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Sample records for neck cancer patient

  1. Rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient: Psychosocial aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Blitzer, A.; Baredes, S.; Kutscher, A.; Seeland, I.B.; Barrett, V.W.; Mossman, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 42 chapters divided among six sections. Some of the chapter titles are: The Challenge of Cancer; Communicaton Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients; Normal Tissue Effects of the Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer; Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer; and Thyroid Cancer.

  2. Hypothyroidism after radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Hideyuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Takata, Yasunori; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    We report on 2 cases of hypothyroidism presenting clinical symptoms that occurred after radiotherapy for cancer of the head and neck and on the results of estimating thyroid function in patients with head and neck cancer who received radiotherapy. The first patient underwent total laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer without sacrificing the thyroid gland and partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Radiotherapy of the neck was carried out postoperatively. Two years later, the patient developed chest pain; pericardial effusion was detected, leading to a diagnosis of myxedema caused by hypothyroidism. The second patient received radiotherapy alone for laryngeal cancer. Two months later, low serum sodium concentration and anemia were detected in this patient. The cause of these changes was subsequently found to be hypothyroidism. Based on our experience with these 2 cases, we measured thyroid function in 35 patients who had undergone neck radiation for head and neck cancer at our hospital over the past 10 years. Hypothyroidism was observed in 13 of the 35 patients (37%). The prevalence of hypothyroidism was 46% (6/13) for patients treated with both radiation and surgery, as compared with 32% (7/22) for those who received radiation alone. The risk factors responsible for hypothyroidism were not evident from the statistical analysis of these cases. We believe that thyroid function should be evaluated periodically in patients who have undergone neck radiation because it is often difficult to diagnose hypothyroidism only from clinical symptoms.

  3. [Psychological care of patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Moya, Mélanie

    2015-09-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancers are generally complex and debilitating. Surgery, often mutilating, profoundly affects the relationship between oneself and others and causes verbal communication, breathing and swallowing difficulties. The functional and aesthetic sequelae are a constant reminder to the patient of the disease and make them conscious of their appearance.

  4. Predictors of pain among patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T; Bradford, Carol R; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A; Duffy, Sonia A

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. DESIGN Prospective, multisite cohort study. SETTING Three academically affiliated medical centers. PATIENTS The study population comprised 374 previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Participants were surveyed before treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the 36-Item Short-Form Instrument (SF-36) bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. RESULTS The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared with 61 at the time of diagnosis (P = .004), and 75, the population norm (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pretreatment pain score (P < .001), less education (P = .02), neck dissection (P = .001), feeding tube (P = .05), xerostomia (P < .001), depressive symptoms (P < .001), taking more pain medication (P < .001), less physical activity (P = .02), and poor sleep quality (P = .006). The association between head and neck cancer pain and current smoking and problem drinking did not reach significance (P = .07 and P = .08, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Aggressive pain management may be indicated for patients with head and neck cancer who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among patients with head and neck cancer.

  5. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  6. Dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Platteaux, Nele; Dirix, Piet; Dejaeger, Eddy; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-06-01

    Dysphagia is a very common complaint of head and neck cancer patients and can exist before, during, and after chemoradiotherapy. It leads to nutritional deficiency, weight loss, and prolonged unnatural feeding and also has a major potential risk for aspiration. This has a significant negative impact on the patient's entire quality of life. Because treatment of dysphagia in this setting is rarely effective, prevention is paramount. Several strategies have been developed to reduce dysphagia. These include swallowing exercises, treatment modification techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, selective delineation of elective nodes, reducing xerostomia by parotid-sparing radiotherapy, and adding of radioprotectors. However, more research is needed to further decrease the incidence of dysphagia and improve quality of life.

  7. Informational Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Janet; McQuestion, Maurene; Gokhale, Anandita; Damji, Ali; Trang, Aileen; Abdelmutti, Nazek; Ringash, Jolie

    2017-02-02

    The patient journey with head and neck cancer (HNC) is particularly challenging given the physical and functional impact of the cancer and treatment. The ability to perform activities of daily living can be severely compromised and have a profound impact on psychosocial well-being. These complex and long-lasting effects can affect patient quality of life for months to years and the literature shows that information for HNC patients is often insufficient. This observational cross-sectional study utilized survey methodology to investigate the informational needs of HNC patients and the preferred modalities for delivery. This was done to inform the development of resources for HNC patients. Four hundred fifty surveys were analyzed. The median age was 61 years and 58% of the cohort was born in Canada. Most were Caucasian (72%), Chinese being the next largest ethnicity (12%). A third had less than high school education and most had cancer of the oral cavity (28%) and were in long-term follow-up (41%). Comparison of the percentage of items to which a patient responded "very important" across the six domains shows variation of importance by domain (overall mixed effects regression model p < 0.0001). Additionally, each domain was compared to the medical domain and all had significantly lower mean scores (all p < 0.0001) with the medical domain scoring highest (mean score 64.6). The top preferred education modalities were teaching with a healthcare professional and pamphlets. This study highlights the type of information that HNC patients want and the format they wish to receive it in. The design provides a comprehensive way to consult with patients toward building education that responds to their specific needs.

  8. Use of dental X rays on postirradiated patients with head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.A.; Purdy, R.B.; Stoker, H.W.; Palmer RW 4

    1988-10-01

    As cancer therapy becomes more successful and cancer survival rates increase, the dentist will be treating more patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Occasionally, patients and health professionals have indicated a belief that patients who have received irradiation to the head and neck regions should not be subjected to additional radiation through dental diagnostic X-ray exposures. A literature search failed to find any references that specifically addressed this question. This study reflects the opinions of 278 radiation oncologists (400 surveyed) who responded to questions about contraindications of dental X rays for the patient with head and neck cancer.

  9. Alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation into neck-related muscles after neck dissection for patients with oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Shinji; Koga, Hirofumi; Kodama, Masaaki; Habu, Manabu; Kokuryo, Shinya; Oda, Masafumi; Matsuo, Kou; Nishino, Takanobu; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Uehara, Masataka; Yoshiga, Daigo; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Nishimura, Shun; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Izumi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) accumulations are commonly seen in the neck-related muscles of the surgical and non-surgical sides after surgery with neck dissection (ND) for oral cancers, which leads to radiologists having difficulty in diagnosing the lesions. To examine the alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation in neck-related muscles of patients after ND for oral cancer. Material and Methods 18F-FDG accumulations on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in neck-related muscles were retrospectively analyzed after surgical dissection of cervical lymph nodes in oral cancers. Results According to the extent of ND of cervical lymph nodes, the rate of patients with 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas increased in the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and posterior neck muscles of the surgical and/or non-surgical sides. In addition, SUVmax of 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were increased according to the extent of the ND. Conclusions In evaluating 18F-FDG accumulations after ND for oral cancers, we should pay attention to the 18F-FDG distributions in neck-related muscles including the non-surgical side as false-positive findings. Key words:18F-FDG, PET-CT, oral cancers, muscles. PMID:27031062

  10. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  11. Lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer: impact on patients, and beliefs of health professionals.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, A C; Osmotherly, P G; Hoffman, G R; Chiarelli, P E

    2014-05-01

    Cervicofacial lymphoedema is a recognised side-effect that may result following treatment for head and neck cancer. This study aimed to investigate the perspectives of affected patients and the beliefs that treating health professionals hold about head and neck lymphoedema. Ten patients with head and neck lymphoedema and 10 health professionals experienced in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients agreed to participate in semi-structured face to face interviews. Interviews were recorded, audio files were transcribed and coded and then analysed for themes. Themes of experiences of patients with head and neck lymphoedema and the beliefs of health professionals largely overlapped. Given its visible deformity, the main effect of lymphoedema in head and neck cancer patients was on appearance. In some cases this lead to negative psychosocial sequelae such as reduced self-esteem, and poor socialisation. Clinicians need to be aware of those patients more likely to experience lymphoedema following treatment for head and neck cancer, and how they are affected. Understanding how patients with facial lymphoedema are affected psychologically and physically, and the importance of prompt referral for lymphoedema treatment, might ultimately improve outcomes and ensure optimal management.

  12. Association Between Preoperative Nutritional Status and Postoperative Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Leung, John S L; Seto, Alfred; Li, George K H

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery often experience significant postoperative morbidities. Administering preoperative nutritional intervention may improve surgical outcomes, but there is currently a paucity of data reviewing the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome. It is therefore of importance to investigate this association among head and neck cancer patients. To assess the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery, a retrospective study of 70 head and neck cancer patients who were surgically treated between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary referral head and neck surgery center in Hong Kong was conducted. Clinical data regarding preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome were retrieved from a computer record system. Logistic and linear regressions were used to analyze the appropriate parameters. A higher preoperative albumin level was associated with lower rates of postoperative complications and better wound healing (P < 0.05). In contrast, preoperative body mass index, hemoglobin level, and absolute lymphocyte count did not demonstrate significant associations with postoperative outcome. As high albumin levels are associated with better surgical outcome in head and neck cancer patients, preoperative intervention strategies that boost albumin levels could be considered for improving surgical outcome.

  13. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer and the stage (extent) of the disease. In general, patients with early-stage head and neck cancers (particularly those limited to the site of origin) are treated with one modality—either radiation therapy ...

