Science.gov

Sample records for neck cancer home

  1. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  2. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  3. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  4. Identifying Early Dehydration Risk With Home-Based Sensors During Radiation Treatment: A Feasibility Study on Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems that enable remote monitoring of patients’ symptoms and other health-related outcomes may optimize cancer care outside of the clinic setting. CYCORE (CYberinfrastructure for COmparative effectiveness REsearch) is a software-based prototype for a user-friendly cyberinfrastructure supporting the comprehensive collection and analyses of data from multiple domains using a suite of home-based and mobile sensors. This study evaluated the feasibility of using CYCORE to address early at-home identification of dehydration risk in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods Head and neck cancer patients used home-based sensors to capture weight, blood pressure, pulse, and patient-reported outcomes for two 5-day periods during radiation therapy. Data were sent to the radiation oncologist of each head and neck cancer patient, who viewed them online via a Web-based interface. Feasibility outcomes included study completion rate, acceptability and perceived usefulness of the intervention, and adherence to the monitoring protocol. We also evaluated whether sensor data could identify dehydration-related events. Results Fifty patients consented to participate, and 48 (96%) completed the study. More than 90% of patients rated their ease, self-efficacy, and satisfaction regarding use of the sensor suite as extremely favorable, with minimal concerns expressed regarding data privacy issues. Patients highly valued the ability to have immediate access to objective, self-monitoring data related to personal risk for dehydration. Clinician assessments indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the ease of using the CYCORE system and the resulting ability to monitor their patients remotely. Conclusion Implementing CYCORE in a clinical oncology care setting is feasible and highly acceptable to both patients and providers. PMID:24395986

  5. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer This page ... and neck cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  6. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  7. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  11. Rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient: Psychosocial aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Blitzer, A.; Baredes, S.; Kutscher, A.; Seeland, I.B.; Barrett, V.W.; Mossman, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 42 chapters divided among six sections. Some of the chapter titles are: The Challenge of Cancer; Communicaton Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients; Normal Tissue Effects of the Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer; Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer; and Thyroid Cancer.

  12. Treatment Options for Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  13. Stages of Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Lip & Oral Cavity Treatment Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... Nasal Cavity Cancer Treatment Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  17. [Head and neck cancer--history].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Anna; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Szyfter, Witold; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    According to epidemiological data head and neck cancers constitute for 12% of all malignancies in the world. It is estimated that a total of 400 000 cases of the mouth and throat and of 160 000 cases of laryngeal cancer, 300 000 people die each year. History of head and neck cancers developed and underwent many changes at the turn of the century. Treatment, pathogenesis and possessed state of knowledge on the subject has changed. Starting from the ancient times there were texts on how to treat and examine patients. The Edwin Smith and Ebers Papyrus are two of the oldest medical documents describing the treatment of cancer patients. Hippocrates was the first person who used the word "cancer" and probably he was the first who divided the tumors into benign and malignant. In a document known as the Doctrine of Hippocrates he described skin cancer and cancer treatments. Over the next centuries, medical science did not develop because of religious concerns about autopsy and surgical procedures. The 17th century is a period in which there were a lot of new information about how to treat such oral cancer. Cancer of the tongue was removed by cauterization, which in the 18th century was replaced by the use of surgical instruments. In the same age glossectomy has been accepted as the treatment of choice performed in the treatment of cancer. The 19th century brought a major breakthrough in the treatment of surgical, diagnostic, anesthetic techniques and understanding of the pathological mechanisms. Histological evaluation of tumors has become mandatory and standard practice in the assessment of cancer. Laryngectomy and neck lymph nodes removal has become commonplace. Modified Radical Neck Dissection (MRND), became popularized as another cancer treatment technique. Describing ways to treat cancer, radiotherapy can not be ignored - there are several new techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and hypofractionation currently used. Chemotherapy and the

  18. Systemic therapy in head and neck cancer: changing paradigm.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Samit; Bhise, Rohan; Lokanatha, D; Govindbabu, K

    2013-03-01

    Head and neck cancers comprise a heterogenous group of cancers that require a multidisciplinary approach. Last few decades have seen an increasing role of chemotherapy with intent of treatment shifting from palliation to cure. We performed a thorough search online and offline for all relevant articles of chemotherapy in head and neck cancer. Cancers of nasopharynx and salivary glands were excluded. PMID:24426694

  19. Targeted therapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brent B

    2013-02-01

    The desire to target therapies to specific cancers while leaving the host unharmed remains an ongoing quest for scientists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists. In recent years, great scientific progress has been made in targeted therapies. Although many modalities remain in preclinical validation, some advances affect patient care today. This article summarizes the concepts of targeting and explores current examples of successful targeting and emerging targeting technologies in head and neck oncology. PMID:23399398

  20. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Results Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. Conclusions The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy. PMID:22313843

  1. Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong; Chen, Guang

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient's neck skin feeling.

  2. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27002678

  3. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. HPV and head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Dufour, X; Beby-Defaux, A; Agius, G; Lacau St Guily, J

    2012-02-01

    Head and neck cancer is frequent worldwide and oropharyngeal locations are presently sharply on the increase, in relation with an increasing incidence of oropharyngeal infection by oncogenic type-16 human papillomavirus (HPV). The clinical and biologic profile of these patients is distinct from that of other oropharyngeal carcinoma patients, with earlier onset, cystic cervical nodes and basaloid carcinoma histopathology. Detection of intratumoral viral DNA is essential to confirm the role of HPV, and E6/E7 mRNA expression is the most relevant indicator for stratification. Several methods can reveal intratumoral oncogenic HPV DNA, but PCR with hybridization is the most sensitive and most widely used. According to several reports, prognosis in terms of survival and locoregional control is better in HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma than in oropharyngeal carcinoma associated with smoking and alcohol consumption. The future lies in vaccination, but further studies will determine whether the rate of oropharyngeal carcinoma falls in women vaccinated against cervical cancer.

  5. Raman spectroscopy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the use of optical diagnostics in cancer detection. Early diagnosis of cancer affords early intervention and greatest chance of cure. Raman spectroscopy is based on the interaction of photons with the target material producing a highly detailed biochemical 'fingerprint' of the sample. It can be appreciated that such a sensitive biochemical detection system could confer diagnostic benefit in a clinical setting. Raman has been used successfully in key health areas such as cardiovascular diseases, and dental care but there is a paucity of literature on Raman spectroscopy in Head and Neck cancer. Following the introduction of health care targets for cancer, and with an ever-aging population the need for rapid cancer detection has never been greater. Raman spectroscopy could confer great patient benefit with early, rapid and accurate diagnosis. This technique is almost labour free without the need for sample preparation. It could reduce the need for whole pathological specimen examination, in theatre it could help to determine margin status, and finally peripheral blood diagnosis may be an achievable target. PMID:20923567

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stell, P. M.; Rawson, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of 23 trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. These were reviewed from the point of view of design of the trial, analysis of survival, response rates, meta-analysis, site of failure, toxicity and cost. The minimal increase in survival that could be detected ranged from 11 to 51%, with a median of 25%. No trial was big enough to detect the likely increase of survival, which is 5%. Many trials excluded some eligible patients before randomisation, the proportion being 21% in those series with details. A further 9% of treated patients were excluded from analysis. A response rate in four induction studies of 47% equated with a 6% increase in cancer mortality. Meta-analysis showed an insignificant overall improvement in cancer mortality of 0.5%. Induction chemotherapy, synchronous chemotherapy and induction/maintenance chemotherapy did not affect cancer mortality whereas synchronous/maintenance therapy did. Cisplatinum, methotrexate, bleomycin, 5-FU and a variety of other regimens did not affect the death rate from cancer, but the combination of VBM significantly increased it. Neither single agent nor combination chemotherapy produced a significant reduction of cancer deaths. The rate of locoregional failure was significantly lower in the treated arms, whereas the metastatic rate was similar in both arms. Only three papers gave full details of toxicity with grading: these showed a high toxicity rate. The mortality rate from chemotherapy in nine series averaged 6.5%. PMID:2140045

  7. Pattern of head and neck cancer in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hamid, G; Saeed, N M; Al-Kahiry, W; Shukry, S

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck cancer constitutes one of the commonest malignancies in Yemen. There may be a role for the use of Shamma and Zarda and Khat for the increase of HNC in Yemen. This study was conducted retrospectively with an overall aim to describe the pattern of head and neck cancers among Yemeni patients attending the Oncology Department of Al-Gamhouria Teaching Hospital, Aden, for the period from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2004. The study included 183 patients with head and neck cancers (Lymphoma and thyroid were excluded), 134 were males (73.2%) and 49 were females (26.8%) , with male to female ratio of 2.7:1. The mean age was 51.3 +/- 14.9 years (range: 3 - 82 years). Statistically, there is significant difference between the mean age of male (49.5 +/- 15.1 years) and female (45.4 +/- 16.3 years) patients with head and neck cancers [t= 2.1, p: 0.03]. The common types of head and neck cancers in this study are cancers of the oral cavity (31.7%), followed by pharyngeal (22.9%) and laryngeal (19.1%). In relation to sex, there is a significant statistical relationship between certain head and neck cancers and sex (p: 0.0000). In males, the common cancers are oral cavity cancers (22.7%), laryngeal (22.1%) and pharyngeal cancers (20.8%). The common histopathological type of head and neck cancers in this study is the well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (70.5%). This study concluded that head and neck cancers are among the common health problems affecting Yemeni patients and recommended further wide national studies to determine the real incidence and the risk factors associated with such cancer. PMID:20164005

  8. Reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, B.; Bignardi, M.; Spector, G.J.; Devineni, V.R.; Hederman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients with recurrent cancers of the head and neck region were treated with surgery, radiation therapy, or combination therapy. The follow-up period ranged from 18 months to 18 years. An initial overall complete response rate of 67% and a partial response rate of 7% (overall response rate-74%) were achieved. The eventual tumor control rate was 15%. Although equal initial response rates were achieved in recurrences at the primary site and the cervical nodes, the eventual local control was better for the former (21% vs. 10%). Patients receiving less than 5,000 rad radiotherapy had a 44% complete response and an 11% eventual tumor control. Patients receiving over 5,000 rad had an 80% complete response and a 25% eventual tumor control.

  9. MATRIX METALLOPROTEASES IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Eben L.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a collection of enzymes capable of cleaving extracellular matrix components, growth factors, and cell-surface receptors. MMPs modulate most aspects of tumorigenesis and are highly expressed in cancer compared with normal tissues. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) express high levels of MMPs in vivo and that inhibition of these enzymes in vitro and in mouse models decreases invasion and metastasis. However, the clinical trials for MMP inhibitors have failed to demonstrate a significant survival advantage in most cancers. The disparity between preclinical and clinical studies has led to the reevaluation of how MMP functions in cancer and the design of clinical trials for molecularly targeted agents. Mouse model data and analysis of HNSCC tumor specimens suggests that membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) may be a critical enzyme in tumor cell invasion and survival in vivo. This accumulated data provide evidence for development of selective MT1-MMP inhibitors as therapy in HNSCC. PMID:16470875

  10. Human papillomavirus in cervical and head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Psyrri, Amanda; DiMaio, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide and is initiated by infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). High-risk HPVs, especially HPV-16, are associated with other anogenital cancers and a subgroup of head-and-neck cancers. Indeed, HPV infection could account for the development of head-and-neck cancer in certain individuals that lack the classical risk factors for this disease (tobacco and alcohol abuse). This Review summarizes the main events of the HPV life cycle, the functions of the viral proteins, and the implications of HPV infection on their hosts, with an emphasis on carcinogenic mechanisms and disease outcomes in head-and-neck cancer. The demonstration that HPVs have a role in human carcinogenesis has allowed the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of HPV-associated cancers.

  11. General Information about Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Occult Primary Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer with Occult Primary ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Lymphedema Outcomes in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Little, Leila G.; Skoracki, Roman J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to describe the presentation of external head and neck lymphedema in patients treated for head and neck cancer and examine their initial response to complete decongestive therapy. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Subjects and Methods Patients evaluated for head and neck cancer at MD Anderson Cancer Center after treatment 01/2007-01/2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Response to complete decongestive therapy was evaluated per changes in lymphedema severity rating or surface tape measures. Predictors of therapy response were examined using regression models. Results 1,202 patients were evaluated. Most patients (62%) had soft, reversible pitting edema (MDACC Stage 1b). Treatment response was evaluated in 733 patients after receiving therapy; 439 (60%) improved after complete decongestive therapy. Treatment adherence independently predicted complete decongestive therapy response (p<0.001). Conclusions These data support the effectiveness of a head and neck cancer-specific regimen of lymphedema therapy for cancer patients with external head and neck lymphedema. Our findings suggest that head and neck lymphedema is distinct from lymphedema that affects other sites, requiring adaptations in traditional methods of management and measurement. PMID:25389318

  13. Outcomes of Induction Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Lin, Ming-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of induction chemotherapy (CT) is controversial. We compared the survival of head and neck cancer patients receiving docetaxel- or platinum-based induction CT before concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with the survival of those receiving upfront CCRT alone. Data from the National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases in Taiwan were linked and analyzed. We enrolled patients who had head and neck cancer between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2011. Follow-up was from the index date to December 31, 2013. We included head and neck patients diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0–148.9 who were aged >20 years, at American Joint Committee on Cancer clinical cancer stage III or IV, and receiving induction CT or platinum-based CCRT. The exclusion criteria were a cancer history before head and neck cancer diagnosis, distant metastasis, AJCC clinical cancer stage I or II, receipt of platinum and docetaxel before radiotherapy, an age <20 years, missing sex data, docetaxel use during or after RT, induction CT for >8 weeks before RT, induction CT alone before RT, cetuximab use, adjuvant CT within 90 days after RT completion, an RT dose <7000 cGy, curative head and neck cancer surgery before RT, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and head and neck cancer recurrence. We enrolled 10,721 stage III–IV head and neck cancer patients, with a median follow-up of 4.18 years (interquartile range, 3.25 years). The CCRT (arm 1), docetaxel-based induction CT (arm 2), and platinum-based CCRT (arm 3; control arm) groups comprised 7968, 503, and 2232 patients, respectively. Arm 3 was used to investigate mortality risk after induction CT. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidities, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for overall death were 1.37 (1.22–1.53) and 1.44 (1.36–1.52) in arms 2 and 3, respectively. In a

  14. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  15. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-08-05

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV-) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC.

  16. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV−) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  17. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  18. Current status of experimental therapeutics for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juna; Moon, Chulso

    2011-04-01

    As with many cancers, early detection of head and neck cancer increases a patient's survival rate. If diagnosed early, its five-year survival nears 90% with standard therapy alone. Unfortunately, the average survival rate for head and neck cancer is low due to the difficulty in early detection and achieving a sustainable response. Conventional treatments are not adequate for the majority of advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer patients because of the remarkable resistance of tumors to chemotherapy and radiation, and the situation is especially devastating for the first time treatment failure. The major limitations of these treatments are the lack of specificity for the tumor cell and unacceptable toxicity to the patient. As a result, current research in therapeutics for advanced, chemotherapy-resistant or recurrent head and neck cancer patients has focused on new treatment modalities that exploit biological differences between tumor and normal cells. These therapies include monoclonal antibodies, molecular inhibitors, gene therapy and photodynamic therapy. This article reviews the current preclinical and clinical evidence of these experimental therapeutics as they relate to head and neck cancer.

  19. Rehabilitation of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Patients with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx may be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Each treatment type may have a negative impact on posttreatment swallowing function; these effects are presented in this chapter. The clinician has a number of rehabilitative procedures available to reduce or eliminate swallowing disorders in patients treated for cancer of the head and neck. The various procedures--including postures, maneuvers, modifications to bolus volume and viscosity, range of motion exercises, and strengthening exercises--and their efficacy in treated head and neck cancer patients are discussed. PMID:18940647

  20. Current clinical immunotherapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto Chervin, Carolina; Brockstein, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that 59,340 new cases of head and neck cancer would be diagnosed in the US alone in 2015 and that 12,290 deaths would be attributed to the disease. Local and regional recurrences may be treated with chemotherapy and radiation; however, metastatic head and neck cancer is fatal and is treated with chemotherapy for palliation. Recent successful treatment of a variety of solid and hematological malignancies by immunotherapeutic approaches (i.e. harnessing the body’s own immune system to combat disease) has added a fourth therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. This commentary will review the status of immunotherapies in clinical development for the specific treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:27239282

  1. [Circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O; Pachmann, K

    2015-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells are defined as tumor cells which are circulating in the peripheral blood of the cancer patient. While several large studies have investigated the role of circulating tumor cells in other solid tumors, the importance of these tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer was turned into the focus not until the recent years. In other solid tumor the presence of circulating tumor cells often seems to be a negative prognostic marker and seems to be a marker for therapy response. The present article wants to give an overview about the knowledge on circulating tumor cells and their clinical relevance in head and neck cancer. The methodology to detect circulating tumor cells will be critically reflected. The future potential of the detection of circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer patients will be discussed.

  2. Effects of Swallowing Exercises on Patients Undergoing Radiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Head and Neck Cancer; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage I Laryngeal Cancer; Stage I Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Laryngeal Cancer; Stage II Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Laryngeal Cancer; Stage III Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Laryngeal Cancer; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Cancer

  3. Racial Disparity Among the Head and Neck Cancer Population.

    PubMed

    Daraei, Pedram; Moore, Charles E

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck cancer is the ninth most common cancer in the USA, accounting for 3.3 % of all cancers. The incidence of head and neck cancer has plateaued recently; however, morbidity and mortality continue to remain high. Moreover, racial disparity between African-American and White patients has been studied in the head and neck community, and a vast difference still remains in mortality rate and late stage at presentation. A review of the English literature was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE for demographics, epidemiology, and studies that focused on the disparity in head and neck cancer between African-American and White patients. Age-adjusted incidence of head and neck cancer is increased in African-Americans, while the 5-year survival is decreased compared to Whites. African-American patients present with more advanced disease. When receiving similar multidisciplinary care, the overall survival was not significantly different, but racial disparity often persists in treatment regimens. Socioeconomic determinants such as insurance status play a critical role in racial disparity, along with low levels of public awareness, a lack of knowledge of specific risk factors, and a sense of mistrust that is seen in the African-American population. Disparity in the head and neck cancer community is worrisome, and although efforts have been taken to decrease the disparity, a significant difference exists. Fortunately, the disparity is reversible and can be eliminated. To do so, it is critical to extend to underserved community programs that provide appropriate screening and diagnosis, with subsequent follow-up and treatment following the standards of care.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) offers a promising opportunity for cure and/or palliation to patients with recurrent head and neck cancer whose comorbidities, performance status, and history of prior treatment may preclude many other salvage options. Stereotactic body radiation therapy appears to have a favorable response and toxicity profile compared with other nonoperative salvage options for recurrent head and neck cancer. However, the risk of severe toxicity remains, with carotid blowout syndrome a unique concern, although the incidence of this complication may be minimized with alternating-day fractionation. The short overall treatment time and low rates of acute toxicity make SBRT an optimal vehicle to integrate with novel systemic therapies, and several phase II studies have used concurrent cetuximab as a radiosensitizer with SBRT with promising results. Ongoing studies aim to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of SBRT with immune checkpoint inhibitors in recurrent head and neck cancer. PMID:27441751

  5. Head and neck cancer: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Chin, David; Boyle, Glen M; Porceddu, Sandro; Theile, David R; Parsons, Peter G; Coman, William B

    2006-07-01

    Head and neck cancer consists of a diverse group of cancers that ranges from cutaneous, lip, salivary glands, sinuses, oral cavity, pharynx and larynx. Each group dictates different management. In this review, the primary focus is on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) arising from the mucosal lining of the oral cavity and pharynx, excluding nasopharyngeal cancer. Presently, HNSCC is the sixth most prevalent neoplasm in the world, with approximately 900,000 cases diagnosed worldwide. Prognosis has improved little in the past 30 years. In those who have survived, pain, disfigurement and physical disability from treatment have had an enormous psychosocial impact on their lives. Management of these patients remains a challenge, especially in developing countries where this disease is most common. Of all human cancers, HNSCC is the most distressing since the head and neck is the site of the most complex functional anatomy in the human body. Its areas of responsibility include breathing, the CNS, vision, hearing, balance, olfaction, taste, swallowing, voice, endocrine and cosmesis. Cancers that occur in this area impact on these important human functions. Consequently, in treating cancers of the head and neck, the effects of the treatment on the functional outcome of the patient need the most serious consideration. In assessing the success of HNSCC treatment, consideration of both the survival and functional deficits that the patient may suffer as a consequence of their treatment are of paramount importance. For this reason, the modern-day management of head and neck patients should be carried out in a multidisciplinary head and neck clinic.

  6. Neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis after neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinu; Shin, Eun Seow; Kim, Jeong Eon; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2015-01-01

    Late complications of head and neck cancer survivors include neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis. We present an autopsy case of neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis (sternocleidomastoid, omohyoid, digastric, sternohyoid, sternothyroid, and platysma muscles) within the radiation field after modified radical neck dissection type I and postoperative radiotherapy for floor of mouth cancer. A 70-year-old man underwent primary tumor resection of the left floor of mouth, left marginal mandibulectomy, left modified radical neck dissection type I, and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. The dose to the primary tumor bed and involved neck nodes was 63 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks. Areas of subclinical disease (left lower neck) received 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered. PMID:26756035

  7. Head and neck cancer in two American presidents: Case reports.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mea A; Wang, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Two former U.S. presidents, Ulysses S. Grant and Grover Cleveland, were diagnosed with head and neck cancer in 1884 and 1893, respectively. A historical review of the risk factors, diagnoses, and treatments is examined and compared with modern-day interpretations. A comparison was made using the original diagnoses with today's equivalent diagnosis. Different treatment outcomes at the time of the original diagnoses relative to today's treatment are reviewed. Clinicians must be familiar with risk factors, signs, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:22313921

  8. Cancer stem cells in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Eugenia; Trapasso, Serena

    2012-01-01

    differentiate, thus making them easier to remove. For all these reasons, we have collected existing literature on head and neck cancer stem cells that correlate the biological characteristics of this subpopulation of cancer cells with the clinical behavior of tumors. PMID:23189032

  9. Head and neck cancer specialist offers us wonderful support.

    PubMed

    Green, Kylee

    2016-08-31

    My husband Jerry was diagnosed with mouth cancer in January 2014 aged 45. A month later he went in for an operation and had a radical neck dissection. The floor of his mouth was replaced with skin from his forearm and part of his tongue was removed. PMID:27577315

  10. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance.

  11. Immunotherapy of HPV-associated head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Sandoval, Federico; Badoual, Cecile; Pere, Helene; Terme, Magali; Hans, Stephane; Benhamouda, Nadine; Granier, Clemence; Brasnu, Daniel; Tartour, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Various arguments support the development of a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. However, the mucosal localization of this tumor, the HPV-driven downregulation of MHC Class I molecules and various other immunosuppressive mechanisms must be carefully considered to improve the clinical efficacy of such an immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:23894716

  12. Clinical aspects of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham

    2002-01-01

    The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the existence of many critical structures in close proximity to the target, and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. PMID:12074474

  13. Access to dental services for head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Mark; Aleid, Wesam; McKechnie, Alasdair

    2013-07-01

    Dental assessment is important for patients with cancer of the head and neck who are to have radiotherapy, as many of these patients have poor dental health before they start treatment. This, compounded by the fact that radiotherapy to the head and neck has a detrimental effect on oral health, has led the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) to issue guidance that the dental health of these patients should be assessed before treatment. Unfortunately some multidisciplinary teams, such as the one at United Lincolnshire Hospitals, do not have access to a restorative dentist or a dental hygienist. In a retrospective survey we investigated access to general dental services by patients with head and neck cancer who were to have radiotherapy at our hospital and found that 37/71 (52%) had not been reviewed by a dentist within the past 12 months. A secondary national survey that investigated the availability of restorative dental and dental hygienic services showed that of the 56 multidisciplinary teams that deal with head and neck cancer in England, 19 (34%) do not have access to a restorative dentist and 23 (41%) do not have access to a dental hygienist, suggesting that this problem may be countrywide.

  14. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  15. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

  16. Metabolic microscopy of head and neck cancer organoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies for head and neck cancer have primarily relied on cell lines or in vivo animal studies. However, a technique that combines the benefits of high-throughput in vitro studies with a complex, physiologically relevant microenvironment would be advantageous for understanding drug effects. Organoids provide a unique platform that fulfills these goals. Organoids are generated from excised and digested tumor tissue and are grown in culture. Fluorescence microscopy provides high-resolution images on a similar spatial scale as organoids. In particular, autofluorescence imaging of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can provide insight into response to anti-cancer treatment. The optical redox ratio reflects relative amounts of NAD(P)H and FAD, and the fluorescence lifetime reflects enzyme activity of NAD(P)H and FAD. This study optimizes and characterizes the generation and culture of organoids grown from head and neck cancer tissue. Additionally, organoids were treated for 24 hours with a standard chemotherapy, and metabolic response in the organoids was measured using optical metabolic imaging. Ultimately, combining head and neck cancer organoids with optical metabolic imaging could be applied to test drug sensitivity for drug development studies as well as treatment planning for cancer patients.

  17. Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

  18. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... alter the DNA in cells. The strongest risk factors for developing this form of cancer are tobacco use (including smoking or using ... SA, Weinstein JN, Treviño L, Drummond JA, Muzny DM, Wu Y, Wood LD, Hruban RH, Westra WH, Koch WM, Califano JA, Gibbs RA, ...

  19. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14–3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015; and HRs of 16.5 and 1.92, respectively). The dementia risk

  1. Unusual Cancers of the Head and Neck

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment for more information. Esthesioneuroblastoma Esthesioneuroblastoma ( olfactory neuroblastoma ) is a tumor that begins in the olfactory ... first formed. Embryonal tumors such as rhabdomyosarcomas and neuroblastomas are most common in children. Treatment Treatment depends ...

  2. Immunology and Immunotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a key role in the development, establishment, and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A greater understanding of the dysregulation and evasion of the immune system in the evolution and progression of HNSCC provides the basis for improved therapies and outcomes for patients. HNSCC cells evade the host immune system through manipulation of their own immunogenicity, production of immunosuppressive mediators, and promotion of immunomodulatory cell types. Through the tumor's influence on the microenvironment, the immune system can be exploited to promote metastasis, angiogenesis, and growth. This article provides a brief overview of key components of the immune infiltrating cells in the tumor microenvironment, reviewing immunological principles related to head and neck cancer, including the concept of cancer immunosurveillance and immune escape. Current immunotherapeutic strategies and emerging results from ongoing clinical trials are presented. PMID:26351330

  3. Head and neck cancer: from research to therapy and cure.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    Cumulative findings from many research groups have identified new signaling mechanisms associated with head and neck cancers. We summarize these findings, including discussion of aberrant NOTCH, PI3K, STAT3, immune recognition, oxidative pathway, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death. The genomic landscape of head and neck cancers has been shown to differ depending on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We discuss studies examining the integration of HPV into genomic regions, as well as the epigenetic alterations that occur in response to HPV infection, and how these may help reveal new biomarker and treatment predictors. The characterization of premalignant lesions is also highlighted, as is evidence indicating that the surgical removal of these lesions is associated with better clinical outcomes. Current surgical methods are also discussed, including several less aggressive approaches such as minimal invasive robotic surgery. While much remains to be done in the fight against head and neck cancer, continued integration of basic research with new treatment options will likely lead to more effective therapeutic strategies directed against this disease.

  4. Head and neck cancer: from research to therapy and cure.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Xaralabos; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2014-12-01

    Cumulative findings from many research groups have identified new signaling mechanisms associated with head and neck cancers. We summarize these findings, including discussion of aberrant NOTCH, PI3K, STAT3, immune recognition, oxidative pathway, and regulation of cell cycle and cell death. The genomic landscape of head and neck cancers has been shown to differ depending on human papillomavirus (HPV) status. We discuss studies examining the integration of HPV into genomic regions, as well as the epigenetic alterations that occur in response to HPV infection, and how these may help reveal new biomarker and treatment predictors. The characterization of premalignant lesions is also highlighted, as is evidence indicating that the surgical removal of these lesions is associated with better clinical outcomes. Current surgical methods are also discussed, including several less aggressive approaches such as minimal invasive robotic surgery. While much remains to be done in the fight against head and neck cancer, continued integration of basic research with new treatment options will likely lead to more effective therapeutic strategies directed against this disease. PMID:25532687

  5. Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study

    PubMed Central

    Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients. PMID:23118755

  6. A Phase I Study of LJM716 in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, or HER2+ Breast Cancer or Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    HER2 + Breast Cancer, HER2 + Gastric Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2 + Breast Cancer; HER2 + Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  7. Reirradiation in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Janot, Francois; Thariat, Juliette; Daly-Schweitzer, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    Salvage surgery is the mainstay of treatment for recurrences or secondary primary tumors in areas that were irradiated earlier. However, locoregional recurrence remains the main cause of death after surgery. Adjuvant reirradiation dramatically reduces locoregional recurrences but the risk-benefit ratio seems to be advantageous mostly for residual microscopic disease. In contrast, the rate of distant metastasis among reirradiated patients indicates that the local treatment alone is not sufficient. Full-dose exclusive chemo-reirradiation (over 60 Gy) can cure a subset of patients when surgery is not feasible. However, reirradiation is associated with a significant rate of severe toxicity and should, therefore, be compared with chemotherapy in randomized trials. Accrual may be difficult because of selection biases such as tumor volume, small volumes (largest axis less than 3-4 cm) being more likely to be irradiated. In addition, patients in poor general condition with severe comorbidities, organ dysfunction, or incomplete healing after salvage surgery, are unlikely to benefit from reirradiation. Noteworthy volumes to be reirradiated must be established between the head and neck surgeon and the radiation oncologist: the definition of the clinical target volume should be taken into account, the natural history of recurrent tumors, especially with regard to extension modalities, and the absence of strict correlation between imaging and histological real extension. This is even more critical with the advent of new irradiation techniques. Chemotherapy associations and new radiosensitizing agents are also under investigation. Comparison between reirradiation modalities is difficult because most trials are phase 2 mono-institutional trials. As selection of patients is a key issue, only phase 3 multiinstitutional trials can provide definitive results.

  8. Alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation into neck-related muscles after neck dissection for patients with oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Shinji; Koga, Hirofumi; Kodama, Masaaki; Habu, Manabu; Kokuryo, Shinya; Oda, Masafumi; Matsuo, Kou; Nishino, Takanobu; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Uehara, Masataka; Yoshiga, Daigo; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Nishimura, Shun; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Izumi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) accumulations are commonly seen in the neck-related muscles of the surgical and non-surgical sides after surgery with neck dissection (ND) for oral cancers, which leads to radiologists having difficulty in diagnosing the lesions. To examine the alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation in neck-related muscles of patients after ND for oral cancer. Material and Methods 18F-FDG accumulations on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in neck-related muscles were retrospectively analyzed after surgical dissection of cervical lymph nodes in oral cancers. Results According to the extent of ND of cervical lymph nodes, the rate of patients with 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas increased in the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and posterior neck muscles of the surgical and/or non-surgical sides. In addition, SUVmax of 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were increased according to the extent of the ND. Conclusions In evaluating 18F-FDG accumulations after ND for oral cancers, we should pay attention to the 18F-FDG distributions in neck-related muscles including the non-surgical side as false-positive findings. Key words:18F-FDG, PET-CT, oral cancers, muscles. PMID:27031062

  9. Treatment of head and neck cancers: issues for clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Scarpace, Sarah L; Brodzik, Frank A; Mehdi, Syed; Belgam, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Head and neck cancers are a heterogeneous group of diseases involving the oral cavity, pharyngeal tube, and larynx. Given the drug therapy options available, clinical pharmacists can play an important role in the care of this patient population. They can recommend a regimen based on efficacy, toxicity, and patient-specific factors; ensure that the prescribed regimen has been studied and reported in the literature; verify dosages; and monitor and counsel patients about adverse effects. Chemotherapy plus radiation (chemoradiation) is often the standard treatment for patients with stage III or nonmetastatic stage IV head and neck cancer. Cisplatin-based regimens are preferred, although carboplatin may be appropriate in some circumstances. Induction therapy with a docetaxel-based regimen is recommended for some patients; however, this therapy has been associated with a high frequency of grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. Cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is the newest agent approved for treatment of head and neck cancer. Although evidence supports cetuximab combined with cisplatin versus cisplatin alone for patients with metastatic disease, the role of combination therapy is less clear in patients undergoing chemoradiation. Patients with head and neck cancer may experience swallowing difficulties or mouth pain, possibly interfering with drug administration and adherence; thus, pharmacists in all practice settings should be knowledgeable about different regimens and alternative routes of administration. Xerostomia and mucositis are common adverse effects of radiation therapy, and it is critical that good oral hygiene practices are maintained. Patients may achieve symptomatic relief from xerostomia with saliva substitutes, and clinical experience suggests that use of pilocarpine is worthwhile. Until more evidence becomes available, prevention of xerostomia and mucositis with amifostine is still controversial. Salt-water rinses

  10. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  11. Head and Neck Cancers, Version 1.2015

    PubMed Central

    Pfster, David G.; Spencer, Sharon; Brizel, David M.; Burtness, Barbara; Busse, Paul M.; Caudell, Jimmy J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Dunphy, Frank; Eisele, David W.; Foote, Robert L.; Gilbert, Jill; Gillison, Maura L.; Haddad, Robert I.; Haughey, Bruce H.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Jimeno, Antonio; Kies, Merrill S.; Lydiatt, William M.; Maghami, Ellie; McCaffrey, Thomas; Mell, Loren K.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Ridge, John A.; Rodriguez, Cristina P.; Samant, Sandeep; Shah, Jatin P.; Weber, Randal S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Worden, Frank; Yom, Sue S.; McMillian, Nicole; Hughes, Miranda

    2016-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the 2015 NCCN Guidelines for Head and Neck (H&N) Cancers. These Insights describe the different types of particle therapy that may be used to treat H&N cancers, in contrast to traditional radiation therapy (RT) with photons (x-ray). Research is ongoing regarding the different types of particle therapy, including protons and carbon ions, with the goals of reducing the long-term side effects from RT and improving the therapeutic index. For the 2015 update, the NCCN H&N Cancers Panel agreed to delete recommendations for neutron therapy for salivary gland cancers, because of its limited availability, which has decreased over the past 2 decades; the small number of patients in the United States who currently receive this treatment; and concerns that the toxicity of neutron therapy may offset potential disease control advantages. PMID:26150579

  12. Head and neck cancer, dental implants, and dental oncology.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun; Guez, Ghislaine

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a real presence in the dental-implant world--patients who undergo surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation often seek the assistance of dental-implant practitioners to restore them to better function; other patients who have had implants in place for years will return with questions regarding how their treatment will be affected by the presence of their dental implant. As oral-cancer treatment modalities are rapidly changing, practitioners struggle to keep up with the literature surrounding this important subset of the dental-implant population. This month, we look at the numbers of patients suffering from oral cancers, consider the different treatment options for patients with oral cancers, and investigate the role that implants play in improving therapeutic outcomes or changing treatment course.

  13. Modeling head and neck cancer stem cell-mediated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Alexander T; Jackson, Trachette L; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-09-01

    A large body of literature has emerged supporting the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the pathogenesis of head and neck cancers. CSCs are a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that share the properties of self-renewal and multipotency with stem cells from normal tissue. Their functional relevance to the pathobiology of cancer arises from the unique properties of tumorigenicity, chemotherapy resistance, and their ability to metastasize and invade distant tissues. Several molecular profiles have been used to discriminate a stem cell from a non-stem cell. CSCs can be grown for study and further enriched using a number of in vitro techniques. An evolving option for translational research is the use of mathematical and computational models to describe the role of CSCs in complex tumor environments. This review is focused discussing the evidence emerging from modeling approaches that have clarified the impact of CSCs to the biology of cancer. PMID:27151511

  14. Salivary gland and associated complications in head and neck cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Ram, Saravanan; Navazesh, Mahvash

    2011-09-01

    Xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction are two of the most common and significant complications of head and neck cancer therapy in the head and neck region. This article will provide a brief overview of salivary gland hypofunction and associated complications in head and neck cancer therapy, mainly in radiation therapy. The discussion will include quality of life issues as well as current advances in cancer therapy to reduce xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction.

  15. Knowledge and Screening of Head and Neck Cancer Among American Indians in South Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Daniel; Sargent, Michele; Emerick, Kevin; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Petereit, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We established the level of awareness of risk factors and early symptoms of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota and determined whether head and neck cancer screening detected clinical findings in this population. Methods. We used the European About Face survey. We added questions about human papillomavirus, a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and demographics. Surveys were administered at 2 public events in 2011. Participants could partake in a head and neck cancer screening at the time of survey administration. Results. Of the 205 American Indians who completed the survey, 114 participated in the screening. Mean head and neck cancer knowledge scores were 26 out of 44. Level of education was the only factor that predicted higher head and neck cancer knowledge (b = 0.90; P = .01). Nine (8%) people had positive head and neck cancer screening examination results. All abnormal clinical findings were in current or past smokers (P = .06). Conclusions. There are gaps in American Indian knowledge of head and neck cancer risk factors and symptoms. Community-based head and neck cancer screening in this population is feasible and may be a way to identify early abnormal clinical findings in smokers. PMID:25320895

  16. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Studies suggest that chronic bladder inflammation, a parasitic infection called schistosomiasis, and some medications used to treat ... Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) American Cancer ...

  17. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  18. The Potential for Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Spector, Matthew E.; Brenner, J. Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer. PMID:26896601

  19. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  20. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important.

  1. Best practice guidelines in the psychosocial management of HPV-related head and neck cancer: recommendations from the European Head and Neck Cancer Society's Make Sense Campaign.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Licitra, L; Vermorken, J B; Bernier, J; Parmar, S; Golusinski, W; Castellsagué, X; Leemans, C R

    2016-10-01

    Over the past three decades, oral human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with an increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in several countries. Specialist oncologists in head and neck cancer are observing a wider range of demographics, sexual behaviours, and survival outcomes with their patients. Additionally, there are fewer smokers, consumers of alcohol, or people of lower socioeconomic status than in previous decades. In order to support patients, the European Head and Neck Society's Make Sense Campaign aims to promote best practice in the management of head and neck cancer through the delivery of counselling, psychological assessment, support with the patient experience following HPV-related cancer diagnosis, sexual impact (in terms of communication, behaviour and prevention), facilitating access to educational resources about HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and OPSCC, and early referral if necessary. New concerns about psychosocial distress and unmet psychosocial needs following diagnosis, therefore, exist throughout the disease and treatment periods. Oncologists treating patients with HPV-related head and neck cancer must integrate new parameters focused on infection risk transmission and sexual topics. The development and dissemination of best practice guidelines through The European Head and Neck Cancer Society Make Sense Campaign will help healthcare professionals to be more confident and resourceful in supporting patients with HPV-related head and neck cancer.

  2. Surgical Management of Perineural Spread of Head and Neck Cancers.

    PubMed

    Solares, C Arturo; Mason, Eric; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    The surgical management of perineural spread of head and neck cancers has become an integral part in the contemporary treatment of this pathology. We now understand that tumour spreads within the epineurium and in a continuous fashion. We also can rely on the accuracy of magnetic resonance neurography in detecting and defining the extent of disease. With modern skull base techniques and a greater understanding of the anatomy in this region, specific operations can be designed to help eradicate disease. We review the current approaches and techniques used that enable us to better obtain tumour free margins and hence improve survival. PMID:27123390

  3. Strategies to Overcome Late Complications from Radiotherapy for Childhood Head and Neck Cancers.

    PubMed

    Spiotto, Michael T; Connell, Philip P

    2016-02-01

    Most pediatric head and neck cancers are treated with radiotherapy, but the morbidity associated with radiotherapy has become a prominent issue. This article discusses the common long-term complications associated with head and neck radiotherapy for childhood cancers. It reviews approaches to minimize toxicity and details the toxicities that head and neck radiation inflicts on relevant functional measures. In addition, it discusses the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancers in childhood cancer survivors, as well as strategies to reduce them. Thus, this article addresses approaches to minimize long-term radiation toxicities in order to improve the quality of life for childhood cancer survivors.

  4. Rare cancers of the head and neck area in Europe.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, B A C; Gatta, G; Capocaccia, R; Pierannunzio, D; Strojan, P; Licitra, L

    2012-04-01

    The RARECARE project has proposed a different and more detailed grouping of cancers, based on localisation and histological type, in order to identify rare entities with clinical meaning. RARECARE gathered data on cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002 and archived in 76 population-based cancer registries, all of which had vital status information available up to at least 31st December 2003. This study provides incidence, prevalence and survival rates for rare head and neck epithelial (H&N) cancers. Among the rare H&N cancers, those of oral cavity had the highest annual crude incidence rate of 48 per million, followed by oropharynx and 'major salivary glands and salivary gland type tumours' (28 and 13 per million, respectively). Incidence rates of epithelial tumours of nasal cavities, nasopharynx, eye and adnexa and middle ears were all lower than 5 per million. The prevalence for all investigated entities was lower than 35 per 100,000. The 5-year relative survival rates ranged from 40% for epithelial cancer of oropharynx to 85% for epithelial cancer of eye and adnexa. Survival rates were lower for men and for patients aged ≥65 years. With few exceptions, the lowest and highest survival figures were observed for Eastern Europe and Northern Europe, respectively. According to the definition for rare tumours by RARECARE (incidence<6 per 100,000), as well as according to the definition for rare diseases by the European Commission (prevalence<50 per 100,000) the H&N cancers described in this paper should be considered rare and diagnosis and treatment of these cancers should therefore be centralised.

  5. Preservation of organ function in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tschiesner, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Preservation of function is a crucial aspect for the evaluation of therapies applied in the field of head and neck cancer. However, preservation of anatomic structures cannot automatically be equated with preservation of function. Functional outcome becomes increasingly important particularly for the evaluation of alternative treatment options with equivalent oncological outcomes. As a result, present studies take into account three topic areas with varying emphasis: (1) the effects of cancer therapy on essential physiological functions, (2) additional therapy-induced side-effects and complications, and (3) health-related quality of life. The present article summarizes vital aspects of clinical research from recent years. Functional outcomes after surgical and non-surgical treatment approaches are presented according to tumor localization and staging criteria. Additional methodological aspects relating to data gathering and documentation as well as challenges in implementing the results in clinical practice are also discussed. PMID:23320059

  6. Advances in nanomedicine for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-yan; Hou, Yang-long; Yang, Shi-ming; Wang, Rong-guang

    2014-01-01

    The quality of life of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been improved because of advances in surgical and radiotherapeutic techniques as well as organ-preservation methods. Despite such progresses, survival rates are dismal because of frequent recurrences, distant metastases and the development of secondary primary tumors. Nanoparticles have distinct characteristics such as a high surface/volume ratio and surface charge and size that can be easily modified. Because of such inherent features, nanoparticles are used in imaging, adjuvant radiotherapy, and drug- or gene-delivery. Thus, nanomedicine holds great promise in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in nanomedicine in the diagnosis and treatment of head and neck cancer. We first review the application of inorganic nanoparticles to photo-thermal and magneto-thermal radiotherapy. We also discuss the use of organic nanoparticles in drug- or gene-delivery during chemotherapy. We then review the application of inorganic nanoparticles as radiotherapy enhancers. Finally, we address the factors that influence the biodistribution of nanoparticles in vivo.

  7. Association of Head and Neck Cancers in Chronic Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Ta; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lin, Dana; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Su, Wen-Chi; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of study is to determine whether chronic osteomyelitis (COM) is linked to an increased risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). We identify 17,033 patients with osteomyelitis and 68,125 subjects without osteomyelitis during 1996 to 2010 periods. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) of head and neck cancer for the osteomyelitis cohort compared with the comparison cohort. A total of 99 patients in the COM and 228 patients in the comparison cohort developed HNC during an average 5.12 years of follow-up period. The incidence rate of HNC in the COM cohort was 1.51-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–1.95) higher than that in the comparison cohort after adjusting gender, age, urbanization level, monthly income, and comorbidities. In subgroup analysis, younger (less than 45 years-old) and patients without comorbidities have greater risks (adjusted HR: 2.29 [95% CI:1.43-3.66] and 1.74 [95% CI:1.28-2.38] respectively). This study results suggested the association between COM and HNC, particularly in younger population and patients without comorbidities. PMID:26817870

  8. Nutritional intervention improves the caloric and proteic ingestion of head and neck cancer patients under radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Dias, M C; de Fátima Nunes Marucci, M; Nadalin, W; Waitzberg, D L

    2005-01-01

    Malnutrition is commonly associated with head and neck cancer, due especially to anorexia, which is aggravated by radiotherapy. The objective of this study was to evaluate modifications to nutritional ingestion following three types of nutritional intervention. Sixty-four male out-patients (62.1 +/- 1.5 years) were divided into three groups: oral group, (n=32) that received an adapted oral diet; feeding tube group, (n=16) under home enteral nutrition via a nasoenteral feeding tube (6x/day); and supplement group, (n=16) with oral diet associated to oral alimentary supplement between meals (3x/day). The groups were homogeneous and counseled to maintain a caloric ingestion of 40 kcal/kg. The diet for the oral group was adapted to the age and to the side effects of radiotherapyThe nutritional state of the three groups was evaluated for the caloric-proteic ingestion, anthropometric indicators (body weight, body mass index, triceps skinfold thickness, midarm muscle area), laboratorial indicators (total proteins, albumin, hematocrit, hemoglobin and total lymphocytes count), The results showed that all of the groups presented an increase in the ingestion of calories and proteins (p < 0.001). The nutritional therapy support for patients with head and neck cancer under radiotherapy, whether exclusive oral diet, enteral through a feeding tube, or with alimentary supplement associated to an oral diet achieved a significant increase in the total caloric ingestion. It is recommended that programs be implemented-to improve the ingestion of foods among these patients.

  9. Risk of Esophageal Cancer Following Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Chun-Shu; Lee, Shih-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chang, Wei-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal cancers account for majority of synchronous or metachronous head and neck cancers. This study examined the risk of esophageal cancer following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in head and neck cancer patients using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From 1997 to 2010, we identified and analyzed 1851 PEG patients and 3702 sex-, age-, and index date-matched controls. After adjusting for esophagitis, esophagus stricture, esophageal reflux, and primary sites, the PEG cohort had a higher adjusted hazard ratio (2.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09–4.09) of developing esophageal cancer than the controls. Primary tumors in the oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx were associated with higher incidence of esophageal cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios were 1.49 (95% CI = 1.01–1.88), 3.99 (95% CI = 2.76–4.98), and 1.98 (95% CI = 1.11–2.76), respectively. Head and neck cancer patients treated with PEG were associated with a higher risk of developing esophageal cancer, which could be fixed by surgically placed tubes. PMID:26945412

  10. Genome Stability Pathways in Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, Kenneth J.; Panizza, Benedict; Richard, Derek J.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability underlies the transformation of host cells toward malignancy, promotes development of invasion and metastasis and shapes the response of established cancer to treatment. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of genomic stability in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), with an emphasis on DNA repair pathways. HNSCC is characterized by distinct profiles in genome stability between similarly staged cancers that are reflected in risk, treatment response and outcomes. Defective DNA repair generates chromosomal derangement that can cause subsequent alterations in gene expression, and is a hallmark of progression toward carcinoma. Variable functionality of an increasing spectrum of repair gene polymorphisms is associated with increased cancer risk, while aetiological factors such as human papillomavirus, tobacco and alcohol induce significantly different behaviour in induced malignancy, underpinned by differences in genomic stability. Targeted inhibition of signalling receptors has proven to be a clinically-validated therapy, and protein expression of other DNA repair and signalling molecules associated with cancer behaviour could potentially provide a more refined clinical model for prognosis and treatment prediction. Development and expansion of current genomic stability models is furthering our understanding of HNSCC pathophysiology and uncovering new, promising treatment strategies. PMID:24364026

  11. Telltale tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in oral, head & neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Xie, Yuying; Tan, Yee Sun; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Nör, Jacques; Wolf, Gregory T

    2016-10-01

    Evidence gleaned from recent studies on the role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) suggests that cancer is not only a genetic disease but also an immunologic disease. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) has been a significant model to study cancer cell-immune cell interactions. First, immune cell infiltration is an important feature of these tumors. Second, HNSCC frequently develops resistance to immunogenic cytotoxicity, which provides a window to decipher how tumors engage the immune system to establish immune tolerance. Finally, chemoradiation therapy, as a central modality for HNSCC treatment, has been shown to elicit immune activation. The presence of effector immune cells in the tumor microenvironment is often associated with superior clinical response to adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, an activated immune system, in addition to limiting tumor initiation and progression, could also exert selective pressure to promote the growth of less immunogenic tumors, as a pivotal immunoediting process. But it remains unclear how cancer cell signaling regulates tumor immunogenicity and how to mitigate HNSCC-potentiated TIL suppression. In this review, we will revisit the prognostic role of TILs in HNSCC, and collectively discuss how cancer cell machinery impacts upon the plasticity of TILs.

  12. Vascular Priming Enhances Chemotherapeutic Efficacy against Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Folaron, Margaret; Kalmuk, James; Lockwood, Jaimee; Frangou, Costakis; Vokes, Jordan; Turowski, Steven G.; Merzianu, Mihai; Rigual, Nestor R.; Sullivan-Nasca, Maureen; Kuriakose, Moni A.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Singh, Anurag K.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The need to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy against head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is well recognized. In this study, we investigated the potential of targeting the established tumor vasculature in combination with chemotherapy in head and neck cancer. Methods Experimental studies were carried out in multiple human HNSCC xenograft models to examine the activity of the vascular disrupting agent (VDA) 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) in combination with chemotherapy. Multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, bioluminescence) in conjunction with drug delivery assessment (fluorescence microscopy), histopathology and microarray analysis was performed to characterize tumor response to therapy. Long-term treatment outcome was assessed using clinically-relevant end points of efficacy. Results Pretreatment of tumors with VDA prior to administration of chemotherapy increased intratumoral drug delivery and treatment efficacy. Enhancement of therapeutic efficacy was dependent on the dose and duration of VDA treatment but was independent of the chemotherapeutic agent evaluated. Combination treatment resulted in increased tumor cell kill and improvement in progression-free survival and overall survival in both ectopic and orthotopic HNSCC models. Conclusion Our results show that preconditioning of the tumor microenvironment with an antivascular agent primes the tumor vasculature and results in enhancement of chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in vivo. Further investigation into the activity of antivascular agents in combination with chemotherapy against HNSCC is warranted. PMID:23890930

  13. Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hans, S; Delas, B; Gorphe, P; Ménard, M; Brasnu, D

    2012-02-01

    Robots have invaded industry and, more recently, the field of medicine. Following the development of various prototypes, Intuitive Surgical® has developed the Da Vinci surgical robot. This robot, designed for abdominal surgery, has been widely used in urology since 2000. The many advantages of this transoral robotic surgery (TORS) are described in this article. Its disadvantages are essentially its high cost and the absence of tactile feedback. The first feasibility studies in head and neck cancer, conducted in animals, dummies and cadavers, were performed in 2005, followed by the first publications in patients in 2006. The first series including more than 20 patients treated by TORS demonstrated the feasibility for the following sites: oropharynx, supraglottic larynx and hypopharynx. However, these studies did not validate the oncological results of the TORS technique. TORS decreases the number of tracheotomies, and allows more rapid swallowing rehabilitation and a shorter length of hospital stay. Technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new generation robots, therefore more adapted to the head and neck, will probably be available in the future.

  14. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  15. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose-response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  16. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pillsbury, H.C. III; Webster, W.P.; Rosenman, J.

    1986-05-01

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study.

