [5]; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios [6-8]. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation [7,8] are determined by a statistical model with properties inferred from large numerical simulations of turbulence [9]. Nebula turbulence can be described by its Reynolds number Re = L/eta sup(4/3), where L = ETA alpha sup (1/2) the largest eddy scale, H is the nebula gas vertical scale height, and a the nebula turbulent viscosity parameter, and ? is the Kolmogorov or smallest scale in turbulence (typically about 1km), with eddy turnover time t?. In the nebula, Re is far larger than any numerical simulation can

  3. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer.

  4. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert A.; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Strohmayer, Tod; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2010-07-01

    Massive stars are born from giant molecular clouds along with many lower mass stars, forming a stellar cluster or association. They dominate the pressure of the interstellar gas through their strong UV radiation, stellar winds and, ultimately, supernova explosions at the end of their life. These processes help the formation of the next generation of stars, but this trigger of star formation is not yet well understood. The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ~30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with a kT~128 eV lackbody with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a 106 year-old neutron star. Current star formation theory does not allow the progenitor of the neutron star and the other massive stars in the Carina Nebula (in particular η Carinae) to be coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for part or all of the diffuse X-ray emission which permeates the Nebula.

  5. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, M. F.; Ezoe, Y.; Townsley, L.; Broos, P.; Gruendl, R.; Vaidya, K.; White, S. M.; Strohmayer, T.; Petre, R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2009-09-01

    Massive stars are born from giant molecular clouds along with many lower mass stars, forming a stellar cluster or association. They dominate the pressure of the interstellar gas through their strong UV radiation, stellar winds and, ultimately, supernova explosions at the end of their life. These processes help the formation of the next generation of stars, but this trigger of star formation is not yet well understood. The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ˜30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with a kT ˜128 eV blackbody with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a 106 year-old neutron star. Current star formation theory does not allow the progenitor of the neutron star and the other massive stars in the Carina Nebula (in particular Eta Carinae) to be coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for part or all of the diffuse X-ray emission which permeates the Nebula.

  6. Hydroxyl Emission in the Westbrook Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, Angelica; Araya, Esteban; Ghosh, Tapasi; Arce, Hector G.; Lebron, Mayra E.; Salter, Christopher J.; Minchin, Robert F.; Pihlstrom, Ylva; Kurtz, Stan; Hofner, Peter; Olmi, Luca

    2016-06-01

    CRL 618, also known as the Westbrook Nebula, is a carbon-rich pre-planetary nebula. Hydroxyl (OH) transitions are typically not detected in carbon-rich late-type stellar objects, however observations conducted with the 305m Arecibo Telescope in 2008 resulted in the detection of 4765 MHz OH emission in CRL 618. We present results of observations carried out a few months after the original detection that confirm the line. This is the first detection of 4765 MHz OH emission (most likely a maser) in a pre-planetary nebula. Follow up observations conducted in 2015 resulted in non-detection of the 4765 MHz OH transition. This behavior is consistent with the high level of variability of excited OH lines that have been detected toward a handful of other pre-planetary nebulae. Our work supports that excited OH masers are short-lived during the pre-planetary nebula phase. We also conducted a search for other OH transitions from 1612 MHz to 8611 MHz with the Arecibo Telescope; we report no other detections at rms levels of ~5 mJy.This work has made use of the computational facilities donated by Frank Rodeffer to the WIU Astrophysics Research Laboratory. We also acknowledge support from M. & C. Wong RISE scholarships and a grant from the WIU College of Arts and Sciences.

  7. Molecular Content of the Helix Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zack, L. N.; Zeigler, N. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-06-01

    Multiple transitions of H_2CO, HCO^+, and CO were detected at nine positions across the planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula, using the 12m telescope and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). A complete map of the nebula has also been made in the J = 1 → 0 transition of HCO^+ at 89 GHz. HCO^+ emission was found to be widespread across the Helix, and is coincident with the ionized gas as traced in optical images. A complex velocity structure is apparent in the HCO^+ spectra, as well. The CO and H_2CO data (J = 1 → 0, 2 → 1, and 3 → 2) were modeled using a radiative transfer code at the nine positions observed in the Helix. Kinetic temperatures were typically found to be in the range Tkin ≈ 20 - 45 K and the gas density on the order of n(H_2) ≈ 105 cm-3 at these positions. The column densities for CO, H_2CO, and HCO^+ were determined to be 1015, 1012, and 1011 cm-2 respectively, corresponding to fractional abundances, relative to H_2, of f ≈ 10-4, 10-7, and 10-8. The extended distribution of HCO^+ suggests that dense clumps may exist throughout the nebula. Hence, the chemistry of evolved planetary nebulae may be more active than previously thought.

  8. The Stingray nebula: watching the rapid evolution of a newly born planetary nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, M.; Sahu, K. C.; Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, Pedro

    The formation and early evolution of planetary nebulae represent one of the most poorly understood phases of stellar evolution ( Kwok, 1987; Maddox, 1995). One of the youngest, the Stingray Nebula (He3-1357) ( Henize, 1967; Henize, 1976), shows all the tell-tale signs of a newly born planetary nebula: it has become ionized only within the past few decades ( Parthasarathy et al., 1993); the mass-loss from the central star has ceased within the past few years; and the central star is becoming hotter and fainter as expected from a star on its way to becoming a DA white dwarf ( Parthasarathy et al., 1995). The Stingray Nebula thus provides the ideal laboratory for examining the early structure and evolution of this class of objects. Images of the Stingray Nebula, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, show for the first time that its multiple expulsions of matter are focused by an equatorial ring and bubbles of gas located on opposite sides of the ring ( Bobrowsky et al., 1995). The position angle of the outflows has changed, possibly as a result of precessional motion induced by the presence of a companion star. This is consistent with the precessing jet model by Livio & Pringle (1996). Indeed, we have reported the discovery of a companion star in the Stingray Nebula ( Bobrowsky et al., 1998). Finally, we present evidence of the companion star dynamically distorting the gas in this newly-born planetary nebula.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this sturning image provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Omega Nebula (M17) resembles the fury of a raging sea, showing a bubbly ocean of glowing hydrogen gas and small amounts of other elements such as oxygen and sulfur. The nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula, is a hotbed of newly born stars residing 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The wavelike patterns of gas have been sculpted and illuminated by a torrent of ultraviolet radiation from the young massive stars, which lie outside the picture to the upper left. The ultraviolet radiation is carving and heating the surfaces of cold hydrogen gas clouds. The warmed surfaces glow orange and red in this photograph. The green represents an even hotter gas that masks background structures. Various gases represented with color are: sulfur, represented in red; hydrogen, green; and oxygen blue.

  10. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This new Hubble image -- one among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory -- shows the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble's WFPC2 workhorse camera.

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

  11. Barnard's Merope Nebula Revisited: New Observational Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.; Simon, Theodore

    2001-06-01

    IC 349 is a small, fan-shaped reflection nebula located only 30" from 23 Tau; its nucleus is, by a factor 15, the brightest area of the Pleiades nebulosity. We propose that IC 349 is a fragment of the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud that has been encountered by the Pleiades in that cluster's southward motion and is being illuminated and shaped by the radiation field of 23 Tau. New Hubble Space Telescope multicolor imagery and the structure, colors, and surface brightness of IC 349 are discussed in terms of that hypothesis. What is known of the proper motion of the nebula, what can be inferred of the properties of the nebula from its color, and what is expected from radiation pressure theory appear to be compatible with this cloudlet-encounter hypothesis.

  12. The temperature gradient in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J S

    1974-11-01

    The available compositional data on planets and satellites can be used to place stringent limits on the thermal environment in the solar nebula. The densities of the terrestrial planets, Ceres and Vesta, the Galilean satellites, and Titan; the atmospheric compositions of several of these bodies; and geochemical and geophysical data on the earth combine to define a strong dependence of formation temperature on heliocentric distance. The pressure and temperature dependences of the condensation process are separable in the sense that the variation of the deduced formation temperatures with heliocentric distance is insensitive to even very diverse assumptions regarding the pressure profile in the nebula. It is impossible to reconcile the available compositional data with any model in which the formation temperatures of these bodies are determined by radiative equilibrium with the sun, regardless of the sun's luminosity. Rather, the data support Cameron's hypothesis of a dense, convective solar nebula, opaque to solar radiation, with an adiabatic temperature-pressure profile.

  13. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  14. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  15. Broad Halpha Wing Formation in the Planetary Nebula IC 4997.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hyung

    2000-02-10

    The young and compact planetary nebula IC 4997 is known to exhibit very broad wings with a width exceeding 5000 km s-1 around Halpha. We propose that the broad wings are formed through Rayleigh-Raman scattering that involves atomic hydrogen, by which Lybeta photons with a velocity width of a few 102 km s-1 are converted to optical photons and fill the Halpha broad wing region. The conversion efficiency reaches 0.6 near the line center, where the scattering optical depth is much larger than 1, and rapidly decreases in the far wings. Assuming that close to the central star there exists an unresolved inner compact core of high density, nH approximately 109-1010 cm-3, we use the photoionization code "CLOUDY" to show that sufficient Lybeta photons for scattering are produced. Using a top-hat-incident profile for the Lybeta flux and a scattering region with a H i column density NHi=2x1020 cm-2 and a substantial covering factor, we perform a profile-fitting analysis in order to obtain a satisfactory fit to the observed flux. We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of the Rayleigh-Raman processes in planetary nebulae and other emission objects. PMID:10642203

  16. The spectrum of the planetary nebula IC 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed high-spectral-resolution study of the spectrum of IC 418 is made for the region 3650 to 10050 A, using the Hamilton echelle spectrograph of Lick Observatory, and of the UV spectral region with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data. From high-resolution images in both the near- and mid-infrared, Hora et al. (1993) showed that IC 418 probably has a compact shell interior to the detached, well-known, main shell emission. If one assumes a black body or Hubeny (or standard LTE) model atmosphere energy distribution, it does not appear possible to construct a fully satisfactory nebula model that will simultaneously represent the H-beta flux, the (O III) 5007/H-beta ratio, and the scale of this planetary nebula (PN). Fortunately, IUE and IR data supply information on ions in addition to those optically observed so that the chemical composition can be reasonably well established by summing over concentrations of observed ions. In spite of the fact that IC 418 is carbon rich in sense of having a C/O ratio exceeding the solar value, it is a 'metal-poor' object. Possibly it resembles IC 4997 but in a more advanced evolutionary phase. The central star is variable and has a strong wind.

  17. Turbulent transport in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1989-01-01

    It is likely that turbulence played a major role in the evolution of the solar nebula, which is the flattened disk of dust and gas out of which our solar system formed. Relevant turbulent processes include the transport of angular momentum, mass, and heat, which were critically important to the formation of the solar system. This research will break ground in the modeling of compressible turbulence and its effects on the evolution of the solar nebula. The computational techniques which were developed should be of interest to researchers studying other astrophysical disk systems (e.g., active galactic nuclei), as well as turbulence modelers outside the astrophysics community.

  18. Shaping the Glowing Eye Planetary Nebula, NGC 6751

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; García-Díaz, Ma. T.; López, J. A.; Steffen, W. G.; Richer, M. G.

    2010-10-01

    NGC 6751 is a highly structured multiple-shell planetary nebula (PN) with a bipolar outflow. In this work, we present a comprehensive set of spatially resolved, high spectral resolution, long-slit spectra and deep imaging from San Pedro Mártir, Gemini, the Hα composite full sky survey and archive images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer. This material allows us to identify all the main morphological components and study their detailed kinematics. We find a thick equatorial structure fragmented into multiple knots that enclose a fast expanding bubble with a filamentary surface structure. The knotty ring is surrounded by faint emission from a disk-like envelope. Lobes with embedded filaments form a bipolar outflow. The equatorial ring is tilted with respect to the line of sight and with respect to the bipolar outflow. A spherical halo surrounds the PN and there is material further out identified as a fragmented outer halo. This information is used to derive a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic model using the code SHAPE that closely replicates the observed image and long-slit spectra of the nebula, providing a fair representation of its complex structure. NGC 6751 is located close to the galactic plane and its large-scale surrounding environment is shown to be a gas-rich region. We find indications that the PN is interacting with the interstellar medium. Emission components from an extended nebulosity located a couple of arcminutes away from the nebula have radial velocities that are inconsistent with the rest of NGC 6751 and are confirmed as originating from the ambient material, not related to the PN, in agreement with a previous suggestion.

  19. Gas absorption and dust extinction towards the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenberger, Birgit; Forbrich, Jan; Alves, João; Wolk, Scott J.; Meingast, Stefan; Getman, Konstantin V.; Pillitteri, Ignazio

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We characterise the relation between the gas and dust content of the interstellar medium towards young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster. Methods: X-ray observations provide estimates of the absorbing equivalent hydrogen column density NH based on spectral fits. Near-infrared extinction values are calculated from intrinsic and observed colour magnitudes (J - H) and (H - Ks) as given by the VISTA Orion A survey. A linear fit of the correlation between column density and extinction values AV yields an estimate of the NH/AV ratio. We investigate systematic uncertainties of the results by describing and (if possible) quantifying the influence of circumstellar material and the adopted extinction law, X-ray models, and elemental abundances on the NH/AV ratio. Results: Assuming a Galactic extinction law with RV = 3.1 and solar abundances by Anders & Grevesse (1989, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 197), we deduce an NH/AV ratio of (1.39 ± 0.14) × 1021 cm-2 mag-1 for Class III sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster where the given error does not include systematic uncertainties. This ratio is consistent with similar studies in other star-forming regions and approximately 31% lower than the Galactic value. We find no obvious trends in the spatial distribution of NH/AV ratios. Changes in the assumed extinction law and elemental abundances are demonstrated to have a relevant impact on deduced AV and NH values, respectively. Large systematic uncertainties associated with metal abundances in the Orion Nebula Cluster represent the primary limitation for the deduction of a definitive NH/AV ratio and the physical interpretation of these results. The catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A7

  20. A simple way to model nebulae with distributed ionizing stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, L.; Morisset, C.

    2008-04-01

    Aims: This work is a follow-up of a recent article by Ercolano et al. that shows that, in some cases, the spatial dispersion of the ionizing stars in a given nebula may significantly affect its emission spectrum. The authors found that the dispersion of the ionizing stars is accompanied by a decrease in the ionization parameter, which at least partly explains the variations in the nebular spectrum. However, they did not research how other effects associated to the dispersion of the stars may contribute to those variations. Furthermore, they made use of a unique and simplified set of stellar populations. The scope of the present article is to assess whether the variation in the ionization parameter is the dominant effect in the dependence of the nebular spectrum on the distribution of its ionizing stars. We examined this possibility for various regimes of metallicity and age. We also investigated a way to model the distribution of the ionizing sources so as to bypass expensive calculations. Methods: We wrote a code able to generate random stellar populations and to compute the emission spectra of their associated nebulae through the widespread photoionization code cloudy. This code can process two kinds of spatial distributions of the stars: one where all the stars are concentrated at one point, and one where their separation is such that their Strömgren spheres do not overlap. Results: We found that, in most regimes of stellar population ages and gas metallicities, the dependence of the ionization parameter on the distribution of the stars is the dominant factor in the variation of the main nebular diagnostics with this distribution. We derived a method to mimic those effects with a single calculation that makes use of the common assumptions of a central source and a spherical nebula, in the case of constant density objects. This represents a computation time saving by a factor of at least several dozen in the case of H ii regions ionized by massive clusters.

  1. The chemical composition of Galactic ring nebulae around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Morisset, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep spectra of ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-type stars: NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58, S 308, NGC 7635 and RCW 52. The data have been taken with the 10m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6.5m Clay Telescope. We extract spectra of several apertures in some of the objects. We derive C2+ and O2+ abundances from faint recombination lines in NGC 6888 and NGC 7635, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios and estimate the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) of O2+. The ADFs are larger than the typical ones of normal H II regions but similar to those found in the ionized gas of star-forming dwarf galaxies. We find that chemical abundances are rather homogeneous in the nebulae where we have spectra of several apertures: NGC 6888, NGC 7635 and G2.4+1.4. We obtain very high values of electron temperature in a peripheral zone of NGC 6888, finding that shock excitation can reproduce its spectral properties. We find that all the objects associated with WR stars show N enrichment. Some of them also show He enrichment and O deficiency as well as a lower Ne/O than expected, this may indicate the strong action of the ON and NeNa cycles. We have compared the chemical composition of NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58 and S 308 with the nucleosynthesis predicted by stellar evolution models of massive stars. We find that non-rotational models of stars of initial masses between 25 and 40 M⊙ seem to reproduce the observed abundance ratios of most of the nebulae.

  2. SHAPING THE GLOWING EYE PLANETARY NEBULA, NGC 6751

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; Garcia-Diaz, Ma. T.; Lopez, J. A.; Steffen, W. G.; Richer, M. G. E-mail: tere@astrosen.unam.m E-mail: wsteffen@astrosen.unam.m

    2010-10-20

    NGC 6751 is a highly structured multiple-shell planetary nebula (PN) with a bipolar outflow. In this work, we present a comprehensive set of spatially resolved, high spectral resolution, long-slit spectra and deep imaging from San Pedro Martir, Gemini, the H{alpha} composite full sky survey and archive images from the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer. This material allows us to identify all the main morphological components and study their detailed kinematics. We find a thick equatorial structure fragmented into multiple knots that enclose a fast expanding bubble with a filamentary surface structure. The knotty ring is surrounded by faint emission from a disk-like envelope. Lobes with embedded filaments form a bipolar outflow. The equatorial ring is tilted with respect to the line of sight and with respect to the bipolar outflow. A spherical halo surrounds the PN and there is material further out identified as a fragmented outer halo. This information is used to derive a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic model using the code SHAPE that closely replicates the observed image and long-slit spectra of the nebula, providing a fair representation of its complex structure. NGC 6751 is located close to the galactic plane and its large-scale surrounding environment is shown to be a gas-rich region. We find indications that the PN is interacting with the interstellar medium. Emission components from an extended nebulosity located a couple of arcminutes away from the nebula have radial velocities that are inconsistent with the rest of NGC 6751 and are confirmed as originating from the ambient material, not related to the PN, in agreement with a previous suggestion.

  3. The Generation of Lighting in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey; Desch, S. J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The process that melted and formed the chondrules, mm-sized glassy beads within meteorites, has not been conclusively identified. Origin by lightning in the solar nebula is consistent with many features of chondrules, but no viable model of lightning has yet been advanced. We present a model demonstrating how lightning could be generated in the solar nebula which differs from previous models in three important aspects. First, we identify a new', powerful charging mechanism that is based on the differences in contact potentials between particles of different composition, a form of triboelectric charging. In the presence of fine silicate grains and fine iron metal grains, large silicate particles (the chondrules) can acquire charges of +10(exp 5) e. Second, we assume that the chondrule precursor particles are selectively concentrated in clumps 1 - 100 km in size by the turbulent concentration mechanism described by Cuzzi et al. (1996). The concentration of these highly charged particles into clumps, in a background of negatively charged metal grains, is what generates the strong electric fields. Third, we make refinements in the estimates of the breakdown electric field and the ionization rate. We calculate that electric fields large enough to trigger breakdown easily could have existed over regions large enough (approx. 100km) to generate very large discharges of electrical energy (approx. 10(exp 16)erg). The discharges would have been sufficiently energetic and frequent to have formed the chondrules. We place constraints on the generation of lightning and conclude that it could not be generated if the abundance of Al-26 in chondrules was as high as the level in the CAls. This conclusion is consistent with isotopic analyses of chondrules. This possibly implies that Al-26 was non-uniformly distributed in the solar nebula or that the chondrules formed several Myr after the CAIs.

  4. Nature versus Nurture: Luminous Blue Variable Nebulae in and near Massive Stellar Clusters at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Morris, M. R.; Adams, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    Three luminous blue variables (LBVs) are located in and near the Quintuplet Cluster at the Galactic center: the Pistol Star, G0.120-0.048, and qF362. We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the region containing these three LBVs, obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. We argue that Pistol and G0.120-0.048 are identical "twins" that exhibit contrasting nebulae due to the external influence of their different environments. Our images reveal the asymmetric, compressed shell of hot dust surrounding the Pistol Star and provide the first detection of the thermal emission from the symmetric, hot dust envelope surrounding G0.120-0.048. However, no detection of hot dust associated with qF362 is made. Dust and gas composing the Pistol nebula are primarily heated and ionized by the nearby Quintuplet Cluster stars. The northern region of the Pistol nebula is decelerated due to the interaction with the high-velocity (2000 km s-1) winds from adjacent Wolf-Rayet Carbon (WC) stars. From fits to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Pistol nebula with the DustEM code we determine that the Pistol nebula is composed of a distribution of very small, transiently heated grains (10 to ~ 35 Å) having a total dust mass of 0.03 M ⊙, and that it exhibits a gradient of decreasing grain size from south to north due to differential sputtering by the winds from the WC stars. The total IR luminosity of the Pistol nebula is 5.2 × 105 L ⊙. Dust in the G0.120-0.048 nebula is primarily heated by the central star; however, the nebular gas is ionized externally by the Arches Cluster. Unlike the Pistol nebula, the G0.120-0.048 nebula is freely expanding into the surrounding medium. A grain size distribution identical to that of the non-sputtered region of the Pistol nebula satisfies the constraints placed on the G0.120-0.048 nebula from DustEM model fits to its SED and implies a total dust mass of 0.021 M ⊙. The total IR luminosity of the G0.120-0.048 nebula is ~105 L ⊙. From

  5. Nature versus nurture: Luminous blue variable nebulae in and near massive stellar clusters at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-04-20

    Three luminous blue variables (LBVs) are located in and near the Quintuplet Cluster at the Galactic center: the Pistol Star, G0.120-0.048, and qF362. We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the region containing these three LBVs, obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. We argue that Pistol and G0.120-0.048 are identical 'twins' that exhibit contrasting nebulae due to the external influence of their different environments. Our images reveal the asymmetric, compressed shell of hot dust surrounding the Pistol Star and provide the first detection of the thermal emission from the symmetric, hot dust envelope surrounding G0.120-0.048. However, no detection of hot dust associated with qF362 is made. Dust and gas composing the Pistol nebula are primarily heated and ionized by the nearby Quintuplet Cluster stars. The northern region of the Pistol nebula is decelerated due to the interaction with the high-velocity (2000 km s{sup –1}) winds from adjacent Wolf-Rayet Carbon (WC) stars. From fits to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Pistol nebula with the DustEM code we determine that the Pistol nebula is composed of a distribution of very small, transiently heated grains (10 to ∼ 35 Å) having a total dust mass of 0.03 M {sub ☉}, and that it exhibits a gradient of decreasing grain size from south to north due to differential sputtering by the winds from the WC stars. The total IR luminosity of the Pistol nebula is 5.2 × 10{sup 5} L {sub ☉}. Dust in the G0.120-0.048 nebula is primarily heated by the central star; however, the nebular gas is ionized externally by the Arches Cluster. Unlike the Pistol nebula, the G0.120-0.048 nebula is freely expanding into the surrounding medium. A grain size distribution identical to that of the non-sputtered region of the Pistol nebula satisfies the constraints placed on the G0.120-0.048 nebula from DustEM model fits to its SED and implies a total dust mass of 0.021 M {sub ☉}. The total IR luminosity of the G0

  6. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    More than 95% of silicate minerals and other oxides found in meteorites were melted, or vaporized and recondensed in the Solar Nebula prior to their incorporation into meteorite parent bodies. Gravitational accretion energy and heating via radioactive decay further transformed oxide minerals accreted into planetesimals. In such an oxygen-rich environment the carbonaceous dust that fell into the nebula as an intimate mixture with oxide grains should have been almost completely converted to CO. While some pre-collapse, molecular-cloud carbonaceous dust does survive, much in the same manner as do pre-solar oxide grains, such materials constitute only a few percent of meteoritic carbon and are clearly distinguished by elevated D/H, N-15/N-16, C-13/C-12 ratios or noble gas patterns. Carbonaceous Dust in Meteorites: We argue that nearly all of the carbon in meteorites was synthesized in the Solar Nebula from CO and that this CO was generated by the reaction of carbonaceous dust with solid oxides, water or OH. It is probable that some fraction of carbonaceous dust that is newly synthesized in the Solar Nebula is also converted back into CO by additional thermal processing. CO processing might occur on grains in the outer nebula through irradiation of CO-containing ice coatings or in the inner nebula via Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) reactions on grain surfaces. Large-scale transport of both gaseous reaction products and dust from the inner nebula out to regions where comets formed would spread newly formed carbonaceous materials throughout the solar nebula. Formation of Organic Carbon: Carbon dust in the ISM might easily be described as inorganic graphite or amorphous carbon, with relatively low structural abundances of H, N, O and S . Products of FTT reactions or organics produced via irradiation of icy grains contain abundant aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. aldehydes, keytones, acids, amines and amides.. The net result of the massive nebular carbon cycle is to convert

  7. Solar nebula origin for volatile gases in Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Steffi; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lewis, John S.

    1990-01-01

    The conditions for Comet Halley formation are presently considered in light of the application of physical and chemical processes in the solar nebula environments to the present data base on the composition of the comet's gases. Key molecular ratios are compared to solar nebula model predictions, and the nebular thermochemistry is quantified for a range of solar elemental compositions which correspond to varying water depletion states in the inner nebula. Assuming that inner nebula chemistry is catalyzed by reaction on grains, it is judged that the abundances of the volatile C species CH4, CO, and CO2 in Halley could have been supplied by the solar nebula.

  8. A Morpho-kinematic and Spectroscopic study of Bipolar Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, Niall

    2015-09-01

    In this thesis, studies of the kinematic properties for a sample of Galactic bipolar planetary nebulae, based on optical and infrared observations, were performed using a morpho-kinematic code, optical and NIR diagnostic diagrams, and techniques using data analyses. The mechanisms that form complex bipolar planetary nebulae remain unclear, and their shapes can be generated either as a planetary or symbiotic nebula. The origin of the material ionised by the white dwarf is very different in these two scenarios, and it complicates the understanding of the morphologies of planetary nebulae. The physical properties, structure, and dynamics of the bipolar nebulae, MyCn 18, M 2-9, Mz 3, Hen 2-104, and Abell 14, are each investigated in detail with the aim of understanding their nature, shaping mechanisms, and evolutionary history. For MyCn 18, VLT infrared images, VLT ISAAC infrared spectra, and long-slit optical echelle spectra are used to investigate the inner and outer regions of the nebula. The morpho-kinematic modelling tool shape was used to firmly constrain the structure and kinematics of the source. A timescale analysis was used to help determine the kinematical age of the nebula and its main components. A spectroscopic study of MyCn 18's central region reveals the detailed make-up of its nebular composition. Molecular hydrogen, atomic helium, and Brackett gamma emission are detected in the central regions. ISAAC spectra from a slit position along the narrow waist of the nebula demonstrate that the ionised gas resides closer to the centre of the nebula than the molecular emission. A final reconstructed 3-D model of MyCn 18 was generated, providing kinematical information on the expansion velocity of its nebular components by means of position-velocity arrays (or observed long-slit spectra). A kinematical age of the nebula and its components were obtained using the position-velocity arrays and timescale analysis. For M 2-9, Mz 3, and Hen 2-104, long-slit optical

  9. A New Population of Galactic Bulge Planetary Nebulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, Travis

    2016-01-01

    A new population of Galactic bulge planetary nebulas is presented. Nebula candidates were discovered by systematically reviewing archival [OIII] on/off band survey imaging of the central -5° ≤ l ≤ 5°, -5° ≤ b ≤ 5° region around the Galactic centre. An image segmentation and interleaving scheme was developed to facilitate this review. The resultant candidates (> 200) were then double checked against complementary archival Hα sky survey data to screen for obvious planetary nebula (PN) mimics or spurious image artefacts. Confirmatory spectroscopy of the PN candidates was pursued with thin slit, fibre multiobject and wide field spectrographs. Custom software was built to streamline interfacing with third-party spectroscopic management tools and a parallel greedy set cover algorithm implemented for efficient field selection in constrained multi-object observations. The combined imaging and spectroscopic evidence yielded true (4), probable (31) and possible (83) PNs toward the bulge. Secondary discoveries such as new PN mimics and late type stars were by-products of the confirmatory spectroscopy. Instances of literature PN duplication encountered during the investigation were noticed and documented. Spectral analysis of new PNs, including those obtained with a new optimised sky subtraction technique devised and demonstrated here, provided diagnostic data allowing radial velocity and Balmer decrement determination. Using a combined diameter and radial velocity criterion, bona fide bulge PNs were distinguished from new foreground PNs. Where Balmer decrements were available for new bulge PNs, differential aperture photometry was used to provide a modest data increment to Galactic bulge planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF). The PNLF was revised with data from some new bulge PNs, but more significantly, by a series of corrections to the data derived from previously known bulge PNs (~225), such as improved filter transmission effects, statistically

  10. Spectrophotometric observations of a peculiar nitrogen-rich planetary nebula NGC 2440

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise, R.