  14. Outcomes for patients with papillary thyroid cancer who do not undergo prophylactic central neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, I. J.; Wang, L. Y.; Ganly, I.; Patel, S. G.; Morris, L. G.; Migliacci, J. C.; Tuttle, R. M.; Shah, J. P.; Shaha, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) in the management of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is controversial. This report describes outcomes of an observational approach in patients without clinical evidence of nodal disease in PTC. Methods All patients who had surgery between 1986 and 2010 without CND for PTC were identified. All patients had careful clinical assessment of the central neck during preoperative and perioperative evaluation, with any suspicious nodal tissue excised for analysis. The cohort included patients in whom lymph nodes had been removed, but no patient had undergone a formal neck dissection. Recurrence-free survival (RFS), central neck RFS and disease-specific survival (DSS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Of 1798 patients, 397 (22·1 per cent) were men, 1088 (60·5 per cent) were aged 45 years or more, and 539 (30·0 per cent) had pT3 or pT4 disease. Some 742 patients (41·3 per cent) received adjuvant treatment with radioactive iodine. At a median follow-up of 46 months the 5-year DSS rate was 100 per cent. Five-year RFS and central neck RFS rates were 96·6 and 99·1 per cent respectively. Conclusion Observation of the central neck is safe and should be recommended for all patients with PTC considered before and during surgery to be free of central neck metastasis. PMID:26511531

  15. Management of the node-positive neck in the patient with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, Gary B.; Hessel, Amy; Beadle, Beth M.; Ahmed, Salmaan; El-naggar, Adel; Fuller, Clifton D.; Byers, Lauren A.; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J.; Morrison, William H.; Kies, Merill S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to assess the rates of recurrence in the neck for node-positive patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer treated with definitive radiation (with or without chemotherapy). Methods This is a single institutional retrospective study. Methodology included database search, and statistical testing including frequency analysis, Kaplan-Meier tests, and comparative tests including chi-square, logistic regression and log-rank. Results The cohort consisted of 401 node-positive patients irradiated between 2006 – June 2012. Three hundred eighty eight patients had CT restaging, and 251 had PET and/or US as a component of their post radiation staging. Eighty patients (20%) underwent neck dissection, and 21 (26%) had a positive specimen. The rate of neck dissection increased with increasing nodal stage, and was lower in patients who had PET scans or ultrasound in addition to CT restaging. The median follow-up was 30 months. The 2-year actuarial neck recurrence rate was 7% and 5% in all patients and those with local control, respectively. Nodal recurrence rates were greater in current smokers (p=.008). There was no difference in nodal recurrences rates in patients who did or did not have a neck dissection (p = .4) Conclusions A treatment strategy of (chemo)radiation with neck dissection performed based on response resulted in high rates of regional disease control in patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:24898672

  16. [Mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata Cristina Schmidt; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to classify oral mucositis according to the Common Toxicity Criterion (CTC) international parameters in head and neck tumor patients simultaneously treated with radio and chemotherapy, and characterize a patient profile in our area, observing the individuals' habits, tumor characteristics, treatment protocol and acute reaction intensity. Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous 66 to 70 Gy megavoltage radiotherapy and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Weekly evaluations of the degree of mucositis were perfoemed according to CTC, a four-degree ordinal scale; 36% of all patients and 100% of those with diabetes discontinued treatment due to mucositis, showing that this pathology contributes to the severity of mucositis.

  17. Assessment of nutritional status and quality of life in patients treated for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Prevost, V; Joubert, C; Heutte, N; Babin, E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients, to evaluate the impact of malnutrition on therapeutic management and quality of life and to propose a simple screening approach adapted to routine clinical practice. The authors conducted a review of the literature to identify tools for the assessment of nutritional status in head and neck cancer patients published in French and English. Articles were obtained from the PubMed database and from the references of these articles and selected journals, using the keywords: "nutritional assessment", and "head and neck" and "cancer". Anthropometric indices, laboratory parameters, dietary intake assessment, clinical scores and nutritional risk scores used in patients with head and neck cancers are presented. The relevance of these tools in clinical practice and in research is discussed, together with the links between nutritional status and quality of life. This article is designed to help teams involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer to choose the most appropriate tools for assessment of nutritional status according to their resources and their objectives.

  18. Change in tongue pressure in patients with head and neck cancer after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Sugahara, Kazuma; Fukuoka, Tatsuyuki; Saito, Shota; Sakuramoto, Ayumi; Horii, Nobuhide; Sano, Saori; Hasegawa, Kana; Nakao, Yuta; Nanto, Tomoki; Kadoi, Kanenori; Moridera, Kuniyasu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Domen, Kazuhisa; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu

    2017-02-14

    Tongue pressure is reportedly associated with dysphagia. This study investigated relationships among characteristics of head and neck cancer, tongue pressure and dysphagia screening tests performed in patients with head and neck cancer during the acute phase after surgical resection. Fifty-seven patients (36 men, 21 women; age range 26-95 years) underwent surgical resection and dysphagia screening tests (Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test, Water Swallowing Test, Modified Water Swallowing Test and Food Test) and pre- and postoperative measurement of tongue pressure at 5 time points (preoperatively, and 1-2 weeks and 1, 2, and 3 months postoperatively). Progression of cancer (stage), tracheotomy, surgical reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and neck dissection were factors associated with postoperative tongue pressure. Data were analyzed by linear mixed-effect model, Spearman correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Tongue pressure was significantly reduced 1-2 weeks after surgery, and recovered over time. Changes in tongue pressure were significantly associated with stage, radiotherapy and reconstruction. All screening tests showed a significant relationship with tongue pressure. Analysis of ROC and area under the effect curve suggested that a tongue pressure of 15 kPa can be used as a cut-off value to detect dysphagia after surgery for head and neck cancer. Our results suggest that tongue pressure evaluation might offer a safe, useful and objective tool to assess dysphagia immediately postoperatively in patients with head and neck cancer.

  19. Head and neck management of the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.; Elias, E.G.; Sonis, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 26 chapters. Some of the titles are: Principles of radiation therapy; Radiotherapeutic management of head and neck neoplasia; Diagnostic radiology for head and neck neoplasms with emphasis on computerized tomography; and Oral complications of radiation therapy.

  20. Increase in head and neck cancer in younger patients due to human papillomavirus (HPV).

    PubMed

    Young, David; Xiao, Christopher C; Murphy, Benjamin; Moore, Michael; Fakhry, Carole; Day, Terry A

    2015-08-01

    The face of head and neck cancer has changed dramatically over the past 30 years. There has been a steady decline in the number of tobacco and alcohol related squamous cell carcinomas over the past 30 years, but and increasing incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers. Some estimates suggest that 70-90% of new oropharyngeal cancers have evidence of HPV. These patients have different demographic patterns, in that they are more likely to be younger, white adults in their 40s and 50s who are never smokers or have reduced tobacco exposure. Studies have shown that a higher number of lifetime oral sex partners (>5) and a higher number of lifetime vaginal sex partners (>25) have been associated with increased risk of HPV positive head and neck cancer. People can also reduce their risk of HPV linked head and neck cancer by receiving the HPV vaccine series prior to becoming sexually active. Recent evidence suggests HPV related head and neck cancers present with different symptoms than those caused by tobacco. The most popular test for HPV status is the p16 immunohistochemical stain because it is cheap, simple, and studies have shown it to have comparable sensitivity and specificity to the previous standards. It is widely recommended that all cancers of the oropharynx be tested for the presence of HPV, and some recommend it for all head and neck cancers. Overall 2-year and 5-year survival for HPV positive head and neck cancer is significantly greater than for HPV negative cancers, likely due to HPV positive cancers being more responsive to treatment.

  1. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  2. Improved immobilization using an individual head support in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Houweling, Antonetta C; van der Meer, Skadi; van der Wal, Edwin; Terhaard, Chris H J; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P J

    2010-07-01

    The benefits of a patient-specific head support, developed to improve immobilization during radiotherapy, were determined in head and neck cancer patients. Cone-beam CTs were registered to the planning CT in five regions. Compared to the standard head support, the individual head support decreased the systematic and random errors of the inter- and intrafraction displacements and reduced deformations.

  3. Effects of Swallowing Exercises on Patients Undergoing Radiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Head and Neck Cancer; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage I Laryngeal Cancer; Stage I Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Laryngeal Cancer; Stage II Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Laryngeal Cancer; Stage III Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Laryngeal Cancer; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Cancer

  4. Head and neck cancer in elderly patients: is microsurgical free-tissue transfer a safe procedure?

    PubMed

    Tarsitano, A; Pizzigallo, A; Sgarzani, R; Oranges, C M; Cipriani, R; Marchetti, C

    2012-12-01

    The safety and success of microvascular transfer have been well documented in the general population, but the good results achieved with the use of free flaps in elderly patients have received little attention. This study sought to identify differences in complications, morbidity and functional outcomes between elderly (≥ 75 years) and younger (< 75 years) patients treated surgically for advanced head and neck cancer using the Head and Neck 35 module of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire. Patient treatment consisted of composite resection, including excision of the primary tumour with ipsilateral or bilateral neck dissection and microvascular reconstruction. Eighty-five microvascular tissue transfers were performed to reconstruct major surgical defects. Postoperative radiation therapy was performed when indicated. Total flap loss occurred in three cases in elderly patients and two cases in younger patients. The rates of major surgical complication were 9% in young patients and 11% in elderly patients. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in the rates of major and minor flap complications, morbidity or long-term functional outcome. The results of the present analysis indicate that free-flap microvascular reconstruction can be considered a safe procedure in elderly patients with head and neck cancer.

  5. Developing a protocol for gastrostomy tube insertion in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Habib, Syed F; Ahmed, Suhail; Skelly, Rachel; Bhatt, Kavita; Patel, Bhaveshree; Lowe, Derek; Tuson, Julian; Rogers, Simon N

    2014-05-01

    Selecting patients with head and neck cancer requiring a pretreatment gastrostomy feeding tube is not straightforward. The nutritional status and functional deficits associated with the cancer, its treatment, and the long-term side effects predicate the need for gastrostomy tube placement. However, gastrostomy tubes are not without morbidity and are an added burden to the patient. The aim of this retrospective case series review was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of newly diagnosed patients with head and neck cancer treated with curative intent having gastrostomy placement, with the intent of developing a protocol to help with the timely selection of patients for pretreatment gastrostomy insertion. A gastrostomy tube was placed in 32%. A regression model identified 5 independent predictors (P < .001) to predict gastrostomy tube placement: overall clinical stage, tumor site, clinical T stage, patient age, and clinical N stage. A protocol to help the multidisciplinary team to decide whether a pretreatment gastrostomy tube should be placed is suggested.

  6. The association of lymph node volume with cervical metastatic lesions in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Tai; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Wang, Ching-Ping; Wang, Chen-Chi; Lin, Whe-Dar; Liu, Shih-An

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if volume of cervical lymph node measured via computed tomography (CT) could differentiate metastatic from benign lesions in head and neck cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective review of chart and images in a tertiary referring center in Taiwan. Patients with head and neck cancers underwent radical, modified radical or functional neck dissection were enrolled. The CT images before operation were reassessed by a radiologist and were compared with the results of pathological examination. A total of 102 patients were included for final analyses. Most patients were male (n = 96, 94%) and average age was 50.1 years. Although the average nodal volume in patients with cervical metastases was higher than those of patients without cervical metastases, it was not an independent factor associated with cervical metastasis after controlling for other variables; however, central nodal necrosis on enhanced CT image [odds ratio (OR) 18.95, P = 0.008) and minimal axial diameter >7.5 mm (OR 6.868, P = 0.001) were independent factors correlated with cervical metastasis. Therefore, the volume of cervical lymph node measured from CT images cannot predict cervical metastases in head and neck cancer patients. Measurement of minimal axial diameter of the largest lymph node is a simple and more accurate way to predict cervical metastasis instead.