  17. Inhibition of STAT3 by Niclosamide Synergizes with Erlotinib against Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; You, Shuo; Hu, Zhongliang; Chen, Zhuo G.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Curran, Walter J.; Shin, Dong M.; Deng, Xingming

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is extensively expressed in head and neck cancer. However, EGFR-targeted therapy has only modest efficacy in head and neck cancer, through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Here, we found that inhibition of EGFR by erlotinib stimulated phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 leading to increased Bcl2/Bcl-XL expression in head and neck cancer cells, which may dampen the therapeutic efficacy of erlotinib against head and neck cancer. Erlotinib-enhanced STAT3 phosphorylation results, at least in part, from suppression of its physiological phosphatase, PTPMeg2. Specific knockdown of STAT3 by RNA interference significantly sensitized head and neck cancer cells to erlotinib treatment. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 by niclosamide not only blocked erlotinib-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation but also synergistically repressed head and neck cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Combined inhibition of EGFR and STAT3 by erlotinib and niclosamide more effectively induced apoptosis in tumor tissues without toxicity for normal tissues. Based on our findings, treatment with erlotinib combined with niclosamide may offer an effective therapeutic approach to improve the prognosis of head and neck cancer. PMID:24019973

  18. Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org; Chan, Kelvin; Bekelman, Justin E.; Zhung, Joanne; Mechalakos, James; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted.

  19. Post-thyroidectomy neck ultrasonography in patients with thyroid cancer and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Sumbul; Tan, Andrew; Ang, Ee Sin; Loke, Kelvin S H; Kao, Yung Hsiang; Goh, Anthony; Wong, Wai Yin

    2014-04-01

    The importance of routine neck ultrasonography for the detection of unsuspected local or nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer following thyroidectomy (with or without neck dissection) is well documented in many journal articles and international guidelines. Herein, we present a pictorial summary of the sonographic features of benign and malignant central neck compartment nodules and cervical lymph nodes via a series of high-quality ultrasonographic images, with a review of the literature.

  20. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  1. Patients' perception of the financial impact of head and neck cancer and the relationship to health related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Harvey-Woodworth, C N; Hare, J; Leong, P; Lowe, D

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional survey was to ask patients about the financial burden of having head and neck cancer, and to explore its relation with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In the Mersey region 447/752 eligible patients (59%) responded to the questionnaire. There was no obvious response bias. The most notable financial costs of head and neck cancer that were a moderate or large burden to patients were petrol (25%, 112), home heating (24%, 108), change in the type of food (21%, 95), and loss of earnings (20%, 88). During the previous week 15% (63/423) had lost a moderate or large amount of income because of their medical condition. In terms of taking care of their financial needs, 10% (40) were moderately dissatisfied and 15% (61) very dissatisfied. Patients with worse physical and social emotional functioning experienced more notable financial burden, more difficult life circumstances in the past month and greater financial difficulty and loss in income due to their condition in the previous week, more dissatisfaction with how well they took care of their own financial needs and were more likely to have sought statutory benefits. Cancer of the head and neck has a serious impact on financial aspects of patients' lives and seems to be associated with a poor HRQoL. Multidisciplinary teams can do much more to address the cost of having treatment by recognising need earlier, and giving advice and access to appropriate benefits. PMID:22000023

  2. Patients' perception of the financial impact of head and neck cancer and the relationship to health related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Harvey-Woodworth, C N; Hare, J; Leong, P; Lowe, D

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional survey was to ask patients about the financial burden of having head and neck cancer, and to explore its relation with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In the Mersey region 447/752 eligible patients (59%) responded to the questionnaire. There was no obvious response bias. The most notable financial costs of head and neck cancer that were a moderate or large burden to patients were petrol (25%, 112), home heating (24%, 108), change in the type of food (21%, 95), and loss of earnings (20%, 88). During the previous week 15% (63/423) had lost a moderate or large amount of income because of their medical condition. In terms of taking care of their financial needs, 10% (40) were moderately dissatisfied and 15% (61) very dissatisfied. Patients with worse physical and social emotional functioning experienced more notable financial burden, more difficult life circumstances in the past month and greater financial difficulty and loss in income due to their condition in the previous week, more dissatisfaction with how well they took care of their own financial needs and were more likely to have sought statutory benefits. Cancer of the head and neck has a serious impact on financial aspects of patients' lives and seems to be associated with a poor HRQoL. Multidisciplinary teams can do much more to address the cost of having treatment by recognising need earlier, and giving advice and access to appropriate benefits.

  3. Psychological functioning of caregivers for head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Margaret L.; Ridge, John A.; Burtness, Barbara A.; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fang, Carolyn Y.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often require assistance from family caregivers during the treatment and post-treatment period. This review article sought to summarize current findings regarding the psychological health of HNSCC caregivers, including factors that may be associated with poorer psychological health. Online databases (PUBMED, MEDLINE and PSYCINFO) were searched for papers published in English through September 2010 reporting on the psychological health of caregivers of HNSCC patients. Eleven papers were identified. Caregivers experience poorer psychological health, including higher levels of anxious symptoms, compared to patients and to the general population. Fear of patient cancer recurrence is evident among caregivers and is associated with poorer psychological health outcomes. The 6-month interval following diagnosis is a significant time of stress for caregivers. Greater perceived social support may yield positive benefits for the psychological health of caregivers. To date, there have been relatively few reports on the psychological health of caregivers of HNSCC patients. Well designed, prospective, longitudinal studies are needed to enhance our understanding of how caregiver psychological health may vary over the cancer trajectory and to identify strategies for improving caregiver outcomes. PMID:22154127

  4. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chencharick, J.D.; Mossman, K.L.

    1983-03-01

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient.

  5. Human papillomavirus induced transformation in cervical and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allie K; Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Wells, Susanne I

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  7. The feasibility of radioimmunotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gerretsen, M; Quak, J J; Brakenhoff, R H; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G A

    1994-01-01

    Since the introduction of the hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein (Nature 1975, 256, 495-497), tremendous effort has been put in the realisation of Ehrlich's concept of the magic bullet, which was proposed as early as the beginning of the century. The first clinical studies for radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with radiolabelled antibodies were undertaken in the early 1980s. Since then, RIS has been performed on thousands of patients with various types of malignancies, like colon carcinoma, lung carcinoma, breast carcinoma, neuroblastoma, T-cell lymphoma and ovarian carcinoma. In addition, a substantial number of therapy trials with radiolabelled antibodies have been performed. The developments for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have only recently been able to catch up with these events to some extent. One of the main reasons for this slow progress has been the lack of monoclonal antibodies (Mab) with specificity for HNSCC. Although there are as yet no real tumour specific antigens known for HNSCC, which also holds true for the majority of malignancies arising from other tissues, we now have the availability of a number of Mab with high specificity for HNSCC and with a very restricted reaction pattern with normal tissues. Labelled with 131I, these Mab have been shown to be highly capable to localise in HNSCC xenografts in nude mice. Based on these promising data, patient studies with one of these Mab, designated Mab E48, labelled with 99mTc, were started to evaluate the feasibility of RIS in patients with head and neck cancer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Getting Personal: Head and Neck Cancer Management in the Era of Genomic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Brenner, J. Chad; Shuman, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic testing is rapidly becoming an important tool in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. As we enter the era of genomics and personalized medicine, providers should be aware of testing options, counseling resources, and the benefits, limitations and future of personalized therapy. Methods This manuscript offers a primer to assist clinicians treating patients in anticipating and managing the inherent practical and ethical challenges of cancer care in the genomic era. Results Clinical applications of genomics for head and neck cancer are emerging. We discuss the indications for genetic testing, types of testing available, implications for care, privacy/disclosure concerns and ethical considerations. Hereditary genetic syndromes associated with head and neck neoplasms are reviewed, and online genetics resources are provided. Conclusions This article summarizes and contextualizes the evolving diagnostic and therapeutic options that impact the care of patients with head and neck cancer in the genomic era. PMID:25995036

  9. Circulating tumour cells in metastatic head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Kulasinghe, Arutha; Perry, Chris; Jovanovic, Lidija; Nelson, Colleen; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2015-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer with 650,000 new cases p/a worldwide. HNSCC causes high morbidity with a 5-year survival rate of less than 60%, which has not improved due to the lack of early detection (Bozec et al. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2013;270: 2745-9). Metastatic disease remains one of the leading causes of death in HNSCC patients. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of literature over the past 5 years on the detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in HNSCC; CTC biology and future perspectives. CTCs are a hallmark of invasive cancer cells and key to metastasis. CTCs can be used as surrogate markers of overall survival and progression-free survival. CTCs are currently used as prognostic factors for breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using the CellSearch® system. CTCs have been detected in HNSCC, however, these numbers depend on the technique applied, time of blood collection and the clinical stage of the patient. The impact of CTCs in HNSCC is not well understood, and thus, not in routine clinical practice. Validated detection technologies that are able to capture CTCs undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition are needed. This will aid in the capture of heterogeneous CTCs, which can be compiled as new targets for the current food and drug administration-cleared CellSearch® system. Recent studies on CTCs in HNSCC with the CellSearch® have shown variable data. Therefore, there is an immediate need for large clinical trials encompassing a suite of biomarkers capturing CTCs in HNSCC, before CTCs can be used as prognostic markers in HNSCC patient management.

  10. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min |. E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Hoffman, Henry T.; Funk, Gerry F. |; Chang, Kristi; Smith, Russell B. |; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken |; Buatti, John M. |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection.

  11. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  12. Efficacy of Thickened Liquids for Eliminating Aspiration in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Barbon, Carly E.A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To appraise the current videofluoroscopic evidence on the reduction of aspiration using thickened liquids in the head and neck cancer population. Data Sources Search terms relating to deglutition or dysphagia or swallow and neoplasms and oncology or head and neck cancer and viscosity or texture and apira or residu* were combined with honey or nectar, xerostomia, respiratory aspiration using Boolean operators. Review Methods A multi-engine literature search identified 337 non-duplicate articles of which 6 were judged to be relevant. These underwent detailed review for study quality and qualitative synthesis. Results The articles reviewed in detail predominantly described heterogeneous study samples with small sample sizes, making for difficult interpretation and generalization of results. Rates of aspiration were typically not reported by bolus consistency, despite the fact that a variety of stimulus consistencies was used during VFSS. Studies confirmed that aspiration is a major concern in the head and neck cancer population and reported a trend towards more frequent aspiration post-(chemo)radiotherapy. Conclusion Overall, the literature on thickened liquids as an intervention to eliminate aspiration in the head and neck cancer population is limited. Because aspiration is known to be prevalent in the head and neck cancer population and thickened liquids are known to eliminate aspiration in other populations, it is important to determine the effectiveness of thickened liquids for reducing aspiration in the head and neck cancer population. PMID:25358345

  13. The Tip of the Iceberg: Clinical Implications of Genomic Sequencing Projects in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Andrew C.; Ludwig, Megan L.; Meraj, Taha S.; Brenner, J. Chad; Prince, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of subgroups of head and neck cancers and follow-up investigation into genetic heterogeneity are needed. While the development of targeted therapy trials is of key importance, numerous challenges exist in establishing and optimizing such programs. This review discusses potential upcoming steps for further genetic evaluation of head and neck cancers and implementation of genetic findings into precision medicine trials. PMID:26506389

  14. Epigenetic silencing of S100A2 in bladder and head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juna; Wysocki, Piotr T.; Topaloglu, Ozlem; Maldonado, Leonel; Brait, Mariana; Begum, Shahnaz; Moon, David; Kim, Myoung Sook; Califano, Joseph A.; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Moon, Chulso

    2015-01-01

    S100A2, a member of the S100 protein family, is known to be downregulated in a number of human cancers, leading to its designation as a potential tumor suppressor gene. Here, we investigated the expression and methylation status of S100A2 in head&neck and bladder cancer. Reduced mRNA and protein expression was observed in 8 head&neck and bladder cancer cell lines. To explore the mechanism responsible for the downregulation of S100A2, we treated six cell lines with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. We found S100A2 is silenced in association with aberrant promoter-region methylation and its expression is restored with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment. Of 31 primary head&neck cancer cases and 31 bladder cancer cases, promoter methylation was detected in 90% and 80% of cases, respectively. Interestingly, only 1/9 of normal head&neck tissues and 2/6 of normal bladder tissues showed promoter methylation. S100A2 promoter methylation can be detected in urine and is more frequent in bladder cancer patients than in healthy subjects (96% vs 48% respectively). Moreover, increased methylation of S100A2 is linked to the progression of the tumor in bladder cancer (p<0.01). Together, this data shows that methylation-associated inactivation of S100A2 is frequent and may be an important event in the tumorigenesis of head&neck and bladder cancer. PMID:26097874

  15. Reviewing and Reconsidering Invasion Assays in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inglehart, Ronald C.; Scanlon, Christina S.; D’Silva, Nisha J.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are malignant tumors that arise from the surface epithelium of the oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx, primarily due to exposure to chemical carcinogens or the human papilloma virus. Due to their location, dental practitioners are well-positioned to detect the lesions. Deadlier than lymphoma or melanoma, HNSCC is incompletely understood. For these reasons, dental practitioners and researchers are focused on understanding HNSCC and the processes driving it. One of these critical processes is invasion, the degradation of the basement membrane by HNSCC cells with subsequent movement into the underlying connective tissue, blood vessels or nerves. Cancer cells metastasize to distant sites via the blood vessels, lymphatics and nerves. Metastasis is associated with poor survival. Since invasion is essential for development and metastasis of HNSCC, it is essential to understand the mechanism(s) driving this process. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved will facilitate the development of targeted treatment, thereby accelerating development of precision/ personalized medicine to treat HNSCC. Robust in vitro and in vivo assays are required to investigate the mechanistic basis of invasion. This review will focus on in vitro and in vivo assays used to study invasion in HNSCC, with special emphasis on some of the latest assays to study HNSCC. PMID:25448226

  16. Level IIb Neck Dissection in Oral Cavity Cancers- When Should One Address it..?

    PubMed

    Dabholkar, Jyoti Pralhad; Kapre, Neeti Madan

    2016-09-01

    Nodal metastases is the most important prognostic marker for oral cavity cancers. Nodal dissection at level IIb risks damage to the spinal accessory nerve. We aim to study positivity of level IIb lymph nodes in oral cancers. In this non-randomized prospective observational study, 65 patients of oral cavity cancers were evaluated. Appropriate surgery for primary tumour and neck dissection were undertaken. All patients underwent level II b dissection. Out of 67 neck dissections (27 elective and 40 therapeutic), 7 patients had level IIb positive for metastases (10.44 %) with no isolated or contralateral metastases at level IIb and direct correlation with level IIa nodes. There was no statistical association of level IIb positivity with stage or site of primary. Level IIb dissection can be avoided in N0 necks. For therapeutic neck dissections, Level IIb should be cleared if there are positive nodes at level IIa. PMID:27651689

  17. Clinical evaluation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, S A; Newbold, K L; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery are the principal curative modalities in treatment of head and neck cancer. Conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy result in significant side effects and altered quality of life. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can spare the normal tissues, while delivering a curative dose to the tumour-bearing tissues. This article reviews the current role of IMRT in head and neck cancer from the point of view of normal tissue sparing, and also reviews the current published literature by individual head and neck cancer subsites. In addition, we briefly discuss the role of image guidance in head and neck IMRT, and future directions in this area. PMID:22556403

  18. Effect of Metformin on Progression of Head and Neck Cancers, Occurrence of Second Primary Cancers, and Cause-Specific Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsu; Song, Jihyun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sung-Bae; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to investigate the effect of metformin on progression of head and neck cancers, occurrence of second primary cancers, and cause-specific survival. Methods. This study analyzed a retrospective cohort of 1,151 consecutive patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who were treated at our hospital. Patients were divided into three groups: nondiabetic, nonmetformin, and metformin. Clinical characteristics, recurrence of index head and neck cancer, occurrence of second primary cancer, and survival were compared among the different groups. Results. Of 1,151 patients, 99 (8.6%) were included in the metformin group, 79 (6.8%) were in the nonmetformin group, and 973 (84.5%) were in the nondiabetic group. Diabetic status and metformin exposure had no significant impact on index head and neck cancer recurrence or second primary cancer development (p > .2). The nonmetformin group showed relatively lower overall (p = .017) and cancer-specific (p = .054) survival rates than the other groups in univariate analyses, but these results were not confirmed in multivariate analyses. Conclusion. Metformin use did not show beneficial effects on index tumor progression, second primary cancer occurrence, and cause-specific survival in patients with head and neck cancer compared with nonmetformin users and nondiabetic patients. PMID:25802404

  19. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  20. Quality-of-life outcomes in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Morton, Randall P; Izzard, Mark E

    2003-07-01

    Quality-of-life (QL) is a relatively new concept in head and neck oncology outcomes research. It is important to have a clear definition and to use reliable and valid measures in its assessment. QL studies should use patient self-reported data and should account for treatment or disease-related symptoms and the domains of physical and psychosocial functioning, together with a patient-rated global QL score. Within head and neck cancer there are very distinct differences between sites. Oral cancer and laryngeal cancer lead to very different QL outcomes. Care must be used when comparing treatments; organ-preservation techniques do not necessarily lead to better QL outcomes, especially in laryngeal cancer. An assessment of life-utility (QALY) may be helpful in determining how meaningful survival is after treatment, and can be used to provide information to purchasers of health care services in support of better resource allocation for head and neck cancer patients.

  1. Performance and standards for the process of head and neck cancer care: South and West audit of head and neck cancer 1996–1997 (SWAHN I)

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, M A; Bailey, D; Lennon, A

    2000-01-01

    Evidence suggests wide variation in cancer care between different hospitals in the UK. To establish bench-marking data, we designed a prospective, 1 year regional study comparing key performance measures with established standards for the 28 hospital Trusts in the South and West of England involved in head and neck cancer care. 566 sequential patients with a newly-diagnosed head and neck cancer were included. Numbers referred and treated per hospital Trust were 1–58 and 1–65 respectively. 59% of patients received a pretreatment chest X-ray (standard 95%). 45% of patients were seen in a multidisciplinary clinic pretreatment (standard 95%), and this was proportional to the frequency of clinics held (P< 0.0001). Median number of cases treated per surgeon was 4 (1–26), and by radiotherapist was 10 (1–51). Times between parts of the process of oral cancer care were closer to the standards than those for laryngeal cancer. Two patients were entered into a clinical trial. One had a quality-of-life score. Thus, in 1996–1997, in the South and West of England, there were major discrepancies between actual performance and established standards in many fundamental aspects of head and neck cancer care. Re-audit is essential to determine if the implementation of the Calman–Hine report has resulted in improvements. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10945484

  2. Home range characteristics and overwintering ecology of the stripe-necked musk turtle (Sternotherus minor peltifer) in middle Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ennen, Joshua R.; Scott, A. Floyd

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the movement behavior of the stripe-necked musk turtle, Sternotherus minor peltifer. Using radiotelemetry, we calculated mean (± SD) home range length, which was 341.4 ± 90.3 m, with home range length not differing between the sexes (males, 335 ± 194 m; females, 346 ± 79.5 m). Sternotherus m. peltifer were active in every month of the year but decreased their movement distance and frequency between December and March; during nonwinter and winter periods, individuals used limestone bluffs most often.

  3. Management of the neck after chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers in Asia: consensus statement from the Asian Oncology Summit 2009.

    PubMed

    Wee, Joseph T; Anderson, Benjamin O; Corry, June; D'Cruz, Anil; Soo, Khee C; Qian, Chao-Nan; Chua, Daniel T; Hicks, Rodney J; Goh, Christopher H K; Khoo, James B; Ong, Seng C; Forastiere, Arlene A; Chan, Anthony T

    2009-11-01

    The addition of a planned neck dissection after radiotherapy has traditionally been considered standard of care for patients with positive neck-nodal disease. With the acceptance of chemoradiotherapy as the new primary treatment for patients with locally advanced squamous-cell head and neck cancers, and the increasing numbers of patients who achieve a complete response, the role of planned neck dissection is now being questioned. The accuracy and availability of a physical examination or of different imaging modalities to identify true complete responses adds controversy to this issue. This consensus statement will address some of the controversies surrounding the role of neck dissection following chemoradiotherapy for squamous-cell carcinomas of the head and neck, with particular reference to patients in Asia.

  4. Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck

  5. Human papillomavirus status in head and neck cancer: the ethics of disclosure.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Wolf, Gregory T

    2010-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an emerging causative factor for squamous carcinoma of the oropharynx and perhaps other head and neck cancers. There is a great deal of uncertainty regarding the clinical significance and implications of HPV status in this patient population. As a result, there is no established protocol for informing patients of the potential link between viral infection and their cancer. This paper discusses some of the ethical issues involved with informing head and neck cancer patients of their HPV status, recognizing the dilemma posed by unresolved clinical questions and the need to respect the autonomy of patients by disclosing relevant information.

  6. Body image: a critical psychosocial issue for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Teo, Irene; Goettsch, Keelan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to evaluating and treating body image difficulties of patients undergoing cancer treatment. Head and neck cancer significantly alters physical appearance and bodily functioning and therefore directly impacts body image. Research involving body image in head and neck cancer patients is growing, and this review considers published findings from 2013 to 2014. Primary attention is given to discussing recent advancements in body image assessment, qualitative studies, descriptive research, and psychosocial intervention studies relevant to body image. Limitations and necessary advancements in this field are noted, and a commentary is provided on the state of the current literature. PMID:25416316

  7. [Advances in head and neck cancers on behalf of the French Intergroup ORL and GORTEC].

    PubMed

    Thariat, J; Jegoux, F; Pointreau, Y; Fayette, J; Boisselier, P; Blanchard, P; Alfonsi, M; Aupérin, A; Bardet, E; Bensadoun, R-J; Garaud, P; Geoffrois, L; Graff, P; Guigay, J; Janot, F; Lapeyre, M; Lefebvre, J-L; Martin, L; Racadot, S; Rolland, F; Sire, C; Tao, Y; Tuchais, C; Chibaudel, B; Girard-Calais, M-H; Cornely, A; Vintonenko, N; Calais, G; De Raucourt, D; Lacau Saint-Guily, J; Bourhis, J

    2013-10-01

    Head and neck cancers are the fifth among the most common cancers in France. Two thirds of cases occur at an advanced stage. For advanced disease, progression-free survival, despite undeniable progress, remains below 50% at three years. The last 20 years have been marked by the necessity to identify situations where less intense surgery and/or radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy is possible without jeopardizing the prognosis, and situations where a therapeutic intensification is necessary and results in a gain in survival while better preserving function with less toxicity. French cooperative groups gathering radiation oncologists (GORTEC), surgeons (GETTEC) and medical oncologists or physicians involved in the management of systemic treatments in head and neck cancers (GERCOR) are now belonging to the INCa-labelled Intergroup ORL to deal with the challenges of head and neck cancers.

  8. Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Labouba; Chloé, Bertolus; Hervé, Koumakpayi Ismail; Ernest, Belembaogo; Jérôme, Miloundja; Nicolas, Berthet

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses. PMID:26557156

  9. Combined ipsilateral neck and axillary lymphadenectomy for metastatic skin cancers: a case series and surgical tips.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, J; Martin, H; Shaaban, H

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of distant disease simultaneous skin cancer metastasis to neck and axillary lymph nodes necessitates both an axillary and neck en block lymphadenectomy. A combined ipsilateral neck and axillary lymph node dissection should involve an in-continuity dissection through the cervicoaxillary canal for optimal lymphatic and oncological clearance. Review of the literature reveals little published instruction on the procedure since the radical surgery performed by Bowden over 50 years ago. We present 4 cases where ipsilateral axillary and neck lymph node dissections were performed for metastatic melanoma and a case of apical axillary node dissection via a neck incision approach. Our surgical tips include performing apical axillary node dissection via the neck incision and consideration of clavicular osteotomy or clavicular excision. A transclavicular approach was taken in one patient who had an excellent functional outcome after a plate and screw fixation. One elderly patient required a middle third claviculectomy which reduced shoulder elevation but was not associated with functional impairment. We conclude the surgery is safe and associated with the usual morbidity ascribed with either an axillary or neck dissection undertaken in isolation. However, patients have a significant risk of disease relapse as would be expected due to the duel metastatic sites, multiple lymph node and neck involvement which are known to be independent poor prognostic factors on melanoma survival and relapse. PMID:23664381

  10. Elective neck irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, F.; Leborgne, J.H.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 69 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue Stages T1-2-3 N0 were treated between 1952 and 1982 at one cancer center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Of 52 patients with the primary disease controlled, 2 had elective cervical lymph node dissection, and were therefore excluded from the study, 25 were treated with elective neck irradiation, and 25 were followed without irradiation to the neck. In the untreated group, 40% developed neck node metastases, while this was observed only in 20% of the group receiving elective neck irradiation, but only 4% recurred in the elective irradiated areas of the neck (p: 0.0028). The survival was the same for each group (5-year absolute survival with NED 67% for the neck irradiation group and 64% for the unirradiated group). From this retrospective study, we conclude that elective neck irradiation in carcinoma of the oral tongue decreases the incidence of neck metastases but an improvement in survival of these patients was not demonstrated.

  11. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  12. Assessment of nutritional status and quality of life in patients treated for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Prevost, V; Joubert, C; Heutte, N; Babin, E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients, to evaluate the impact of malnutrition on therapeutic management and quality of life and to propose a simple screening approach adapted to routine clinical practice. The authors conducted a review of the literature to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients published in French and English. Articles were obtained from the PubMed database and from the references of these articles and selected journals, using the keywords: "nutritional assessment", and "head and neck" and "cancer". Anthropometric indices, laboratory parameters, dietary intake assessment, clinical scores and nutritional risk scores used in patients with head and neck cancers are presented. The relevance of these tools in clinical practice and in research is discussed, together with the links between nutritional status and quality of life. This article is designed to help teams involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer to choose the most appropriate tools for assessment of nutritional status according to their resources and their objectives.

  13. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  14. Cannabis use and cancer of the head and neck: Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Aldington, Sarah; Harwood, Matire; Cox, Brian; Weatherall, Mark; Beckert, Lutz; Hansell, Anna; Pritchard, Alison; Robinson, Geoffrey; Beasley, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether cannabis smoking increases the risk of head and neck cancer. Design Case-control study. Subjects and Methods Cases of head and neck cancer ≤55 years identified from hospital databases and the Cancer Registry, and controls randomly selected from the electoral roll completed interviewer-administered questionnaires. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relative risk of head and neck cancer. Results There were 75 cases and 319 controls. An increased risk of cancer was found with increasing tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and decreased income but not increasing cannabis use. The highest tertile of cannabis use (>8.3 joint years) was associated with a nonsignificant increased risk of cancer (relative risk = 1.6, 95% confidence interval, 0.5-5.2) after adjustment for confounding variables. Conclusions Cannabis use did not increase the risk of head and neck cancer; however, because of the limited power and duration of use studied, a small or longer-term effect cannot be excluded. PMID:18312888

  15. Human papilloma virus: a new risk factor in a subset of head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Manisha; Bist, Sampan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two well known behavioral risk factors associated with head and neck cancer. Recently, evidence is mounting that infection with human papilloma virus, most commonly human papilloma virus-16 is responsible for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma especially tumors of tonsillar origin. The molecular pathway used by human papilloma virus to trigger malignant transformation of tissue is different from that of other well known risk factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol, associated with squamous cell carcinoma. Apparently, these subsets of patients with human papilloma virus positive tumor are more likely to have a better prognosis than human papilloma virus negative tumor. Considering this fact, the human papilloma virus infection should be determined in all oropharyngeal cancers since it can have a major impact on the decision making process of the treatment.

  16. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  17. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  18. Unilateral Cervical Polyneuropathies following Concurrent Bortezomib, Cetuximab, and Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Elghouche, Alhasan; Shokri, Tom; Qin, Yewen; Wargo, Susannah; Citrin, Deborah; Van Waes, Carter

    2016-01-01

    We report a constellation of cervical polyneuropathies in a patient treated with concurrent bortezomib, cetuximab, and cisplatin alongside intensity modulated radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tonsil with neck metastasis. The described deficits include brachial plexopathy, cervical sensory neuropathy, and oculosympathetic, recurrent laryngeal, and phrenic nerve palsies within the ipsilateral radiation field. Radiation neuropathy involving the brachial plexus is typically associated with treatment of breast or lung cancer; however, increased awareness of this entity in the context of investigational agents with potential neuropathic effects in head and neck cancer has recently emerged. With this report, we highlight radiation neuropathy in the setting of investigational therapy for head and neck cancer, particularly since these sequelae may present years after therapy and entail significant and often irreversible morbidity.

  19. The Role of p53 and MDM2 in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Denaro, N.; Lo Nigro, C.; Natoli, G.; Russi, E. G.; Adamo, V.; Merlano, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a complex disorder that includes mostly squamous cell carcinomas that can develop in the throat, larynx, nose, sinuses, and mouth. Etiopathogenesis is due to tobacco and alcohol consumption and to infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16/18. Tumors often develop within preneoplastic fields of genetically altered cells. Most head and neck cancers result from multistep accumulation of genetic alterationsm resulting in clonal outgrowth of transformed cells. These DNA changes are caused by a variety of mechanisms like endogenous mutations and exogenous mutations. Dysregulated molecular pathway includes alterations of critical inhibitor of cyclin CDK complexes, inactivating mutations of p53 gene, and activation of oncogenes and growth factors. This paper attempts to review the role of p53 and MDM2 genetic aberrations and pathways in head and neck cancer. PMID:23724261

  20. Vitamin E intake from natural sources and head and neck cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium

    PubMed Central

    Edefonti, V; Hashibe, M; Parpinel, M; Ferraroni, M; Turati, F; Serraino, D; Matsuo, K; Olshan, A F; Zevallos, J P; Winn, D M; Moysich, K; Zhang, Z-F; Morgenstern, H; Levi, F; Kelsey, K; McClean, M; Bosetti, C; Schantz, S; Yu, G-P; Boffetta, P; Chuang, S-C; A Lee, Y-C; La Vecchia, C; Decarli, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence for the possible effect of vitamin E on head and neck cancers (HNCs) is limited. Methods: We used individual-level pooled data from 10 case–control studies (5959 cases and 12 248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium to assess the association between vitamin E intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models applied to quintile categories of nonalcohol energy-adjusted vitamin E intake. Results: Intake of vitamin E was inversely related to oral/pharyngeal cancer (OR for the fifth vs the first quintile category=0.59, 95% CI: 0.49–0.71; P for trend <0.001) and to laryngeal cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.54–0.83, P for trend <0.001). There was, however, appreciable heterogeneity of the estimated effect across studies for oral/pharyngeal cancer. Inverse associations were generally observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer and within covariate strata for both sites. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that greater vitamin E intake from foods may lower HNC risk, although we were not able to explain the heterogeneity observed across studies or rule out certain sources of bias. PMID:25989276

  1. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G; Ivanova, Elena V; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A; Haddad, Robert I; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Hayes, D Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R; El-Naggar, Adel K; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J G; Hammerman, Peter S; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2014-10-28

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  2. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S.; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A.; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W.; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J. G.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Dean; Chu, Andy; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Wong, Tina; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Lee, Semin; Parfenov, Michael; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Haseley, Psalm; Zeng, Dong; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Bristow, Christopher; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Casasent, Tod; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Motter, Thomas; Weinstein, John; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Fan, You Hong; Liu, Jinze; Wang, Kai; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buda, Elizabeth; Hayes, D. Neil; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kimes, Patrick K.; Marron, J.S.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Prins, Jan F.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Singh, Darshan; Soloway, Mathew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Walter, Vonn; Waring, Scot; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wu, Junyuan; Zhao, Ni; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Tward, Aaron D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Carter, Scott L.; Zack, Travis I.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Freeman, Samuel S.; Meyerson, Matthew; Cho, Juok; Chin, Lynda; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael S.; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Hailei; Heiman, David I.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Voet, Doug; Lin, Pei; Frazer, Scott; Stojanov, Petar; Liu, Yingchun; Zou, Lihua; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sougnez, Carrie; Lichtenstein, Lee; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lander, Eric; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Muzny, Donna; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Kovar, Christie; Reid, Jeff; Morton, Donna; Han, Yi; Hale, Walker; Chao, Hsu; Chang, Kyle; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kakkar, Nipun; Wheeler, David; Xi, Liu; Ciriello, Giovanni; Ladanyi, Marc; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Shen, Ronglai; Sinha, Rileen; Weinhold, Nils; Taylor, Barry S.; Aksoy, B. Arman; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Reva, Boris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Chan, Timothy; Morris, Luc; Stuart, Joshua; Benz, Stephen; Ng, Sam; Benz, Christopher; Yau, Christina; Baylin, Stephen B.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Herman, James G.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Laird, Peter W.; Triche, Timothy; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Agrawal, Nishant; Bishop, Justin; Boutros, Paul C.; Bruce, Jeff P; Byers, Lauren Averett; Califano, Joseph; Carey, Thomas E.; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hui; Chiosea, Simion I.; Cohen, Ezra; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ferris, Robert L.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Guo, Yan; Haddad, Robert I.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Harris, Thomas; Hayes, D. Neil; Hui, Angela BY; Lee, J. Jack; Lippman, Scott M.; Liu, Fei-Fei; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Myers, Jeff; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Pickering, Curtis R.; Prystowsky, Michael; Romkes, Marjorie; Saleh, Anthony D.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Seethala, Raja; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Si, Han; Tward, Aaron D.; Van Waes, Carter; Waggott, Daryl M.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Yarbrough, Wendell; Zhang, Jiexin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Burnett, Ken; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candance; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Frick, Jessica; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Harper, Hollie A.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Baboud, Julien; Jensen, Mark A.; Kahn, Ari B.; Pihl, Todd D.; Pot, David A.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Walton, Jessica S.; Wan, Yunhu; Burton, Robert; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Saller, Charles; Tarvin, Katherine; Chen, Chu; Bollag, Roni; Weinberger, Paul; Golusiński, Wojciech; Golusiński, Paweł; Ibbs, Matthiew; Korski, Konstanty; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Burnett, Ken; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Mallery, David; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Yena, Peggy; Beard, Christina; Mitchell, Colleen; Sandusky, George; Agrawal, Nishant; Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph; Khan, Zubair; Bruce, Jeff P; Hui, Angela BY; Irish, Jonathan; Liu, Fei-Fei; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Waldron, John; Boutros, Paul C.; Waggott, Daryl M.; Myers, Jeff; Lippman, Scott M.; Egea, Sophie; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Herbert, Lynn; Bradford, Carol R.; Carey, Thomas E.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Haddad, Andrea S.; Jones, Tamara R.; Komarck, Christine M.; Malakh, Mayya; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Nguyen, Ariane; Peterson, Lisa A.; Prince, Mark E.; Rozek, Laura S.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Taylor, Evan G.; Walline, Heather M.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Boice, Lori; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Funkhouser, William K.; Gulley, Margaret L.; Hackman, Trevor G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hayward, Michele C.; Huang, Mei; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Salazar, Ashley H.; Shockley, William W.; Shores, Carol G.; Thorne, Leigh; Weissler, Mark C.; Wrenn, Sylvia; Zanation, Adam M.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; Ferris, Robert L.; Romkes, Marjorie; Seethala, Raja; Brown, Brandee T.; Guo, Yan; Pham, Michelle; Yarbrough, Wendell G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  3. Head and neck cancer due to heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and professional exposure: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Khlifi, Rim Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2010-10-15

    Chronic exposures to heavy metals via tobacco smoking and professional exposure may increase the risk of head and neck cancer, although the epidemiologic evidence is limited by problems of low study power and inadequate adjustment for tobacco and professional exposure use. Numerous scientific reviews have examined the association of various heavy metals exposure with respiratory cancer as well as other cancer types, but few have been published on head and neck cancer. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to review the head and neck tract cancer-related data on exposure to heavy metals via smoking and working exposure and to study the major mechanisms underlying some toxic metals carcinogenesis.

  4. Head and neck cancer due to heavy metal exposure via tobacco smoking and professional exposure: a review.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2010-10-15

    Chronic exposures to heavy metals via tobacco smoking and professional exposure may increase the risk of head and neck cancer, although the epidemiologic evidence is limited by problems of low study power and inadequate adjustment for tobacco and professional exposure use. Numerous scientific reviews have examined the association of various heavy metals exposure with respiratory cancer as well as other cancer types, but few have been published on head and neck cancer. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to review the head and neck tract cancer-related data on exposure to heavy metals via smoking and working exposure and to study the major mechanisms underlying some toxic metals carcinogenesis. PMID:20708025

  5. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  6. Managing complications of radiation therapy in head and neck cancer patients: Part I. Management of xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Wei Cheong; Chai, Wen Lin; Rahman, Roslan Abdul; Ramli, Roszalina

    2006-12-01

    Head and neck cancer is becoming a more recognizable pathology to the general population and dentists. The modes of treatment include surgery and/or radiation therapy. Where possible, pretreatment dental assessment shall be provided for these patients before they receive radiation therapy. There are occasions, however, whereby head and neck cancer patients are not prepared optimally for radiation therapy. Because of this, they succumb to complicated oral adverse effects after radiation therapy. Part I of this series reviews the management of xerostomia. The management of the effect of xerostomia to the dentition/oral cavity is discussed in Part II. PMID:17378333

  7. Determining Adequate Margins in Head and Neck Cancers: Practice and Continued Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    Margin assessment remains a critical component of oncologic care for head and neck cancer patients. As an integrated team, both surgeons and pathologists work together to assess margins in these complex patients. Differences in method of margin sampling can impact obtainable information and effect outcomes. Additionally, what distance is an "adequate or clear" margin for patient care continues to be debated. Ultimately, future studies and potentially secondary modalities to augment pathologic assessment of margin assessment (i.e., in situ imaging or molecular assessment) may enhance local control in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27469263

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia for Head & Neck Cancer in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Wang, Luning; Cheng, Rui; Mao, Leidong; Arnold, Robert D.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Chen, Zhuo G.; Platt, Simon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle induced hyperthermia is applied for treatment of head and neck cancer using a mouse xenograft model of human head and neck cancer (Tu212 cell line). A hyperthermia system for heating iron oxide nanoparticles was developed by using alternating magnetic fields. Both theoretical simulation and experimental studies were performed to verify the thermotherapy effect. Experimental results showed that the temperature of the tumor center has dramatically elevated from around the room temperature to about 40oC within the first 5-10 minutes. Pathological studies demonstrate epithelial tumor cell destruction associated with the hyperthermia treatment. PMID:22287991

  9. Nanoparticle-based targeted therapeutics in head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Shui-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Head-and-neck cancer is a major form of the disease worldwide. Treatment consists of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but these have not resulted in improved survival rates over the past few decades. Versatile nanoparticles, with selective tumor targeting, are considered to have the potential to improve these poor outcomes. Application of nanoparticle-based targeted therapeutics has extended into many areas, including gene silencing, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, radiosensitization, photothermal therapy, and has shown much promise. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of nanoparticle-mediated targeted therapeutics for head-and-neck cancer, with an emphasis on the description of targeting points, including future perspectives.

  10. Management of the node-positive neck in the patient with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, Gary B.; Hessel, Amy; Beadle, Beth M.; Ahmed, Salmaan; El-naggar, Adel; Fuller, Clifton D.; Byers, Lauren A.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Kies, Merill S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess the rates of recurrence in the neck for node-positive patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer treated with definitive radiation (with or without chemotherapy). Methods This is a single institutional retrospective study. Methodology included database search, and statistical testing including frequency analysis, Kaplan-Meier tests, and comparative tests including chi-square, logistic regression and log-rank. Results The cohort consisted of 401 node-positive patients irradiated between 2006 – June 2012. Three hundred eighty eight patients had CT restaging, and 251 had PET and/or US as a component of their post radiation staging. Eighty patients (20%) underwent neck dissection, and 21 (26%) had a positive specimen. The rate of neck dissection increased with increasing nodal stage, and was lower in patients who had PET scans or ultrasound in addition to CT restaging. The median follow-up was 30 months. The 2-year actuarial neck recurrence rate was 7% and 5% in all patients and those with local control, respectively. Nodal recurrence rates were greater in current smokers (p=.008). There was no difference in nodal recurrences rates in patients who did or did not have a neck dissection (p = .4) Conclusions A treatment strategy of (chemo)radiation with neck dissection performed based on response resulted in high rates of regional disease control in patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:24898672

  11. Methods of Investigating Metastatic Lymph Nodes in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    POPESCU, Bogdan; ENE, Patricia; BERTESTEANU, Serban Vifor Gabriel; ENE, Razvan; CIRSTOIU, Catalin; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT When dealing with patients who have head and neck cancer - squamous cell carcinoma and have clinically N0 neck disease it is very difficult to assess the real extension of the malignant proccess. This is why several techniques are curently in use to determine the actual TNM clasiffication for each patient in order to apply best suited therapy management. Up until today the staging of the neck has been done by using a combination of the physical exam and conventional imaging studies. Recent studies and research have tried to determine weather the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy is a more reliable tool in predicting occult metastasis in cancer patients with clinically N0 neck disease. There are no guidelines in this matter and as such the use of the sentinel lymph node detection technique is yet to be used on a routine basis. The authors are trying to assess the benefits of different paraclinical investigation regarding the improvement of overall survival rates in patients with T1/T2 squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and N0 neck disease. PMID:24790674

  12. Surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery: risk factors and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Ozawa, Taijiro; Hyodo, Ikuo; Suzuki, Mikio

    2013-03-01

    Since new treatment strategies, such as chemoradiotherapy, have been introduced for head and neck cancer, a higher number of unknown factors may be involved in surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery. The aim of the present study was to clarify the risk factors of surgical site infection in clean-contaminated surgery for head and neck cancer and the prognosis of patients with surgical site infection. Participants were 277 consecutive patients with head and neck cancer who underwent clean-contaminated surgery for primary lesions at the Aichi Cancer Center over a 60-month period. A total of 22 putative risk factors were recorded in each patient and statistically analyzed to elucidate surgical site infection related factors. Surgical site infection was observed in 92 (32.1 %) of 277 cases. Univariate analysis indicated that alcohol consumption, T classification, neck dissection, reconstructive procedure, and chemoradiotherapy were significantly associated with surgical site infection. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two independent risk factors for surgical site infection: reconstructive surgery (p = 0.04; odds ratio (OR) 1.77) and chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.01; OR 1.93). In spite of surgical site infection, the five-year overall survival rate of patients with surgical site infection was not significantly different from those without surgical site infection. Although surgical site infection did not impact the overall survival of patients with surgical procedures, head and neck surgeons should pay attention to patients with previous chemoradiotherapy as well as to those with a high risk of surgical site infection requiring reconstructive surgery. PMID:22865106

  13. Two-year longitudinal study of parotid salivary flow rates in head and neck cancer patients receiving unilateral neck parotid-sparing radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Henson, B S; Eisbruch, A; D'Hondt, E; Ship, J A

    1999-05-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment for head and neck cancers, and frequently causes permanent salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. This 2-year longitudinal study evaluated unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates in 11 patients with head and neck cancers who received unilateral neck parotid-sparing RT. The results demonstrated that treated parotid glands had essentially no output up to 2 years post-RT. Alternatively, spared parotid flow rates were indistinguishable from pre-RT values at 1 and 2 years post-RT, and increased slightly over time. Total unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates 2 years after completion of RT were similar to pre-RT values, suggesting that spared parotid function may compensate for lost function from treated parotid glands. These results demonstrate that unilateral neck parotid-sparing techniques are effective in preserving contralateral parotid glands up to 2 years after the completion of RT. PMID:10621842

  14. Sexual behaviours and the risk of head and neck cancers: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Berthiller, Julien; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Winn, Deborah M; Smith, Elaine M; Shan'gina, Oxana; Schwartz, Stephen M; Purdue, Mark P; Pilarska, Agnieszka; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Menezes, Ana; McClean, Michael D; Matos, Elena; Koifman, Sergio; Kelsey, Karl T; Herrero, Rolando; Hayes, Richard B; Franceschi, Silvia; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Fernández, Leticia; Daudt, Alexander W; Curado, Maria Paula; Chen, Chu; Castellsagué, Xavier; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexual contact may be the means by which head and neck cancer patients are exposed to human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods We undertook a pooled analysis of four population-based and four hospital-based case–control studies from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium, with participants from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, India, Italy, Spain, Poland, Puerto Rico, Russia and the USA. The study included 5642 head and neck cancer cases and 6069 controls. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of associations between cancer and specific sexual behaviours, including practice of oral sex, number of lifetime sexual partners and oral sex partners, age at sexual debut, a history of same-sex contact and a history of oral–anal contact. Findings were stratified by sex and disease subsite. Results Cancer of the oropharynx was associated with having a history of six or more lifetime sexual partners [OR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01, 1.54] and four or more lifetime oral sex partners (OR = 2.25, 95% CI 1.42, 3.58). Cancer of the tonsil was associated with four or more lifetime oral sex partners (OR = 3.36, 95 % CI 1.32, 8.53), and, among men, with ever having oral sex (OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.09, 2.33) and with an earlier age at sexual debut (OR = 2.36, 95% CI 1.37, 5.05). Cancer of the base of the tongue was associated with ever having oral sex among women (OR = 4.32, 95% CI 1.06, 17.6), having two sexual partners in comparison with only one (OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.19, 3.46) and, among men, with a history of same-sex sexual contact (OR = 8.89, 95% CI 2.14, 36.8). Conclusions Sexual behaviours are associated with cancer risk at the head and neck cancer subsites that have previously been associated with HPV infection. PMID:20022926

  15. Zinc and Copper Homeostasis in Head and Neck Cancer: Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ressnerova, Alzbeta; Raudenska, Martina; Holubova, Monika; Svobodova, Marketa; Polanska, Hana; Babula, Petr; Masarik, Michal; Gumulec, Jaromir

    2016-01-01

    Metals are known for playing essential roles in human physiology. Copper and zinc are trace elements closely dependent on one another and are involved in cell proliferation, growth, gene expression, apoptosis and other processes. Their homeostasis is crucial and tightly controlled by a resourceful system of transporters and transport proteins which deliver copper and zinc ions to their target sites. Abnormal zinc and copper homeostasis can be seen in a number of malignancies and also in head and neck cancer. Imbalance in this homeostasis is observed as an elevation or decrease of copper and zinc ions in serum or tissue levels in patients with cancer. In head and neck cancer these altered levels stand out from those of other malignancies which makes them an object of interest and therefore zinc and copper ions might be a good target for further research of head and neck cancer development and progression. This review aims to summarize the physiological roles of copper and zinc, its binding and transport mechanisms, and based on those, its role in head and neck cancer. To provide stronger evidence, dysregulation of levels is analysed by a meta-analytical approach.

  16. New equations for matching a low neck field to oblique upper neck fields with collimator rotation in a 3-field monoisocentric setup for head-and-neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Manske, Maria A; Barker, Jerry L; Wong, Pei-Fong; Westlake, Wallace; Garden, Adam S; Ang, K Kian; Rosenthal, David I

    2004-01-01

    With a monoisocentric 3-field technique for treating head-and-neck cancer, collimator rotation may be needed for the upper lateral fields to avoid cephalad-positioned shoulders or to avoid unnecessary arytenoid irradiation while maintaining more anterior coverage. For patients with unilateral lymphadenopathy, lateral oblique-opposed boost fields can be used to encompass the primary tumor and ipsilateral lymph nodes without junctioning through gross disease. When initial collimated lateral fields are also rotated with a gantry angle to produce oblique boost fields, however, the resulting matchline with a low anterior neck (LAN) boost field is no longer nondivergent. This can be corrected by manual adjustment of collimator and gantry angles for the LAN field using 3D treatment planning software. The goal of this study was to derive mathematical formulas to simplify this process. We used a transformation matrix to define formulas that could predict the appropriate modifications to the LAN boost field. Output from the formulas was (1) visually tested within 3D treatment planning software and (2) verified using a solid water head-and-neck phantom and radiographic film dosimetry to confirm that a nondivergent matchline was obtained in several clinical scenarios. When evaluated with 3D treatment planning software, the formulas accurately predicted the appropriate gantry and collimator angles of the LAN boost field for a variety of possible beam combinations. When evaluated with film dosimetry, the formulas were shown to accurately predict the appropriate gantry and collimator angles of the LAN boost field to within the +/- 2 mm/1 degrees tolerance specifications of the linear accelerator and acceptable for routine clinical use. The presented formulas are simple and geometrically precise. They predict the necessary manipulations of the LAN boost field to maintain a geometrically precise matchline, as verified by 3D treatment planning software, phantom dosimetry, and actual

  17. Immunonutrition in head and neck cancer: have a look before surgery!

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Chiara; Ciorba, Andrea; Stomeo, Francesco; Pelucchi, Stefano; Pastore, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible role of immunonutrition in head and neck cancer patients. Malnutrition frequently occurs in head and neck oncological patients, due to mechanical obstruction, such as tumour induced cachexia, poor dietary habits, as well as excessive alcohol consumption. These defects combined with the immune suppressive effects of surgery have been claimed to contribute in increasing the postoperative complications rate, such as poor wound healing and higher incidence of infections. Immunonutrition has been proposed to provide specific benefits to the immune system; several clinical trials, also in head and neck cancer patients, are already present in the literature, even if methodological differences impede comparisons and firm conclusions so far. Nutritional oncology is a new and interesting field and requires the use of standardised intervention protocols in order to evaluate its clinical efficacy. PMID:21833564

  18. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  19. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Denise; Flint, Stephen R; Healy, Claire; Stassen, Leo F A

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of 'field cancerisation'/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, cancer treatment, and head and neck cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Weissler, Mark C.; Avery, Christy L.; Herring, Amy H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck cancers (HNC) are commonly treated with radiation and platinum-based chemotherapy, which produce bulky DNA adducts to eradicate cancerous cells. Because nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes remove adducts, variants in NER genes may be associated with survival among HNC cases both independently and jointly with treatment. Methods Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate race-stratified (White, African American) hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for overall (OS) and disease-specific (DS) survival based on treatment (combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 NER genes among 1,227 HNC cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study. Results None of the NER variants evaluated were associated with survival at a Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0006. However, rs3136038 [OS HR = 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), DS HR = 0.69 (0.51, 0.93)] and rs3136130 [OS HR = 0.78 (0.64, 0.96), DS HR = 0.68 (0.50, 0.92)] of ERCC4 and rs50871 [OS HR = 0.80 (0.64, 1.00), DS HR = 0.67 (0.48, 0.92)] of ERCC2 among Whites, and rs2607755 [OS HR = 0.62 (0.45, 0.86), DS HR = 0.51 (0.30, 0.86)] of XPC among African Americans were suggestively associated with survival at an uncorrected alpha of 0.05. Three SNP-treatment joint effects showed possible departures from additivity among Whites. Conclusions Our study, a large and extensive evaluation of SNPs in NER genes and HNC survival, identified mostly null associations, though a few variants were suggestively associated with survival and potentially interacted additively with treatment. PMID:24487794

  1. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: From Identification to Tumor Immune Network.

    PubMed

    Dionne, L K; Driver, E R; Wang, X J

    2015-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer. Annually, more than half a million individuals are diagnosed with this devastating disease, with increasing incidence in Europe and Southeast Asia. The diagnosis of HNSCC often occurs in late stages of the disease and is characterized by manifestation of a high-grade primary tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, precluding timely management of this deadly cancer. Recently, HNSCC cancer stem cells have emerged as an important factor for cancer initiation and maintenance of tumor bulk. Like normal stem cells, cancer stem cells can undergo self-renewal and differentiation. This unique trait allows for maintenance of the cancer stem cell pool and facilitates differentiation into heterogeneous neoplastic progeny when necessary. Recent studies have suggested coexistence of different cancer stem cell populations within a tumor mass, where the tumor initiation and metastasis properties of these cancer stem cells can be uncoupled. Cancer stem cells also possess resistant phenotypes that evade standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy, resulting in tumor relapse. Therefore, understanding distinctive pathways relating to cancer stem cells will provide insight into early diagnosis and treatment of HNSCC. In this review, we highlight current advances in identifying cancer stem cells, detail the interactions of these cells with the immune system within the tumor niche, and discuss the potential use of immunotherapy in managing HNSCC.