    1982-06-01

    By using the Boller and Chivens spectrograph with a moderate dispersion (59 A/mm) in the red spectral region, 65 spectra covering the whole surface of the planetary nebula NGC 2440 were obtained. Intensities of H-alpha, forbidden N II lines 6548-6584 A and forbidden S II lines 6717-6731 A are derived using the IDS system available at the ESO in La Silla (Chile). The nebula is known to be a nitrogen-rich nebula (Peimbert, 1978) surrounded by secondary structures (Minkowski, 1964). The unusual high value of the forbidden N II lines/H-alpha in the central core (approximately 3.0) is certainly due to the nitrogen overabundance occurring in that part of the nebula. Its variations from the center to the outer regions are interpreted as a consequence of small-scale ionization structure (Capriotti, Cromwell and Williams, 1971). The observations show clearly an outward increase of both forbidden N II lines/H-alpha and I(6717)/I(6713) ratios.

  11. The dynamics and physical properties of the cometary nebula G29. 96 - 0. 02

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.O.S.; Churchwell, E. Wisconsin, University, Madison )

    1991-05-01

    The H76-alpha recombination line emission distribution from the cometary UC H II regions G29.96 - 0.02 has been mapped with a resolution of 0.62 x 0.49 arcsec. The distribution of radial velocities in the ionized gas is well ordered. There is an unambiguous velocity gradient across the face of the nebula with velocities ranging from about 80 km/s on the leading edge of the cometary arc to about 105 km/s in the 'tail', a shift of about 25 km/s over an angular distance of about 4 arcsec. The linewidths are significantly broader along the leading edge of the cometary arc than elsewhere in the nebula. LTE electron temperatures are systematically low throughout the nebula, ranging from about 2500 K to 4200 K at different points in the H II region. Non-LTE line models combined with the continuum image imply that the electron densities in the arc are 5-10 times greater than in the tail of the nebula. G29.96 - 0.02 is moderately attenuated by interstellar dust. 25 refs.

  12. THE NATURE AND FREQUENCY OF OUTFLOWS FROM STARS IN THE CENTRAL ORION NEBULA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    O’Dell, C. R.; Ferland, G. J.; Henney, W. J.; Peimbert, M.; García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Rubin, Robert H.

    2015-10-15

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope images have allowed the determination with unprecedented accuracy of motions and changes of shocks within the inner Orion Nebula. These originate from collimated outflows from very young stars, some within the ionized portion of the nebula and others within the host molecular cloud. We have doubled the number of Herbig–Haro objects known within the inner Orion Nebula. We find that the best-known Herbig–Haro shocks originate from relatively few stars, with the optically visible X-ray source COUP 666 driving many of them. While some isolated shocks are driven by single collimated outflows, many groups of shocks are the result of a single stellar source having jets oriented in multiple directions at similar times. This explains the feature that shocks aligned in opposite directions in the plane of the sky are usually blueshifted because the redshifted outflows pass into the optically thick photon-dominated region behind the nebula. There are two regions from which optical outflows originate for which there are no candidate sources in the SIMBAD database.

  13. The Nature and Frequency of Outflows from Stars in the Central Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Ferland, G. J.; Henney, W. J.; Peimbert, M.; García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Rubin, Robert H.

    2015-10-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope images have allowed the determination with unprecedented accuracy of motions and changes of shocks within the inner Orion Nebula. These originate from collimated outflows from very young stars, some within the ionized portion of the nebula and others within the host molecular cloud. We have doubled the number of Herbig-Haro objects known within the inner Orion Nebula. We find that the best-known Herbig-Haro shocks originate from relatively few stars, with the optically visible X-ray source COUP 666 driving many of them. While some isolated shocks are driven by single collimated outflows, many groups of shocks are the result of a single stellar source having jets oriented in multiple directions at similar times. This explains the feature that shocks aligned in opposite directions in the plane of the sky are usually blueshifted because the redshifted outflows pass into the optically thick photon-dominated region behind the nebula. There are two regions from which optical outflows originate for which there are no candidate sources in the SIMBAD database. Based on observations at the San Pedro Martir Observatory operated by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

  14. OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA'S ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, A. M.; Desch, S. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Foy, J. P.

    2013-03-10

    We present the first Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 imaging survey of the entire Crab Nebula, in the filters F502N ([O III] emission), F673N ([S II]), F631N ([O I]), and F547M (continuum). We use our mosaics to characterize the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its three-dimensional structure, the ionizational structure in the filaments forming at its periphery, the speed of the shock driven by the PWN into surrounding ejecta (by inferring the cooling rates behind the shock), and the morphology and ionizational structure of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) fingers. We quantify a number of asymmetries between the northwest (NW) and southeast (SE) quadrants of the Crab Nebula. The lack of observed filaments in the NW, and our observations of the spatial extent of [O III] emission lead us to conclude that cooling rates are slower, and therefore the shock speeds are greater, in the NW quadrant of the nebula, compared with the SE. We conclude that R-T fingers are longer, more ionizationally stratified, and apparently more massive in the NW than in the SE, and the R-T instability appears more fully developed in the NW.

  15. INTERNAL PROPER MOTIONS IN THE ESKIMO NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Gutiérrez, L.; Steffen, W.; López, J. A.; Beckman, J. E-mail: leonel@astro.unam.mx E-mail: jal@astro.unam.mx

    2015-01-10

    We present measurements of internal proper motions at more than 500 positions of NGC 2392, the Eskimo Nebula, based on images acquired with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by 7.695 yr. Comparisons of the two observations clearly show the expansion of the nebula. We measured the amplitude and direction of the motion of local structures in the nebula by determining their relative shift during that interval. In order to assess the potential uncertainties in the determination of proper motions in this object, in general, the measurements were performed using two different methods, used previously in the literature. We compare the results from the two methods, and to perform the scientific analysis of the results we choose one, the cross-correlation method, because it is more reliable. We go on to perform a ''criss-cross'' mapping analysis on the proper motion vectors, which helps in the interpretation of the velocity pattern. By combining our results of the proper motions with radial velocity measurements obtained from high resolution spectroscopic observations, and employing an existing 3D model, we estimate the distance to the nebula to be 1.3 kpc.

  16. Search for excess showers from Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirov, I. N.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.; Janminchev, V. D.; Aseikin, V. S.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Nikolskaja, N. M.; Yakovlev, V. I.; Morozov, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of muon poor showers registrated in the Tien Shan experiment during an effective running time about I,8.IO(4)h were analyzed. It is shown that there is a significant excess of these showers coming the direction of Crab Nebula.

  17. Molecular line mapping of (young) planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, I will review recent results obtained from high-resolution observations of molecular emission of planetary nebulae in the millimeter and submillimeter waves, stressing the easy interpretation of the data and the great amount of quantitative results obtained from them. Radio interferometers have been shown to be very efficient in the observation of our objects and, particularly since the arrival of ALMA, the amount of results is becoming impressive. We will deal mainly with young planetary nebulae or protoplanetary nebulae, since, as we will see, molecular lines tend to be weak in evolved objects because of photodissociation. In relatively young nebulae, the molecular gas represents most of the nebular material and can be well observed in line emission in mm- and submm-waves. Those observations have yielded many quantitative and accurate results on the structure, dynamics, and physical conditions of this largely dominant nebular component. In more evolved sources, we can follow the evolution of the chemical composition, although the data become rare.

  18. Comets Kick up Dust in Helix Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Helix nebula, a cosmic starlet often photographed by amateur astronomers for its vivid colors and eerie resemblance to a giant eye.

    The nebula, located about 700 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, belongs to a class of objects called planetary nebulae. Discovered in the 18th century, these colorful beauties were named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets like Jupiter.

    Planetary nebulae are the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. When sun-like stars die, they puff out their outer gaseous layers. These layers are heated by the hot core of the dead star, called a white dwarf, and shine with infrared and visible colors. Our own sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years.

    In Spitzer's infrared view of the Helix nebula, the eye looks more like that of a green monster's. Infrared light from the outer gaseous layers is represented in blues and greens. The white dwarf is visible as a tiny white dot in the center of the picture. The red color in the middle of the eye denotes the final layers of gas blown out when the star died.

    The brighter red circle in the very center is the glow of a dusty disk circling the white dwarf (the disk itself is too small to be resolved). This dust, discovered by Spitzer's infrared heat-seeking vision, was most likely kicked up by comets that survived the death of their star. Before the star died, its comets and possibly planets would have orbited the star in an orderly fashion. But when the star blew off its outer layers, the icy bodies and outer planets would have been tossed about and into each other, resulting in an ongoing cosmic dust storm. Any inner planets in the system would have burned up or been swallowed as their dying star expanded.

    So far, the Helix nebula is one of only a few dead-star systems in which evidence for comet survivors has been found.

    This image

  19. The Discovery of a Bipolar, Rotating, Episodic Jet (BRET) in the Planetary Nebula KjPn 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. A.; Vazquez, R.; Rodriguez, L. F.

    1995-12-01

    A spectacular (~=14' x 4') bipolar nebula, with a symmetric and rotating, high-velocity collimated outflow, with episodic outburst properties, has been discovered in the Cassiopeia-Cepheus region. A compact object classified as the planetary nebula KjPn 8 is located at the center of symmetry of this extraordinary nebula. The angular extent of this bipolar structure is now the largest one known associated with a planetary nebula (PN). A mosaic of H alpha images covering the full extent of the nebula is presented, as well as [N II] lambda 6584, [S II] lambda 6724, [O II] lambda 3729, and [O III] lambda 5007 images of the central (~=5' x 5') region. These images reveal symmetric pairs of bow shocks which are located at different position angles, in a way expected from a rotating, episodic jet. Low-dispersion spectroscopy of regions of the bipolar lobes confirms their shock-excited nature. The core is of low excitation class and seems nitrogen enriched. Our 3.5 cm VLA observations yield a first radio detection of the core of KjPn 8.

  20. Nothing to Hide -- An X-ray Survey of Star Formation Activity in the Pipe Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Posselt, Bettina; Lada, Charles J.; Covey, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In a recent mid-infrared survey using Spitzer-MIPS to cover 13 square degrees, we have established that the star formation efficiency for the entire cloud is only ˜0.06%. The mid-infrared data are most sensitive for the earliest evolutionary stages of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs), covering class I protostars and typical class II sources (classical T Tauri stars). X-ray observations allow us to extend our survey to constrain any population of classical and weak-line T Tauri stars. In a first step, we use the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to constrain any overall T Tauri star population of the Pipe Nebula. Due to the fact that the Pipe Nebula is at a distance of only 130 pc, the ROSAT survey is already quite sensitive. Assuming a typical level of extinction, the completeness for G- and K-type stars is estimated to be about 50%. Subsequently, we use XMM-Newton observations pointed at three high-extinction regions within the Pipe Nebula to analyze these areas at higher sensitivity. These three regions are Barnard 59, the only core with ongoing star formation, the ``ring'' (i.e., the highest extinction region in the ``bowl'' of the Pipe), and Barnard 68. We additionally analyze the YSOs of Barnard 59 in the radio continuum to constrain high-energy processes. Overall, our results corroborate our previous Spitzer result that the star formation efficiency of the Pipe Nebula is very low.

  1. On the possible wind nebula of magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846: a magnetism-powered synchrotron nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846 has been reported to have a possible wind nebula. It is shown that both the magnetar and its wind nebula are understandable in the wind braking scenario. The magnetar's rotational energy loss rate is not enough to power the particle luminosity. The required particle luminosity should be about 1036 erg s-1 to 1038 erg s-1. It is obtained in three different approaches: considering wind braking of Swift J1834.9-0846 the spectral and spatial observations of the wind nebula; and an empirical upper bound on wind nebula X-ray luminosity. The nebula magnetic field is about 10-4 G. The possible wind nebula of Swift J1834.9-0846 should be a magnetar wind nebula. It is powered by the magnetic energy released from the magnetar.

  2. On the possible wind nebula of magnetar Swift J1834.9–0846: a magnetism-powered synchrotron nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the magnetar Swift J1834.9–0846 has been reported to have a possible wind nebula. It is shown that both the magnetar and its wind nebula are understandable in the wind braking scenario. The magnetar's rotational energy loss rate is not enough to power the particle luminosity. The required particle luminosity should be about 1036 erg s‑1 to 1038 erg s‑1. It is obtained in three different approaches: considering wind braking of Swift J1834.9–0846 the spectral and spatial observations of the wind nebula; and an empirical upper bound on wind nebula X-ray luminosity. The nebula magnetic field is about 10‑4 G. The possible wind nebula of Swift J1834.9–0846 should be a magnetar wind nebula. It is powered by the magnetic energy released from the magnetar.

  3. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-09-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  4. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  5. The remarkably high excitation planetary nebula GC 6537.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Hung, S; Feibelman, W A

    1999-05-11

    NGC 6537 is an unusually high excitation point symmetric planetary nebula with a rich spectrum. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with the high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution approximately 0.2 A) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. These extensive data permit a determination of interstellar extinction, plasma diagnostics, and ionic concentrations. The photoionization models that have been used successfully for many planetary nebulae are not entirely satisfactory here. The plasma electron temperature of a photoionization model cannot much exceed 20,000 K, but plasma diagnostics show that regions emitting radiation of highly ionized atoms such as [NeIV] and [NeV] are much hotter, showing that shock excitation must be important, as suggested by the remarkable kinematics of this object. Hence, instead of employing a strict photoionization model, we are guided by the nebular diagnostics, which reveal how electron temperature varies with ionization potential and accommodates density effects. The predictions of the photoionization model may be useful in estimating ionization correction factor. In effect, we have estimated the chemical composition by using both photoionization and shock considerations. PMID:10318889

  6. Improved Neutron-Capture Element Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, N. C.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Hwang, S.; Redfield, S.; Aguilar, A.; Witthoeft, M. C.; Esteves, D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Bautista, M.; Phaneuf, R.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B.; Norrington, P. H.

    2009-09-01

    Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae (PNe) provides the means to investigate s-process enrichments of neutron(n)-capture elements that cannot be detected in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. However, accurate abundance determinations of these elements present a challenge. Corrections for unobserved ions can be large and uncertain, since in many PNe only one ion of a given n-capture element has been detected. Furthermore, the atomic data governing the ionization balance of these species are not well-determined, inhibiting the derivation of accurate ionization corrections. We present initial results of a program that addresses these challenges. Deep high-resolution optical spectroscopy of ~20 PNe has been performed to detect emission lines from trans-iron species including Se, Br, Kr, Rb and Xe. The optical spectral region provides access to multiple ions of these elements, which reduces the magnitude and importance of uncertainties in the ionization corrections. In addition, experimental and theoretical efforts are providing determinations of the photoionization cross sections and recombination rate coefficients of Se, Kr and Xe ions. These new atomic data will make it possible to derive robust ionization corrections for these elements. Together, our observational and atomic data results will enable n-capture element abundances to be determined with unprecedented accuracy in ionized nebulae.

  7. SOFIA/FORCAST Spectroscopy of NGC 7009, the Saturn Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Leal-Ferreira, Marcelo L.; Aleman, Isabel; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Tielens, Xander; Tsamis, Yiannis G.

    2016-01-01

    We present spatially resolved mid-IR spectra of the well-studied Planetary Nebula (PN) NGC 7009 obtained with the FORCAST instrument on board the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). NGC 7009 has a relatively high "abundance discrepancy factor" - the heavy element abundances derived from optical recombination lines (ORLs) are higher by a factor of about 5 than abundances derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs). One hypothesis to resolve this discrepancy is that two kinds of regions with distinct properties are responsible for the abundance measurements from ORLs and CELs. Lines from [OIV], [SIII], [SIV] and [ArIII] are detected in the FORCAST spectra, which cover the wavelength ranges 8.7--13.9 and 17.7--27.6 microns with moderate spectral resolution (R~100). We explore the abundance variations with radial distance from the center of the nebula and their possible correlations with the abundance discrepancy factor.Starting with our observations and results on NGC 7009 as an example, we present a survey of the capabilities of SOFIA, and describe its potential in the field of infra-red studies of Galactic PNe.

  8. The remarkably high excitation planetary nebula GC 6537

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Lawrence H.; Hung, Siek; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    NGC 6537 is an unusually high excitation point symmetric planetary nebula with a rich spectrum. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with the high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution ≈ 0.2 Å) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. These extensive data permit a determination of interstellar extinction, plasma diagnostics, and ionic concentrations. The photoionization models that have been used successfully for many planetary nebulae are not entirely satisfactory here. The plasma electron temperature of a photoionization model cannot much exceed 20,000 K, but plasma diagnostics show that regions emitting radiation of highly ionized atoms such as [Neiv] and [Nev] are much hotter, showing that shock excitation must be important, as suggested by the remarkable kinematics of this object. Hence, instead of employing a strict photoionization model, we are guided by the nebular diagnostics, which reveal how electron temperature varies with ionization potential and accommodates density effects. The predictions of the photoionization model may be useful in estimating ionization correction factor. In effect, we have estimated the chemical composition by using both photoionization and shock considerations. PMID:10318889

  9. Analysis of the WN star WR 102c, its WR nebula, and the associated cluster of massive stars in the Sickle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, M.; Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sander, A.; Liermann, A.; Todt, H.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The massive Wolf-Rayet type star WR 102c is located near the Quintuplet Cluster, one of the three massive star clusters in the Galactic centre region. Previous studies indicated that WR 102c may have a dusty circumstellar nebula and is among the main ionising sources of the Sickle Nebula associated with the Quintuplet Cluster. Aims: The goals of our study are to derive the stellar parameters of WR 102c from the analysis of its spectrum and to investigate its stellar and nebular environment. Methods: We obtained observations with the ESO VLT integral field spectrograph SINFONI in the K-band, extracted the stellar spectra, and analysed them by means of stellar atmosphere models. Results: Our new analysis supersedes the results previously reported for WR 102c. We significantly decrease its bolometric luminosity and hydrogen content. We detect four early OB type stars close to WR 102c. These stars have radial velocities similar to that of WR 102c. We suggest that together with WR 102c these stars belong to a distinct star cluster with a total mass of ~ 1000 M⊙. We identify a new WR nebula around WR 102c in the SINFONI map of the diffuse Brγ emission and in the HST Paα images. The Brγ line at different locations is not significantly broadened and similar to the width of nebular emission elsewhere in the H ii region around WR 102c. Conclusions: The massive star WR 102c located in the Galactic centre region resides in a star cluster containing additional early-type stars. The stellar parameters of WR 102c are typical for hydrogen-free WN6 stars. We identify a nebula surrounding WR 102c that has a morphology similar to other nebulae around hydrogen-free WR stars, and propose that the formation of this nebula is linked to interaction of the fast stellar wind with the matter ejected at a previous evolutionary stage of WR 102c. The scientific results reported in this article are based on observations obtained during the ESO VLT program 383.D-0323(A).

  10. Star Formation in the Molecular Cloud Associated with the Monkey Head Nebula: Sequential or Spontaneous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibueze, J. O.; Imura, K.; Omodaka, T.; Handa, T.; Nagayama, T.; Fujisawa, K.; Sunada, K.; Nakano, M.; Kamezaki, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.

    2013-03-01

    We mapped the NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with 1'.6 angular resolution using Kashima 34 m telescope. Its kinetic temperature distribution was contrary to what is expected for a molecular cloud at the edge of an expanding H II region and suggested that the massive star associated with S252A compact HII region formed spontaneously rather than through a sequential process.

  11. Cloud structure and feedback effects in the Carina Nebula Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatagliata, Veronica; Preibisch, Thomas; Gaczkowski, Benjamin; Ratzka, Thorsten

    2013-07-01

    The star formation process in large clusters/associations can be strongly influenced by the feedback from high mass stars. Whether the resulting net effect of the feedback is predominantly negative (cloud dispersal) or positive (triggering of star formation due to cloud compression) is still an open question. The Carina Nebula complex (CNC) represents one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We use our Herschel far-infrared observations to study the properties of the clouds over the entire CNC and LABOCA/APEX telescope on the central part of the CNC.Our Herschel maps resolve, for the first time, the small-scale structure of the dense clouds over the entire spatial extent of the CNC. Several particularly interesting regions, including the prominent pillars south of eta Car, are analyzed in detail. Our maps also reveal a peculiar 'wave'-like pattern in the northern part of the Carina Nebula. The total mass of the clouds seen by Herschel in the central region is about 656 000 Msun. We derive the global spectral energy distribution in the mid-infrared to mm wavelength range and derive a total mass of < 890 000 Msun. We find that the density and temperature structure of the clouds in most parts of the CNC is dominated by the strong feedback from the numerous massive stars, rather than random turbulence. Comparing the cloud mass and the star formation rate derived for the CNC to other Galactic star forming regions suggests that the CNC is forming stars very efficiently. We suggest this to be a consequence of triggered star formation by radiative cloud compression.In our LABOCA sub-mm map, we identify about 600 individual clumps. We analyze and interpret the clump initial mass function (CIMF) as signature of turbulent pre-stellar clouds or star-forming clouds.

  12. Star formation in the Eagle Nebula and NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Jeffries, R. D.; van Loon, J. Th

    M16, also known as the Eagle Nebula, is a prime example for the study of star formation under the hostile environment created by massive O-stars. A rich young stellar population (NGC6611) has been identified. The well-known elephant trunks are striking examples of the massive star feedback into the parent molecular cloud. The detection of several water maser sources as well as embedded IR objects points at current star formation. I will present an overview of our recent observations that aim at characterising not only the young pre-main-sequence (PMS) and their disc, but also the still embedded population. We have discovered a rich population of low-mass PMS stars concentrated around the massive stars and the first results show that the IMF in NGC6611 is consistent with the IMF in less extreme star forming regions. I am using VLT/ VIMOS spectroscopy to determine reddening, effective temperature and gravity for a sample of ~260 cluster candidates to test the validity of the photometric techniques. We have been awarded HST observations to extend the optical and near-IR survey down to brown dwarfs and planetary mass objects. Recent theoretical developments propose that the density in the molecular cloud and/or the UV radiation from O-stars may play an role in shaping the low-mass IMF, with the signs of such influence enhanced in the brown-dwarf regime. Our HST observations will help disentangle these two effects on the IMF. We have also conducted a deep survey of the central area of NGC 6611 in L-band to determine the fraction of low-mass stars with circumstellar discs. The K-L colours indicate that 58% of objects retain their circumstellar discs, implying that the O-stars might not significantly hasten disc dissipation. We are complementing our data on NGC6611 with Spitzer/IRAC data for the outer regions where crowding is less severe, allowing us to investigate disc properties like inner disc temperature and geometry. Star formation is still ongoing in the denser

  13. The Puzzle of the Narrow Brackett Lines in Super Star Cluster Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.; Crosthwaite, L. P.; Meier, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    We have high resolution (R ~ 25000) spectra of Brackett recombination line emission from nebulae surrounding young, optically obscured super star clusters in the process of formation. We used the NIRSPEC spectrometer on the Keck Telescope for these observations. We detected Brackett γ emission from nebulae in NGC 660, He 2-10, II Zw 40, and M83. The slit positions were the locations of bright radio nebulae (Carral et al. 1990, ApJ, 362, 434; Turner & Ho 1994, ApJ, 421, 122; Kobulnicky & Johnson, 1999, ApJ, 527, 154; and Beck et al. 2001, in prep.) The Brackett γ intensities confirm that these bright and compact radio sources are indeed HII regions, or ``supernebulae" surrounding young clusters containing several thousand O stars, and potentially millions of cluster stars. The Brackett γ linewidths are in general remarkably small for the sizes and inferred masses of the clusters. Although there is some evidence for cluster winds, we suggest that these nebulae may be graviationally bound, as seems to be the case for the supernebula in NGC 5253 (Turner et al. 2001, submitted.) This research is supported by NSF grant AST-0071276 to J.L.T., the Israel Academy Center for Multi-Wavelength Astronomy Grant to S.C.B., and Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid of Research to L.P.C. and D.S.M.

  14. Explosive reconnection of the double tearing mode in relativistic plasmas with application to the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.; Takamoto, M.; Baty, H.; Zenitani, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Crab pulsar and its surrounding nebula is a well-known relic of a massive star that exploded in 1054 AD. The Crab nebula was generally believed to be a good standard candle in gamma rays. Recently, this view has been challenged by sudden increases in the gamma-ray flux in a narrow spectral band within a few hundred MeV. These flares are short but powerful; their duration is between a few hours and up to several days with a rising/falling time of a few hours/days. To date it is neither clear what mechanism powers these flares nor where exactly in the nebula they should be located. However, recent models seem to favor emission sites inside the nebula. In the present work, we study the magneto-hydrodynamic tearing instability occurring in a double current sheet configuration with application to the Crab flares. This is investigated by means of resistive relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. These put some constraints on the maximum Lorentz factor of the striped wind, Γ≲150 and on the localization of the emission region, r ≈ 50 rL where rL = c/Ω is the light-cylinder radius, c is the speed of light and Ω is the rotation speed of the pulsar. Sites close to but outside the light-cylinder are favored in our model.

  15. HUBBLE SEES SUPERSONIC EXHAUST FROM NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. Ground-based studies have shown that the nebula's size increases with time, suggesting that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1,200 years ago. The central star in M2-9 is known to be one of a very close pair which orbit one another at perilously close distances. It is even possible that one star is being engulfed by the other. Astronomers suspect the gravity of one star pulls weakly bound gas from the surface of the other and flings it into a thin, dense disk which surrounds both stars and extends well into space. The disk can actually be seen in shorter exposure images obtained with the Hubble telescope. It measures approximately 10 times the diameter of Pluto's orbit. Models of the type that are used to design jet engines ('hydrodynamics') show that such a disk can successfully account for the jet-exhaust-like appearance of M2-9. The high-speed wind from one of the stars rams into the surrounding disk, which serves as a nozzle. The wind is deflected in a perpendicular direction and forms the pair of jets that we see in the nebula's image. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in

  16. Birth and early evolution of a planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew; Sahu, Kailash C.; Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, Pedro

    1998-04-01

    The final expulsion of gas by a star as it forms a planetary nebula - the ionized shell of gas often observed surrounding a young white dwarf - is one of the most poorly understood stages of stellar evolution,. Such nebulae form extremely rapidly (about 100 years for the ionization) and so the formation process is inherently difficult to observe. Particularly puzzling is how a spherical star can produce a highly asymmetric nebula with collimated outflows. Here we report optical observations of the Stingray nebula,, which has become an ionized planetary nebula within the past few decades. We find that the collimated outflows are already evident, and we have identified the nebular structure that focuses the outflows. We have also found a companion star, reinforcing previous suspicions that binary companions play an important role in shaping planetary nebulae and changing the direction of successive outflows.