  7. Ex vivo label-free microscopy of head and neck cancer patient tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-03-01

    Standard methods to characterize patient tissue rely on histology. This technique provides only anatomical information, so complementary imaging methods could provide beneficial phenotypic information. Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolism, and metabolic imaging could be applied to better understand cancer tissue. This study applies redox ratio, fluorescence lifetime, and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging to ex vivo tissue from head and neck cancer patients. This high-resolution imaging technique has unique advantages of utilizing intrinsic tissue contrast, which eliminates the need for sample processing or staining, and multiphoton microscopy, which provides depth sectioning in intact tissue. This study demonstrates feasibility of these measurements in patient tissue from multiple anatomical sites and carcinoma types of head and neck cancer.

  8. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  9. Difficult problems and their solutions in patients with cancer pain of the head and neck areas.

    PubMed

    Sist, T; Wong, C

    2000-01-01

    Pain management can be especially difficult in patients with head and neck cancer due to the erosive nature of the neoplasms that invade the region, the rich innervation of the head and neck, and other factors. Consequently, diagnosis is a complex process that cannot be dealt with in a cursory fashion. Furthermore, tumor pain can mimic noncancer conditions, nonmalignant orofacial disorders can be suggestive of tumor growth, and antineoplastic treatment-related conditions can be difficult to distinguish from tumor recurrence. A series of case reports illustrates key elements of diagnosis and pain management in patients with head and neck cancer. These elements include 1) detailed assessment of pain intensity and characteristics; 2) appropriate use of analgesic adjuvant medications; 3) use of diagnostic and therapeutic nerve blocks and myofascial trigger point injections; and 4) a high index of suspicion regarding tumor recurrence pain.

  10. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  11. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  12. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person’s risk of head and neck cancer. Marijuana use. Research suggests that people who have used marijuana may be at higher risk for head and ... head and neck cancer include: Avoiding alcohol Discussing marijuana as a risk factor with your doctor and ...

  13. [Self presentation of patients disfigured by head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyata, R

    1996-01-01

    Surgery for maxilofacial cancer is often radical and disfiguring, and therefore can have an influence on patient's interpersonal relationship and social activities. However, little is known about self-presentation of disfigured patients during rehabilitation. This is an inductive and qualitative study based on 26 extensive interviews. The results demonstrate that patients with disfigurement cope actively with problems in their interpersonal relationship and even go through the empowerment process. Self-presentation of the disfigured patients consisted of four dimensions: (1)self-evaluation: (2)judgment of others' reactions; (3)intention of personal relations and style of self-presentation; and (4) concrete self-presentation using six "strategies". Each of the dimensions 1-3 included several processes that were generally taken in sequence according to time after surgery, but also strongly influenced by behaviors of family members or medical staff. "Strategies" chosen in dimension 4 depending upon the situations in dimensions 1-3 corresponded to the five type of "self-presentation" reported by Goffman (1959), except for "letting others be used to the patients", which was one of the continuous efforts to overcome their chronic disfigurement. Importantly, the patients became confident by focusing upon their chronic disfigurement. Importantly, the patients became confident by focusing upon their healthy parts such as maxiofacial functions recovered to some degree, and this confidence led to the acceptance of disfigurement and further to the expansion of their social behaviors.

  14. Caregivers' Illness Perceptions Contribute to Quality of Life in Head and Neck Cancer Patients at Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of patient and caregiver illness perceptions to the quality of life of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Ninety-eight patients and their caregivers (n = 80) completed questionnaires at diagnosis. Caregivers' illness perceptions were significantly more negative than patients with respect to consequences, timeline, treatment, concern, and the emotional impact of HNC. The interaction between some patient and caregiver illness perceptions explained additional variance in patient quality of life, above and beyond patients' own illness perceptions. These findings suggest that caregivers should be included in psychological interventions to improve HNC patient quality of life.

  15. What Does PET Imaging Add to Conventional Staging of Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Pohar, Surjeet . E-mail: poharss@evms.edu; Brown, Robert B.S.; Newman, Nancy; Koniarczyk, Michael; Hsu, Jack; Feiglin, David

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of PET scans in the staging of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The charts of 25 patients who underwent neck dissection, computed tomography (CT) scan, and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging as part of their initial work-up for a head and neck squamous cell cancer between 2000-2003 were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical examination, triple endoscopy, and chest radiograph as part of their clinical staging, adhering to American Joint Commission for Cancer criteria. In addition to the clinical nodal (N) stage, PET findings were incorporated to determine a second type of N staging: clinical N + PET stage. The number of neck sides and nodal levels involved on CT or PET and on pathologic examination were recorded. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detection of nodal disease were similar for CT and FDG-PET. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were similar for both diagnostic tests. None of our 25 patients had unsuspected distant disease detected by PET. Conclusion: The addition of PET imaging did not improve diagnostic accuracy in our patients compared with CT. PET scanning did not alter clinical management in any of the patients.

  16. The Role of Chemotherapy in the Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savvides, Panayiotis (Panos)

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of patients with head and neck cancer point to an expanding role of chemotherapy, resulting in an increased involvement of the medical oncologist in the multidisciplinary care of these patients. This review focuses on patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. A comprehensive review of the clinical trial data that have defined new standards of care and a detailed presentation of widely used chemotherapeutic regimens, including both cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents, are presented. Information on human papilloma virus–associated squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is presented, and implications in the clinical management of this subgroup of patients based on the epidemiologic and pathologic characteristics are discussed. PMID:22550434

  17. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  18. A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soltys, Scott G.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Fee, Willard E.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

  19. Acupuncture in Treating Dry Mouth Caused By Radiation Therapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupuncture may help relieve dry mouth caused by radiation therapy. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying to see how well one set of acupuncture points work in comparison to a different set of acupuncture points or standard therapy in treating dry mouth caused by radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. |

  20. Effectiveness of prophylactic retropharyngeal lymph node irradiation in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for the prevention of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods A retrospective review of 76 patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiation or postoperative radiotherapy with IMRT or IGRT who were at risk for retropharyngeal nodal recurrences because of anatomic site (hypopharynx, nasopharynx, oropharynx) and/or the presence of nodal metastases was undertaken. The prevalence of retropharyngeal nodal recurrences was assessed on follow-up positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scans. Results At a median follow-up of 22 months (4–53 months), no patient developed retropharyngeal nodal recurrences. Conclusion Prophylactic irradiation of retropharyngeal lymph nodes with IMRT or IGRT provides effective regional control for individuals at risk for recurrence in these nodes. PMID:22708791

  1. [Nutritional management of patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Lefebvre, L; Dandoy, S; Guérault, F; Ebran, M; Lebreton, M; Veresezan, O; Rigal, O; Clatot, F

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are standard treatment of head and neck cancer alone or associated to surgical treatment. Early (during treatment or the following weeks) and late side effects contribute to malnutrition in this population at risk. In this context, nutritional support adapted by dietary monitoring and enteral nutrition (nasogastric tube or gastrostomy) are often necessary. The early identification of the patients with high malnutrition risk and requiring enteral nutrition is necessary to improve the tolerance and efficacy of treatment.

  2. Hearing and tinnitus in head and neck cancer patients after chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niemensivu, Riina; Saarilahti, K; Ylikoski, J; Aarnisalo, A; Mäkitie, A A

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with high-dose cisplatin and radiotherapy will suffer from hearing deficits. The current low-dose regimen seldom causes hearing threshold decrease. Tinnitus in this patient population has not been investigated earlier. We aimed to evaluate the possible ototoxicity of low-dose (40 mg/m(2)) weekly administered cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were prospectively recruited to participate the study after treatment recommendation for chemoradiotherapy with low-dose cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. They filled in a Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and undertook audiologic evaluations before and after treatment. Ototoxicity was determined by >10 dB threshold shift at frequencies 4 and 8 kHz or in pure tone average. A historical cohort of nine patients treated with high-dose (100 mg/m(2)) cisplatin and radiotherapy was used for comparison. After treatment, study patients demonstrated no significant changes in their hearing over frequencies 0.5-4 kHz, and the threshold shifts were minor at 4 and 8 kHz. More than 50 % of patients reported no tinnitus after treatment and the remainder only had slight to moderate tinnitus causing no interference with their daily activities. In contrast, five of the nine patients having received high-dose cisplatin reported disturbing tinnitus. Further, changes in pure tone averages were exhibited in three of these patients and six had significant threshold shifts at 4 and 8 kHz. Head and neck cancer patients treated with concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy and low-dose cisplatin seem to experience only minor audiological sequelae and therefore, these patients appear to require no routine audiological monitoring. Such evaluation could be performed only when needed.

  3. Prospective Study of Psychosocial Distress Among Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. Jennelle, Richard; Grady, Victoria; Tovar, Adrienne; Bowen, Kris; Simonin, Patty; Tracy, Janice; McCrudden, Dale; Stella, Jonathan R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of psychosocial distress among patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer and to examine the association between depression and anxiety and demographic and medical variables. Methods and Materials: A total of 40 patients (25 men and 15 women) with nonmetastatic head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study and underwent RT administered with definitive (24 patients) or postoperative (16 patients) intent. Twenty patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument before RT, on the last day of RT, and at the first follow-up visit. The effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors on psychosocial distress was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of mild to severe pre-RT depression was 58% and 45% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-D and Beck Depression Inventory-II scale, respectively. The prevalence of severe pre-RT anxiety was 7%. The depression levels, as determined by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II instrument increased significantly during RT and remained elevated at the first follow-up visit (p < 0.001 for both). The variables that were significantly associated with post-RT depression included a greater pre-RT depression level, employment status (working at enrollment), younger age (<55 years), single marital status, and living alone (p < 0.05, for all). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that an alarming number of patients undergoing RT for head and neck cancer have symptoms suggestive of psychosocial distress even before beginning treatment. This proportion increases significantly during RT. Studies investigating the role of antidepressants and/or psychiatric counseling might be warranted in the future.