  2. Health care delivery for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta: a practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J.R.; Lau, H.; Surgeoner, B.V.; Chua, N.; Dobrovolsky, W.; Dort, J.C.; Kalaydjian, E.; Nesbitt, M.; Scrimger, R.A.; Seikaly, H.; Skarsgard, D.; Webster, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of head-and-neck cancer is complex and requires the involvement of various health care professionals with a wide range of expertise. We describe the process of developing a practice guideline with recommendations about the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta. Methods Outcomes of interest included composition of the health care team, qualification requirements for team members, cancer centre and team member volumes, infrastructure needs, and wait times. A search for existing practice guidelines and a systematic review of the literature addressing the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients were conducted. The search included the Standards and Guidelines Evidence (sage) directory of cancer guidelines and PubMed. Results One practice guideline was identified for adaptation. Three additional practice guidelines provided supplementary evidence to inform guideline recommendations. Members of the Alberta Provincial Head and Neck Tumour Team (consisting of various health professionals from across the province) provided expert feedback on the adapted recommendations through an online and in-person review process. Selected experts in head-and-neck cancer from outside the province participated in an external online review. SUMMARY The recommendations outlined in this practice guideline are based on existing guidelines that have been modified to fit the Alberta context. Although specific to Alberta, the recommendations lend credence to similar published guidelines and could be considered for use by groups lacking the resources of appointed guideline panels. The recommendations are meant to be a guide rather than a fixed protocol. The implementation of this practice guideline will depend on many factors, including but not limited to availability of trained personnel, adequate funding of infrastructure, and collaboration with other associations of

  3. Photodynamic therapy of head and neck cancer with different sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoulovskaya, Elena G.; Shental, Victor V.; Abdoullin, N. A.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Edinak, N. J.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kondratjeva, T. T.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Valery V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper deals with the results of clinical trials for sulfated aluminum phthalocyanine (PHS) (Photosens, Russia; Photogeme (PG) in Russia. The results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of head and neck tumors (HNT), side effects and ways of their correction and prevention, as well as possibility to work out less toxic regimes of PDT with photosense, choice of laser and type of irradiation are discussed. PDT have been provided in 79 patients with different head and neck tumors. Efficacy of PDT depended on tumor size and its histological type. Undesirable changes in plasma content of antioxidants by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HLPC) have been found in patients after PHS injection. Influence of short-term and long-term supplementation with beta-carotene and vitamin E on this parameters are discussed.

  4. The role of human papillomavirus infection in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, S

    2010-10-01

    The link between head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC), especially oropharyngeal cancer, and HPV has become established. HPV16 is the most common genotype in these tumours but HPV6 and HPV11 can also be found in a minority of these cancers, implying that these low-risk HPV types are not entirely benign in the head and neck region. HPV status is also associated with p16 expression and HPV+ tumours are less likely to harbour p53 mutations. HPV DNA is closely associated with poorly differentiated cancers, positive lymph nodes and late-stage disease, which all indicate poor prognosis. Contradictory to this, patients with HPV+ HNSCC seem to have significantly improved response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy as compared with HPV-negative tumours. Interestingly, the risk factors of HNSCC are the same as for HPV, including the number of sexual partners, younger age at first sexual intercourse, practice of oral sex, history of genital warts and younger age.

  5. Multidisciplinary teamwork in the treatment and rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient.

    PubMed

    King, G E; Lemon, J C; Martin, J W

    1992-06-01

    The advantages of multidisciplinary treatment planning of head and neck cancer patients is described. Planning rehabilitation concurrently with curing the malignancy results in the most effective application of treatment modalities coordinated with rehabilitative care. Concentrated multidisciplinary treatment reduces post treatment morbidity by shortening recovery and rehabilitation time.

  6. Immunotherapy of HPV-associated head and neck cancer: Critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Sandoval, Federico; Badoual, Cecile; Pere, Helene; Terme, Magali; Hans, Stephane; Benhamouda, Nadine; Granier, Clemence; Brasnu, Daniel; Tartour, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Various arguments support the development of a vaccine targeting human papillomavirus (HPV) for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. However, the mucosal localization of this tumor, the HPV-driven downregulation of MHC Class I molecules and various other immunosuppressive mechanisms must be carefully considered to improve the clinical efficacy of such an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  7. Physical and psychosocial correlates of head and neck cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    De Boer, M F; McCormick, L K; Pruyn, J F; Ryckman, R M; van den Borne, B W

    1999-03-01

    This article reviews recent literature on the physical and psychosocial correlates of head and neck cancer, with a focus on quality-of-life issues, rehabilitation outcomes, and changes in the literature from the previous decade. These studies have shown that head and neck cancer has an enormous impact on the quality of life of patients. The most important physical symptoms are speech problems, dry mouth and throat, and swallowing problems. Pain is also frequently reported. Disturbances in psychosocial functioning and psychological distress are reported by a considerable number of patients; worry, anxiety, mood disorder, fatigue, and depression are the main symptoms. Cancer of the head and neck has a negative effect on social, recreational, and sexual functioning. Despite a growing number of longitudinal studies, little is known about the rehabilitation outcomes over a longer period of time. Future research is necessary to form a consensus about the further development and use of specific instruments to study patients with cancer of the head and neck, to conduct more prospective studies, and to develop programs that are aimed at maximizing rehabilitation outcomes and evaluate these programs with randomized designs.

  8. International Cancer of the Head and Neck, Genetics and Environment (InterCHANGE) Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Evaluate the Association Between Certain Environmental Exposures (e.g. Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, Betel Nut Chewing…) and Head and Neck Cancers; Assess the Effect of Genetic Factors, Including Both SNP and Copy Number Variation (CNV) Through Analysis of Both Main Effect and Gene-gene Interaction

  9. The effect of head and neck cancer treatment on whole salivary flow.

    PubMed

    Marunick, M T; Seyedsadr, M; Ahmad, K; Klein, B

    1991-10-01

    The effects of multimodality therapy for head and neck cancer on whole salivary flow were evaluated. Eighteen subjects with head and neck cancer were studied. Resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates were recorded, pretreatment, after individual modality therapy, and posttreatment. Twenty-four subjects with no history of head and neck cancer matched for age, and sex distribution, served as controls. Primary site, stage, major salivary glands resected, radiation fields, and dose to major salivary glands are reported. The average salivary flow rates for 18 subjects following treatment was reduced 83% for resting and 86% for stimulated saliva from pretreatment levels. The null hypothesis that the overall resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates are unaffected by treatment (surgery and radiation) of the head and neck cancer was rejected (P values at 0.05 level of significance). Stage and location of primary, total dose delivered to and volume of gland exposure are important factors when predicting xerostomia following multimodality therapy. PMID:1921403

  10. Phase Ib Study of BKM120 With Cisplatin and XRT in High Risk Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Early Invasive Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Carcinoma of Larynx; Cancer of Nasopharynx

  11. Treatment Outcome of Combined Modalities for Buccal Cancers: Unilateral or Bilateral Neck Radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-Y.; Lee, L.-Y.; Huang, S.-F.; Kang, C.-J.; Fan, K.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of treatment for buccal cancers and assess the impact of unilateral vs. bilateral adjuvant neck radiation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the course of 145 patients newly diagnosed with buccal squamous cell carcinoma without distant metastases who completed definitive treatment between January 1994 and December 2000. Of 145 patients, 112 (77%) had Stage III or IV disease. All underwent radical surgery with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 64 Gy), including unilateral neck treatment in most (n = 120, 82.8%). After 1997, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy was given for high-risk patients with more than two involved lymph nodes, extracapsular spread, and/or positive margins. Results: The 5-year disease-specific survival rate for Stages I-IV was 87%, 83%, 61%, and 60%, respectively (p = 0.01). The most significant prognostic factor was N stage, with the 5-year disease-specific survival rate for N0, N1, and N2 being 79%, 65%, and 54%, respectively (p 0.001). For patients with more than two lymph nodes or positive extracapsular spread, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control (p = 0.02). Locoregional control did not differ between patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral neck treatments (p = 0.95). Contralateral neck failure occurred in only 2.1%. Conclusions: In patients with buccal carcinoma after radical resection, ipsilateral neck radiation is adequate. Bilateral prophylactic neck treatment does not confer an added benefit.

  12. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Indications and Extent of Central Neck Dissection—Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Pietro Giorgio; Boi, Francesco; Baghino, Germana; Nicolosi, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the rate of metastases in the central neck compartment and examine the morbidity and rate of recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer treated with or without a central neck dissection. Two hundred and fifteen patients undergoing total thyroidectomy with preoperative diagnosis of differentiated thyroid cancer, in the absence of suspicious nodes, were divided in two groups: those who underwent a thyroidectomy only (group A; n = 169) and those who also received a central neck dissection (group B; n = 46). Five cases (2.32%) of nodal recurrence were observed: 3 in group A and 2 in group B. Tumor histology was associated with a risk of recurrence: Hürthle cell-variant and tall cell-variant carcinomas were associated with a high risk of recurrence. Multifocality and extrathyroidal invasion also presented a higher risk, while smaller tumors were at lower risk. The results of this study suggest that prophylactic central neck dissection should be reserved for high-risk patients only. A wider use of immunocytochemical and genetic markers to improve preoperative diagnosis and the development of methods for the intraoperative identification of metastatic lymph nodes will be useful in the future for the improved selection of patients for central neck dissections. PMID:24282633

  13. Body image and depressive symptoms in patients with head and neck cancer: an important relationship

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Dietrich, Mary S.; Murphy, Barbara; Ridner, Sheila H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between body image and depressive symptoms in patients who have been treated for head and neck cancer. Methods This is a prospective, longitudinal analysis. Body image and depressive symptoms were measured in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer at baseline, end of treatment, 6 weeks post-treatment, and 12 weeks post-treatment. Body image was measured using the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory, and depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Results Forty-three individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer participated in this study. The majority of participants were male, Caucasian, and married or living with a partner. Participants ranged from age 32 to 78 years (M=57.8 years, SD=10.5 years). At 12 weeks post-treatment, body image scores were statistically significantly higher than they were at the end of treatment (p=0.016) and 6 weeks post-treatment (p=0.032). Statistically significant increases in levels of depressive symptoms were observed at the end of treatment (p<0.001) and 6 weeks post-treatment (p=0.036) with a return to baseline by the 12-week post-treatment assessment (p=0.115). Body image and depressive symptoms were statistically significantly associated at the end of treatment, 6 weeks post-treatment, and 12 weeks post-treatment (rs −0.32 to −0.56, p <0.05). Conclusions This study supports early assessment of body image in patients with head and neck cancer. Additionally, the association between poorer body image and increased depressive symptoms is key in understanding the symptom clusters that patients with head and neck cancer experience. PMID:24925049

  14. Pattern of head and neck cancers in a sample of Syrian population: a retrospective hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Moudallal, Y Al; Khankan, N

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers include a wide number of different types of cancer arising from a variety of different sites in the head and neck. Cancer patterns show a large worldwide variation. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive analysis of the pattern of occurrence of head and neck cancers in a sample of the Syrian population. A retrospective hospital-based descriptive study was conducted of all cases of head and neck cancer at two hospitals in Damascus over a 3-year period (2008-2010). Information was obtained from the records of the 2 centres: Maxillofacial Hospital and the head and neck surgery department in Al Mouasah Hospital. A total of 267 cases of head and neck cancers were recorded. The male to female ratio was 4:1 and the mean age was 57.7 years. The 5 most common sites were larynx (45.0%), oral cavity (16.5%), skin of the head and neck (14.0%), lower lip (6.0%) and lymph nodes (5%). Nose and external auditory tube were the least common sites. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common histological type (69%). This study indicates the relative prominence of laryngeal, oral and skin cancers in this area. PMID:24995760

  15. Is an Elective Neck Dissection Necessary for All Cases of N0 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma? -Elective Neck Dissection may be Performed for Tongue Cancer with Tumor Thickness More than 4 mm.

    PubMed

    Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Denda, Yuya; Akiba, Takeshi; Sekine, Riyo; Yoshida, Yoshifumi; Osaka, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether neck dissection should be performed to prevent T1-2N0M0 tongue cancer by using the Weiss and colleague's decision tree method. The results showed that preventive neck dissection should not be recommended for T1-2N0M0 tongue cancer. However, preventive neck dissection is a suitable approach when treating tongue cancer tumors with a thickness of ≥ 4 mm. PMID:27628601

  16. Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer improves xerostomia related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    van Rij, CM; Oughlane-Heemsbergen, WD; Ackerstaff, AH; Lamers, EA; Balm, AJM; Rasch, CRN

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose To assess the impact of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation on late xerostomia and Quality of Life aspects in head and neck cancer patients. Patients and nethods Questionnaires on xerostomia in rest and during meals were sent to all patients treated between January 1999 and December 2003 with a T1-4, N0-2 M0 head and neck cancer, with parotid gland sparing IMRT or conventional bilateral neck irradiation to a dose of at least 60 Gy, who were progression free and had no disseminated disease (n = 192). Overall response was 85% (n = 163); 97% in the IMRT group (n = 75) and 77% in the control group (n = 88) the median follow-up was 2.6 years. The prevalence of complaints was compared between the two groups, correcting for all relevant factors at multivariate ordinal regression analysis. Results Patients treated with IMRT reported significantly less difficulty transporting and swallowing their food and needed less water for a dry mouth during day, night and meals. They also experienced fewer problems with speech and eating in public. Laryngeal cancer patients in general had fewer complaints than oropharynx cancer patients but both groups benefited from IMRT. Within the IMRT group the xerostomia scores were better for those patients with a mean parotid dose to the "spared" parotid below 26 Gy. Conclusion Parotid gland sparing IMRT for head and neck cancer patients improves xerostomia related quality of life compared to conventional radiation both in rest and during meals. Laryngeal cancer patients had fewer complaints but benefited equally compared to oropharyngeal cancer patients from IMRT. PMID:19068126

  17. Microscopically diagnosed head and neck cancers in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, P; Pathmanathan, R; Raman, R; Prasad, U

    1989-03-01

    A retrospective study of 1000 cases of microscopically diagnosed head and neck cancers in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur was done. Head and neck neoplasms comprise 7.1% of all tumours diagnosed in this Hospital and the commonest sites of involvement are the nasopharynx (29.1%), cervical lymph nodes (22.6%), oral cavity (10.2%), thyroid (8.2%) and skin (6.5%). Histologically, 87% of tumours are epithelial in nature. The results of this study show that nasopharyngeal carcinoma is commonest in Chinese males, while oral and laryngeal malignancies occur more frequently in Indians.

  18. Targeting Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells: Current Advances and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, A C; Owen, J H; Prince, M E

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), or tumor-initiating cells, comprise a subset of tumor cells with demonstrated ability for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Targeting of CSCs remains an attractive yet elusive therapeutic option, with the goal of increasing specificity and effectiveness in tumor eradication, as well as decreasing off-target or systemic toxicity. Research into further characterization and targeted therapy toward head and neck CSCs is an active and rapidly evolving field. This review discusses the current state of research into therapy against head and neck CSCs and future directions for targeted therapy.

  19. Can the medical home reduce cancer morbidity and mortality?

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard C; Altshuler, Marc

    2009-12-01

    Addressing our current health care crisis will demand 2 forms of health care reform: reform of health care coverage and transformation of health care delivery. Most policy makers have accepted that primary care must play a prominent role in a new health care delivery vehicle. A new concept, the medical home, has emerged as a possible model of how primary care can improve performance and help control costs. Although the medical home concept has not yet been applied to cancer care, elements of the concept have the potential to improve cancer prevention efforts and to help coordinate care of individuals diagnosed with cancer. This article explores the possible role of the medical home in the war on cancer. PMID:19913189

  20. Natural vitamin C intake and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortiuma,b

    PubMed Central

    Edefonti, Valeria; Hashibe, Mia; Parpinel, Maria; Turati, Federica; Serraino, Diego; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olshan, Andrew F.; Zevallos, Jose P.; Winn, Deborah M.; Moysich, Kirsten; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Levi, Fabio; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Bosetti, Cristina; Galeone, Carlotta; Schantz, Stimson; Yu, Guo-Pei; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Chuang, Shu-Chun; La Vecchia, Carlo; Decarli, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of associations between single nutrients and head and neck cancer (HNC) is still more limited and less consistent than that for fruit and vegetables. However, clarification of the protective mechanisms of fruit and vegetables is important to our understanding of HNC etiology. We investigated the association between vitamin C intake from natural sources and cancer of the oral cavity/pharynx and larynx using individual-level pooled data from ten case-control studies (5959 cases and 12248 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. After harmonization of study-specific exposure information via the residual method, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression models on quintile categories of ’non-alcohol energy-adjusted’ vitamin C intake. In the presence of heterogeneity of the estimated ORs among studies, we derived those estimates from generalized linear mixed models. Higher intakes of vitamin C were inversely related to oral and pharyngeal (OR=0.54, 95% CI: 0.45–0.65, for the fifth quintile category versus the first one, p for trend<0.001) and laryngeal cancers (OR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.40–0.68, p for trend=0.006), although in the presence of heterogeneity among studies for both sites. Inverse associations were consistently observed for the anatomical subsites of oral and pharyngeal cancer, and across strata of age, sex, education, body mass index, tobacco, and alcohol, for both cancer sites. The inverse association of vitamin C intake from foods with HNC may reflect a protective effect on these cancers; however, we cannot rule out other explanations. PMID:25627906

  1. Head and neck cancer in elderly patients: is microsurgical free-tissue transfer a safe procedure?

    PubMed

    Tarsitano, A; Pizzigallo, A; Sgarzani, R; Oranges, C M; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

    2012-12-01

    The safety and success of microvascular transfer have been well documented in the general population, but the good results achieved with the use of free flaps in elderly patients have received little attention. This study sought to identify differences in complications, morbidity and functional outcomes between elderly (≥ 75 years) and younger (< 75 years) patients treated surgically for advanced head and neck cancer using the Head and Neck 35 module of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire. Patient treatment consisted of composite resection, including excision of the primary tumour with ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissection and microvascular reconstruction. Eighty-five microvascular tissue transfers were performed to reconstruct major surgical defects. Postoperative radiation therapy was performed when indicated. Total flap loss occurred in three cases in elderly patients and two cases in younger patients. The rates of major surgical complication were 9% in young patients and 11% in elderly patients. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in the rates of major and minor flap complications, morbidity or long-term functional outcome. The results of the present analysis indicate that free-flap microvascular reconstruction can be considered a safe procedure in elderly patients with head and neck cancer.

  2. Anticancer activity of drug conjugates in head and neck cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2016-06-01

    Sexually transmitted oral cancer/head and neck cancer is increasing rapidly. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is playing a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). Paclitaxel is a widely used anticancer drug for breast, ovarian, testicular, cervical, non-small cell lung, head and neck cancer. However, it is water insoluble and orally inactive. We report the synthesis of water soluble nanosize conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide by employing native chemical ligation. We performed a native chemical ligation between the N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) ester of paclitaxel succinate and cysteine at pH 6.5 to give the cysteine-conjugated paclitaxel derivative. The thiol functionality of cysteine was activated and subsequently conjugated to multiarm thiol-PEG to obtain the paclitaxel branched PEG conjugate. Finally, we conjugated an EGFR-targeting peptide to obtain conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide. These conjugates show anticancer activity against squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck cells (SCCHN, Tu212).

  3. Is benchmarking possible in audit of early outcomes after operations for head and neck cancer?

    PubMed

    Tighe, David; Sassoon, Isabel; Kwok, A; McGurk, Mark

    2014-12-01

    There is a need for a validated means of adjusting for case mix in morbidity audits of patients with cancer of the head and neck. To address this, we did a multicentre audit of 3 U.K. NHS cancer networks that treat patients with head and neck cancer, to compare the incidence of early adverse postoperative outcomes and to develop a means of adjusting for case mix. We did a retrospective and prospective audit of the case notes of 901 consecutive patients who had 1034 operations for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck under general anaesthesia at 3 NHS hospitals. Analysis of raw data showed postoperative 30-day mortality (n=17) to be consistent between sites (1.7%-1.9%) but 30-day complication rates varied more (34%-49%). Logistic regression models predicting morbidity discriminated well (area under the curve 0.74-0.76). Adjusted morbidity rates for the 3 units were compared on a funnel plot with 95% and 99% confidence intervals to account for random variation. It is possible to benchmark surgical performance by focusing on early postoperative outcomes in head and neck surgery. Morbidity is common and usually has a considerable impact on recovery, bed occupancy, cost, and the patient's perception of the quality of care.

  4. The association of lymph node volume with cervical metastatic lesions in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Tai; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Wang, Ching-Ping; Wang, Chen-Chi; Lin, Whe-Dar; Liu, Shih-An

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if volume of cervical lymph node measured via computed tomography (CT) could differentiate metastatic from benign lesions in head and neck cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective review of chart and images in a tertiary referring center in Taiwan. Patients with head and neck cancers underwent radical, modified radical or functional neck dissection were enrolled. The CT images before operation were reassessed by a radiologist and were compared with the results of pathological examination. A total of 102 patients were included for final analyses. Most patients were male (n = 96, 94%) and average age was 50.1 years. Although the average nodal volume in patients with cervical metastases was higher than those of patients without cervical metastases, it was not an independent factor associated with cervical metastasis after controlling for other variables; however, central nodal necrosis on enhanced CT image [odds ratio (OR) 18.95, P = 0.008) and minimal axial diameter >7.5 mm (OR 6.868, P = 0.001) were independent factors correlated with cervical metastasis. Therefore, the volume of cervical lymph node measured from CT images cannot predict cervical metastases in head and neck cancer patients. Measurement of minimal axial diameter of the largest lymph node is a simple and more accurate way to predict cervical metastasis instead.

  5. Perineural Spread of Head and Neck Cancer: Ophthalmic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Ableman, Thomas Benton; Newman, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Head and neck malignancies with orbital involvement present difficult decisions to the treating physician. When the spread is perineural, the challenges are greater due to the incipient nature of the spread and the fact that the orbit can also be involved by centrifugal spread from the non-ophthalmic branches of the trigeminal nerve. The disease is often misdiagnosed and the subsequent delay in treatment results in worse outcomes. This article discusses the evaluation of the eye and the many facets of orbital involvement by perineural spread of malignancy including the treatment of complications. PMID:27123389

  6. Molecular Biology and Immunology of Head & Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Theresa; Califano, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis In recent years our knowledge and understanding of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has expanded dramatically. New high-throughput sequencing technologies have accelerated these discoveries since the first reports of whole exome sequencing of HNSCC tumors in 2011. In addition, the discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) in relationship with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma has shifted our molecular understanding of the disease. New investigation into the role of immune evasion in HNSCC has also led to potential novel therapies based on immune specific systemic therapies. PMID:25979390

  7. Molecular biology and immunology of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Califano, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, our knowledge and understanding of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has expanded dramatically. New high-throughput sequencing technologies have accelerated these discoveries since the first reports of whole-exome sequencing of HNSCC tumors in 2011. In addition, the discovery of human papillomavirus in relationship with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma has shifted our molecular understanding of the disease. New investigation into the role of immune evasion in HNSCC has also led to potential novel therapies based on immune-specific systemic therapies.

  8. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  9. The effects of mucositis on quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Judith A; McCaffrey, Ruth

    2006-02-01

    A search of the literature from 1993-2005 revealed four articles on quality-of-life issues for patients with head and neck cancer who develop mucositis. This article reviews four views on quality-of-life issues for patients who receive cancer treatments and develop mucositis. Small samples were utilized in each of the reviewed articles; however, because of the studies' qualitative designs, researchers concluded that quality-of-life issues exist among patients with head and neck cancer who are undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. Nurses play a significant role in assisting patients to tolerate their treatments. Further research is necessary to develop effective nursing interventions to improve quality of life for patients who develop mucositis while undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  10. Cetuximab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-26

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  11. Effects of radiation therapy on T-lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.C.; Chretien, P.B.; Suter, C.M.; Revie, D.R.; Tomazic, V.T.; Blanchard, C.L.; Aygun, C.; Amornmarn, R.; Ordonez, J.V.

    1985-10-01

    Cellular immunity was assessed in 85 patients with head and neck cancer with monoclonal antibodies to lymphocyte surface antigens that identify total T cells, helper cells, and suppressor cells. The control group consisted of 22 healthy volunteers. Nine patients who had surgical procedures for benign diseases were also studied. Compared with the controls, the patients with cancer who received radiation therapy had a significant decrease in total lymphocytes, T cells, helper cells, suppressor cells, and decreased helper/suppressor cell ratio. Significant decreases in lymphocyte subpopulations were not detected in patients tested before treatment or in patients treated with surgery alone. The immune deficits observed were prolonged in duration, with some present in the patients studied up to 11 years after radiation therapy. This long-lasting immune depression may have relevance to tumor recurrences and second primaries in patients with head and neck cancer treated by radiation therapy and to attempts at increasing cure rates with adjuvant agents that improve immune reactivity.

  12. Emotions and coping of patients with head and neck cancers after diagnosis: A qualitative content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, A; Juvva, S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Patients suffering with head and neck cancers are observed to have a relatively high risk of developing emotional disturbances after diagnosis and treatment. These emotional concerns can be best understood and explored through the method of content analysis or qualitative data. Though a number of qualitative studies have been conducted in the last few years in the field of psychosocial oncology, none have looked at the emotions experienced and the coping by head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five new cases of postsurgery patients of head and neck cancers were qualitatively interviewed regarding the emotions experienced and coping strategies after diagnosis. Results: Qualitative content analysis of the in-depth interviews brought out that patients experienced varied emotions on realizing that they were suffering from cancer, the cause of which could be mainly attributed to three themes: 1) knowledge of their illness; 2) duration of untreated illness; and 3) object of blame. They coped with their emotions by either: 1) inculcating a positive attitude and faith in the doctor/treatment, 2) ventilating their emotions with family and friends, or 3) indulging in activities to divert attention. Conclusion: The results brought out a conceptual framework, which showed that an in-depth understanding of the emotions — Their root cause, coping strategies, and spiritual and cultural orientations of the cancer survivor — Is essential to develop any effective intervention program in India. PMID:27320951

  13. Long term cerebral and vascular complications after irradiation of the neck in head and neck cancer patients: a prospective cohort study: study rationale and protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful treatment options for cancer result in more young long-term survivors prone for long-term complications. Carotid artery vasculopathy is a potential long-term complication after radiotherapy of the neck, resulting in cerebrovascular events and probably deficits in cognitive and motor functioning. Better insight into the underlying pathofysiology of radiotherapy induced carotid artery vasculopathy is needed for prognostic purposes and to develop preventive strategies. Methods/Design The current study is a prospective cohort study on the long-term cerebral and vascular complications after radiotherapy of the neck, in 103 patients treated for head and neck cancer, included in our study database between 2002 and 2008. Baseline protocol (before radiotherapy) included screening for cerebrovascular risk factors and intima media thickness measurement of carotid arteries by ultrasonography. Follow-up assessment more than 5 years after radiotherapy included screening of cerebrovascular risk factors, cerebrovascular events, neurological examination with gait and balance tests, extensive neuropsychological examination, self-report questionnaires, ultrasonography of the carotid arteries with measurement of intima media thickness and elastography, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance angiography of the carotid arteries. Discussion The current study adds to the understanding of the causes and consequences of long-term cerebral and vascular changes after radiotherapy of the neck. These data will be helpful to develop a protocol for diagnostic and preventive strategies for long-term neurological complications in future head and neck cancer patients with anticipated radiotherapy treatment. PMID:24942263

  14. Biomarkers of head and neck cancer, tools or a gordian knot?

    PubMed Central

    Lampri, Evangeli S; Chondrogiannis, Georgios; Ioachim, Elli; Varouktsi, Anna; Mitselou, Antigoni; Galani, Aggeliki; Briassoulis, Evangelos; Kanavaros, Panagiotis; Galani, Vasiliki

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck tumors comprise a wide spectrum of heterogeneous neoplasms for which biomarkers are needed to aid in earlier diagnosis, risk assessment and therapy response. Personalized medicine based on predictive markers linked to drug response, it is hoped, will lead to improvements in outcomes and avoidance of unnecessary treatment in carcinoma of the head and neck. Because of the heterogeneity of head and neck tumors, the integration of multiple selected markers in association with the histopathologic features is advocated for risk assessment. Validation of each biomarker in the context of clinical trials will be required before a specific marker can be incorporated into daily practice. Furthermore, we will give evidence that some proteins implicated in cell-cell interaction, such as CD44 may be involved in the multiple mechanism of the development and progression of laryngeal lesions and may help to predict the risk of transformation of the benign or precancerous lesions to cancer. PMID:26379825

  15. Treatment Response Assessment of Head and Neck Cancers on CT Using Computerized Volume Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hadjiiski, L.; Mukherji, S.K.; Gujar, S.K.; Sahiner, B.; Ibrahim, M.; Street, E.; Moyer, J.; Worden, F.P.; Chan, H.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Head and neck cancer can cause substantial morbidity and mortality Our aim was to evaluate the potential usefulness of a computerized system for segmenting lesions in head and neck CT scans and for estimation of volume change of head and neck malignant tumors in response to treatment. Materials and Methods CT scans from a pretreatment examination and a post 1-cycle chemotherapy examination of 34 patients with 34 head and neck primary-site cancers were collected. The computerized system was developed in our laboratory. It performs 3D segmentation on the basis of a level-set model and uses as input an approximate bounding box for the lesion of interest. The 34 tumors included tongue, tonsil, vallecula, supraglottic, epiglottic, and hard palate carcinomas. As a reference standard, 1 radiologist outlined full 3D contours for each of the 34 primary tumors for both the pre- and posttreatment scans and a second radiologist verified the contours. Results The correlation between the automatic and manual estimates for both the pre- to post-treatment volume change and the percentage volume change for the 34 primary-site tumors was 0.95, with an average error of −2.4 ± 8.5% by automatic segmentation. There was no substantial difference and specific trend in the automatic segmentation accuracy for the different types of primary head and neck tumors, indicating that the computerized segmentation performs relatively robustly for this application. Conclusions The tumor size change in response to treatment can be accurately estimated by the computerized segmentation system relative to radiologists' manual estimations for different types of head and neck tumors. PMID:20595363

  16. What's New in Head and Neck Cancer: Key Findings in 2015-2016 From ECCO/ESMO, ASTRO, and the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium.

    PubMed

    Yom, Sue S; Ganti, Apar K; Dietz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Scientific investigation is extremely active in the treatment, management, and optimization of therapies for patients with head and neck cancer. These issues have undergone recent rapid evolution in response to a changing epidemiology based on an increasing proportion of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer with advances in multimodality technologies to improve outcomes and reduce toxicity. Choices of definitive treatment of various anatomic subsites are being refined, balancing the relative indications and advantages of surgery or chemoradiation-based strategies. The major potential influence of HPV-associated etiology on therapy selection, prognostic factors, response to treatment, survival outcomes, and post-treatment surveillance has created a robust and distinct field of scientific inquiry around this patient subset. Meanwhile, for patient subsets where prognosis remains poor, therapeutic intensification is being explored, and for recurrent/metastatic disease, improved selection for salvage and novel systemic therapies are under development. For all patients with head and neck cancer, upholding principles of equity and access to the highly specialized care that results in optimal outcomes should be the goal.

  17. Individualized optimal surgical extent of the lateral neck in papillary thyroid cancer with lateral cervical metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Yong; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-06-01

    Despite an excellent prognosis, cervical lymph node (LN) metastases are common in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The presence of metastasis is associated with an increased risk of locoregional recurrence, which significantly impairs quality of life and may decrease survival. Therefore, it has been an important determinant of the extent of lateral LN dissection in the initial treatment of PTC patients with lateral cervical metastasis. However, the optimal extent of therapeutic lateral neck dissection (ND) remains controversial. Optimizing the surgical extent of LN dissection is fundamental for balancing the surgical morbidity and oncological benefits of ND in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. We reviewed the currently available literature regarding the optimal extent of lateral LN dissection in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. Even in cases with suspicion of metastatic LN at the single lateral level or isolated metastatic lateral LN, the application of ND including all sublevels from IIa and IIb to Va and Vb may be overtreatment, due to the surgical morbidity. When there is no suspicion of LN metastasis at levels II and V, or when multilevel aggressive neck metastasis is not found, sublevel IIb and Va dissection may not be necessary in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. Thus consideration of the individualized optimal surgical extent of lateral ND is important when treating PTC patients with lateral cervical metastasis.

  18. Sequence Variants and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer: Pooled Analysis in the INHANCE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Agudo, Antonio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Anantharaman, Devasena; Benhamou, Simone; Boccia, Stefania; Chen, Chu; Conway, David I.; Fabianova, Eleonora; Hayes, Richard B.; Healy, Claire M.; Holcatova, Ivana; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lagiou, Pagona; Lazarus, Philip; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Mates, Dana; Matsuo, Keitaro; Merletti, Franco; Metspalu, Andres; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Cadoni, Gabriella; Olshan, Andrew F.; Purdue, Mark; Ramroth, Heribert; Rudnai, Peter; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Elaine M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Talamini, Renato; Thomson, Peter; Wei, Qingyi; Zaridze, David; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Znaor, Ariana; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia

    2011-01-01

    Previous molecular epidemiological studies on head and neck cancer have examined various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), but there are very few documented associations. In the International head and neck cancer epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium, we evaluated associations between SNPs in the metabolism, cell cycle, and DNA repair pathways and the risk of head and neck cancer. We analyzed individual-level pooled data from 14 European, North American, Central American, and Asia case–control studies (5,915 head and neck cancer cases and 10,644 controls) participating in the INHANCE consortium. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for SNP effects, adjusting for age, sex, race, and country. We observed an association between head and neck cancer risk and MGMT Leu84Phe heterozygotes (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.68–0.93), XRCC1 Arg194Trp homozygotes Arg/Arg (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1–4.7), ADH1B Arg48His homozygotes Arg/Arg (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.9–4.0), ADH1C Ile350Val homozygotes Ile/Ile (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1–1.4), and the GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0–1.2). Among these results, MGMT Leu84Phe, ADH1B Arg48His, ADH1C Ile350Arg, and the GSTM1 null genotype had fairly low false positive report probabilities (<20%). We observed associations between ADH1B Arg48His, ADH1C Ile350Arg, and GSTM1 null genotype and head and neck cancer risk. No functional study currently supports the observed association for MGMT Leu84Phe, and the association with XRCC1 Arg194Trp may be a chance finding. PMID:22655231

  19. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  20. MicroRNAs as new biomarkers for human papilloma virus related head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhan; Wang, Jie; Huang, Yuanshuai

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers are the sixth most common cancer in the world and the predominant type of which consist of squamous cell carcinomas (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC). Besides tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the third leading cause of the occurrence of HNSCC. The presence of HPV is a distinct group of head and neck cancers exhibiting epidemiological, histopathological, clinical and prognostic differences opposed to the typical HNSCC. HPV positive HNSCC normally have a favorable prognosis compared with HPV negative HNSCC, so biomarkers suitable for the early detection of HPV positive HNSCC should be developed urgently to improve patient outcomes. HPV DNA screening is sensitive, but probably not useful because of the high prevalence of oral HPV and low risk of HNSCC. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since miRNAs have a role in the cancer development and HPV status may affect the miRNAs expression pattern in HNSCC, the specific of miRNAs' expression in HPV positive HNSCC may expound the role of HPV in HNSCC and be new biomarkers for the early detection of HNSCC. More excitingly, saliva as proximal biofluid in the context of HNSCC contains a good deal of miRNAs. These miRNAs are stabile and may be suitable for noninvasive biomarkers of HNSCC.

  1. Epigenetic alterations in head and neck cancer: prevalence, clinical significance, and implications.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-Yang

    2004-03-01

    Head and neck cancers are a group of malignancies with diverse biologic behaviors and a strong, well-established association with tobacco and alcohol use. Although the hunt for genetic alterations in head and neck cancer has continued in the past two decades, with unequivocal proof of a genetic role in multistage head and neck carcinogenesis, epigenetic alteration in association with promoter CpG island hypermethylation has emerged in the past few years as one of the most active areas of cancer research. It is now firmly believed that, in cancer cells, promoter CpG island hypermethylation (epigenetic alteration) represents a bona fide alternative mechanism, as opposed to genetic factors, such as gene mutations and deletion, in the inactivation of many tumor-suppressor genes. It is also realized that epigenetic and genetic factors often work together, affecting multiple cellular pathways, such as cell-cycle regulation, DNA repair, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cell-to-cell adhesion, during the process of tumor growth and progression.

  2. The association between malnutrition and psychological distress in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L.; Poulin, P.; Feldstain, A.; Chasen, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Malnutrition and psychological distress are often seen in patients with head-and-neck cancer, but little is known about the interrelationships between those two symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between malnutrition and psychological distress in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods Using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment, 99 patients with advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer were screened for nutrition status. The patients were also screened for psychosocial distress (using the Distress Thermometer) and for psychosocial issues (using the Problem Checklist). Any relationship between malnutrition and psychosocial distress was determined by regression and correlation analysis. We also used t-tests to compare distress levels for patients with and without specific nutrition-related symptoms. Results The study group included 80 men and 19 women [mean age: 58.4 ± 10.9 years (range: 23–85 years)]. The correlation between poorer nutrition status and level of psychological distress was significant r = 0.37 (p < 0.001). Specifically, reduced food intake and symptoms were both positively associated with distress: r = 0.27 and r = 0.29 respectively, both significant at p < 0.01. After controlling for the effects of psychosocial problems and pain, nutrition status remained a significant predictor of distress, explaining 3.8% of the variance in the distress scores of the patients (p < 0.05). Conclusions Malnutrition and symptoms were strongly related to distress in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Our results suggest the need for further research into the complex relationship between nutrition status and distress and into the management of both nutrition and distress in cancer care. PMID:24311956

  3. Predictors of Poor Sleep Quality Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Duffy, Sonia A.; Ronis, David L.; Garetz, Susan L.; McLean, Scott A.; Fowler, Karen E.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The objective of this study was to determine the predictors of sleep quality among head and neck cancer patients 1 year after diagnosis. Study Design This was a prospective, multisite cohort study of head and neck cancer patients (N = 457). Methods Patients were surveyed at baseline and 1 year after diagnosis. Chart audits were also conducted. The dependent variable was a self-assessed sleep score 1 year after diagnosis. The independent variables were a 1 year pain score, xerostomia, treatment received (radiation, chemotherapy, and/or surgery), presence of a feeding tube and/or tracheotomy, tumor site and stage, comorbidities, depression, smoking, problem drinking, age, and sex. Results Both baseline (67.1) and 1-year post-diagnosis (69.3) sleep scores were slightly lower than population means (72). Multivariate analyses showed that pain, xerostomia, depression, presence of a tracheotomy tube, comorbidities, and younger age were statistically significant predictors of poor sleep 1 year after diagnosis of head and neck cancer (P < .05). Smoking, problem drinking, and female sex were marginally significant (P < .09). Type of treatment (surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy), primary tumor site, and cancer stage were not significantly associated with 1-year sleep scores. Conclusions Many factors adversely affecting sleep in head and neck cancer patients are potentially modifiable and appear to contribute to decreased quality of life. Strategies to reduce pain, xerostomia, depression, smoking, and problem drinking may be warranted, not only for their own inherent value, but also for improvement of sleep and the enhancement of quality of life. PMID:20513034

  4. What Does PET Imaging Add to Conventional Staging of Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Pohar, Surjeet . E-mail: poharss@evms.edu; Brown, Robert B.S.; Newman, Nancy; Koniarczyk, Michael; Hsu, Jack; Feiglin, David

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of PET scans in the staging of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The charts of 25 patients who underwent neck dissection, computed tomography (CT) scan, and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging as part of their initial work-up for a head and neck squamous cell cancer between 2000-2003 were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical examination, triple endoscopy, and chest radiograph as part of their clinical staging, adhering to American Joint Commission for Cancer criteria. In addition to the clinical nodal (N) stage, PET findings were incorporated to determine a second type of N staging: clinical N + PET stage. The number of neck sides and nodal levels involved on CT or PET and on pathologic examination were recorded. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detection of nodal disease were similar for CT and FDG-PET. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were similar for both diagnostic tests. None of our 25 patients had unsuspected distant disease detected by PET. Conclusion: The addition of PET imaging did not improve diagnostic accuracy in our patients compared with CT. PET scanning did not alter clinical management in any of the patients.

  5. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  6. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle as a prognostic indicator of survival in head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Władysiuk, M.S.; Mlak, R.; Morshed, K.; Surtel, W.; Brzozowska, A.; Małecka-Massalska, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phase angle could be an alternative to subjective global assessment for the assessment of nutrition status in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 75 stage iiib and iv head-and-neck patients treated at the Otolaryngology Department, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Lublin, Poland. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was performed in all patients using an analyzer that operated at 50 kHz. The phase angle was calculated as reactance divided by resistance (Xc/R) and expressed in degrees. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate survival. Results Median overall survival in the cohort was 32.0 months. At the time of analysis, 47 deaths had been recorded in the cohort (62.7%). The risk of shortened overall survival was significantly higher in patients whose phase angle was less than 4.733 degrees than in the remaining patients (19.6 months vs. 45 months, p = 0.0489; chi-square: 3.88; hazard ratio: 1.8856; 95% confidence interval: 1.0031 to 3.5446). Conclusions Phase angle might be prognostic of survival in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Further investigation in a larger population is required to confirm our results. PMID:27803609

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  8. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  9. The characteristics of human papillomavirus DNA in head and neck cancers and papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Major, T; Szarka, K; Sziklai, I; Gergely, L; Czeglédy, J

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine the prevalence, type, physical state, and viral load of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cases of head and neck cancer and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Methods: The prevalence and type of HPV DNA was determined in 27 fresh frozen tissue specimens from patients with head and neck cancers and 16 specimens from 10 patients with RRP by MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent restriction enzyme cleavage. The physical state of HPV DNA was analysed by E1, E2, and E1E2 specific PCRs and Southern blot hybridisation (SBH). Results: HPV DNA was detected in 13 of 27 cancers and 10 of 10 papillomas. Both low risk HPV-6 and HPV-11 and high risk HPV-16 were present in cancers in low copy numbers, whereas papillomas exclusively harboured low risk HPV-6 and HPV-11. E1E2 PCRs failed to determine the physical state of HPV in cancers except one case where HPV-6 DNA was integrated. In contrast to cancers, all papillomas showed the episomal state of HPV DNA and a relatively higher viral load. Conclusions: Based on the prevalence, type, physical state, and copy number of HPV DNA, cancers and papillomas tend to show a different HPV DNA profile. The 100% positivity rate of low risk HPV types confirms the role of HPV-6 and HPV-11 in the aetiology of RRP. PMID:15623482

  10. Influence of excisional or incisional biopsy of metastatic neck nodes on the management of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.T.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.

    1985-08-01

    Between November 1964 and December 1981, 80 patients who had undergone an open biopsy of a cervical lymph node containing squamous cell carcinoma were treated with curative intent in the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy. Irradiation was the initial step in the definitive treatment of all patients, followed by neck dissection and/or primary resection, as indicated. The patients were divided into two groups. (a) NX (no gross residual neck disease) (25 patients). No neck dissections were added following irradiation in this group of patients. The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in the NX group was 79%, and the rate of neck disease control was 96%. (b) Gross residual neck disease (55 patients). The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in this group of patients was 31%, and the rate of neck disease control was 64%. The more consistent addition of a neck dissection in recent years has resulted in improved neck control rates in this group. There are some differences in the rates of neck control, control above the clavicles, survival, distant metastasis, and complications between this series and other reported series in which open neck-node biopsy preceded definitive treatment. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed.

  11. Life Priorities in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Between Ages of 45 to 65.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hasan Huseyin; Ahmadov, Asif; Cebeci, Suleyman; Binar, Murat; Karahatay, Serdar

    2016-06-01

    Diseases in head and neck cancer patients and applied therapies according to former affect life quality to a higher extent. In this paper, life priorities in 49 patients with head and neck cancer who referred to Gulhane Military Medical Academy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and the relationship between these priorities and sociodemographic properties have been studied. Following life priorities have been observed more important for the patients: to communicate with people in social places, to eat without any help by themselves, external appearance, taste and odor sense, continuing sexual life. Other priorities have been observed less important for the patients: attending social activities like cinema and theater, swimming pool and sea sports, money required for check-ups, necessities like time. Besides, these necessities do not show dissimilarities to any significant extent according to sociodemographic properties of the patients. PMID:27244211

  12. Effectiveness of prophylactic retropharyngeal lymph node irradiation in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the prevention of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods A retrospective review of 76 patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiation or postoperative radiotherapy with IMRT or IGRT who were at risk for retropharyngeal nodal recurrences because of anatomic site (hypopharynx, nasopharynx, oropharynx) and/or the presence of nodal metastases was undertaken. The prevalence of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences was assessed on follow-up positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scans. Results At a median follow-up of 22 months (4–53 months), no patient developed retropharyngeal nodal recurrences. Conclusion Prophylactic irradiation of retropharyngeal lymph nodes with IMRT or IGRT provides effective regional control for individuals at risk for recurrence in these nodes. PMID:22708791

  13. Applying the molecular biology and epigenetics of head and neck cancer in everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Glazer, Chad A; Chang, Steven S; Ha, Patrick K; Califano, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a significant increase in knowledge regarding the molecular biology and epigenetics of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This has been aided by the steady development of new technology and novel techniques aimed at elucidating additional aberrant molecular alterations characteristic of HNSCC, including the advent of high throughput assays and the development of more sophisticated bioinformatics tools. In addition, advancements in the field of cancer epigenetics and microRNA have increased the complexity of understanding HNSCC tumorigenesis. These advances have lead to an increasing number of translational studies in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of head and neck cancer. The end result is that molecular biomarkers, gene detection panels and targeted therapeutics are becoming a reality for the care of patients with HNSCC. In this article, we will focus on the many implications of this research as it pertains to clinical practice and the treatment of HNSCC patients.

  14. Soothing and balmy, cure without disfigurement: Benjamin Bye, false promises, and head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jennifer; Shuman, Andrew G

    2015-04-01

    One century ago, patients dreaded a diagnosis of head and neck cancer, fearing not only the progression of the disease but also the prospect of surgery. A cadre of charlatans preyed upon these fears to make a profit. We unearth the tale of Benjamin Bye, an Indianapolis doctor peddling the Combination Oil Cure. His collection of creams applied to the face offered unsuspecting patients a painless cure of their head and neck cancer. Bye eventually came under the fire of muckrakers as well as the federal government. Not long thereafter, Bye's practice was declared fraudulent, and the US Postmaster General refused to send his products. Bye's story recalls a time in which curative options were few and fear of malignancy was pervasive. Today, as our treatment armamentarium grows, we are reminded to critically assess efficacy, honestly discuss options with patients, and ensure that charlatanism remains a shadow of the past. PMID:25338669

  15. Dental care during and after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Singh, Nimisha

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a major health problem. Oral cancer is increasing in Indian subcontinent mainly due to lack of hygiene, tobacco use, chewing tobacco, smoking, and many other factors. Radiation therapy is the most common form of treatment along with surgery and chemotherapy. There are 2 types of complication that occurs during and after radiotherapy, that occur because of effects on normal tissue. Radiotherapy-induced effects occur on the oral mucosa salivary glands, bone, teeth, and musculature of face and neck. These complications needs special attention for their prevention and treatment, Preradiotherapy evaluation and disease stabilization are necessary in every patient, counseling of patients before during and after radiotherapy is important to help them become aware of several oral complications and their prevention. PMID:25937720

  16. An overview of randomised controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    Meta-analysis of the published results from 54 randomised controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer suggests that chemotherapy might increase absolute survival by 6.5% (95% confidence interval 3.1-9.9%). The odds ratio in favour of chemotherapy is 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.24-1.5). Single-agent chemotherapy given synchronously with radiotherapy increased survival by 12.1% (95% confidence interval 5-19%). The benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy was less: a rate difference of 3.7% (95% confidence interval 0.9-6.5%). The results suggest that the investigation of optimal agents and scheduling for synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy might still be important in clinical trials in head and neck cancer. PMID:7819055

  17. Soothing and balmy, cure without disfigurement: Benjamin Bye, false promises, and head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jennifer; Shuman, Andrew G

    2015-04-01

    One century ago, patients dreaded a diagnosis of head and neck cancer, fearing not only the progression of the disease but also the prospect of surgery. A cadre of charlatans preyed upon these fears to make a profit. We unearth the tale of Benjamin Bye, an Indianapolis doctor peddling the Combination Oil Cure. His collection of creams applied to the face offered unsuspecting patients a painless cure of their head and neck cancer. Bye eventually came under the fire of muckrakers as well as the federal government. Not long thereafter, Bye's practice was declared fraudulent, and the US Postmaster General refused to send his products. Bye's story recalls a time in which curative options were few and fear of malignancy was pervasive. Today, as our treatment armamentarium grows, we are reminded to critically assess efficacy, honestly discuss options with patients, and ensure that charlatanism remains a shadow of the past.

  18. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-21

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  19. Radiosensitization in head and neck cancer: do we have an alternative to platins? Role of taxanes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bindhu; Vishwanath, Lokesh; Venugopal, Bindu K

    2014-03-01

    In the past few decades, concurrent chemoradiation has conclusively been established as the standard of care in resectable, locally advanced head and neck cancer. Platins until now have been the established radiosensitizer in all concurrent settings, including postoperative high-risk scenarios. However, retrospective and evolving data suggest that they have their limitations in terms of compatibility, toxicity, and intrinsic resistance. There is therefore the need to explore the scope of other agents that may address these issues through a different mode of action, a better toxicity profile, or preferably a combination of both. In recent years, taxanes have emerged as an effective chemotherapeutic agent for head and neck cancer for recurrent or metastatic disease and chemoinduction for downstaging before definitive treatment. In this article, the authors review the potential of taxanes as an alternative to platins in the concurrent setting. PMID:24388535

  20. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was <50 Gy in all nine patients in the control group. The onset of this syndrome was 5 months, 6 months and 15 months. The early-onset DHS may have something to do with dose to the neck extensor muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy). PMID:26684338

  1. [Nutritional management of patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Lefebvre, L; Dandoy, S; Guérault, F; Ebran, M; Lebreton, M; Veresezan, O; Rigal, O; Clatot, F

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are standard treatment of head and neck cancer alone or associated to surgical treatment. Early (during treatment or the following weeks) and late side effects contribute to malnutrition in this population at risk. In this context, nutritional support adapted by dietary monitoring and enteral nutrition (nasogastric tube or gastrostomy) are often necessary. The early identification of the patients with high malnutrition risk and requiring enteral nutrition is necessary to improve the tolerance and efficacy of treatment.

  2. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E.; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment. PMID:26588072

  3. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment.