  17. Shell nebulae around luminous evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1989-01-01

    Shell nebulae around luminous Population I Wolf-Rayet, Of, and P-Cygni stars are astrophysically interesting since they are indicators of pre-supernova mass loss and how such massive stars prepare their surrounding interstellar medium prior to explosion. Some twenty-odd such nebulae are known, for which detailed study of their morphological and spectroscopic characteristics have only begun in this decade. In this paper, some of these characteristics are reviewed in general, and new observations are reported. Emphasis has been placed on several 'prototype 'objects (NGC 7635, NGC 2359, NGC 6888, and the Eta Carinae condensations) to illustrate the varied massive-star mass-loss, the physics of their winds and shell ejecta, and related nucleosynthesis effects in the compositions of the winds and shells.

  18. Temperature anisotropy of the Jovian sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.; Mekler, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The apparent paradox between the reported observation of a 3-eV gyration energy of Jupiter's ionized sulfur nebula and its observed thickness is discussed. An observation of the thickness of the cloud taken nearly edge-on is presented and shown to imply a large bounce-averaged anisotropy of the sulfur in temperature. These observations are used to construct a self-consistent model of the sulfur nebula in which the sulfur ions are injected by Io as ions and remain sufficiently collisionless in the magnetosphere to maintain the anisotropy for a time longer than a characteristic diffusion time. It is also shown that the proton-electron plasma is collisionally thermalized and provides an adequate means of tapping the rotational energy of the planet to provide the power radiated in the sulfur lines.

  19. The temperature gradient in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The available compositional data on planets and satellites can be used to place stringent limits on the thermal environment in the solar nebula. The densities of the terrestrial planets, Ceres and Vesta, the Galilean satellites, and Titan; the atmospheric compositions of several of these bodies; and geochemical and geophysical data on the earth combine to define a strong dependence of formation temperature on heliocentric distance. It is impossible to reconcile the available compositional data with any model in which the formation temperatures of these bodies are determined by radiative equilibrium with the sun, regardless of the sun's luminosity. Rather, the data support Cameron's hypothesis of a dense, convective solar nebula, opaque to solar radiation, with an adiabatic temperature-pressure profile.

  20. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  1. Chemical Abundances of Compact Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Hui; Shaw, Richard A.; Stanghellini, letizia; Riley, Ben

    2015-08-01

    We present preliminary results from an optical spectroscopic survey of compact planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic disk. This is an ongoing optical+infrared spectral survey of 150 compact PNe to build a deep sample of PN chemical abundances. We obtained optical spectra of PNe with the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope and Goodman High-Throughput Spectrograph between 2012 and 2015. These data were used to calculate the nebulae diagnostics such as electron temperature and density for each PN, and to derive the elemental abundances of He, N, O Ne, S and Ar. These abundances are vital to understanding the nature of the PNe, and their low- to intermediate-mass progenitor stars.

  2. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  3. Interstellar molecules - Formation in solar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Herbig's (1970) hypothesis that solar nebulae might be the principal source of interstellar grains and molecules is investigated. The investigation includes the determination of physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. The production of organic compounds in the solar nebula is studied, and the compounds in meteorites are compared with those obtained in Miller-Urey and Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions, taking into consideration aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, porphyrins, and aspects of carbon-isotope fractionation. It is found that FTT reactions account reasonably well for all well-established features of organic matter in meteorites investigated. The distribution of compounds produced by FTT reactions is compared with the distribution of interstellar molecules. Biological implications of the results are considered.

  4. The Orion Nebula: The Jewel in the Sword

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    /01 ESO PR Photo 03c/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 452 pix - 57k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 904 pix - 488k] [Hires - JPEG: 2300 x 2600 pix - 3.3M] Caption : PR Photo 03b/01 and PR Photo 03c/01 show smaller, particularly interesting areas of PR Photo 03a/01 . Photo 03b/01 shows the traces of a massive outflow of gas from a very young object embedded in the dense molecular cloud behind the Orion Nebula. Shards of gas from the explosion create shocks and leave bow-waves as they move at speeds of up to 200 km/sec from the source. Photo 03c/01 shows the delicate tracery created at the so-called Bright Bar , as the intense UV-light and strong winds from the hot Trapezium stars eat their way into the surrounding molecular cloud. Also visible are a number of very young red objects partly hidden in the cloud, waiting to be revealed as new members of the Trapezium Cluster . Technical information about these photos is available below. Indeed, at visible wavelengths, the dense cluster of stars at the centre is drowned out by the light from the nebula and obscured by remnants of the dust in the gas from which they were formed. However, at longer wavelengths, these obscuring effects are reduced, and the cluster is revealed. In the past couple of years, several of the world's premier ground- and space-based telescopes have made new detailed infrared studies of the Orion Nebula and the Trapezium Cluster , but the VLT image shown here is the "deepest" wide-field image obtained so far. The large collecting area of the VLT and the excellent seeing of the Paranal site combined to yield this beautiful image, packed full of striking details. Powerful explosions and winds from the most massive stars in the region are evident, as well as the contours of gas sculpted by these stars, and more finely focused jets of gas flowing from the smaller stars. Sharper images from the VLT ESO PR Photo 03d/01 ESO PR Photo 03d/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 490 pix - 28k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 980 pix - 192k] [Hi

  5. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  6. Magnetic fields in Proto Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Patel, N. A.; Vázquez, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Contreras, M. E.; Guillén, P. F.

    2014-08-01

    The role of magnetic field in late type stars such as proto-planetary and planetary nebulae (PPNe/PNe), is poorly known from an observational point of view. We present submillimetric observations realized with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) which unveil the dust continuum polarization in the envelopes of two well known PPNe: CRL 618 and OH 231.8+4.2. Assuming the current grain alignment theory, we were then able to trace the geometry of the magnetic field.

  7. Nebulae at keratoconus--the result after excimer laser removal.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, P; Fitzsimmons, T; Ohman, L; Orndahl, M

    1993-12-01

    Ten patients underwent excimer laser ablation due to nebula formation at keratoconus. The nebulae interfered significantly with contact lens fit or wearing time. The mean follow-up time in these patients was 16.5 months. Following surgery all patients could be successfully fitted with a contact lens and thereby obtain good visual acuity. Furthermore, contact lens wearing time was 8 hours or more in all cases. In 2 patients the nebulae recurred but were successfully retreated. PMID:8154261

  8. HUBBLE CAPTURES UNVEILING OF PLANETARY NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue). The filters used were F658N ([N II]), F502N ([O III]), and F487N (H-beta). The observations were made in March 1996. Credit: Matt Bobrowsky, Orbital Sciences Corporation and NASA

  9. Wavelet Technique Applications in Planetary Nebulae Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Ferreira, M. L.; Rabaça, C. R.; Cuisinier, F.; Epitácio Pereira, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    Through the application of the wavelet technique to a planetary nebulae image, we are able to identify different scale sizes structures present in its wavelet coefficient decompositions. In a multiscale vision model, an object is defined as a hierarchical set of these structures. We can then use this model to independently reconstruct the different objects that compose the nebulae. The result is the separation and identification of superposed objects, some of them with very low surface brightness, what makes them, in general, very difficult to be seen in the original images due to the presence of noise. This allows us to make a more detailed analysis of brightness distribution in these sources. In this project, we use this method to perform a detailed morphological study of some planetary nebulae and to investigate whether one of them indeed shows internal temperature fluctuations. We have also conducted a series of tests concerning the reliability of the method and the confidence level of the objects detected. The wavelet code used in this project is called OV_WAV and was developed by the UFRJ's Astronomy Departament team.

  10. Radio continuum properties of young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrigone, L.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Buemi, C. S.; Hora, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We have selected a small sample of post-AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars in transition towards the planetary nebula and present new Very Large Array multi-frequency high-angular resolution radio observations of them. The multi-frequency data are used to create and model the targets' radio continuum spectra, proving that these stars started their evolution as very young planetary nebulae. In the optically thin range, the slopes are compatible with the expected spectral index (-0.1). Two targets (IRAS 18062+2410 and 17423-1755) seem to be optically thick even at high frequency, as observed in a handful of other post-AGB stars in the literature, while a third one (IRAS 20462+3416) shows a possible contribution from cold dust. In IRAS 18062+2410, where we have three observations spanning a period of four years, we detect an increase in its flux density, similar to that observed in CRL 618. High-angular resolution imaging shows bipolar structures that may be due to circumstellar tori, although a different hypothesis (i.e. jets) could also explain the observations. Further observations and monitoring of these sources will enable us to test the current evolutionary models of planetary nebulae.

  11. Protoplanetary Nebula Evolution using the Beta Viscosity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of a protoplanetary disk is an important component of the planet formation process. In particular, the dynamic and thermodynamic field plays a critical role in chemical evolution, the migration of dust particles in the nebula, and the radial transport of meteoritic components. The dynamic evolution is investigated using analytical solutions of the surface density transport equations using a turbulence model based on hydrodynamic generation of turbulence. It captures the major properties of the disk including region of separation between radial inflow and-outflow and the evolution of the central plane temperature. The analytical formulas are compared with available numerical solutions based on the alpha viscosity model. The beta viscosity model, heretofore used for steady-state disks, is shown to be a useful approximation for unsteady problems.

  12. The Eagle Nebula unveiled by the MIPSGAL survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, N.; Boulanger, F.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S.; Mizuno, D.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of structured diffuse infrared emission in MIPSGAL 24 μm Spitzer images of the Eagle Nebula that fills the wind-blown cavity of this massive star forming region. We combine the Spitzer data with ISO and MSX observations to present a spectral energy distribution of this emission. The SED peaks at 24 μm and is fit by emission from silicates and/or graphite grains at ˜90 K. We show that the emission cannot be powered by the NGC 6611 cluster radiation or winds. The spatial extent, the dust temperature and the infrared brightness can all be accounted for by collisional heating of interstellar dust swept by a supernova explosion.

  13. Status of the spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenholm, Bjorn; Acker, Agnes

    A current-status report is presented for the PN survey begun in 1984 (Stenholm and Lundstrom, 1984) with the Boller and Chivens spectrograph and IDS detector on the 1.52-m telescope at ESO and with the Carelec spectrograph and CCD detector on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. The instruments are briefly characterized; the spatial distribution of the 1563 PN candidates (of which 718 had been observed as of August 1986) is indicated in a histogram; and problems of spectral classification are discussed. Of the 718 observed objects, 161 have been shown not to be true PN (including 74 symbiotic stars, 14 H II regions, 18 galaxies, 4 reflection nebulae, 1 SNR knot, 13 plate faults, and 37 undetected or uncertain).

  14. Ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebulae. X - Physical conditions in the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. R.; Goharji, A.; Cohen, M.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectric visual and ultraviolet observations of the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1 are analyzed. The electron density, determined from the C III 1907/1909 A line ratio, is N(e) = (1.1 + or - 0.1) x 10 to the 5th/cu cm, consistent with the high emission measure and high critical frequency determined from observations of the thermal radio emission. The C/O abundance ratio in the nebula is found to be N(C)/N(O) = 0.72 + or - 0.1, i.e. the envelope is oxygen-rich, as suggested by the identification of the silicate feature in the 8-13 micron infrared spectrum. Difficulties remain in accurately determining the reddening constant to the nebula and its electron temperature.

  15. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-03-15

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H{sub 2} knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H{sub 2} emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  16. The current research of planetary nebulae distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-yuan; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Wen-wu; Wu, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Planetary Nebula is an important tracer of Galactic chemical history and evolution, star and interstellar evolution. Distance as a basic physical parameter of planetary nebula, is crucial to study its size, luminosity, ionized mass, formation rate, space density and Galactic distribution. Distance of planetary nebula has been studied for several decades, but most of their distances are not well determined, e.g. only thirty-one planetary nebulae have distance measurement with uncertainty within 20%. We summarize major distance measurement methods of planetary nebulae, i.e., trigonometric parallax, cluster member, expansion parallax, spectroscopic parallax, reddening, Na D absorption, determinations of central star gravities, Shklovsky method, kinematics method, and then discuss the limitations and applications scope of each method in detail. Actually, applying different methods to the same planetary nebulae can have a huge difference in distance, and even the same method can lead to great difference for the same planetary nebula. We focus on the kinematics method applied to planetary nebulae either seriously effected by Galactic extinction or having no observable centra star but being radio bright. The kinematics distance has been used in our on-going project of radio planetary nebulae distance measurement.

  17. Physical characteristics of diffuse nebulae and nonstationary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, A. V.

    Papers are presented on a variety of topics, including a one-dimensional scattering model for the interpretation of emission from globules and dust nebulae; the properties of silicate particles in the IR range connected with gas-dust nebulae; the central stars of planetary nebulae; and spectrophotometry of the Triffid nebula (NGC 6514, M20). Attention is also given to Be-star spectrophotometry, the use of a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer to observe extended objects of low surface brightness, and star-identification techniques.

  18. HUBBLE RESUMES GAZING AT THE HEAVENS BY TAKING A LOOK AT THE 'ESKIMO' NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In its first glimpse of the heavens following the successful December 1999 servicing mission, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured a majestic view of a planetary nebula, the glowing remains of a dying, Sun-like star. This stellar relic, first spied by William Herschel in 1787, is nicknamed the 'Eskimo' Nebula (NGC 2392) because, when viewed through ground-based telescopes, it resembles a face surrounded by a fur parka. In this Hubble telescope image, the 'fur parka' is really a disk of material embellished with a ring of comet-shaped objects, with their tails streaming away from the central, dying star. The Eskimo's 'face' also contains some fascinating details. Although this bright central region resembles a ball of twine, it is, in reality, a bubble of material being blown into space by the central star's intense 'wind' of high-speed material. The planetary nebula began forming about 10,000 years ago, when the dying star began flinging material into space. The nebula is composed of two elliptically shaped lobes of matter streaming above and below the dying star. In this photo, one bubble lies in front of the other, obscuring part of the second lobe. Scientists believe that a ring of dense material around the star's equator, ejected during its red giant phase, created the nebula's shape. This dense waist of material is plodding along at 72,000 miles per hour (115,000 kilometers per hour), preventing high-velocity stellar winds from pushing matter along the equator. Instead, the 900,000-mile-per-hour (1.5-million-kilometer-per-hour) winds are sweeping the material above and below the star, creating the elongated bubbles. The bubbles are not smooth like balloons but have filaments of denser matter. Each bubble is about 1 light-year long and about half a light-year wide. Scientists are still puzzled about the origin of the comet-shaped features in the 'parka.' One possible explanation is that these objects formed from a collision of slow- and fast-moving gases

  19. THE [O III] NEBULA OF THE MERGER REMNANT NGC 7252: A LIKELY FAINT IONIZATION ECHO

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Francois; Kelson, Daniel D.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Seitzer, Patrick; Walth, Gregory L.

    2013-08-20

    We present images and spectra of a {approx}10 kpc-sized emission-line nebulosity discovered in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252 and dubbed the ''[O III] nebula'' because of its dominant [O III] {lambda}5007 line. This nebula seems to yield the first sign of episodic active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity still occurring in the remnant, {approx}220 Myr after the coalescence of two gas-rich galaxies. Its location and kinematics suggest it belongs to a stream of tidal-tail gas falling back into the remnant. Its integrated [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity is 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, and its spectrum features some high-excitation lines, including He II {lambda}4686. In diagnostic line-ratio diagrams, the nebula lies in the domain of Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that it is photoionized by a source with a power-law spectrum. Yet, a search for AGN activity in NGC 7252 from X-rays to radio wavelengths yields no detection, with the most stringent upper limit set by X-ray observations. The upper luminosity limit of L{sub 2-10{sub keV,0}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} estimated for the nucleus is {approx}10{sup 3} times lower than the minimum ionizing luminosity of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} necessary to excite the nebula. This large discrepancy suggests that the nebula is a faint ionization echo excited by a mildly active nucleus that has declined by {approx}3 orders of magnitude over the past 20,000-200,000 yr. In many ways this nebula resembles the prototypical ''Hanny's Voorwerp'' near IC 2497, but its size is 3 Multiplication-Sign smaller and its [O III] luminosity {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign lower. We propose that it be classified as an extended emission-line region (EELR). The [O III] nebula is then the lowest-luminosity ionization echo and EELR discovered so far, indicative of recent, probably sputtering AGN activity of Seyfert-like intensity in NGC 7252.

  20. OVERTURNING THE CASE FOR GRAVITATIONAL POWERING IN THE PROTOTYPICAL COOLING LYα NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Møller, Palle

    2015-03-20

    The Nilsson et al. Lyα nebula has often been cited as the most plausible example of an Lyα nebula powered by gravitational cooling. In this paper, we bring together new data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory as well as comparisons to recent theoretical simulations in order to revisit the questions of the local environment and most likely power source for the Lyα nebula. In contrast to previous results, we find that this Lyα nebula is associated with six nearby galaxies and an obscured AGN that is offset by ∼4″ ≈ 30 kpc from the Lyα peak. The local region is overdense relative to the field, by a factor of ∼10, and at low surface brightness levels the Lyα emission appears to encircle the position of the obscured AGN, highly suggestive of a physical association. At the same time, we confirm that there is no compact continuum source located within ∼2–3″ ≈ 15–23 kpc of the Lyα peak. Since the latest cold accretion simulations predict that the brightest Lyα emission will be coincident with a central growing galaxy, we conclude that this is actually a strong argument against, rather than for, the idea that the nebula is gravitationally powered. While we may be seeing gas within cosmic filaments, this gas is primarily being lit up, not by gravitational energy, but due to illumination from a nearby buried AGN.

  1. Variation of the extinction law in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambrésy, L.; Rho, J.; Marshall, D. J.; Reach, W. T.

    2011-03-01

    Context. In the past few years, the extinction law has been measured in the infrared wavelengths for various molecular clouds and different laws have been obtained. Aims: In this paper we seek variations of the extinction law within the Trifid nebula region. Such variations would demonstrate local dust evolution linked to variation of the environment parameters such as the density or the interstellar radiation field. Methods: The extinction values, Aλ/AV, are obtained using the 2MASS, UKIDSS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys. The technique is to inter-calibrate color-excess maps from different wavelengths to derive the extinction law and to map the extinction in the Trifid region. Results: We measured the extinction law at 3.6, 4.5, and 5.8 μm and we found a transition at AV ≈ 20 mag. Below this threshold the extinction law is as expected from models for RV = 5.5 whereas above 20 mag of visual extinction, it is flatter. Using these results the color-excess maps are converted into a composite extinction map of the Trifid nebula at a spatial resolution of 1 arcmin. A tridimensional analysis along the line-of-sight allowed us to estimate a distance of 2.7 ± 0.5 kpc for the Trifid. The comparison of the extinction with the 1.25 mm emission suggests the millimeter emissivity is enhanced in the dense condensations of the cloud. Conclusions: Our results suggest a dust transition at large extinction which has not been reported so far as well as dust emissivity variations.

  2. Detection of a Noble Gas Molecular Ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.; Owen, P. J.; Cernicharo, J.; Gomez, H. L.; Ivison, R. J.; Krause, O.; Lim, T. L.; Matsuura, M.; Miller, S.; Olofsson, G.; Polehampton, E. T.

    2013-12-01

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of 36ArH+ at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed 36ArH+ emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  3. Detection of a noble gas molecular ion, 36ArH+, in the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Barlow, M J; Swinyard, B M; Owen, P J; Cernicharo, J; Gomez, H L; Ivison, R J; Krause, O; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Miller, S; Olofsson, G; Polehampton, E T

    2013-12-13

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (36)ArH(+) at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (36)ArH(+) emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed. PMID:24337290

  4. Integral field spectroscopy of M1-67. A Wolf-Rayet nebula with luminous blue variable nebula appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Candian, A.; Sánchez, S. F.; Martín-Gordón, D.; Riera, A.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: This work aims to disentangle the morphological, kinematic, and chemical components of the nebula M1-67 to shed light on its process of formation around the central Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR124. Methods: We have carried out integral field spectroscopy observations over two regions of M1-67, covering most of the nebula in the optical range. Maps of electron density, line ratios, and radial velocity were created to perform a detailed analysis of the two-dimensional structure. We studied the physical and chemical properties by means of integrated spectra selected over the whole nebula. Photoionization models were performed to confirm the empirical chemical results theoretically. In addition, we obtained and analysed infrared spectroscopic data and the MIPS 24 μm image of M1-67 from Spitzer. Results: We find that the ionized gas of M1-67 is condensed in knots aligned in a preferred axis along the NE-SW direction, like a bipolar structure. Both electron density and radial velocity decrease in this direction when moving away from the central star. From the derived electron temperature, Te ~ 8200 K, we have estimated chemical abundances, obtaining that nitrogen appears strongly enriched and oxygen depleted. From the last two results, we infer that this bipolarity is the consequence of an ejection of an evolved stage of WR124 with material processed in the CNO cycle. Furthermore, we find two regions placed outside of the bipolar structure with different spectral and chemical properties. The infrared study has revealed that the bipolar axis is composed of ionized gas with a low ionization degree that is well mixed with warm dust and of a spherical bubble surrounding the ejection at 24 μm. Taking the evolution of a 60 M⊙ star and the temporal scale of the bipolar ejection into account, we propose that the observed gas was ejected during an eruption in the luminous blue variable stage. The star has entered the WR phase recently without apparent signs of interaction

  5. The Rings Around the Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpaz, Amos; Rappaport, Saul; Soker, Noam

    1997-01-01

    We present an eccentric binary model for the formation of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula) that exhibits multiple concentric shells. Given the apparent regularity of the structure in the Egg Nebula, we postulate that the shells are caused by the periodic passages of a companion star. Such an orbital period would have to lie in the range of 100-500 yr, the apparent time that corresponds to the spacing between the rings. We assume, in this model, that an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, which is the origin of the matter within the planetary nebula, loses mass in a spherically symmetric wind. We further suppose that the AGB star has an extended atmosphere (out to approximately 10 stellar radii) in which the outflow speed is less than the escape speed; still farther out, grains form and radiation pressure accelerates the grains along with the trapped gas to the escape speed. Once escape speed has been attained, the presence of a companion star will not significantly affect the trajectories of the matter leaving in the wind and the mass loss will be approximately spherically symmetric. On the other hand, if the companion star is sufficiently close that the Roche lobe of the AGB star moves inside the extended atmosphere, then the slowly moving material will be forced to flow approximately along the critical potential surface (i.e., the Roche lobe) until it flows into the potential lobe of the companion star. Therefore, in our model, the shells are caused by periodic cessations of the isotropic wind rather than by any periodic enhancement in the mass-loss process. We carry out detailed binary evolution calculations within the context of this scenario, taking into account the nuclear evolution and stellar wind losses of the giant as well as the effects of mass loss and mass transfer on the evolution of the eccentric binary orbit. From the initial binary parameters that we find are required to produce a multiple concentric shell nebula and the known

  6. The formation of elephant-trunk globules in the Rosette nebula: CO observations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneps, M.H.; Ho, P.T.P.; Barrett, A.H.

    1980-08-15

    The prominent elephant-trunk globules in the northwest quadrant of the Rosette nebula have been observed in the microwave lines of CO and /sup 13/CO (J=1..-->..0). The CO emission closely follows the optical outline of the obscuring material and leaves little doubt that the emission is associated with the globules. The physical characteristics derived are typical of those observed in other dust globules which are not necessarily associated with H II regions.

  7. Properties of LMC planetary nebulae and parent populations in the MACHO database

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, D.R. |; Alcock, C.; Cook, K.H.

    1996-10-01

    The MACHO microlensing experiment's time-sampled photometry database contains blue and red lightcurves for nearly 9 million stars in the central bar region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have identified known LMC Planetary Nebulae (PN) in the database and find one, Jacoby 5, to be variable. We additionally present data on the ``parent populations`` of LMC PN, and discuss the star formation history of the LMC bar. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  8. The Fe/Ni ratio in ionized nebulae: clues on dust depletion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Inglada, G.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; García-Rojas, J.; Rodríguez, M.; Esteban, C.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a homogeneous analysis of the Fe/Ni abundance ratio in eight Galactic planetary nebulae and three Galactic H II regions that include the Orion nebula, where we study four nebular zones and one shocked region. We use [Fe II], [Fe III], and [Ni III] lines, and ionization correction factors (ICFs) that account for the unobserved ions. We derive an ICF for nickel from an extensive grid of photoionization models. We compare our results with those derived by other authors for 16 neutral clouds in the solar neighbourhood with available Fe/Ni ratios in the literature. We find an excellent agreement between the ionized nebulae and the diffuse clouds, with both types of regions showing a clear correlation between the Fe/Ni ratios and the iron and nickel depletion factors. The trend shows that the objects with a relatively low depletion have near solar Fe/Ni ratios whereas at higher depletions the Fe/Ni ratio increases with the depletion. Our results confirm that, compared to iron atoms, nickel ones are more efficiently stuck to the dust grains in ambients where dust formation or growth have been more efficient.

  9. Ices in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Sarah

    2008-05-01

    The centerpiece of this proposal is my hypothesis that other ices besides H2O help build giant planet cores. I propose a theory project on the ice composition of planet-forming regions and a related observing project on ice detection and mineralogy in debris disks. Together, the theory and observing projects will answer two questions: 1. Where are the condensation fronts of abundant volatiles located in relation to giant planet feeding zones? 2. How much does the presence of CHON ices in planetesimals speed up giant planet formation?