  4. Postradiotherapy quality of life for head-and-neck cancer patients is independent of xerostomia

    SciTech Connect

    Ringash, Jolie . E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Warde, Padraig; Lockwood, Gina; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Cummings, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and xerostomia over time for patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and materials: Patients with head-and-neck cancer were randomized to pilocarpine (n = 65) vs. placebo (n = 65) during RT. QOL was measured using the McMaster Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ). Xerostomia was measured on a linear analog scale. No statistically significant differences were observed between arms; all 130 patients were analyzed together. Results: Baseline QOL data were obtained for 98.5% of participants. The baseline HNRQ score of 5.7 declined significantly to 4.0 (p <0.0001) by RT Week 6 and returned to baseline (5.8) by 6 months after treatment. This represents a large, clinically important change of 1.7 of 7 (24%; effect size 1.34). The decline in HNRQ score during RT paralleled the onset of xerostomia on the linear analog scale (r = 0.36 at 1 month). After treatment, the QOL scores recovered without improvement in xerostomia. The trajectory of the linear analog scale score resembled that of the HNRQ's single xerostomia question (r = 0.75 at 1 month). Conclusion: Quality of life recovers to baseline after RT, despite persistent xerostomia. Either a response shift occurs or xerostomia in the absence of acute mucositis has a relatively small influence on overall QOL.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Treatment for Elderly Patients with Medically Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Clump, David A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With a growing elderly population, elderly patients with head and neck cancers represent an increasing challenge with limited prospective data to guide management. The complex interplay between advanced age, associated co-morbidities, and conventional local therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, can significantly impact elderly patients’ quality of life (QoL). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a well-established curative strategy for medical-inoperable early-stage lung cancers even in elderly populations; however, there is limited data examining SBRT as primary therapy in head and neck cancer. Material/methods: Twelve patients with medically inoperable head and neck cancer treated with SBRT ± cetuximab from 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. SBRT consisted of primarily 44 Gy in five fractions delivered on alternating days over 1–2 weeks. Concurrent cetuximab was administered at a dose of 400 mg/m2 on day −7 followed by 250 mg/m2 on day 0 and +7 in n = 3 (25%). Patient-reported quality of life (PRQoL) was prospectively recorded using the previously validated University of Washington quality of life revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Median clinical follow-up was 6 months (range: 0.5–29 months). The 1-year actuarial local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival for definitively treated patients were 69, 100, 69, and 64%, respectively. One patient (8%) experienced acute grade 3 dysphagia and one patient (8%) experienced late grade 3 mucositis; there were no grade 4–5 toxicities. Prospective collection of PRQoL as assessed by UW-QoL-R was preserved across domains. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy shows encouraging survival and relatively low toxicity in elderly patients with unresectable head and neck cancer, which may provide an aggressive potentially curative local therapy while maintaining QoL. PMID

  6. Neurotoxic radiosensitizers and head and neck cancer patients-how many will benefit

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, B.J.; Thomas, G.M.; Rauth, A.M.; Sorrenti, V.; Black, B.; Bush, R.S.

    1982-03-01

    The causes for the exclusion of patients from a Phase I dose tolerance study of metronidazole as a hypoxic cell sensitizing agent in patients receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer have been reviewed. One hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients were assessed between October 1979 and December 1980 according to eligibility criteia decided upon prior to the study. Only 26 (23%) of 111 patients treated with radical radiation therapy entered the Phase I study. The major reasons for exclusion were a history of prior nervous system abnormality, age over 70, and refusal by some patients to participate in the study. The criteria used for patient selection for studies of hypoxic cell sensitizers (and other investigational agents) must be known so that data from each study can be assessed appropriately before being extrapolated to the general patient population. Clinical trials should be designed to take into account factors that might influence patient entry.

  7. Outcomes of Induction Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Combined Study of Two National Cohorts in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Lin, Ming-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    The use of induction chemotherapy (CT) is controversial. We compared the survival of head and neck cancer patients receiving docetaxel- or platinum-based induction CT before concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with the survival of those receiving upfront CCRT alone. Data from the National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases in Taiwan were linked and analyzed. We enrolled patients who had head and neck cancer between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2011. Follow-up was from the index date to December 31, 2013. We included head and neck patients diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0-148.9 who were aged >20 years, at American Joint Committee on Cancer clinical cancer stage III or IV, and receiving induction CT or platinum-based CCRT. The exclusion criteria were a cancer history before head and neck cancer diagnosis, distant metastasis, AJCC clinical cancer stage I or II, receipt of platinum and docetaxel before radiotherapy, an age <20 years, missing sex data, docetaxel use during or after RT, induction CT for >8 weeks before RT, induction CT alone before RT, cetuximab use, adjuvant CT within 90 days after RT completion, an RT dose <7000 cGy, curative head and neck cancer surgery before RT, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and head and neck cancer recurrence. We enrolled 10,721 stage III-IV head and neck cancer patients, with a median follow-up of 4.18 years (interquartile range, 3.25 years). The CCRT (arm 1), docetaxel-based induction CT (arm 2), and platinum-based CCRT (arm 3; control arm) groups comprised 7968, 503, and 2232 patients, respectively. Arm 3 was used to investigate mortality risk after induction CT. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidities, the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for overall death were 1.37 (1.22-1.53) and 1.44 (1.36-1.52) in arms 2 and 3, respectively. In a disease

  8. AHNS series: Do you know your guidelines? Management of head and neck cancer in the era of human papillomavirus: Educating our patients on human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Goldenberg, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2017-03-06

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has changed the face of head and neck cancer over the past 2 decades. No longer is this solely a disease of older patients with a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use. Patients with HPV-related head and neck cancers tend to be younger, healthier, and have an improved prognosis, compared with those with HPV-negative tumors. As more patients are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer, physicians have important topics to consider. These include prevalence, transmission, and natural history of HPV, the role of screening, vaccines, and HPV testing in head and neck cancer. This article continues a series developed by the American Head and Neck Society's Education Committee entitled "Do you know your guidelines?" and is intended to provide guidance for navigating common questions and concerns patients may have about HPV infection and HPV-related head and neck cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2017.

  9. Malnutrition and cachexia in patients with head and neck cancer treated with (chemo)radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gorenc, Mojca; Kozjek, Nada Rotovnik; Strojan, Primož

    2015-01-01

    Aim To highlight the problems associated with nutrition that occur in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Background SCCHN is associated with weight loss before, during and after radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Because of serious consequences of malnutrition and cachexia on treatment outcome, mortality, morbidity, and quality of life, it is important to identify SCCHN patients with increased risk for the development of malnutrition and cachexia. Materials and methods Critical review of the literature. Results This review describes pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition and cancer cachexia. Treatment of malnutrition and cancer cachexia includes nutritional interventions and pharmacological therapy. Advantages and disadvantages of different nutritional interventions and their effect on the nutritional status, quality of life and specific oncological treatment are presented. Conclusions Nutritional management is an essential part of care of these patients, including early screening, assessment of nutritional status and appropriate intervention. PMID:26109912

  10. Lugol's iodine dye-enhanced endoscopy in patients with cancer of the oesophagus and head and neck.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, E M; Williams, S R; Leung, J W; Chung, S C; Van Hasselt, C A; Li, A K

    1992-12-01

    Lugol's iodine dye indicates the presence of unsuspected early oesophageal cancers during endoscopy at which such cancers fail to show the characteristic black colour change. We evaluated Lugol's iodine dye-enhanced endoscopy in 17 patients with oesophageal cancer. In a further 37 patients with head and neck cancer we examined the use of Lugol's iodine since these patients have a 29% risk of synchronous oesophageal cancer. The oesophagus was sprayed with Lugol's iodine (1.5%) during endoscopy. Any areas not turning black were biopsied. In 13 patients with oesophageal cancer discrete areas beyond the macroscopically obvious primary tumour showed no change in colour. Biopsy revealed cancer in all cases. Six synchronous cancers were found in the head and neck group, one of which was identified only by the use of Lugol's iodine. Lugol's iodine augmented the information gained about the oesophageal mucosa during endoscopy. It revealed unsuspected cancer which altered the management of patients with primary oesophageal cancer as well as those with head and neck cancer. We recommend the routine use of Lugol's iodine-enhanced endoscopy for surveillance of all 'at risk' oesophageal cases.

  11. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping of the Oral Cavity in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van der Vorst, Joost R.; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Keereweer, Stijn; Jansen, Jeroen C.; van der Velden, Lilly-Ann; Langeveld, Antonius; Hutteman, Merlijn; Löwik, Clemens; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Frangioni, John V.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Elective neck dissection is frequently performed during surgery in head and neck cancer patients. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) procedure can prevent the morbidity of a neck dissection and improve lymph node staging by fine pathology. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is a promising technique to identify the sentinel lymph node (SLN) intraoperatively. This feasibility study explored the use of indocyanine green adsorbed to human serum albumin (ICG:HSA) for SLN mapping in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods A total of 10 consecutive patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancer and a clinical N0 neck were included. After exposure of the neck, 1.6 mL of ICG:HSA (500 μM) was injected at 4 quadrants around the tumor. During the neck dissection, levels I, II, III and IV were measured for fluorescence using the Mini-FLARE imaging system. Results In all 10 patients, NIR fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of one or more SLNs. A total of 17 SLNs were identified. The mean contrast between the fluorescent signal of the lymph nodes and of the surrounding tissue was 8.7 ± 6.4. In 3 patients, of which 1 was false-negative, lymph node metastases were found. After administration of ICG:HSA, the average number of fluorescent lymph nodes significantly increased over time (P < 0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated feasibility to detect draining lymph nodes in head and neck cancer patients using NIR fluorescence imaging. However, the fluorescent tracer quickly migrated beyond the SLN to higher tier nodes. PMID:22939692

  12. The Validity of Self-reported Recent Smoking in Head and Neck Cancer Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alberg, Anthony J.; Worley, Mitchell L.; Tooze, Janet A.; Hatcher, Jeanne L.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Day, Terry A.; Sullivan, Christopher A.; Warren, Graham W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In cancer patients, cigarette smoking causes poorer response to treatment, treatment toxicity, increased risk of recurrence, higher surgical complication rates, and poorer overall survival. As such a significant determinant of patient prognosis, accurate classification of current smoking status is important. Self-reported smoking status may lead to misclassification if patients conceal their true status. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of self-reported tobacco use during the previous 48 hours in head and neck cancer patients on the day of surgery. Study Design Cross-sectional. Setting Two academic medical centers in the southeastern United States. Subjects and Methods On the day of surgery, 108 head and neck cancer patients completed a survey asking about tobacco use during the past 48 hours and had semi-quantitative levels of urinary cotinine measured to biochemically validate self-reported recent smoking. Results Self-reported smoking yielded a sensitivity of 60.9% (95% CI, 45.4%-74.9%) and a specificity of 98.4% (95% CI, 91.3%-100.0%). The sensitivity increased to 76.1% (95% CI, 61.2%-87.4%) when allowing for the possibility that exposure to secondhand smoke or use of nicotine-containing products could have caused a positive cotinine test. Conclusion In this patient population, self-reported recent smoking yielded a high (39%) proportion of false-negatives, and even 24% remained false-negatives after allowing for other sources of nicotine exposure. This magnitude of underreporting combined with the importance of tobacco use to patient prognosis supports the need for routinely biochemically verifying recent tobacco use in self-reported nonsmokers within the clinical setting. PMID:26195573

  13. Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck

  14. Induction chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients followed by concomitant docetaxel-based radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mencoboni, M; Grillo-Ruggieri, F; Salami, A; Scasso, F; Rebella, L; Grimaldi, A; Dellepiane, M; Moratti, G; Bruzzone, A; Spigno, F; Ghio, R; Figliomeni, M

    2011-07-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for patients with inoperable squamous cell head and neck carcinoma. More recently, induction chemotherapy has been adopted as an approach in the management of these patients. We report the results of a phase II trial associating induction chemotherapy and concomitant chemoradiotherapy in a series of patients with inoperable squamous cell head and neck cancer. Twenty-nine patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma ineligible for surgery were enrolled. Induction chemotherapy with docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) every 21 days was administered for two cycles. Radiotherapy followed the induction phase. During radiotherapy, docetaxel was administered weekly at the dose of 33 mg/m(2) . Primary end point of the study was feasibility of treatment. Six (18%) patients failed to conclude the treatment schedule. Although response rates in evaluable patients were very high (disease control rate >90%), toxicities were a matter of concern. The reported treatment schedule proved infeasible. However, some modifications in ancillary therapies aimed at exploiting its efficacy could make it practicable.