  4. Cold Atmospheric Plasma: A Promising Complementary Therapy for Squamous Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Welz, Christian; Emmert, Steffen; Canis, Martin; Becker, Sven; Baumeister, Philipp; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Morfill, Gregor E; Harréus, Uli; Zimmermann, Julia L

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 7th most common cancer worldwide. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, prognosis did not change for the last decades. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) presents the most promising new technology in cancer treatment. In this study the efficacy of a surface micro discharging (SMD) plasma device against two head and neck cancer cell lines was proved. Effects on the cell viability, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis induction were evaluated with the MTT assay, alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay) and Annexin-V/PI staining. MTT assay revealed that the CAP treatment markedly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 s). IC 50 was reached within maximal 120 seconds of CAP treatment. Comet assay analysis showed a dose dependent high DNA fragmentation being one of the key players in anti-cancer activity of CAP. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed induction of apoptosis in CAP treated HNSCC cell lines but no significant dose dependency was seen. Thus, we confirmed that SMD Plasma technology is definitely a promising new approach on cancer treatment. PMID:26588072

  5. Cigarette Smoking Prior to First Cancer and Risk of Second Smoking-Associated Cancers Among Survivors of Bladder, Kidney, Head and Neck, and Stage I Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Gibson, Todd; Sampson, Joshua; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Beane Freeman, Laura; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Caporaso, Neil; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Elena, Joanne; Freedman, Neal D.; Robien, Kim; Black, Amanda; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on smoking and second cancer risk among cancer survivors are limited. We assessed associations between smoking before first cancer diagnosis and risk of second primary smoking-associated cancers among survivors of lung (stage I), bladder, kidney, and head/neck cancers. Methods Data were pooled from 2,552 patients with stage I lung cancer, 6,386 with bladder cancer, 3,179 with kidney cancer, and 2,967 with head/neck cancer from five cohort studies. We assessed the association between prediagnostic smoking and second smoking-associated cancer risk with proportional hazards regression, and compared these estimates to those for first smoking-associated cancers in all cohort participants. Results Compared with never smoking, current smoking of ≥ 20 cigarettes per day was associated with increased second smoking-associated cancer risk among survivors of stage I lung (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.26; 95% CI, 0.92 to 11.6), bladder (HR = 3.67; 95% CI, 2.25 to 5.99), head/neck (HR = 4.45; 95% CI, 2.56 to 7.73), and kidney cancers (HR = 5.33; 95% CI, 2.55 to 11.1). These estimates were similar to those for first smoking-associated cancer among all cohort participants (HR = 5.41; 95% CI, 5.23 to 5.61). The 5-year cumulative incidence of second smoking-associated cancers ranged from 3% to 8% in this group of cancer survivors. Conclusion Understanding risk factors for second cancers among cancer survivors is crucial. Our data indicate that cigarette smoking before first cancer diagnosis increases second cancer risk among cancer survivors, and elevated cancer risk in these survivors is likely due to increased smoking prevalence. The high 5-year cumulative risks of smoking-associated cancers among current smoking survivors of stage I lung, bladder, kidney, and head/neck cancers highlight the importance of smoking cessation in patients with cancer. PMID:25385740

  6. Activation of the NOTCH pathway in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenyue; Gaykalova, Daria A; Ochs, Michael F; Mambo, Elizabeth; Arnaoutakis, Demetri; Liu, Yan; Loyo, Myriam; Agrawal, Nishant; Howard, Jason; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Sun; Fertig, Elana; Sidransky, David; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Choudhary, Ashish; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Latham, Gary; Bishop, Justin; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H; Hennessey, Patrick; Chung, Christine H; Califano, Joseph A

    2014-02-15

    NOTCH1 mutations have been reported to occur in 10% to 15% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). To determine the significance of these mutations, we embarked upon a comprehensive study of NOTCH signaling in a cohort of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 normal mucosal samples through a set of expression, copy number, methylation, and mutation analyses. Copy number increases were identified in NOTCH pathway genes, including the NOTCH ligand JAG1. Gene set analysis defined a differential expression of the NOTCH signaling pathway in HNSCC relative to normal tissues. Analysis of individual pathway-related genes revealed overexpression of ligands JAG1 and JAG2 and receptor NOTCH3. In 32% of the HNSCC examined, activation of the downstream NOTCH effectors HES1/HEY1 was documented. Notably, exomic sequencing identified 5 novel inactivating NOTCH1 mutations in 4 of the 37 tumors analyzed, with none of these tumors exhibiting HES1/HEY1 overexpression. Our results revealed a bimodal pattern of NOTCH pathway alterations in HNSCC, with a smaller subset exhibiting inactivating NOTCH1 receptor mutations but a larger subset exhibiting other NOTCH1 pathway alterations, including increases in expression or gene copy number of the receptor or ligands as well as downstream pathway activation. Our results imply that therapies that target the NOTCH pathway may be more widely suitable for HNSCC treatment than appreciated currently.

  7. Activation of the NOTCH pathway in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenyue; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Ochs, Michael F.; Mambo, Elizabeth; Arnaoutakis, Demetri; Liu, Yan; Loyo, Myriam; Agrawal, Nishant; Howard, Jason; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Sun; Fertig, Elana; Sidransky, David; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Choudhary, Ashish; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Latham, Gary; Bishop, Justin; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H.; Hennessey, Patrick; Chung, Christine H.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    NOTCH1 mutations have been reported to occur in 10 to 15% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). To determine the significance of these mutations, we embarked upon a comprehensive study of NOTCH signaling in a cohort of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 normal mucosal samples through a set of expression, copy number, methylation and mutation analyses. Copy number increases were identified in NOTCH pathway genes including the NOTCH ligand JAG1. Gene set analysis defined a differential expression of the NOTCH signaling pathway in HNSCC relative to normal tissues. Analysis of individual pathway-related genes revealed overexpression of ligands JAG1 and JAG2 and receptor NOTCH3. In 32% of the HNSCC examined, activation of the downstream NOTCH effectors HES1/HEY1 was documented. Notably, exomic sequencing identified 5 novel inactivating NOTCH1 mutations in 4/37 of the tumors analyzed, with none of these tumors exhibiting HES1/HEY1 overexpression. Our results revealed a bimodal pattern of NOTCH pathway alterations in HNSCC, with a smaller subset exhibiting inactivating NOTCH1 receptors mutations but a larger subset exhibiting other NOTCH1 pathway alterations, including increases in expression or gene copy number of the receptor or ligands as well as downstream pathway activation. Our results imply that therapies that target the NOTCH pathway may be more widely suitable for HNSCC treatment than appreciated currently. PMID:24351288

  8. The characteristics of advanced cancer patients followed at home, but admitted to the hospital for the last days of life.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Aielli, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding advanced cancer patients followed at home who are admitted to the hospital in the last days of life are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of patients who were hospitalized in the last days of life after being assisted by a home palliative care team. The secondary outcome was to identify possible risk factors for hospitalization. The charts were analyzed of a consecutive sample of advanced cancer patients admitted to hospital wards in the last days of life after being followed at home by a palliative care team. Of 550 consecutive patients followed at home, 138 (25.1 %) were admitted to the hospital. Younger patients were more likely to die in the hospital. In a logistic risk analysis adjusted for age, patients with lung and head-neck cancer were more likely to die in the hospital. Patients having a female relative or a female consort as a caregiver were more likely to die at home. CAGE-positive patients (7.25 %), and patients with a shorter period of home assistance were more likely transported to hospital before dying (p = 0.00 and p < 0.024, respectively). The most frequent reason for hospital admission was dyspnea. Admission was more frequent to the oncology ward. Patients who were admitted to the hospital died after a mean of 10.2 days (SD 8.2, range 0-40). This study provides preliminary data on the risk factors of hospitalization at the end of life for advanced cancer patients followed at home.

  9. The role of paclitaxel in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Vokes, E E; Haraf, D J; Stenson, K; Stupp, R; Malone, D; Levin, J; Weichselbaum, R R

    1995-10-01

    Current chemotherapeutic approaches to recurrent head and neck cancer have routinely yielded response rates of 10% to 30% (for single agents) and 30% to 50% (for combination chemotherapy). However, median survival times for patients with metastatic and/or recurrent disease have stagnated at around 6 months since the 1970s. The investigation of new drugs and treatment approaches thus continues to be a high priority. One such agent, paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ), has shown good single-agent activity and is also believed to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. We have focused on the addition of paclitaxel to the previously established combination of 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, and radiation therapy. The study goals are to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel when added to this combination as a 5-day continuous infusion on a biweekly schedule. Preliminary results of this ongoing study have demonstrated activity in patients with poor-prognosis head and neck cancer. Major dose-limiting toxicities have consisted of neutropenia and mucositis, and definition of a recommended phase II dose is in progress.

  10. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  11. Effects of enhanced bolus flavors on oropharyngeal swallow in patients treated for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara Roa; Logemann, Jerilyn A.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Lundy, Donna; Sullivan, Paula A.; Newman, Lisa A.; Lazarus, Cathy; Bacon, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment for head and neck cancer can reduce peripheral sensory input and impair oropharyngeal swallow. This study examined the effect of enhanced bolus flavor on liquid swallows in these patients. Methods Fifty-one patients treated for head and neck cancer with chemoradiation or surgery and 64 healthy adult control subjects served as subjects. All were randomized to receive sour, sweet, or salty bolus flavor. Patients were evaluated at 7–10 days, 1 month, and 3 months after completion of tumor treatment. Control subjects received 1 assessment. Results All bolus flavors affected oropharyngeal swallow; sour flavor significantly shortened pharyngeal transit time across all evaluations. Conclusions Sour flavor influenced the swallow of patients treated for head and neck cancer, as well as that of control subjects in a manner similar to those with neurologic impairment observed in an earlier study. Sour flavor may improve the speed of pharyngeal transit regardless of whether a patient has suffered peripheral or central sensory damage. PMID:22907789

  12. Head and neck cancer patients' experiences of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding: a Q-methodology study.

    PubMed

    Merrick, S; Farrell, D

    2012-07-01

    Head and neck cancer patients are at high risk of malnutrition and its complications and therefore often undergo non-oral nasogastric or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) nutrition support. However, there is little evidence that either approach is effective in this group. While one possible explanation for these findings relates to the relationship between artificial tube feeding and poor quality of life, there is little research that examines the patient's subjective experience of nutrition support. This study investigated the experiences of PEG tube feeding in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radical treatment. Conventional Q-methodology was used with 15 head and neck cancer patients, who rank-ordered 36 statements according to the extent to which these reflected their experiences of PEG tube feeding. The sorted statements were factor-analysed case-wise to provide clusters of similar experiences. Three perspectives emerged. Factor 1, labelled 'Constructive cognitive appraisal', focused around positive adaptation to, and acceptance of, PEG feeding. Factor 2, labelled 'Cognitive-affective dissonance', reflected ambivalence between cognitive acceptance and affective rejection of the PEG tube. Factor 3, labelled 'Emotion-focused appraisal', was characterised by tube-focused anxiety and fear. The findings broadly confirm Levanthal et al.'s Self-Regulatory Model of coping and support the need for genuine and individualised patient-centred nutritional care.

  13. Head and neck cancer patients' experiences of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding: a Q-methodology study.

    PubMed

    Merrick, S; Farrell, D

    2012-07-01

    Head and neck cancer patients are at high risk of malnutrition and its complications and therefore often undergo non-oral nasogastric or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) nutrition support. However, there is little evidence that either approach is effective in this group. While one possible explanation for these findings relates to the relationship between artificial tube feeding and poor quality of life, there is little research that examines the patient's subjective experience of nutrition support. This study investigated the experiences of PEG tube feeding in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radical treatment. Conventional Q-methodology was used with 15 head and neck cancer patients, who rank-ordered 36 statements according to the extent to which these reflected their experiences of PEG tube feeding. The sorted statements were factor-analysed case-wise to provide clusters of similar experiences. Three perspectives emerged. Factor 1, labelled 'Constructive cognitive appraisal', focused around positive adaptation to, and acceptance of, PEG feeding. Factor 2, labelled 'Cognitive-affective dissonance', reflected ambivalence between cognitive acceptance and affective rejection of the PEG tube. Factor 3, labelled 'Emotion-focused appraisal', was characterised by tube-focused anxiety and fear. The findings broadly confirm Levanthal et al.'s Self-Regulatory Model of coping and support the need for genuine and individualised patient-centred nutritional care. PMID:22329827

  14. The use of proton therapy in the treatment of head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Peter H; Lukens, J Nicholas; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin; Kirk, Maura; Lin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a commonly utilized treatment modality in the management of head and neck cancer. Given the close proximity of disease to critical normal tissues and structures, the delivery of external beam radiation therapy can result in severe acute and late toxicities, even when delivered with advanced photon-based techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The unique physical characteristics of protons make it a promising option in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer, with the potential to improve sparing of normal tissues and/or safely escalate radiation doses. Clinical implementation will require the continued development of advanced techniques such as intensity-modulated proton therapy, using pencil beam scanning, as well as rigorous methods of quality assurance and adaptive techniques to accurately adjust to changes in anatomy due to disease response. Ultimately, the widespread adaptation and implementation of proton therapy for head and neck cancer will require direct, prospective comparisons to standard techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, with a focus on measures such as toxicity, disease control, and quality of life. PMID:25415689

  15. Development of a Telehealth Intervention for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Studts, Jamie L.; Bumpous, Jeffrey M.; Gregg, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Liz; Keeney, Cynthia; Scharfenberger, Jennifer A.; Pfeifer, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Treatment for head and neck cancer precipitates a myriad of distressing symptoms. Patients may be isolated both physically and socially and may lack the self-efficacy to report problems and participate as partners in their care. The goal of this project was to design a telehealth intervention to address such isolation, develop patient self-efficacy, and improve symptom management during the treatment experience. Participatory action research and a review of the literature were used to develop electronically administered symptom management algorithms addressing all major symptoms experienced by patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers. Daily questions and related messages were then programmed into an easy-to-use telehealth messaging device, the Health Buddy®. Clinician and patient acceptance, feasibility, and technology issues were measured. Using participatory action research is an effective means for developing electronic algorithms acceptable to both clinicians and patients. The use of a simple tele-messaging device as an adjunct to symptom management is feasible, affordable, and acceptable to patients. This telehealth intervention provides support and education to patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers. PMID:19199847

  16. Radiobiological modeling of interplay between accelerated repopulation and altered fractionation schedules in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G; Bezak, Eva

    2009-10-01

    Head and neck cancer represents a challenge for radiation oncologists due to accelerated repopulation of cancer cells during treatment. This study aims to simulate, using Monte Carlo methods, the response of a virtual head and neck tumor to both conventional and altered fractionation schedules in radiotherapy when accelerated repopulation is considered. Although clinical trials are indispensable for evaluation of novel therapeutic techniques, they are time-consuming processes which involve many complex and variable factors for success. Models can overcome some of the limitations encountered by trials as they are able to simulate in less complex environment tumor cell kinetics and dynamics, interaction processes between cells and ionizing radiation and their outcome. Conventional, hyperfractionated and accelerated treatment schedules have been implemented in a previously developed tumor growth model which also incorporates tumor repopulation during treatment. This study focuses on the influence of three main treatment-related parameters, dose per fraction, inter fraction interval and length of treatment gap and gap timing based on RTOG trial data on head and neck cancer, on tumor control. The model has shown that conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is not able to eradicate the stem population of the tumor. Therefore, new techniques such as hyperfractionated/ accelerated radiotherapy schedules should be employed. Furthermore, the correct selection of schedule-related parameters (dose per fraction, time between fractions, treatment gap scheduling) is crucial in overcoming accelerated repopulation. Modeling of treatment regimens and their input parameters can offer better understanding of the radiobiological interactions and also treatment outcome.

  17. Genetic susceptibility to head and neck cancer: interaction between nutrition and mutagen sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S P; Zhang, Z F; Spitz, M S; Sun, M; Hsu, T C

    1997-06-01

    The development of head and neck cancer may depend not only on exposure to environmental carcinogens but also on a genetically based susceptibility to carcinogen-induced damage. This thesis presents a case-control study that demonstrates the significance of mutagen sensitivity, a measure of an individual's intrinsic DNA repair capacity against free radical damage, as a risk factor for the disease. As part of the case-control analysis, 167 previously untreated patients and 177 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed for various lifestyle factors including tobacco and alcohol habits, occupational exposures, and diet. Mutagen sensitivity expressed by each individual was determined by quantifying bleomycin-induced chromosomal breaks within peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Consistent with our initial observations and those of others, mutagen hypersensitivity was strongly associated with increased risk of head and neck cancer (odds ratio, 4.95; 95% confidence interval, 2.67 to 9.17) after adjusting for age, sex, and race. Low intake of vitamins C and E was also associated with an increased risk of disease and was interactive with mutagen sensitivity in risk estimates. Individuals with both a low intake of various antioxidants and increased chromosomal sensitivity to oxidant-induced DNA damage were at greatest risk. This study supports the concept that the risk of head and neck cancer is determined by a balance of factors that either enhance or protect against free radical oxygen damage, including innate capacities for DNA repair.

  18. Novel targets in HPV-negative head and neck cancer: overcoming resistance to EGFR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Burtness, Barbara; Bauman, Julie E; Galloway, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Cancers of the head and neck that arise from habitual exposure to carcinogens have lower cure rates than those that arise from infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), and intensification of cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation has not improved outcomes. HPV-negative head and neck cancers abundantly express EGFR, and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab, directed against EGFR, is the only targeted therapy that has improved disease survival so far. However, response rates to single-agent cetuximab are lower than 15%, and cetuximab given with chemotherapy or radiation leads to only a modest effect on survival. Thus, investigating the mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibition in HPV-negative head and neck cancer might help identify novel and active therapies. In this Review, we focus on therapies in development that target redundant receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, HER2 and MET), reduce or abrogate nuclear functions of EGFR, affect cellular trafficking by inhibition of histone deacetylase, or treatments that might address resistance that arises in the EGFR signalling stream (eg, aurora-kinase inhibitors and STAT decoys). PMID:23816296

  19. Intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer: The UCSF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; Singer, Mark I.; Garcia, Joaquin; Kaplan, Michael J.; Chan, Albert S.; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To review a single-institutional experience with the use of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for recurrent head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 137 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for recurrence or persistence of locoregional cancer of the head and neck. One hundred and thirteen patients (83%) had previously received external beam radiation as a component of definitive therapy. Ninety-four patients (69%) had squamous cell histology. Final surgical margins were microscopically positive in 56 patients (41%). IORT was delivered using either a modified linear accelerator or a mobile electron unit and was administered as a single fraction to a median dose of 15 Gy (range, 10-18 Gy). Median follow-up among surviving patients was 41 months (range, 3-122 months). Results: The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year estimates of in-field control after salvage surgery and IORT were 70%, 64%, and 61%, respectively. Positive margins at the time of IORT predicted for in-field failure (p = 0.001). The 3-year rates of locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 51%, 46%, and 36%, respectively. There were no perioperative fatalities. Complications included wound infection (4 patients), orocutaneous fistula (2 patients), flap necrosis (1 patient), trismus (1 patient), and neuropathy (1 patient). Conclusions: Intraoperative RT results in effective disease control with acceptable toxicity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent or persistent cancers of the head and neck.

  20. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  1. Autoantibody Approach for Serum-Based Detection of Head and Neck Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our long term goal is to improve survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) through early detection using simple noninvasive serum assays in an ELISA-like platform. The objective of this proposal is to improve and confirm the validity of a diagnostic serum assay based on a panel of cancer-specific biomarkers for early cancer detection in patients with HNSCC. Our central hypothesis is that the detection of antibody responses to HNSCC-specific antigens, using a panel of biomarkers, can provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity suitable for clinical testing in the primary setting to screen and diagnose HNSCC in high risk populations to improve early detection.

  2. [Genes associated with tobacco smoke-associated cancer of head and neck].

    PubMed

    Szyfter, Krzysztof; Giefing, Maciej; Jarmuz, Małgorzata; Kostrzewska-Poczekaj, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    The article presents the current techniques used for the identification of genes involved in tobacco smoke-associated cancers. The focus is set on the techniques derived from the conventional cytogenetics and includes fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomes hybridization (CGH) and its further improvement that is array-CGH, and other aspects of microarray DNA technology. The second part deals with the main findings concerning participation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in development and progression of tobacco smoke-associated head and neck cancers. PMID:19189577

  3. The history of sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer: From visualization of lymphatic vessels to sentinel nodes.

    PubMed

    de Bree, Remco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the history of sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer. Sentinel node biopsy is a minimally invasive technique to select patients for treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Although this procedure has only recently been accepted for early oral cancer, the first studies on visualization of the cervical lymphatic vessels were reported in the 1960s. In the 1980s mapping of lymphatic drainage from specific head and neck sites was introduced. Sentinel node biopsy was further developed in the 1990s and after validation in this century the procedure is routinely performed in early oral cancer in several head and neck centers. New techniques may improve the accuracy of sentinel node biopsy further, particularly in difficult subsites like the floor of mouth.

  4. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... JT, van Hillegersberg R, Dekker E, Oliveira C, Cats A, Hoogerbrugge N; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary ... JH, van Hillegersberg R, Ligtenberg M, Bleiker E, Cats A; Dutch Working Group on Hereditary Gastric Cancer. ...

  6. Diagnostic sensitivity of ¹⁸fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for detecting synchronous multiple primary cancers in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Norio; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Nishimura, Goshi

    2012-05-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) for detecting synchronous multiple primary cancers, particularly synchronous esophageal cancers in head and neck cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 230 head and neck cancer patients. All the patients routinely underwent the following examinations: urinalysis, occult blood, tumor marker detection [squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cytokeratin fragment (CYFRA), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)], esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy (when CEA was high or occult blood was positive), abdominal ultrasonography, plain chest computed tomography (CT), and PET. Bronchoscopy was performed when CT revealed lung shadow of central region. Synchronous multiple primary cancers were detected in 42 (18.2%) patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of PET for synchronous primary cancers was as follows: esophagus, 7.6% (1/13); stomach, 25.0% (2/8); lung, 66.7% (4/6); head and neck, 75.0% (3/4); colon, 0% (0/1); kidney, 0% (0/1); and subcutaneous, 100% (1/1). The sensitivity of PET for detecting synchronous esophageal cancers is low because these are early-stage cancers (almost stage 0-I). Therefore, it is necessary to perform esophagogastroduodenoscopy for detecting synchronous esophageal cancers. PET is an important additional tool for detecting synchronous multiple primary cancers because the diagnostic sensitivity of PET in synchronous head and neck cancer and lung cancer is high. But PET has the limitation of sensitivity for synchronous multiple primary cancers because the diagnostic sensitivity of PET in synchronous esophageal cancer is very low.

  7. Honey and Radiation-Induced Stomatitis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Bassampour, Shiva Sadat; Khajeh, Mahboobeh; Asgari, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a common oral complication which affects 100% of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy. Acute stomatitis might cause failure and delay radiotherapy. Attention to mouth hygiene, particularly using mouthwash, has a fundamental importance for these patients. Objectives: The current study came to addresses the effects of pure natural honey on radiation-induced stomatitis in patients with a variety of head and neck cancers. Patients and Methods: The present single-blinded nonrandomized controlled trial was conducted on 105 patients undergoing radiotherapy due to head and neck cancer at the radiation unit of Shafa hospital in Kerman, Iran, from October 2012 to March 2012. The research groups were selected by writing the names of the protocols (the mouthwashes of chamomile, honey and the common caring protocol at ward which uses water) on three cubes. The first extracted cube was related to the chamomile mouthwash (Matrica), the second to the honey mouthwash and the last cube to the water mouthwash. The first experimental group (n = 35) gurgled a solution containing 20 mL diluted honey, the second group gurgled a solution containing German chamomile, and the 35 patients in the control group were advised to gurgle 20 mL water (the ward routine). Results: The results showed that severe stomatitis in groups of honey, chamomile and control was 0, 5.7%, and 17.6%, respectively. On the 14th day, it was 0, 0, and 17.6%, respectively. There were significant differences between the three groups regarding the severity of stomatitis in the 14th day (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The application of natural honey is effective in managing and preventing radiation-induced stomatitis in patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:26568850

  8. COFFEE AND TEA INTAKE AND RISK OF HEAD AND NECK CANCER: POOLED ANALYSIS IN THE INTERNATIONAL HEAD AND NECK CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    PubMed Central

    Galeone, Carlotta; Tavani, Alessandra; Pelucchi, Claudio; Turati, Federica; Winn, Deborah M.; Levi, Fabio; Yu, Guo-Pei; Morgenstern, Hal; Kelsey, Karl; Maso, Luigino Dal; Purdue, Mark P.; McClean, Michael; Talamini, Renato; Hayes, Richard B.; Franceschi, Silvia; Schantz, Stimson; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Ferro, Gilles; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo; Hashibe, Mia

    2011-01-01

    Background Only a few studies have explored the relation between coffee and tea intake and head and neck (HN) cancers, with inconsistent results. Methods We pooled individual-level data from nine case-control studies of HN cancers, including 5139 cases and 9028 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for potential confounders. Results Caffeinated coffee intake was inversely related with the risk of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx (OP): the ORs were 0.96 (95% CI 0.94–0.98) for an increment of one cup per day and 0.61 (95% CI 0.47–0.80) in drinkers of >4 cups per day vs. non-drinkers. This latter estimate was consistent for different anatomical sites (ORs were 0.46, 95%CI 0.30–0.71 for oral cavity, 0.58, 95% CI 0.41–0.82 for oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal and 0.61, 95% CI 0.37–1.01 for OP not otherwise specified), and across strata of selected covariates. No association of caffeinated coffee drinking was found with laryngeal cancer (OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.64–1.45 in drinkers of >4 cups per day vs. non-drinkers). Data on decaffeinated coffee were too sparse for detailed analysis, but indicated no increased risk. Tea intake was not associated with HN cancer risk (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.89–1.11 for drinkers vs. non-drinkers). Conclusions This pooled-analysis of case-control studies support the hypothesis of an inverse association between caffeinated coffee drinking and OP cancer risk. Impact Given widespread use of coffee and the relatively high incidence and low survival of HN cancers, the observed inverse association may have appreciable public health relevance. PMID:20570908

  9. Advice about Work-Related Issues to Peers and Employers from Head and Neck Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Trojanowski, Lucy; Tamminga, Sietske J.; Ringash, Jolie; McQuestion, Maurene; Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study is to contribute to the sparse return-to-work literature on head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors. Interview participants were asked to reflect upon their work-related experience with cancer by answering two specific questions: (1) What advice would you give someone who has been newly diagnosed with head and neck cancer? (2) What advice would you give to employers of these people? Methods Data were gathered through 10 individual semi-structured in-depth interviews with HNC clinic patients at a regional cancer center’s head and neck clinic in Ontario, Canada. A constant comparative method of theme development was used. Codes identified in and derived from the data were discussed by research team members until consensus was reached. Codes with similar characteristics were grouped together and used to develop overarching themes. Results Work-related advice for peers focused on personal self-care and interactions within workplaces. Work-related advice to employers focused on demonstrating basic human values as well as the importance of communication. Discussion The study results suggest HNC clinic patients should be proactive with employers and help to set reasonable expectations and provide a realistic plan for work to be successfully completed. HNC clinic patients should develop communication skills to effectively disclose their cancer and treatment to employers. Conclusions In this exploratory study, HNC clinic patients’ advice was solution-focused underscoring the importance of self-care and pro-active communication and planning with employers. Employers were advised to demonstrate core human values throughout all phases of the work disability episode beginning at diagnosis. PMID:27070654

  10. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  11. The Role of HPV in Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cell Formation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark S.; Kokot, Niels; Sinha, Uttam K.

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory proposes that a minority of tumor cells are capable of self-replication and tumorigenesis. It is these minority of cells that are responsible for cancer metastasis and recurrence in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC). Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related cancer of the oropharynx is becoming more prevalent, which makes understanding of the relationship between HPV and CSCs more important than ever. This relationship is critical because CSC behavior can be predicted based on cell surface markers, which makes them a suitable candidate for targeted therapy. New therapies are an exciting opportunity to advance past the stalled outcomes in HNSCC that have plagued patients and clinicians for several decades. PMID:26907349

  12. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    PubMed

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., "stemness"), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology.

  13. The impact of virus in N3 node dissection for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Armas, Gian Luca; Su, Chih-Ying; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Fang, Fu-Min; Chen, Ching-Mei; Chien, Chih-Yen

    2008-11-01

    This study is to determine the impact of virus in surgical outcomes among patients of head and neck cancer with N3 lymph node metastasis. A retrospective analysis was conducted for 32 patients with operable N3 neck metastasis undergoing surgical treatment between January 1987 and October 2006. The nuclei of the tumor cells were investigated for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNAs and were taken into account as the variable for survival analysis. The primary sites were oropharynx in 11 patients, tongue in 3, buccal mucosa in 1, hypopharynx in 8 and unknown primary in 9. The five-year cumulative overall survival rate was 40.7% and 5-year cumulative regional control rate was 55.8%. The 5-year cumulative overall survival rate of patients with unknown primary site (72.9%) and HPV or EBV positive in the tumor (77.8%) were significantly higher than those patients with known primary site (31.3%) and HPV or EBV negative in the tumor (27.4%), respectively (P = 0.0335 and P = 0.0348, log rank test). In conclusion, surgery with adjuvant therapy offers reasonable outcomes for operable N3 node in head and neck cancer in our cohort. In addition, patients with HPV or EBV positive in the tumor have a better survival.

  14. Postradiotherapy quality of life for head-and-neck cancer patients is independent of xerostomia

    SciTech Connect

    Ringash, Jolie . E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Warde, Padraig; Lockwood, Gina; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Cummings, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and xerostomia over time for patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and materials: Patients with head-and-neck cancer were randomized to pilocarpine (n = 65) vs. placebo (n = 65) during RT. QOL was measured using the McMaster Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ). Xerostomia was measured on a linear analog scale. No statistically significant differences were observed between arms; all 130 patients were analyzed together. Results: Baseline QOL data were obtained for 98.5% of participants. The baseline HNRQ score of 5.7 declined significantly to 4.0 (p <0.0001) by RT Week 6 and returned to baseline (5.8) by 6 months after treatment. This represents a large, clinically important change of 1.7 of 7 (24%; effect size 1.34). The decline in HNRQ score during RT paralleled the onset of xerostomia on the linear analog scale (r = 0.36 at 1 month). After treatment, the QOL scores recovered without improvement in xerostomia. The trajectory of the linear analog scale score resembled that of the HNRQ's single xerostomia question (r = 0.75 at 1 month). Conclusion: Quality of life recovers to baseline after RT, despite persistent xerostomia. Either a response shift occurs or xerostomia in the absence of acute mucositis has a relatively small influence on overall QOL.

  15. Proton Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer: A Review of the Clinical Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Proton beam radiation has been used for cancer treatment since the 1950s, but recent increasing interest in this form of therapy and the construction of hospital-based and clinic-based facilities for its delivery have greatly increased both the number of patients and the variety of tumors being treated with proton therapy. The mass of proton particles and their unique physical properties (ie, the Bragg peak) allow proton therapy to spare normal tissues distal to the tumor target from incidental irradiation. Initial observations show that proton therapy is particularly useful for treating tumors in challenging locations close to nontarget critical structures. Specifically, improvements in local control outcomes for patients with chordoma, chonodrosarcoma, and tumors in the sinonasal regions have been reported in series using proton. Improved local control and survival outcomes for patients with cancer of the head and neck region have also been seen with the advent of improvements in better imaging and multimodality therapy comprising surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, aggressive local therapy in the proximity of critical normal structures to tumors in the head and neck region may produce debilitating early and late toxic effects. Great interest has been expressed in evaluating whether proton therapy can improve outcomes, especially early and late toxicity, when used in the treatment of head and neck malignancies. This review summarizes the progress made to date in addressing this question.

  16. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederholt, Peggy A. Connor, Nadine P.; Hartig, Gregory K.; Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

  17. Full-field OCT for fast diagnostic of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leeuw, Frederic; Casiraghi, Odile; Ben Lakhdar, Aïcha; Abbaci, Muriel; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) produces optical slices of tissue using white light interferometry providing in-depth 2D images, with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. These optical biopsy images are similar to those obtained with established histological procedures, but without tissue preparation and within few minutes. This technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion or at the time of its surgical management. Here we evaluate the clinical value of FFOCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by assessing the accuracy of the diagnosis done on FFOCT images from resected specimen. FFOCT images from Head and Neck samples were first compared to the gold standard (HES-conventional histology). An image atlas dedicated to the training of pathologists was built and diagnosis criteria were identified. Then, we performed a morphological correlative study: both healthy and cancerous samples from patients who undergo Head and Neck surgery of oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx were imaged. Images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists and the FFOCT based diagnostics were compared with HES (gold standard) of the same samples. Here we present preliminary results showing that FFOCT provides a quick assessment of tissue architecture at microscopic level that could guide surgeons for tumor margin delineation during intraoperative procedure.

  18. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  19. Salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Syed, A.M. Nisar . E-mail: bvigil@memnet.org; Puthawala, Ajmel; Sharma, Anil; Frankel, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Background: A significant portion of head-and-neck cancer patients will develop persistent or recurrent disease after definitive treatment. Radiation therapy is often used as definitive therapy or as an adjunct to surgery. Recurrent cancer of the head and neck in the previously irradiated field is, thus, a common occurrence and poses a therapeutic challenge. Some studies have evaluated low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy as a therapeutic option, including a large case series with long-term follow-up by our own institution. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy offers therapeutic advantages over LDR brachytherapy. This study evaluates the local control and outcomes of patients with previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2002, 30 patients who received prior radiation therapy for primary tumors of the head and neck were treated for biopsy-proven recurrent disease. All patients received previous radiation as definitive therapy alone or as adjunct to surgery. All patients were inoperable, refused surgery, or had gross residual disease after salvage surgery for their recurrent disease. Thirty-six sites on the 30 patients were implanted by application of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy techniques with mean tumor dose of 34 Gy (18-48 Gy) in twice daily fractions of 300 to 400cGy per fraction. Results: At a minimum follow-up of 12 months, local tumor control was achieved in 69% of implanted sites. Disease-specific survival at 1 and 2 years was 54% and 45%, respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 56% and 37%, respectively. Grade 3/4 late complications occurred in 16% of the patients. No fatal complications occurred. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer. This study shows that comparable results are obtained by HDR brachytherapy with fewer late complications than

  20. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cer

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: emphasis on the selection and delineation of the targets.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Foote, Robert L; O'Sullivan, Brian; Beitler, Jonathan J; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2002-07-01

    The head and neck contain many critical, noninvolved structures in close vicinity to the targets. The tightly conformal doses produced by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and the lack of internal organ motion in the head and neck, provide the potential for organ sparing and improved tumor irradiation. Many studies of treatment planning for head and neck cancer have demonstrated the dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques in these respects. The initial results of clinical studies demonstrate reduced xerostomia. They suggest an improvement in tumor control, which needs to be verified in larger studies and longer follow-up. Critical issues for successful outcome of head and neck IMRT are accurate selection of the neck lymph nodes that require adjuvant treatment, and accurate delineation on the planning computed tomography (CT) of the lymph-node bearing areas and subclinical disease adjoining the gross tumor. This review emphasizes these topics and provides some guidelines. PMID:12118389

  2. [HPV-associated head and neck cancer: update and recommendations for practice].

    PubMed

    Švajdler, Marian; Laco, Jan; Ondič, Ondrej; Kašpírková, Jana; Mezencev, Roman; Michal, Michal; Skálová, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HPV-OSCC) represents a specific clinical and pathological entity among head and neck cancers with more favorable prognosis than corresponding HPV-negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). HPV-OSCC most commonly displays non-keratinzing SCC histology, although number of cases presented variable morphology. Detection of transcriptionally active HPV in oropharyngeal SCCs is of critical prognostic importance, which even supersedes the importance of their formal pathological grading. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge of HPV-positive SCC of oropharynx and of other anatomical subsites of the head and neck and discusses the role of HPV detection in the diagnostics of metastatic SCC lesions of unknown origin. PMID:27526013

  3. Human papillomavirus and head and neck cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, C G L; Sterne, J A C; Bailey, M; Heyderman, R S; Birchall, M A; Thomas, S J

    2006-08-01

    It has been suggested that the link between human papillomavirus (HPV) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is specific to carcinoma of the tonsil. We systematically reviewed studies that tested for HPV16 exposure in anatomically defined sites in the head and neck and a control group. The association between HPV16 and cancer was strongest for tonsil (OR: 15.1, 95% CI: 6.8-33.7), intermediate for oropharynx (OR: 4.3, 95% CI: 2.1-8.9) and weakest for oral (OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.2-3.4) and larynx (OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.0-4.2). To investigate heterogeneity, further stratification by method of HPV16 detection, suggested that variation in the magnitude of the HPV-cancer association with cancer site was restricted to studies using ELISA: among studies using PCR, the magnitude of the summary odds ratios was similar across the four sites. The association between HPV16 infection and HNSCC in specific sites suggests the strongest and most consistent association is with tonsil cancer, and the magnitude of this association is consistent with an infectious aetiology. However, the method of viral detection may be an important source of heterogeneity. Resolution of this issue will require further studies using both methods, examining associations separately in different sites.

  4. Head and Neck Cancer Pain: Systematic Review of Prevalence and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Tanja; Ranasinghe, Sriyani; Ah-See, Kim W.; Renny, Nick; Hurman, David

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Pain is a major symptom in patients with cancer; however information on head and neck cancer related pain is limited. The aim of this review was to investigate the prevalence of pain and associated factors among patients with HNC. Material and Methods The systematic review used search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases to December 2011. Cancers of the oral mucosa, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx were included in this review with pain as main outcome. The review was restricted to full research reports of observational studies published in English. A checklist was used to assess the quality of selected studies. Results There were 82 studies included in the review and most of them (84%) were conducted in the past ten years. Studies were relatively small, with a median of 80 patients (IQR 44, 154). The quality of reporting was variable. Most studies (77%) used self-administered quality of life questionnaires, where pain was a component of the overall scale. Only 33 studies reported pain prevalence in HNC patients (combined estimate from meta-analysis before (57%, 95% CI 43% - 70%) and after (42%, 95% CI 33% - 50%) treatment. Only 49 studies (60%) considered associated factors, mostly tumour- or treatment-related. Conclusions The study has shown high levels of pain prevalence and some factors associated with higher levels of pain. There is a need for higher quality studies in a priority area for the care of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:24422003

  5. Nucleic Acid Targeting: Towards Personalized Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parsel, Sean M; Grandis, Jennifer R; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    In light of a detailed characterization of genetic aberrations in cancer, nucleic acid targeting represents an attractive therapeutic approach with significant translational potential. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with stagnant 5-year survival rates. Advances in conventional treatment have done little to improve survival and combined chemoradiation is associated with significant adverse effects. Recent reports have characterized the genetic alterations in HNSCC and demonstrated that mutations confer resistance to conventional and molecular targeted therapies. The ability to use specific nucleic acid sequences to inhibit cancer-associated genes including non-druggable targets facilitates personalized medicine approaches with less adverse effects. Additionally, advances in drug delivery mechanisms have increased the transfection efficiency aiding in greater therapeutic responses. Given these advances, the stage has been set to translate the information garnered from genomic studies into personalized treatment strategies. Genes involved in the tumor protein 53 (TP53) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways have been extensively investigated and many promising preclinical studies have shown tumor inhibition through genetic modulation. We, and others, have demonstrated that targeting oncogene expression with gene therapy approaches is feasible in patients. Other methods such as RNA interference have proven to be effective and are potential candidates for clinical studies. This review summarizes the major advances in sequence-specific gene modulation in the preclinical setting and in clinical trials in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:26592450

  6. Photodynamic Therapy for Head and Neck Dysplasia and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rigual, Nestor R.; Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Cooper, Michele; Sullivan, Maureen A.; Dougherty, Thomas; Popat, Saurin R.; Loree, Thom R.; Biel, Merrill A.; Henderson, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the response of dysplasia, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and T1 carcinoma of the oral cavity and larynx to photodynamic therapy with porfimer sodium. Design Prospective trial. Setting A National Cancer Institute–designated cancer institute. Patients Patients with primary or recurrent moderate to severe oral or laryngeal dysplasia, CIS, or T1N0 carcinoma. Intervention Porfimer sodium, 2 mg/kg of body weight, was injected intravenously 48 hours before treatment. Light at 630 nm for photosensitizer activation was delivered from an argon laser or diode laser using lens or cylindrical diffuser fibers. The light dose was 50 J/cm2 for dysplasia and CIS and 75 J/cm2 for carcinoma. Main Outcome Measures Response was evaluated at 1 week and at 1 month and then at 3-month intervals thereafter. Response options were complete (CR), partial (PR), and no (NR) response. Posttreatment biopsies were performed in all patients with persistent and recurrent visible lesions. Results Thirty patients were enrolled, and 26 were evaluable. Mean follow-up was 15 months (range, 7–52 months). Twenty-four patients had a CR, 1 had a PR, and 1 had NR. Three patients with oral dysplasia with an initial CR experienced recurrence in the treatment field. All the patients with NR, a PR, or recurrence after an initial CR underwent salvage treatment. Temporary morbidities included edema, pain, hoarseness, and skin phototoxicity. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy with porfimer sodium is an effective treatment alternative, with no permanent sequelae, for oral and laryngeal dysplasia and early carcinoma. PMID:19687399

  7. EVIDENCE OF EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS ASSOCIATION WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Soorebettu R; Wilson, David F

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is ubiquitous: over 90% of the adult population is infected with this virus. EBV is capable of infecting both B lymphocytes and epithelial cells throughout the body including the head and neck region. Transmission occurs mainly by exchange of saliva. The infection is asymptomatic or mild in children but, in adolescents and young adults, it causes infectious mononucleosis, a self-limiting disease characterized by lethargy, sore throat, fever and lymphadenopathy. Once established, the virus often remains latent and people become lifelong carriers without experiencing disease. However, in some people, the latent virus is capable of causing malignant tumours, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and various B- and T-cell lymphomas, at sites including the head, neck and oropharyngeal region. As lymphoma is the second-most common malignant disease of the head, neck and oral region after squamous cell carcinoma, oral health care workers including dentists and specialists have a responsibility to carry out a thorough clinical examination of this anatomical region with a view to identifying and diagnosing lesions that may represent lymphomas. Early detection allows early treatment resulting in better prognosis. The focus of this review is on the morphology, transmission and carcinogenic properties of EBV and clinical and diagnostic aspects of a range of EBV-associated malignancies occurring in the head, neck and oral region. As carcinogenic agents, viruses contribute to a significant proportion of the global cancer burden: approximately 15% of all human cancers, worldwide, are attributable to viruses.1,2 Serologic and epidemiologic studies are providing mounting evidence of an etiologic association between viruses and head and neck malignancies.3 To update oral and maxillofacial surgeons and oral medicine specialists and raise awareness of this association, we recently reviewed the evidence of the etiologic role of human papillomavirus in oral disease.4

  8. Early detection in head and neck cancer – current state and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Andreas O. H.

    2010-01-01

    Survival and quality of life in head and neck cancer are directly linked to the size of the primary tumor at first detection. In order to achieve substantial gain at these issues, both, primary prevention and secondary prevention, which is early detection of malignant lesions at a small size, have to be improved. So far, there is not only a lack in the necessary infrastructure not only in Germany, but rather worldwide, but additionally the techniques developed so far for early detection have a significance and specificity too low as to warrant safe implementation for screening programs. However, the advancements recently achieved in endoscopy and in quantitative analysis of hypocellular specimens open new perspectives for secondary prevention. Chromoendoscopy and narrow band imaging (NBI) pinpoint suspicious lesions more easily, confocal endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography obtain optical sections through those lesions, and hyperspectral imaging classifies lesions according to characteristic spectral signatures. These techniques therefore obtain optical biopsies. Once a “bloody” biopsy has been taken, the plethora of parameters that can be quantified objectively has been increased and could be the basis for an objective and quantitative classification of epithelial lesions (multiparametric cytometry, quantitative histology). Finally, cytomics and proteomics approaches, and lab-on-the-chip technology might help to identify patients at high-risk. Sensitivity and specificity of these approaches have to be validated, yet, and some techniques have to be adapted for the specific conditions for early detection of head and neck cancer. On this background it has to be stated that it is still a long way to go until a population based screening for head and neck cancer is available. The recent results of screening for cancer of the prostate and breast highlight the difficulties implemented in such a task. PMID:22073093

  9. Nutritional and zinc status of head and neck cancer patients: an interpretive review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Beck, F W; Doerr, T D; Shamsa, F H; Penny, H S; Marks, S C; Kaplan, J; Kucuk, O; Mathog, R H

    1998-10-01

    In this review, we provide evidence based on our studies, for zinc deficiency and cell mediated immune disorders, and the effects of protein and zinc status on clinical morbidities in patients with head and neck cancer. We investigated subjects with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. Patients with metastatic disease and with severe co-morbidity were excluded. Nutritional assessment included dietary history, body composition, and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) determination. Zinc status was determined by zinc assay in plasma, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Pretreatment zinc status and nutritional status were correlated with clinical outcomes in 47 patients. Assessment of immune functions included production of TH1 and TH2 cytokines, T cell subpopulations and cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reaction to common antigens. At baseline approximately 50% of our subjects were zinc-deficient based on cellular zinc criteria and had decreased production of TH1 cytokines but not TH2 cytokines, decreased NK cell lytic activity and decreased proportion of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells in the peripheral blood. The tumor size and overall stage of the disease correlated with baseline zinc status but not with PNI, alcohol intake, or smoking. Zinc deficiency was associated with increased unplanned hospitalizations. The disease-free interval was highest for the group which had both zinc sufficient and nutrition sufficient status. Zinc deficiency and cell mediated immune dysfunctions were frequently present in patients with head and neck cancer when seen initially. Zinc deficiency resulted in an imbalance of TH1 and TH2 functions. Zinc deficiency was associated with increased tumor size, overall stage of the cancer and increased unplanned hospitalizations. These observations have broad implications in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:9791836

  10. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamiri, Hashem-Motahir; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Study Design Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implants were excluded. Results 18 articles out of 27 were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. 12 out of 18 studies reported favorable outcome of dental implants and radiotherapy with survival rates between 74.4% and 97%. Seven out of ten studies comparing the survival rates according to site of implant placement reported that implants were found to osseointegrate with greater success in the irradiated mandible than irradiated maxilla. 5 studies which compared implant survival in irradiated native bone versus irradiated grafted bone reported that irradiated grafted bone showed a significantly reduced dental implant survival rate in comparison to irradiated native bone. 6 out of 18studies in which radiation doses exceeded 70 Gy reported lower survival rates of dental implants in comparison to the studies in which radiation doses were ≤70Gy. Higher survival rates were reported in 2 studies in which implants placement was before radiotherapy in comparison to the remaining 16 studies in which implants placement was after radiotherapy. Conclusions Dental implants may be affected by radiotherapy especially when they are placed in maxilla, in grafted bone, or after radiation, however, they remain a functional option for rehabilitation of head and cancer patients. More Prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trails are still needed to draw more evidence based conclusions. Key words:Dental implants, implant survival, radiotherapy, head and neck cancer. PMID

  11. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, Rob H. . E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.

  12. Home - The Cancer Genome Atlas - Cancer Genome - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of genome analysis technologies, including large-scale genome sequencing.

  13. Home-use cancer detecting band aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Sheinman, Victor; Tzoy, Andrey; Toktosunov, Aitmamat; Adashov, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel concept in which special band aid is developed for early detection of cancer. The band aid contains an array of micro needles with small detection array connected to each needle which inspects the color of the surface of the skin versus time after being pinched with the needles. We were able to show in pre-clinical trials that the color varies differently if the skin is close to tumor tissue.

  14. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  15. Recent advances in head and neck cancer reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Prabha

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of cancer is race against time! Following radical excision, breathing, speech, mastication and swallowing are hampered. Face is invariably involved. Beside functional normalcy, excellent cosmetic restoration is necessary for patient's life quality. Primary wound healing, quick resumption of adequate oral intake, prompt initiation of chemo-radiotherapy has direct bearing on cure. Primary reconstruction with pedicle or free flap is the choice of treatment in most protocols. Composite defects are requiring bone, muscle and skin restrict choice of donor site and may have shortfalls in aesthetic and functional requirements. To improve further newer, and newer modalities are being developed and used to give best aesthetic and functions. Navigation, use of three-dimensional imaging, stereo lithic model and custom made implant for reconstruction are recommended as they promise improvement in aesthetics. Robotic surgeries allow access for resection of tumours and reconstruction with free flap in deep oropharynx obviating need of doing mandibulotomy. Researchers in stem cell and tissue engineering are looking forward to regenerating tissues and avoid the need of autologous tissue flaps. Desired tissue combination across counter may be available in the future. Excellent immunosuppressant drugs have made it possible to reconstruct composite facial anatomical units with allotransplant in a single surgery, along sensory and motor recovery! Mythological heterogenic head transplant like clone Ganesha, will be a reality in the near future!! PMID:25190912

  16. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods. PMID:27601396

  17. Lessons Learned from Unfavorable Microsurgical Head and Neck Reconstruction: Japan National Cancer Center Hospital and Okayama University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Narusi; Onoda, Satoshi; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    The risk of surgical site infection (SSI) remains high after major reconstructive surgery of the head and neck. Clinical data regarding SSI in microsurgical tongue reconstruction are described at National Cancer Hospital in Japan, including discussions of unfavorable representative cases, the relationship between SSI and preoperative irradiation at Okayama University Hospital in Japan, and strategies for SSI control in head and neck reconstruction. Local complications are inevitable in patients undergoing reconstruction in the head and neck areas. The frequency of major complications can be decreased, and late postoperative complications can be prevented with the help of appropriate methods.

  18. Multimodal Guided Self-Help Exercise Program to Prevent Speech, Swallowing, and Shoulder Problems Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Rinkel, Rico NPM; Aalders, IJke J; de Goede, Cees JT; de Bree, Remco; Doornaert, Patricia; Rietveld, Derek HF; Langendijk, Johannes A; Witte, Birgit I; Leemans, C Rene

    2014-01-01

    Background During a 6-week course of (chemo)radiation many head and neck cancer patients have to endure radiotherapy-induced toxicity, negatively affecting patients’ quality of life. Pretreatment counseling combined with self-help exercises could be provided to inform patients and possibly prevent them from having speech, swallowing, and shoulder problems during and after treatment. Objective Our goal was to investigate the feasibility of a multimodal guided self-help exercise program entitled Head Matters during (chemo)radiation in head and neck cancer patients. Methods Head and neck cancer patients treated with primary (chemo)radiation or after surgery were asked to perform Head Matters at home. This prophylactic exercise program, offered in three different formats, aims to reduce the risk of developing speech, swallowing, shoulder problems, and a stiff neck. Weekly coaching was provided by a speech and swallowing therapist. Patients filled out a diary to keep track of their exercise activity. To gain insight into possible barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence, reports of weekly coaching sessions were analyzed by 2 coders independently. Results Of 41 eligible patients, 34 patients were willing to participate (83% uptake). Of participating patients, 21 patients completed the program (64% adherence rate). The majority of participants (58%) had a moderate to high level of exercise performance. Exercise performance level was not significantly associated with age (P=.50), gender (P=.42), tumor subsite (P=1.00) or tumor stage (P=.20), treatment modality (P=.72), or Head Matters format (Web-based or paper) (P=1.00). Based on patients’ diaries and weekly coaching sessions, patients’ perceived barriers to exercise were a decreased physical condition, treatment-related barriers, emotional problems, lack of motivation, social barriers, and technical problems. Patients’ perceived facilitators included an increased physical condition, feeling motivated, and

  19. [Quality of life and supportive care in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Grandazzi, Guillaume; Prévost, Virginie; Robard, Laetitia

    2014-05-01

    The quality of life of patients treated for head and neck cancers and their carers is part of the current concerns of health care teams. Assessment tools were created and helped to highlight the severe physical effects (pain, mucositis…) and chronic (mutilation, post-radiation complications…) related to the disease or to different treatments but also to consider the psychosocial impact of this disease. Improving the quality of life through a thoughtful and comprehensive support that must be associated with somatic care, mental health care, rehabilitation and inclusion of social difficulties and suffering relatives. Supportive care shall ensure a good quality of life for patients treated and their families but also reduce the physical effects associated with the disease and treatment. They rely on coordination of care including the cancer networks established in the cancer plan to ensure comprehensive and continuous care for these patients. PMID:24886902

  20. Do head and neck cancer survivors attend a high street dentist on a regular basis?

    PubMed

    Pace-Balzan, A; Butterworth, C; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2014-09-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients face complex oral health issues following treatment. The aims of this study were to determine the proportion of HNC patients attending their dentist regularly and investigate clinicodemographic characteristics associated with attendance. Two surveys asked about patient attendance patterns and dentition. Pre-treatment orthopantomographs were evaluated for those treated between 2007-2009. The response rate was 66% (444/672). 69% (305/444) saw a high street dentist regularly. 28% of edentulous patients attended regularly compared with 84% with natural teeth, p < 0.001. Associations at p < 0.001 with regular attendance were the leaving of formal education (> 16 years) and earlier clinical staging. HNC patients should be encouraged to see a dentist regularly for routine dental care and cancer surveillance in partnership with the cancer service.