  10. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    at optical wavelengths and only one is bright enough to allow reasonably detailed spectroscopic observations with currently available optical telescopes. The Crab Pulsar This is the famous Crab Pulsar, also known as PSR 0531+21. It was discovered as a radio pulsar in 1968, soon after the detection of the first known radio pulsar. A little later, pulsed optical emission from the Crab Pulsar was also observed. It was quickly recognized that this emission obeys Pacini's law [2]. Stated in simple terms, this implies that the emission of optical light from the pulsar is due to the interaction between very energetic elementary particles close to the neutron star and its incredibly strong magnetic field. The Crab Pulsar is especially interesting, because we have detailed historical information about the event from which it was born: the very bright `guest star' which was so well observed and described by Chinese astronomers in the year 1054 AD in the constellation of Taurus (the Bull). At the exact location of this supernova is now observed the famous Crab Nebula in which the Crab Pulsar is embedded. The Crab Nebula is a very conspicuous object in the sky (the name alludes to its overall form), and it emits a very significant amount of energy at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum that have so far been explored, from long-wave radio waves to gamma-rays of ultra-high energy. At X-ray wavelengths (above 1 keV), it is in fact one of the brightest, continuously emitting sources in the sky. The Crab Pulsar also emits at all wavelengths, but it is much fainter than the surrounding nebula. This Press Release is accompanied by a photo with caption, showing the pulsar in the innermost region of the nebula. At optical wavelengths, the Crab Pulsar is a comparatively faint, point-like object of magnitude 16.6. It is interesting to note that, from the measured, outward motion of the individual condensations in the Crab Nebula, this object was recognized, already a decade

  11. A SURVEY OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, E. D.; Baldwin, J. A.; Curtis, Z. K.; Ferland, G. J.; O'Dell, C. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Salome, Philippe E-mail: baldwin@pa.msu.edu E-mail: gary@pa.uky.edu E-mail: acf@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2011-06-01

    We have carried out a near-infrared, narrowband imaging survey of the Crab Nebula, in the H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m and Br{gamma} 2.17 {mu}m lines, using the Spartan Infrared camera on the SOAR Telescope. Over a 2.'8 x 5.'1 area that encompasses about 2/3 of the full visible extent of the Crab, we detect 55 knots that emit strongly in the H{sub 2} line. We catalog the observed properties of these knots. We show that they are in or next to the filaments that are seen in optical-passband emission lines. Comparison to Hubble Space Telescope [S II] and [O III] images shows that the H{sub 2} knots are strongly associated with compact regions of low-ionization gas. We also find evidence of many additional, fainter H{sub 2} features, both discrete knots and long streamers following gas that emits strongly in [S II]. A pixel-by-pixel analysis shows that about 6% of the Crab's projected surface area has significant H{sub 2} emission that correlates with [S II] emission. We measured radial velocities of the [S II] {lambda}6716 emission lines from 47 of the cataloged knots and find that most are on the far (receding) side of the nebula. We also detect Br{gamma} emission. It is right at the limit of our survey, and our Br{gamma} filter cuts off part of the expected velocity range. But clearly the Br{gamma} emission has a quite different morphology than the H{sub 2} knots, following the long linear filaments that are seen in H{alpha} and in [O III] optical emission lines.

  12. SOFIA/FORCAST Spectroscopy of NGC 7009, the Saturn Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Leal-Ferreira, Marcelo L.; Aleman, Isabel; Colgan, Sean; Simpson, Janet P.; Tielens, Alexander; Tsamis, Yiannis

    2015-08-01

    We present spatially resolved mid-IR spectra of the well-studied Planetary Nebula (PN) NGC 7009 obtained with the FORCAST instrument on board the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). NGC 7009 has a relatively high "abundance discrepancy factor" - the heavy element abundances derived from optical recombination lines (ORLs) are higher by a factor of about 5 than abundances derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs). One hypothesis to resolve this discrepancy is that two kinds of regions with distinct properties are responsible for the abundance measurements from ORLs and CELs. Emission lines from Argon, Sulphur and Oxygen are detected in our spectra, which span the 8.7--13.9 and 17.7--27.6 micron ranges. By combining the SOFIA observations with Herschel/PACS spectra and HST narrowband imaging we explore the abundance variations in the nebula, and we examine the correlation of the IR to optical line ratios with the abundance discrepancy factor.We also use this concrete example as a starting point for a general survey of the capabilities of SOFIA in the field of PN research, and introduce the community to the wide array of instruments available. We show that SOFIA, which is currently the only operational facility allowing access to mid- and far-IR wavelengths for the general astronomical community, has the potential for continuing the studies initiated by Spitzer and Herschel and will provide detailed information about Galactic PNe. The results from such studies will in turn be crucial for our understanding and interpretation of data from more distant, extragalactic objects that will be obtained by future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Hubble Finds an Hourglass Nebula Around a Dying Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Taken by the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), this image of MyCn18, a young planetary nebula located about 8,000 light-years away, reveals its true shape to be an hourglass with an intricate pattern of 'etchings' in its walls. The arc-like etchings could be the remnants of discrete shells ejected from the star when it was younger, flow instabilities, or could result from the action of a narrow beam of matter impinging on the hourglass walls. According to one theory on the formation of planetary nebulae, the hourglass shape is produced by the expansion of a fast stellar wind within a slowly expanding cloud, which is denser near its equator than near its poles. Hubble has also revealed other features in MyCn18 which are completely new and unexpected. For example, there is a pair of intersecting elliptical rings in the central region which appear to be the rims of a smaller hourglass. This picture has been composed from three separate images taken in the light of ionized nitrogen (represented by red), hydrogen (green) and doubly-ionized oxygen (blue). The results are of great interest because they shed new light on the poorly understood ejection of stellar matter which accompanies the slow death of sun-like stars. An unseen companion star and accompanying gravitational effects may well be necessary in order to explain the structure of MyCn18. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST.

  14. Similarity of ionized gas nebulae around unobscured and obscured quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guilin; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-08-01

    Quasar feedback is suspected to play a key role in the evolution of massive galaxies, by removing or reheating gas in quasar host galaxies and thus limiting the amount of star formation. In this paper, we continue our investigation of quasar-driven winds on galaxy-wide scales. We conduct Gemini Integral Field Unit spectroscopy of a sample of luminous unobscured (type 1) quasars, to determine the morphology and kinematics of ionized gas around these objects, predominantly via observations of the [O III] λ5007 Å emission line. We find that ionized gas nebulae extend out to ˜13 kpc from the quasar, that they are smooth and round, and that their kinematics are inconsistent with gas in dynamical equilibrium with the host galaxy. The observed morphological and kinematic properties are strikingly similar to those of ionized gas around obscured (type 2) quasars with matched [O III] luminosity, with marginal evidence that nebulae around unobscured quasars are slightly more compact. Therefore, in samples of obscured and unobscured quasars carefully matched in [O III] luminosity, we find support for the standard geometry-based unification model of active galactic nuclei, in that the intrinsic properties of the quasars, of their hosts and of their ionized gas appear to be very similar. Given the apparent ubiquity of extended ionized regions, we are forced to conclude that either the quasar is at least partially illuminating pre-existing gas or that both samples of quasars are seen during advanced stages of quasar feedback. In the latter case, we may be biased by our [O III]-based selection against quasars in the early `blow-out' phase, for example due to dust obscuration.

  15. Molecular hydrogen ion /H2+/ absorption in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Boggess, A.; Mccracken, C. W.; Hobbs, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Several IUE spectra of planetary nebulae show an absorption feature shortward of 1500 A which is believed to be due to H2(+). The nebulae are excited by stars of spectral type O3-O7 or continuum, and all but one have double-shell structure.

  16. Three-dimensional evolution of early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1991-01-01

    The progress is reported toward the goal of a complete theory of solar nebula formation, with an emphasis on three spatial dimension models of solar nebular formation and evolution. The following subject areas are covered: (1) initial conditions for protostellar collapse; (2) single versus binary star formation; (3) angular momentum transport mechanisms; (4) three dimensional solar nebula models; and (5) implications for planetary formation.

  17. Herschel/HIFI observations of molecular emission in protoplanetary nebulae and young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Planesas, P.; Teyssier, D.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Dominik, C.; Justtanont, K.; de Koter, A.; Marston, A. P.; Melnick, G.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Olofsson, H.; Schmidt, M.; Schöier, F. L.; Szczerba, R.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the physical conditions, particularly the excitation state, of the intermediate-temperature gas in protoplanetary nebulae and young planetary nebulae (PPNe, PNe). The information that the observations of the different components deliver is of particular importance for understanding the evolution of these objects. Methods: We performed Herschel/HIFI observations of intermediate-excitation molecular lines in the far-infrared/submillimeter range in a sample of ten nebulae. The high spectral resolution provided by HIFI allows the accurate measurement of the line profiles. The dynamics and evolution of these nebulae are known to result from the presence of several gas components, notably fast bipolar outflows and slow shells (that often are the fossil AGB shells), and the interaction between them. Because of the diverse kinematic properties of the different components, their emissions can be identified in the line profiles. The observation of these high-energy transitions allows an accurate study of the excitation conditions, particularly in the warm gas, which cannot be properly studied from the low-energy lines. Results: We have detected FIR/sub-mm lines of several molecules, in particular of 12CO, 13CO, and H2O. Emission from other species, like NH3, OH, H218O, HCN, SiO, etc., has been also detected. Wide profiles showing sometimes spectacular line wings have been found. We have mainly studied the excitation properties of the high-velocity emission, which is known to come from fast bipolar outflows. From comparison with general theoretical predictions, we find that CRL 618 shows a particularly warm fast wind, with characteristic kinetic temperature Tk ≳ 200 K. In contrast, the fast winds in OH 231.8+4.2 and NGC 6302 are cold, Tk ~ 30 K. Other nebulae, like CRL 2688, show intermediate temperatures, with characteristic values around 100 K. We also discuss how the complex structure of the nebulae can affect our estimates, considering two

  18. Chronology of star formation and disk evolution in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarcello, M. G.; Micela, G.; Peres, G.; Prisinzano, L.; Sciortino, S.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Massive star-forming regions are characterized by intense ionizing fluxes, strong stellar winds and, occasionally, supernovae explosions, all of which have important effects on the surrounding media, on the star-formation process and on the evolution of young stars and their circumstellar disks. We present a multiband study of the massive young cluster NGC 6611 and its parental cloud (the Eagle Nebula) with the aim of studying how OB stars affect the early stellar evolution and the formation of other stars. Aims: We search for evidence of triggering of star formation by the massive stars inside NGC 6611 on a large spatial scale (~10 parsec) and ongoing disk photoevaporation in NGC 6611 and how its efficiency depends on the mass of the central stars. Methods: We assemble a multiband catalog of the Eagle Nebula with photometric data, ranging from B band to 8.0 μm, and X-ray data obtained with two new and one archival Chandra/ACIS-I observation. We select the stars with disks from infrared photometry and disk-less ones from X-ray emission, which are associated both with NGC 6611 and the outer region of the Eagle Nebula. We study induced photoevaporation searching for the spatial variation of disk frequency for distinct stellar mass ranges. The triggering of star formation by OB stars has been investigated by deriving the history of star formation across the nebula. Results: We find evidence of sequential star formation in the Eagle Nebula going from the southeast (2.6 Myears) to the northwest (0.3 Myears), with the median age of NGC 6611 members ~1 Myear. In NGC 6611, we observe a drop of the disk frequency close to massive stars (up to an average distance of 1 parsec), without observable effects at larger distances. Furthermore, disks are more frequent around low-mass stars (≤ 1 M⊙) than around high-mass stars, regardless of the distance from OB stars. Conclusions: The star-formation chronology we find in the Eagle Nebula does not support the hypothesis

  19. NE V in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Burke, V. M.; Aggarwal, K. M.

    1991-04-01

    The improved atomic data of Lennon and Burke (1991) are used there to rederive Ne V diagnostic line ratios applicable to PNe for a range of electron temperatures and densities. These results are found to be somewhat different from those determined when the earlier R-matrix atomic data of Baluja et al. (1980) and Aggarwal (1983) are used in the line ratio calculations. It is shown that it is unwise to use R1 or R3 alone as a temperature or density diagnostic, unless the density or temperature of the Ne V emitting region of the plasma has been independently determined. However, reliable estimates of both Ne and Te may be found when R1 and R3 are used together, while R2 may be used by itself as an accurate Ne diagnostic.

  20. Extreme Particle Acceleration via Magnetic Reconnection in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Agile and Fermi of intense day-long synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula challenges classical models of pulsar wind nebulae and particle acceleration. We argue that the flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the nebula. Using relativistic test-particle simulations, we show that particles are naturally focused into a thin fan beam, deep inside the reconnection layer where the magnetic field is small. The particles then suffer less from synchrotron losses and pile up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop in the layer. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum above 100 MeV is consistent with the September 2010 flare observations. No detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This scenario provides a viable explanation for the Crab Nebula gamma-ray flares.

  1. Element Masses in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Katz, Andrea M.; Satterfield, Timothy J.; Vanderveer, Steven J.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.

    2016-10-01

    Using our previously published element abundance or mass-fraction distributions in the Crab Nebula, we derived actual mass distributions and estimates for overall nebular masses of hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. As with the previous work, computations were carried out for photoionization models involving constant hydrogen density and also constant nuclear density. In addition, employing new flux measurements for [Ni ii] λ7378, along with combined photoionization models and analytic computations, a nickel abundance distribution was mapped and a nebular stable nickel mass estimate was derived.

  2. Eagle Nebula Pillars: From Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Mizuta, Akira; Takabe, Hideaki

    Over the past few years, our group has been developing hydrodynamic models to simulate formation of the Eagle Nebula pillars. The true test of any model is, of course, how well it can reproduce the observations. Here, we discuss how we go about testing our models against observations. We describe the process by which we "observe" the model data to create synthetic maps. We show an example of this technique using one of our model runs and compare the resultant synthetic map to the real one.

  3. Eagle Nebula Pillars: From Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Mizuta, Akira; Takabe, Hideaki

    2005-07-01

    Over the past few years, our group has been developing hydrodynamic models to simulate formation of the Eagle Nebula pillars. The true test of any model is, of course, how well it can reproduce the observations. Here, we discuss how we go about testing our models against observations. We describe the process by which we “observe” the model data to create synthetic maps. We show an example of this technique using one of our model runs and compare the resultant synthetic map to the real one.

  4. MCNeil's Nebula in Orion: The Outburst History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, C.; Vivas, A. K.; Hernández, J.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Megeath, T.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M.; Hoyer, S.

    2004-05-01

    We present a sequence of I-band images obtained at the Venezuela 1 m Schmidt telescope during the outburst of the nebula recently discovered by J. W. McNeil in the Orion L1630 molecular cloud. We derive photometry spanning the preoutburst state and the brightening itself, which is a unique record including 14 epochs and spanning a timescale of ~5 years. We constrain the beginning of the outburst at some time between 2003 October 28 and November 15. The light curve of the object at the vertex of the nebula, the likely exciting source of the outburst, reveals that it has brightened ~5 mag in about 4 months. The timescale for the nebula to develop is consistent with the light-travel time, indicating that we are observing light from the central source scattered by the ambient cloud into the line of sight. We also show recent FLWO optical spectroscopy of the exciting source and of the nearby HH 22. The spectrum of the source is highly reddened; in contrast, the spectrum of HH 22 shows a shock spectrum superposed on a continuum, most likely the result of reflected light from the exciting source reaching the HH object through a much less reddened path. The blue portion of this spectrum is consistent with an early B spectral type, similar to the early outburst spectrum of the FU Orionis variable star V1057 Cygni; we estimate a luminosity of L~219 Lsolar. The eruptive behavior of McNeil's Nebula, its spectroscopic characteristics and luminosity, suggest that we may be witnessing an FU Ori event on its way to maximum. By further monitoring this object, we will be able decide whether or not it qualifies as a member of this rare class of objects. Based on observations obtained at the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela, operated by CIDA for the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, and at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. Kinematic Distances of Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, A. Y.; Tian, W. W.; Zhu, H.; Leahy, D. A.; Wu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We construct H i absorption spectra for 18 planetary nebulae (PNs) and their background sources using data from the International Galactic Plane Survey. We estimate the kinematic distances of these PNs, among which 15 objects’ kinematic distances are obtained for the first time. The distance uncertainties of 13 PNs range from 10% to 50%, which is a significant improvement with uncertainties of a factor of two or three smaller than most previous distance measurements. We confirm that PN G030.2-00.1 is not a PN because of its large distance found here.

  6. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  7. Investigation of the cometary nebula Parsamyan 21

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosyan, V.M.

    1985-05-01

    The results are given of an isodensitometric and spectrophotometric investigation of the cometary nebula P 21 and its associated nucleus. The shape of the isodensities of the nucleus differs from those for normal stars, and in this the nucleus recalls R Mon. A spectral investigation of the nucleus of P 21 made on the basis of observations during 1981-1982 shows that it is a star of the class F2-F5V with an envelope expanding at about 120 km/sec.

  8. Spatially-resolved Spectroscopy of the IC443 Pulsar Wind Nebula and Environs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, D. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zavlin, V. E.; Bucciantini, N.; Clarke, T. E.; Karovska, M.; Pavlov, G. G.; O'Dell, S. L.; vanderHorst, A J.; Yukita, M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar, CXOU J061705.3+222117, in the supernova remnant IC443 reveal, for the first time, a ring-like morphology surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like structure oriented roughly north-south across the ring and through the pulsar location. The observations further confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar interpretation, (2) the non-thermal surrounding nebula is likely powered by the pulsar wind, and (3) the thermal-dominated spectrum at greater distances is consistent with emission from the supernova remnant. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion towards the southwest (or, equivalently, flow of ambient medium to the northeast), appears to be subsonic; there is no evidence for a strong bow shock, and the circular ring is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium.

  9. Detection of C60 and C70 in a young planetary nebula.

    PubMed

    Cami, Jan; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Peeters, Els; Malek, Sarah Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, a number of molecules and diverse dust features have been identified by astronomical observations in various environments. Most of the dust that determines the physical and chemical characteristics of the interstellar medium is formed in the outflows of asymptotic giant branch stars and is further processed when these objects become planetary nebulae. We studied the environment of Tc 1, a peculiar planetary nebula whose infrared spectrum shows emission from cold and neutral C60 and C70. The two molecules amount to a few percent of the available cosmic carbon in this region. This finding indicates that if the conditions are right, fullerenes can and do form efficiently in space. PMID:20651118

  10. Hubble Space Telescope images and follow-up spectroscopy of the Orion nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Wen, Zheng; Hester, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recently published HST images of the Orion nebula reveal elephant-trunk structures, an apparent jet of material, and fine-scale structure in the Herbig-Haro object HH2, which is located at the base of an elephant trunk. High-resolution spectroscopy shows that the apparent jet is actually an ionization front seen edge-on. HH2 shows a complex structure in the several stages of ionization observed. There seem to be two velocity systems characterized by a bright central region and an accompanying shell-like emission. These two systems are most likely to be the result of a bow shock and corresponding Mach disk formed from the interaction of a collimated jet and the ambient gas of the nebula.

  11. Spatially-resolved Spectroscopy of the IC443 Pulsar Wind Nebula and Environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zavlin, V.; Bucciantini, N.; Clarke, T. E.; Karovska, M.; Pavlov, G. G.; van der Horst, A.; Yukita, M.

    2013-04-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar, CXO J061705.3+222127, in the supernova remnant IC443 confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar interpretation, (2) the non-thermal surrounding nebula is likely powered by a pulsar wind, and (3) the thermal-dominated spectrum at greater distances is consistent with emission from the supernova remnant. The observations further reveal, for the first time, a ring-like morphology surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like structure oriented roughly north-south across the ring and through the pulsar location. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion towards the southwest, appears to be subsonic; there is no evidence for a strong bow shock and the ring, presumably formed at a wind termination shock, is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium.

  12. Saturn Satellite Densities and the C/O Chemistry of the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of material condensed in the outer solar system is very dependent on the state of carbon and oxygen in the solar or circumplanetary nebula, since oxygen is the dominant solid-forming element in a solar composition gas (in the form of silicates and water ice), and carbon is about half as abundant. Past discussions of solid material formed in these regions have focused on differences expected between material formed near giant planets where carbon is generally expected to be in the reduced, CH4, form and material formed in the outer protoplanetary solar nebula where CO is believed to be the dominant form [1]. The composition and expected density of these materials are quite sensitive to the C and O solar abundances in all these models. We discuss here the effects of recently suggested modifications to solar abundances on the interpretation of the mean densities for satellites in the Saturn system.

  13. Waiting in the Wings: Reflected X-ray Emission from the Homunculus Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Davidson, K.; Petre, R.; Hillier, D. J.; Smith, N.; Damineli, A.; Morse, J. A.; Walborn, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Homunculus Nebula which surrounds the supermassive star eta Carinae. The emission is characterized by a temperature in excess of 100 MK, and is consistent with scattering of the time-delayed X-ray flux associated with the star. The nebular emission is bright in the northwestern lobe and near the central regions of the Homunculus, and fainter in the southeastern lobe. We also report the detection of an unusually broad Fe K fluorescent line, which may indicate fluorescent scattering off the wind of a companion star or some other high velocity outflow. The X-ray Homunculus is the nearest member of the small class of Galactic X-ray reflection nebulae, and the only one in which both the emitting and reflecting sources are distinguishable.

  14. A SPITZER CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Forbrich, Jan; Lada, Charles J.; Muench, August A.; Alves, Joao

    2009-10-10

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In order to quantitatively determine the current level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula, we analyzed 13 deg{sup 2} of sensitive mid-infrared maps of the entire cloud, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer at wavelengths of 24 mum and 70 mum, to search for candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the high-extinction regions. We argue that our search is complete for class I and typical class II YSOs with luminosities of L {sub bol} approx 0.2 L {sub sun} and greater. We find only 18 candidate YSOs in the high-extinction regions of the entire Pipe cloud. Twelve of these sources are previously known members of a small cluster associated with Barnard 59, the largest and most massive dense core in the cloud. With only six candidate class I and class II YSOs detected toward extinction cores outside of this cluster, our findings emphatically confirm the notion of an extremely low level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula. The resulting star formation efficiency for the entire cloud mass is only approx0.06%.

  15. Size-Selective Concentration of Chondrules and Other Small Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula may be responsible for the initial collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodY precursors. This paper presents the main elements of this process of turbulent concentration. In the terrestrial planet region. both the characteristic size and size distribution of chondrules are explained. "Fluffier" particles would be concentrated in nebula regions which were at a lower density and/or more intensely turbulent. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a close tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the probability distributions for concentration in the protoplanetary nebula to be made. Large concentration factors (less than 10(exp 5)) are readily obtained, implying that numerous zones of particle density significantly exceeding the gas density could exist. If most of the available solids were actually in chondrule sized particles, the ensuing particle mass density would become so large that the feedback effects on gas turbulence due to mass loading could no longer be neglected. This paper describes the process, presenting its basic elements and some implications, without including the effects of mass loading.

  16. Constraining Disk Survival Times using the Statistical Properties of Proplyds in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, K. A.; Bally, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Orion Nebula, one of the closest and richest star forming regions, is an ideal laboratory for observing young stars. We perform a statistical study of the stars in this region, comparing photometric and spectroscopic data collected by Hillenbrand (1997) with images obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope collected by O'Dell and Wong (1996), Bally et. al. (2000), and new velocity-resolved Fabry-Perot data cubes that trace jets and outflows. We explore the relationships between stellar age and proplyd characteristics such as externally ionized structure and size and the presence or absence of outflows. Theoretical models predict that external photoevaporation will disperse minimum solar nebula circumstellar disks within 105 years. However, we identify objects that challenge this model as the central stars embedded in several proplyds have ages greater than half a million years. We place new constraints on the survival times of circumstellar disks in the Orion nebula based on the ages of their central stars. This research is supported by NASA grants GO8324, GO9125, and NCC2-1052 (Astrobiology).

  17. Discovery and Characterization of Large-Angular Size Ionized Nebulae with WHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doze, Peter; Benjamin, Robert A.; Haffner, L. Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalog of large-angular size (radius>0.25 deg) ionized nebula detected as part of the WHAM-SS (Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper Sky Survey). Starting with the the combined H-alpha surveys of WHAM, SHASSA (Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas), and VTSS (Virginia Tech Spectral Survey), we identified 758 nebula candidates for follow-up study; 105 of these were not previously cataloged. From this list, we selected all nebulae larger than 0.25 degree that contained the center of a WHAM (one-degree) beam. We present the H-alpha Dopper shift velocities, H-alpha line-widths, nebular emission measures, and when possible the [S II]/H alpha ratio for each of these objects and compare them to typical Galactic HII regions and the diffuse warm ionized medium. Using kinematic distances, we also examing the size and spatial distribution of these sources and compare our results to recent catalogs of Galactic HII regions.

  18. Multiple Shells Around G79.29+0.46 Revealed from Near-IR to Millimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Esteban, F. M.; Rizzo, J. R.; Palau, Aina

    2010-04-01

    Aiming to perform a study of the warm dust and gas in the luminous blue variable star G79.29+0.46 and its associated nebula, we present infrared Spitzer imaging and spectroscopy, and new CO J = 2 → 1 and 4 → 3 maps obtained with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope and the Submillimeter Telescope, respectively. We have analyzed the nebula detecting multiple shells of dust and gas connected to the star. Using Infrared Spectrograph-Spitzer spectra, we have compared the properties of the central object, the nebula, and their surroundings. These spectra show a rich variety of solid-state features (amorphous silicates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and CO2 ices) and narrow emission lines, superimposed on a thermal continuum. We have also analyzed the physical conditions of the nebula, which point to the existence of a photo-dissociation region.

  19. Fine-Scale Temperature Fluctuations in the Orion Nebula and the t2 Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Peimbert, Manuel; Peimbert, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    We present a high spatial resolution map of the columnar electron temperature (Tc) of a region to the southwest of the Trapezium in the Orion Nebula. This map was derived from Hubble Space Telescope images that isolated the primary lines of H I for determination of the local extinction and of the [O III] lines for determination of Tc. Although there is no statistically significant variation of Tc with distance from the dominant ionizing star, θ1 Ori C, we find small-scale variations in the plane of the sky down to a few arcseconds, which are compatible with the variations inferred from comparing the value of Te derived from forbidden and recombination lines, commonly known as the t2 problem. We present other evidence for fine-scale variations in conditions in the nebula, these being variations in the surface brightness of the nebula, fluctuations in radial velocities, and ionization changes. From our Tc map and other considerations we estimate that t2 =0.028+/-0.006 for the Orion Nebula. Shadowed regions behind clumps close to the ionization front can make a significant contribution to the observed temperature fluctuations, but they cannot account for the t2 values inferred from several methods of temperature determination. It is shown that an anomalous broadening of nebular emission lines appears to have the same sense of correlation as the temperature anomalies, although a causal link is not obvious. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  20. RESOLVING THE GALAXIES WITHIN A GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULA: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF A GALAXY GROUP?

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Chaffee, Frederic H.; Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2012-06-20

    Detailed analysis of the substructure of Ly{alpha} nebulae can put important constraints on the physical mechanisms at work and the properties of galaxies forming within them. Using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a Ly{alpha} nebula at z Almost-Equal-To 2.656, we have taken a census of the compact galaxies in the vicinity, used optical/near-infrared colors to select system members, and put constraints on the morphology of the spatially extended emission. The system is characterized by (1) a population of compact, low-luminosity ({approx}0.1 L*) sources-17 primarily young, small (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 1-2 kpc), disky galaxies including an obscured active galactic nucleus-that are all substantially offset ({approx}>20 kpc) from the line-emitting nebula; (2) the lack of a central galaxy at or near the peak of the Ly{alpha} emission; and (3) several nearly coincident, spatially extended emission components-Ly{alpha}, He II, and UV continuum-that are extremely smooth. These morphological findings are difficult to reconcile with theoretical models that invoke outflows, cold flows, or resonant scattering, suggesting that while all of these physical phenomena may be occurring, they are not sufficient to explain the powering and large extent of Ly{alpha} nebulae. In addition, although the compact galaxies within the system are irrelevant as power sources, the region is significantly overdense relative to the field galaxy population (by at least a factor of four). These observations provide the first estimate of the luminosity function of galaxies within an individual Ly{alpha} nebula system and suggest that large Ly{alpha} nebulae may be the seeds of galaxy groups or low-mass clusters.

  1. The North American and Pelican Nebulae. I. IRAC Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, S.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Carpenter, J. M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Padgett, D. L.; Cole, D. M.; Carey, S. J.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Strom, S. E.