  15. Cevimeline for the Treatment of Postirradiation Xerostomia in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Mark S. . E-mail: mchamber@mdanderson.org; Posner, Marshall; Jones, Christopher Uwe; Biel, Merrill A.; Hodge, Kenneth M.; Vitti, Robert; Armstrong, Ingrid; Yen, Cindy; Weber, Randal S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the efficacy and safety of cevimeline in two double-blind trials (Studies 003 and 004) enrolling patients with head and neck cancer in whom xerostomia developed after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were randomly assigned to receive cevimeline, 30 mg three times daily, or placebo for 12 weeks, with the possibility of dose escalation to 45 mg three times daily at 6 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the patient's final global evaluation of oral dryness; change in unstimulated salivary flow was a secondary endpoint. Results: Five hundred seventy subjects (284 in Study 003 and 286 in Study 004) were randomized. Significantly more cevimeline-treated subjects than placebo recipients (47.4% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.0162) in Study 003 reported improvement in dry mouth in the final global evaluation of oral dryness. No significant difference between groups in the final global evaluation was seen in Study 004, in which a high placebo response rate of 47.6% was observed. In both studies, cevimeline-treated subjects had significantly greater increases in the objective measure of unstimulated salivary flow than placebo recipients (p 0.0093 [Study 003] and p = 0.0215 [Study 004]), whereas no significant differences in stimulated salivary flow were observed. The most frequent adverse event was increased sweating. Conclusion: Cevimeline was well tolerated by patients with xerostomia after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and oral administration of 30-45 mg of cevimeline three times daily increased unstimulated salivary flow.

  16. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  17. Aspiration as a late complication after accelerated versus conventional radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Ulrika; Nilsson, Per; Gärskog, Ola; Kjellen, Elisabeth; Laurell, Göran; Wahlberg, Peter; Zackrisson, Björn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Neck dissection after radiotherapy increased the risk of aspiration as a late effect in a sub-sample of patients treated for head and neck cancer in the ARTSCAN study. Patients treated with accelerated fractionation (AF) developed aspiration, with or without coughing, more frequently than patients treated with conventional fractionation (CF). Objectives A long-term follow-up study was conducted to determine the frequency of aspiration as a late effect in patients with head and neck cancer treated with AF or CF. Method One-hundred and eight patients were recruited from two centres of the Swedish multi-centre study, ARTSCAN, where AF and CF were compared. Patients with positive lymph nodes were treated with neck dissection after completing radiotherapy. The follow-up was performed at a median of 65 months after initiation of radiotherapy and included an ENT and a videofluoroscopic examination. Results Aspiration was found in 51/108 (47%) and silent aspiration in 34/96 (35%) patients. Neck dissection (n = 47 patients) was significantly associated with both aspiration and silent aspiration. Aspiration was more common among patients treated with AF (34/61; 56%) compared to CF (17/47; 36%; p = 0.053). Silent aspiration was also more common after AF (24/54; 44%) than after CF (10/42; 24%; p = 0.052).

  18. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jie; Ridner, Sheila H.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  19. Cetuximab as treatment for head and neck cancer patients with a previous liver transplant: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Holguin, Francia; Rubió-Casadevall, Jordi; Saigi, Maria; Marruecos, Jordi; Taberna, Miren; Tobed, Marc; Maños, Manuel; Mesía, Ricard

    2016-07-05

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor useful in the treatment of patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma combined with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Its pharmacokinetics are not influenced by hepatic status and there are no specific warnings concerning its indication in patients with impaired hepatic function. Patients with a previous liver transplant are at risk for hepatic toxicity and use immunosupressants to avoid rejection that can interact with other drugs. We present two cases of patients with a previous liver transplant in which cetuximab was administered to treat head and neck cancer.

  20. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  1. Effects of a spleen peptide preparation as supportive therapy in inoperable head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Borghardt, J; Rosien, B; Görtelmeyer, R; Lindemann, S; Hartleb, M; Klingmüller, M

    2000-02-01

    Patients with inoperable head and neck cancer were treated with a spleen peptide preparation (Polyerga) in a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study during chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin, 5-fluorouracil) to investigate further the efficacy of this peptide preparation as supportive treatment under chemotherapy. Immunological changes as well as quality of life aspects were examined. Forty patients were included in this study. The peptide preparation had a significant stabilizing effect on the peripheral blood lymphocyte status during chemotherapy cycles (Student t-test, p = 0.05) and tended to stabilize the shift of granulocyte count (Student t-test, p = 0.18). In addition, the group receiving the verum showed a remarkable stabilization of body weight (Mann-Whitney U-test, p = 0.17) during chemotherapy treatment and the generally observed increase of fatigue-inertia during the chemotherapy cycles was significantly reduced (Student t-test, p = 0.01).

  2. Unmet needs and relationship challenges of head and neck cancer patients and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Badr, Hoda; Herbert, Krista; Reckson, Batya; Rainey, Hope; Sallam, Aminah; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    In head and neck cancer (HNC), couple-based interventions may be useful for facilitating treatment completion, patient rehabilitation, and improving both partners' quality of life. With the goal of identifying targets for future interventions, we conducted a qualitative study to understand patient and spouse unmet needs and relationship challenges during curative radiotherapy for HNC. Semistructured interviews were conducted with six HNC patients (83% male) and six spouses (83% female) within 6 months of completing treatment. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed using grounded theory analysis. Patients and spouses identified several unmet needs including better preparation regarding the severity of physical side effects, a clearer timeline for recovery, and strategies for dealing with their own and each other's emotional reactions. Caregiver's unmet needs included balancing competing roles/responsibilities, making time for self-care, and finding effective strategies for encouraging patient's self-care. Eighty-three percent of spouses and all patients reported increased conflict during treatment. Other relationship challenges included changes in intimacy and social/leisure activities. Findings suggest that couple-based interventions that emphasize the importance of managing physical and psychological symptoms through the regular practice of self-care routines may be beneficial for both patients and spouses. Likewise, programs that teach spouses ways to effectively motivate and encourage patients' self-care may help minimize conflict and help couples navigate HNC treatment and recovery together as a team.

  3. Change of Swallowing in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional characteristics of swallowing and to analyze the parameters of dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods The medical records of 32 patients with head and neck cancer who were referred for a videofluoroscopic swallowing study from January 2012 to May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were allocated by duration after starting CCRT into early phase (<1 month after radiation therapy) and late phase (>1 month after radiation therapy) groups. We measured the modified penetration aspiration scale (MPAS) and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale (ASHA-NOMS). The oral transit time (OTT), pharyngeal delay time (PDT), and pharyngeal transit time (PTT) were recorded to assess the swallowing physiology. Results Among 32 cases, 18 cases (56%) were of the early phase. In both groups, the most common tumor site was the hypopharynx (43.75%) with a histologic type of squamous cell carcinoma (75%). PTT was significantly longer in the late phase (p=0.03). With all types of boluses, except for soup, both phases showed a statistically significant difference in MPAS results. The mean ASHA-NOMS level for the early phase was 5.83±0.78 and that for the late phase was 3.79±1.80, with statistical significance (p=0.01). The PTT and ASHA-NOMS level showed a statistically significant correlation (correlation coefficient=–0.52, p=0.02). However, it showed no relationship with the MPAS results. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that in the late phase that after CCRT, the OTT, PDT, and PTT were longer than in the early phase and the PTT prolongation was statistically significant. Therefore, swallowing therapy targeting the pharyngeal phase is recommended after CCRT. PMID:28119841

  4. Patients' perspective of financial benefits following head and neck cancer in Merseyside and Cheshire.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Harvey-Woodworth, C N; Lowe, D

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this interview study was to ask patients with head and neck cancer in the Mersey region about their need for financial benefits, the advice they were given about benefits and financial matters, and the financial burden of the disease. Stratified quota sampling was by employment status, whether work had been affected by the cancer, and by sex. Of 51 interviewees (mean (SD) age 61(8) years) 20 were retired, 11 were unemployed, 13 worked full-time, and 7 worked part-time. Cancer had affected the work status of 24. Since diagnosis 57% had suffered financially; this was particularly high in those who had retired (65%), and in those whose work had been affected by cancer (79%). Quality of life had decreased in 53% as a result of the financial impact of the disease. This was most common in the unemployed (64%), and in those whose work was affected by cancer (83%). Only a quarter had been given adequate help and information about finance; this was lowest in the unemployed (18%) and highest in those who were fully employed (39%). One third (17/51) had never claimed benefits. The most common benefits were Disability Living Allowance and Incapacity Benefit. Two-thirds (21/31) had applied for benefits after diagnosis, 18 of these were directly as a result of the disease. The median (IQR) weekly income from benefits was £88 (£60-170). Patients and carers need better access to financial advice. We suggest that each multidisciplinary team should have a designated benefits or financial advisor who is readily available to patients in the clinic and on the ward.

  5. Photobiomodulation therapy: management of mucosal necrosis of the oropharynx in previously treated head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Song, Paul Y; Ho, Allen S; Larian, Babak; Asher, Arash; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean

    2017-04-01

    Necrosis of the oral mucosa following head and neck cancer radiation therapy presents considerable clinical management challenges. We report three cases of symptomatic persisting oral ulcerations where the addition of photobiomodulation therapy resulted in a rapid resolution of the oral lesions and in patient symptoms. These cases suggest that photobiomodulation may represent an adjunct to care of these difficult to manage complications in oncology.