  1. Do head and neck cancer survivors attend a high street dentist on a regular basis?

    PubMed

    Pace-Balzan, A; Butterworth, C; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2014-09-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients face complex oral health issues following treatment. The aims of this study were to determine the proportion of HNC patients attending their dentist regularly and investigate clinicodemographic characteristics associated with attendance. Two surveys asked about patient attendance patterns and dentition. Pre-treatment orthopantomographs were evaluated for those treated between 2007-2009. The response rate was 66% (444/672). 69% (305/444) saw a high street dentist regularly. 28% of edentulous patients attended regularly compared with 84% with natural teeth, p < 0.001. Associations at p < 0.001 with regular attendance were the leaving of formal education (> 16 years) and earlier clinical staging. HNC patients should be encouraged to see a dentist regularly for routine dental care and cancer surveillance in partnership with the cancer service. PMID:25831711

  2. Bronchial airway gene expression in smokers with lung or head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Eric; Nazarov, Petr V; Muller, Arnaud; Nicot, Nathalie; Bosseler, Manon; Pierson, Sandrine; Van Moer, Kris; Palissot, Valérie; Mascaux, Céline; Knolle, Ulrich; Ninane, Vincent; Nati, Romain; Bremnes, Roy M; Vallar, Laurent; Berchem, Guy; Schlesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of cancers of the respiratory tract, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck cancer (HNC). In order to better understand carcinogenesis of the lung and upper airways, we have compared the gene expression profiles of tumor-distant, histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens obtained from current smokers with NSCLC or HNC (SC, considered as a single group), as well as nonsmokers (NS) and smokers without cancer (SNC). RNA from a total of 97 biopsies was used for gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array). Differentially expressed genes were used to compare NS, SNC, and SC, and functional analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Smoking-related cancer of the respiratory tract was found to affect the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic biotransformation proteins, as well as proteins associated with crucial inflammation/immunity pathways and other processes that protect the airway from the chemicals in cigarette smoke or contribute to carcinogenesis. Finally, we used the prediction analysis for microarray (PAM) method to identify gene signatures of cigarette smoking and cancer, and uncovered a 15-gene signature that distinguished between SNC and SC with an accuracy of 83%. Thus, gene profiling of histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens provided insight into cigarette-induced carcinogenesis of the respiratory tract and gene signatures of cancer in smokers. PMID:24497500

  3. CHK1 Inhibition Radiosensitizes Head and Neck Cancers to Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Holly E; Patel, Radhika; McLaughlin, Martin; Schick, Ulrike; Zaidi, Shane; Nutting, Christopher M; Newbold, Katie L; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, with increasingly more cases arising due to high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy is a standard-of-care for locally advanced head and neck cancer but is frequently ineffective. Research into enhancing radiation responses as a means of improving treatment outcomes represents a high priority. Here, we evaluated a CHK1 inhibitor (CCT244747) as a radiosensitiser and investigated whether a mechanistically rational triple combination of radiation/paclitaxel/CHK1 inhibitor delivered according to an optimized schedule would provide added benefit. CCT244747 abrogated radiation-induced G2 arrest in the p53-deficient HNSCC cell lines, HN4 and HN5, causing cells to enter mitosis with unrepaired DNA damage. The addition of paclitaxel further increased cell kill and significantly reduced tumor growth in an HN5 xenograft model. Importantly, a lower dose of paclitaxel could be used when CCT244747 was included, therefore potentially limiting toxicity. Triple therapy reduced the expression of several markers of radioresistance. Moreover, the more radioresistant HN5 cell line exhibited greater radiation-mediated CHK1 activation and was more sensitive to triple therapy than HN4 cells. We analyzed CHK1 expression in a panel of head and neck tumors and observed that primary tumors from HPV(+) patients, who went on to recur postradiotherapy, exhibited significantly stronger expression of total, and activated CHK1. CHK1 may serve as a biomarker for identifying tumors likely to recur and, therefore, patients who may benefit from concomitant treatment with a CHK1 inhibitor and paclitaxel during radiotherapy. Clinical translation of this strategy is under development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2042-54. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and γH2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  5. CHK1 Inhibition Radiosensitizes Head and Neck Cancers to Paclitaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Holly E; Patel, Radhika; McLaughlin, Martin; Schick, Ulrike; Zaidi, Shane; Nutting, Christopher M; Newbold, Katie L; Bhide, Shreerang; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, with increasingly more cases arising due to high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy is a standard-of-care for locally advanced head and neck cancer but is frequently ineffective. Research into enhancing radiation responses as a means of improving treatment outcomes represents a high priority. Here, we evaluated a CHK1 inhibitor (CCT244747) as a radiosensitiser and investigated whether a mechanistically rational triple combination of radiation/paclitaxel/CHK1 inhibitor delivered according to an optimized schedule would provide added benefit. CCT244747 abrogated radiation-induced G2 arrest in the p53-deficient HNSCC cell lines, HN4 and HN5, causing cells to enter mitosis with unrepaired DNA damage. The addition of paclitaxel further increased cell kill and significantly reduced tumor growth in an HN5 xenograft model. Importantly, a lower dose of paclitaxel could be used when CCT244747 was included, therefore potentially limiting toxicity. Triple therapy reduced the expression of several markers of radioresistance. Moreover, the more radioresistant HN5 cell line exhibited greater radiation-mediated CHK1 activation and was more sensitive to triple therapy than HN4 cells. We analyzed CHK1 expression in a panel of head and neck tumors and observed that primary tumors from HPV(+) patients, who went on to recur postradiotherapy, exhibited significantly stronger expression of total, and activated CHK1. CHK1 may serve as a biomarker for identifying tumors likely to recur and, therefore, patients who may benefit from concomitant treatment with a CHK1 inhibitor and paclitaxel during radiotherapy. Clinical translation of this strategy is under development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2042-54. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27422809

  6. Tobacco Smoking During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Is Associated With Unfavorable Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Leon M.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sreeraman, Radhika; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of continued cigarette smoking among patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer by comparing the clinical outcomes among active smokers and quitters. Methods and Materials: A review of medical records identified 101 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who continued to smoke during radiation therapy. Each active smoker was matched to a control patient who had quit smoking before initiation of radiation therapy. Matching was based on tobacco history (pack-years), primary site, age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Status, disease stage, radiation dose, chemotherapy use, year of treatment, and whether surgical resection was performed. Outcomes were compared by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis. Normal tissue effects were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 49 months, active smokers had significantly inferior 5-year overall survival (23% vs. 55%), locoregional control (58% vs. 69%), and disease-free survival (42% vs. 65%) compared with the former smokers who had quit before radiation therapy (p < 0.05 for all). These differences remained statistically significant when patients treated by postoperative or definitive radiation therapy were analyzed separately. The incidence of Grade 3 or greater late complications was also significantly increased among active smokers compared with former smokers (49% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer is associated with unfavorable outcomes. Further studies analyzing the biologic and molecular reasons underlying these differences are planned.

  7. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites.

  8. Prospective Study of Psychosocial Distress Among Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. Jennelle, Richard; Grady, Victoria; Tovar, Adrienne; Bowen, Kris; Simonin, Patty; Tracy, Janice; McCrudden, Dale; Stella, Jonathan R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of psychosocial distress among patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer and to examine the association between depression and anxiety and demographic and medical variables. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients (25 men and 15 women) with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent RT administered with definitive (24 patients) or postoperative (16 patients) intent. Twenty patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument before RT, on the last day of RT, and at the first follow-up visit. The effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on psychosocial distress was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of mild to severe pre-RT depression was 58% and 45% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-D and Beck Depression Inventory-II scale, respectively. The prevalence of severe pre-RT anxiety was 7%. The depression levels, as determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument increased significantly during RT and remained elevated at the first follow-up visit (p < 0.001 for both). The variables that were significantly associated with post-RT depression included a greater pre-RT depression level, employment status (working at enrollment), younger age (<55 years), single marital status, and living alone (p < 0.05, for all). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that an alarming number of patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer have symptoms suggestive of psychosocial distress even before beginning treatment. This proportion increases significantly during RT. Studies investigating the role of antidepressants and/or psychiatric counseling might be warranted in the future.

  9. Exosomes Derived from Squamous Head and Neck Cancer Promote Cell Survival after Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mutschelknaus, Lisa; Peters, Carsten; Winkler, Klaudia; Yentrapalli, Ramesh; Heider, Theresa; Atkinson, Michael John; Moertl, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles that are believed to function as intercellular communicators. Here, we report that exosomes are able to modify the radiation response of the head and neck cancer cell lines BHY and FaDu. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned medium of irradiated as well as non-irradiated head and neck cancer cells by serial centrifugation. Quantification using NanoSight technology indicated an increased exosome release from irradiated compared to non-irradiated cells 24 hours after treatment. To test whether the released exosomes influence the radiation response of other cells the exosomes were transferred to non-irradiated and irradiated recipient cells. We found an enhanced uptake of exosomes isolated from both irradiated and non-irradiated cells by irradiated recipient cells compared to non-irradiated recipient cells. Functional analyses by exosome transfer indicated that all exosomes (from non-irradiated and irradiated donor cells) increase the proliferation of non-irradiated recipient cells and the survival of irradiated recipient cells. The survival-promoting effects are more pronounced when exosomes isolated from irradiated compared to non-irradiated donor cells are transferred. A possible mechanism for the increased survival after irradiation could be the increase in DNA double-strand break repair monitored at 6, 8 and 10 h after the transfer of exosomes isolated from irradiated cells. This is abrogated by the destabilization of the exosomes. Our results demonstrate that radiation influences both the abundance and action of exosomes on recipient cells. Exosomes transmit prosurvival effects by promoting the proliferation and radioresistance of head and neck cancer cells. Taken together, this study indicates a functional role of exosomes in the response of tumor cells to radiation exposure within a therapeutic dose range and encourages that exosomes are useful objects of study for a better understanding of tumor

  10. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Jidong; Guerrero, Mariana; Chen, Wenjuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6{+-}0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4{+-}0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8{+-}0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2{+-}4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  11. Reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Rudzianskas, V; Inciura, A; Juozaityte, E; Rudzianskiene, M; Kubilius, R; Vaitkus, S; Kaseta, M; Adliene, D

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results of hypofractionated accelerated CT-guided interstitial HDR-BRT using 2.5 Gy per fraction. From December 2008 to March 2010, 30 patients were treated for recurrence of previously-irradiated head and neck cancer. Thirteen patients underwent surgical resection followed by HDR-BRT to the tumour bed. Seventeen patients were treated with HDR-BRT only. All patients received 2.5 Gy twice per day for a total dosage of 30 Gy. The overall survival rate (OS) for the entire group at 1 and 2-years was 63% and 47%, while local control (LC) was 73% and 67%, and disease-free survival (DFS) was 60% and 53%, respectively. Patients treated with surgical resection and HDR-BRT showed an improvement in both 2-year LC (77% vs. 47%, p = 0.013) and 2-year OS (62% vs. 35%, p = 0.035) compared to patients treated with HDR-BRT only. Median OS for pre-treatment tumour volumes ≤ 36 cm3 was 22 months and 9.2 months for those > 36 cm3 (p = 0.038). Grade III and IV late complications occurred in 3% of patients. There were no grade V complications. The interstitial HDR brachytherapy regimen using 2.5 Gy twice daily fractions at a total dose of 30 Gy offers an effective treatment option for patients with recurrent previously-irradiated head and neck cancer with a low rate of late high grade toxicity. Surgical resection had a positive effect on survival and local control in management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancer.

  12. Erlotinib, Docetaxel, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-05

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. Quality of life in head and neck cancers patients: predictive factors, functional and psychosocial outcome.

    PubMed

    Babin, E; Sigston, E; Hitier, M; Dehesdin, D; Marie, J P; Choussy, O

    2008-03-01

    The principal endpoints in head and neck cancer are survival with improvement of quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients. Patients treated for head and neck cancer suffer from a number of symptom domains: physical symptoms linked to diet and feeding, communication disorders, pain and their general state of health; psychological symptoms including depression, irritability, loss of self-esteem (occasionally feelings of shame), and social symptoms including relationship difficulties with partner (sexual disorders) or with other family members, loss of work, reduction in salary, and sense of uselessness, resulting in a negative impact on their daily life. At present, most tools only partially evaluate patient QoL, concentrating on the global impact of disease and its treatment on patients' physical and psychological condition. The "sociability" of individual patients is rarely evaluated, and the development of qualitative studies in this domain will enable improved understanding of the social factors involved in each patient's adaptability to disease, its treatment and after-effects.

  14. RELATION OF ALLIUM VEGETABLES INTAKE WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: EVIDENCE FROM THE INHANCE CONSORTIUM

    PubMed Central

    Galeone, Carlotta; Turati, Federica; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Guercio, Valentina; Tavani, Alessandra; Serraino, Diego; Brennan, Paul; Fabianova, Eleonora; Lissowska, Jola; Mates, Dana; Rudnai, Peter; Shangina, Oxana; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Kelsey, Karl; McClean, Michael; Levi, Fabio; Hayes, Richard B.; Purdue, Mark P.; Bosetti, Cristina; Brenner, Hermann; Pelucchi, Claudio; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; Boffetta, Paolo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Scope Only a few studies analyzed the role of allium vegetables with reference to head and neck cancers (HNC), with mixed results. We investigated the potential favorable role of garlic and onion within the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) Consortium. Methods and results We analyzed pooled individual-level data from eight case-control studies, including 4590 cases and 7082 controls. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between garlic and onion intakes and HNC risk. Compared with no or low garlic use, the ORs of HNC were 0.95 (95% CI 0.71–1.27) for intermediate and 0.74 (95% CI 0.55–0.99) for high garlic use (p for trend= 0.02). The ORs of HNC for increasing categories of onion intake were 0.91 (95% CI 0.68–1.21) for >1 to ≤3 portions per week, and 0.83 (95% CI 0.60–1.13) for >3 portions per week (p for trend= 0.02), as compared to <1 portion per week. We found an inverse association between high onion intake and laryngeal cancer risk (OR=0.69; 95% CI 0.54–0.88), but no significant association for other subsites. Conclusions The results of this pooled-analysis support a possible moderate inverse association between garlic and onion intake and HNC risk. PMID:26018663

  15. Orphan symptoms in advanced cancer patients followed at home.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Valle, Alessandro; Fusco, Flavio; Aielli, Federica; Adile, Claudio; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2013-12-01

    Orphan symptoms are rarely assessed, particularly at home. The aim of this multicenter prospective study was to assess the prevalence of these symptoms and eventual factors possibly associated in advanced cancer patients at admission of a home care program. A prospective study was performed at three home care programs in Italy. Patients' data were collected, including age, sex, diagnosis, and Karnofsky status. Possible contributing factors were analyzed; preexisting neurological diseases, cerebral metastases, hyperthermia, diabetes, a state of dehydration clinically evident and/or oliguria, possible biochemical parameters when available, data regarding recent chemotherapy, opioids and doses, use of neuroleptics, benzodiazepine or anticonvulsants, corticosteroids, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotics were collected. Myoclonus, hiccup, sweating, pruritus, and tenesmus, either rectal or vesical, were assessed, according to a preliminary definition, at time of home care program admission. Three hundred sixty-two patients were surveyed at the three home care programs. Globally, 48 patients presented one or more orphan symptoms in the period taken into consideration, and 7 patients presented more than 1 symptom. One patient presented occasional and diffuse myoclonus. Nineteen patients presented sweating, 13 patients presented pruritus, and 14 patients presented hiccup. Finally, nine patients presented rectal or vesical tenesmus. There was a significant correlation between sweating and transdermal fentanyl use (P = 0.044), fever (P = 0.001), hiccup (P < 0.0005), and vesical tenesmus (P = 0.028). Pruritus was not associated to any factor. Hiccup was associated with gender (males, P = 0.006) and sweating (P < 0.0005). Vesical tenesmus was associated with fever (P = 0.019) and sweating (P = 0.028). Although the symptoms examined have a low prevalence in advanced cancer patients admitted to home care, the distress for patients may be high and

  16. New cytostatic agents for the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, D; Klastersky, J

    1997-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays a definite role in the management of head and neck cancers, especially in combination with radiotherapy in patients with possibly curable disease. As far as new agents are concerned, the combinations of paclitaxel or docetaxel and gemcitabine with cisplatin or carboplatin deserve special attention. These regimens should be compared to the more classical combinations of cisplatin with Sefluorouracil or Ifosfamide in phase III trials. A special emphasis should be placed on the evaluation of these new agents in combination with radiotherapy, since all have strong radiopotentiating properties.

  17. Using Technology to Give Patients a Voice After Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Theresa H; Kristyn DiFortuna, Kristyn DiFortuna; Michael LeTang, Michael LeTang; Murphy, Jane; Stemplewicz, Kara; Magda Kovacs, Magda Kovacs; DeRosa, Antonio P P; Gibson, Donna S; Ginex, Pamela K

    2016-10-01

    For patients with head and neck cancer, altered communication is a frequently occurring and highly upsetting issue that has been associated with psychological distress, fear, and anger among those with temporary or permanent speech impairment postsurgery. Many postoperative patients express that the most terrifying situation is to wake up from surgery and not be able to speak. Mobile devices have become part of everyday life, and augmentative and alternative communication mobile applications have the potential to enhance the healthcare journey of the patient and provider.


  18. Analysis of endodontic therapy in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, B.G.; Beumer, J. 3d.; Kagawa, T.; Klokkevold, P.; Wolinsky, L.

    1985-11-01

    The outcome of endodontic therapy in 16 patients irradiated for head and neck cancer was studied. Thirty-five postradiation endodontically treated teeth (54 roots) were included in the study. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 54 months. At the time of last follow-up, 46 of 54 roots were being maintained. No osteoradionecroses were seen in association with teeth that had been endodontically treated. From this review, it is clear that endodontic therapy is a viable method of treating diseased teeth in patients irradiated for oral neoplasms.

  19. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration. PMID:27098922

  20. Re-animation and rehabilitation of the paralyzed face in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Divi, Vasu; Deschler, Daniel G

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerve paralysis can occasionally result from the treatment of head and neck cancer. The treatment of paralysis is patient specific, and requires an assessment of the remaining nerve segments, musculature, functional deficits, anticipated recovery, and patient factors. When feasible, reinnervation of the remaining musculature can provide the most natural outcome. However, the complex and topographic nature of facial innervation often prevents complete and meaningful movement. In these instances, a wide variety of procedures can be used to combat the functional and cosmetic sequella of facial paralysis.

  1. A systematic review of head and neck cancer quality of life assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Bukola; Genden, Eric M; Teng, Marita S; Milbury, Kathrin; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J; Badr, Hoda

    2012-10-01

    Although quality of life (QOL) is an important treatment outcome in head and neck cancer (HNC), cross-study comparisons have been hampered by the heterogeneity of measures used and the fact that reviews of HNC QOL instruments have not been comprehensive to date. We performed a systematic review of the published literature on HNC QOL instruments from 1990 to 2010, categorized, and reviewed the properties of the instruments using international guidelines as reference. Of the 2766 articles retrieved, 710 met the inclusion criteria and used 57 different head and neck-specific instruments to assess QOL. A review of the properties of these utilized measures and identification of areas in need of further research is presented. Given the volume and heterogeneity of QOL measures, there is no gold standard questionnaire. Therefore, when selecting instruments, researchers should consider not only psychometric properties but also research objectives, study design, and the pitfalls and benefits of combining different measures. Although great strides have been made in the assessment of QOL in HNC and researchers now have a plethora of quality instruments to choose from, more work is needed to improve the clinical utility of these measures in order to link QOL research to clinical practice. This review provides a platform for head and neck-specific instrument comparisons, with suggestions of important factors to consider in the systematic selection of QOL instruments, and is a first step towards translation of QOL assessment into the clinical scene. PMID:22525604

  2. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Retreatment of Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer After Prior Definitive Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Lawson, Joshua; Garg, Madhur Kumar; Quon, Harry; Ridge, John A.; Saba, Nabil; Salama, Joseph K.; Smith, Richard V.; Yeung, Anamaria Reyna; Yom, Sue S.; Beitler, Jonathan J.

    2011-08-01

    Recurrent and second primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas arising within or in close proximity to previously irradiated fields are a common clinical challenge. Whereas surgical salvage therapy is recommended for resectable disease, randomized data support the role of postoperative reirradiation in high-risk patients. Definitive reirradiation is an established approach for patients with recurrent disease who are medically or technically inoperable or decline radical surgery. The American College of Radiology Expert Panel on Head and Neck Cancer reviewed the relevant literature addressing re-treatment after prior definitive radiation and developed appropriateness criteria for representative clinical scenarios. Examples of unresectable recurrent disease and microscopic residual disease after salvage surgery were addressed. The panel evaluated the appropriateness of reirradiation, the integration of concurrent chemotherapy, radiation technique, treatment volume, dose, and fractionation. The panel emphasized the importance of patient selection and recommended evaluation and treatment at tertiary-care centers with a head-and-neck oncology team equipped with the resources and experience to manage the complexities and toxicities of re-treatment.

  3. Influence of parotid-sparing radiotherapy on xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malouf, J Gabriel; Aragon, Cecilia; Henson, Brad S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A

    2003-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers causes permanent salivary gland dysfunction (SGD) and xerostomia. We have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of parotid-sparing RT on salivary function. The aim of this was to characterize the relationship between radiation dosages to parotid glands, SGD, xerostomia, and impaired quality of life (QOL). Ninety-three patients received unilateral (n=38) and bilateral (n=44) neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques, or standard three-field technique RT (n=11). Unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva was collected pre-RT and 1 year post-RT. Assessment of QOL and xerostomia was conducted with three questionnaires. The results demonstrated that reduced radiation dosages to parotid glands were strongly associated with percentage of baseline parotid flow rates measured at 1 year post-RT. Unilateral and bilateral neck RT with parotid-sparing techniques were successful in preserving salivary output, compared to standard three beam RT techniques. Lower radiation dose to contralateral parotid glands was associated with greater percentage of baseline salivary flow rates at 1 year post-RT, fewer xerostomic complaints, and an enhanced QOL. PMID:12893079

  4. A Systematic Review of Head and Neck Cancer Quality of Life Assessment Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Bukola; Genden, Eric M.; Teng, Marita S.; Milbury, Kathrin; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.; Badr, Hoda

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although quality of life (QOL) is an important treatment outcome in head and neck cancer (HNC), cross-study comparisons have been hampered by the heterogeneity of measures used and the fact that reviews of HNC QOL instruments have not been comprehensive to date. We performed a systematic review of the published literature on HNC QOL instruments from 1990–2010, categorized, and reviewed the properties of the instruments using international guidelines as reference. Of the 2766 articles retrieved, 710 met the inclusion criteria and used 57 different head and neck-specific instruments to assess QOL. A review of the properties of these utilized measures and identification of areas in need of further research is presented. Given the volume and heterogeneity of QOL measures, there is no gold standard questionnaire. Therefore, when selecting instruments, researchers should consider not only psychometric properties but also research objectives, study design, and the pitfalls and benefits of combining different measures. Although great strides have been made in the assessment of QOL in HNC and researchers now have a plethora of quality instruments to choose from, more work is needed to improve the clinical utility of these measures in order to link QOL research to clinical practice. This review provides a platform for head and neck-specific instrument comparisons, with suggestions of important factors to consider in the systematic selection of QOL instruments, and is a first step towards translation of QOL assessment into the clinical scene. PMID:22525604

  5. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  6. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, and Hydroxyurea Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous

  7. Evaluation of the benefit and use of multidisciplinary teams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Lisa; Keilholz, Ulrich; Tahara, Makoto; Lin, Jin-Ching; Chomette, Pauline; Ceruse, Philippe; Harrington, Kevin; Mesia, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Given the complexities of multimodality treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, the rationale for the use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) to define individual optimal treatment strategies on a per-patient basis is apparent. Increased use of guideline-directed approaches, reduced time to treatment and improved outcomes, which result from use of an MDT approach in head and neck cancer, have been documented. A discussion of these recent advances, as well as presentation of available country-specific guidance on the roles and responsibilities of team members, supports the creation of similar local-language recommendations for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. Finally, expert practical advice on the implementation of MDTs may enable the establishment of the MDT approach more universally around the world. PMID:27424185

  8. Trace elements in head and neck cancer patients: zinc status and immunologic functions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Kaplan, J; Beck, F W; Penny, H S; Shamsa, F H; Salwen, W A; Marks, S C; Mathog, R H

    1997-06-01

    In this study we have assessed zinc status and zinc-dependent cell-mediated immune functions (interleukin-2 production by mononuclear cells, natural killer cell lytic activity, and interleukin-1 beta production by mononuclear cells) in adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract at diagnosis and before any therapy was instituted. Inasmuch as significant interactions between zinc, copper, and iron exist, we also assayed the plasma copper level, serum iron level, and total iron-binding capacity in our patients. We recruited 30 cancer subjects and 21 control subjects. On the basis of cellular zinc criteria, we diagnosed a mild deficiency of zinc in 53% of cancer subjects. The plasma zinc level was not decreased in our subjects. A univariate analysis was applied by use of one-way analysis of variance comparing study variables among the three study groups (controls and zinc-deficient and zinc-sufficient cancer patients) and Tukey's multiple comparison test, and we showed that interleukin-2 production and natural killer lytic activity were decreased in zinc-deficient cancer patients. Interleukin-1 beta production (ELISA assay) was increased in both zinc-deficient and zinc-sufficient groups. Plasma copper level was not different, but the iron utilization was decreased in both groups of cancer subjects. We conclude that zinc deficiency and zinc-dependent immunologic dysfunctions are present in more than half of the patients with head and neck cancer in the Detroit area.

  9. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  10. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  11. Determining optimal clinical target volume margins in head-and-neck cancer based on microscopic extracapsular extension of metastatic neck nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Elliott, Danielle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Asper, Joshua A. P.A.; Blanco, Angel; Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David; Weber, Randal S.; Chao, K.S. Clifford . E-mail: cchao@mdanderson.org

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal clinical target volume margins around the gross nodal tumor volume in head-and-neck cancer by assessing microscopic tumor extension beyond cervical lymph node capsules. Methods and Materials: Histologic sections of 96 dissected cervical lymph nodes with extracapsular extension (ECE) from 48 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma were examined. The maximum linear distance from the external capsule border to the farthest extent of the tumor or tumoral reaction was measured. The trends of ECE as a function of the distance from the capsule and lymph node size were analyzed. Results: The median diameter of all lymph nodes was 11.0 mm (range: 3.0-30.0 mm). The mean and median ECE extent was 2.2 mm and 1.6 mm, respectively (range: 0.4-9.0 mm). The ECE was <5 mm from the capsule in 96% of the nodes. As the distance from the capsule increased, the probability of tumor extension declined. No significant difference between the extent of ECE and lymph node size was observed. Conclusion: For N1 nodes that are at high risk for ECE but not grossly infiltrating musculature, 1 cm clinical target volume margins around the nodal gross tumor volume are recommended to cover microscopic nodal extension in head-and-neck cancer.

  12. [Role and responsibility of multimodal imaging in head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Gõdény, Mária

    2013-09-01

    Hungary is first in head and neck cancer mortality in Europe in men and also in women. Head and neck (HN) is a difficult region, its anatomy and also pathology is very complex, various connection points exist between the sites which determine the extension of the disease. Diagnostic algorithms as well as imaging techniques have to be optimized to examine in standard manner. Like most other cancers, prognosis depends largely on the stage of the tumor. Accuracy of tumor detection and evaluation is very important because it affects treatment planning. As non-surgical organ-preserving therapeutic modalities (chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, targeted biological therapy) gain general acceptance, the importance of noninvasive diagnostic accuracy as well as radiologic evaluation of the extent of the tumor has increased. Clinical examinations including endoscopy should be combined with radiologic imaging to assess the precise local (T), regional nodal (N), and distant (M) extent of the tumor. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become basic tools in the diagnosis of head and neck tumors. They are both useful for assessing deep tumor extensions, able to detect changes missed by endoscopy. It has been shown that the primary determined tumor stage increases in up to 90% of patients after the results of cross sectional imaging. MRI is being increasingly used and has become the gold standard in head and neck cancer for staging, assessing tumor response, finding recurrent tumor and also for treatment planning in radiotherapy. The field strength of MRI scanners has been increasing to 1.5 T and now 3 T with better signal-to-noise ratio, higher resolution images and better tissue diagnosis. Functional MR techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted MRI (DW-MRI) may provide further characterization. PET/CT is beneficial in detecting unsuspected metastatic nodes, distant disease and second primary tumor. PET/CT and

  13. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Reirradiation of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Keith R.; Lominska, Christopher E.; Deeken, John F.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an appealing treatment option after previous radiotherapy because of its precision, conformality, and reduced treatment duration. We report our experience with reirradiation using fractionated SRS for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2008, 65 patients received SRS to the oropharynx (n = 13), hypopharynx (n = 8), nasopharynx (n = 7), paranasal sinus (n = 7), neck (n = 7), and other sites (n = 23). Thirty-eight patients were treated definitively and 27 patients with metastatic disease and/or untreated local disease were treated palliatively. Nine patients underwent complete macroscopic resection before SRS. Thirty-three patients received concurrent chemoradiation. The median initial radiation dose was 67 Gy, and the median reirradiation SRS dose was 30 Gy (21-35 Gy) in 2-5 fractions. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 16 months. Fifty-six patients were evaluable for response: 30 (54%) had complete, 15 (27%) had partial, and 11 (20%) had no response. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 12 months. For definitively treated patients, the 2-year OS and locoregional control (LRC) rates were 41% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that higher total dose, surgical resection, and nasopharynx site were significantly associated with improved LRC; surgical resection and nonsquamous histology were associated with improved OS. Seven patients (11%) experienced severe reirradiation-related toxicity, including one treatment-attributed death. Conclusion: SRS reirradiation for head-and-neck cancer is feasible. This study demonstrates encouraging response rates with acceptable toxicity. Fractionated SRS reirradiation with concurrent chemotherapy in select patients warrants further study.

  14. The spinal accessory nerve plexus, the trapezius muscle, and shoulder stabilization after radical neck cancer surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H; Burns, S; Kaiser, C W

    1988-01-01

    A clinical and anatomic study of the spinal accessory, the eleventh cranial nerve, and trapezius muscle function of patients who had radical neck cancer surgery was conducted. This study was done not only to document the indispensibility of the trapezius muscle to shoulder-girdle stability, but also to clarify the role of the eleventh cranial nerve in the variable motor and sensory changes occurring after the loss of this muscle. Seventeen male patients, 49-69 years of age, (average of 60 years of age) undergoing a total of 23 radical neck dissections were examined for upper extremity function, particularly in regard to the trapezius muscle, and for subjective signs of pain. The eleventh nerve, usually regarded as the sole motor innervation to the trapezius, was cut in 17 instances because of tumor involvement. Dissection of four fresh and 30 preserved adult cadavers helped to reconcile the motor and sensory differences in patients who had undergone loss of the eleventh nerve. The dissections and clinical observations corroborate that the trapezius is a key part of a "muscle continuum" that stabilizes the shoulder. Variations in origins and insertions of the trapezius may influence its function in different individuals. As regards the spinal accessory nerve, it is concluded that varying motor and sensory connections form a plexus with the eleventh nerve, accounting, in part, for the variations in motor innervation and function of the trapezius, as well as for a variable spectrum of sensory changes when the eleventh nerve is cut. For this reason, it is suggested that the term "spinal accessory nerve plexus" be used to refer to the eleventh nerve when it is considered in the context of radical neck cancer surgery. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3056289

  15. Gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa™) as palliative treatment in recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M; A'hern, R P; D'ambrosio, C; Tanay, M; Syrigos, K N; Rogers, S J; Box, C; Eccles, S A; Nutting, C M; Harrington, K J

    2006-01-01

    To assess the level of activity and toxicity of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa™) in a population of patients with locally recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer. Patients were recruited into an expanded access programme through the multidisciplinary head and neck clinics at the Royal Marsden and St George's Hospitals. Patients were required to have received at least one course of standard systemic chemotherapy or radiation therapy, or be medically unfit for chemotherapy. Patients were commenced on single-agent gefitinib at a dose of 500 mg day−1. Clinical, symptomatic and radiological response, time to progression (TTP), survival and toxicity were recorded. A total of 47 patients were enrolled (35 male and 12 female) with a median age of 62 years (range 18–93 years). The observed clinical response rate was 8% with a disease control rate (complete response, partial response, stable disease) of 36%. In all, 34% of patients experienced an improvement in their symptoms. The median TTP and survival were 2.6 and 4.3 months, respectively. Acneiform folliculitis was the most frequent toxicity observed (76%) but the majority of cases were grade 1 or 2. Only four patients experienced grade 3 toxicity of any type (all cases of folliculitis). Gefitinib was well tolerated and yielded symptomatic improvement in one-third of patients. However, this agent appeared to possess limited antitumour activity in this group of patients with head and neck cancer in whom the objective response rate, median TTP and survival were all lower than has been reported in a previous study. PMID:16495923

  16. Aspiration in head and neck cancer patients: a single centre experience of clinical profile, bacterial isolates and antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

    PubMed

    Lakshmaiah, K C; Sirsath, Nagesh T; Subramanyam, Jayshree R; Govind, Babu K; Lokanatha, D; Shenoy, Ashok M

    2013-07-01

    Most patients with head and neck cancer have dysphagia and are at increased risk of having aspiration and subsequent pneumonia. It can cause prolonged hospitalization, treatment delay and/or interruption and mortality in cancer patients. The treatment of these infections often relies on empirical antibiotics based on local microbiology and antibiotic sensitivity patterns. The aim of present study is to analyse respiratory tract pathogens isolated by sputum culture in head and neck cancer patients undergoing treatment at a tertiary cancer centre in South India who presented with features of aspiration. The study is carried out to establish empirical antibiotic policy for head and neck cancer patients who present with features of aspiration. This was a retrospective study. The study included sputum samples sent for culture and sensitivity from January 2011 to December 2012. Analysis of microbiologic species isolated in sputum specimen and the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of the bacterial isolates was performed. A detailed study of case files of all patients was done to find out which is the most common site prone for producing aspiration. There were 47 (31.54 %) gram positive isolates and 102 (68.45 %) gram negative isolates. The most common bacterial isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (25.50 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16.77 %) and Haemophilus influenzae (15.43 %). Levofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic with excellent activity against both gram positive and gram negative isolates. Most patients with aspiration had laryngeal cancer (34.89 %). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 14 (9.39 %) patients. Gram negative bacteria are common etiologic agents in head and neck cancer patients presenting with features of aspiration. Levofloxacin should be started as empirical antibiotic in these patients while awaiting sputum culture sensitivity report. As aspiration in head and neck cancer is an underreported event such institutional antibiotic sensitivity

  17. DNA-based immunotherapy for HPV-associated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Charu

    2016-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) accounts for 3% of all cancers. Most patients present with locally advanced disease, where multimodality therapies are used with curative intent. Despite favorable early local treatment results, about one third of the patients will eventually develop metastatic disease. Immunotherapy offers a novel therapeutic strategy beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy, with initial approvals in melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. HPV-associated SCCHN is a distinct subset, with unique epidemiology and treatment outcomes. Both subsets of SCCHN (HPV-related or not) are particularly favorable for immunotherapy, as immune evasion and dysregulation have been shown to play a key role in the initiation and progression of disease. This review focuses on the latest developments in immunotherapy in SCCHN, with a particular focus on DNA-based approaches including vaccine and adoptive cellular therapies. PMID:27605067

  18. Malnutrition and cachexia in patients with head and neck cancer treated with (chemo)radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gorenc, Mojca; Kozjek, Nada Rotovnik; Strojan, Primož

    2015-01-01

    Aim To highlight the problems associated with nutrition that occur in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Background SCCHN is associated with weight loss before, during and after radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Because of serious consequences of malnutrition and cachexia on treatment outcome, mortality, morbidity, and quality of life, it is important to identify SCCHN patients with increased risk for the development of malnutrition and cachexia. Materials and methods Critical review of the literature. Results This review describes pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition and cancer cachexia. Treatment of malnutrition and cancer cachexia includes nutritional interventions and pharmacological therapy. Advantages and disadvantages of different nutritional interventions and their effect on the nutritional status, quality of life and specific oncological treatment are presented. Conclusions Nutritional management is an essential part of care of these patients, including early screening, assessment of nutritional status and appropriate intervention. PMID:26109912

  19. DNA-based immunotherapy for HPV-associated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Charu

    2016-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) accounts for 3% of all cancers. Most patients present with locally advanced disease, where multimodality therapies are used with curative intent. Despite favorable early local treatment results, about one third of the patients will eventually develop metastatic disease. Immunotherapy offers a novel therapeutic strategy beyond cytotoxic chemotherapy, with initial approvals in melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. HPV-associated SCCHN is a distinct subset, with unique epidemiology and treatment outcomes. Both subsets of SCCHN (HPV-related or not) are particularly favorable for immunotherapy, as immune evasion and dysregulation have been shown to play a key role in the initiation and progression of disease. This review focuses on the latest developments in immunotherapy in SCCHN, with a particular focus on DNA-based approaches including vaccine and adoptive cellular therapies.

  20. Molecular changes in the multistage pathogenesis of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Brian J.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCCHN) arise in the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract at multiple anatomic sites. While tobacco and alcohol exposure remain the primary risk factors for this malignancy, infection with the human papilloma virus is emerging as a major contributing factor to cancers that arise primarily in the oropharynx. Despite therapeutic advances, survival has remained relatively unchanged over the past few decades. Increased understand of the cellular and molecular biology of these cancers will improve our understanding of this malignancy and facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. Alterations that have been studied to date include genetic and epigenetic changes. While the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is the only established molecular therapeutic target, other proteins and pathways are under active investigation to determine their contribution to SCCHN carcinogenesis and progression. PMID:22112483

  1. Associations between psychosocial functioning and smiling intensity in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Teo, Irene; Guindani, Michele; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to developing quantitative measures of facial expression. This study used quantitative facial expression analysis to examine associations between smiling intensity and psychosocial functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Smiling intensity of 95 HNC patients was measured using 48 quantitative measures calculated from facial photographs with and without a smile. We computed a composite smiling intensity score for each patient representing the degree of similarity to healthy controls. A lower composite score indicates that the person is less expressive, on average, than healthy controls. Patients also completed self-report measures assessing domains of body image and quality of life (QOL). Spearman rank correlations were computed to examine relationships between composite scores and psychosocial functioning. Composite scores were significantly correlated with multiple measures of body image and QOL. Specifically, decreased smiling intensity was associated with feelings of dissatisfaction with one's body, perceived negative social impact of body image, increased use of avoidance as a body image-coping strategy, reduced functional well-being, and greater head and neck cancer-specific issues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate associations between an objectively quantified facial expression (i.e. smiling) and psychosocial functioning. Most previous studies have measured facial expression qualitatively. These findings indicate that smiling intensity may serve as an important clinical indicator of psychosocial well-being and warrants further clinical investigation.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Glucose Uptake and Metabolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jihong; Weygand, Joseph; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Ding, Yao; Fuller, Clifton D; Lai, Stephen Y; Frank, Steven J; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging metabolic dysfunction, a hallmark of solid tumors, usually requires radioactive tracers. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can potentially detect and visualize glucose uptake and metabolism, without the need for radioisotopes. Here, we tested the feasibility of using glucose CEST (glucoCEST) to image unlabeled glucose uptake in head and neck cancer by using a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The average CEST contrast between tumors and normal tissue in 17 patients was 7.58% (P = 0.006) in the 3-4 ppm offset frequency range and 5.06% (P = 0.02) in 1-5 ppm range. In a subgroup of eight patients, glucoCEST signal enhancement was higher in tumors than in normal muscle (4.98% vs. 1.28%, P < 0.021). We conclude that glucoCEST images of head and neck cancer can be obtained with a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:27461165

  3. Piezoresistive Membrane Surface Stress Sensors for Characterization of Breath Samples of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hans Peter; Loizeau, Frédéric; Hiou-Feige, Agnès; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Romero, Pedro; Akiyama, Terunobu; Gerber, Christoph; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    For many diseases, where a particular organ is affected, chemical by-products can be found in the patient’s exhaled breath. Breath analysis is often done using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, but interpretation of results is difficult and time-consuming. We performed characterization of patients’ exhaled breath samples by an electronic nose technique based on an array of nanomechanical membrane sensors. Each membrane is coated with a different thin polymer layer. By pumping the exhaled breath into a measurement chamber, volatile organic compounds present in patients’ breath diffuse into the polymer layers and deform the membranes by changes in surface stress. The bending of the membranes is measured piezoresistively and the signals are converted into voltages. The sensor deflection pattern allows one to characterize the condition of the patient. In a clinical pilot study, we investigated breath samples from head and neck cancer patients and healthy control persons. Evaluation using principal component analysis (PCA) allowed a clear distinction between the two groups. As head and neck cancer can be completely removed by surgery, the breath of cured patients was investigated after surgery again and the results were similar to those of the healthy control group, indicating that surgery was successful. PMID:27455276

  4. Nisin ZP, a Bacteriocin and Food Preservative, Inhibits Head and Neck Cancer Tumorigenesis and Prolongs Survival.

    PubMed

    Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Hayami, Takayuki; Matte, Bibiana; Liu, Yang; Danciu, Theodora; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Worden, Francis; Kapila, Sunil; Kapila, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    The use of small antimicrobial peptides or bacteriocins, like nisin, to treat cancer is a new approach that holds great promise. Nisin exemplifies this new approach because it has been used safely in humans for many years as a food preservative, and recent laboratory studies support its anti-tumor potential in head and neck cancer. Previously, we showed that nisin (2.5%, low content) has antitumor potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in vitro and in vivo. The current studies explored a naturally occurring variant of nisin (nisin ZP; 95%, high content) for its antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Nisin ZP induced the greatest level of apoptosis in HNSCC cells compared to low content nisin. HNSCC cells treated with increasing concentrations of nisin ZP exhibited increasing levels of apoptosis and decreasing levels of cell proliferation, clonogenic capacity, and sphere formation. Nisin ZP induced apoptosis through a calpain-dependent pathway in HNSCC cells but not in human oral keratinocytes. Nisin ZP also induced apoptosis dose-dependently in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with concomitant decreases in vascular sprout formation in vitro and reduced intratumoral microvessel density in vivo. Nisin ZP reduced tumorigenesis in vivo and long-term treatment with nisin ZP extended survival. In addition, nisin treated mice exhibited normal organ histology with no evidence of inflammation, fibrosis or necrosis. In summary, nisin ZP exhibits greater antitumor effects than low content nisin, and thus has the potential to serve as a novel therapeutic for HNSCC.

  5. Cevimeline for the Treatment of Postirradiation Xerostomia in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Mark S. . E-mail: mchamber@mdanderson.org; Posner, Marshall; Jones, Christopher Uwe; Biel, Merrill A.; Hodge, Kenneth M.; Vitti, Robert; Armstrong, Ingrid; Yen, Cindy; Weber, Randal S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the efficacy and safety of cevimeline in two double-blind trials (Studies 003 and 004) enrolling patients with head and neck cancer in whom xerostomia developed after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were randomly assigned to receive cevimeline, 30 mg three times daily, or placebo for 12 weeks, with the possibility of dose escalation to 45 mg three times daily at 6 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the patient's final global evaluation of oral dryness; change in unstimulated salivary flow was a secondary endpoint. Results: Five hundred seventy subjects (284 in Study 003 and 286 in Study 004) were randomized. Significantly more cevimeline-treated subjects than placebo recipients (47.4% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.0162) in Study 003 reported improvement in dry mouth in the final global evaluation of oral dryness. No significant difference between groups in the final global evaluation was seen in Study 004, in which a high placebo response rate of 47.6% was observed. In both studies, cevimeline-treated subjects had significantly greater increases in the objective measure of unstimulated salivary flow than placebo recipients (p 0.0093 [Study 003] and p = 0.0215 [Study 004]), whereas no significant differences in stimulated salivary flow were observed. The most frequent adverse event was increased sweating. Conclusion: Cevimeline was well tolerated by patients with xerostomia after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and oral administration of 30-45 mg of cevimeline three times daily increased unstimulated salivary flow.

  6. Does PEG Use Cause Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Langmore, Susan; Krisciunas, Gintas P.; Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Evans, Steven R.; Cheng, Debbie M.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use is common in patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer to maintain weight and nutrition during treatment. However, the true effect of PEG use on weight maintenance and its potential impact on long-term dysphagia outcomes have not been adequately studied. This retrospective study looked at swallowing-related outcomes among patients who received prophylactic PEG vs. those who did not, and among patients who maintained oral diets vs. partial oral diets vs. those who were nil per os (NPO). Outcomes were assessed at the end of RT and at 3, 6, and 12 months post RT. A comprehensive review of patients’ medical charts for a 6-year period yielded 59 subjects with complete data. Results showed no difference in long-term percent weight change between the prophylactic PEG patients vs. all others, or between patients who, during RT, had oral diets vs. partial oral diets vs. NPO. However, those who did not receive prophylactic PEGs and those who maintained an oral or a partial oral diet during RT had significantly better diet outcomes at all times post RT. Dependence on a PEG may lead to adverse swallowing ability in post-irradiated head and neck cancer patients possibly due to decreased use of the swallowing musculature. PMID:21850606

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Glucose Uptake and Metabolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihong; Weygand, Joseph; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Ding, Yao; Fuller, Clifton D.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Frank, Steven J.; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging metabolic dysfunction, a hallmark of solid tumors, usually requires radioactive tracers. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can potentially detect and visualize glucose uptake and metabolism, without the need for radioisotopes. Here, we tested the feasibility of using glucose CEST (glucoCEST) to image unlabeled glucose uptake in head and neck cancer by using a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The average CEST contrast between tumors and normal tissue in 17 patients was 7.58% (P = 0.006) in the 3–4 ppm offset frequency range and 5.06% (P = 0.02) in 1–5 ppm range. In a subgroup of eight patients, glucoCEST signal enhancement was higher in tumors than in normal muscle (4.98% vs. 1.28%, P < 0.021). We conclude that glucoCEST images of head and neck cancer can be obtained with a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:27461165

  8. ASA grade and disease-free mortality in head and neck cancer patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kanatas, Anastasios; Gorton, Heather; Smith, Adam B; Mannion, Christopher; Ong, Thian K; Mitchell, David

    2010-12-01

    Complex surgery with curative intent as part of the care of patients with head and neck cancer, who also have serious coexisting conditions is sometimes viewed critically as being unduly, optimistic. We have used American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) grading by a single anaesthetist prospectively as a baseline to investigate a possible link between coexisiting conditions and disease-free survival in 114 patients with head and neck cancer patients treated by the same anaesthetist and surgical team, and found that the ASA grade is not a reliable predictor of disease-free survival. There was no significant association between ASA grade and overall mortality, but there was a significant association between ASA grade and mortality associated with metastatic disease. However, the test for trend was not significant, which suggested that deaths from metastatic disease did not increase in line with ASA grading. All patients in ASA grades II and III were alive 2 years after their initial operation and the risk of mortality after 2 years may increase by up to 10%.

  9. The development of a liquid biopsy for head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Henri; Kulasinghe, Arutha; Kenny, Liz; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-10-01

    Developing non-invasive diagnostic tools in the field of head and neck oncology has been a challenge. Analysis of circulating tumour derivatives in a patient's blood has been explored in other solid cancers. This includes analysis of circulating tumour DNA, intact circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and exosomes. These circulating tumour derivatives provide avenues of investigation which can be representative of a patient's primary tumour signature and can be assessed from a patient's blood sample. In advanced stage cancer patients, these tumour derivatives are found in higher amounts, attributed to higher cellular turnover (apoptosis, autophagy), lysed CTCs and sloughing from necrotic tumours. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients often present with advanced disease associated with a poor 5-year survival of <50%. Outside of sophisticated imaging and clinical examination, there is a lack of available biomarkers to measure disease burden, and/or response to therapy. Implementation of a liquid biopsy in HNSCC through serial blood samples has the potential to detect metastatic events earlier, thereby allowing better selection of appropriate treatment choices, predict prognosis in patients with potentially curable disease, monitor systemic therapies and residual disease post-treatment. PMID:27688098

  10. Piezoresistive Membrane Surface Stress Sensors for Characterization of Breath Samples of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Lang, Hans Peter; Loizeau, Frédéric; Hiou-Feige, Agnès; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Romero, Pedro; Akiyama, Terunobu; Gerber, Christoph; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    For many diseases, where a particular organ is affected, chemical by-products can be found in the patient's exhaled breath. Breath analysis is often done using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, but interpretation of results is difficult and time-consuming. We performed characterization of patients' exhaled breath samples by an electronic nose technique based on an array of nanomechanical membrane sensors. Each membrane is coated with a different thin polymer layer. By pumping the exhaled breath into a measurement chamber, volatile organic compounds present in patients' breath diffuse into the polymer layers and deform the membranes by changes in surface stress. The bending of the membranes is measured piezoresistively and the signals are converted into voltages. The sensor deflection pattern allows one to characterize the condition of the patient. In a clinical pilot study, we investigated breath samples from head and neck cancer patients and healthy control persons. Evaluation using principal component analysis (PCA) allowed a clear distinction between the two groups. As head and neck cancer can be completely removed by surgery, the breath of cured patients was investigated after surgery again and the results were similar to those of the healthy control group, indicating that surgery was successful. PMID:27455276

  11. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis associated with radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Ishihara, Masashi; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2010-10-15

    Oral mucositis is frequent but serious adverse event associated with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in head and neck cancer severely impairs health-related quality of life, leading to poor prognosis due to discontinuation of the therapy. Although a number of compounds have been tested for prophylaxis of oral mucositis, few of them are satisfactory. We investigated the effect of polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine), a gastric mucosal protective drug, on radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients were randomly assigned to receive polaprezinc (n = 16) or azulene oral rinse as the control (n = 15). The incidence rates of mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance were all markedly lower in polaprezinc group than in control. Moreover, the use of analgesics was significantly (p = 0.003) less frequent and the amount of food intake was significantly (p = 0.002) higher in polaprezinc group than in control. On the other hand, tumor response rate in patients with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly affected by polaprezinc, in which the response rate (complete plus partial response) was 88% for polaprezinc and 92% for control (p = 1.000). Therefore, it is highly assumable that polaprezinc is potentially useful for prevention of oral mucositis and improvement of quality of life without reducing the tumor response.

  12. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.; Filip, Sanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET) have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour. PMID:25214887

  13. Margin on Gross Tumor Volume and Risk of Local Recurrence in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Keene, Kimberley S.; Dobelbower, M. Christian; Bonner, James A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. Results: The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of <=15 mm. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, there was not an increased risk of local failure using smaller margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  14. Function of the parotid gland following radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Downs, J.; Herbert, D.; Aramany, M.

    1981-02-01

    The parotid gland was selected for study of its salivary output before and after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Before radiation therapy, a sialogram of the parotid gland was performed with the patient's head positioned for radiation therapy; a lateral radiographic view of the parotid gland was used to compare with the radiation treatment portal to determine the portion of the parotid gland to be irradiated. Samples of stimulated saliva were collected from the parotid gland before and at 1 and 6 months post-radiation. Eighteen patients with head and neck cancer who received radiation therapy were studied. The data showed that in the irradiation of nasopharyngeal, advanced oropharyngeal and Waldeyer's ring lesions, 100% of the parotid gland was irradiated; for the early oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal lesions, from 30 to 90% of the parotid gland was irradiated and for the supraglottic and oral cavity lesions, 25 to 30% of the parotid gland was irradiated. When 100% of the parotid gland was irradiated, no saliva was produced at 1 month post-radiation; this remained the same when re-tested at 4 to 8 months, however, when any portion of the parotid gland was not irradiated, there was residual salivary function.

  15. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Maasland, Denise H. E.; Brandt, Piet A. van den; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J.

    2015-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40–7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m2, compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m2. Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found. PMID:26634678

  16. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-12-04

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40-7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2), compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m(2). Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found.

  17. Intraobserver and Interobserver Variability in GTV Delineation on FDG-PET-CT Images of Head and Neck Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, Stephen L. |. E-mail: Stephen.Breen@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Publicover, Julia; De Silva, Shiroma; Pond, Greg; Brock, Kristy |; O'Sullivan, Brian |; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Waldron, John |; Keller, Anne |; Yu, Eugene; Hendler, Aaron |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if the addition of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data changes primary site gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced CT, and FDG-PET-CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with head and neck cancers. Eight experienced observers (6 head and neck oncologists and 2 neuro-radiologists) with access to clinical and radiologic reports outlined primary site GTVs on each modality. Three cases were recontoured twice to assess intraobserver variability. The magnitudes of the GTVs were compared. Intra- and interobserver variability was assessed by a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results: There were no significant differences in the GTVs across the image modalities when compared as ensemble averages; the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test showed that CT volumes were larger than PET-CT. Observers demonstrated the greatest consistency and were most interchangeable on contrast-enhanced CT; they performed less reliably on PET-CT. Conclusions: The addition of PET-CT to primary site GTV delineation of head and neck cancers does not change the volume of the GTV defined by this group of expert observers in this patient sample. An FDG-PET may demonstrate differences in neck node delineation and in other disease sites.