    2009-05-01

    We present a 9 deg2 map of the North American and Pelican Nebulae regions obtained in all four Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) channels with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The resulting photometry is merged with that at JHKs from Two Micron All Sky Survey and a more spatially limited BVI survey from previous ground-based work. We use a mixture of color-color diagrams to select a minimally contaminated set of more than 1600 objects that we claim are young stellar objects (YSOs) associated with the star-forming region. Because our selection technique uses infrared excess as a requirement, our sample is strongly biased against inclusion of Class III YSOs. The distribution of IRAC spectral slopes for our YSOs indicates that most of these objects are Class II, with a peak toward steeper spectral slopes but a substantial contribution from a tail of Flat spectrum and Class I type objects. By studying the small fraction of the sample that is optically visible, we infer a typical age of a few Myr for the low-mass population. The young stars are clustered, with about a third of them located in eight clusters that are located within or near the LDN 935 dark cloud. Half of the YSOs are located in regions with surface densities higher than 1000 YSOs/deg2. The Class I objects are more clustered than the Class II stars.

  2. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This picture shows a Hubble Space Telescope image of the inner parts of the Crab. The pulsar itself is visible as the left of the pair of stars near the center of the frame. Surrounding the pulsar is a complex of sharp knots and wisp-like features. This image is one of a sequence of Hubble images taken over the course of several months. This sequence shows that the inner part of the Crab Nebula is far more dynamic than previously understood. The Crab literally 'changes it stripes' every few days as these wisps stream away from the pulsar at half the speed of light. The Hubble Space Telescope photo was taken Nov. 5, 1995 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 at a wavelength of around 550 nanometers, in the middle of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  3. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  4. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  5. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  6. Probing the depths: Relativistic, hydrodynamic simulations and X-ray observations of pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Joseph P.

    2008-06-01

    I have undertaken a joint computational and observational study of the interaction of a light, relativistic pulsar wind with a dense, ambient medium. Such a scenario has been suggested as the origin of asymmetric pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). I present an analysis of Chandra X-ray Observatory data on the supernova remnant (SNR) MSH 11-6 2 . I show that the central region's spectrum above 2 keV is dominated by non-thermal emission consistent with that from a PWN. The spatial and spectral analyses strongly suggest that the nebula harbors a compact object with an inferred spin-down energy sufficient to rotationally power the nebula. Nebular asymmetry strongly suggests that the nebula has been crushed by the SNR reverse shock and the nebula and SNR are consistent with being in pressure equilibrium. Thus, this observation provides evidence that, in this case, the density distribution of the interstellar medium has had a dynamical effect on the morphology of the SNR/PWN system. Another scenario wherein the ambient medium influences PWNe morphology arises when the pulsar's space velocity is supersonic. In order to study such a system I have applied an existing adaptive-mesh, axisymmetric, relativistic hydrodynamic code to the simulation of the interaction of a relativistic pulsar wind with the ambient flow setup by the space motion of the pulsar. I discuss simulations showing that this interaction can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow. Further, I present the first results from an extension of the model to study the shock acceleration, and subsequent synchrotron cooling, of particles advected by the flow. The new module may be used to compute models of

  7. High-Resolution Infrared Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Pistol Nebula: Evidence for Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Morris, Mark; Geballe, T. R.; Rich, R. Michael; Serabyn, Eugene; McLean, Ian S.; Puetter, R. C.; Yahil, Amos

    1999-11-01

    We present new infrared images, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrometer (NICMOS), and Brα (4.05 μm) spectroscopy, obtained using CGS4 on UKIRT, of the Pistol Star and its associated nebula. We find strong evidence to support the hypothesis that the Pistol Nebula was ejected from the Pistol Star. The Paα (1.87 μm) NICMOS image shows that the nebula completely surrounds the Pistol Star, although the line intensity is much stronger on its northern and western edges. The Brα CGS4 spectra show the classical ringlike signature of quasi-spherical expansion. The blueshifted emission (Vmax~-60 km s-1) is much weaker than the redshifted emission (Vmax~+10 km s-1), where the velocities are with respect to the velocity of the Pistol Star; further, the redshifted emission spans a very narrow range of velocities, i.e., it appears ``flattened'' in the position-velocity diagram. These data suggest that the nebula was ejected from the star several thousand years ago, with a velocity between the current terminal velocity of the stellar wind (95 km s-1) and the present expansion velocity of gas in the outer shell of the nebula (60 km s-1). The Paα image reveals several emission-line stars in the region, including two newly identified emission-line stars north of the Pistol Star, both of which are likely to be the hottest known stars in the Galactic center with spectral types earlier than WC8 and Teff>50,000 K). The presence of these stars, the morphology of the Paα emission, and the velocity field in the gas suggest that the side of the nebula farthest from us is approaching, and being ionized by, the hot stars of the Quintuplet and that the highest velocity redshifted gas has been decelerated by winds from the Quintuplet stars. We also discuss the possibility that the nebular gas might be magnetically confined by the ambient magnetic field delineated by the nearby nonthermal filaments. Based on observations with the

  8. Planetary Nebulae and their parent stellar populations. Tracing the mass assembly of M87 and Intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, Magda; Longobardi, Alessia; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-08-01

    The diffuse extended outer regions of galaxies are hard to study because they are faint, with typical surface brightness of 1% of the dark night sky. We can tackle this problem by using resolved star tracers which remain visible at large distances from the galaxy centers. This article describes the use of Planetary Nebulae as tracers and the calibration of their properties as indicators of the star formation history, mean age and metallicity of the parent stars in the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies. We then report on the results from a deep, extended, planetary nebulae survey in a 0.5 deg2 region centered on the brightest cluster galaxy NGC 4486 (M87) in the Virgo cluster core, carried out with SuprimeCam@Subaru and FLAMES-GIRAFFE@VLT. Two planetary nebulae populations are identified out to 150 kpc distance from the center of M87. One population is associated with the M87 halo and the second one with the intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core. They have different line-of-sight velocity and spatial distributions, as well as different planetary nebulae specific frequencies and luminosity functions. The intracluster planetary nebulae in the surveyed region correspond to a luminosity of four times the luminosity of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The M87 halo planetary nebulae trace an older, more metal-rich, parent stellar population. A substructure detected in the projected phase-space of the line-of-sight velocity vs. major axis distance for the M87 halo planetary nebulae provides evidence for the recent accretion event of a satellite galaxy with luminosity twice that of M33. The satellite stars were tidally stripped about 1 Gyr ago, and reached apocenter at a major axis distance of 60-90 kpc from the center of M87. The M87 halo is still growing significantly at the distances where the substructure is detected.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope observations of Orion Nebula, Helix Nebula, and NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Lyman; Fitzpatrick, Ed

    1999-01-01

    This grant covered the major part of the work of the Principal Investigator and his collaborators as a Guaranteed Time Observer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The work done naturally divided itself into two portions the first being study of nebular objects and the second investigation of the interstellar medium between stars. The latter investigation was pursued through a contract with Princeton University, with Professor Lyman Spitzer as the supervising astronomer, assisted by Dr. Ed Fitzpatrick. Following the abrupt death of Professor Spitzer, his responsibilities were shifted to Dr. Fitzpatrick. When Dr. Fitzpatrick relocated to Villanova University the concluding work on that portion of this grant was concluded under a direct service arrangement. This program has been highly successful and the resulting publications in scientific journals are listed below. To the scientist, this is the bottom line, so that I shall simply try to describe the general nature of what was accomplished. There were three nebular programs conducted, one on the Orion Nebula, the second on the Helix Nebula, and the third on NGC 6822. The largest program was that on the Orion Nebula. This involved both HST observations and supporting groundbased observations obtained with a variety of instruments, including the Coude Feed Telescope at the Kitt Peak National observatory in Arizona, the Cerro Tololo observatory in Chile, and the Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Moreover, considerable theoretical modeling was done and all of the data analysis was performed at the Rice University in Houston, except for the PI's period of sabbatical leave (6-96 through 7-97) when he was based at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. The Orion Nebula program was the most productive part, resulting in numerous papers, but more important in the discovery of a new class of objects, for which we coined the name "proplyds". The proplyds are protoplanetary disks surrounding very young

  10. Discovery of a Circumstellar Disk in the Lagoon Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Circumstellar disks of gas and dust play a crucial role in the formation of stars and planets. Until now, high-resolution images of such disks around young stars within the Orion Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) constituted the most direct proof of their existence. Now, another circumstellar disk has been detected around a star in the Lagoon Nebula - also known as Messier 8 (M8) , a giant complex of interstellar gas and dust with many young stars in the southern constellation of Sagittarius and four times more distant than the Orion Nebula. The observations were carried out by an international team of scientists led by Bringfried Stecklum (Thüringer Landessternwarte, Tautenburg, Germany) [1] who used telescopes located at the ESO La Silla observatory and also observations from the HST archive. These new results are paving the road towards exciting research programmes on star formation which will become possible with the ESO Very Large Telescope. The harsh environment of circumstellar disks The existence of circumstellar disks has been inferred from indirect measurements of young stellar objects, such as the spectral energy distribution, the analysis of the profiles of individual spectral lines and measurements of the polarisation of the emitted light [2]. Impressive images of such disks in the Orion Nebula, known as proplyds (PROto-PLanetarY DiskS), have been obtained by the HST during the recent years. They have confirmed the interpretation of previous ground-based emission-line observations and mapping by radio telescopes. Moreover, they demonstrated that those disks which are located close to hot and massive stars are subject to heating caused by the intense radiation from these stars. Subsequently, the disks evaporate releasing neutral gas which streams off. During this process, shock fronts (regions with increased density) with tails of ionised gas result at a certain distance between the disk and the hot star. These objects appear on

  11. The Orion Nebula: The Jewel in the Sword

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    /01 ESO PR Photo 03c/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 452 pix - 57k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 904 pix - 488k] [Hires - JPEG: 2300 x 2600 pix - 3.3M] Caption : PR Photo 03b/01 and PR Photo 03c/01 show smaller, particularly interesting areas of PR Photo 03a/01 . Photo 03b/01 shows the traces of a massive outflow of gas from a very young object embedded in the dense molecular cloud behind the Orion Nebula. Shards of gas from the explosion create shocks and leave bow-waves as they move at speeds of up to 200 km/sec from the source. Photo 03c/01 shows the delicate tracery created at the so-called Bright Bar , as the intense UV-light and strong winds from the hot Trapezium stars eat their way into the surrounding molecular cloud. Also visible are a number of very young red objects partly hidden in the cloud, waiting to be revealed as new members of the Trapezium Cluster . Technical information about these photos is available below. Indeed, at visible wavelengths, the dense cluster of stars at the centre is drowned out by the light from the nebula and obscured by remnants of the dust in the gas from which they were formed. However, at longer wavelengths, these obscuring effects are reduced, and the cluster is revealed. In the past couple of years, several of the world's premier ground- and space-based telescopes have made new detailed infrared studies of the Orion Nebula and the Trapezium Cluster , but the VLT image shown here is the "deepest" wide-field image obtained so far. The large collecting area of the VLT and the excellent seeing of the Paranal site combined to yield this beautiful image, packed full of striking details. Powerful explosions and winds from the most massive stars in the region are evident, as well as the contours of gas sculpted by these stars, and more finely focused jets of gas flowing from the smaller stars. Sharper images from the VLT ESO PR Photo 03d/01 ESO PR Photo 03d/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 490 pix - 28k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 980 pix - 192k] [Hi

  12. Mapping the latitude dependence of the primary stellar wind of eta Carinae using the spectrum reflected on the Homunculus nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odessey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The binary star Eta Carinae underwent a massive eruption in the 1840s, resulting in a huge nebula of ejected material, called the Homunculus. Despite preventing us from the direct view from the central source, the Homunculus acts like a mirror, allowing us to see the spectrum of the central binary system from different stellar latitudes. Therefore, by mapping the spectrum along the nebula we are actually probing the dependence of the spectrum with stellar latitude. Our project focuses on the P Cyg absorption component of H lines mostly in the optical and near-infrared wavelengths. in order to investigate the structure of the primary stellar wind. A full spectral mapping of the entire nebula was constructed by combining multiple dithered long slit observations using the ESO/X-Shooter high-resolution spectrograph. Such mapping allowed us to assemble a data cube containing the spectrum of each position along the nebula. Preliminary analysis confirms that the primary wind indeed has a deeper absorption component at high stellar latitudes (polar region). Also, contrary to our expectations, our analysis indicates that the polar region does not seem entirely radially symmetric in terms of density, which invites further investigation into the source of these discrepancies.

  13. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    at optical wavelengths and only one is bright enough to allow reasonably detailed spectroscopic observations with currently available optical telescopes. The Crab Pulsar This is the famous Crab Pulsar, also known as PSR 0531+21. It was discovered as a radio pulsar in 1968, soon after the detection of the first known radio pulsar. A little later, pulsed optical emission from the Crab Pulsar was also observed. It was quickly recognized that this emission obeys Pacini's law [2]. Stated in simple terms, this implies that the emission of optical light from the pulsar is due to the interaction between very energetic elementary particles close to the neutron star and its incredibly strong magnetic field. The Crab Pulsar is especially interesting, because we have detailed historical information about the event from which it was born: the very bright `guest star' which was so well observed and described by Chinese astronomers in the year 1054 AD in the constellation of Taurus (the Bull). At the exact location of this supernova is now observed the famous Crab Nebula in which the Crab Pulsar is embedded. The Crab Nebula is a very conspicuous object in the sky (the name alludes to its overall form), and it emits a very significant amount of energy at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum that have so far been explored, from long-wave radio waves to gamma-rays of ultra-high energy. At X-ray wavelengths (above 1 keV), it is in fact one of the brightest, continuously emitting sources in the sky. The Crab Pulsar also emits at all wavelengths, but it is much fainter than the surrounding nebula. This Press Release is accompanied by a photo with caption, showing the pulsar in the innermost region of the nebula. At optical wavelengths, the Crab Pulsar is a comparatively faint, point-like object of magnitude 16.6. It is interesting to note that, from the measured, outward motion of the individual condensations in the Crab Nebula, this object was recognized, already a decade

  14. X-Ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula trailing the high-velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the "Guitar Nebula"). This X-ray flux gives evidence of gamma approximately 10(exp 7) eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the postshock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near-equipartition values.

  15. Planetary nebulae and their central stars - origin and evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, I., Jr.

    This very detailed review deals with the following topics: star evolution to the AGB phase, thermally pulsating AGB stars, evolution from the AGB to the planetary nebula phase and from there to the white dwarf stage, pulsation, dust and mass loss, OH/IR sources, carbon-rich IR sources, and protoplanetary nebulae, classical planetary nebulae and their central stars, chemistry of the central stars and the born-again phenomenon, common-envelope PNe and binary central stars and final fate of central stars.

  16. X-Ray Outburst from Young Star in McNeil's Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    Observations with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory captured an X-ray outburst from a young star, revealing a probable scenario for the intermittent brightening of the recently discovered McNeil's Nebula. It appears the interaction between the young star's magnetic field and an orbiting disk of gas can cause dramatic, episodic increases in the light from the star and disk, illuminating the surrounding gas. "The story of McNeil's Nebula is a wonderful example of the importance of serendipity in science," said Joel Kastner of the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York, lead author of a paper in the July 22 issue of Nature describing the X-ray results. "Visible-light images were made of this region several months before Jay McNeil made his discovery, so it could be determined approximately when and by how much the star flared up to produce McNeil's Nebula." The small nebula, which lies in the constellation Orion about 1300 light years from Earth, was discovered with a 3-inch telescope by McNeil, an amateur astronomer from Paducah, Kentucky, in January 2004. In November 2002, a team led by Ted Simon of the Institute for Astronomy in Hawaii had observed the star-rich region with Chandra in search of young, X-ray emitting stars, and had detected several objects. Optical and infrared astronomers had, as part of independent surveys, also observed the region about a year later, in 2003. After the announcement of McNeil's discovery, optical, infrared and X-ray astronomers rushed to observe the region again. They found that a young star buried in the nebula had flared up, and was illuminating the nebula. This star was coincident with one of the X-ray sources discovered earlier by Simon. Chandra observations obtained by Kastner's group just after the optical outburst showed that the source had brightened fifty-fold in X-rays when compared to Simon's earlier observation. The visible-light eruption provides evidence that the cause of the X-ray outburst is the

  17. Constraints on particle acceleration sites in PWNe from multi-wavelength variability in the inner nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Elena; Del Zanna, Luca; Olmi, Barbara; Bucciantini, Niccolo'

    It is a commonly accepted idea that most of the emission properties of Pulsar Wind Nebulae can be well reproduced within a MHD description of the dynamics of the pulsar wind, granted that the anisotropy of the outflow in terms of its energy flux is taken into account. Much of the structure observed in the high energy morphology of PWNe derives from shape of the termination shock, which is far from spherical and of different strength, magnetization and obliquity at different latitudes above and below the equatorial plane of the pulsar rotation. The wind termination shock is usually believed to be the primary particle acceleraton site in PWNe, although there is no general consensus on what the acceleration mechanism(s) at work is(are). Given the variation of the shock properties along its surface, it is reasonable to think that different acceleration processes might be at work in different places and accelerate particles in a different energy range or with a different spectrum. We investigate this possibility through 2D MHD simulations of the nebular dynamics and emission. In particular we study the dependence on the assumed acceleration site of the variability patterns that are found at different wavelengths in the inner region of the nebulae. Our results are compared with observations of "wisp" activity in the Crab Nebula at radio, optical and X-ray frequencies.

  18. Emission lines of [K v] in the optical spectra of gaseous nebulae

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Francis P.; Aller, Lawrence H.; Espey, Brian R.; Exter, Katrina M.; Hyung, Siek; Keenan, Michael T. C.; Pollacco, Don L.; Ryans, Robert S. I.

    2002-01-01

    Recent R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation rates in K v are used to derive the nebular emission line ratio R = I(4122.6 Å)/I(4163.3 Å) as a function of electron density (Ne). This ratio is found to be very sensitive to changes in Ne over the density range 103 to 106 cm−3, but does not vary significantly with electron temperature, and hence in principle should provide an excellent optical Ne diagnostic for the high-excitation zones of nebulae. The observed value of R for the planetary nebula NGC 7027, measured from a spectrum obtained with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, implies a density in excellent agreement with that derived from [Ne iv], formed in the same region of the nebula as [K v]. This observation provides observational support for the accuracy of the theoretical [K v] line ratios, and hence the atomic data on which they are based. However, the analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star RR Telescopii, obtained with the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo–Australian Telescope, reveals that the [K v] 4122.6 Å line in this object is badly blended with Fe ii 4122.6 Å. Hence, the [K v] diagnostic may not be used for astrophysical sources that show a strong Fe ii emission line spectrum. PMID:11904366

  19. Emission lines of [K V] in the optical spectra of gaseous nebulae.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Francis P; Aller, Lawrence H; Espey, Brian R; Exter, Katrina M; Hyung, Siek; Keenan, Michael T C; Pollacco, Don L; Ryans, Robert S I

    2002-04-01

    Recent R-matrix calculations of electron impact excitation rates in K v are used to derive the nebular emission line ratio R = I(4122.6 A)/I(4163.3 A) as a function of electron density (N(e)). This ratio is found to be very sensitive to changes in N(e) over the density range 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3), but does not vary significantly with electron temperature, and hence in principle should provide an excellent optical N(e) diagnostic for the high-excitation zones of nebulae. The observed value of R for the planetary nebula NGC 7027, measured from a spectrum obtained with the Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane Telescope, implies a density in excellent agreement with that derived from [Ne iv], formed in the same region of the nebula as [K v]. This observation provides observational support for the accuracy of the theoretical [K v] line ratios, and hence the atomic data on which they are based. However, the analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the symbiotic star RR Telescopii, obtained with the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope, reveals that the [K v] 4122.6 A line in this object is badly blended with Fe ii 4122.6 A. Hence, the [K v] diagnostic may not be used for astrophysical sources that show a strong Fe ii emission line spectrum. PMID:11904366

  20. Monitoring of the Crab Nebula with Chandra and Other Observatories Including HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Subsequent to the detections AGILE and Fermi/LAT of the gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula in the fall of 2010, this team has been monitoring the X-Ray emission from the Crab on a regular basis. X-Ray observations have taken place typically once per month when viewing constraints allow and more recently four times per year. There have been notable exceptions, e.g. in April of 2011 and March 2013 when we initiated a set of Chandra Target of opportunity observations in conjunction with bright gamma-ray flares. For much of the time regular HST observations were made in conjunction with the Chandra observations. The aim of this program to further characterize, in depth, the X-Ray and optical variations that take place in the nebula, and by so doing determine the regions which contribute to the harder X-ray variations and, if possible, determine the precise location within the Nebula of the origin of the gamma-ray flares. As part of this project members of the team have developed Singular Value Decomposition techniques to sequences of images in order to more accurately characterize features. The current status of the project will be presented highlighting studies of the inner knot and possible correlations with the flares.

  1. A DETAILED SPATIOKINEMATIC MODEL OF THE CONICAL OUTFLOW OF THE MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7026

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; Lopez, J. A.; Steffen, W.; Richer, M. G.

    2013-03-15

    We present extensive, long-slit, high-resolution coverage of the complex planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7026. We acquired 10 spectra using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico, and each shows exquisite detail, revealing the intricate structure of this object. Incorporating these spectra into the three-dimensional visualization and kinematic program SHAPE and using Hubble Space Telescope images of NGC 7026, we have produced a detailed structural and kinematic model of this PN. NGC 7026 exhibits remarkable symmetry consisting of three lobe pairs and four sets of knots, all symmetrical about the nucleus and displaying a conical outflow. Comparing the three-dimensional structure of this nebula to recent XMM-Newton X-ray observations, we investigate the extended X-ray emission in relation to the nebular structure. We find that the X-ray emission, while confined to the closed, northern lobes of this PN, shows an abrupt termination in the middle of the southeast lobe, which our long slit data show to be open. This is where the shocked fast wind seems to be escaping the interior of the nebula and the X-ray emission rapidly cools in this region.

  2. ON THE ORIGIN AND PHYSICS OF GAMMA FLARES IN CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Machabeli, George; Rogava, Andria; Shapakidze, David

    2015-11-20

    We consider parametric generation of electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere of the pulsar PSR0531. The suggested mechanism allows us to convert the pulsar rotational energy into the energy of Langmuir waves. The maximum growth rate is achieved in the “superluminal” area, where the phase velocity of perturbations exceeds the speed of light. Therefore, electromagnetic waves do not damp on particles. Instead, they create plasmon condensate, which is carried out outside of the pulsar magnetosphere and reaches the Crab Nebula. It is shown that the transfer of the energy of the plasmon condensate from the light cylinder to the active region of the nebula happens practically without losses. Unlike the plasma of the magnetosphere, the one of the nebula contains ions, i.e., it may sustain modulation instability, that leads to the collapse of the Langmuir condensate. Langmuir wave collapse, in turn, leads to the acceleration of the distribution function particles. Furthermore, the processes that lead to self-trapping of the synchrotron radiation are discussed. The self-trapping results in the growth of the radiation intensity, which manifests itself observationally as a flare. The condition for the self-trapping onset is derived, showing that if the phenomenon takes place at 100 MeV, then it does not happen at lower (or higher) energies. This specific kind of higher-/lower-energy cutoff could explain why when we observe the flare at 100 MeV that no enhanced emission is observed at lower/higher energies!.

  3. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the IC 443 Pulsar Wind Nebula and Environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Pavlov, George G.; Clarke, Tracy; Castelletti, Gabriela; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Karovska, Margarita; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2015-07-01

    Deep Chandra ACIS observations of the region around the putative pulsar, CXOU J061705.3+222127, in the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 reveal an ∼5″ radius ring-like structure surrounding the pulsar and a jet-like feature oriented roughly north–south across the ring and through the pulsar's location at 06h17m5.ˢ200 + 22°21‧27.″52 (J2000.0 coordinates). The observations further confirm that (1) the spectrum and flux of the central object are consistent with a rotation-powered pulsar, (2) the non-thermal spectrum and morphology of the surrounding nebula are consistent with a pulsar wind, and (3) the spectrum at greater distances is consistent with thermal emission from the SNR. The cometary shape of the nebula, suggesting motion toward the southwest, appears to be subsonic: There is no evidence either spectrally or morphologically for a bow shock or contact discontinuity; the nearly circular ring is not distorted by motion through the ambient medium; and the shape near the apex of the nebula is narrow. Comparing this observation with previous observations of the same target, we set a 99% confidence upper limit to the proper motion of CXOU J061705.3+222127 to be less than 44 mas yr‑1 (310 km s‑1 for a distance of 1.5 kpc), with the best-fit (but not statistically significant) projected direction toward the west.

  4. SULFURIZATION OF IRON IN THE DYNAMIC SOLAR NEBULA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, Fred J.

    2015-02-10

    One explanation for the enhanced ratio of volatiles to hydrogen in Jupiter’s atmosphere compared to a a gas of solar composition is that the planet accreted volatile-bearing clathrates during its formation. Models, however, suggest that S would be over abundant if clathrates were the primary carrier of Jupiter’s volatiles. This led to the suggestion that S was depleted in the outer nebula due to the formation troilite (FeS). Here, this depletion is quantitatively explored by modeling the coupled dynamical and chemical evolution of Fe grains in the solar nebula. It is found that disks that undergo rapid radial expansion from an initially compact state may allow sufficient production of FeS and carry H{sub 2}S-depleted gas outward where ices would form, providing the conditions needed for S-depleted clathrates to form. However, this expansion would also carry FeS grains to this region, which could also be incorporated into planetesimals. Thus for clathrates to be a viable source of volatiles, models must account for the presence of both H{sub 2}S in FeS in the outer solar nebula.

  5. Near infrared photometric and optical spectroscopic study of 22 low mass star clusters embedded in nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:Among the star clusters in the Galaxy, those embedded in nebulae represent the youngest group, which has only recently been explored. The analysis of a sample of 22 candidate embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII environments is presented. Methods: We employed optical spectroscopic observations of stars in the directions of the clusters carried out at CASLEO (Argentina) together with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS catalogue. Our analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour diagrams and on theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field star contamination by carrying out a statistical subtraction. Results: The studied objects have the characteristics of low mass systems. We derive their fundamental parameters. Most of the cluster ages are younger than 2 Myr. The studied embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII region complexes do not have stars of spectral types earlier than B. The total stellar masses locked in the clusters are in the range 20-220 M⊙. They are found to be gravitationally unstable and are expected to dissolve in a timescale of a few Myr. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  6. Extreme Particle Acceleration in Reconnection Layers and Gamma-ray Flares in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2011-09-01

    The Fermi and Agile gamma-ray space telescopes recently discovered short and powerful gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula. These events presumably originate from a tiny region of the nebula where electrons are accelerated to PeV energies and radiate >100 MeV synchrotron radiation in a milli-Gauss magnetic field. In classical models of particle acceleration, where the accelerating electric field is smaller than the magnetic field, the synchrotron radiation cannot exceed 100 MeV because radiative losses balance the acceleration rate. We propose that particles are efficiently accelerated to PeV energies in a magnetic reconnection layer. We find that ultrarelativistic electron orbits are trapped and collapse rapidly deep into the current layer where the magnetic field becomes small. After a few days of acceleration by the reconnection electric field, electrons are accelerated to PeV energies and are focused into a tight, narrow beam. This mechanism provides a viable explanation to the gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula and could be at work in other astrophysical objects such as relativistic jets in AGN.