  6. Nicotine dependence and smoking habits in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Adriana Ávila; Bandeira, Celso Muller; Gonçalves, Antonio José; Araújo, Alberto José

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess smoking habits and nicotine dependence (ND) in patients with head and neck cancer Methods: This study involved 71 smokers or former smokers with squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx who were treated at a university hospital in the city of São Paulo between January and May of 2010. We used the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence to evaluate smoking habits and ND in the sample. Data regarding cancer treatment were collected from medical records. Depending on the variables studied, we used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test, or Spearman's correlation test. Results: Of the 71 patients, 47 (66.2%) presented with high or very high ND, 40 (56.3%) smoked more than 20 cigarettes/day, and 32 (45.1%) smoked their first cigarette within 5 min of awakening. Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.011) and with smoking history (p = 0.047). We found that ND did not correlate significantly with gender, disease stage, smoking cessation, or number of smoking cessation attempts, nor did the number of cigarettes smoked per day correlate with smoking cessation or gender. Treatment for smoking cessation was not routinely offered. Conclusions: In most of the patients studied, the level of ND was high or very high. The prevalence of heavy smoking for long periods was high in our sample. A diagnosis of cancer is a motivating factor for smoking cessation. However, intensive smoking cessation treatment is not routinely offered to smoking patients diagnosed with cancer. PMID:25029652

  7. Analysis of time taken to discuss new patients with head and neck cancer in multidisciplinary team meetings.

    PubMed

    Mullan, B J; Brown, J S; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N; Shaw, R J

    2014-02-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings have an important role in the management of head and neck cancer. Increasing incidence of the disease and a drive towards centralised meetings on large numbers of patients mean that effective discussions are pertinent. We aimed to evaluate new cases within a single high volume head and neck cancer MDT and to explore the relation between the time taken to discuss each case, the number of discussants, and type of case. A total of 105 patients with a new diagnosis of head and neck malignancy or complex benign tumour were discussed at 10 head and neck cancer MDT meetings. A single observer timed each discussion using a stopwatch, and recorded the number of discussants and the diagnosis and characteristics of each patient. Timings ranged from 15 to 480 s (8 min) with a mean of 119 s (2 min), and the duration of discussion correlated closely with the number of discussants (rs=0.63, p<0.001). The longest discussions concerned patients with advanced T stage (p=0.006) and advanced N stage (p=0.009) disease, the elderly (p=0.02) and male patients (p=0.05). Tumour site and histological findings were not significant factors in the duration of discussion. Most discussions on patients with early stage tumours were short (T1: 58% less than 60s, mean 90) and fewer people contributed. Many patients, particularly those with early stage disease, require little discussion, and their treatment might reasonably be planned according to an agreed protocol, which would leave more time and resources for those that require greater multidisciplinary input. Further studies may highlight extended discussions on patients with head and neck cancer, which may prompt a review of protocols and current evidence.

  8. Changes in and predictors of pain characteristics in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Guro Lindviksmoen; Rustøen, Tone; Miaskowski, Christine; Paul, Steven M; Bjordal, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) that is associated with significant decrements in physical and psychological functioning. Only 4 studies have evaluated for changes in and predictors of different pain characteristics in these patients. In this longitudinal study of patients with HNC, changes in pain intensity (i.e., average pain, worst pain), pain interference with function, and pain relief were evaluated from the initiation of radiotherapy and through the following 6 months. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate for changes over time in these 4 pain characteristics, as well as to identify predictors of interindividual variability in each characteristic. Overall, pain intensity and interference with function scores were in the mild-to-moderate range, while pain relief scores were in the moderate range. The occurrence of pain, as well as scores for each pain characteristic, increased from the initiation to the completion of radiotherapy, followed by a gradual decrease to near pretreatment levels at 6 months. However, interindividual variability existed in patients' ratings of each pain characteristic. Predictors of more severe pain characteristic scores were more comorbidities, worse physical functioning, not having surgery before radiotherapy, difficulty swallowing, mouth sores, sleep disturbance, fatigue, more energy, and less social support. Patients with more depressive symptoms had better pain relief. Although some of the predictors cannot be modified (e.g., rrence of surgery), other predictors (e.g., symptoms) can be treated. Therefore, information about these predictors may result in decreased pain in patients with HNC.

  9. Supportive Management of Mucositis and Metabolic Derangements in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Marcelo; Batt, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is among the most undesirable, painful, and expensive toxicities of cytotoxic cancer therapy, and is disheartening for patients and frustrating for caregivers. Accurate assessment of the incidence of OM has been elusive, but accumulating data suggests that reported OM frequency is significantly less than its actual occurrence. It has been suggested that over 90% of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cisplatin experience severe OM with symptoms of extreme pain, mucosal ulceration and consequent limitations in swallowing and achieving adequate nutritional intake. This panoply of symptoms inevitably impacts a patients’ quality of life and their willingness to continue treatment. In spite of all the advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of OM, there is still no prophylactic therapy with proven efficacy. Strategies to limit the extent of OM and to manage its symptomatology include basic oral care, supportive medications, nutritional support and targeting aggressive treatments to high-risk patients. This review focuses on OM recognition, preventive measurements, and symptom-management strategies. PMID:26404378

  10. Impact of Radiotherapy Dose on Dentition Breakdown in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mary P.; Wichman, Brian; Cheng, An-Lin; Coster, James; Williams, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the severity of post-radiation dental lesions and possible correlation with radiation dose to the teeth in patients treated for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials Data from 93 head and neck radiotherapy patients treated between 1997 and 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The main effect, radiation dose to the individual teeth, was evaluated with covariates of elapsed time after radiation, xerostomia, topical fluoride use, and oral hygiene status included. Patients’ radiotherapy plans were used to calculate cumulative exposure for each tooth. Patients’ teeth were evaluated using a validated index and then categorized as having none/slight or moderate/severe post-radiation damage. Results Patients (31 females, 62 males) ranged in age from 18–82 yrs (mean=57). The number of teeth/patient ranged from 3–30 (mean=20) with a total of 1873 teeth evaluated. Overall, 51% of teeth had moderate/severe damage, with the remaining having little or none. Using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, the odds for moderate/severe damage were 2–3x greater for teeth exposed to between 30–60 Gy as compared to no radiation. However, for teeth exposed to ≥60 Gy as compared to no radiation the odds of moderate/severe tooth damage was greater by a magnitude of 10 times. Conclusions The results indicate that there is minimal tooth damage below 30 Gy (salivary gland threshold), a greater than 1:1 increased dose-response between 30–60y likely related to salivary gland damage, and a critical threshold of ≥60Gy which may be linked to direct effects of radiation on tooth structure. These findings suggest that care should be taken during the treatment planning process to limit tooth dose, and when clinically possible to limit tooth dose to less than 60 Gy. PMID:21857887

  11. Integrative Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matovina, Chloe; Birkeland, Andrew C; Zick, Suzanna; Shuman, Andrew G

    2017-02-01

    Objective Complementary and alternative medicine, or integrative medicine, has become increasingly popular among patients with head and neck cancer. Despite its increasing prevalence, many patients feel uncomfortable discussing such therapies with their physicians, and many physicians are unaware and underequipped to evaluate or discuss their use with patients. The aim of this article is to use recent data to outline the decision making inherent to integrative medicine utilization among patients with head and neck cancer, to discuss the ethical implications inherent to balancing integrative and conventional approaches to treatment, and to highlight available resources to enhance head and neck cancer providers' understanding of integrative medicine. Data Sources Randomized controlled trials involving integrative medicine or complementary and alternative medicine treatment for cancer patients. Review Methods Trials were drawn from a systematic PubMed database search categorized into cancer prevention, treatment, and symptom management. Conclusions Integrative medicine is gaining popularity for the management of cancer and is most commonly used for symptom management. A number of randomized controlled trials provide data to support integrative therapies, yet physicians who treat head and neck cancer may be faced with ethical dilemmas and practical barriers surrounding incorporation of integrative medicine. Implications for Practice In the management of head and neck cancer, there is an increasing demand for awareness of, dialogue about, and research evaluating integrative medicine therapies. It is important for otolaryngologists to become aware of integrative therapy options, their risks and benefits, and resources for further information to effectively counsel their patients.

  12. Impact of Pretreatment Body Mass Index on Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Ping-Ching; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of pretreatment body mass index (preT BMI) with outcomes of head-and-neck cancer in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: All 1,562 patients diagnosed with head-and-neck cancer and treated with curative-intent RT to a dose of 60 Gy or higher were retrospectively studied. Body weight was measured both at entry and at the end of RT. Cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis (DM) were analyzed by preT BMI (<25 kg/m{sup 2} vs. {>=}25 kg/m{sup 2}). The median follow-up was 8.6 years. Results: Patients with lower preT BMI were statistically significantly associated with poorer CSS and OS than those with higher preT BMI. There was no significant difference between preT BMI groups in terms of LRC and DM. Body weight loss (BWL) during radiation did not influence survival outcomes. However, in the group with higher preT BMI, CSS, OS, and DM-free survival of patients with less BWL during radiation were statistically longer when compared with greater BWL. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that higher preT BMI positively influenced survival outcomes for patients with head-and-neck cancer. Patients with higher preT BMI who were able to maintain their weight during radiation had significantly better survival than patients with greater BWL.

  13. Endoscopic surveillance of head and neck cancer in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Minoru; Ishihara, Ryu; Hamada, Kenta; Tonai, Yusuke; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Matsuura, Noriko; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) frequently arise in the upper aerodigestive tract, referred to as the field cancerization phenomenon. The aim of this study was to elucidate the detailed clinical features of second primary head and neck (H&N) SCCs arising in patients with esophageal SCC. Patients and methods: A total of 818 patients underwent endoscopic resection for superficial esophageal cancer between January 2006 and December 2013. Of these, 439 patients met our inclusion criteria, and we retrospectively investigated the incidence, primary sites, and stages of second primary H&N SCCs in these patients. Results: A total of 53 metachronous H&N SCCs developed in 40 patients after a median follow-up period of 46 months (range 9 – 109). The cumulative incidence rates of metachronous H&N SCCs at 3, 5, and 7 years were 5.3 %, 9.7 %, and 17.2 %, respectively. These lesions were frequently located at pyriform sinus or in the posterior wall of the pharynx (70 %, 37/53 lesions). Most of the lesions were detected at an early stage, though 4 lesions were associated with lymph node metastasis when their primary sites were detected (1 postcricoid area, 2 posterior wall of hypopharynx, and 1 lateral wall of oropharynx). Conclusions: Patients with esophageal SCC should undergo careful inspection of the pyriform sinus and posterior wall of the pharynx for detection of H&N SCCs. Methods to open the hypopharyngeal space, such as the Valsalva maneuver, should be included in the surveillance program. PMID:27556090

  14. Innate tissue fluorescence of the oral mucosa of controls and head-and-neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Howard E.; Kolli, Venkateswara; Ansley, John; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y.; Alfano, Robert R.; Schantz, Stimson P.