  18. Phototheranostic Porphyrin Nanoparticles Enable Visualization and Targeted Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Clinically Relevant Models

    PubMed Central

    Muhanna, Nidal; Jin, Cheng S; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chan, Harley; Qiu, Yi; Jiang, Wenlei; Cui, Liyang; Burgess, Laura; Akens, Margarete K; Chen, Juan; Irish, Jonathan C; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer worldwide and remains challenging for effective treatment due to the proximity to critical anatomical structures in the head and neck region, which increases the probability of toxicity from surgery and radiotherapy, and therefore emphasizes the importance of maximizing the targeted ablation. We have assessed the effectiveness of porphysome nanoparticles to enhance fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of head and neck tumors in rabbit and hamster models. In addition, we evaluated the effectiveness of this agent for localized photothermal ablative therapy of head and neck tumors. We have demonstrated that porphysomes not only enabled fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of buccal and tongue carcinomas, but also allowed for complete targeted ablation of these tumors. The supremacy of porphysome-enabled photothermal therapy over surgery to completely eradicate primary tumors and metastatic regional lymph node while sparing the adjacent critical structures' function has been demonstrated for the first time. This study represents a novel breakthrough that has the potential to revolutionize our approach to tumor diagnosis and treatment in head and neck cancer and beyond. PMID:26681987

  19. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  20. [Physiological metals in the serum, hair and nails of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Anna; Kujawa, Anita; Seńczuk-Przybyłowska, Monika; Kulza, Maksymilian; Gawecki, Wojciech; Szybiak, Bartosz; Herman, Małgorzata; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Kurhańska-Flisykowska, Anna; Chesy, Paulina; Szyfter, Witold; Walas, Stanisław; Golusiński, Wojciech; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Parczewski, Andrzej; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol drinking result in the rise of numbers of patients suffering from the head and neck cancer. Addiction to any of these stimulants carry a risk of developing a cancerogenesis process. Using them simultaniously lead not to a summary of each of those risks but multiplies them. Scientific research also indicates the important difference in the incidence of cancer in people who have never smoked cigarettes or drunk alcohol in comparison to those, whose exposure to these stimulatns was longterm - in such case, the former group had a lower percentage of developing the disease. Human body burdened with the ongoing cancer shows disturbances on various levels of the system. One of such disturbances is change of the concetration levels of physiological metals, such as calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, zinc or mangenese. They play key roles in maintaing the hormonal and ionic stability, they act as cofactors in many enzymes in metabolic processes. Diagnostic research of any deviations in levels of those essential elements enables a full estimation of a patient condition. The aim of this study was physiological metal levels evaluation in different kinds of biological material in patients with tumors of larynx, salivary glands and oral cavity and tongue. Hair and nail samples were used as examples of alternative material, beside the serum samples, which is a standard material and often used. Subjects were patients of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology Clinic of Poznan University of Medical Sciences (Samodzielny Publiczny Szpital Kliniczny nr 2 im. Heliodora Swiecickiego Uniwersytetu Medycznego im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu) and The Head and Neck Surgery Ward of The Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Poznan. Subjects were 41 men and 18 women with tumors of larynx, salivary glands and oral cavity and tongue. The control group consisted of patients from the Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology Clinic of Poznan University of

  1. Impact of Node Negative Target Volume Delineation on Contralateral Parotid Gland Dose Sparing Using IMRT in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, William J; Urban, Erich; Bayliss, R Adam; Harari, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    There is considerable practice variation in treatment of the node negative (N0) contralateral neck in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, we examined the impact of N0 neck target delineation volume on radiation dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Following institutional review board approval, 12 patients with head and neck cancer were studied. All had indications for treatment of the N0 neck, such as midline base of tongue or soft palate extension or advanced ipsilateral nodal disease. The N0 neck volumes were created using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group head and neck contouring atlas. The physician-drawn N0 neck clinical target volume (CTV) was expanded by 25% to 200% to generate volume variation, followed by a 3-mm planning target volume (PTV) expansion. Surrounding organs at risk were contoured and complete intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for each N0 volume expansion. The median N0 target volume drawn by the radiation oncologist measured 93 cm(3) (range 71-145). Volumetric expansion of the N0 CTV by 25% to 200% increased the resultant mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland by 1.4 to 8.5 Gray (Gy). For example, a 4.1-mm increase in the N0 neck CTV translated to a 2.0-Gy dose increase to the parotid, 7.4 mm to a 4.5 Gy dose increase, and 12.5 mm to an 8.5 Gy dose increase, respectively. The treatment volume designated for the N0 neck has profound impact on resultant dose to the contralateral parotid gland. Variations of up to 15 mm are routine across physicians in target contouring, reflecting individual preference and training expertise. Depending on the availability of immobilization and image guidance techniques, experts commonly recommend 3 to 10 mm margin expansions to generate the PTV. Careful attention to the original volume of the N0 neck CTV, as well as expansion margins, is important in achieving effective contralateral gland sparing to reduce the resultant xerostomia and dysguesia that may ensue

  2. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS ASSOCIATION WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: UNDERSTANDING VIRUS BIOLOGY AND USING IT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CANCER DIAGNOSTICS.

    PubMed

    Strati, Katerina; Lambert, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    The link between human papillomaviruses and human cervical cancers has long been established. However, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are now being detected in another type of cancer, not previously associated with this virus, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This review will focus on experimental data supporting the view that HPVs contribute to the etiology of a subset of HNSCC. We further put forth the argument that HPV-associated HNSCC deserves to be recognized as a distinct disease in the clinic and as such needs to be appropriately diagnosed. We offer an overview of studies that have helped dissect the role of HPVs in HNSCC and that may be helpful in the development of new diagnostic tools for discriminating this type of HNSCC.

  3. The head and neck cancer immune landscape and its immunotherapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Rajarsi; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Havel, Jonathan J.; Dalin, Martin G.; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Ken-Wing; Ganly, Ian; Hakimi, A. Ari; Chan, Timothy A.; Morris, Luc G.T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated a clear survival advantage in advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with immune checkpoint blockade. These emerging results reveal that HNSCC is one of the most promising frontiers for immunotherapy research. However, further progress in head and neck immuno-oncology will require a detailed understanding of the immune infiltrative landscape found in these tumors. We leveraged transcriptome data from 280 tumors profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to comprehensively characterize the immune landscape of HNSCC in order to develop a rationale for immunotherapeutic strategies in HNSCC and guide clinical investigation. We find that both HPV+ and HPV– HNSCC tumors are among the most highly immune-infiltrated cancer types. Strikingly, HNSCC had the highest median Treg/CD8+ T cell ratio and the highest levels of CD56dim NK cell infiltration, in our pan-cancer analysis of the most immune-infiltrated tumors. CD8+ T cell infiltration and CD56dim NK cell infiltration each correlated with superior survival in HNSCC. Tumors harboring genetic smoking signatures had lower immune infiltration and were associated with poorer survival, suggesting these patients may benefit from immune agonist therapy. These findings illuminate the immune landscape of HPV+ and HPV– HNSCC. Additionally, this landscape provides a potentially novel rationale for investigation of agents targeting modulators of Tregs (e.g., CTLA-4, GITR, ICOS, IDO, and VEGFA) and NK cells (e.g., KIR, TIGIT, and 4-1BB) as adjuncts to anti–PD-1 in the treatment of advanced HNSCC. PMID:27777979

  4. Paucity of HPV-Related Head and Neck Cancers (HNC) in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oga, Emmanuel A.; Schumaker, Lisa M.; Alabi, Biodun Sulyman; Obaseki, Darlington; Umana, Aniefon; Bassey, Ima-Abasi; Ebughe, Godwin; Oluwole, Olabode; Akeredolu, Teniola; Adebamowo, Sally N.; Dakum, Patrick; Cullen, Kevin; Adebamowo, Clement A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The burden of HPV-related Head and Neck Cancers (HNC) has been rising in the U.S. and other developed countries but this trend has not been reported in Africa. Objective of study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection in HNC cancer cases seen between 1990 and 2011 at the tertiary health care institutions in Nigeria. Methods We retrieved 149 head and neck cancer formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tumor specimens diagnosed between 1990 and 2011 from four teaching hospitals in Nigeria. One hundred and twenty-three blocks (83%) contained appropriate HNC for analysis while DNA extraction was successful in 60% (90/149). PCR amplification was successful in 33% (49/149) and Linear Array genotyping for HPV was successful in 11% (17/149) of these cases. These were in tumors from the larynx (6), cervical lymph nodes (3), nasal cavity (2), parotid (1), palate (1), maxillary sinus (1) and mandible (1). Two cases were non-specific and none were from the oropharynx. Histologically, 41% (7/17) of the successfully genotyped blocks were squamous cell carcinomas (larynx 6, maxillary sinus 1). Results and Conclusion We were unable to detect HPV in any of the HNC samples in our study. Our result may suggest that there is a low prevalence of HPV-related HNC among the adult population in Nigeria. Our results provide a benchmark to compare future incidence of HPV -related HNC in this community in future. We had significant analytical challenges from possible poor tissue processing and urge that future studies should prospectively collect samples and ensure high quality sample processing. PMID:27050815

  5. Determinants of patient delay in doctor consultation in head and neck cancers (Protocol DEREDIA)

    PubMed Central

    Christophe, Véronique; Leroy, Tanguy; Seillier, Mélanie; Duthilleul, Camille; Julieron, Morbize; Clisant, Stéphanie; Foncel, Jérôme; Vallet, Fanny; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reducing the time between the onset of the first symptoms of cancer and the first consultation with a doctor (patient delay) is essential to improve the vital prognosis and quality of life of patients. Longer patient delay is linked to the already known sociodemographic, socioeconomic, socioeducational, sociocultural and socioprofessional factors. However, recent data suggest that some sociocognitive and emotional determinants may explain patient delay from a complementary point of view. The main objective of this study is to assess whether, in head and neck cancer, patient delay is linked to these sociocognitive and emotional factors, in addition to previously known factors. Methods and analysis We intend to include in this study 400 patients with a not yet treated head and neck cancer diagnosed in one of six health centres in the North of France region. The main evaluation criterion is ‘patient delay’. Sociocognitive, emotional, medical, sociodemographic, socioeconomic, educational, professional and geographic factors will be assessed by means of (1) a case report form, (2) a questionnaire completed by the clinical research associate together with the patient, (3) a questionnaire completed by the patient and (4) a recorded semidirective interview of the patient by a psychologist (for 80 patients only). The collected data will be analysed to underline the differences between patients who consulted a doctor earlier versus those who consulted later. Ethics The study has obtained all the relevant authorisations for the protection of patients enrolled in clinical trials (CCTIRS, CCP, CNIL), does not involve products mentioned in article L.5311-1 of the French Code of Public Health, and does not imply any changes in the medical care received by the patients. The study began in October 2012 and will end in June 2015. Trial registration ID-RCB 2012-A00005-38. PMID:25063460

  6. Stepwise Progress in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Radiation Studies for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of four new epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors for cancer therapy (cetuximab, panitumumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib) over the last 3 years is a remarkable milestone in oncology. Indeed, molecular inhibition of EGFR signaling represents one of the most promising current arenas for the development of molecular-targeted cancer therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors from both the monoclonal antibody and tyrosine kinase inhibitor class have demonstrated clinical activity in the treatment of a broad spectrum of common human malignancies. For the discipline of radiation oncology, the 2006 report of a phase III trial demonstrating a survival advantage for advanced head and neck cancer patients with the addition of weekly cetuximab during a 7-week course of radiation is particularly gratifying. Indeed, this is the first phase III trial to confirm a survival advantage with the addition of a molecular-targeted agent to radiation. Furthermore, this result seems to have been achieved with only a modest increment in overall treatment toxicity and with very high compliance to the prescribed treatment regimen. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned regarding the rational integration of EGFR inhibitors into cancer treatment regimens, as well as methods to optimize the selection of patients most likely to benefit from EGFR inhibitor strategies.

  7. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., “stemness”), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology. PMID:27429838

  8. Evaluation of Automatic Atlas-Based Lymph Node Segmentation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleford, Liza J.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Perkins, Charles; Edelman, Scott; Davis, Lawrence

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if automatic atlas-based lymph node segmentation (LNS) improves efficiency and decreases inter-observer variability while maintaining accuracy. Methods and Materials: Five physicians with head-and-neck IMRT experience used computed tomography (CT) data from 5 patients to create bilateral neck clinical target volumes covering specified nodal levels. A second contour set was automatically generated using a commercially available atlas. Physicians modified the automatic contours to make them acceptable for treatment planning. To assess contour variability, the Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm was used to take collections of contours and calculate a probabilistic estimate of the 'true' segmentation. Differences between the manual, automatic, and automatic-modified (AM) contours were analyzed using multiple metrics. Results: Compared with the 'true' segmentation created from manual contours, the automatic contours had a high degree of accuracy, with sensitivity, Dice similarity coefficient, and mean/max surface disagreement values comparable to the average manual contour (86%, 76%, 3.3/17.4 mm automatic vs. 73%, 79%, 2.8/17 mm manual). The AM group was more consistent than the manual group for multiple metrics, most notably reducing the range of contour volume (106-430 mL manual vs. 176-347 mL AM) and percent false positivity (1-37% manual vs. 1-7% AM). Average contouring time savings with the automatic segmentation was 11.5 min per patient, a 35% reduction. Conclusions: Using the STAPLE algorithm to generate 'true' contours from multiple physician contours, we demonstrated that, in comparison with manual segmentation, atlas-based automatic LNS for head-and-neck cancer is accurate, efficient, and reduces interobserver variability.

  9. Palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer: "I would like a quick return to a normal lifestyle".

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Nathan E; Genden, Eric; Morrison, R Sean

    2008-04-16

    Head and neck cancers constitute a diverse group of diseases including malignancies of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, sinuses, and skull base. Treatment of these cancers includes a combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation. Due to both the patterns of disease recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments, patients with head and neck cancer often have a complex and prolonged course of illness that is marked by periods of freedom from disease and symptoms interspersed with bouts of serious illness, debility, and numerous physical and psychological symptoms including pain, dysphagia, weight loss, disfigurement, depression, and xerostomia. Thus, management of this disease is best provided by an interdisciplinary team that includes individuals from the disciplines of otolaryngology, palliative care, radiation oncology, oncology, nutrition, speech, and physical and occupational therapy. Using the case of Mr K, we describe the symptoms encountered by patients with head and neck cancer and suggest options for management. We discuss the psychological aspects that affect these patients, including issues such as changes in body image, quality of life, anxiety, and guilt. Finally, we discuss the importance of the interdisciplinary team in the care of these patients and outline the roles of each team member. By providing comprehensive care to patients with malignancies of the head and neck, clinicians can increase the likelihood that patients and their families will be able to obtain the best possible outcomes and quality of life. PMID:18413876

  10. Psychological Factors Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Treatment and Survivorship : Evidence and Opportunities for Behavioral Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howren, M. Bryant; Christensen, Alan J.; Karnell, Lucy Hynds; Funk, Gerry F.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC) not only face a potentially life-threatening diagnosis but must endure treatment that often results in significant, highly visible disfigurement and disruptions of essential functioning, such as deficits or complications in eating, swallowing, breathing, and speech. Each year, approximately…

  11. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  12. Predictive factors for surgical site infection in head and neck cancer surgery: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Henry, J S; Buffet-Bataillon, S; Deberge, S; Jegoux, F

    2014-01-01

    Surgical Site Infection (SSI) after head and neck cancer surgery may be life threatening and induces increasing in healthcare cost. The objective of this present study was to identify predictive factors associated to surgical site infection in head and neck cancer surgery. Numerous predictive factors were analyzed with univariate case-control method, then with multivariate method. This retrospective study included 71 patients who have been hospitalized in our department during 2010 for a head and neck cancer surgery. The incidence of surgical site infection was 15.5%. The T3-T4 stages were identified as an independent predictive factor (p = 0.04). Our study does not find other predictive factor for a SSI. The NNIS index (National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance), used by the Center for disease control and prevention as predictive factor, was not valid in our study. A specific predictive index should include the tumor stage for Head and Neck Cancer surgery and should be taken into account for the management of a preventive antibiotic treatment.

  13. Parotid Gland Sparing With Helical Tomotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Voordeckers, Mia; Farrag, Ashraf; Everaert, Hendrik; Tournel, Koen; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the ability of helical tomotherapy to spare the function of the parotid glands in patients with head-and-neck cancer by analyzing dose-volume histograms, salivary gland scintigraphy, and quality of life assessment. Methods and Materials: Data from 76 consecutive patients treated with helical tomotherapy (Hi-Art Tomotherapy) at University Hospital Brussel were analyzed. During planning, priority was given to planning target volume (PTV) coverage: {>=}95% of the dose must be delivered to {>=}95% of the PTV. Elective nodal regions received 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). A dose of 70.5 Gy (2.35 Gy/fraction) was prescribed to the primary tumor and pathologic lymph nodes (simultaneous integrated boost scheme). Objective scoring of salivary excretion was performed by salivary gland scintigraphy. Subjective scoring of salivary gland function was evaluated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 (QLQ-C30) and Quality of Life Questionnaire-Head and Neck 35 (H and N35). Results: Analysis of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) showed excellent coverage of the PTV. The volume of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (V95%) was 99.4 (range, 96.3-99.9). DVH analysis of parotid gland showed a median value of the mean parotid dose of 32.1 Gy (range, 17.5-70.3 Gy). The median parotid volume receiving a dose <26 Gy was 51.2%. Quality of life evaluation demonstrated an initial deterioration of almost all scales and items in QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H and N35. Most items improved in time, and some reached baseline values 18 months after treatment. Conclusion: DVH analysis, scintigraphic evaluation of parotid function, and quality of life assessment of our patient group showed that helical tomotherapy makes it possible to preserve parotid gland function without compromising disease control. We recommend mean parotid doses of <34 Gy and doses <26 Gy to a maximum 47% of the parotid

  14. Biological basis for increased sensitivity to radiation therapy in HPV-positive head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Bol, V; Grégoire, V

    2014-01-01

    Although development of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is commonly linked to the consumption of tobacco and alcohol, a link between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a subgroup of head and neck cancers has been established. These HPV-positive tumors represent a distinct biological entity with overexpression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7. It has been shown in several clinical studies that HPV-positive HNSCCs have a more favorable outcome and greater response to radiotherapy. The reason for improved prognosis of HPV-related HNSCC remains speculative, but it could be owned to multiple factors. One hypothesis is that HPV-positive cells are intrinsically more sensitive to standard therapies and thus respond better to treatment. Another possibility is that HPV-positive tumors uniquely express viral proteins that induce an immune response during therapy that helps clear tumors and prevents recurrence. Here, we will review current evidence for the biological basis of increased radiosensitivity in HPV-positive HNSCC.

  15. Perineural Spread in Noncutaneous Head and Neck Cancer: New Insights into an Old Problem.

    PubMed

    Amit, Moran; Eran, Ayelet; Billan, Salem; Fridman, Eran; Na'ara, Shorook; Charas, Tomer; Gil, Ziv

    2016-04-01

    Head and neck malignancies have the propensity to invade nerves. Perineural tumor invasion is common, with some series reporting rates of 30 to 100%. Squamous cell carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma are the most commonly involved tumors. The most commonly involved nerves are the trigeminal (cranial nerve [CN] V) and facial (CN VII) and their branches. Neural spread away from a tumor is encountered less often and usually causes specific symptoms such as pain, muscle weakness, and atrophy, depending on the involved nerves. While clinical symptoms and physical examination may suggest the presence of neural invasion, specific imaging modalities such as fat-suppressed T1-weighted magnetic resonance images, should be utilized to identify perineural tumor spread in its early phases. Perineural tumor spread should be considered and addressed in the treatment planning of patients with head and neck or skull base cancers as it can influence the extent of surgery, and the dosage and fields of radiation therapy. In the current review, we discuss the clinical course of perineural tumor spread and its therapeutic implications. PMID:27123384

  16. [Assessment of Cachexia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Based on a Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score].

    PubMed

    Matsuzuka, Takashi; Suzuki, Masahiro; Saijoh, Satoshi; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsumasa; Nomoto, Yukio; Matsui, Takamichi; Tada, Yasuhiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients who died of head and neck squamous cell caricinoma regarding the process and duration of cachexia using the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS). The patients were classified as having cachexia when the serum albumin level was less than 3.5 mg/dL and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level was more than 0.5 mg/dL. The number of patients with cachexia was eight (8%) at the first visit and 50 (93%) at the time of death. In the 50 patients, the median and average time of having cachexia was 59 and 95 days, respectively. Thirty-two of the 50 patients (64%) died within three months after the presence of cachexia was confirmed. In this study, the time of having cachexia was so short, then the policy of care should be converted from aggressive into supportive in patients classified as having cachexia. mGPS would be an accurate assessment tool for cachexia and ascertain the end stage of head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27149710

  17. The provision of enteral nutritional support during definitive chemoradiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Sarah; Reed, Warren Michael

    2015-12-01

    Combination chemoradiation is the gold standard of management for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. One of the most significant advantages of this approach to treatment is organ preservation which may not be possible with radical surgery. Unfortunately, few treatments are without side-effects and the toxicity associated with combined modality treatment causes meaningful morbidity. Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) may have difficulties meeting their nutritional requirements as a consequence of tumour location or size or because of the acute toxicity associated with treatment. In particular, severe mucositis, xerostomia, dysgeusia and nausea and vomiting limit intake. In addition to this, dysphagia is often present at diagnosis, with many patients experiencing silent aspiration. As such, many patients will require enteral nutrition in order to complete chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Feeding occurs via catheters placed transnasally (nasogastric tubes) or directly into the stomach through the anterior abdominal wall (percutaneous gastrostomy tubes). In the absence of clear evidence concerning the superiority of one method over another, the choice of feeding tube tends to be dependent on clinician and patient preference. This review examines key issues associated with the provision of enteral nutritional support during definitive CRT in HNC patients, including feeding methods, patient outcomes and timing of tube insertion and use. PMID:27512573

  18. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jie; Ridner, Sheila H.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  19. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with surgery in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, V.A.; Pajak, T.F.

    1985-05-01

    Radiation therapy alone, surgery alone, or the combination of these two modalities, remain the accepted treatments in the management of epidermoid carcinomas of the mucosa of the head and neck. These modalities of therapy produce comparable results; but, radiotherapy alone has the advantage that it can conserve anatomy and function. Irradiation with teletherapy techniques, at times supplemented by interstitial brachytherapy, with doses ranging from 6600 to 8000 cGy, results in satisfactory tumor response (CR). The CR of T1N0 and T2N0 lesions will be 99% and 90% respectively, but only 29% in T4N3 tumors treated with radiation only. To improve on the limited CR rate achieved in the advanced stages, surgery is combined pre or post-irradiation, or reserved for the salvage of failures. In the oral cavity and oropharynx, these possible options give comparable tumor control and survival, but in the supraglottic larynx post-operative irradiation is superior to pre- operative radiotherapy. Tumor recurrence rates in the head and neck range from 15 to 34% depending on initial site, stage and type of therapy. Cancer control activities that emphasize prevention and early diagnosis should present a better future for these patients.

  20. Feasibility and implementation of a literature information management system for human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers with imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain.

  1. Feasibility and implementation of a literature information management system for human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers with imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  2. Feasibility and Implementation of a Literature Information Management System for Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancers with Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  3. Intra-tumor Genetic Heterogeneity and Mortality in Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Edmund A.; Tward, Aaron M.; Hammon, Rebecca J.; Ren, Yin; Rocco, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the involvement of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in tumor progression, treatment resistance, and metastasis is established, genetic heterogeneity is seldom examined in clinical trials or practice. Many studies of heterogeneity have had prespecified markers for tumor subpopulations, limiting their generalizability, or have involved massive efforts such as separate analysis of hundreds of individual cells, limiting their clinical use. We recently developed a general measure of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity based on whole-exome sequencing (WES) of bulk tumor DNA, called mutant-allele tumor heterogeneity (MATH). Here, we examine data collected as part of a large, multi-institutional study to validate this measure and determine whether intra-tumor heterogeneity is itself related to mortality. Methods and Findings Clinical and WES data were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas in October 2013 for 305 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), from 14 institutions. Initial pathologic diagnoses were between 1992 and 2011 (median, 2008). Median time to death for 131 deceased patients was 14 mo; median follow-up of living patients was 22 mo. Tumor MATH values were calculated from WES results. Despite the multiple head and neck tumor subsites and the variety of treatments, we found in this retrospective analysis a substantial relation of high MATH values to decreased overall survival (Cox proportional hazards analysis: hazard ratio for high/low heterogeneity, 2.2; 95% CI 1.4 to 3.3). This relation of intra-tumor heterogeneity to survival was not due to intra-tumor heterogeneity’s associations with other clinical or molecular characteristics, including age, human papillomavirus status, tumor grade and TP53 mutation, and N classification. MATH improved prognostication over that provided by traditional clinical and molecular characteristics, maintained a significant relation to survival in multivariate analyses, and distinguished

  4. Validation of the sentinel lymph node biopsy technique in head and neck cancers of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Radkani, Pejman; Mesko, Thomas W; Paramo, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our experience and validate the use of sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in patients with head and neck cancers. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database of patients with a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck from 2008 to 2011 was done. The group consisted of a total of 20 patients. The first node(s) highlighted with blue, or identified as radioactive by Tc99-sulfur radioactive colloid, was (were) identified as the SLNs. In the first seven patients, formal modified neck dissection was performed. In the remaining 13 patients, only a SLN biopsy procedure was done. At least one SLN was identified in all 20 patients (100%). Only one patient (5%) had positive nodes. In this case, the SLN was also positive. In the remaining 19 cases, all lymph nodes were negative. After an average of 24 months of follow-up, there have been three local recurrences (15%) but no evidence of distant metastatic disease. SLN mapping in head and neck cancers is a feasible technique with a high identification rate and a low false-negative rate. Although the detection rate of regional metastatic disease compares favorably with published data as well as the disease-free and overall survival, further studies are warranted before considering this technique to be the "gold standard" in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and a negative neck by clinical examination and imaging studies. PMID:24351359

  5. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  6. Choosing an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org; Mechalakos, James; Puri, Dev R.; Hunt, Margie

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: With the emerging use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer, selection of technique becomes a critical issue. The purpose of this article is to establish IMRT guidelines for head-and-neck cancer at a given institution. Methods and Materials: Six common head-and-neck cancer cases were chosen to illustrate the points that must be considered when choosing between split-field (SF) IMRT, in which the low anterior neck (LAN) is treated with an anterior field, and the extended whole-field (EWF) IMRT in which the LAN is included with the IMRT fields. For each case, the gross tumor, clinical target, and planning target volumes and the surrounding critical normal tissues were delineated. Subsequently, the SF and EWF IMRT plans were compared using dosimetric parameters from dose-volume histograms. Results: Target coverage and doses delivered to the critical normal structures were similar between the two different techniques. Cancer involving the nasopharynx and oropharynx are best treated with the SF IMRT technique to minimize the glottic larynx dose. The EWF IMRT technique is preferred in situations in which the glottic larynx is considered as a target, i.e., cancer of the larynx, hypopharynx, and unknown head-and-neck primary. When the gross disease extends inferiorly and close to the glottic larynx, EWF IMRT technique is also preferred. Conclusion: Depending on the clinical scenario, different IMRT techniques and guidelines are suggested to determine a preferred IMRT technique. We found that having this treatment guideline when treating these tumors ensures a smoother flow for the busy clinic.

  7. HPV Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Molecular Pathogenesis and Evolving Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dok, Rüveyda; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease that is the result of tobacco and/or alcohol abuse or infection with high-risk Human papillomaviruses. Despite the fact that HPV positive HNSCC cancers form a distinct clinical entity with better treatment outcome, all HNSCC are currently treated uniformly with the same treatment modality. At present, biologic basis of these different outcomes and their therapeutic influence are areas of intense investigation. In this review, we will summarize the molecular basis for this different outcome, novel treatment opportunities and possible biomarkers for HPV positive HNSCC. In particular, the focus will be on several molecular targeted strategies that can improve the chemoradiation response by influencing DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:27043631

  8. Portrait of a process: arts-based research in a head and neck cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark A; Lydiatt, William M; Aita, Virginia A; Robbins, Regina E; McNeilly, Dennis P; Desmarais, Michele Marie

    2016-03-01

    The role of art in medicine is complex, varied and uncertain. To examine one aspect of the relationship between art and medicine, investigators analysed the interactions between a professional artist and five adult patients with head and neck cancer as they cocreated portraits in a clinical setting. The artist and four members of an interdisciplinary team analysed the portraits as well as journal entries, transcripts of portrait sessions and semistructured interviews. Over the course of 5 months, 24 artworks evolved from sittings that allowed both the patients and the artist to collaborate around stories of illness, suffering and recovery. Using narrative inquiry and qualitative arts-based research techniques five emergent themes were identified: embracing uncertainties; developing trusting relationships; engaging in reflective practices; creating shared stories; and empowerment. Similar themes are found in successful physician-patient relationships. This paper will discuss these findings and potential implications for healthcare and medical education.

  9. Young adults with head and neck cancer express increased susceptibility to mutagen-induced chromosome damage

    SciTech Connect

    Schantz, S.P.; Hsu, T.C.; Ainslie, N.; Moser, R.P. )

    1989-12-15

    Factors that contribute to an increased prevalence of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract among young adults in the United States remain unknown. A potential etiologic factor may relate to a genetically controlled sensitivity to environmental carcinogens. This study, therefore, examined 20 young adult patients who had squamous cell carcinoma for mutagen-induced chromosome sensitivity. Lymphocytes from respective patients were cultured, exposed to the clastogen bleomycin, arrested during metaphase, and examined quantitatively for chromosome breakage. The young adult population with squamous cell carcinoma expressed a significantly increased number of bleomycin-induced chromosome breaks per cell. Furthermore, among the study patients, chromosome sensitivity was most apparent in the non-tobacco users and in patients less than 30 years of age. The expression of such chromosome fragility following mutagen exposure should be considered in epidemiologic studies that intend to define risk factors for development of head and neck cancer.

  10. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by cetuximab plus minocycline in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shan-Shien; Chu, Pen-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a unique case of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) caused by cetuximab plus minocycline during chemoradiation for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In April 2008, a 49-year-old man was diagnosed with recurrent SCCHN. He received surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy with cetuximab plus chemoradiation. Because of exacerbation of acneform rash by cetuximab, minocycline was added thereafter. However, TEN appeared after the fifth course of weekly cetuximab, and cetuximab plus minocycline was assumed to be the cause. Cetuximab plus minocycline carries a risk of evoking TEN, and the side effects of chemoradiation for SCCHN mask some early signs of TEN. Noticing the transformation of skin lesions makes early diagnosis possible, and prompt cessation of the causative agent is essential for patients with TEN. We review the literature on cetuximab, minocycline, and TEN and discuss the impact of TEN on cancer therapy.

  11. Actively targeted gold nanoparticles as novel radiosensitizer agents: an in vivo head and neck cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovtzer, Aron; Mizrachi, Aviram; Motiei, Menachem; Bragilovski, Dimitri; Lubimov, Leon; Levi, Mattan; Hilly, Ohad; Ben-Aharon, Irit; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2016-01-01

    A major problem in the treatment of head and neck cancer today is the resistance of tumors to traditional radiation therapy, which results in 40% local failure, despite aggressive treatment. The main objective of this study was to develop a technique which will overcome tumor radioresistance by increasing the radiation absorbed in the tumor using cetuximab targeted gold nanoparticles (GNPs), in clinically relevant energies and radiation dosage. In addition, we have investigated the biological mechanisms underlying tumor shrinkage and the in vivo toxicity of GNP. The results showed that targeted GNP enhanced the radiation effect and had a significant impact on tumor growth (P < 0.001). The mechanism of radiation enhancement was found to be related to earlier and greater apoptosis (TUNEL assay), angiogenesis inhibition (by CD34 level) and diminished repair mechanism (PCNA staining). Additionally, GNPs have been proven to be safe as no evidence of toxicity has been observed.

  12. Portrait of a process: arts-based research in a head and neck cancer clinic.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mark A; Lydiatt, William M; Aita, Virginia A; Robbins, Regina E; McNeilly, Dennis P; Desmarais, Michele Marie

    2016-03-01

    The role of art in medicine is complex, varied and uncertain. To examine one aspect of the relationship between art and medicine, investigators analysed the interactions between a professional artist and five adult patients with head and neck cancer as they cocreated portraits in a clinical setting. The artist and four members of an interdisciplinary team analysed the portraits as well as journal entries, transcripts of portrait sessions and semistructured interviews. Over the course of 5 months, 24 artworks evolved from sittings that allowed both the patients and the artist to collaborate around stories of illness, suffering and recovery. Using narrative inquiry and qualitative arts-based research techniques five emergent themes were identified: embracing uncertainties; developing trusting relationships; engaging in reflective practices; creating shared stories; and empowerment. Similar themes are found in successful physician-patient relationships. This paper will discuss these findings and potential implications for healthcare and medical education. PMID:26744356

  13. The STAT3 pathway as a therapeutic target in head and neck cancer: Barriers and innovations.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Jessica L; Grandis, Jennifer R; Bauman, Julie E

    2016-05-01

    Proteins of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family mediate cellular responses to cytokines and growth factors. Aberrant regulation of the STAT3 oncogene contributes to tumor formation and progression in many cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), where hyperactivation of STAT3 is implicated in both treatment resistance and immune escape. There are no oncogenic gain-of-function mutations in HNSCC. Rather, aberrant STAT3 signaling is primarily driven by upstream growth factor receptors, such as Janus kinase (JAK) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Moreover, genomic silencing of select protein tyrosine phosphatase receptors (PTPRs), tumor suppressors that dephosphorylate STAT3, may lead to prolonged phosphorylation and activation of STAT3. This review will summarize current knowledge of the STAT3 pathway and its contribution to HNSCC growth, survival, and resistance to standard therapies, and discuss STAT3-targeting agents in various phases of clinical development.

  14. HPV Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Molecular Pathogenesis and Evolving Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Dok, Rüveyda; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease that is the result of tobacco and/or alcohol abuse or infection with high-risk Human papillomaviruses. Despite the fact that HPV positive HNSCC cancers form a distinct clinical entity with better treatment outcome, all HNSCC are currently treated uniformly with the same treatment modality. At present, biologic basis of these different outcomes and their therapeutic influence are areas of intense investigation. In this review, we will summarize the molecular basis for this different outcome, novel treatment opportunities and possible biomarkers for HPV positive HNSCC. In particular, the focus will be on several molecular targeted strategies that can improve the chemoradiation response by influencing DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:27043631

  15. The role and targeting of Aurora kinases in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Ranee; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.; Burtness, Barbara; Astsaturov, Igor; Golemis, Erica A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Controlled activation of the Aurora kinases regulates mitotic progression in normal cells. Overexpression and hyperactivation of the Aurora-A and -B kinases play a leading role in tumorigenesis, inducing aneuploidy and genomic instability. In squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN), overexpression of Aurora-A is associated with decreased survival, and reduction of Aurora-A and -B expression inhibits SCCHN cell growth and increases apoptosis. In this article, we provide a basic overview of the biological functions of Aurora kinases in normal cells and in cancer, and review both small studies and high throughput datasets that implicate Aurora-A, particularly, in the pathogenesis of SCCHN. Early phase clinical trials are beginning to evaluate the activity of small molecule inhibitors of the Aurora kinases. We summarize the state of current trials evaluating Aurora inhibitors in SCCHN, and discuss rational directions for future drug combination trials and biomarkers for use with Aurora-inhibiting agents. PMID:23993387

  16. Freedom From Local and Regional Failure of Contralateral Neck With Ipsilateral Neck Radiotherapy for Node-Positive Tonsil Cancer: Results of a Prospective Management Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E. Raben, David; Schneider, Charles; Witt, Robert; Sammons, Sarah; Raben, Adam

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To review the outcomes of a prospective management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2007, 20 patients who presented with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate, and with Stage N1-N2b disease were prospectively treated with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. In addition, 18 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal and in-field progression was determined. Acute and late toxicity were prospectively evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The nodal disease was Stage N1 in 4 patients, N2a in 3 patients, and N2b in 13 patients. At a median follow-up 19 months (range, 12-40), no in-field or contralateral nodal recurrences had been observed. The 2-year freedom from distant metastasis rate was 87.4%. The actuarial 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 79.5%. Late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 1 patient (5%). No late Grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. No patient was feeding tube dependent at their last follow-up visit. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with node-positive, lateralized tonsillar cancer, treatment of the ipsilateral neck and primary site does not appear to increase the risk of contralateral nodal failure and reduces late morbidity compared with historical controls. Although the outcomes with ipsilateral radiotherapy in the present series were promising, these findings require longer follow-up and validation in a larger patient cohort.

  17. Protons in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Bridging the Gap of Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaekers, Bram L.T.; Grutters, Janneke P.C.; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Lambin, Philippe; Joore, Manuela A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To use Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) models and comparative planning studies to explore the (cost-)effectiveness of swallowing sparing intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) compared with swallowing sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: A Markov model was constructed to examine and compare the costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) of the following strategies: (1) IMPT for all patients; (2) IMRT for all patients; and (3) IMPT if efficient. The assumption of equal survival for IMPT and IMRT in the base case analysis was relaxed in a sensitivity analysis. Results: Intensity modulated proton radiation therapy and IMRT for all patients yielded 6.620 and 6.520 QALYs and cost €50,989 and €41,038, respectively. Intensity modulated proton radiation therapy if efficient yielded 6.563 QALYs and cost €43,650. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of IMPT if efficient versus IMRT for all patients was €60,278 per QALY gained. In the sensitivity analysis, IMRT was more effective (0.967 QALYs) and less expensive (€8218) and thus dominated IMPT for all patients. Conclusions: Cost-effectiveness analysis based on normal tissue complication probability models and planning studies proved feasible and informative and enables the analysis of individualized strategies. The increased effectiveness of IMPT does not seem to outweigh the higher costs for all head-and-neck cancer patients. However, when assuming equal survival among both modalities, there seems to be value in identifying those patients for whom IMPT is cost-effective.

  18. Molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Azoury, SaÏd C; Gilmore, Richard C; Shukla, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most frequent tumors of the head and neck and often presents at an advanced-stage. Traditionally, treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has included surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy depending on both the site and stage of disease. Although the treatment approach for local disease is often standardized, the management of recurrent and advanced disease is evolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HNSCC has led to numerous promising investigations and the push for the development of novel therapies. Similarly, over the past several decades, growing data supports the notion that an individual's immune system can be manipulated in such a way to help eradicate cancer. The success of immunotherapeutic agents such as interleukin therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitor blockade in cancer, particularly advanced-stage melanoma, has stimulated researchers to uncover similar success stories in HNSCC. Examples of immunotherapeutics that are being studied for the treatment of HNSCC include adoptive T-cell therapy, vaccines, and immune checkpoint inhibitor proteins (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, -PD-1, -PD-L1). Molecularly targeted agents of interest include inhibitors of transmembrane growth factor receptors, angiogenesis, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR and NOTCH signaling pathways. To date, cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is the only targeted agent for HNSCC that was approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the basis that it improves overall survival when combined with chemotherapy or radiation. Herein, the authors provide an up-to-date review of immunotherapeutic and molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:27448787

  19. Dental demineralization and caries in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie; Jackson, Leanne; Epstein, Joel B; Migliorati, Cesar A; Murphy, Barbara A

    2015-09-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation (CCR) therapy is a standard treatment for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). It is well documented that CCR causes profound acute and late toxicities. Xerostomia (the symptom of dry mouth) and hyposalivation (decreased salivary flow) are among the most common treatment side effects in this cohort of patients during and following treatment. They are the result of radiation-induced damage to the salivary glands. Patients with chronic hyposalivation are at risk for demineralization and dental cavitation (dental caries), often presenting as a severe form of rapidly developing decay that results in loss of dentition. Usual post-radiation oral care which includes the use of fluoride, may decrease, but does not eliminate dental caries associated with radiation-induced hyposalivation. The authors conducted a narrative literature review regarding dental caries in HNC population based on MEDLINE, PubMed, CLNAHL, Cochrane database, EMBASE, and PsycINFO from 1985 to 2014. Primary search terms included head and/or neck cancer, dental caries, dental decay, risk factor, physical symptom, physical sequellea, body image, quality of life, measurement, assessment, cost, prevention, and treatment. The authors also reviewed information from National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), American Dental Association (ADA), and other related healthcare professional association web sites. This literature review focuses on critical issues related to dental caries in patients with HNC: potential mechanisms and contributing factors, clinical assessment, physical sequellea, negative impact on body image and quality of life, potential preventative strategies, and recommendations for practice and research in this area. PMID:26198979

  20. Monitoring longitudinal changes in irradiated head and neck cancer xenografts using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Shudong; Gunn, Jason R.; Marra, Kayla; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation therapy is often used as the preferred clinical treatment for control of localized head and neck cancer. However, during the course of treatment (6-8 weeks), feedback about functional and/or physiological changes within impacted tissue are not obtained, given the onerous financial and/or logistical burdens of scheduling MRI, PET or CT scans. Diffuse optical sensing is well suited to address this problem since the instrumentation can be made low-cost and portable while still being able to non-invasively provide information about vascular oxygenation in vivo. Here we report results from studies that employed an optical fiber-based portable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system to longitudinally monitor changes in tumor vasculature within two head and neck cancer cell lines (SCC-15 and FaDu) xenografted in the flanks of nude mice, in two separate experiments. Once the tumor volumes were 100mm3, 67% of animals received localized (electron beam) radiation therapy in five fractions (8Gy/day, for 5 days) while 33% of the animals served as controls. DRS measurements were obtained from each animal on each day of treatment and then for two weeks post-treatment. Reflectance spectra were parametrized to extract total hemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen-saturation and the resulting time-trends of optical parameters appear to be dissimilar for the two cell-lines. These findings are also compared to previous animal experiments (using the FaDu line) that were irradiated using a photon beam radiotherapy protocol. These results and implications for the use of fiber-based DRS measurements made at local (irradiated) tumor site as a basis for identifying early radiotherapy-response are presented and discussed.

  1. Nisin ZP, a Bacteriocin and Food Preservative, Inhibits Head and Neck Cancer Tumorigenesis and Prolongs Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Hayami, Takayuki; Matte, Bibiana; Liu, Yang; Danciu, Theodora; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Worden, Francis; Kapila, Sunil; Kapila, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    The use of small antimicrobial peptides or bacteriocins, like nisin, to treat cancer is a new approach that holds great promise. Nisin exemplifies this new approach because it has been used safely in humans for many years as a food preservative, and recent laboratory studies support its anti-tumor potential in head and neck cancer. Previously, we showed that nisin (2.5%, low content) has antitumor potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in vitro and in vivo. The current studies explored a naturally occurring variant of nisin (nisin ZP; 95%, high content) for its antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Nisin ZP induced the greatest level of apoptosis in HNSCC cells compared to low content nisin. HNSCC cells treated with increasing concentrations of nisin ZP exhibited increasing levels of apoptosis and decreasing levels of cell proliferation, clonogenic capacity, and sphere formation. Nisin ZP induced apoptosis through a calpain-dependent pathway in HNSCC cells but not in human oral keratinocytes. Nisin ZP also induced apoptosis dose-dependently in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with concomitant decreases in vascular sprout formation in vitro and reduced intratumoral microvessel density in vivo. Nisin ZP reduced tumorigenesis in vivo and long-term treatment with nisin ZP extended survival. In addition, nisin treated mice exhibited normal organ histology with no evidence of inflammation, fibrosis or necrosis. In summary, nisin ZP exhibits greater antitumor effects than low content nisin, and thus has the potential to serve as a novel therapeutic for HNSCC. PMID:26132406

  2. Knowledge About Head and Neck Cancer in the Population of Vojvodina: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Mumović, Gordana; Golijan, Borislav; Skrbić, Renata; Kravos, Alenka

    2015-09-01

    In 2009, the Institute of Oncology of Vojvodina reported the total of 553 newly registered patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) in the Province of Vojvodina, with a lethal outcome in 332 HNC patients. These facts impose the need of investigating the health education of the general population and proposing possible prevention measures. The present prospective study included 200 subjects classified into two groups. Group 1 (100 subjects) consisted of randomly selected adults from urban and rural regions of Vojvodina. Group II (100 subjects) included the adults from the same regions affected by HNC. All subjects answered the anonymous questionnaire which complied with the standards of a similar European Union research project "About Face". The results showed that 96% of the subjects from the Group II and only 77% of the subjects from the Group I were familiar with the term "head and neck cancer" what represented a significant difference. The results from Vojvodina were significantly better than those from the European study (23%). Most subjects were informed about HNC through television programs (60%), hospital leaflets (41%) or internet (37%). Both the patients and the citizens of Vojvodina were better informed about the most common localizations of HNC-pharynx and larynx, but less informed about other HNC localizations than the citizens of seven European countries. The citizens and the HNC patients from Vojvodina were equally well informed about some risk factors (e.g., smoking, alcoholism, aging and sun exposure) as the citizens in Europe. Both the patients and the general population of Vojvodina are mostly worried about the consequences/side effects of the applied surgical treatment. The obtained results may be a good starting point in the prevention and early detection of HNC in Vojvodina. PMID:26898078

  3. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  4. Evaluation of image-guidance protocols in the treatment of head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidan, Omar A. . E-mail: omar.zeidan@orhs.org; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Manon, Rafael R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Jenkins, D. Wayne; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the residual setup error of different image-guidance (IG) protocols in the alignment of patients with head and neck cancer. The protocols differ in the percentage of treatment fractions that are associated with image guidance. Using data from patients who were treated with daily IG, the residual setup errors for several different protocols are retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: Alignment data from 24 patients (802 fractions) treated with daily IG on a helical tomotherapy unit were analyzed. The difference between the daily setup correction and the setup correction that would have been made according to a specific protocol was used to calculate the residual setup errors for each protocol. Results: The different protocols are generally effective in reducing systematic setup errors. Random setup errors are generally not reduced for fractions that are not image guided. As a consequence, if every other treatment is image guided, still about 11% of all treatments (IG and not IG) are subject to three-dimensional setup errors of at least 5 mm. This frequency increases to about 29% if setup errors >3 mm are scored. For various protocols that require 15% to 31% of the treatments to be image guided, from 50% to 60% and from 26% to 31% of all fractions are subject to setup errors >3 mm and >5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Residual setup errors reduce with increasing frequency of IG during the course of external-beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer patients. The inability to reduce random setup errors for fractions that are not image guided results in notable residual setup errors.

  5. Associations between psychological factors and the effect of home-based physical exercise in women with chronic neck and shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Linn; Gerdle, Björn; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Andersson, Gerhard; Larsson, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exercise is often used in the treatment of chronic neck and shoulder muscle pain. It is likely that psychological aspects have an impact on the results of exercise-based treatments. Objectives: (1) To examine the associations between psychological factors and the effect of a home-based physical exercise intervention. (2) To examine differences in psychological factors at baseline between (a) subjects who continued in the trial and those who did not and (b) subjects who completed the intervention and those who did not. Method: A total of 57 women with chronic neck and shoulder pain were included in a home-based exercise intervention trial. Pain intensity, disability, and psychological factors (anxiety and depression symptoms, catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, self-efficacy, and pain acceptance) were measured at baseline, after 4–6 months, and after 1 year of exercise. Associations between the psychological factors and changes in pain intensity and disability were analysed, as well as differences in psychological factors at baseline between subjects who continued in and completed the intervention, and those who did not. Results: Associations between positive changes in pain intensity and disability were found for low fear-avoidance beliefs and low-pain self-efficacy at baseline. In addition, fear-avoidance beliefs at baseline were higher in the subjects who dropped out of the intervention than in those who continued. Pain acceptance at baseline was higher in the subjects who completed the intervention at the end of the trial. Conclusion: Particularly, fear-avoidance beliefs and pain self-efficacy should be taken into consideration when implementing home-based physical exercise as treatment for chronic neck pain. In addition, high pain acceptance might improve the adherence to prescribed exercise. PMID:27688880

  6. Associations between psychological factors and the effect of home-based physical exercise in women with chronic neck and shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Linn; Gerdle, Björn; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Andersson, Gerhard; Larsson, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exercise is often used in the treatment of chronic neck and shoulder muscle pain. It is likely that psychological aspects have an impact on the results of exercise-based treatments. Objectives: (1) To examine the associations between psychological factors and the effect of a home-based physical exercise intervention. (2) To examine differences in psychological factors at baseline between (a) subjects who continued in the trial and those who did not and (b) subjects who completed the intervention and those who did not. Method: A total of 57 women with chronic neck and shoulder pain were included in a home-based exercise intervention trial. Pain intensity, disability, and psychological factors (anxiety and depression symptoms, catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, self-efficacy, and pain acceptance) were measured at baseline, after 4–6 months, and after 1 year of exercise. Associations between the psychological factors and changes in pain intensity and disability were analysed, as well as differences in psychological factors at baseline between subjects who continued in and completed the intervention, and those who did not. Results: Associations between positive changes in pain intensity and disability were found for low fear-avoidance beliefs and low-pain self-efficacy at baseline. In addition, fear-avoidance beliefs at baseline were higher in the subjects who dropped out of the intervention than in those who continued. Pain acceptance at baseline was higher in the subjects who completed the intervention at the end of the trial. Conclusion: Particularly, fear-avoidance beliefs and pain self-efficacy should be taken into consideration when implementing home-based physical exercise as treatment for chronic neck pain. In addition, high pain acceptance might improve the adherence to prescribed exercise.

  7. Theranostic tumor homing nanocarriers for the treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Apurva R; Chougule, Mahavir B.; Lim, Ed; Francis, Kevin P; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2014-01-01

    The drugs/strategies to selectively inhibit tumor blood supply has generated interest in recent years for enhancement of cancer therapeutics. The objective of this study was to formulate tumor homing PEGylated CREKA peptide conjugated theranostic nanoparticles of DIM-C-pPhC6H5 (DIM-P) and investigate in vivo antitumor activity as well as evaluate the targeted efficiency to lung tumors using imaging techniques. DIM-P loaded Nanoparticles (NCs-D) were prepared using lipids, and DOGS-NTA-Ni and the surface of NCs-D was modified with PEGylated CREKA peptide (PCNCs-D). PCNCs-D showed 3 fold higher binding to clotted plasma proteins in tumor vasculature compared to NCs-D. PCNCs-D showed 26±4% and 22±5% increase in tumor reduction compare to NCs-D in metastatic and orthotopic models respectively. In-vivo imaging studies showed ~40 folds higher migration of PCNCs-Di in tumor vasculature than NCs-Di. Our studies demonstrate the role of PCNCs-D as theranostic tumor homing drug delivery and imaging systems for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24355163

  8. Relationship between head and neck cancer therapy and some genetic endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Minicucci, Eliana Maria; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the sixth most common human malignancy worldwide. The main forms of treatment for HNC are surgery, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). However, the choice of therapy depends on the tumor staging and approaches, which are aimed at organ preservation. Because of systemic RT and CT genotoxicity, one of the important side effects is a secondary cancer that can result from the activity of radiation and antineoplastic drugs on healthy cells. Ionizing radiation can affect the DNA, causing single and double-strand breaks, DNA-protein crosslinks and oxidative damage. The severity of radiotoxicity can be directly associated with the radiation dosimetry and the dose-volume differences. Regarding CT, cisplatin is still the standard protocol for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma, the most common cancer located in the oral cavity. However, simultaneous treatment with cisplatin, bleomycin and 5-fluorouracil or treatment with paclitaxel and cisplatin are also used. These drugs can interact with the DNA, causing DNA crosslinks, double and single-strand breaks and changes in gene expression. Currently, the late effects of therapy have become a recurring problem, mainly due to the increased survival of HNC patients. Herein, we present an update of the systemic activity of RT and CT for HNC, with a focus on their toxicogenetic and toxicogenomic effects. PMID:24829856

  9. Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders after Nonsurgical Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marta Halina; Dedivitis, Rogerio A.; Queija, Débora Santos; Nascimento, Paulo César

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy can result in severe swallowing disorders with potential risk for aspiration and can negatively impact the patient's quality of life (QOL). Objective To assess swallowing-related QOL in patients who underwent radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Methods We interviewed 110 patients (85 men and 25 women) who had undergone exclusive radiotherapy (25.5%) or concomitant chemoradiotherapy (74.5%) from 6 to 12 months before the study. The Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders (SWAL-QOL) questionnaire was employed to evaluate dysphagia-related QOL. Results The QOL was reduced in all domains for all patients. The scores were worse among men. There was a relationship between oral cavity as the primary cancer site and the fatigue domain and also between advanced cancer stage and the impact of food selection, communication, and social function domains. Chemoradiotherapy association, the presence of nasogastric tube and tracheotomy, and the persistence of alcoholism and smoking had also a negative effect on the QOL. Conclusions According to the SWAL-QOL questionnaire, the dysphagia-related impact on QOL was observed 6 to 12 months after the treatment ended. PMID:25992151

  10. PTX3 gene activation in EGF-induced head and neck cancer cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Chiao; Wu, Shuo-Lun; Huang, Wan-Chen; Hsu, Jinn-Yuan; Chan, Shih-Hung; Wang, Ju-Ming; Tsai, Jhih-Peng; Chen, Ben-Kuen

    2015-04-10

    Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is associated with enhanced invasion and metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Long Pentraxin PTX3 is involved in immune escape in cancer cells. Here, we identified PTX3 as a promoting factor that mediates EGF-induced HNSCC metastasis. EGF-induced PTX3 transcriptional activation is via the binding of c-Jun to the activator protein (AP)-1 binding site of the PTX3 promoter. PI3K/Akt and NF-κB were essential for the PTX3 activation. EGF-induced PTX3 expression was blocked in c-Jun- and NF-κB-knockdown cells. EGF-mediated PTX3 secretion resulted in the enhancement of cell migration and invasion, and interactions between cancer and endothelial cells. The tail-vein injection animal model revealed that depletion of PTX3 decreased EGF-primed tumor cell metastatic seeding of the lungs. In addition, fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and E-cadherin were essential components in EGFR/PTX3-mediated cancer metastasis. In conclusion, PI3K/Akt and NF-κB-dependent regulation of AP-1 mediates PTX3 transcriptional responses to EGF. Autocrine production of EGF-induced PTX3 in turn induces metastatic molecules, activating inflammatory cascades and metastasis.