  7. Formation of Explosive Comet in Proto-planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysheva, O.

    2013-09-01

    The question about the formation of the comet's nucleus is examined, taking into account the peculiarities of the destruction of the Tunguska cosmic body. According to the suggested model, the comet's nucleus consists from ample quantity of organic coverings, one covering inserts into another covering, similar to Russian set of nesting dolls. The space between neighbouring coverings is filled by different size lumps and grains down to micron size. Comets were formed in the inner region of the solar system in the early stages of the evolution of the proto-planetary cloud. Proto-comets began to accumulate their mass on the periphery of protoplanetary nebula (far from the ecliptic), where the temperature decreases to <100 K. Then, under the influence of gravitation, comets many times crossed the plane of the ecliptic, performing relaxation oscillations. Coverings on comet surfaces formed during every crossing by the comet of the ecliptic area, where the temperature was high. During their oscillations, most comets were thrown out of the inner regions of the solar system by planetary perturbations in the Öpik-Oort cloud.

  8. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE (HST) IMAGERY OF THE 30 DORADUS NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the 30 Doradus Nebula show its remarkable cluster of tightly-packed young stars 160,000 light years from Earth in the large Magellanic cloud galaxy. Panel A is a portion of a image made with the HST Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC). WFPC photographed four adjoining sky regions simultaneously which are assembled in this mosaic. Panel B is an enlargement of the central portion of the HST image which was made in violet light. It shows the compact star cluster R136, which consists of very hot and massive young stars. The star images have bright cores that are only 0.1 arc seconds wide, allowing many more stars to be distinguished than in previous ground-based telescopic photos. Panel C is a photograph of the same region as Panel B, obtained with the Max Planck 2.2 meter telescope at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. The star images are 0.6 arc seconds wide. Panel D shows how computer processing of the HST image in Panel B has sharpened its

  9. Outflows, dusty cores, and a burst of star formation in the North America and Pelican nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Bally, John; Ginsburg, Adam; Probst, Ron; Reipurth, Bo; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S. E-mail: aginsburg@eso.org E-mail: reipurth@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: Guy.Stringfellow@colorado.edu

    2014-12-01

    We present observations of near-infrared 2.12 μm molecular hydrogen outflows emerging from 1.1 mm dust continuum clumps in the North America and Pelican Nebula (NAP) complex selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Hundreds of individual shocks powered by over 50 outflows from young stars are identified, indicating that the dusty molecular clumps surrounding the NGC 7000/IC 5070/W80 H II region are among the most active sites of ongoing star formation in the solar vicinity. A spectacular X-shaped outflow, MHO 3400, emerges from a young star system embedded in a dense clump more than a parsec from the ionization front associated with the Pelican Nebula (IC 5070). Suspected to be a binary, the source drives a pair of outflows with orientations differing by 80°. Each flow exhibits S-shaped symmetry and multiple shocks indicating a pulsed and precessing jet. The 'Gulf of Mexico', located south of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), contains a dense cluster of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs), Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, and over 300 young stellar objects (YSOs), indicating a recent burst of star formation. The largest outflow detected thus far in the North America and Pelican Nebula complex, the 1.6 parsec long MHO 3417 flow, emerges from a 500 M {sub ☉} BGPS clump and may be powered by a forming massive star. Several prominent outflows such as MHO 3427 appear to be powered by highly embedded YSOs only visible at λ > 70 μm. An 'activity index' formed by dividing the number of shocks by the mass of the cloud containing their source stars is used to estimate the relative evolutionary states of Bolocam clumps. Outflows can be used as indicators of the evolutionary state of clumps detected in millimeter and submillimeter dust continuum surveys.

  10. Bubbles and Knots in the Kinematical Structure of the Bipolar Planetary Nebula NGC 2818

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope archive imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy are used to study the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula, NGC 2818. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III], [N II], [S II], and He II images, addressing important morphological features. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 2818 at five different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. A distance of 2.5 kpc was used to determine physical scales. Constructing models to fit the data with modern computational tools, we find NGC 2818 is composed of (1) a non-uniform bipolar structure with a semimajor axis of 0.92 pc (75''), possibly deformed by the stellar wind, (2) a 0.17 pc (14'') diameter central region, which is potentially the remnant of an equatorial enhancement, and (3) a great number of cometary knots. These knots are preferentially located inside a radius of 0.24 pc (20'') around the central star. The major axis of the main structure is oriented at i ~= 60° with respect to the line of sight and at P.A. = +89° on the plane of the sky. Expansion velocities of this nebula are V pol = 105 km s-1 and V eq = 20 km s-1, which lead to our estimate of the kinematical age of τk ~= 8400 ± 3400 yr (assuming homologous expansion). Our observations do not support the idea that high-velocity collimated ejections are responsible for the formation of microstructures inside the nebula. We determine the systemic velocity of NGC 2818 to be V HEL = +26 ± 2 km s-1.

  11. Outflows, Dusty Cores, and a Burst of Star Formation in the North America and Pelican Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Ginsburg, Adam; Probst, Ron; Reipurth, Bo; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.

    2014-12-01

    We present observations of near-infrared 2.12 μm molecular hydrogen outflows emerging from 1.1 mm dust continuum clumps in the North America and Pelican Nebula (NAP) complex selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Hundreds of individual shocks powered by over 50 outflows from young stars are identified, indicating that the dusty molecular clumps surrounding the NGC 7000/IC 5070/W80 H II region are among the most active sites of ongoing star formation in the solar vicinity. A spectacular X-shaped outflow, MHO 3400, emerges from a young star system embedded in a dense clump more than a parsec from the ionization front associated with the Pelican Nebula (IC 5070). Suspected to be a binary, the source drives a pair of outflows with orientations differing by 80°. Each flow exhibits S-shaped symmetry and multiple shocks indicating a pulsed and precessing jet. The "Gulf of Mexico," located south of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), contains a dense cluster of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs), Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, and over 300 young stellar objects (YSOs), indicating a recent burst of star formation. The largest outflow detected thus far in the North America and Pelican Nebula complex, the 1.6 parsec long MHO 3417 flow, emerges from a 500 M ⊙ BGPS clump and may be powered by a forming massive star. Several prominent outflows such as MHO 3427 appear to be powered by highly embedded YSOs only visible at λ > 70 μm. An "activity index" formed by dividing the number of shocks by the mass of the cloud containing their source stars is used to estimate the relative evolutionary states of Bolocam clumps. Outflows can be used as indicators of the evolutionary state of clumps detected in millimeter and submillimeter dust continuum surveys.

  12. A spectroscopic and photometric study of the planetary nebulae Kn 61 and Pa 5

    SciTech Connect

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; González-Buitrago, D.; López, J. A.; Zharikov, S.; Tovmassian, G.; Borisov, N.; Valyavin, G. E-mail: dgonzalez@astro.unam.mx E-mail: zhar@astro.unam.mx E-mail: borisov@sao.ru

    2014-09-01

    We present the first morpho-kinematical analysis of the planetary nebulae Kn 61 and Pa 5 and explore the nature of their central stars. Our analysis is based on high-resolution and medium-resolution spectroscopic observations, deep narrow-band imaging, and integral photometry. This material allows us to identify the morphological components and study their kinematics. The direct images and spectra indicate an absence of the characteristic [N II] and [S II] emission lines in both nebulae. The nebular spectrum of Kn 61 suggests a hydrogen deficient planetary nebula and the stellar spectrum of the central star reveals a hydrogen-deficient PG 1159-type star. The [O III] position velocity diagram reveals that Kn 61 is a closed, empty, spherical shell with a thin border and a filamentary surface expanding at 67.6 km s{sup –1} and the shell is currently not expanding isotropically. We derived a kinematic age of ∼1.6 × 10{sup 4} yr for an assumed distance of 4 kpc. A photometric period of ∼5.7(±0.4) days has been detected for Kn 61, indicating the presence of a possible binary system at its core. A possible link between filamentary spherical shells and PG 1159-type stars is noted. The morphology of Pa 5 is dominated by an equatorial toroid and faint polar extensions. The equatorial region of this planetary nebula is expanding at 45.2 km s{sup –1}. The stellar spectrum corresponds to a very hot star and is dominated by a steep blue rising continuum and He II, Balmer, and Ca II photospheric lines.

  13. Proper Motion of the Remarkable Irradiated Jet HH399 in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2007-07-01

    The Trifid nebula has recently been of much interest because of its identification with a large number of massive protostars, as well as young stellar objects. HH 399 is one of the most spectacular Herbig-Haro flows recognized to be irradiated by the UV flux of the massive O7.5 star in the Trifid nebula. The irradiated jet, which is propagating in a fully ionized medium, contains numerous knots along the jet and also shows evidence for a number of isolated knots running immediately outside the jet. Two different HST observations of the nebula, with different scientific goals, were carried out in 1997 and 2002, having sensitivities that differed by a factor of 10. We performed preliminary proper motion measurements of the jet based on these observations and discovered a continuous velocity structure of the bright knots of about 230 km/sec. Here we propose four WFPC2 orbits to reobserve HH 399 in order to carry out accurate proper motion measurements over the full extent of the jet, based on observations spanning more than 10 years and having equally deep sensitivity. The proposed observations are not simply a repeat of previous measurements, as this will be the first highly accurate proper motion measurement of an irradiated jet based on two identical epochs of WFPC2 observations. The observations will improve the accuracy of proper motion measurements for HH 399 by more than a factor of five and will address important questions beyond our preliminary result. Currently measured velocity differences between the jet features are barely significant. The factor of 5 increase in accuracy will establish the evidence for deceleration along the jet and the lateral motion of the jet. In addition, these measurements will address the kinematics of individual entrained and isolated blobs of the jet as it propagates into an HII region associated with the nebula. This is the last opportunity to perform this experiment before WFPC2 is removed from HST.

  14. THE YOUNG INTERSTELLAR BUBBLE WITHIN THE ROSETTE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Bourdin, M. O.; Gull, T. R. E-mail: theodore.r.gull@nasa.go

    2010-08-20

    We use high-resolution International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data and the interstellar (IS) features of highly ionized Si IV and C IV seen toward the young, bright OB stars of NGC 2244 in the core of the Rosette Nebula to study the physics of young IS bubbles. Two discrete velocity components in Si IV and C IV are seen toward stars in the 6.2 pc radius central cavity, while only a single velocity component is seen toward those stars in the surrounding H II region, at the perimeter and external to this cavity. The central region shows characteristics of a very young, windblown bubble. The shell around the central hot cavity is expanding at 56 km s{sup -1} with respect to the embedded OB stars, while the surrounding H II region of the Rosette is expanding at {approx}13 km s{sup -1}. Even though these stars are quite young ({approx}2-4 Myr), both the radius and expansion velocity of the 6.2 pc inner shell point to a far younger age; t{sub age} {approx} 6.4 x 10{sup 4} years. These results represent a strong contradiction to theory and present modeling, where much larger bubbles are predicted around individual O stars and O associations. Specifically, the results for this small bubble and its deduced age extend the 'missing wind luminosity problem' to young evolving bubbles. These results indicate that OB star winds mix the surrounding H II regions and the wind kinetic energy is converted to turbulence and radiated away in the dense H II regions. These winds do not form hot, adiabatically expanding cavities. True IS bubbles appear only to form at later evolutionary times, perhaps triggered by increased mass loss rates or discrete ejection events. Means for rectifying discrepancies between theory and observations are discussed.

  15. Atlas of monochromatic images of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Schmidt, E. O.; Vena Valdarenas, R. R.; Ahumada, J. A.; Volpe, M. G.; Mudrik, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present an atlas of more than one hundred original images of planetary nebulae (PNe). These images were taken in a narrow-band filter centred on the nebular emission of the [N ii] during several observing campaigns using two moderate-aperture telescopes, at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), and the Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA), both in Argentina. The data provided by this atlas represent one of the most extensive image surveys of PNe in [N ii]. We compare the new images with those available in the literature, and briefly describe all cases in which our [N ii] images reveal new and interesting structures. The reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A103

  16. Watching Young Planetary Nebulae Grow: The Movie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Bruce

    2009-07-01

    The development of magneto-hydro gas dynamical models is the key to the understanding of both the physics {processes} and astronomy {initial conditions} of astrophysical nebulae of all sorts. The models are reaching their highest degree of accuracy when applied to and compared against pre Planetary Nebulae {pPNe} thanks to the simplicity, relative lack of extinction, and the detail of the imaging and kinematic data that have bcome available for these objects. The primary barrier to progress is inadequate kinematic data of pPNe against which the predictions models can be tested. Unlike PNe, pPNe do not emit emission lines for detailed Doppler measurements. Therefore it is essential to find another way to monitor the morphological evolution. Only HST can uncover the dynamics of the growth patterns by subtracting multi-epoch images spanning a decade or more. We have selected four pPNe with highly collimated outflows in different evolutionary stages for which high-quality first-epoch images were obtained from 1996 to 2002. All of them display regularly shaped thin rims, sharp edges, and symmetric pairs of knots or bowshocks that are ideal for our purposes. We will closely mimic many of the earlier exposures using ACS and to monitor changes in structures. The morphology and its evolution will be compared to 3-D MHD models with adaptive grids in order to build a far clearer picture of the nuclear geometry which shaped the outflows and constrained their propagation to the present. We shall also obtain R, J, and H images for use with a 3-D dust radiative transfer code LELUYA to model the dust distribution deep into the nuclear zones.

  17. Temperature Scale of Central Stars Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffry

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain new insight into both the true temperatures of the central stars of planetary nebulae and their evolutionary histories. The temperature scale of the hottest central stars of planetary nebulae is poorly known. The temperature diagnostics available at visible wavelengths are not useful for these very hot stars, or suffer from as-yet unresolved systematic uncertainties. However, the combination of FUSE FUV spectra and HST NUV spectra allows precise temperature determinations by utilizing ionization balances of C III, C IV and O V, O VI lines. The sample comprises hot hydrogen-rich central stars covering the hottest phase of post-AGB evolution (T_eff greater than 70,000K). The spectra were analyzed with fully metal line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres in order to determine T_eff, surface gravity, and chemical composition. In addition to the temperature scale, the spectra help address the question of metal abundances at the surface of these stars. Depending on the particular star, the metal abundances are either dominated by ongoing diffusion processes or they originate from dredge-up phases during previous AGB evolution. The sample was selected so as to include objects that were expected to exhibit both processes, in order to assess their relative importance and to gain insight into the evolutionary history of the stars. The objects that show qualitatively a metal abundance pattern which points at dredge-up phases, can be used to quantitatively check against abundance predictions of stellar evolution theory. The other objects, where gravitational diffusion and radiative acceleration determine the photospheric metal abundances, will be used to check our NLTE models which for the first time include diffusion processes self-consistently.

  18. Peculair Abundances in the Crab Nebula's Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances of supernova remnants can provide invaluable information concerning the properties of the progenitor star as well as details of stellar nucleosynthesis. In this regard, the Crab Nebula is especially useful, it being the youngest supernova remnant observable with IUE. Despite being fairly heavily reddened, UV emission-lines from its filaments have been successfully obtained many times early in the history of IUE. These UV spectra provided important and unique data for determining elemental composition of the filamentary ejecta, especially for C, N, and O. Analysis of these data by Davidson et al (1982) indicated nearly solar C/O and N/O ratios despite the large general enrichment of helium in the remnant. Although not realized at the time, there is considerable recent evidence which indicates that significant abundance variations do exist among the filaments. The strongest anomalies in composition are puzzlingly confined to a few relatively bright northern filaments which exhibit nearly solar He abundance yet show possibly large Ni enrichment. If we hope to understand the elemental composition of remnants in general and the Crab Nebula in particular, we then need to determine the composition of these peculiar filaments and to what extent they differ from the rest of the remnant. Towards that goal, we therefore propose to obtain IUE low dispersion SWP spectra on the brightest of these peculiar filaments where we have already obtained matching optical data. Analysis will follow that of Davidson el al but with much more detailed photoionization models for the Crab already developed by us. These data should help determine the true range of abundances present in the Crab's filamentary ejecta.

  19. A Radio-Polarisation and Rotation Measure Study of the Gum Nebula and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X. H.; Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Haverkorn, M.; Kesteven, M. J.; Poppi, S.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36°-wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only ˜450 pc. It has been hypothesized to be an old supernova remnant, fossil H ii region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H α data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionized gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H α data to constrain average electron density in the shell ne. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in rotation measure, we find {{n}e}=1.3-0.4+0.4 c{{m}-3}, angular radius {{φ }outer}=22\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7-0.1+0.1, shell thickness dr=18.5-1.4+1.5 pc, ambient magnetic field strength {{B}0}=3.9-2.2+4.9 μ G, and warm gas filling factor f=0.3-0.1+0.3. We constrain the local, small-scale (˜260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to +7{}^\\circ ≲ \\wp ≲ +44{}^\\circ , which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (˜-7.°2). The moderate compression factor X=6.0-2.5+5.1 at the edge of the H α shell implies that the “old supernova remnant” origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a H ii region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarization in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.

  20. The near-infrared continuum emission of visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1984-01-01

    In the past, reflection nebulae have provided an astrophysical laboratory well suited for the study of the reflection properties of interstellar dust grains at visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. The present investigation is concerned with observations which were begun with the objective to extend to near-infrared wavelengths the study of grains in reflection. Observations of three classical visual reflection nebulae were conducted in the wavelength range from 1.25 to 2.2 microns, taking into account NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. All three nebulae were found to have similar near-infrared colors, despite widely different colors of their illuminating stars. The brightness level shown by two of the nebulae at 2.2 microns was too high to be easily accounted for on the basis of reflected light. Attention is given to a wide variety of possible emission mechanisms.

  1. Chondrule formation by clumpy accretion onto the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Graham, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chondrule textures and compositions appear to require rapid heating of precursor grain aggregates to temperatures in the range 1500 K to 2100 K, cooling times on the order of hours, and episodic and variable intensity events in order to produce chondrule rims and chemically distinct groups. Nebula shock waves have been proposed by Hood and Horanyi as a physical mechanism that may be capable of meeting the meteoritical constraints. Motivated by astronomical observations of the close environments of young stars, we suggest that the source of the nebula shock waves may be clumpy accretion onto the solar nebula - that is, episodic impacts onto the nebula by discrete cloud clumps with masses of at least 10(exp 22) g. If the cloud clumps are massive enough (10(exp 26) g), the resulting shockwave may be able to propagate to the midplane and process precursor aggregates residing in a dust sub-disk.

  2. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the planetary nebula in the Fornax galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Gull, T. R.; Stecher, T. P.; Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.

    1984-01-01

    The planetary nebula in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy is carbon rich, according to calculations based on measurements of the 1909 A emission line doublet of semiforbidden C III obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. The ratio N(C)/N(O) is approximately equal to 3.7, comparable to the largest reliably determined carbon/oxygen ratios in high excitation planetaries of the Milky Way. The present result is based on four low-dispersion spectra with a combined exposure time of 27.2 hours; the Fornax planetary nebula is probably the most distant known planetary that can be observed with IUE. The IUE data were analyzed together with visible-wavelength emission-line fluxes reported by Danziger et al. (1978) to compute abundances for various elements. In terms of chemical composition, the Fornax nebula resembles planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds more closely than it does typical or carbon-rich planetaries in the Galaxy.

  3. The Crab Nebula: A Flickering X-ray Candle

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Crab Nebula, created by a supernova seen nearly a thousand years ago, is one of the sky's most famous "star wrecks." For decades, most astronomers have regarded it as the steadiest beacon at X-...

  4. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Simonelli, D.P.; Pollack, J.B.; Mckay, C.P.; Reynolds, R.T.; Summers, A.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The compositional contrast between the giant-planet satellites and the significantly rockier Pluto/Charon system is indicative of different formation mechanisms; cosmic abundance calculations, in conjunction with an assumption of the Pluto/Charon system's direct formation from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that most of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in CO form, in keeping with both the inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium, and/or the Lewis and Prinn (1980) kinetic-inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Laboratory studies of carbonaceous chondrites and Comet Halley flyby studies suggest that condensed organic material, rather than elemental carbon, is the most likely candidate for the small percentage of the carbon-bearing solid in the outer solar nebula. 71 refs.

  5. A New Color Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, R. J.; Kormendy, K.

    1997-03-01

    A new color image of the Crab Nebula is presented. This is a $2782 \\times 1904$ pixel mosaic of CCD frames taken through \\B\\ (blue), \\V\\ (green), and \\R\\ (red) filters; it was carefully color balanced so that the Sun would appear white. The resolution of the final image is approximately 0\\farcs8 FWHM. The technique by which this image was constructed is described, and some aspects of the structure of the Crab Nebula revealed by the image are discussed. We also discuss the weaknesses of this technique for producing ``true-color'' images, and describe how our image would differ from what the human eye might see in a very large wide-field telescope. The structure of the inner part of the synchrotron nebula is compared with recent high-resolution images from the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope\\/} and from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. (SECTION: Interstellar Medium and Nebulae)

  6. Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bowshock Nebulae: Identifying Twelve New Early-Type Stars using SMOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chick, William T.; Andrews, Julian E.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Povich, Matthew S.; Dale, Daniel A.; Munari, Stephan; Olivier, Grace M.; Schurhammer, Danielle; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Wernke, Heather N.

    2016-01-01

    Massive O and B type stars are crucial to the evolution of the interstellar medium, dominating the production of ionizing radiation, mechanical energy, and heavy elements. However, due to their short lives and relative scarcity, these stars are some of the least well understood and are difficult to locate outside of large star forming regions. A small but significant fraction of these massive stars have been observed to be high-velocity runaway stars moving rapidly away from their origin. When these stars encounter nebular gas they create characteristic arc-shaped bowshocks of heated compressed dust and gas. Using the distinct infrared emission morphology of the hot dust, these bowshock nebulae are predicted to give the location of the massive early type stars.Visual inspection of 24-micron band images from the Spitzer Mapping of the Outer Galaxy (SMOG) revealed 12 new bowshock nebula candidates. Follow up optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory confirmed that all 12 of the associated stellar sources are early-type stars. Combined with related results from visual searches for bowshock nebulae using WISE and Spitzer surveys in the inner Galaxy, we have identified over 85 new early type bowshock supporting stellar sources, a 95% success rate. We conclude that morphological selection of arc-shared infrared nebulae with a symmetrically placed star is an efficient way to discover early type stars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  7. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  8. Collimated Outflows in the Stingray Nebula (He 3-1357)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, M.; Sahu, K. C.; Parthasarathy, M.; Garcia-Lario, P.

    1997-12-01

    Observations over the past four decades have revealed significant changes in the spectrum of the Stingray Nebula (He 3-1357). Here we present HST images and spectra showing the most recent developments. In 1950, Henize saw only Hα in emission; but more recent observations by Parthasarathy et al. in 1992 showed strong forbidden lines consistent with a young planetary nebula. The spherically aberrated 1992 HST images, in which Bobrowsky first optically resolved the nebula, showed a compact nebula surrounding the central star. Nebular gas appeared most strongly concentrated in an ellipse with its major axis subtending 1.('') 6 from NE to SW. If this ellipse is actually a circular ring viewed obliquely, then our line of sight is inclined from the symmetry axis by 56deg . Above and below the ring of gas are two bubbles containing lower-density gas. At the tip of each bubble, there is a hole where the gas inside the bubbles has broken through and is now escaping. While images of focused jets have been obtained previously (Borkowski et al.), this is the first case where the nebular structure responsible for the focusing of an outflow can be clearly seen. The windblown appearance of the nebula is consistent with the blueshifted Si IV (1394-1403 Angstroms) and Al III (1855-1863 Angstroms) doublets observed by Parthasarathy et al. that indicated the presence of a strong stellar wind. The N V (1239-1243 Angstroms) to C IV (1548-1551 Angstroms) ratio has increased in recent years, consistent with a young nebula becoming increasingly ionized. Our new spectra reveal additional developments that show the real-time development of this young nebula. Finally, the new HST Planetary Camera images of the nebula show detailed structure indicating a much more complex object than previously known, including the presence of a companion star 0.('') from the central star.

  9. Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Observations of the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Thomas E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present the results of a 250 arcmin2 mapping of the 205 μm [NII] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II HII regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at South Pole. We supplement the 205 μm data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 63 μm [OI], 122 μm [NII], 146 μm [OI], and 158 μm [CII]. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum and CO maps. The 122 [NII] / 205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158 [C II] / 205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C+ arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). From the [OI] and [CII] data, we construct a PDR model of Carina following Kaufman et al. (1999). When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than Galactic star-forming regions such as the Orion Bar, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ever ground-based detection of the 205 μm [NII] line, and only the third detection overall since those of the COBE FIRAS and the KAO in the early 1990s.

  10. PROBING THE ROSETTE NEBULA STELLAR BUBBLE WITH FARADAY ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Allison H.; Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, Patrick D.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of Faraday rotation measurements of 23 background radio sources whose lines of sight pass through or close to the Rosette Nebula. We made linear polarization measurements with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at frequencies of 4.4 GHz, 4.9 GHz, and 7.6 GHz. We find the background Galactic contribution to the rotation measure in this part of the sky to be +147 rad m{sup -2}. Sources whose lines of sight pass through the nebula have an excess rotation measure of 50-750 rad m{sup -2}, which we attribute to the plasma shell of the Rosette Nebula. We consider two simple plasma shell models and how they reproduce the magnitude and sign of the rotation measure, and its dependence on distance from the center of the nebula. These two models represent different modes of interaction of the Rosette Nebula star cluster with the surrounding interstellar medium. Both can reproduce the magnitude and spatial extent of the rotation measure enhancement, given plausible free parameters. We contend that the model based on a stellar bubble more closely reproduces the observed dependence of rotation measure on distance from the center of the nebula.

  11. On planetary nebulae as sources of carbon dust: Infrared emission from planetary nebulae of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Lester, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary nebulae of the galactic disk are generally seen to emit a thermal continuum due to dust grains heated by stellar and nebular photons. This continuum typically peaks between 25 and 60 micron m, so that the total power emitted by the dust is sampled well by the broad-band measurements made by IRAS. Researchers examine here the characteristics of the infrared emission from the four planetary nebulae which are believed on the basis of their low overall metallicities to belong to the halo population. These nebulae are of particular interest because they are the most metal-poor ionized nebulae known in our Galaxy, and offer the opportunity to probe possible dependences of the dust properties on nebular composition. Researchers present fluxes extracted from co-addition of the IRAS data, as well as ground-based near infrared measurements. Each of the four halo objects, including the planetary nebula in the globular cluster M15, is detected in at least one infrared band. Researchers compare the estimated infrared excesses of these nebulae (IRE, the ratio of measured infrared power to the power available in the form of resonantly-trapped Lyman alpha photons) to those of disk planetary nebulae with similar densities but more normal abundances. Three of the halo planetaries have IRE values similar to those of the disk nebulae, despite the fact that their Fe- and Si-peak gas phase abundances are factors of 10 to 100 lower. However, these halo nebulae have normal or elevated C/H ratios, due to nuclear processing and mixing in their red giant progenitors. Unlike the other halo planetaries, DDDM1 is deficient in carbon as well as in the other light metals. This nebula has a substantially lower IRE than the other halo planetaries, and may be truly dust efficient. Researchers suggest that the deficiency is due to a lack of the raw material for producing carbon-based grains, and that the main bulk constituent of the dust in these planetary nebulae is carbon.