    1995-04-01

    Base line spectral excitation and emission scans were defined for the oral mucosa in a population of 61 controls, 16 oral tongue cancer patients and 2 patients with tongue leukoplakia. A xenon-based fluorescence spectrophotometer (Mediscience Corp.) with a fiberoptic probe (Mediscience Corp.) was used to collect excitation and emission spectra. Two excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm; (lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm) and two emission scans ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm; (lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360-660 nm) were used to analyze the buccal mucosa (BM), hard palate (HP), floor of mouth (FOM) and dorsal tongue (DT) of 61 control individuals. In 41 controls the lateral tongue site (LT) was added. The same set of scans was performed on tumor lesions and contralateral normal tissues of 16 patients with lateral tongue tumors and on two individuals with leukoplakia of the tongue. Ratios of points on the individual scans were used to quantitate data. The excitation scan ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm) and the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm) were able to statistically discriminate the HP and DT from the BM and FOM. The ratios of intensities of neoplastic mucosa and contralateral sites were significantly different with the excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm, p < 0.001) and ((lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm, p < 0.01) and with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm, p < 0.001). Discrimination was significant with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360- 660 nm, p < 0.07). Innate tissue fluorescence has potential as a monitor of cancer patients and populations at risk for head and neck cancer.

  15. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  16. Calcified carotid artery atheromas on panoramic radiographs of head and neck cancer patients before and after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Markman, Renata-Lucena; Conceição-Vasconcelos, Karina-Gondim-Moutinho; Brandão, Thais-Bianca; Prado-Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to verify if head and neck radiotherapy (RT) is able to induce calcified carotid artery atheroma (CCAA) in a large head and neck cancer (HNC) population and also to compare the socio-demographic and clinical findings of patients with and without CCAA detected on panoramic radiographs. Material and Methods Panoramic radiographs taken before and after head and neck radiotherapy (RT) of 180 HNC patients were selected and analyzed in order to identify the presence of CCAA. In addition, CCAA presence or absence on panoramic radiographs were compared and correlated with clinicopathological findings. Results A high overall prevalence of CCAA was found on panoramic radiographs (63 out of 180 = 35%) of HNC patients. No significant difference of CCAA before and after RT was observed. There were also no differences between groups (with and without CCAA) regarding age, gender, tobacco and alcohol use, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, acute myocardial infarction, hypercholesterolemia, tumor location, clinical stage of disease and RT dose. However, there was a greater prevalence of strokes in patients with CCAA (p<0.05). Conclusions Although CCAA were frequently found in panoramic radiographs of patients with HNC, RT seems not to alter the prevalence of these calcifications. Key words:Head and neck cancer, radiotherapy, carotid artery diseases, panoramic radiography. PMID:28160583

  17. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  18. Accurate positioning for head and neck cancer patients using 2D and 3D image guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyejoo; Lovelock, Dale M.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Kriminiski, Sergey; Lee, Nancy; Amols, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to determine an optimized image-guided setup by comparing setup errors determined by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) image guidance for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients immobilized by customized thermoplastic masks. Nine patients received weekly imaging sessions, for a total of 54, throughout treatment. Patients were first set up by matching lasers to surface marks (initial) and then translationally corrected using manual registration of orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) radiographs with DRRs (2D-2D) on bony anatomy. A kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) was acquired and manually registered to the simulation CT using only translations (3D-3D) on the same bony anatomy to determine further translational corrections. After treatment, a second set of kVCBCT was acquired to assess intrafractional motion. Averaged over all sessions, 2D-2D registration led to translational corrections from initial setup of 3.5 ± 2.2 (range 0–8) mm. The addition of 3D-3D registration resulted in only small incremental adjustment (0.8 ± 1.5 mm). We retrospectively calculated patient setup rotation errors using an automatic rigid-body algorithm with 6 degrees of freedom (DoF) on regions of interest (ROI) of in-field bony anatomy (mainly the C2 vertebral body). Small rotations were determined for most of the imaging sessions; however, occasionally rotations > 3° were observed. The calculated intrafractional motion with automatic registration was < 3.5 mm for eight patients, and < 2° for all patients. We conclude that daily manual 2D-2D registration on radiographs reduces positioning errors for mask-immobilized HNC patients in most cases, and is easily implemented. 3D-3D registration adds little improvement over 2D-2D registration without correcting rotational errors. We also conclude that thermoplastic masks are effective for patient immobilization. PMID:21330971

  19. Coping strategies predict post-traumatic stress in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall P; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    Evidence suggests that patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, research is yet to examine predictors of PTSD symptoms in this patient group. The objective of this study was to investigate whether coping strategies at HNC diagnosis were related to outcomes of post-traumatic stress and health-related quality of life (HRQL) 6 months later. Sixty-five patients with HNC completed an assessment of coping, distress, and health-related quality of life at diagnosis and again 6 months later, and an assessment of post-traumatic stress at 6 months. Correlations and regression analyses were performed to examine relationships between coping and outcomes over time. Regression analyses showed that denial, behavioural disengagement and self-blame at diagnosis predicted post-traumatic stress symptoms. Self-blame at diagnosis also predicted poor HRQL. Results have implications for the development of psychological interventions that provide alternative coping strategies to potentially reduce PTSD symptoms and improve HRQL.

  20. Implant-prosthetic rehabilitation after radiation treatment in head and neck cancer patients: a case-series report of outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cotic, Jasna; Jamsek, Jure; Kuhar, Milan; Ihan Hren, Natasa; Kansky, Andrej; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Slovenia has a high burden of head and neck cancer. Patients are mostly treated with surgery followed by radiation therapy. Advanced surgical and prosthodontic techniques have expanded the rehabilitation options. The aim of the study was to review the outcome of implant-prosthetic treatment after radiation therapy. Patients and methods Twenty irradiated head and neck cancer patients who received a removable implant-supported denture at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana were included in the study. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox proportional hazard models and logistic regression were used to assess the implant survival and success rate. Results Twenty patients had 100 implants inserted. The estimated implant survival rate was 96% after 1 year and 87% after 5 years. Failures were mostly observed before loading (91.2%). Implants inserted in the transplanted bone were significantly more likely to fail. Out of 89 implants supporting the dentures, 79 implants (88.7%) were successful, meaning that they were functionally loaded and exhibited no pain, radiolucency or progressive bone loss. Prosthetic treatment was significantly less successful in older patients. The attachment system and the number of implants did not have a statistically significant influence on the success rate. Conclusions Implant-supported dentures have been shown to be a reliable treatment modality after head and neck cancer surgery and radiation therapy. Possible early failures should be communicated with the patients.

  1. Effect of Pretreatment Anemia on Treatment Outcome of Concurrent Radiochemotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, Andre Wang Changshu; Vigneault, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of anemia on outcome of treatment with radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 196 patients with Stage II-IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria as hemoglobin <130 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women. Results: Fifty-three patients were classified as anemic, 143 as nonanemic. The 3-year local control rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 72% and 85%, respectively (p = 0.01). The 3-year overall survival rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 52% and 77%, respectively (p = 0.004). In multivariate analysis, anemia was the most significant predictor of local control (hazard ratio, 0.37, p = 0.009) and survival (hazard ratio, 0.47, p = 0.007). A dose-effect relationship was also found for local control (p = .04) and survival (0.04) when grouping by hemoglobin concentration: <120, 120-140, and >140 g/L. Conclusions: Anemia was strongly associated with local control and survival in this cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiochemotherapy.

  2. Patient reported outcomes in head and neck cancer: selecting instruments for quality of life integration in clinical protocols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health Related Quality of Life has been used in medical research for more than twenty years, being progressively accepted during the last decade as an important patient reported outcome. Considering the multidimensional approach involved in Health Related Quality of Life assessment, instrument applicability and cultural adaptation must be tested for each population. In order to select the most appropriate instrument for Head and Neck cancer patients, two major Health Related Quality of Life specific questionnaires for Head and Neck cancer patients were compared. Conceptual differences, psychometric characteristics, scores, reliability, construct validity and sensitivity to symptomatology, tumour location, tumour size were analyzed. Methods 102 consecutive Head and Neck cancer patients completed two different Health Related Quality of Life questionnaires: EORTC QLQ-C30 and its specific head and neck module QLQ-H&N35 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Scales (FACT-H&N). Patients completed the questionnaires, immediately before consultation as a part of the routine evaluation. Results A greater variability was always found in the EORTC QLC-C30 questionnaire's scores for all comparable domains. Both instruments revealed a good internal consistency and demonstrated to be good tools to distinguish symptomatic patients. The EORTC questionnaires still demonstrated sensitivity to distinguish T3 and T4 staging. Conceptual differences and the psychometric characteristics are discussed. Our results suggest that these two instruments assess different aspects of Health Related Quality of Life - the questionnaires should be used separately and chosen according to the study objectives and methodology. Conclusions This study emphases the importance in selecting the appropriate tool as a critical success factor in implementing routine Health Related Quality of Life assessment in clinical practice. This decision assumes particularly importance when utilization

  3. Q36R polymorphism of KiSS-1 gene in Brazilian head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mariângela Torreglosa; Galbiatti, Ana Lívia Silva; Pavarino, Erika Cristina; Maniglia, José Victor; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria

    2012-05-01

    The KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor gene (KiSS-1) product (metastin, kisspeptin) is reported to act after binding with the natural ligand of a G-protein coupled receptor and this gene product inhibits chemotaxis, invasion, and metastasis of cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Q36R polymorphism of KiSS-1 in patients with head and neck cancer and to compare the results with healthy individuals and its association with clinicopathological parameters. Gender, age, smoking and alcohol consumption were analyzed for 744 individual (252 head and neck cancer patients and in 522 control individuals). The molecular analysis of these individuals was made after extraction of genomic DNA using the SSCP-PCR technique. This study did not reveal any significant differences in genotype frequencies between healthy individuals and patients with head and neck cancer or with the clinical parameters. This study showed an increase frequency of the Q36R polymorphism in pharyngeal cancer.

  4. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition.