  11. Activation of mitochondrial oxidation by PDK2 inhibition reverses cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Eun Hye; Jang, Hye Jin; Kwon, Minsu

    2016-02-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), an orphan drug that promotes a shift from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, has been repurposed for cancer therapy. The present study investigated whether DCA may overcome cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer (HNC). Two cisplatin-resistant HNC cell lines (AMC-HN4R and -HN9R), their parental lines, and other human HNC lines were used. The effect of DCA, alone and in combination with cisplatin, was assessed by measuring cell cycle, viability, death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and protein expression in preclinical mouse tumor xenograft models. Increased glycolysis correlated with decreased sensitivity to cisplatin and was reduced by DCA. Cisplatin-resistant cells overexpressed pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2). DCA induced HNC cell death by decreasing ΔΨm and promoting mitochondrial ROS production. This effect was decreased by the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine or by inhibition of caspase-mediated apoptosis. Activation of mitochondrial glucose oxidation by DCA eventually activated downstream mitochondrial apoptotic signaling, leading to the death of chemoresistant cancer cells. Therefore, DCA significantly sensitized resistant HNC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. High glycolysis and PDK2 overexpression are closely linked to cisplatin resistance in HNC cells; the latter can be overcome by DCA. PMID:26607904

  12. Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkston, J.A.; Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

    1981-11-15

    A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large, fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P . 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

  13. Restricting carbohydrates to fight head and neck cancer-is this realistic?

    PubMed

    Klement, Rainer J

    2014-09-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are aggressive tumors that typically demonstrate a high glycolytic rate, which results in resistance to cytotoxic therapy and poor prognosis. Due to their location these tumors specifically impair food intake and quality of life, so that prevention of weight loss through nutrition support becomes an important treatment goal. Dietary restriction of carbohydrates (CHOs) and their replacement with fat, mostly in form of a ketogenic diet (KD), have been suggested to accommodate for both the altered tumor cell metabolism and cancer-associated weight loss. In this review, I present three specific rationales for CHO restriction and nutritional ketosis as supportive treatment options for the HNC patient. These are (1) targeting the origin and specific aspects of tumor glycolysis; (2) protecting normal tissue from but sensitizing tumor tissue to radiation- and chemotherapy induced cell kill; (3) supporting body and muscle mass maintenance. While most of these benefits of CHO restriction apply to cancer in general, specific aspects of implementation are discussed in relation to HNC patients. While CHO restriction seems feasible in HNC patients the available evidence indicates that its role may extend beyond fighting malnutrition to fighting HNC itself.

  14. [Importance of upper digestive endoscopy using lugol dye solution for the diagnosis of superficial esophageal cancer and dysplasia in patients with head and neck neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Tincani, A J; Brandalise, N; Andreollo, N A; Lopes, L R; Montes, C G; Altemani, A; Martins, A S

    2000-01-01

    Head and neck cancer has a high incidence in Brazil, with cancer of the oral cavity being one of the five most common cancers among Brazilians. Alcohol and tobacco consumption may contribute to synchronous or metachronous head and neck cancer and esophageal cancer. A prospective study involving 60 patients with head and neck cancer was carried out at the State University of Campinas--UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil to screen for superficial esophageal cancer and dysplasia using endoscopy and a 2% lugol dye solution followed by biopsy of the suspicious areas. Five patients (8.3%) had superficial esophageal cancer, which was diagnosed as intraepithelial carcinoma in three of them (5.0%). In four patients, the superficial esophageal cancer was synchronous and in one it was metachronous to head and neck cancer. Five patients (8.3%) had dysplasias in the esophageal epithelium (three were classified as mild and two as moderate). These results demonstrate the value of endoscopic screening of the esophagus using lugol dye in patients with head and neck cancer, particularly since superficial esophageal cancer is extremely difficult to detect by conventional methods in asymptomatic patients.

  15. Patients' perspective of financial benefits following head and neck cancer in Merseyside and Cheshire.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Harvey-Woodworth, C N; Lowe, D

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this interview study was to ask patients with head and neck cancer in the Mersey region about their need for financial benefits, the advice they were given about benefits and financial matters, and the financial burden of the disease. Stratified quota sampling was by employment status, whether work had been affected by the cancer, and by sex. Of 51 interviewees (mean (SD) age 61(8) years) 20 were retired, 11 were unemployed, 13 worked full-time, and 7 worked part-time. Cancer had affected the work status of 24. Since diagnosis 57% had suffered financially; this was particularly high in those who had retired (65%), and in those whose work had been affected by cancer (79%). Quality of life had decreased in 53% as a result of the financial impact of the disease. This was most common in the unemployed (64%), and in those whose work was affected by cancer (83%). Only a quarter had been given adequate help and information about finance; this was lowest in the unemployed (18%) and highest in those who were fully employed (39%). One third (17/51) had never claimed benefits. The most common benefits were Disability Living Allowance and Incapacity Benefit. Two-thirds (21/31) had applied for benefits after diagnosis, 18 of these were directly as a result of the disease. The median (IQR) weekly income from benefits was £88 (£60-170). Patients and carers need better access to financial advice. We suggest that each multidisciplinary team should have a designated benefits or financial advisor who is readily available to patients in the clinic and on the ward.

  16. Optimization strategies for pulsed low-dose-rate IMRT of recurrent lung and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shengwei; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Lin, Muhan; Chen, Xiaoming; Guo, Ming; Chen, Fu; Chen, Lili; Ma, Charlie Ming

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed low-dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been proven to be a valid method of reirradiation. Previous studies of recurrent cancer radiotherapy were mainly based on conventional 3D CRT and VMAT delivery techniques. There are difficulties in IMRT planning using existing commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) to meet the PLDR protocol. This work focuses on PLDR using ten-field IMRT and a commercial TPS for two specific sites: recurrent lung cancers and head and neck cancers. Our PLDR protocol requires that the maximum dose to the PTV be less than 0.4 Gy and the mean dose to be 0.2 Gy per field. We investigated various planning strategies to meet the PLDR requirements for 20 lung and head and neck patients. The PTV volume for lung cases ranged from 101.7 to 919.4 cm3 and the maximum dose to the PTV ranged from 0.22 to 0.39 Gy. The PTV volume for head and neck cases ranged from 66.2 to 282.1 cm3 and the maximum dose to the PTV ranged from 0.21 to 0.39 Gy. With special beam arrangements and dosimetry parameters, it is feasible to use a commercial TPS to generate quality PLDR IMRT plans for lung and head and neck reirradiation. PMID:24892337

  17. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong; Booth, Christopher M.; Mackillop, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  18. Nicotine dependence and smoking habits in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Adriana Ávila; Bandeira, Celso Muller; Gonçalves, Antonio José; Araújo, Alberto José

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess smoking habits and nicotine dependence (ND) in patients with head and neck cancer Methods: This study involved 71 smokers or former smokers with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx who were treated at a university hospital in the city of São Paulo between January and May of 2010. We used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence to evaluate smoking habits and ND in the sample. Data regarding cancer treatment were collected from medical records. Depending on the variables studied, we used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test, or Spearman's correlation test. Results: Of the 71 patients, 47 (66.2%) presented with high or very high ND, 40 (56.3%) smoked more than 20 cigarettes/day, and 32 (45.1%) smoked their first cigarette within 5 min of awakening. Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.011) and with smoking history (p = 0.047). We found that ND did not correlate significantly with gender, disease stage, smoking cessation, or number of smoking cessation attempts, nor did the number of cigarettes smoked per day correlate with smoking cessation or gender. Treatment for smoking cessation was not routinely offered. Conclusions: In most of the patients studied, the level of ND was high or very high. The prevalence of heavy smoking for long periods was high in our sample. A diagnosis of cancer is a motivating factor for smoking cessation. However, intensive smoking cessation treatment is not routinely offered to smoking patients diagnosed with cancer. PMID:25029652

  19. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  20. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  1. Visible tumor surface response to physical plasma and apoptotic cell kill in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Matthias; Seebauer, Christian; Rutkowski, Rico; Hauschild, Anna; Podmelle, Fred; Metelmann, Camilla; Metelmann, Bibiana; von Woedtke, Thomas; Hasse, Sybille; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Metelmann, Hans-Robert

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to learn, whether clinical application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is able to cause (i) visible tumor surface effects and (ii) apoptotic cell kill in squamous cell carcinoma and (iii) whether CAP-induced visible tumor surface response occurs as often as CAP-induced apoptotic cell kill. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer and infected ulcerations received locally CAP followed by palliative treatment. Four of them revealed tumor surface response appearing 2 weeks after intervention. The tumor surface response expressed as a flat area with vascular stimulation (type 1) or a contraction of tumor ulceration rims forming recesses covered with scabs, in each case surrounded by tumor tissue in visible progress (type 2). In parallel, 9 patients with the same kind of cancer received CAP before radical tumor resection. Tissue specimens were analyzed for apoptotic cells. Apoptotic cells were detectable and occurred more frequently in tissue areas previously treated with CAP than in untreated areas. Bringing together both findings and placing side by side the frequency of clinical tumor surface response and the frequency of analytically proven apoptotic cell kill, detection of apoptotic cells is as common as clinical tumor surface response. There was no patient showing signs of an enhanced or stimulated tumor growth under influence of CAP. CAP was made applicable by a plasma jet, kINPen(®) MED (neoplas tools GmbH, Greifswald, Germany). PMID:27499516

  2. Head and neck cancer cell lines exhibit differential mitochondrial repair deficiency in response to 4NQO.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael M; Glazer, Chad A; Mambo, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Aditi; Zhao, Ming; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A

    2006-02-01

    Constituents of tobacco can cause DNA adduct formation and are implicated in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSC) development. We investigated the capacity of HNSC cell lines to repair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage induced by a DNA adduct-forming agent. HNSC cell lines underwent 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) exposure with subsequent rescue with normal media. Real-time quantitative PCR for nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mtDNA was performed. mtDNA to nDNA ratios were calculated and standardized to mock-treated cells to assess mtDNA repair ability. Two of three tested cancer cell lines exposed to 4NQO exhibited consistent decreases in mtDNA/nDNA ratios throughout the different repair timepoints. At 24 h mtDNA/nDNA ratios of JHU-O19 and JHU-O22 decreased to 63% and 60% of controls, respectively. Conversely, a control keratinocyte cell line exhibited overall increases in mtDNA/nDNA ratios compared to baseline suggesting intact DNA repair mechanisms. By using a DNA adduct formation and repair model featuring 4NQO and HNSC cell lines, we have implicated faulty mtDNA repair as having a potential role in HNSC.

  3. [Sequential Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: A Clinical Study with 33 Cases].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsumasa; Nakajima, Kyoko; Murata, Takaaki; Shino, Masato; Nikkuni, Osamu; Toyoda, Minoru; Takayasu, Yukihiro; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki

    2016-05-01

    A total of 33 patients with advanced head and neck cancer (AHNC) treated with sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) were retrospectively evaluated at Gunma University Hospital between 2009 and 2011. The regimen of SCRT was docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (TPF)-based induction chemotherapy (ICT), accompanied by docetaxel and cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and oral administration of TS-1 after that. The response rate was 61%, the 3-year overall survival rate was 42%, the non-tumor-bearing survival rate was 27%, and the tumor-bearing survival rate was 15%. Fourteen of 33 patients were tumor-free, and their 3-year overall survival rate was surprisingly 86%. On the other hand, 3-year overall survival rate in the remaining 19 patients was significantly low. To select good response cases for ICT was important. In such cases, TPF should be applied repeatedly, which achieved a 61% response rate even in AHNC. A long-term TS-1 oral medication suppressed cancer regrowth and contributed to long-term survival. PMID:27459819

  4. Strategies for managing radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David I; Trotti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced mucositis (RIM) is a common toxicity for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The frequency has increased because of the use of more intensive altered radiation fractionation and concurrent chemotherapy regimens. The extent of the injury is directly related to the mucosal volume irradiated, anatomic subsite exposed, treatment intensity, and individual patient predisposition. The consequences of mucositis include pain, dysphagia including feeding tube dependency, dehydration, micronutrient deficiencies, weight loss, and potentially life-threatening aspiration. Currently, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved cytoprotective agent that reliably prevents RIM for HNC, but several are under investigation. Strategies to limit the extent of mucositis and to manage its symptoms include basic oral care and supportive medications. Limiting the use of aggressive treatments to truly high-risk cancers and special attention to radiation therapy planning techniques can also help restrict the scope of the problem. This review focuses on mucositis recognition, patient treatment selection, and RIM symptom-management strategies. PMID:19028343

  5. Induction of ferroptotic cell death for overcoming cisplatin resistance of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Jang, Hye Jin; Park, Jin Young; Shin, Daiha

    2016-10-10

    Inhibition of key molecules related to ferroptosis, cystine/glutamate antiporter and glutathione peroxidase, may induce eradication of chemotherapy/radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. The present study investigated whether ferroptosis could overcome head and neck cancer (HNC) resistance to cisplatin treatment. Three cisplatin-resistant HNC cell lines (AMC-HN3R, -HN4R, and -HN9R) and their parental lines were used. The effects of cystine and glutamate alteration and pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter were assessed by measuring viability, death, reactive oxygen species production, protein expression, and preclinical mouse tumor xenograft models. Conditioned media with no cystine or glutamine excess induced ferroptosis of both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant HNC cells without any apparent changes to necrosis and apoptosis markers. The cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitors erastin and sulfasalazine inhibited HNC cell growth and accumulated lipid reactive oxygen species, thereby inducing ferroptosis. Genetic silencing of cystine/glutamate antiporter with siRNA or shRNA treatment also induced effective ferroptotic cell death of resistant HNC cells and enhanced the cisplatin cytotoxicity of resistant HNC cells. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter significantly sensitized resistant HNC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter overcomes the cisplatin resistance of HNC cells by inducing ferroptosis.

  6. Supportive Management of Mucositis and Metabolic Derangements in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Marcelo; Batt, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is among the most undesirable, painful, and expensive toxicities of cytotoxic cancer therapy, and is disheartening for patients and frustrating for caregivers. Accurate assessment of the incidence of OM has been elusive, but accumulating data suggests that reported OM frequency is significantly less than its actual occurrence. It has been suggested that over 90% of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cisplatin experience severe OM with symptoms of extreme pain, mucosal ulceration and consequent limitations in swallowing and achieving adequate nutritional intake. This panoply of symptoms inevitably impacts a patients’ quality of life and their willingness to continue treatment. In spite of all the advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of OM, there is still no prophylactic therapy with proven efficacy. Strategies to limit the extent of OM and to manage its symptomatology include basic oral care, supportive medications, nutritional support and targeting aggressive treatments to high-risk patients. This review focuses on OM recognition, preventive measurements, and symptom-management strategies. PMID:26404378

  7. [HPV-associated head and neck cancer : mutational signature and genomic aberrations].

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Würdemann, N; Hübbers, C; Reuschenbach, M; Prigge, E-S; Wichmann, G; Hess, J; Dietz, A; Dürst, M; Tinhofer, I; von Knebel-Döberitz, M; Wittekindt, C; Klussmann, J P

    2015-11-01

    A significantly increasing proportion of oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas (OSCC) in North America and Europe are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. HPV-related OSCC is regarded as a distinct tumor type with regard to its cellular, biologic, and clinical characteristics. Patients with HPV-related OSCC have significantly better local control, but higher rates of regional lymph node and distant metastases as compared to patients with HPV-negative OSCC. Classical molecular genetic investigations demonstrated specific chromosomal aberration signatures in HPV-related OSCC, and recent developments in next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have rendered possible the sequencing of entire genomes, and thus detection of specific mutations, in just a few days. Initial data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project obtained by using genome-wide high throughput methods have confirmed that HPV-related OSCC contain fewer, albeit more specific mutations than HPV-negative tumors. Additionally, these data revealed the presence of specific-potentially therapeutically targetable-activating driver mutations in subgroups of HPV-positive OSCC, some of which have a prognostic impact. Specific targeted NGS technologies provide new possibilities for identification of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers and the development of personalized cancer treatment. Patients with HPV-positive tumors are likely to profit from these developments in the future, since the genetic alterations are relatively homogenous and frequently lead to signal pathway activation. There is an urgent need for network research activities to carry out the necessary basic research in prospective cohort studies.

  8. Evaluation of pain and function after two home exercise programs in a clinical trial on women with chronic neck pain - with special emphasises on completers and responders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Different types of exercises can help manage chronic neck pain. Supervised exercise interventions are widely used, but these protocols require substantial resources. The aim of this trial, which focused on adherence, was to evaluate two home exercise interventions. Methods This parallel group randomized controlled trial included 57 women randomly allocated into two groups – a strength training group (STRENGTH, 34 subjects) and a stretching group (STRETCH, 23 subjects). The interventions focused on the neck and shoulder muscles and lasted for 12 months. The STRENGTH group performed weight training and ended each session with stretching exercises. These stretching exercises constituted the entirety of the STRETCH group’s training session. Both groups were instructed to exercise three times per week. All the participants kept an exercise diary. In addition, all participants were offered support via phone and e-mail. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and function. The trial included a four- to six-month and a twelve-month follow-up. A completer in this study exercised at least 1,5 times per week during eight unbroken weeks. A responder in this study reported clinically significant improvements on pain and function. The statistical analyses used the Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and X 2 test. Results At four- to six-months, the numbers of completers were 19 in the STRENGTH group and 17 in the STRETCH group. At twelve months, the corresponding numbers were 11 (STRENGTH) and 10 (STRETCH). At four- to six-months, the proportions of subjects reporting clinically important changes (STRENGTH and STRETCH) were for neck pain: 47% and 41%, shoulder pain: 47% and 47%, function: 37% and 29%. At twelve months, the corresponding numbers were for neck pain: 45% and 40%, shoulder pain: 55% and 50%, function: 55% and 20%. Conclusions No differences in the two primary outcomes between the two interventions were found, a finding that may be due to

  9. Evaluation of weekly paclitaxel, carboplatin, and cetuximab in head and neck cancer patients with incurable disease.

    PubMed

    Narveson, Lisa; Kathol, Emily; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, David; Grauer, Dennis; Neupane, Prakash

    2016-10-01

    Weekly paclitaxel, carboplatin, and cetuximab (PCC) has been found to be efficacious and well-tolerated in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with good performance status (PS) when used as induction chemotherapy. Use of PCC in incurable SCCHN in patients with poor PS or in a non-induction setting is an area which warrants further evaluation. Current recommendations for incurable disease consist of a platinum-based regimen with fluorouracil and cetuximab. Studied in patients with PS of 0 to 1, the fluorouracil-based regimens were associated with significant toxicities. Therefore, weekly PCC may offer an appealing, less toxic alternative for incurable patients with poor PS. This retrospective analysis evaluated 41 patients with very advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer who had received PCC (paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2), carboplatin AUC 2, and a cetuximab 400 mg/m(2) loading dose, followed by 250 mg/m(2) weekly) for up to 6 cycles between April 2008 and September 2014. Maximal response achieved and progression-free survival (PFS), as well as dose intensity and adverse effects, were evaluated. Of the 41 patients evaluated, baseline PS ranged as follows: PS of 2 (41 %), PS of 1 (54 %), and PS of 0 (5 %). Patients received 2 to 6 cycles, averaging 4 cycles. Thirty-one patients (76 %) required treatment to be held, delayed or dose reduced, most commonly for hematologic toxicities. Grades 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 16 patients (39 %), grades 1/2 neutropenia in 12 patients (29 %), with grades 3/4 thrombocytopenia in 1 patient (2 %), and grades 1/2 thrombocytopenia in 2 patients (4 %). No patients developed febrile neutropenia or required hospitalization due to treatment. Partial radiographic response occurred in 15 patients (37 %), complete radiographic response in 2 patients (5 %), stable disease in 14 patients (34 %), and progression in 8 patients (20 %). PFS ranged from 1.6 to 45 months, with a median duration of 4.6

  10. Evaluation of weekly paclitaxel, carboplatin, and cetuximab in head and neck cancer patients with incurable disease.

    PubMed

    Narveson, Lisa; Kathol, Emily; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, David; Grauer, Dennis; Neupane, Prakash

    2016-10-01

    Weekly paclitaxel, carboplatin, and cetuximab (PCC) has been found to be efficacious and well-tolerated in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with good performance status (PS) when used as induction chemotherapy. Use of PCC in incurable SCCHN in patients with poor PS or in a non-induction setting is an area which warrants further evaluation. Current recommendations for incurable disease consist of a platinum-based regimen with fluorouracil and cetuximab. Studied in patients with PS of 0 to 1, the fluorouracil-based regimens were associated with significant toxicities. Therefore, weekly PCC may offer an appealing, less toxic alternative for incurable patients with poor PS. This retrospective analysis evaluated 41 patients with very advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer who had received PCC (paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2), carboplatin AUC 2, and a cetuximab 400 mg/m(2) loading dose, followed by 250 mg/m(2) weekly) for up to 6 cycles between April 2008 and September 2014. Maximal response achieved and progression-free survival (PFS), as well as dose intensity and adverse effects, were evaluated. Of the 41 patients evaluated, baseline PS ranged as follows: PS of 2 (41 %), PS of 1 (54 %), and PS of 0 (5 %). Patients received 2 to 6 cycles, averaging 4 cycles. Thirty-one patients (76 %) required treatment to be held, delayed or dose reduced, most commonly for hematologic toxicities. Grades 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 16 patients (39 %), grades 1/2 neutropenia in 12 patients (29 %), with grades 3/4 thrombocytopenia in 1 patient (2 %), and grades 1/2 thrombocytopenia in 2 patients (4 %). No patients developed febrile neutropenia or required hospitalization due to treatment. Partial radiographic response occurred in 15 patients (37 %), complete radiographic response in 2 patients (5 %), stable disease in 14 patients (34 %), and progression in 8 patients (20 %). PFS ranged from 1.6 to 45 months, with a median duration of 4.6

  11. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, Nicolas F; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Nuovo, Gerard J; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V; Burk, Robert D; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for HPV detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with a 'gold standard' HPV PCR assay. A total of 110 prospectively collected, formalin-fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarrays and tested for HPV DNA by in situ hybridization with two probe sets, a biotinylated probe for high-risk (HR) HPV types 16/18 (Dako, CA, USA) and a probe cocktail for 16/18, plus 10 additional HR types (Ventana, AZ, USA). The p16(INK4) expression was also assessed using a Pharmingen immunohistochemistry antibody (BD Biosciences, CA, USA). Tissue microarrays were stained and scored at expert laboratories. HPV DNA was detected by MY09/11-PCR, using Gold AmpliTaq and dot-blot hybridization on matched-fresh frozen specimens in a research laboratory. HPV 16 E6 and E7-RNA expression was also measured using RT-PCR. Test performance was assessed by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. HR-HPV DNA types 16, 18 and 35 were detected by MY-PCR in 28% of tumors, with the majority (97%) testing positive for type 16. Compared with MY-PCR, the sensitivity and specificity for HR-HPV DNA detection with Dako in situ hybridization was 21% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7-42) and 100% (95% CI: 93-100), respectively. Corresponding test results by Ventana in situ hybridization were 59% (95% CI: 39-78) and 58% (95% CI: 45-71), respectively. The p16 immunohistochemistry performed better overall than Dako (P=0.042) and Ventana (P=0.055), with a sensitivity of 52% (95% CI: 32-71) and specificity of 93% (95% CI: 84-98). Compared with a gold standard HPV-PCR assay, HPV detection by in situ hybridization was less accurate for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on tissue microarrays than p16 immunohistochemistry. Further

  12. Osteoprotegerin and bone mass in squamous cell head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Valero, C; Olmos, J M; Rivera, F; Hernández, J L; Vega, M E; Macías, J González

    2006-06-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is considered one of the main regulators of bone remodeling. Various patterns of serum OPG levels have been described in different types of tumors. We undertook this study to determine serum OPG levels in patients with squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCHNC), analyzing their relationship with other metabolic bone parameters and bone mineral density (BMD), as well as the possible influence of chemotherapy. Forty male patients with localized SCHNC were studied, and their results were compared with those of 40 healthy male controls. The type of treatment followed by each patient was noted. Age, weight, height, and lifestyle habits were recorded; and OPG, Ca(2+), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D), bone alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and serum C-terminal cross-links telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were determined. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and hip was also measured. Serum OPG was higher in patients than in controls (91.7 +/- 25.8 vs. 77.2 +/- 26.3, P = 0.02). ICTP (a bone resorption marker) was 37% higher in patients (P = 0.007). Bone mass was lower in patients at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total hip. Lumbar spine Z-score showed a significant progressive decrease in controls, stage I-III patients, and stage IV patients. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between the disease and serum OPG levels, the odds ratio per standard deviation increase of this being 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.1-3.8, P = 0.04) after adjusting for bone mass and ICTP serum levels, as well as for alcohol and smoking history. Adjustment for alcohol intake and tobacco use did not cancel out BMD differences between patients and controls. Patients with SCHNC show increased OPG serum levels, increased bone resorption, and decreased bone mass. The OPG rise appears to be unrelated to the BMD decrease, and the BMD

  13. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  14. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Studenski, Matthew T.; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S.

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  15. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua; Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph; Tuluc, Madalina; Harrison, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  16. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy as Reirradiation for Locally Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, Kwang-Won; Jang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Min-Sik; Sun, Dong-Il; Kim, Bum-Soo; Jung, So-Lyoung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Yoo, Eun-Jung; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Jang, Hong-Seok; Chung, Su-Mi; Kim, Yeon-Sil

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We report early preliminary experience with CyberKnife radiosurgery (RS) as salvage treatment for locally recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and August 2006, 36 patients (44 sites) were treated with CyberKnife RS as reirradiation for locally recurrent HNC. Treatment sites were as follows: nasopharynx (8), maxillary sinus (8), neck lymph nodes (8), skull base (7), nasal cavity (4), retropharyngeal lymph nodes (3), orbit (2), and others (4). Total doses administered were 18-40 Gy (median, 30 Gy) in 3 to 5 fractions to the 65%-85% isodose line for 3-5 consecutive days. Previous external radiation dose ranged from 39.6 to 134.4 Gy (median, 70.2 Gy). Gross tumor volume ranged from 0.2 to 114.9 cm{sup 3} (median, 22.6 cm{sup 3}). Median follow-up was 17.3 months. Results: Thirty-five of 44 sites were evaluated for response. Fifteen (42.9%) sites achieved complete response, 13 sites (37.1%) achieved a partial response, 3 (8.6%) sites maintained stable disease, and 4 sites (11.4%) showed tumor progression. Grade III acute complications were noted in 13 patients. Late complications were observed in three patients (1 bone necrosis, 2 soft tissue necrosis) during follow-up. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective treatment modality as a salvage treatment with good short-term local control. The early overall response rate is encouraging. However, more experience and a longer follow-up are necessary to determine the role of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery as a salvage treatment of locally recurrent HNC and to define long-term complications.

  17. Preclinical Activity of the Vascular Disrupting Agent OXi4503 against Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bothwell, Katelyn D.; Folaron, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a relatively distinct class of agents that target established blood vessels in tumors. In this study, we examined the preclinical activity of the second-generation VDA OXi4503 against human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Studies were performed in subcutaneous and orthotopic FaDu-luc HNSCC xenografts established in immunodeficient mice. In the subcutaneous model, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) along with tumor growth measurements was performed to assess tumor response to therapy. In mice bearing orthotopic tumors, a dual modality imaging approach based on BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was utilized. Correlative histologic assessment of tumors was performed to validate imaging data. Dynamic BLI revealed a marked reduction in radiance within a few hours of OXi4503 administration compared to baseline levels. However, this reduction was transient with vascular recovery observed at 24 h post treatment. A single injection of OXi4503 (40 mg/kg) resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) tumor growth inhibition of subcutaneous FaDu-luc xenografts. MRI revealed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in volume of orthotopic tumors at 10 days post two doses of OXi4503 treatment. Corresponding histologic (H&E) sections of Oxi4503 treated tumors showed extensive areas of necrosis and hemorrhaging compared to untreated controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report, on the activity of Oxi4503 against HNSCC. These results demonstrate the potential of tumor-VDAs in head and neck cancer. Further examination of the antivascular and antitumor activity of Oxi4503 against HNSCC alone and in combination with chemotherapy and radiation is warranted. PMID:26751478

  18. Evaluation of Parotid Gland Function following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Joo Young

    2006-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to determine the parotid gland tolerance dose levels following intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treating patients who suffered with head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods From February 2003 through June 2004, 34 head and neck patients with 6 months of follow-up were evaluated for xerostomia after being treated by IMRT. Their median age was 59 years (range: 29~78). Xerostomia was assessed using a 4-question xerostomia questionnaire score (XQS) and a test for the salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated: USFR and SSFR, respectively). The patients were also given a validated LENT SOMA scale (LSS) questionnaire. Evaluations were performed before IMRT and at 1, 3 and 6 months after IMRT. Results All 34 patients showed significant changes in the XQS, LSS and Salivary Flow rates (USFR and SSFR) after IMRT. No significant changes in the XQS or LSS were noted in 12 patients who received a total parotid mean dose of ≤3,100 cGy at 1, 3 and 6 months post-IMRT relative to the baseline values. However, for the 22 patients who received >3,100 cGy, significant increases in the XQS and LSS were observed. The USFR and SSFR from the parotid glands in 7 patients who received ≤2,750 cGy were significantly preserved at up to 6 months after IMRT. However, the USFR and SSFR in 27 patients who were treated with >2,750 cGy were significantly lower than the baseline values at all times after IMRT. Conclusion We suggest that the total parotid mean dose should be limited to ≤2,750 cGy to preserve the USFR and SSFR and so improve the subsequent quality of life. PMID:19771265

  19. The Nature and Extent of Body Image Concerns Among Surgically Treated Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Yuan, Ying; Urbauer, Diana; Weston, June; Nipomnick, Summer; Weber, Randal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe body image concerns for surgically treated patients with head and neck cancer and evaluate the relationship between body image concerns and quality of life outcomes. Methods Data were obtained from 280 patients undergoing surgical treatment for head and neck cancer. We used a cross-sectional design and obtained data from individuals at different time points relative to initiation of surgical treatment. Participants completed the Body Image Scale, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale – Head and Neck version, and a survey designed for this study to evaluate disease-specific body image issues, satisfaction with care regarding body image issues, and interest in psychosocial intervention. Results Body image concerns were prevalent in the majority of participants with 75% acknowledging concerns or embarrassment about one or more types of bodily changes at some point during treatment. Significant associations were found between body image concerns and all major domains of quality of life. Age, gender, cancer type, time since surgery, and body image variables were significantly associated with psychosocial outcomes. A clear subset of participants expressed dissatisfaction with care received about body image issues and/or indicated they would have liked additional resources to help them cope with body image changes. Conclusions These data provide useful information to document wide-ranging body image difficulties for this population and provide important targets for the development of relevant psychosocial interventions. PMID:21706673

  20. Impact of Pretreatment Body Mass Index on Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Ping-Ching; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of pretreatment body mass index (preT BMI) with outcomes of head-and-neck cancer in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: All 1,562 patients diagnosed with head-and-neck cancer and treated with curative-intent RT to a dose of 60 Gy or higher were retrospectively studied. Body weight was measured both at entry and at the end of RT. Cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis (DM) were analyzed by preT BMI (<25 kg/m{sup 2} vs. {>=}25 kg/m{sup 2}). The median follow-up was 8.6 years. Results: Patients with lower preT BMI were statistically significantly associated with poorer CSS and OS than those with higher preT BMI. There was no significant difference between preT BMI groups in terms of LRC and DM. Body weight loss (BWL) during radiation did not influence survival outcomes. However, in the group with higher preT BMI, CSS, OS, and DM-free survival of patients with less BWL during radiation were statistically longer when compared with greater BWL. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that higher preT BMI positively influenced survival outcomes for patients with head-and-neck cancer. Patients with higher preT BMI who were able to maintain their weight during radiation had significantly better survival than patients with greater BWL.

  1. Correlation of Positron Emission Tomography Standard Uptake Value and Pathologic Specimen Size in Cancer of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J. Rangaswamy, Balasubramanya; Kostakoglu, Lale; Hoch, Benjamin; Genden, Eric M.; Som, Peter M.; Kao, Johnny

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To correlate positron emission tomography (PET) standard uptake value (SUV) with pathologic specimen size in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with Stage II-IVB head-and-neck cancer with 27 tumors who underwent PET and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the head and neck followed by surgical resection were selected for this study. Various SUV thresholds were examined, including the software default (SUV{sub def}), narrowing the window by 1 standard deviation (SD) of the maximum (SUV-1SD), and SUV cutoff values of 2.5 or greater (SUV2.5) and 40% or greater maximum (SUV40). Volumetric pathologic data were available for 12 patients. Tumor volumes based on pathologic examination (gold standard), CT, SUV{sub def}, SUV-1SD, SUV2.5, and SUV40 were analyzed. Results: PET identified five tumors not seen on CT. The sensitivity of PET for identifying primary tumors was 94% (17 of 18). The Sensitivity of PET for staging the neck was 90% (9 of 10), whereas the specificity was 78% (7 of 9). The SUV2.5 method was most likely to overestimate tumor volume, whereas SUV{sub def} and SUV-1SD were most likely to underestimate tumor volume. Conclusions: The PET scan provides more accurate staging of primary tumors and nodal metastases for patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer than CT alone. Compared with the gold standard, significant variability exists in volumes obtained by using various SUV thresholds. A combination of clinical, CT, and PET data should continue to be used for optimal treatment planning. The SUV40 method appears to offer the best compromise between accuracy and reducing the risk of underestimating tumor extent.

  2. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  3. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  4. A Phase 1 Study of Everolimus + Weekly Cisplatin + Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Sherman, Eric; Ho, Alan L.; Rao, Shyam; Heguy, Adriana; Shen, Ronglai; Korte, Susan; Lisa, Donna; Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Haque, Sofia; Katabi, Nora; Pfister, David G.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Elevated expression of eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in histologically cancer-free margins of resected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and has been associated with increased risk of disease recurrence. Preclinically, inhibition of mTORC1 with everolimus sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin and radiation. Methods and Materials: This was single-institution phase 1 study to establish the maximum tolerated dose of daily everolimus given with fixed dose cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2} weekly × 6) and concurrent intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locally and/or regionally advanced head-and-neck cancer. The study had a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Results: Tumor primary sites were oral cavity (4), salivary gland (4), oropharynx (2), nasopharynx (1), scalp (1), and neck node with occult primary (1). In 4 of 4 cases in which resected HNSCC surgical pathology specimens were available for immunohistochemistry, elevated expression of eIF4E was observed in the cancer-free margins. The most common grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse event was lymphopenia (92%), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were mucositis (n=2) and failure to thrive (n=1). With a median follow up of 19.4 months, 2 patients have experienced recurrent disease. The maximum tolerated dose was everolimus 5 mg/day. Conclusions: Head-and-neck cancer patients tolerated everolimus at therapeutic doses (5 mg/day) given with weekly cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy. The regimen merits further evaluation, especially among patients who are status post resection of HNSCCs that harbor mTORC1-mediated activation of eIF4E in histologically negative surgical margins.

  5. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  6. SU-E-T-460: Comparison of Proton and IMRT Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenla, S; Zhou, Y; Kowalski, A; Mah, D; Leven, T; Cahlon, O; Lee, N; Hunt, M; Mechalakos, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study comparing proton and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer Methods: This study consists of six H and N cancer patients that underwent proton as well as IMRT planning. Patients analyzed had unilateral target volumes, one had prior RT. 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) plans with multiple field uniform scanning were generated for delivery on the inclined beam line. IMRT was planned using fixed field sliding window. Final plan evaluations were performed by a radiation oncologist and a physicist. Metrics for comparison included tumor coverage, organ sparing with respect to spinal cord, brainstem, parotids, submandibulars, oral cavity, larynx, brachial plexus, cochleas, normal brain tissue, and skin using relevant indices for these structures. Dose volume histograms were generated as well as a qualitative comparison of isodose distributions between the two modalities. Planning and treatment delivery times were compared. Results: Results showed that IMRT plans offered better conformality in the high dose region as demonstrated by the conformality index for each plan. Ipsilateral cochlea, submandibular gland, and skin doses were lower with IMRT than proton therapy. There was significant sparing of larynx, oral cavity, and brainstem with proton therapy compared to IMRT. This translated into direct patient benefit with no evidence of hoarseness, mucositis, or nausea. Contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were equally spared. IMRT had shorter planning/parts fabrication and treatment times which needs to be taken into account when deciding modality. Conclusion: Sparing of clinically significant normal tissue structures such as oral cavity and larynx for unilateral H and N cancers was seen with 3D-CPT versus IMRT. However, this is at the expense of less conformality at the high dose region and higher skin dose. Future studies are needed with full gantry systems and pencil beam scanning as these

  7. Innate tissue fluorescence of the oral mucosa of controls and head-and-neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Howard E.; Kolli, Venkateswara; Ansley, John; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y.; Alfano, Robert R.; Schantz, Stimson P.

    1995-04-01

    Base line spectral excitation and emission scans were defined for the oral mucosa in a population of 61 controls, 16 oral tongue cancer patients and 2 patients with tongue leukoplakia. A xenon-based fluorescence spectrophotometer (Mediscience Corp.) with a fiberoptic probe (Mediscience Corp.) was used to collect excitation and emission spectra. Two excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm; (lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm) and two emission scans ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm; (lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360-660 nm) were used to analyze the buccal mucosa (BM), hard palate (HP), floor of mouth (FOM) and dorsal tongue (DT) of 61 control individuals. In 41 controls the lateral tongue site (LT) was added. The same set of scans was performed on tumor lesions and contralateral normal tissues of 16 patients with lateral tongue tumors and on two individuals with leukoplakia of the tongue. Ratios of points on the individual scans were used to quantitate data. The excitation scan ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm) and the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm) were able to statistically discriminate the HP and DT from the BM and FOM. The ratios of intensities of neoplastic mucosa and contralateral sites were significantly different with the excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm, p < 0.001) and ((lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm, p < 0.01) and with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm, p < 0.001). Discrimination was significant with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360- 660 nm, p < 0.07). Innate tissue fluorescence has potential as a monitor of cancer patients and populations at risk for head and neck cancer.

  8. Vitamin or mineral supplement intake and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Chuang, Shu-chun; Neto, Jose Eluf; Menezes, Ana; Matos, Elena; Koifman, Sergio; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Fernandez, Leticia; Daudt, Alexander W.; Curado, Maria Paula; Winn, Deborah M.; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Castellsague, Xavier; Morgenstern, Hal; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; McClean, Michael; Kelsey, Karl T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Purdue, Mark P.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Chen, Chu; Benhamou, Simone; Olshan, Andrew F.; Yu, Guopei; Schantz, Stimson; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potential role of vitamin or mineral supplementation on the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC), we analyzed individual-level pooled data from 12 case-control studies (7,002 HNC cases and 8,383 controls) participating in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium. There were a total of 2,028 oral cavity cancer, 2,465 pharyngeal cancer, and 874 unspecified oral/pharynx cancer, 1,329 laryngeal cancer and 306 overlapping HNC cases. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for self reported ever use of any vitamins, multivitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and calcium, beta-carotene, iron, selenium, and zinc supplements were assessed. We further examined frequency, duration and cumulative exposure of each vitamin or mineral when possible and stratified by smoking and drinking status. All ORs were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, study center, education level, and pack-years of smoking, frequency of alcohol drinking and fruit/vegetable intake. A decreased risk of HNC was observed with ever use of vitamin C (OR=0.76, 95% CI=0.59-0.96) and with ever use of calcium supplement (OR=0.64, 95% CI=0.42-0.97). The inverse association with HNC risk was also observed for 10 or more years of vitamin C use (OR=0.72, 95% CI=0.54-0.97) and more than 365 tablets of cumulative calcium intake (OR=0.36, 95% CI=0.16-0.83), but linear trends were not observed for the frequency or duration of any supplement intake. We did not observe any strong associations between vitamin or mineral supplement intake and the risk of head and neck cancer. PMID:22173631

  9. [Surgical approach of lateral temporal bone resection for treatment of head and neck cancer with invasion surrounding the jugular foramen].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akiteru; Ueda, Yoshihisa; Ono, Takeharu; Shin, Buichiro; Chitose, Shun-ichi; Umeno, Hirohito; Nakashima, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    We herein present a review of the surgical approach of lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) in the treatment of 5 cases of head and neck cancers invading the jugular foramen between 2008 to 2013. The patients comprised 3 males and 2 females with ages ranging from 25 to 76 and observation times were between 13 and 22 months. In this study we reviewed the method of operation and treatment. Four patients are alive, but one patient died from the primary disease. Complications occurred including postoperative facial nerve palsy and hearing loss. Although the LTBR with jugular foramen approach can cause postoperative facial nerve palsy and hearing loss, this method would be recommended as a safe surgical procedure for its wide surgical field. We therefore propose that this LTBR technique is useful for patients with head and neck cancer extending to the jugular foramen.

  10. Multi-Case Knowledge-Based IMRT Treatment Planning in Head and Neck Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzetic, Shelby Mariah

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) IMRT treatment planning is a challenging process that relies heavily on the planner's experience. Previously, we used the single, best match from a library of manually planned cases to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for a new patient. The current multi-case Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy (MC-KBRT) study utilized different matching cases for each of six individual organs-at-risk (OARs), then combined those six cases to create the new treatment plan. From a database of 103 patient plans created by experienced planners, MC-KBRT plans were created for 40 (17 unilateral and 23 bilateral) HNC "query" patients. For each case, 2D beam's-eye-view images were used to find similar geometric "match" patients separately for each of 6 OARs. Dose distributions for each OAR from the 6 matching cases were combined and then warped to suit the query case's geometry. The dose-volume constraints were used to create the new query treatment plan without the need for human decision-making throughout the IMRT optimization. The optimized MC-KBRT plans were compared against the clinically approved plans and Version 1 (previous KBRT using only one matching case with dose warping) using the dose metrics: mean, median, and maximum (brainstem and cord+5mm) doses. Compared to Version 1, MC-KBRT had no significant reduction of the dose to any of the OARs in either unilateral or bilateral cases. Compared to the manually planned unilateral cases, there was significant reduction of the oral cavity mean/median dose (>2Gy) at the expense of the contralateral parotid. Compared to the manually planned bilateral cases, reduction of dose was significant in the ipsilateral parotid, larynx, and oral cavity (>3Gy mean/median) while maintaining PTV coverage. MC-KBRT planning in head and neck cancer generates IMRT plans with better dose sparing than manually created plans. MC-KBRT using multiple case matches does not show significant dose reduction compared to using a

  11. Discrimination of Benign and Neoplastic Mucosa with a High-Resolution Microendoscope (HRME) in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Peter M.; Park, Chan W.; Pierce, Mark C.; Goldstein, Gregg H.; Levy, Lauren; Gurudutt, Vivek V.; Polydorides, Alexandras D.; Godbold, James H.; Teng, Marita S.; Genden, Eric M.; Miles, Brett A.; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The efficacy of ablative surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) depends critically on obtaining negative margins. While intraoperative "frozen section" analysis of margins is a valuable adjunct, it is expensive, time-consuming, and highly dependent on pathologist expertise. Optical imaging has potential to improve the accuracy of margins by identifying cancerous tissue in real time. Our aim was to determine the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of head and neck cancer specialists using high-resolution microendoscopic (HRME) images to discriminate between cancerous and benign mucosa. Methods Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with HNSCC were enrolled in this single-center study. HRME was used to image each specimen after application of proflavine, with concurrent standard histopathologic analysis. Images were evaluated for quality control, and a training set containing representative images of benign and neoplastic tissue was assembled. After viewing training images, seven head and neck cancer specialists with no prior HRME experience reviewed 37 test images and were asked to classify each. Results The mean accuracy of all reviewers in correctly diagnosing neoplastic mucosa was 97 percent (95% Cl = 94–99%). The mean sensitivity and specificity were 98 percent (97–100%) and 92 percent (87–98%), respectively. The Fleiss kappa statistic for inter-rater reliability was 0.84 (0.77–0.91). Conclusions Medical professionals can be quickly trained to use HRME to discriminate between benign and neoplastic mucosa in the head and neck. With further development, the HRME shows promise as a method of real-time margin determination at the point of care. PMID:22492225

  12. Effect of CT contrast on volumetric arc therapy planning (RapidArc and helical tomotherapy) for head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Alan J.; Vora, Nayana; Suh, Steve; Liu, An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast in the dosimetry of helical tomotherapy and RapidArc treatment for head and neck cancer and determine if it is acceptable during the computed tomography (CT) simulation to acquire only CT with contrast for treatment planning of head and neck cancer. Overall, 5 patients with head and neck cancer (4 men and 1 woman) treated on helical tomotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. For each patient, 2 consecutive CT scans were performed. The first CT set was scanned before the contrast injection and secondary study set was scanned 45 seconds after contrast. The 2 CTs were autoregistered using the same Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates. Tomotherapy and RapidArc plans were generated on 1 CT data set and subsequently copied to the second CT set. Dose calculation was performed, and dose difference was analyzed to evaluate the influence of intravenous contrast media. The dose matrix used for comparison included mean, minimum and maximum doses of planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose coverage, and V{sub 45} {sub Gy}, V{sub 30} {sub Gy}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} organ doses. Treatment planning on contrasted images generally showed a lower dose to both organs and target than plans on noncontrasted images. The doses for the points of interest placed in the organs and target rarely changed more than 2% in any patient. In conclusion, treatment planning using a contrasted image had insignificant effect on the dose to the organs and targets. In our opinion, only CT with contrast needs to be acquired during the CT simulation for head and neck cancer. Dose calculations performed on contrasted images can potentially underestimate the delivery dose slightly. However, the errors of planning on a contrasted image should not affect the result in clinically significant way.

  13. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  14. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  15. Deformation Prediction and Geometrical Modeling of Head and Neck Cancer Tumor: A Data Mining Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Maryam

    Radiation therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer tumors for several years and many cancer patients receive radiotherapy. It may be used as primary therapy or with a combination of surgery or other kinds of therapy such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or some mixture of the three. The treatment objective is to destroy cancer cells or shrink the tumor by planning an adequate radiation dose to the desired target without damaging the normal tissues. By using the pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT) images, most of the radiotherapy planning systems design the target and assume that the size of the tumor will not change throughout the treatment course, which takes 5 to 7 weeks. Based on this assumption, the total amount of radiation is planned and fractionated for the daily dose required to be delivered to the patient's body. However, this assumption is flawed because the patients receiving radiotherapy have marked changes in tumor geometry during the treatment period. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the changes of the tumor shape and size over time during the course of radiotherapy in order to prevent significant effects of inaccuracy in the planning. In this research, a methodology is proposed in order to monitor and predict daily (fraction day) tumor volume and surface changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire treatment period. In the proposed method, geometrical modeling and data mining techniques will be used rather than repetitive CT scans data to predict the tumor deformation for radiation planning. Clinical patient data were obtained from the University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). In the first step, by using CT scan data, the tumor's progressive geometric changes during the treatment period are quantified. The next step relates to using regression analysis in order to develop predictive models for tumor geometry based on the geometric analysis results and the patients' selected attributes (age, weight

  16. Chyle Fistula after Neck Dissection for an Unusual Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Harlak, Ali; Karahatay, Serdar; Onguru, Onder; Mentes, Oner; Gerek, Mustafa; Tufan, Turgut

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Chyle fistula is one of the rare complications of neck dissections. Even though no consented algorithm for the management of this entity has been established yet, conservative treatment options including somatostatin analogues have been suggested as an adequate modality for low output fistulas. Case Report Here we present a patient with a right-sided neck fistula which was resistant to conventional treatment, and was finally treated by surgery. The neck dissection was performed for a malignant right neck mass that was accepted as the lymph node metastasis of formerly treated papillary thyroid carcinoma. The pathology of the specimen revealed a contralateral neck metastasis of previously treated breast carcinoma. Conclusion We assume that consecutive surgeries on axillary and neck lymph pathways resulted in such a complicated and exceptional case. PMID:21076608

  17. Chyle Fistula after Neck Dissection for an Unusual Breast Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Harlak, Ali; Karahatay, Serdar; Onguru, Onder; Mentes, Oner; Gerek, Mustafa; Tufan, Turgut

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chyle fistula is one of the rare complications of neck dissections. Even though no consented algorithm for the management of this entity has been established yet, conservative treatment options including somatostatin analogues have been suggested as an adequate modality for low output fistulas. CASE REPORT: Here we present a patient with a right-sided neck fistula which was resistant to conventional treatment, and was finally treated by surgery. The neck dissection was performed for a malignant right neck mass that was accepted as the lymph node metastasis of formerly treated papillary thyroid carcinoma. The pathology of the specimen revealed a contralateral neck metastasis of previously treated breast carcinoma. CONCLUSION: We assume that consecutive surgeries on axillary and neck lymph pathways resulted in such a complicated and exceptional case. PMID:21076608

  18. Priorities of head and neck cancer patients: a patient survey based on the brief ICF core set for HNC.

    PubMed

    Tschiesner, Uta; Sabariego, Carla; Linseisen, Elisabeth; Becker, Sven; Stier-Jarmer, Marita; Cieza, Alarcos; Harreus, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer (ICF-HNC) covers the typical spectrum of problems in functioning experienced by patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). The major goal of the present work was to evaluate patients' priorities using the brief ICF-HNC as a starting point. A priorities assessment checklist consisting of 15 statements was created based on the 14 validated categories of the brief ICF-HNC. In a cross-sectional study, patients were requested to select up to 5 items that were especially important to them. The checklist was sent by mail to 465 patients at different time points of cancer follow-up and handed out to 56 patients with recent HNC diagnosis. Altogether 300 (64.51 %) patients returned the checklist. The top priority of our sample was "I want to survive the cancer", followed by "I want that all the expenses for cancer treatment, cancer care and any additional follow-up treatments be covered by my health insurance or by the welfare system", "I want to be able to continue performing all daily life tasks well", "I want to have trusting relationships with my doctors, nurses and therapists" and "I want to be able to speak clearly". Although survival was, as expected, the top priority for patients enrolled in the study, we show that the weight given to survival and further symptoms or daily life activities meaningfully changes when the biopsychosocial perspective proposed in the ICF is adopted.