  12. Three New Candidate Planetary Nebulae near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Sellgren, Kristen; Ramirez, Solange; Cotera, Angela; An, Deokkeun

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of three candidate planetary nebulae (PNe) detected in lines of sight close to our Galactic Center: G0.098-0.051, G0.399+0.208, and G359.963-0.120. These objects are identified by being compact continuum sources with exceptionally high excitation as seen in spectra of forbidden lines taken with Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph and downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. In particular, the high excitation lines include [Na III] 7.32 micron, [O IV] 25.9 micron, and [Ne V] 14.3 and 24.3 micron. Such lines are not seen in Galactic H II regions but only are found in PNe and supernova remnants; we exclude the last by the existance of the co-located continuum sources of size a few arcsec. We note that none of these sources has any significant associated emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which is otherwise common in the Galactic Center and in PNe. We will present spectra, abundance analyses, additional data from radio and near-infrared telescopes, and photoionization and shock models computed with Cloudy (Ferland et al. 2013) and MAPPINGS III (Allen et al. 2008).

  13. The Spatially Resolved Bipolar Nebula of Sakurai's Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.

    2014-04-01

    Sakurai's object (V4334 Sgr), the final flash object discovered in the mid-1990s, underwent rapid cooling during the first decade of the 21st century becoming as faint as K ~ 25. This stage of evolution has ceased. Between observations in 2010 September and 2013 April V4334 Sgr brightened >2 mag to K = 14.2 and the effective temperature increased to ~590 K. AO images show a central source and two extended globules defining a 13° position angle. The globules span a spatial extent of ~0.''3 in 2013. This spatial extent is consistent with sizes derived from spectral energy distributions taken over the previous decade and a debris cloud expanding at 0.055 mas d-1 since late 1998. Near-simultaneous 0.85-2.5 μm spectra reveal helium lines attributed to a wind-interaction shock. The He I 1.0830 μm emission has a spectral width of ~1000 km s-1 and a spatial extent of ~1.''4. The helium shell is fragmented, spatially asymmetric, and five times larger than the dust debris cloud. [C I] and [N I] forbidden lines are present in the 1 μm region spectrum. The forbidden line spectrum is similar to that of proto-planetary nebulae. The [C I] 9850 Å line is spatially extended. The expansion velocity and change of angular size limit the distance to 2.1-3.7 kpc.

  14. PAH formation in O-rich planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Lagadec, E.; Jones, D.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Gesicki, K.

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been observed in O-rich planetary nebulae towards the Galactic bulge. This combination of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich material, known as dual-dust or mixed chemistry, is not expected to be seen around such objects. We recently proposed that PAHs could be formed from the photodissociation of CO in dense tori. In this work, using VISIR/VLT, we spatially resolved the emission of the PAH bands and ionized emission from the [S IV] line, confirming the presence of dense central tori in all the observed O-rich objects. Furthermore, we show that for most of the objects, PAHs are located at the outer edge of these dense/compact tori, while the ionized material is mostly present in the inner parts of these tori, consistent with our hypothesis for the formation of PAHs in these systems. The presence of a dense torus has been strongly associated with the action of a central binary star and, as such, the rich chemistry seen in these regions may also be related to the formation of exoplanets in post-common-envelope binary systems.

  15. FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA DRIVEN BY UNTWISTING MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, Peter; Aschwanden, Markus J. E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com

    2012-06-01

    The recent discovery of PeV electrons from the Crab Nebula, produced on rapid timescales of one day or less with a sharply peaked gamma-ray spectrum without hard X-rays, challenges traditional models of diffusive shock acceleration followed by synchrotron radiation. Here, we outline an acceleration model involving a DC electric field parallel to the magnetic field in a twisted toroidal field around the pulsar. Sudden developments of resistivity in localized regions of the twisted field are thought to drive the particle acceleration, up to PeV energies, resulting in flares. This model can reproduce the observed timescales of T Almost-Equal-To 1 day, the peak photon energies of U{sub {Phi},rr} Almost-Equal-To 1 MeV, maximum electron energies of U{sub e,rr} Almost-Equal-To 1 PeV, and luminosities of L Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}.

  16. GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

  17. Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Toalá, J. A.; Fang, X.; Rubio, G.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of 11 planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 μm that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ≃900 ± 70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.

  18. FUSE observations of Hot Gas in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Jenkins, E. B.; Bowen, D. V.

    2002-06-01

    We present an analysis of interstellar O VI 1031.93 toward several O and WR stars in the Tr 16 cluster, based on high-resolution spectra obtained with the FUSE satellite. The objective of this study is to investigate the distribution of O VI absorption within the cluster. The target stars include CPD-59D2628, CPD-59D2627, CPD-59D2632, HDE 303308, CPD -59 2600, CPD -59 2603, HD093205, HD093204, HD93162, HD093250 and HD 93308 (Eta Car). Two interstellar molecular hydrogen transitions, Lyman 6-0 P(3) 1031.19 and Lyman 6-0 R(4) 1032.35, are located very close to the interstellar O VI feature. These lines have been modelled by analyzing other P(3) and R(4) transitions in the FUSE spectrum. The column densities and distribution of the O VI ion in the Carina Nebulae is determined by using Gaussian profile fitting procedures. These results are compared with FUSE observations of other OB stars in the general vicinity of Carina, but outside the active region. This work has been supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-11137 to Catholic University of America and NASA contract NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  19. STARING INTO THE WINDS OF DESTRUCTION: HST/NICMOS IMAGES OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has captured a glimpse of a brief stage in the burnout of NGC 7027, a medium-mass star like our sun. The infrared image (on the left) shows a young planetary nebula in a state of rapid transition. This image alone reveals important new information. When astronomers combine this photo with an earlier image taken in visible light, they have a more complete picture of the final stages of star life. NGC 7027 is going through spectacular death throes as it evolves into what astronomers call a 'planetary nebula.' The term planetary nebula came about not because of any real association with planets, but because in early telescopes these objects resembled the disks of planets. A star can become a planetary nebula after it depletes its nuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium - and begins puffing away layers of material. The material settles into a wind of gas and dust blowing away from the dying star. This NICMOS image captures the young planetary nebula in the middle of a very short evolutionary phase, lasting perhaps less than 1,000 years. During this phase, intense ultraviolet radiation from the central star lights up a region of gas surrounding it. (This gas is glowing brightly because it has been made very hot by the star's intense ultraviolet radiation.) Encircling this hot gas is a cloud of dust and cool molecular hydrogen gas that can only be seen by an infrared camera. The molecular gas is being destroyed by ultraviolet light from the central star. THE INFRARED VIEW -- The composite color image of NGC 7027 (on the left) is among the first data of a planetary nebula taken with NICMOS. This picture is actually composed of three separate images taken at different wavelengths. The red color represents cool molecular hydrogen gas, the most abundant gas in the universe. The image reveals the central star, which is difficult to see in images taken with visible light. Surrounding it is an

  20. Abundances in planetary nebulae: NGC 1535, NGC 6629, He2-108, and Tc1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Surendiranath, R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Models have been made of stars of a given mass that produce planetary nebulae that usually begin on the AGB (although they may begin earlier) and run to the white dwarf stage. While these models cover the so-called dredge-up phases when nuclear reactions occur and the newly formed products are brought to the surface, it is important to compare the abundances predicted by the models with the abundances actually observed in PNe. Aims: The aim of the paper is to determine the abundances in a group of PNe with uniform morphological and kinematic properties. The PNe we discuss are circular with rather low-temperature central stars and are rather far from the galactic plane. We discuss the effect these abundances have on determining the evolution of the central stars of these PNe. Methods: The mid-infrared spectra of the planetary nebulae NGC 1535, NGC 6629, He2-108, and Tc1 (IC 1266) taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope are presented. These spectra were combined with the ultraviolet IUE spectra and with the spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain complete, extinction-corrected spectra. The chemical composition of these nebulae is then found by directly calculating and adding individual ion abundances. For two of these PNe, we attempted to reproduce the observed spectrum by making a model nebula. This proved impossible for one of the nebulae and the reason for this is discussed. The resulting abundances are more accurate than earlier studies for several reasons, the most important is that inclusion of the far infrared spectra increases the number of observed ions and makes it possible to include the nebular temperature gradient in the abundance calculations. Results: The abundances of the above four PNe have been determined and compared to the abundances found in five other PNe with similar properties studied earlier. These abundances are further compared with values predicted by the models of Karakas (2003). From this comparison we conclude that the

  1. Low-excitation atomic gas around evolved stars. I. ISO observations of C-rich nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, D.; Meixner, M.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Latter, W. B.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Kelly, D. M.; Sutton, E. C.

    2001-02-01

    We present ISO LWS and SWS spectra of far-infrared (FIR) atomic fine structure lines in 12 carbon-rich evolved stars including asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe). The spectra include grating and Fabry-Perot measurements of the line emission of [O I], [C Ii], [Si I], [Si Ii], [S I], [Fe I], [Fe Ii], [Ne Ii] and [N Ii]. Only 5 out of our 12 object sample have been detected in at least one of these FIR lines. When we include the 12 oxygen-rich evolved stars from Castro-Carrizo et al. (\\cite{CastroCarrizo00}, Paper II), we find that atomic line emission is observed only in those sources in which the central star's T_eff >= 10 000 K. Above this cutoff, the number of detectable lines and the intensity of the line emission increase as T_eff increases. These trends suggest that the atomic lines originate from photodissociation regions (PDRs). In general, the kinematics of the atomic gas, derived from line fits to the Fabry-Perot data, are comparable to the molecular expansion velocities. These kinematics are expected for atomic cooling lines associated with circumstellar PDRs. AFGL 618, however, appears exceptional with dual velocity components: a narrow component (<20 km s-1) that may be associated with a PDR, and a broad component (~66 km s-1) that may be produced in post-shocked, accelerated gas. A new PDR code which properly treats enhanced carbon abundances was used to model the observations of our carbon-rich objects. The predicted line intensities agree reasonably well with the observations. Shock models, however, do not compare well with the observed line intensities. PDR mass estimates ranging from ~0.01-0.2 M_sun were derived from the [C Ii] 158 mu m line emission. The atomic gas constitutes only a small fraction of the total mass for young planetary nebulae, but its importance grows significantly as the nebulae evolve. Our overall analysis shows that photodissociation, and not shocks, dominates the

  2. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO < 10(-2) in the gas phase) and/or (2) of the Lewis and Prinn kinetic inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be

  3. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO < 10(-2) in the gas phase) and/or (2) of the Lewis and Prinn kinetic inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be

  4. Molecular Clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg2 area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M ⊙ pc-2 and a mean H2 column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 1021 cm-2 for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 104 M ⊙ (12CO), 2.0 × 104 M ⊙ (13CO), and 6.1 × 103 M ⊙ (C18O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (~10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of 13CO emission range within 2-10 pc2 with mass of (1-5) × 103 M ⊙ and line width of a few km s-1. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the 13CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  5. THE CHANDRA X-RAY SURVEY OF PLANETARY NEBULAE (CHANPLANS): PROBING BINARITY, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND WIND COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Rapson, V.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Behar, E.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; Sandin, C. E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il; and others

    2012-08-15

    We present an overview of the initial results from the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first systematic (volume-limited) Chandra X-Ray Observatory survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. The first phase of CHANPLANS targeted 21 mostly high-excitation PNe within {approx}1.5 kpc of Earth, yielding four detections of diffuse X-ray emission and nine detections of X-ray-luminous point sources at the central stars (CSPNe) of these objects. Combining these results with those obtained from Chandra archival data for all (14) other PNe within {approx}1.5 kpc that have been observed to date, we find an overall X-ray detection rate of {approx}70% for the 35 sample objects. Roughly 50% of the PNe observed by Chandra harbor X-ray-luminous CSPNe, while soft, diffuse X-ray emission tracing shocks-in most cases, 'hot bubbles'-formed by energetic wind collisions is detected in {approx}30%; five objects display both diffuse and point-like emission components. The presence (or absence) of X-ray sources appears correlated with PN density structure, in that molecule-poor, elliptical nebulae are more likely to display X-ray emission (either point-like or diffuse) than molecule-rich, bipolar, or Ring-like nebulae. All but one of the point-like CSPNe X-ray sources display X-ray spectra that are harder than expected from hot ({approx}100 kK) central stars emitting as simple blackbodies; the lone apparent exception is the central star of the Dumbbell nebula, NGC 6853. These hard X-ray excesses may suggest a high frequency of binary companions to CSPNe. Other potential explanations include self-shocking winds or PN mass fallback. Most PNe detected as diffuse X-ray sources are elliptical nebulae that display a nested shell/halo structure and bright ansae; the diffuse X-ray emission regions are confined within inner, sharp-rimmed shells. All sample PNe that display diffuse X-ray emission have inner shell dynamical ages {approx}< 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup

  6. GLOBAL SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN THE PROSPECT OF THE PLANCK SATELLITE POLARIZATION CALIBRATION

    SciTech Connect

    MacIas-Perez, J. F.; Mayet, F.; Aumont, J.

    2010-03-01

    Within the framework of the Planck satellite polarization calibration, we present a study of the Crab Nebula spectral energy distribution (SED) over more than six decades in frequency ranging from 1 to 10{sup 6} GHz (from 299 to 2.99 x 10{sup -4} mm). The Planck satellite mission observes the sky from 30 to 857 GHz (from 9.99 to 0.3498 mm) and therefore we focus on the millimeter region. We use radio and submillimeter data from the WMAP satellite between 23 and 94 GHz (from 13 to 3.18 mm), from the Archeops balloon experiment between 143 (2.1 mm) and 545 GHz (0.55 mm), and a compendium of other Crab Nebula observations. The Crab SED is compared to models including three main components: synchrotron that is responsible for the emission at low and high frequencies, dust that explains the excess of flux observed by the IRAS satellite, and an extra component on the millimeter regime. From this analysis, we conclude that the unpolarized emission of the Crab Nebula at microwave and millimeter wavelengths is the same synchrotron emission as the one observed in the radio domain. Therefore, we expect the millimeter emission of the Crab Nebula to be polarized with the same degree of polarization and orientation as the radio emission. We set upper limits on the possible errors induced by any millimeter extra component on the reconstruction of the degree and angle of polarization at the percent level as a maximum. This result strongly supports the choice by the Planck collaboration of the Crab Nebula emission for performing polarization cross-checks in the range 30 (299 mm) to 353 GHz (0.849 mm).

  7. The violent interstellar medium associated with the Carina nebula. I - The line of sight toward HD 93205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, C.; Paul, J. A.; Pettini, M.

    1982-09-01

    Four high velocity and two low velocity components have been identified by the analysis of interstellar absorption lines in high resolution spectra of HD 93205. The chemical composition and physical conditions of the different regions are discussed in light of UV, optical and radio observations, and the two main high velocity components are found to show different relative abundance patterns. Among the two low velocity components, one has been identified with the normal interstellar material in the disk of the Galaxy between the sun and the Carina nebula. Column densities of interstellar C IV and Si IV have been measured in this component, free from contamination by circumstellar material. The other low velocity component has been identified with the approaching part of the expanding ionized nebula around the Carina OB associations, and consists of a dense H II region in which the two O I fine structure lines originate.

  8. X-Rays from Young Stars and Eggs in the Eagle Nebula (M16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Gagne, Marc; Mytyk, Anna

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory observed the Eagle Nebula (M16) a young star forming region containing the dark columns of dust and cold molecular gas known as the ""Pillars of Creation"" or ""elephant trunks"". We identify more than 1000 X-ray sources coincident with K-band stars that are premain sequence stars ranging in spectral type from O to M. A handful of the hard X-ray sources in the pillars are spatially coincident with deeply embedded young stellar objects seen in JHK images. However none of the X-ray sources are associated with the evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) first observed by Hester et al. (1996).

  9. BRIGHT Lights, BIG City: Massive Galaxies, Giant Ly-A Nebulae, and Proto-Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Reuland, M; de Vries, W; Stanford, A; Dey, A; Kurk, J; Venemans, B; Rottgering, H; Miley, G; De Breuck, C; Dopita, M; Sutherland, R; Bland-Hawthorn, J

    2002-08-01

    High redshift radio galaxies are great cosmological tools for pinpointing the most massive objects in the early Universe: massive forming galaxies, active super-massive black holes and proto-clusters. They report on deep narrow-band imaging and spectroscopic observations of several z > 2 radio galaxy fields to investigate the nature of giant Ly-{alpha} nebulae centered on the galaxies and to search for over-dense regions around them. They discuss the possible implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters.

  10. Planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the planetary nebulae (PNe) population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on evolutionary models of stars with metallicities in the range 10-3 ≤ Z ≤ 4 × 10-3 and mass 0.9 M⊙ < M < 8 M⊙, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The models used account for dust formation in the circumstellar envelope. To characterize the PNe sample of the SMC, we compare the observed abundances of the various species with the final chemical composition of the AGB models: this study allows us to identify the progenitors of the PNe observed, in terms of mass and chemical composition. According to our interpretation, most of the PNe descend from low-mass (M < 2 M⊙) stars, which become carbon rich, after experiencing repeated third dredge-up episodes, during the AGB phase. A fraction of the PNe showing the signature of advanced CNO processing are interpreted as the progeny of massive AGB stars, with mass above ˜6 M⊙, undergoing strong hot bottom burning. The differences with the chemical composition of the PNe population of the Large Magellanic Cloud is explained on the basis of the diverse star formation history and age-metallicity relation of the two galaxies. The implications of this study for some still highly debated points regarding the AGB evolution are also commented.

  11. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  12. Black Widow Nebula Hiding in the Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In this Spitzer image, the two opposing bubbles are being formed in opposite directions by the powerful outflows from massive groups of forming stars. The baby stars can be seen as specks of yellow where the two bubbles overlap.

    When individual stars form from molecular clouds of gas and dust they produce intense radiation and very strong particle winds. Both the radiation and the stellar winds blow the dust outward from the star creating a cavity or, bubble.

    In the case of the Black Widow Nebula, astronomers suspect that a large cloud of gas and dust condensed to create multiple clusters of massive star formation. The combined winds from these groups of large stars probably blew out bubbles into the direction of least resistance, forming a double bubble.

    The infrared image was captured by the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) Legacy project. The Spitzer picture is a four-channel false-color composite, showing emission from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red).

  13. Radio Observations of Elongated Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    The majority of pulsars' rotational energy is carried away by relativistic winds, which are energetic particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. The confinement of the winds by the ambient medium result in synchrotron bubbles with broad-band emission, which are commonly referred to as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Due to long synchrotron cooling time, a radio PWN reflects the integrated history of the system, complementing information obtained from the X-ray and higher energy bands. In addition, radio polarization measurements can offer a powerful probe of the PWN magnetic field structure. Altogether these can reveal the physical conditions and evolutionary history of a system.I report on preliminary results from high-resolution radio observations of PWNe associated with G327.1-1.1, PSRs J1015-5719, B1509-58, and J1549-4848 taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Their magnetic field structure and multiwavelength comparison with other observations are discussed.This work is supported by a ECS grant of the Hong Kong Government under HKU 709713P. The Australia Telescope is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO.

  14. Star Formation Sequence in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, N.; Hanawa, T.; Sugitani, K.

    We report high density gas clouds observed in molecular pillars in the Eagle Nebula. They were observed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array in the 13{CO}(J = 1 - 0) line, {C}18{O}(J = 1 - 0) line and 2.7-mm continuum. The 13CO line emission traces the head of the northern molecular pillar (π1). In the head, two 2.7-mm continuum sources and three C18O cores are embedded. The western continuum source is associated with a class I like source, and is the nearest object to the O5 star. The eastern 2.7-mm source over-wrapped with a C18O core, a Class 0 candidate, is the second nearest. The central C18O core associated with an NIR jet-like feature, is the third. The western C18O core is starless, and is the most distant from the O5 star. Thus, these sources are arranged in order of age. This arrangement suggests the propagation of star formation activity from west to east. A similar sequence of a young stellar object and a C18O core was found in the central molecular pillar (π2). The 2.7-mm continuum with a class I like source is the nearest object to the O5 star. A starless core is on the far side from the O5 star. These sources are also arranged in order of age.

  15. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  16. A nebula around Nova BT Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Oke, J. B.; Wade, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    H-alpha observations of Nova BT Mon obtained on December 15, 1981 using an 800x800-pixel CCD detector on the double spectrograph of the 5-m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory are reported. The reciprocal dispersion at H-alpha was 6.04 A/pixel and the angular scale along the 1.0-arcsec-wide east-west slit was 0.58 arcsec/pixel; resolution of the combined, processed image is about 12 A. A ring-shaped nebular emission with a center displaced slightly from the stellar image and an expansion distance to BT Mon of about 1800 pc was detected. The velocity diameter is found to be about 1500 km/sec along the ridge line and 2100 km/sec along the 10-unit contour. The mass of the visible nebula is estimated as 0.00003 solar mass, similar to the BT Mon ejection mass determined by Schaefer and Patterson (1983).

  17. Edwin Hubble. Mariner of the nebulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, G. E.

    This biography of Edwin Hubble has been acclaimed by professionals and laymen alike. It is both the biography of an extraordinary human being and the story of the greatest quest in the history of astronomy since the Copernican revolution. Born in 1889 and reared in the village of Marshfield, Missouri, Edwin Powell Hubble became one of the towering figures in 20th century science. Hubble worked with the great 100 inch Hooker telescope at California's Mount Wilson Observatory and made a series of discoveries that revolutionized humanity's vision of the cosmos. In 1923 he was able to confirm the existence of other nebulae beyond our own Milky Way. By the end of the decade, he had proven that the universe is expanding, thus laying the very cornerstone of the "Big Bang" theory of creation. It was Hubble who developed the elegant scheme by which the galaxies are classified as ellipticals and spirals, and it was Hubble who first provided reliable evidence that the universe is homogeneous, the same in all directions as far as the telescope can see.

  18. The Nineteenth-Century Spiral Nebula Whodunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of the first spiral nebula was a milestone in the history of astronomy, but the initial observations of it are shrouded in mystery. The discovery came within months of the commissioning of the Third Earl of Rosse’s very large 72-inch optical telescope at Birr Castle in the center of Ireland. Unfortunately, no observing records have survived, and while there is no doubt that the observations took place in the spring of 1845, there is some uncertainty as to whom was actually present when the discovery was made. The construction of the Earl’s telescope (the Leviathan) was a magnificent achievement, since it was entirely of his design, built with his own funds, and constructed by his own workers who were literally taken “from the plough” on his estate. The summer of 1845 saw the first appearance of the Irish Potato Famine of 1845-1848, which would seriously curtail astronomical activity when Lord Rosse’s 72-inch telescope was in prime condition.

  19. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 10(exp 7) yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or equal to 10(exp 6) yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modeling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molcular clouds in the interstellar clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly, on a time scale of the order 10(exp 5) yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronoloically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differential meteorites (eucrites and augrites) -- appear to have experienced potentially dateable nebular events. In both cases, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate

  20. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 10(exp 7) yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or = 10(exp 6) yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modelling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly on a time scale of the order 10(exp 5) yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronologically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differentiated meteorites (eucrites and angrites) - appear to have experience potentially dateable nebular events. In both case, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate nebular events spanning several Ma. We

  1. Theoretical, observational, and isotopic estimates of the lifetime of the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podosek, Frank A.; Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    There are a variety of isotopic data for meteorites which suggest that the protostellar nebula existed and was involved in making planetary materials for some 107 yr or more. Many cosmochemists, however, advocate alternative interpretations of such data in order to comply with a perceived constraint, from theoretical considerations, that the nebula existed only for a much shorter time, usually stated as less than or = 106 yr. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to solar nebula duration which is available through three different disciplines: theoretical modelling of star formation, isotopic data from meteorites, and astronomical observations of T Tauri stars. Theoretical models based on observations of present star-forming regions indicate that stars like the Sun form by dynamical gravitational collapse of dense cores of cold molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. The collapse to a star and disk occurs rapidly on a time scale of the order 105 yr. Disks evolve by dissipating energy while redistributing angular momentum, but it is difficult to predict the rate of evolution, particularly for low mass (compared to the star) disks which nonetheless still contain enough material to account for the observed planetary system. There is no compelling evidence, from available theories of disk structure and evolution, that the solar nebula must have evolved rapidly and could not have persisted for more than 1 Ma. In considering chronologically relevant isotopic data for meteorites, we focus on three methodologies: absolute ages by U-Pb/Pb-Pb, and relative ages by short-lived radionuclides (especially Al-26) and by evolution of Sr-87/Sr-86. Two kinds of meteoritic materials-refractory inclusions such as CAIs and differentiated meteorites (eucrites and angrites) - appear to have experience potentially dateable nebular events. In both case, the most straightforward interpretations of the available data indicate nebular events spanning several Ma. We also consider

  2. A nebular analysis of the central Orion nebula with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mc Leod, A. F.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Ginsburg, A.; Dale, J. E.; Ramsay, S.; Testi, L.

    2016-02-01

    A nebular analysis of the central Orion nebula and its main structures is presented. We exploit observations from the integral field spectrograph Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) in the wavelength range 4595-9366 Å to produce the first O, S and N ionic and total abundance maps of a region spanning 6 arcmin × 5 arcmin with a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec. We use the S23(=([S II] λλ6717, 6731+[S III] λ9068)/Hβ) parameter, together with [O II]/[O III] as an indicator of the degree of ionization, to distinguish between the various small-scale structures. The only Orion bullet covered by MUSE is HH 201, which shows a double component in the [Fe II] λ8617 line throughout indicating an expansion, and we discuss a scenario in which this object is undergoing a disruptive event. We separate the proplyds located south of the Bright Bar into four categories depending on their S23 values, propose the utility of the S23 parameter as an indicator of the shock contribution to the excitation of line-emitting atoms, and show that the MUSE data are able to identify the proplyds associated with discs and microjets. We compute the second-order structure function for the Hα, [O III] λ5007, [S II] λ6731 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines to analyse the turbulent velocity field of the region covered with MUSE. We find that the spectral and spatial resolution of MUSE are not able to faithfully reproduce the structure functions of previous works.

  3. A Protosolar Nebula Origin for the Ices Agglomerated by Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, O.; Lunine, J. I.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Guillot, T.; Marty, B.; Ali-Dib, M.; Wurz, P.; Altwegg, K.; Bieler, A.; Hässig, M.; Rubin, M.; Vernazza, P.; Waite, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The nature of the icy material accreted by comets during their formation in the outer regions of the protosolar nebula (PSN) is a major open question in planetary science. Some scenarios of comet formation predict that these bodies agglomerated from crystalline ices condensed in the PSN. Concurrently, alternative scenarios suggest that comets accreted amorphous ice originating from the interstellar cloud or from the very distant regions of the PSN. On the basis of existing laboratory and modeling data, we find that the N2/CO and Ar/CO ratios measured in the coma of the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis instrument on board the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft match those predicted for gases trapped in clathrates. If these measurements are representative of the bulk N2/CO and Ar/CO ratios in 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, it implies that the ices accreted by the comet formed in the nebula and do not originate from the interstellar medium, supporting the idea that the building blocks of outer solar system bodies have been formed from clathrates and possibly from pure crystalline ices. Moreover, because 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is impoverished in Ar and N2, the volatile enrichments observed in Jupiter’s atmosphere cannot be explained solely via the accretion of building blocks with similar compositions and require an additional delivery source. A potential source may be the accretion of gas from the nebula that has been progressively enriched in heavy elements due to photoevaporation.