  19. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  20. Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer: what radiologists need to know about the cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Loevner, Laurie A; Learned, Kim O; Mohan, Suyash; O'Malley, Bert W; Scanlon, Mary H; Rassekh, Christopher H; Weinstein, Gregory S

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of oncologic surgical technology has moved toward reducing patient morbidity and mortality without compromising oncologic resection or oncologic outcomes. The goals in treating head and neck cancer are to cure patients, as well as to provide quality of life by improving functional and social outcomes through organ-preservation therapies, which may include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is an emerging technique that provides several benefits over existing treatment regimens and over open surgery for head and neck cancer, including reductions in operative times, blood loss, intensive care unit stays, and overall duration of patient hospitalization. Transoral robotic techniques allow wide-view, high-resolution, magnified three-dimensional optics for visualization of the mucosal surfaces of the head and neck through an endoscope, while avoiding the extensive external cervical incisions often required for open surgeries. Radiologists play an important role in the successful outcome of these procedures, both before and after TORS. Determining a cancer patient's surgical candidacy for TORS requires a thorough preoperative radiologic evaluation, coupled with clinical and intraoperative assessment. Radiologists must pay particular attention to important anatomic landmarks that are clinical blind spots for surgeons. Knowledge of the expected postoperative imaging appearances, so that they can be distinguished from recurrent disease and second primary tumors, is essential for all radiologists involved in the care of these patients.

  1. Expression of magnesium transporter genes in head and neck cancer patients underwent neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chien, Li-Sheng; Lin, Jin-Ching; Jiang, Rong-San; Liu, Shih-An

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to investigate expression of magnesium transporter genes in patients with head and neck cancer who underwent cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their association with serum magnesium level. Head and neck cancer patients scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy were eligible for enrollment. Blood samples were obtained at three time points: prior to, during, and after completion of chemotherapy. Expression levels of magnesium transporter genes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. A total of 23 patients were included in the final analysis. The average serum magnesium levels dropped 6.98 and 5.20% during and after completion of chemotherapy. There were neither significant associations between serum magnesium level and demographic variables nor tumor-related variables. SLC41A1 expression level was positively correlated with serum magnesium whereas TRPM6 expression level was negatively correlated with serum magnesium. Serum magnesium level decreased during cisplatin-based chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to investigate optimal magnesium measurement and substitution protocol.

  2. Intravenous amifostine during chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: A randomized placebo-controlled phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Buentzel, Jens . E-mail: jens.buentzel@shk-ndh.de; Micke, Oliver; Adamietz, Irenaus A.; Monnier, Alain; Glatzel, Michael; Vries, Alexander de

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy and safety of intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine for reducing xerostomia and mucositis after radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of i.v. amifostine during radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients from European and American study centers received i.v. amifostine 300 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 67) or placebo (n = 65) before carboplatin 70 mg/m{sup 2} and radiotherapy on Days 1 to 5 and 21 to 25, and i.v. amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} or placebo before radiotherapy on other days. Results: Toxicity incidences were (amifostine, placebo, p value): Grade 2 or higher acute xerostomia (39%, 34%, 0.715), Grade 3 or higher acute mucositis (39%, 22%, 0.055), Grade 2 or higher late xerostomia (37%, 24%, 0.235), and Grade 3 or higher treatment-related adverse events (42%, 20%, 0.008). One-year rates of locoregional failure, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between treatments. Conclusions: The used amifostine doses were not able to reduce the toxicity of simultaneous radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. The safety of amifostine and the lack of tumor protection were consistent with previous studies.

  3. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  4. Effect of Pretreatment Anemia on Treatment Outcome of Concurrent Radiochemotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, Andre Wang Changshu; Vigneault, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of anemia on outcome of treatment with radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 196 patients with Stage II-IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria as hemoglobin <130 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women. Results: Fifty-three patients were classified as anemic, 143 as nonanemic. The 3-year local control rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 72% and 85%, respectively (p = 0.01). The 3-year overall survival rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 52% and 77%, respectively (p = 0.004). In multivariate analysis, anemia was the most significant predictor of local control (hazard ratio, 0.37, p = 0.009) and survival (hazard ratio, 0.47, p = 0.007). A dose-effect relationship was also found for local control (p = .04) and survival (0.04) when grouping by hemoglobin concentration: <120, 120-140, and >140 g/L. Conclusions: Anemia was strongly associated with local control and survival in this cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiochemotherapy.

  5. Immunologically augmented skin flap as a novel dendritic cell vaccine against head and neck cancer in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keita; Saegusa, Noriko; Omiya, Maho; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Miyata, Haruo; Komiyama, Masaru; Iizuka, Akira; Kume, Akiko; Sugino, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Ken; Kiyohara, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Akiyama, Yasuto

    2015-02-01

    Local recurrence is a major clinical issue following surgical resection in head and neck cancer, and the dissemination and lymph node metastasis of minimal residual disease is relatively difficult to treat due to the lack of suitable therapeutic approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a novel immunotherapy using a skin flap transfer treated with sensitized dendritic cells (DC), termed the "immuno-flap," in a rat tumor model. After the local round area of skin was resected, SCC-158 cells (a rat head and neck cancer cell line) were inoculated into the muscle surface; lastly, the groin skin flap injected with mature DC was overlaid. Two weeks after the second DC injection, systemic immunological reactions and tumor size were measured. The DC-treated group showed a significant reduction in tumor size compared with the control. Although the induction of CTL activity in spleen cells was marginal, Th1 cytokines such as interleukin-2 and interferon-γ were elevated in the DC-treated group. These results suggest that a novel immunotherapy based on the immuno-flap method has the potential for clinical application to prevent the local recurrence of head and neck cancer patients.

  6. Human Papillomavirus as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Tool in Cancer of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck Region.

    PubMed

    Sivars, Lars; Tani, Edneia; Näsman, Anders; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Dalianis, Tina

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as a risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), especially tonsillar and base of tongue cancer. Furthermore, HPV-positive tonsillar and base of tongue SCC have a significantly better prognosis than their HPV-negative counterparts and head and neck cancer (HNSCC) in general. HPV has recently also been implicated in cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the head and neck region, where a primary tumour is not found despite extensive workup. Using fine-needle aspiration cytology to determine CUP HPV status in cervical lymph nodes could be of advantage, since it is minimally invasive and it is assumed that an HPV-positive lymph node metastasis likely has an HPV-positive otopharyngeal SCC origin. We review the current knowledge of HPV in HNSCC, with an emphasis on CUP of the head and neck region, its relation to oropharyngeal, tonsillar and base of tongue SCC and implications of HPV status for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  7. Dying to be Screened: Exploring the Unequal Burden of Head and Neck Cancer in Health Provider Shortage Areas.

    PubMed

    Rereddy, Shruthi K; Jordan, Demetrice R; Moore, Charles E

    2015-09-01

    Multiple factors contribute to disparities in head and neck cancer prevalence across the sociodemographic spectrum, including a lack of screening efforts in mostly underserved minority communities. African Americans and other ethnic minorities are at greater risk for late-stage diagnoses due to the lack of routine screenings and examinations. Advanced stage diagnosis profoundly limits treatment options, disease recovery, and survivorship. Differential access to care is frequently cited as contributing to delayed diagnosis in minority patients. Access to care is a complex concept that includes not only insurance status but also the equitable spatial distribution of health-care services. Recognizing this complexity, we explored the distribution of head and neck cancer cases seen at Grady Health System from 2010 to 2012 in order to identify geographic trends in disease prevalence compared to the distribution of oral health-care providers at the zip code level. We identified 53 cases of head and neck cancer spread across 36 zip codes primarily in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Geographic information systems analysis showed a spatial mismatch: increased disease prevalence and provider shortage in the mostly minority zip codes, and decreased disease prevalence and greater provider presence in the majority zip codes.

  8. Internal margin assessment using cine MRI analysis of deglutition in head and neck cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Eric S.; Bradley, Julie A.; Wang Dian; Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Schultz, Christoper; Li, X. Allen

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a promising treatment modality for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). The dose distributions from IMRT are static and, thus, are unable to account for variations and/or uncertainties in the relationship between the patient (region being treated) and the beam. Organ motion comprises one such source of this uncertainty, introduced by physiological variation in the position, size, and shape of organs during treatment. In the head and neck, the predominant source of this variation arises from deglutition (swallowing). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cinematographic MRI (cine MRI) could be used to determine asymmetric (nonuniform) internal margin (IM) components of tumor planning target volumes based on the actual deglutition-induced tumor displacement. Methods: Five head and neck cancer patients were set up in treatment position on a 3 T MRI scanner. Two time series of single-slice, sagittal, cine images were acquired using a 2D FLASH sequence. The first time series was a 12.8 min scan designed to capture the frequency and duration of deglutition in the treatment position. The second time series was a short, 15 s scan designed to capture the displacement of deglutition in the treatment position. Deglutition frequency and mean swallow duration were estimated from the long time series acquisition. Swallowing and resting (nonswallowing) events were identified on the short time series acquisition and displacement was estimated based on contours of gross tumor volume (GTV) generated at each time point of a particular event. A simple linear relationship was derived to estimate 1D asymmetric IMs in the presence of resting- and deglutition-induced displacement. Results: Deglutition was nonperiodic, with frequency and duration ranging from 2.89-24.18 mHz and from 3.86 to 6.10 s, respectively. The deglutition frequency and mean duration were found to vary among patients. Deglutition

  9. Pain Management Among Nursing Home Residents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Camilla B.; Briesacher, Becky A.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Rosen, Allison B.; Pimentel, Marc T.; Lapane, Kate L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the mid-1990s, 29.4% of nursing home (NH) residents with cancer suffered from daily pain, and among them 26% failed to receive any analgesics. OBJECTIVES To assess improvements in pain management of NH residents with cancer since the implementation of pain management quality indicators. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING 1,382 US NHs. PARTICIPANTS 8,094 newly-admitted, Medicare-eligible NH residents with cancer. MEASUREMENTS Nationwide data on NH resident health from the Minimum Data Set 2.0 linked to all-payer pharmacy dispensing records (February 2006–June 2007) were used to determine prevalence of pain, including frequency and intensity, and receipt of non-opioid and opioid analgesics. Multinomial logistic regression evaluated resident-level correlates of pain and binomial logistic regression identified correlates of untreated pain. RESULTS More than 65% of NH residents with cancer had any pain (28.3% daily, 37.3% less than daily), among whom 13.5% had severe and 61.3% had moderate pain. Women, residents admitted from acute care or who were bedfast, and those with compromised activities of daily living, depressed mood, indwelling catheter, or terminal prognosis were more likely to have pain. More than 17% of residents in daily pain (95% confidence interval [CI]: 16.0–19.1%) received no analgesics, including 11.7% with daily severe pain (95% CI: 8.9–14.5%) and 16.9% with daily moderate pain (95% CI: 15.1–18.8%). Treatment was negatively associated with age >85 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=0.67, 95% CI: 0.55–0.81 versus aged 65–74), cognitive impairment (aOR=0.71, 95% CI: 0.61–0.82), presence of feeding tube (aOR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.60–0.99), and restraints (aOR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.31–0.82). CONCLUSION Untreated pain is still common among NH residents with cancer and persists despite pain management quality indicators. PMID:25900481

  10. The head and neck cancer cell oncogenome: a platform for the development of precision molecular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Daniel; Abba, Martin C.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Wang, Zhiyong; Zaida, Moraima; Delic, Naomi C.; Samuels, Yardena; Lyons, J. Guy; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2014-01-01

    The recent elucidation of the genomic landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has provided a unique opportunity to develop selective cancer treatment options. These efforts will require the establishment of relevant HNSCC models for preclinical testing. Here, we performed full exome and transcriptome sequencing of a large panel of HNSCC-derived cells from different anatomical locations and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection status. These cells exhibit typical mutations in TP53, FAT1, CDK2NA, CASP8, and NOTCH1, and copy number variations (CNVs) and mutations in PIK3CA, HRAS, and PTEN that reflect the widespread activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway. SMAD4 alterations were observed that may explain the decreased tumor suppressive effect of TGF-β in HNSCC. Surprisingly, we identified HPV+ HNSCC cells harboring TP53 mutations, and documented aberrant TP53 expression in a subset of HPV+ HNSCC cases. This analysis also revealed that most HNSCC cells harbor multiple mutations and CNVs in epigenetic modifiers (e.g., EP300, CREBP, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, KDM6A, and KDM6B) that may contribute to HNSCC initiation and progression. These genetically-defined experimental HNSCC cellular systems, together with the identification of novel actionable molecular targets, may now facilitate the pre-clinical evaluation of emerging therapeutic agents in tumors exhibiting each precise genomic alteration. PMID:25275298

  11. HGF/Met Signaling in Head and Neck Cancer: Impact on the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefan; Bhola, Neil E; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Studies to date have revealed several major molecular alterations that contribute to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) initiation, progression, metastatic spread, and therapeutic failure. The EGFR is the only FDA-approved therapeutic target, yet responses to cetuximab have been limited. Activation and cross-talk of cellular receptors and consequent activation of different signaling pathways contribute to limited activity of blockade of a single pathway. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor, Met, has been implicated in HNSCC tumorigenesis and EGFR inhibitor resistance. HGF, the sole ligand of Met, is overexpressed in the tumor microenvironment. The role of HGF/Met signaling in proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis has been investigated in HNSCC, leading to clinical trials with various Met inhibitors and HGF antibodies. However, the role of the HGF/Met signaling axis in mediating the tumor microenvironment has been relatively understudied in HNSCC. In this review, we discuss the functional roles of Met and HGF in HNSCC with a focus on the tumor microenvironment and the immune system. Clin Cancer Res; 22(16); 4005-13. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27370607

  12. Challenges in integrating 18FDG PET-CT into radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, P; Partridge, M; Kazi, R; Nutting, C; Harrington, K; Newbold, K

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy forms one of the major treatment modalities for head and neck cancers (HNC), and precision radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy require accurate target delineation to ensure success of the treatment. Conventionally used imaging modalities, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging are used to delineate the tumor. Imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET)-CT, which combines the functional and anatomic modalities, is increasingly being used in the management of HNC. Currently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radioisotope, which is accumulated in areas of high glucose uptake, such as the tumor tissue. Because most disease recurrences are within the high-dose radiotherapy volume, defining a biological target volume for radiotherapy boost is an attractive approach to improve the results. There are many challenges in employing the PET-CT for radiotherapy planning, such as patient positioning, target edge definition, and use of new PET tracers, which represent various functional properties, such as hypoxia, protein synthesis, and proliferation. The role of PET-CT for radiotherapy planning is ever expanding and more clinical data underlining the advantages and challenges in this approach are emerging. In this article, we review the current clinical evidence for the application of functional imaging to radiotherapy planning and discuss some of the current challenges and possible solutions that have been suggested to date.

  13. Changes in and predictors of pain characteristics in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Guro Lindviksmoen; Rustøen, Tone; Miaskowski, Christine; Paul, Steven M; Bjordal, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) that is associated with significant decrements in physical and psychological functioning. Only 4 studies have evaluated for changes in and predictors of different pain characteristics in these patients. In this longitudinal study of patients with HNC, changes in pain intensity (i.e., average pain, worst pain), pain interference with function, and pain relief were evaluated from the initiation of radiotherapy and through the following 6 months. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate for changes over time in these 4 pain characteristics, as well as to identify predictors of interindividual variability in each characteristic. Overall, pain intensity and interference with function scores were in the mild-to-moderate range, while pain relief scores were in the moderate range. The occurrence of pain, as well as scores for each pain characteristic, increased from the initiation to the completion of radiotherapy, followed by a gradual decrease to near pretreatment levels at 6 months. However, interindividual variability existed in patients' ratings of each pain characteristic. Predictors of more severe pain characteristic scores were more comorbidities, worse physical functioning, not having surgery before radiotherapy, difficulty swallowing, mouth sores, sleep disturbance, fatigue, more energy, and less social support. Patients with more depressive symptoms had better pain relief. Although some of the predictors cannot be modified (e.g., rrence of surgery), other predictors (e.g., symptoms) can be treated. Therefore, information about these predictors may result in decreased pain in patients with HNC.

  14. Neurocognitive function after (chemo)-radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Welsh, L C; Dunlop, A W; McGovern, T; McQuaid, D; Dean, J A; Gulliford, S L; Bhide, S A; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M; Newbold, K L

    2014-12-01

    Radical radiotherapy has a pivotal role in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) and cures a significant proportion of patients while simultaneously sparing critical normal organs. Some patients treated with radical radiotherapy for HNC receive significant radiation doses to large volumes of brain tissue. In fact, intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for HNC have been associated with a net increase in irradiated brain volumes. The increasing use of chemoradiotherapy for HNC has additionally exposed this patient population to potential neurotoxicity due to cytotoxic drugs. Patients with HNC may be particularly at risk for adverse late brain effects after (chemo)-radiotherapy, such as impaired neurocognitive function (NCF), as risk factors for the development of HNC, such as smoking, excess alcohol consumption and poor diet, are also associated with impaired NCF. The relatively good survival rates with modern treatment for HNC, and exposure to multiple potentially neurotoxic factors, means that it is important to understand the impact of (chemo)-radiotherapy for HNC on NCF, and to consider what measures can be taken to minimise treatment-related neurotoxicity. Here, we review evidence relating to the late neurotoxicity of radical (chemo)-radiotherapy for HNC, with a focus on studies of NCF in this patient population.

  15. A survey of head and neck cancer curriculum in United States speech language pathology masters programs.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hon K; Fallis, Michelle; Martin-Harris, Bonnie

    2010-12-01

    We surveyed speech language pathology (SLP) programs for head and neck cancer (HNC) training. Program directors of 242 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association accredited masters programs for SLP were contacted regarding curricular HNC material. Directors (n = 120) responded online: six included a required course in HNC, and all but two programs with no required HNC course included HNC topics in other required courses. Thirty-two programs were affiliated with a medical center and/or a teaching hospital. Programs that offered either a required course in HNC or elective courses on HNC were more likely to be affiliated with a medical center and/or a teaching hospital than programs that did not offer a required course in HNC (P = 0.043) or elective courses on HNC (P = 0.007), respectively. Few programs offer a required HNC course but most programs integrate HNC content into the required coursework. Potential strategies to incorporate HNC exposure into formal SLP programs are identified.

  16. The Use of Inpatient Palliative Care Services In Patients With Metastatic Incurable Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Carolyn L.; Smith, Thomas J.; Gourin, Christine G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Substantial health care resources are used on aggressive end-of-life care, despite an increasing recognition that palliative care improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. We examined the incidence of palliative care encounters in inpatients with incurable head and neck cancer (HNCA) and associations with in-hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, and costs. Methods Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 80,514 HNCA patients with distant metastatic disease in 2001–2010 was analyzed using cross-tabulations and multivariate regressions. Results Palliative care encounters occurred in 4,029 cases (5%) and were significantly associated with age ≥80 years, female sex, self-pay pay or status, and prior radiation. Palliative care was significantly associated with increased in-hospital mortality and reduced hospital-related costs. Conclusions Inpatient palliative care consultation in terminal HNCA is associated with reduced hospital-related costs, but appears to be underutilized and restricted to the elderly, uninsured, and patients with an increased risk of mortality. PMID:25331744

  17. The lived experience of dysphagia following non-surgical treatment for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence and severity of dysphagia in people treated non-surgically for primary head and neck cancer (HNC) is well documented. However, few studies have looked beyond the physiological impairment to explore the lived experience of dysphagia in the post-treatment period of HNC. The current study adopted a person-centred, qualitative approach to describe the experiences of people living with dysphagia in the months and years following non-surgical treatment for HNC. Using maximum variation sampling, 24 participants who had undergone radiotherapy treatment for HNC were recruited. Individual interviews were conducted to explore the impact of dysphagia on participants' everyday lives. The themes identified included: (1) physical changes related to swallowing; (2) emotions evoked by living with dysphagia; (3) altered perceptions and changes in appreciation of food; and (4) personal and lifestyle impacts. The data revealed the breadth and significance of the impact of dysphagia on the lives of people treated curatively for HNC. Assessment and management in the post-treatment period must be sufficiently holistic to address both the changing physical states and the psychosocial needs of people with dysphagia following HNC. Rehabilitation services which focus only on impairment-based management will fail to fully meet the support needs of this clinical population.

  18. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management.

  19. Genetic variability of Xrcc3 and Rad51 modulates the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Polanska, Kinga; Twardowska, Ewa; Jurewicz, Joanna; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2012-08-10

    A case-control study was conducted to analyze the possible associations between the head and neck cancer (HNC) risk and fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in Xrcc3 and Rad51 genes. This study involved 81 HNC cases and 111 healthy control subjects. A significant risk-increasing effect of rs3212057 (p.Arg94His) SNP in Xrcc3 (OR=6.6; p<0.01) was observed. On the other hand, risk-decreasing effect was found for rs5030789 (g.3997A>G) and rs1801321 (c.-60G>T) in 5' near gene and 5'UTR regions of Rad51, respectively (OR=0.3 and OR=0.2, p<0.05, respectively). Moreover, these effects were shown to be modulated by tobacco-smoking status and gene-gene interactions. Concluding, the genetic variability of Xrcc3 and/or Rad51 genes might be of relevance with respect to HNC risk. PMID:22613844

  20. Rad51C: a novel suppressor gene modulates the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Twardowska, Ewa; Rydzynski, Konrad; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the possible association between the head and neck cancer (HNC) and genetic variability of Rad51C tumor suppressor gene. Eight polymorphic sites spanning over non-coding regions of Rad51C promoter, exon 1 and intron 1 were genotyped in 81 HNC cases and 156 healthy controls using the real-time PCR technique. One investigated site turned out to be not polymorphic, while among the remaining seven sites a significant HNC risk-increasing effect was found for rs16943176 (c.-118G>A), rs12946397 (c.-26C>T) and rs17222691 (c.145+947C>T) on both allelic (OR=1.8; p<0.05) and genotypic (OR=2.0; p<0.05) level. Furthermore, our data seem to provide marginal evidence, that this effect might possibly be confined to women only (OR=2.8; p=0.05 for allelic and OR=3.7; p=0.05 for genotypic comparisons). These SNPs were found to co-segregate together forming two distinct, HNC risk-modulating haplotypes. The genetic variability of Rad51C might thus be of relevance with respect to HNC risk. PMID:24631219

  1. Coping strategies predict post-traumatic stress in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall P; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Evidence suggests that patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, research is yet to examine predictors of PTSD symptoms in this patient group. The objective of this study was to investigate whether coping strategies at HNC diagnosis were related to outcomes of post-traumatic stress and health-related quality of life (HRQL) 6 months later. Sixty-five patients with HNC completed an assessment of coping, distress, and health-related quality of life at diagnosis and again 6 months later, and an assessment of post-traumatic stress at 6 months. Correlations and regression analyses were performed to examine relationships between coping and outcomes over time. Regression analyses showed that denial, behavioural disengagement and self-blame at diagnosis predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms. Self-blame at diagnosis also predicted poor HRQL. Results have implications for the development of psychological interventions that provide alternative coping strategies to potentially reduce PTSD symptoms and improve HRQL.

  2. The head and neck cancer cell oncogenome: a platform for the development of precision molecular therapies.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel; Abba, Martin C; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Wang, Zhiyong; Zaida, Moraima; Delic, Naomi C; Samuels, Yardena; Lyons, J Guy; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2014-10-15

    The recent elucidation of the genomic landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has provided a unique opportunity to develop selective cancer treatment options. These efforts will require the establishment of relevant HNSCC models for preclinical testing. Here, we performed full exome and transcriptome sequencing of a large panel of HNSCC-derived cells from different anatomical locations and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection status. These cells exhibit typical mutations in TP53, FAT1, CDK2NA, CASP8, and NOTCH1, and copy number variations (CNVs) and mutations in PIK3CA, HRAS, and PTEN that reflect the widespread activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway. SMAD4 alterations were observed that may explain the decreased tumor suppressive effect of TGF-β in HNSCC. Surprisingly, we identified HPV+ HNSCC cells harboring TP53 mutations, and documented aberrant TP53 expression in a subset of HPV+ HNSCC cases. This analysis also revealed that most HNSCC cells harbor multiple mutations and CNVs in epigenetic modifiers (e.g., EP300, CREBP, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, KDM6A, and KDM6B) that may contribute to HNSCC initiation and progression. These genetically-defined experimental HNSCC cellular systems, together with the identification of novel actionable molecular targets, may now facilitate the pre-clinical evaluation of emerging therapeutic agents in tumors exhibiting each precise genomic alteration. PMID:25275298

  3. The role of tumor volume in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The assumption that the larger tumor contains a higher number of clonogenic cells what may deteriorate prognosis of patients treated with RT has been confirmed in many clinical studies. Significant prognostic influence of tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome has been found for tumors of different localizations including patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Although TV usually is a stronger prognostic factor than T stage, commonly used TNM classification system dose not incorporate TV data. The aim of the paper is to refresh clinical data regarding the role of TV in RT of patients with HNC. At present somehow new meaning of TV could be employed in the aspect of modern RT techniques and combined treatment strategies. For larger TV more aggressive treatment options may be considered. In modern RT techniques escalated dose could be provided highly conformal or RT can be combined with systemic treatment increasing therapeutic ratio. In the study several reports estimating prognostic value of TV for patients with HNC treated with RT has been reviewed.Due to substantially various reported groups of patients as to tumor site, stage of disease or treatment strategies, precise cut-off value could not be establish in general, but the significant association between TV and treatment outcome had been found in almost all studies. There is a strong suggestion that TV should supplement clinical decision in the choice of optimal treatment strategy for patients with HNC. PMID:24423415

  4. Thyroid dysfunction and neoplasia in children receiving neck irradiation for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, I.D.; Black, T.L.; Thompson, E.I.; Pratt, C.; Rao, B.; Hustu, O.

    1985-03-15

    The reported relationship of radiation exposure and thyroid carcinoma stimulated this retrospective study of 298 patients treated at St. Jude Children's Hospital with radiation therapy to the neck for childhood cancer to identify patients who developed subsequent thyroid abnormalities. This series includes 153 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 95 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with lymphoepithelioma, and 22 with miscellaneous tumors. Inclusion in the study required 5 years of disease-free survival following therapy for their original tumor, which included thyroid irradiation. Follow-up has been 100%. Most patients also received chemotherapy. Seventeen patients were found to have decreased thyroid reserve with normal levels of free triiodothyroxine (T3) or free thyroxin, (T4) and an elevated level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In nine patients hypothyroidism developed, with decreased T3 or T4 levels and an elevated level of TSH. One hyperthyroid patient was identified. Two patients had thyroiditis, and seven had thyroid neoplasms: (carcinoma in two, adenoma in two, colloid nodule in one, and undiagnosed nodules in two). This survey has demonstrated an increased incidence of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid neoplasia when compared to the general population. The importance of long-term follow-up for thyroid disease is emphasized in patients who have received thyroid irradiation. The possible role of subclinical hypothyroidism with TSH elevation coupled with radiation damage to the thyroid gland as a model for the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  5. Biological Features of Human Papillomavirus-related Head and Neck Cancers Contributing to Improved Response.

    PubMed

    Cleary, C; Leeman, J E; Higginson, D S; Katabi, N; Sherman, E; Morris, L; McBride, S; Lee, N; Riaz, N

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are the sixth most common malignancy globally, and an increasing proportion of oropharyngeal HNSCCs are associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Patients with HPV-associated tumours have markedly improved overall and disease-specific survival compared with their HPV-negative counterparts when treated with chemoradiation. Although the difference in outcomes between these two groups is clearly established, the mechanism underlying these differences remains an area of investigation. Data from preclinical, clinical and genomics studies have started to suggest that an increase in radio-sensitivity of HPV-positive HNSCC may be responsible for improved outcomes, the putative mechanisms of which we will review here. The Cancer Genome Atlas and others have recently documented a multitude of molecular differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative tumours. Preclinical investigations by multiple groups have explored possible mechanisms of increased sensitivity to therapy, including examining differences in DNA repair, hypoxia and the immune response. In addition to differences in the response to therapy, some groups have started to investigate phenotypic differences between the two diseases, such as tumour invasiveness. Finally, we will conclude with a brief review of ongoing clinical trials that are attempting to de-escalate treatment to minimise long-term toxicity while maintaining cure rates. New insights from preclinical and genomic studies may eventually lead to personalised treatment paradigms for HPV-positive patients. PMID:27052795

  6. Hedgehog signaling drives radioresistance and stroma-driven tumor repopulation in head and neck squamous cancers.

    PubMed

    Gan, Gregory N; Eagles, Justin; Keysar, Stephen B; Wang, Guoliang; Glogowska, Magdalena J; Altunbas, Cem; Anderson, Ryan T; Le, Phuong N; Morton, J Jason; Frederick, Barbara; Raben, David; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Jimeno, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Local control and overall survival in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) remains dismal. Signaling through the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and activation of the Hh effector transcription factor Gli1 is a poor prognostic factor in this disease setting. Here, we report that increased GLI1 expression in the leading edge of HNSCC tumors is further increased by irradiation, where it contributes to therapeutic inhibition. Hh pathway blockade with cyclopamine suppressed GLI1 activation and enhanced tumor sensitivity to radiotherapy. Furthermore, radiotherapy-induced GLI1 expression was mediated in part by the mTOR/S6K1 pathway. Stroma exposed to radiotherapy promoted rapid tumor repopulation, and this effect was suppressed by Hh inhibition. Our results demonstrate that Gli1 that is upregulated at the tumor-stroma intersection in HNSCC is elevated by radiotherapy, where it contributes to stromal-mediated resistance, and that Hh inhibitors offer a rational strategy to reverse this process to sensitize HNSCC to radiotherapy. PMID:25297633

  7. Molecular Characterization of Head and Neck Cancer: How Close to Personalized Targeted Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Worsham, Maria J.; Ali, Haythem; Dragovic, Jadranka; Schweitzer, Vanessa P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy in squamous head and neck cancer (HNSCC) continues to make strides and holds much promise. Cetuximab remains the sole FDA-approved molecular targeted therapy available for HNSCC, though there are several new biological agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other pathways in the regulatory approval pipeline. While targeted therapies have the potential to be personalized, their current use in HNSCC is not personalized. This is illustrated for EGFR targeted drugs, where EGFR as a molecular target has yet to be individualized for HNSCC. Future research needs to identify factors that correlate with response (or lack of one) and the underlying genotype-phenotype relationship that dictates this response. Comprehensive exploration of genetic and epigenetic landscapes in HNSCC is opening new frontiers to further enlighten, mechanistically inform, and set a course for eventually translating these discoveries into therapies for patients. This opinion offers a snap shot of the evolution of molecular subytping in HNSCC, its current clinical applicability, as well as new emergent paradigms with implications for controlling this disease in the future. PMID:22873739

  8. Endoscopic surveillance of head and neck cancer in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Minoru; Ishihara, Ryu; Hamada, Kenta; Tonai, Yusuke; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Matsuura, Noriko; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) frequently arise in the upper aerodigestive tract, referred to as the field cancerization phenomenon. The aim of this study was to elucidate the detailed clinical features of second primary head and neck (H&N) SCCs arising in patients with esophageal SCC. Patients and methods: A total of 818 patients underwent endoscopic resection for superficial esophageal cancer between January 2006 and December 2013. Of these, 439 patients met our inclusion criteria, and we retrospectively investigated the incidence, primary sites, and stages of second primary H&N SCCs in these patients. Results: A total of 53 metachronous H&N SCCs developed in 40 patients after a median follow-up period of 46 months (range 9 – 109). The cumulative incidence rates of metachronous H&N SCCs at 3, 5, and 7 years were 5.3 %, 9.7 %, and 17.2 %, respectively. These lesions were frequently located at pyriform sinus or in the posterior wall of the pharynx (70 %, 37/53 lesions). Most of the lesions were detected at an early stage, though 4 lesions were associated with lymph node metastasis when their primary sites were detected (1 postcricoid area, 2 posterior wall of hypopharynx, and 1 lateral wall of oropharynx). Conclusions: Patients with esophageal SCC should undergo careful inspection of the pyriform sinus and posterior wall of the pharynx for detection of H&N SCCs. Methods to open the hypopharyngeal space, such as the Valsalva maneuver, should be included in the surveillance program. PMID:27556090

  9. DEK promotes HPV positive and negative head and neck cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Hallenbeck, Grace E.; Casper, Keith A.; Patil, Yash J.; Wilson, Keith M.; Kimple, Randall J.; Lambert, Paul F.; Witte, David P.; Xiao, Weihong; Gillison, Maura L.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, and patient outcomes using current treatments remains poor. Tumor development is etiologically associated with tobacco or alcohol use and/or HPV infection. HPV positive HNSCCs, which frequently harbor wild-type p53, carry a more favorable prognosis and are a biologically distinct subgroup when compared to their HPV negative counterparts. HPV E7 induces expression of the human DEK gene, both in vitro and in vivo. In keratinocytes, DEK overexpression is sufficient for causing oncogenic phenotypes in the absence of E7. Conversely, DEK loss results in cell death in HPV positive cervical cancer cells at least in part through p53 activation, and Dek knockout mice are relatively resistant to the development of chemically induced skin papillomas. Despite the established oncogenic role of DEK in HPV associated cervical cancer cell lines and keratinocytes, a functional role of DEK has not yet been explored in HNSCC. Using an established transgenic mouse model of HPV16 E7 induced HNSCC, we demonstrate that Dek is required for optimal proliferation of E7-transgenic epidermal cells and for the growth of HNSCC tumors. Importantly, these studies also demonstrate that DEK protein is universally up-regulated in both HPV positive and negative human HNSCC tumors relative to adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, DEK knockdown inhibited the proliferation of HPV positive and negative HNSCC cells, establishing a functional role for DEK in human disease. Mechanistic studies reveal that attenuated HNSCC cell growth in response to DEK loss was associated with reduced expression of the oncogenic p53 family member, ΔNp63. Exogenous ΔNp63 expression rescued the proliferative defect in the absence of DEK, thereby establishing a functional DEK-ΔNp63 oncogenic pathway that promotes HNSCC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that DEK stimulates HNSCC cellular growth and identify ΔNp63 as a novel DEK

  10. Osteoradionecrosis in Head-and-Neck Cancer Has a Distinct Genotype-Dependent Cause

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Andrew J.; West, Catharine M.; Risk, Janet M.; Slevin, Nick J.; Chan, Clara; Crichton, Siobhan; Rinck, Gabrielle; Howell, Dawn; Shaw, Richard J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We performed a case-control study to establish whether the development of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) was related to a variant allele substituting T for C at -509 of the transforming growth factor-{beta}1 gene (TGF-{beta}1). Patients and Methods: A total of 140 patients, 39 with and 101 without ORN, who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer with a minimum of 2 years follow-up, were studied. None of the patients had clinical evidence of recurrence at this time. DNA extracted from blood was genotyped for the -509 C-T variant allele of the TGF-{beta}1 gene. Results: There were no significant differences in patient, cancer treatment, or tumor characteristics between the two groups. Of the 39 patients who developed ORN, 9 were homozygous for the common CC allele, 19 were heterozygous, and 11 were homozygous for the rare TT genotype. Of the 101 patients without ORN, the distribution was 56 (CC), 33 (CT), and 12 (TT). The difference in distribution was significant, giving an increased risk of ORN of 5.7 (95% CI, 1.7-19.2) for homozygote TT patients (p = 0.001) and 3.6 (95% CI, 1.3-10.0) for heterozygotes (p = 0.004) when compared with patients with the CC genotype. Postradiotherapy dentoalveolar surgery preceding the development of ORN was associated with the CC genotype (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our findings support the postulate that the development of ORN is related to the presence of the T variant allele at -509 within the TGF-{beta}1 gene.

  11. Radiochemotherapy With Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Amifostine for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Karapantzos, Ilias; Daniilidis, Vassilios; Kouskoukis, Constantinos

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) combined with cisplatin or cetuximab is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced head/neck cancer (LA-HNC). The feasibility of radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and cetuximab, supported with amifostine, was herein investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-three patients with LA-HNC were recruited. Conformal hypofractionated/accelerated RT with amifostine cytoprotection (2.7 Gy/fraction, 21 fractions in 4 weeks) was combined with cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}/week) and cetuximab (standard weekly regimen) therapy. The dose of amifostine was individualized according to tolerance. Results: A high daily amifostine dose (750-1,000 mg) was tolerated by 41.8% of patients, and a standard dose (500 mg) was tolerated by 34.9% of patients. A high amifostine dose was linked to reduced RT delays (p = 0.0003). Grade 3 to 4 (3-4) mucositis occurred in 7/43 (16.2%) patients, and fungal infections occurred in 18/43 (41.8%) patients. Radiation dermatitis was not aggravated. Interruption of cetuximab due to acneiform rash was necessary in 23.3% of patients, while amifostine-related fever and rash were not observed. Severe late radiation sequelae consisted of laryngeal edema (9% laryngeal cases) and cervical strictures (33% of hypopharyngeal cases). Good salivary function was preserved in 6/11 (54.5%) nasopharyngeal cancer patients. The complete response rate was 68.5%, reaching 77.2% in patients with minor radiotherapy delays. The 24-month local control and survival rates were 72.3% and 91%, respectively (median follow-up was 13 months.). Conclusions: In this feasibility study, weekly administration of cisplatin and cetuximab was safely combined with accelerated RT, supported with amifostine, at the cost of a high incidence of acneiform rash but a reduced incidence of amifostine-related fever/rash. A high daily dose of amifostine allows completion of therapy with minor delays.

  12. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  13. The role of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exploring the presence and role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck cancer (HNC) is a necessary step to evaluate the potential impact of HPV prophylactic vaccines. Objective To assess the prevalence and oncogenic role of HPV in HNC in Senegal. Methods This is a multicenter cross-sectional study. Paraffin-embedded blocks of cases diagnosed with invasive HNC between 2002 and 2010 were collected from 4 pathology laboratories in Senegal. Presence of HPV DNA was determined by PCR and DEIA, and genotyping performed with LiPA25. Tubulin analysis was performed to assess DNA quality. HPV DNA-positive cases were tested for p16INK4a expression. Findings A total of 117 cases were included in the analysis: 71% were men, mean age was 52 years old (SD ±18.3), and 96% of cases were squamous cell carcinoma. Analysis was performed on 41 oral cavity tumors, 64 laryngeal tumors, 5 oropharyngeal tumors and 7 pharyngeal tumors. Only four cases (3.4%; 95% CI = 0.9%-8.5%) harbored HPV DNA. HPV types detected were HPV16, HPV35 and HPV45. However, among HPV-positive cases, none showed p16INK4a overexpression. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HPV DNA prevalence in HNC in Senegal is very low, suggesting that HPV is not a strong risk factor for these cancers. Additional larger studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore other potential risk factors specific to the region. PMID:23594504

  14. Repeat CT imaging and replanning during the course of IMRT for head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Eric K.; Bucci, M. Kara; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Weinberg, Vivian; Xia Ping . E-mail: xia@radonc17.ucsf.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Many patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer have tumor shrinkage and/or weight loss during the course of radiotherapy. We conducted this retrospective study to determine the dosimetric effects of repeat computed tomography (CT) imaging and replanning during the course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on both normal tissues and target volumes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review identified 13 patients with H and N cancer treated with IMRT who had repeat CT imaging and replanning during the course of radiotherapy. The first IMRT plan for each patient was generated based on the original planning CT scan acquired before the start of treatment. Because of tumor shrinkage or weight loss during radiotherapy, a second CT scan was acquired, and a new plan was generated and used to complete the course of IMRT. CT-CT fusion was used to correct patient positioning differences between the scans. By using a commercial inverse IMRT planning system, a hybrid IMRT plan was generated for each patient by applying the beam configurations of the first IMRT plan (including the intensity profile of each beam) to the anatomy of the second CT scan. The dose-volume histograms of the actual and hybrid IMRT plans were compared using analysis of variance methods for repeated measures. Results: All patients had locally advanced, nonmetastatic Stage III or IV disease, including 6 nasopharynx, 6 oropharynx, and 1 unknown primary site. All patients were treated with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. When replanning vs. not replanning was compared, the hybrid IMRT plans (without replanning) demonstrated reduced doses to target volumes and increased doses to critical structures. The doses to 95% (D{sub 95}) of the planning target volumes of the gross tumor volume (PTV{sub GTV}) and the clinical target volume (PTV{sub CTV}) were reduced in 92% of patients, by 0.8-6.3 Gy (p = 0.02) and 0.2-7.4 Gy (p = 0.003), respectively. The maximum dose (D{sub max}) to

  15. TGFβ3-mediated induction of Periostin facilitates head and neck cancer growth and is associated with metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xing; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Xu; Shen, Zongze; Lv, Zhongjing; Li, Zhihui; Wei, Wenyi; Chen, Wantao

    2016-01-01

    The matrix-specific protein periostin (POSTN) is up-regulated in human cancers and associated with cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Although the stroma of cancer tissues is the main source of POSTN, it is still unclear how POSTN plays a role to facilitate the interplay between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in head and neck cancer (HNC), thereby promoting tumorigenesis via modifying the tumor microenvironment. Herein, we have performed studies to investigate POSTN and its role in HNC microenvironment. Our results indicated that POSTN was significantly up-regulated in HNCs, especially in the tissues with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, POSTN was highly enriched in the stroma of cancer tissues and produced mainly by CAFs. More importantly, we have pinpointed TGF-β3 as the major upstream molecular that triggers the induction of POSTN in CAFs. As such, during the interaction between fibroblasts and cancer cells, the increased stromal POSTN induced by TGF-β3 directly accelerated the growth, migration and invasion of cancer cells. Hence, our study has provided a novel modulative role for POSTN on HNC progression and further reveals POSTN as an effective biomarker to predict metastasis as well as a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26857387

  16. Safety and Tumor-specificity of Cetuximab-IRDye800 for Surgical Navigation in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Eben L; Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Chung, Thomas K; Korb, Melissa L; Brandwein-Gensler, Margie; Strong, Theresa V; Schmalbach, Cecelia E; Morlandt, Anthony B; Agarwal, Garima; Hartman, Yolanda E; Carroll, William R; Richman, Joshua S; Clemons, Lisa K; Nabell, Lisle M; Zinn, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Positive margins dominate clinical outcomes after surgical resections in most solid cancer types including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Unfortunately, surgeons remove cancer in the same manner they have for a century with complete dependence on subjective tissue changes to identify cancer in the operating room. To effect change, we hypothesize that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can be targeted for safe and specific real-time localization of cancer. Experimental design A dose escalation study of cetuximab conjugated to IRDye800 was performed in patients (n=12) undergoing surgical resection of squamous cell carcinoma arising in the head and neck. Safety and pharmacokinetic data were obtained out to 30 days post-infusion. Multi-instrument fluorescence imaging was performed in the operating room and in surgical pathology. Results There were no grade 2 or higher adverse events attributable to cetuximab-IRDye800. Fluorescence imaging with an intraoperative, wide-field device successfully differentiated tumor from normal tissue during resection with an average tumor-to-background ratio of 5.2 in the highest dose range. Optical imaging identified opportunity for more precise identification of tumor during the surgical procedure and during the pathological analysis of tissues ex-vivo. Fluorescence levels positively correlated with EGFR levels. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that commercially available antibodies can be fluorescently labeled and safely administered to humans to identify cancer with sub-millimeter resolution, which has the potential to improve outcomes in clinical oncology. PMID:25904751

  17. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

  18. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition. PMID:27588193

  19. Concurrent Cisplatin and Radiation Versus Cetuximab and Radiation for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koutcher, Lawrence; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew; Wolden, Suzanne; Zhang Zhigang; Mo Qianxing; Stewart, Laschelle; Schupak, Karen; Gelblum, Daphna; Wong, Richard; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael; Pfister, David; Lee, Nancy

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare concurrent cisplatin (CDDP) and radiation (RT) with cetuximab (C225) and RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LAHNC). Methods and Materials: This study retrospectively compared 174 consecutive, newly diagnosed LAHNC patients definitively treated from March 1, 2006, to April 1, 2008, with single-agent CDDP/RT (n = 125) or C225/RT (n = 49). We excluded patients who received additional concurrent, induction, or adjuvant systemic therapy; weekly cisplatin; prior head-and-neck radiotherapy; or primary surgical resection. Outcomes were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox model, and competing-risks analysis tools. Results: The C225/RT patients were older and had decreased creatinine clearance. At a median follow-up of 22.5 months for living patients, the 2-year locoregional failure rate was 5.7% for CDDP/RT and 39.9% for C225/RT (p < 0.0001). The 2-year failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 87.4% vs. 44.5% (p < 0.0001) and 92.8% vs. 66.6% (p = 0.0003), respectively, in favor of CDDP/RT. When the Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis, treatment with CDDP/RT predicted for improved locoregional control (p < 0.0001), FFS (p < 0.0001), and OS (p = 0.01). Late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or feeding tube dependence 9 months after completion of RT was observed in 21% of patients in the CDDP/RT cohort and 24% in the C225/RT cohort (p = 0.66). Conclusions: In this study of LAHNC patients, CDDP/RT achieved better locoregional control, FFS, and OS than C225/RT. Although the results were upheld on multivariate analysis, they must be interpreted cautiously because of the retrospective nature of the study and significant differences in patient selection. There was no statistically significant difference in late Grade 3 or 4 effects or feeding tube dependence.

  20. Double-blind randomized study of lonidamine and radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Magno, L.; Terraneo, F.; Bertoni, F.; Tordiglione, M.; Bardelli, D.; Rosignoli, M.T.; Ciottoli, G.B. )

    1994-04-30

    This Phase III double blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate whether lonidamine can increase the tumor control of radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer without any synergistic toxic effects on the exposed normal tissues. Ninety-seven patients with Stages II-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were enrolled. Separate analyses were done on the 96 eligible patients and the 90 patients who completed the prescribed treatment regimen. Patients received radiotherapy up to a planned total of 60-66 Gy, in 2 daily fractions of 1.5 Gy each and either lonidamine (450 mg p.o. in three divided daily doses) or placebo, given continuously for 3 months or up to 1 month after the end of radiotherapy. The rate of tumor clearance was 66% in the lonidamine group and 65% in the placebo group, while the subsequent failure rate was 50% and 77%, respectively. The 3 and 5 year locoregional control rates in the adequately treated patients achieving complete tumor clearance were 66% and 63% for lonidamine vs. 41% and 37% for placebo. The disease-free survival in adequately treated patients was significantly better in the lonidamine group, with 3 and 5 year rates of 44% and 40%, respectively, vs. 23% and 19% in the placebo group. The overall survival rate for all eligible patients at both 3 and 5 years was 44% in the lonidamine group and 44% and 31%, respectively, in the placebo group. Both acute and late radiation reactions were similar in the two groups. Myalgia and testicular pain were the most frequent side effects of lonidamine with an incidence of 8.5% and 4.2%, respectively. The addition of lonidamine to hyperfractionated radiotherapy was correlated with a statistically and clinically significant proportion of long-term disease-free patients. The toxicity of radiotherapy was not aggravated by the drug and the overall tolerance of the combined regimen was acceptable. 54 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Cancers of the lung, head and neck on the rise: perspectives on the genotoxicity of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ian Chi Kei; Ng, Yuen-Keng; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan

    2014-10-01

    Outdoor air pollution has been recently classified as a class I human carcinogen by the World Health Organization (WHO). Cumulative evidence from across the globe shows that polluted air is associated with increased risk of lung, head and neck, and nasopharyngeal cancers--all of which affect the upper aerodigestive tract. Importantly, these cancers have been previously linked to smoking. In this article, we review epidemiologic and experimental evidence of the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of air pollution on DNA, purportedly a key mechanism for cancer development. The alarming increase in cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract in Asia suggests a need to focus government efforts and research on reducing air pollution, promoting clean energy, and investigating the carcinogenic effects of air pollution on humans.

  2. Lymphangiogenesis, Lymphatic Endothelial Cells and Lymphatic Metastasis in Head and Neck Cancer — A Review of Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuang; Helman, Joseph I; Li, Long-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is a continuous and complicated process. The detailed mechanisms of lymphatic metastasis are still not very clear, despite considerable research efforts in recent years. Previously, it was commonly accepted that there were no lymphatic vessels in the primary tumor. However, recent studies have demonstrated that lymphatic vessels are detectable in certain types of cancer, and more and more evidence has shown that cancer cells invade into local lymph nodes mainly via peritumoral lymphatic vessels. Moreover, activated endothelial cells may also be important, having an influence on lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells. This article, based on recent research findings, provides an in-depth discussion of the relationship between lymphangiogenesis, tumor-derived lymphatic endothelial cells and lymphatic metastasis in head and neck cancer. PMID:20690413

  3. Tumor delineation using PET in head and neck cancers: Threshold contouring and lesion volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Hanlon, Lorraine; Alessio, Adam; Rajendran, Joseph; Schwartz, David L.; Phillips, Mark

    2006-11-15

    Tumor boundary delineation using positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising tool for radiation therapy applications. In this study we quantify the uncertainties in tumor boundary delineation as a function of the reconstruction method, smoothing, and lesion size in head and neck cancer patients using FDG-PET images and evaluate the dosimetric impact on radiotherapy plans. FDG-PET images were acquired for eight patients with a GE Advance PET scanner. In addition, a 20 cm diameter cylindrical phantom with six FDG-filled spheres with volumes of 1.2 to 26.5 cm{sup 3} was imaged. PET emission scans were reconstructed with the OSEM and FBP algorithms with different smoothing parameters. PET-based tumor regions were delineated using an automatic contouring function set at progressively higher threshold contour levels and the resulting volumes were calculated. CT-based tumor volumes were also contoured by a physician on coregistered PET/CT patient images. The intensity value of the threshold contour level that returns 100% of the actual volume, I{sub V100}, was measured. We generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for an example head and neck patient, treating 66 Gy to CT-based gross disease and 54 Gy to nodal regions at risk, followed by a boost to the FDG-PET-based tumor. The volumes of PET-based tumors are a sensitive function of threshold contour level for all patients and phantom datasets. A 5% change in threshold contour level can translate into a 200% increase in volume. Phantom data indicate that I{sub V100} can be set as a fraction, f, of the maximum measured uptake. Fractional threshold values in the cylindrical water phantom range from 0.23 to 0.51. Both the fractional threshold and the threshold-volume curve are dependent on lesion size, with lesions smaller than approximately 5 cm{sup 3} displaying a more pronounced sensitivity and larger fractional threshold values. The threshold-volume curves and fractional threshold values also depend

  4. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Amy J. C.; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. PMID:26343729

  5. Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann; Mehta, Vivek; Blough, David; Tock, Lauri; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

  6. Summary of epidemiologic studies of lung cancer and radon in Swedish homes

    SciTech Connect

    Swedjemark, G.A.; Desai, G.

    1992-12-31

    Several epidemiologic studies of lung cancer and radon exposure in Swedish homes have been published, and an extensive study is currently being conducted over the whole country. Described is a short summary of the Swedish studies.

  7. Consensus standards for the process of cancer care: a modified expert panel method applied to head and neck cancer. South and West Expert Tumour Panel for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    There are many pressures to improve the standard of care delivered to cancer patients, including the reforms subsequent to the Calman-Hine report. The establishment of standards is a prerequisite for audit, benchmarking and certification of cancer centres and units. Randomized trials of head and neck cancer are uncommon, and other forms of evidence often conflicting. In the south and west of England, a multidisciplinary expert panel consensus method has been applied to the development of standards. A panel representative of specialties involved in the process of care at all three levels, plus social medicine and lay members, was constructed. A model for the process of care was developed consisting of activity areas. For each activity, a near exhaustive list of tasks and standards was established. A three-iteration method with statistical group response was then used to refine the standards. The same method was also applied to the production of a minimum data set for registration, recording and audit. The resulting standards will be regularly reviewed. We have developed a model of the care process, and an expert panel methodology that is applicable to a wide range of problems in clinical oncology. PMID:9667669

  8. Swing of the Surgical Pendulum: A Return to Surgery for Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in the 21st Century?

    SciTech Connect

    Holsinger, F. Christopher Weber, Randal S.

    2007-10-01

    Treatment for head and neck cancer has evolved significantly during the past 100 years. Beginning with Bilroth's total laryngectomy on New Year's Day in 1873, 'radical' su