  4. The Orion Nebula in the Far-Infrared: high-J CO and fine-structure lines mapped by FIFI-LS/SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Randolf; Looney, Leslie; Cox, Erin; Fischer, Christian; Iserlohe, Christof; Krabbe, Alfred

    2015-08-01

    The Orion Nebula is the closest massive star forming region allowing us to study the physical conditions in such a region with high spatial resolution. We used the far infrared integral-field spectrometer, FIFI-LS, on-board the airborne observatory SOFIA to study the atomic and molecular gas in the Orion Nebula at medium spectral resolution.The large maps obtained with FIFI-LS cover the nebula from the BN/KL-object to the bar in several fine structure lines. These spectral maps are the largest and highest spatially resolved to date. They allow us to study the conditions of the photon-dominated region and the interface to the molecular cloud with unprecedented detail.Another investigation targeted the molecular gas in the BN/KL region of the Orion Nebula, which is stirred up by a violent explosion about 500 years ago. The explosion drives a wide angled molecular outflow. We present maps of several high-J CO observations (J in the range of 10 to 30), allowing us to analyse of the heated molecular gas.The observations were taken during the commissioning of FIFI-LS last year and as recent as this March. The results are still preliminary as the data reduction and calibration is still under development.

  5. PAHs in the Ices of Saturn's Satellites: Connections to the Solar Nebula and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pendleton, Yvonne J.

    2015-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons and PAHs have been observed in the interstellar medium (e.g., Allamandola et al. 1985, Pendleton et al. 1994, Pendleton & Allamandola 2002, Tielens 2013, Kwok 2008, Chiar & Pendleton 2008) The inventory of organic material in the ISM was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed, contributing to the feedstock for the formation of the Sun, major planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Additional organic synthesis occurred in the solar nebula (Ciesla & Sandford 2012). Saturn's satellites Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn. Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saturn (Johnson & Lunine 2005). VIMS spectral maps of Phoebe's surface reveal a complex organic spectral signature consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon (=CH2, -CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 micrometers). Phoebe is the source of a huge debris ring encircling Saturn, and from which particles ((is) approximately 5-20 micrometers size) spiral inward toward Saturn (Verbiscer et al. 2009). They encounter Iapetus and Hyperion where they mix with and blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aromatic CH is approximately 10 times as abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, comet particles, and in carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2014). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis of Hyperion and Phoebe itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 (is) approximately 4, which is larger than the value found in the diffuse ISM ((is) approximately 2

  6. Observational constraints on solar nebula nitrogen chemistry - N2/NH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womack, Maria; Wyckoff, Susan; Ziurys, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of N2(+) and NH2 in Comet Halley and N2H(+) and NH3 in nine Galactic star-forming regions are used to determine the average N2/NH3 abundance ratio in these objects. For Comet Halley, N2/NH3 of about 0.1 is found, and for the quiescent gas in a sample of star-forming regions, N2/NH3 of about 170 +/- 100. The cometary N2/NH3 ratio corrected for gas-phase elemental nitrogen depletion in Comet Halley indicates that the gas component in the comet-forming region of the solar nebula was N2/NH3 of about 4. It is concluded that more realistic models which include condensation fractionation effects are required before the N2 and NH3 abundances in comet volatiles can be related to star-forming regions.

  7. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  8. MORPHOLOGY OF THE RED RECTANGLE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2011-10-10

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as 'ladder rungs' across the nebula. At the edge of each 'rung' gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the 'rungs' seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of {approx}158 km s{sup -1}.

  9. HUBBLE HERITAGE PROJECT'S FIRST ANNIVERSARY HUBBLE'S VARIABLE NEBULA (NGC 2261)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hubble's variable nebula is named (like the Hubble telescope itself) after the American astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, who carried out some of the early studies of this object. It is a fan-shaped cloud of gas and dust which is illuminated by R Monocerotis (R Mon), the bright star at the bottom end of the nebula. Dense condensations of dust near the star cast shadows out into the nebula, and as they move the illumination changes, giving rise to the variations first noted by Hubble. The star itself, lying about 2,500 light-years from Earth, cannot be seen directly, but only through light scattered off of dust particles in the surrounding nebula. R Mon is believed to have a mass of about 10 times that of the Sun, and to have an age of only 300,000 years. There is probably a symmetrical counterpart of the fan-shaped nebula on the southern side of the star, but it is heavily obscured from view by dust lying between this lobe and our line of sight. The Hubble Heritage team made this image from observations of R Mon acquired by William Sparks (STScI), Sylvia Baggett (STScI) and collaborators. Image Credit: NASA/The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI).

  10. The Galactic Bulge: the stellar and planetary nebulae populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, F.; Koppen, J.; Acker, A.; Maciel, W. J.

    2000-11-01

    How the Galactic Bulge formed, what was the duration of this episode, are qu ite controversary subjects. It is even unclear wether stars are still forming there. These questions are generaly adressed with stars, but planetary nebulae are very apropriate tools to trace the Bulge history as well, due to the great variety of their progenitor lifetimes. In particular, because diferent elements are detectable in planetary nebulae and in stars, a combined analysis of the abundances patterns detected in stars and in planetary nebulae offers new insight in this problem. In long lived stars, most elements have their abundances unmodified and keep the fingerprints of the ISM when it was born. Analysing element abundances both in planetary nebulae and in stars allow thus to have a very good idea of the chemical enrichment of the ISM. We will see how we can understand these patterns in terms of supernovae of type II and type Ia explosions. Because the lifetimes of the progenitors of type II and type Ia supernovae are quite different, they offer very good chronometers for the Bulge evolution. As well, we will see how the abundances of elements synthetised in planetary nebulae progenitors can be unterstood in terms of recent star formation.

  11. Eta Carinae, the Integral Nebula and the Homunculus Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2000-07-01

    In the past two years, observations of Eta Carina have revealed much new and very exciting information. Augusto Damineli noted a 5.5 year period in the visible and near infrared spectroscopy. Michael Corcoran and Bish Ishibashi noticed modulation of the x-ray fluxes with various periodicities around 90 days before and after the xray and radio minimum in December 1997. Observations, done in March 1998 under proposal 7302 {Davidson et al} from 1640A to 10400A using STIS in GXXXM mode and the 50x0.1 arcsecond slit, revealed much new information in the immediate regions of Eta Carina. The slit orientation was slightly off the major axis of the Homunculus, but passed through Weigelt components B and D. Bish Ishibashi and Ted Gull have reduced the data and provided it to various team members. Torgil Zethson has identified well over 90 percent of the emission lines in the March 1998 spectrum and finds most to be FeII emission lines. Based upon the past ground-based history of Eta Carina, we expected that FeIII and other high ionization states would return within the year. STIS GTO observations {Ted Gull, PI program 8036} characterized a bright internal emission nebula by turning the slit 90 degrees for visit 1 and studying the changes in spectrum as the FeIII lines appear by using visit 2 with the identical slit orientation from March 19, 1998. Data from the four visits of STIS to Eta Carinae between December 1997 and February 1999 demonstrate that the star has brightened by a factor of two during that interval and that the immediate nebulosity has tripled in surface brightness. Moreover a small circular nebular shell, seen in multiple [Fe II] lines has disappeared and the opacity in the 2000 to 3000A region obscuring the star has lifted considerable as the Fe II is converting to Fe III. Given the strong changes in the spectrum, we have chosen to use the six orbits in two visits. Visit 1 will be a precise repeat of the March 1998 and February 1999 observations, adjusted

  12. Newest insights from MHD numerical modeling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical MHD models are considered very successful in accounting for many of the observed properties of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), especially those concerning the high energy emission morphology and the inner nebula dynamics. Although PWNe are known to be among the most powerful accelerators in nature, producing particles up to PeV energies, the mechanisms responsible of such an efficient acceleration are still a deep mystery. Indeed, these processes take place in one of the most hostile environment for particle acceleration: the relativistic and highly magnetized termination shock of the pulsar wind. The newest results from numerical simulations of the Crab Nebula, the PWN prototype, will be presented, with special attention to the problem of particle acceleration. In particular it will be shown how a multi-wavelengths analysis of the wisps properties can be used to constrain the particle acceleration mechanisms working at the Crab's termination shock, by identifying the particle acceleration site at the shock front.

  13. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae. PMID:24913306

  14. MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE: NOT AS GEOMETRICALLY DIVERSIFIED AS THOUGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.-N.; Imai, H.; Chibueze, J.; Kwok, Sun; Tafoya, D. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2012-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) have diverse morphological shapes, including point-symmetric and multipolar structures. Many PNe also have complicated internal structures such as tori, lobes, knots, and ansae. A complete accounting of all the morphological structures through physical models is difficult. A first step toward such an understanding is to derive the true three-dimensional structure of the nebulae. In this paper, we show that a multipolar nebula with three pairs of lobes can explain many such features, if orientation and sensitivity effects are taken into account. Using only six parameters-the inclination and position angles of each pair-we are able to simulate the observed images of 20 PNe with complex structures. We suggest that multipolar structure is an intrinsic structure of PNe and the statistics of multipolar PNe have been severely underestimated in the past.

  15. Oscillating ion streamline model of Jupiter's neutral sodium nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brian

    1993-10-01

    Recent observations of neutral sodium D line emissions within 10 jovian radii (RJ) of Jupiter have led to the proposal of a new mechanism for the production of fast neutral sodium. The mechanism involves corotating, sodium-bearing molecular ions from Io's exosphere which undergo dissociation and/or dissociative recombination, resulting in fast neutral sodium atoms on escape trajectories from Jupiter. Fast neutral sodium atoms ejected near Io are also required to explain observations of the 1000 RJ-wide neutral sodium nebula surrounding Jupiter. A new Monte Carlo model explicitly computes particle trajectories resulting from molecular ion velocities at the time of dissociation or dissociative recombination. Initial simulations compare favorably with the general morphology of the nebula. Model estimates of nebula parameters are given.

  16. EVOLUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN A LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2015-06-20

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼10{sup 50} erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  17. THE PHASES OF WATER ICE IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, Fred J.

    2014-03-20

    Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as the internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures <70 K being possible under protoplanetary disk conditions. We further argue that photodesorption and freeze-out of water molecules near the surface layers of the solar nebula would have provided the conditions needed for amorphous ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

  18. Production of Gamma-Rays in the Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.; Bartosik, M.

    2004-10-01

    We construct the time dependent hadronic-leptonic radiation model for the high energy processes inside the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). This model is based on the hypothesis that heavy nuclei are effi- ciently accelerated in the vicinity of young pulsars. Different energy loss processes of nuclei and accel- erated by them leptons are considered in order to obtain the equilibrium spectra of these particles in- side the nebula at an arbitrary time after the pulsar formation. We calculate the multiwavelength spec- tra from specific PWNe expected from different lep- tonic and hadronic processes. From normalization of the calculated synchrotron spectrum to the observed spectrum at low energies, the expected TeV gamma- ray fluxes from a few PWNe are predicted and its possible detectability by the future TeV telescopes is discussed. Key words: Pulsars: nebulae - radiation mecha- nisms: gamma-rays.

  19. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  20. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  1. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Pham, L.; Kempler, S.; Theobald, M.; Esfandiari, A.; Campino, J.; Vollmer, B.; Lynnes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud Computing technology has been used to offer high-performance and low-cost computing and storage resources for both scientific problems and business services. Several cloud computing services have been implemented in the commercial arena, e.g. Amazon's EC2 & S3, Microsoft's Azure, and Google App Engine. There are also some research and application programs being launched in academia and governments to utilize Cloud Computing. NASA launched the Nebula Cloud Computing platform in 2008, which is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to deliver on-demand distributed virtual computers. Nebula users can receive required computing resources as a fully outsourced service. NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) migrated several GES DISC's applications to the Nebula as a proof of concept, including: a) The Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processor for Measurements (S4PM) for processing scientific data; b) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data process workflow for processing AIRS raw data; and c) the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI) for online access to, analysis, and visualization of Earth science data. This work aims to evaluate the practicability and adaptability of the Nebula. The initial work focused on the AIRS data process workflow to evaluate the Nebula. The AIRS data process workflow consists of a series of algorithms being used to process raw AIRS level 0 data and output AIRS level 2 geophysical retrievals. Migrating the entire workflow to the Nebula platform is challenging, but practicable. After installing several supporting libraries and the processing code itself, the workflow is able to process AIRS data in a similar fashion to its current (non-cloud) configuration. We compared the performance of processing 2 days of AIRS level 0 data through level 2 using a Nebula virtual computer and a local Linux computer. The result shows that Nebula has significantly

  2. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  3. IUE observations of the 'Butterfly' Nebula M2-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    IUE observations of the peculiar 'Butterfy' nebula M2-9 indicate that it is not a normal planetary nebula. The ultraviolet spectrum is characterized by few emission lines and a weak continuum. Mg II 2800 A is the strongest emission line present and may be indicative of a binary nucleus. Lines of N v, Q I, N III, N IV, Si III, and C III are seen, but C IV and O III are conspicuous by their absence. T(e) = 10,250 + or - 400 K was determined for the core. Nitrogen in the core is found to be overabundant by about a factor of 5 over the solar value. M2-9 may be an object in the early stages of becoming a planetary nebula.

  4. Electrical discharge heating of chondrules in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present a rudimentary theoretical assessment of electrical discharge heating as a candidate mechanism for the formation of chondrules in the solar nebula. The discharge model combines estimates of the properties of the nebula, a mechanism for terrestrial thunderstorm electrification, and some fundamental electrical properties of gases. Large uncertainties in the model inputs limit these calculations to order-or-magnitude accuracy. Despite the uncertainty, it is possible to estimate an upper limit to the efficiency of nebular discharges at melting millimeter-sized stony objects. We find that electrical arcs analogous to terrestrial lightning could have occurred in the nebula, but that under most conditions these discharges probably could not have melted chondrules. Despite our difficulties, we believe the topic worthy of further investigation and suggest some experiments which could improve our understanding of nebular discharges.

  5. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  6. IFU spectroscopy of southern planetary nebulae - III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Dopita, M. A.; Basurah, H. M.; Amer, M. A.; Alsulami, R.; Alruhaili, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we describe integral field spectroscopic observations of four southern Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), M3-4, M3-6, Hen2-29 and Hen2-37 covering the spectral range 3400-7000 Å. We derive the ionization structure, the physical conditions, the chemical compositions and the kinematical characteristics of these PNe and find good agreement with previous studies that relied upon the long-slit technique in their co-spatial area. From their chemical compositions as well as their spatial and kinematic characteristics, we determined that Hen2-29 is of the Peimbert type I (He- and N-rich), while the other three are of type II. The strength of the nebular He II line reveals that M3-3, Hen2-29 and Hen2-37 are of mid to high excitation classes while M3-6 is a low-excitation PN. A series of emission-line maps extracted from the data cubes were constructed for each PN to describe its overall structure. These show remarkable morphological diversity. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of M3-6 shows that the recombination lines of C II, C III, C IV and N III are of nebular origin, rather than arising from the central star as had been previously proposed. This result increases doubts regarding the weak emission-line star (WELS) classification raised by Basurah et al. In addition, they reinforce the probability that most genuine cases of WELS arise from irradiation effects in close binary central stars.

  7. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy for proud nebulae in keratoconus.

    PubMed Central

    Moodaley, L; Liu, C; Woodward, E G; O'Brart, D; Muir, M K; Buckley, R

    1994-01-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy was performed as an outpatients with proud nebulae as treatment patients with proud nebulae as treatment for their contact lens intolerance. The mean period of contact lens wear before the development of intolerance was 13.4 years (range 2 to 27 years). Following the development of intolerance, three patients abandoned contact lens wear in the affected eye while the remainder experienced a reduction in comfortable wearing time (mean = 3.75 hours; range: 0-14 hours). All patients had good potential Snellen visual acuity with a contact lens of 6/9 (nine eyes) and 6/12 (one eye). The proud nebulae were directly ablated with a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using a 1 mm diameter beam. Between 100-150 pulses were sufficient to ablate the raised area. Patients experienced no pain during the procedure and reported minimal discomfort postoperatively. In all cases flattening of the proud nebulae was achieved. Seven patients were able to resume regular contact lens wear (mean wearing time = 10.17 hours; range 8 to 16 hours). In three patients, resumption of contact lens wear was unsuccessful because of cone steepness. All patients achieved postoperative Snellen visual acuity of 6/12 or better with a contact lens. Four patients experienced a loss of one line in Snellen acuity. The mean follow up period was 8.3 months (range 2 to 17 months). Excimer laser superficial keratectomy is a useful technique for the treatment of contact lens intolerance caused by proud nebulae in patients with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty is thus avoided. Images PMID:8060928

  8. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy for proud nebulae in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moodaley, L; Liu, C; Woodward, E G; O'Brart, D; Muir, M K; Buckley, R

    1994-06-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy was performed as an outpatients with proud nebulae as treatment patients with proud nebulae as treatment for their contact lens intolerance. The mean period of contact lens wear before the development of intolerance was 13.4 years (range 2 to 27 years). Following the development of intolerance, three patients abandoned contact lens wear in the affected eye while the remainder experienced a reduction in comfortable wearing time (mean = 3.75 hours; range: 0-14 hours). All patients had good potential Snellen visual acuity with a contact lens of 6/9 (nine eyes) and 6/12 (one eye). The proud nebulae were directly ablated with a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using a 1 mm diameter beam. Between 100-150 pulses were sufficient to ablate the raised area. Patients experienced no pain during the procedure and reported minimal discomfort postoperatively. In all cases flattening of the proud nebulae was achieved. Seven patients were able to resume regular contact lens wear (mean wearing time = 10.17 hours; range 8 to 16 hours). In three patients, resumption of contact lens wear was unsuccessful because of cone steepness. All patients achieved postoperative Snellen visual acuity of 6/12 or better with a contact lens. Four patients experienced a loss of one line in Snellen acuity. The mean follow up period was 8.3 months (range 2 to 17 months). Excimer laser superficial keratectomy is a useful technique for the treatment of contact lens intolerance caused by proud nebulae in patients with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty is thus avoided. PMID:8060928

  9. The Nature of Cometary Knots in the Helix Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; O'dell, C. R.

    1996-12-01

    Recent HST observations have revealed heretofore unseen fine scale structure in the Helix Nebula. Thousands of well resolved neutral dark cores have been detected in extinction against the background emission of the nebula. These Cometary Knots (CK) have a remarkably uniform appearance with photoionized cusps and tails trailing away from the cusps on almost radial lines. The total mass of the CK is similar to the total mass of the ionized diffuse gas in the ring which means that they represent an important component of the nebula. We discuss the origin and future of the CK in the Helix. It has been suggested that the CK result from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities arising at the ionization front of the nebula (Capriotti 1973, 1996). Our hydrodynamical simulations indicate that indeed Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities could lead to filamentary structures within planetary nebulae. The substructure of these fingers differs, however, from the observations in important ways. The observed CK therefore must have a different origin. The knots might represent local density fluctuations which remained behind and were compressed as the main ionization front advanced into the neutral material. Another formation scenario is a thin shell instability which results from the interaction of the nebula with a fast stellar wind. Although no stellar wind features have been detected so far, the brightness distribution of the ionized cusps of the knots indicates that this gas is in pressure equilibrium with a high-temperature surrounding gas which could be generated by a shocked stellar wind. If such a wind would have high velocities and low densities it could fall beneath the threshold for spectroscopic detection although it could be important for understanding the formation and structure of the CK. Detailed high-resolution numerical simulations which take into account a fast wind phase as well as the time variation of the Central Star's UV photon flux are presented.

  10. Carbon Chemistry in Planetary Nebulae: Observations of the CCH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Rose; Ziurys, Lucy

    2015-08-01

    The presence of infrared (IR) emission features observed in interstellar environments is consistent with models that suggest they are produced by complex organic species containing both aliphatic and aromatic components (Kwok & Zhang 2011). These IR signals change drastically over the course of the AGB, proto-planetary, and planetary nebulae phases, and this dramatic variation is yet to be understood. The radical CCH is a potential tracer of carbon chemistry and its evolution in dying stars. CCH is very common in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars, and is present in the proto-planetary nebulae. It has also been observed at one position in the very young planetary nebula, NGC 7027 (Hasegawa & Kwok 2001), as well as at one position in the Helix Nebula (Tenenbaum et al. 2009) - a dense clump east of the central white dwarf. In order to further probe the chemistry of carbon, we have initiated a search for CCH in eight PNe previously detected in HCN and HCO+ from a survey conducted by Schmidt and Ziurys, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Observations of the N=1→0 transition of CCH at 87 GHz have been conducted using the new ARO 12-m ALMA prototype antenna, while measurements of the N=3→2 transition at 262 GHz are being made with the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT). We also have extended our study in the Helix Nebula. Thus far, CCH has been detected at 8 new positions across the Helix Nebula, and appears to be widespread in this source. The radical has also been identified in K4-47, M3-28, K3-17, and K3-58. These sources represent a range of nebular ages. Additional observations are currently being conducted for CCH in other PNe, as well as abundance analyses. These results will be presented.

  11. COMPARING SHOCKS IN PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH THE SOLAR WIND TERMINATION SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Soker, Noam; Rahin, Roi; Behar, Ehud; Kastner, Joel H.

    2010-12-20

    We show that suprathermal particles, termed pick-up ions (PUIs), might reduce the postshock temperature of the fast wind and jets in some planetary nebulae (PNs) and in symbiotic systems. The goal is to explain the finding that the temperature of the 'hot bubble' formed by the postshock gas in some PNs and symbiotic nebulae is lower, sometimes by more than an order of magnitude, than the value expected from simple hydrodynamical calculations. Although various explanations have been proposed, there is as yet no preferred solution for this 'low temperature problem'. PUIs have been invoked to explain the low temperature behind the termination shock of the solar wind. While in the case of the solar wind the neutral atoms that turn into PUIs penetrate the preshock solar wind region from the interstellar medium, in PNs the PUI source is more likely slowly moving clumps embedded in the fast wind or jets. These clumps are formed by instabilities or from backflowing cold gas. Our estimates indicate that in young PNs these PUIs will thermalize before leaving the system. Only in older PNs whose sizes exceed {approx}5000 AU and for which the fast wind mass loss rate is M-dot{sub w{approx}}<10{sup -7} M-sun yr{sup -1} do we expect the PUIs to be an efficient carrier of energy out of the postshock region (the hot bubble).

  12. A Detailed Investigation into the Use of Planetary Nebulae as Standard Candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Robin

    2000-01-01

    The program's goal was to understand the physics underlying the [O III] (lambda)5007 planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) and evaluate its accuracy as an extragalactic distance indicator. Work under the grant concentrated in two areas. The first major goal was to extensively test the PNLF method to find its limits. We did this performing yet another internal test of the method in the core galaxies of the Fornax Cluster, performing external comparisons of PNLF distances with distances derived from Cepheids and the Surface Brightness Fluctuation method (SBF), and, in general, examining the PNLF in as many different galactic environments as possible, including the disks of late-type spirals. Because of the difficulty distinguishing planetary nebulae (PNe) from H II regions, and because spiral galaxies have uneven internal extinction, the process of identifying "statistical" samples of PNe in these objects is extremely complicated. Nevertheless, by using the ratio of [O III] (lambda)5007 to H(alpha) as a diagnostic, we were able to effectively discriminate PNe from most H II regions, and apply the method to systems such as NGC 300, M101, M51, and M96. The second goal of this research was to determine theoretically, why the PNLF is such an excellent standard candle.

  13. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION THROUGH ACCRETION OF SUBLIMATING ICY PLANETESIMALS IN A COLD NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Ryosuke; Abe, Yutaka

    2010-06-20

    Most of the theories of the solar system formation stand on the assumption that the formation of planetesimals occurs in a transparent (i.e., optically thin) nebula, in which H{sub 2}O ice is unstable at the formation region of the terrestrial planet due to direct stellar irradiation. However, in the astronomical context, it is confirmed by both observations and numerical models that protoplanetary disks are initially opaque (i.e., optically thick) owing to floating small dust particles, and the interior of the disk is colder than the transparent disk. If planetesimals are formed in the opaque cold nebula, they should be mainly composed of H{sub 2}O ice, even at the formation region of terrestrial planets. Abundant icy material would help the formation of planetesimals through enhancement of the dust amount. Icy planetesimals start sublimation when the protoplanetary disk gets transparent through clearance of small dust particles. Here, we investigated the consequence of such icy planetesimal formation through numerical simulations of the competition between the sublimation and accretion of icy planetesimals. It was shown that various types of planets ranging from rocky planets to water-ball planets can be formed inside the location of the snow line of a transparent disk depending on the disk mass and the time evolution of disk transparency. We found size-dependent water content of icy planetesimals, which suggests potential difference in the redox state between meteorites and terrestrial planets at the same distance from the central star.

  14. Image of the Great Nebula in Andromeda, M31 Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Both of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory imaging devices were used to observe the Great Nebula in Andromeda, M31. This is a smaller field and more detailed view of the central region of the Great Nebula in Andromeda, M31, taken with the High Resolution Imager. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Columns Found toward the Double Helix Nebulae in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Ogawa, Takayuki

    NANTEN2 observations of the galactic molecular gas revealed that molecular columns surround the double helix nebulae at our Galactic center (Enokiya et al. 2014). In order to study the formation mechanism of the double helix nebulae and molecular columns, we carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of a magnetic tower jet ejected from the galactic center with interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) gas taking into account the interstellar cooling. The HI gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, cold, dense region is formed around the helical magnetic tower jet. These molecular columns can be the evidences of the past activity near the galactic center black hole.

  16. Diffuse X-ray emission from the Dumbbell Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kwitter, Karen B.; Kaler, James B.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter pointed observations of the Dumbbell Nebula and find that the previously reported 'extended' X-ray emission is an instrumental electronic ghost image at the softest energy band. At slightly higher energy bands, the image of the Dumbbell is not very different from that of the white dwarf HZ43. We conclude that the X-ray emission of the Dumbbell Nebula comes from its central star. A blackbody model is fitted to the spectrum and the best-fit temperature of not greater than 136,000 +/- 10,000 K is in excellent agreement with the Zanstra temperatures.

  17. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J; Walker, M F; Krueger, T K

    1970-05-01

    The intensity ratio of the green lambdalambda5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria. PMID:16591829

  18. Turbulent diffusion and concentration of chondrules in the protoplanetary nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Hogan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulence is known to possess structure on many scales. The largest or integral scale L is usually taken to be the largest dimension of the system. Two different turbulent regimes are likely to be of importance. Early stage convective turbulence in a hot nebula probably extends over the entire nebula scale height, and probably has typical eddy frequency comparable to the orbit frequency. At a later stage, midplane shear layer turbulence can be driven by the presence of a differently rotating, densely settled particle layer, with different length and timescales.

  19. Planetary nebulae in 2014: A review of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Planetary nebulae had a double anniversary in 2014, 250 years since their discovery and 150 years since the correct spectroscopic identification. This paper gives an overview of planetary nebula research published in 2014. Topics include surveys, central stars, abundances, morphologies, magnetic fields, stellar population and galactic dynamics. An important continuing controversy is the discrepancy between recombination-line and forbidden-line abundances. A new controversy is the relation between symbiotic stars and [WC] stars. PN of the year is undoubtedly CRL 618, with papers on its binary symbiotic/[WC] nucleus, rapid stellar evolution, expanding jets and magnetic fields.

  20. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Long; Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Theobald, Michael; Asghar, Esfandiari; Campino, Jane; Vollmer, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Cloud Computing has been implemented in several commercial arenas. The NASA Nebula Cloud Computing platform is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) built in 2008 at NASA Ames Research Center and 2010 at GSFC. Nebula is an open source Cloud platform intended to: a) Make NASA realize significant cost savings through efficient resource utilization, reduced energy consumption, and reduced labor costs. b) Provide an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to efficiently explore and share large and complex data sets. c) Allow customers to provision, manage, and decommission computing capabilities on an as-needed bases