  5. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition. PMID:27588193

  6. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; ten Haken, Bennie; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van ‘t Veld, Aart A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT) with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors. Methods and Materials For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields), minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields) plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm) and range error (±3%) combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT. Results The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10) patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0–21.1) and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9–11.2) on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing. Conclusions The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax) IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans. PMID:27030987

  7. Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Detect Local Tumor Recurrence in Primary Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Park, Ji Eun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Treatment failures in head and neck cancer patients are mainly related to locoregional tumor recurrence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of model-free dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to detect local recurrence during the surveillance of head and neck cancer patients.Our retrospective study enrolled 24 patients with primary head and neck cancer who had undergone definitive treatment. Patients were grouped into local recurrence (n = 12) or posttreatment change (n = 12) groups according to the results of biopsy or clinicoradiologic follow-up. The types of time-signal intensity (TSI) curves were classified as follows: "progressive increment" as type I, "plateau" as type II, and "washout" as type III. TSI curve types and their parameters (i.e., wash-in, Emax, Tmax, area under the curve [AUC]60, AUC90, and AUC120) were compared between the 2 study groups.The distributions of TSI curve types for local recurrence versus posttreatment change were statistically significant (P < 0.001) (i.e., 0% vs 83.3% for type I, 58.3% vs 16.7% for type II, and 41.7% vs 0% for type III). There were statistically significant differences in Emax, Tmax, and all of the AUC parameters between 2 groups (P < 0.0083 [0.05/6]). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses indicated that the TSI curve type was the best predictor of local recurrence with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 73.5-100.0) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI, 51.6-97.9) (cutoff with type II).Model-free DCE-MRI using TSI curves and TSI curve-derived parameters detects local recurrence in head and neck cancer patients with a high diagnostic accuracy.

  8. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  9. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 29: Characterization of Patient Immobilization for Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Courneyea, L; Mullins, J; Howard, M; Beltran, C; Brinkmann, D; Pafundi, D

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Evaluate an immobilization system to determine its adequacy for the reduced margins required for proton therapy. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients were immobilized for conventional photon radiotherapy and imaged with pre- and post-treatment cone beam CTs (CBCTs) for each treatment fraction. To quantify the patient positioning reproducibility, each CBCT was registered to the simulation CT offline. Registrations were performed using auto-match tools and a matching volume-of-interest (VOI) consisting of a 5mm expansion around the mandible, occipital bone, C1/C2 and C7/T1. For each registration, the bony anatomy in the VOI was evaluated for agreement with the simulation position using 3 and 5mm margins. Registrations were initially restricted to translational corrections. If the bony anatomy did not agree with the simulation position to within 3mm or 5mm, the auto-match was repeated with 3 additional rotational corrections. Intrafraction motion was calculated as the difference between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT matches. Results: Pre-treatment patient positioning agreed with the simulation CT to within 3mm/5mm for 62%/86% of fractions using translational matching and 84%/100% of fractions when rotations were included. Intrafraction motion averaged 1.1±0.8mm, with 12% of fractions having >2mm intrafraction motion. Post-treatment positioning accuracy was 57%/84% and 80%/100% for registrations without/with rotations. For the mandible, positioning accuracy dropped from 93% pre-treatment to 82% post-treatment. Conclusion: If rotational corrections are available, the immobilization system studied created reproducible patient positioning to within 3mm for 84% of fractions. However, intrafraction motion caused additional anatomy to fall outside the 3mm margin by the end of treatment.

  11. Transcervical approach to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion in a patient with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Amir Hafeez; Waqas, Muhammad; Akhtar, Shabbir

    2014-08-01

    This is the case of a 48-year-old woman with recurrent head and neck cancer. Six years before presenting at our institution, she was diagnosed with a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma involving the right maxilla and underwent surgical resection followed by chemoradiation. More recently, she presented at our institution with oral bleeding and pain. Examination revealed severe trismus, and biopsy demonstrated recurrent squamous cell carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection with a plan for simultaneous placement of a feeding gastrostomy tube. Owing to the near non-existent mouth opening, traditional per-oral placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube was impossible. Intraoperatively, following tumor resection, endoscopy was performed via direct pharyngeal access through a right cervical incision. The PEG tube was then placed uneventfully. Numerous studies have shown the superiority of PEG tubes over either radiologically or surgically placed gastrostomy tubes. This report describes an approach to PEG placement in a patient in whom per-oral placement was not feasible.

  12. Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) of the head and neck: retrospective analysis of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Papaspyrou, Giorgos; Linxweiler, Maximilian; Schick, Bernhard; Rübe, Christian; Büchler, Benjamin Simeon; Niewald, Marcus

    2017-03-17

    The treatment of patients with cervical lymph node metastases without detectable primary tumor remains an important challenge, until today, no standard therapy is available. The present study investigated the multimodal treatment of patients with head and neck CUP syndrome (HNCUP) and their follow-up retrospectively. 81 patients with cervical lymph node metastases without a primary tumor were treated at the Departments of Otorhinolaryngology as well as Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology at the University of Saarland in Homburg, Germany in the period between 1991 and 2013. All patients received routine work-up consisting of CUP panendoscopy and imaging. Neck dissection was then performed in 77% of the patients. The most common histology was squamous cell carcinoma (80%). Ten percent of the patients had distant metastases. All patients underwent primary or adjuvant radiation therapy, or simultaneous radiochemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, the 5-year survival rate was 30%. There was a local recurrence that was known in 20/63 patients (31%) and distant metastases were documented in 19/61 M0 patients (31%). Higher grade late toxicity (grade 3-4) was observed in 12% of patients. Neck dissection and radiation therapy remains an integral part of HNCUP therapy, while the use of chemotherapy could be considered in selected cases. Prospective multicenter randomized trials would be necessary to identify the best target volume and to clarify the role of chemotherapy.

  13. Perioperative assessment of psychological state and quality of life of head and neck cancer patients undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yumi; Matsushima, Eisuke; Omura, Ken

    2009-02-01

    This study assessed psychological state and quality of life (QOL) in head and neck cancer patients during the perioperative period. Patients who had undergone primary surgery at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan were enrolled. After obtaining informed consent, three tests were administered: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to assess psychological state, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General (FACT-G) and Functional Assessment of Head and Neck (FACT-H&N) to assess QOL. Japanese language versions of all tests were administered. Tests were administered 1 day before surgery, 1 week after surgery, and 1 and 6 months after discharge. Test scores were analyzed, as were relationships between psychological state, QOL and clinical factors. Anxiety was greatest before surgery, while depression was greatest immediately after surgery. QOL in the somatic and specific domains also decreased immediately after surgery. QOL in most domains improved 1 month after discharge. This study offers important information regarding perioperative psychological state and QOL in head and neck cancer patients.

  14. Risk of Esophageal Cancer Following Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Chun-Shu; Lee, Shih-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chang, Wei-Kuo

    2016-03-01

    Esophageal cancers account for majority of synchronous or metachronous head and neck cancers. This study examined the risk of esophageal cancer following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in head and neck cancer patients using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From 1997 to 2010, we identified and analyzed 1851 PEG patients and 3702 sex-, age-, and index date-matched controls. After adjusting for esophagitis, esophagus stricture, esophageal reflux, and primary sites, the PEG cohort had a higher adjusted hazard ratio (2.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-4.09) of developing esophageal cancer than the controls. Primary tumors in the oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx were associated with higher incidence of esophageal cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios were 1.49 (95% CI = 1.01-1.88), 3.99 (95% CI = 2.76-4.98), and 1.98 (95% CI = 1.11-2.76), respectively. Head and neck cancer patients treated with PEG were associated with a higher risk of developing esophageal cancer, which could be fixed by surgically placed tubes.

  15. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  16. SU-E-J-225: CEST Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Hwang, K; Fuller, C; Mohamed, A; Ding, Y; Frank, S; Hazle, J; Zhou, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging is an MRI technique enables the detection and imaging of metabolically active compounds in vivo. It has been used to differentiate tumor types and metabolic characteristics. Unlike PET/CT,CEST imaging does not use isotopes so it can be used on patient repeatedly. This study is to report the preliminary results of CEST imaging in Head and Neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods: A CEST imaging sequence and the post-processing software was developed on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. Ten patients with Human papilloma virus positive oropharyngeal cancer were imaged in their immobilized treatment position. A 5 mm slice CEST image was acquired (128×128, FOV=20∼24cm) to encompass the maximum dimension of tumor. Twenty-nine off-set frequencies (from −7.8ppm to +7.8 ppm) were acquired to obtain the Z-spectrum. Asymmetry analysis was used to extract the CEST contrasts. ROI at the tumor, node and surrounding tissues were measured. Results: CEST images were successfully acquired and Zspectrum asymmetry analysis demonstrated clear CEST contrasts in tumor as well as the surrounding tissues. 3∼5% CEST contrast in the range of 1 to 4 ppm was noted in tumor as well as grossly involved nodes. Injection of glucose produced a marked increase of CEST contrast in tumor region (∼10%). Motion and pulsation artifacts tend to smear the CEST contrast, making the interpretation of the image contrast difficult. Field nonuniformity, pulsation in blood vesicle and susceptibility artifacts caused by air cavities were also problematic for CEST imaging. Conclusion: We have demonstrated successful CEST acquisition and Z-spectrum reconstruction on HNC patients with a clinical scanner. MRI acquisition in immobilized treatment position is critical for image quality as well as the success of CEST image acquisition. CEST images provide novel contrast of metabolites in HNC and present great potential in the pre- and post-treatment assessment

  17. Self-image of the Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Mixed Method Research

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Shalini G; Pai, Mamatha Shivananda; George, Linu Sara

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the self-image of the patients with head and neck cancers (HNCs) by using a mixed method research. Subjects and Methods: A mixed method approach and triangulation design was used with the aim of assessing the self-image of the patients with HNCs. Data was gathered by using self-administered self-image scale and structured interview. Nested sampling technique was adopted. Sample size for quantitative approach was 54 and data saturation was achieved with seven subjects for qualitative approach. Institutional Ethical Committee clearance was obtained. Results: The results of the study showed that 30 (56%) subjects had positive self-image and 24 (44%) had negative self-image. There was a moderate positive correlation between body image and integrity (r = 0.430, P = 0.001), weak positive correlation between body image and self-esteem (r = 0.270, P = 0.049), and no correlation between self-esteem and integrity (r = 0.203, P = 0.141). The participants also scored maximum (24/24) in the areas of body image and self-esteem. Similar findings were also observed in the phenomenological approach. The themes evolved were immaterial of outer appearance and desire of good health to all. Conclusion: The illness is long-term and impacts the individual 24 h a day. Understanding patients’ self-concept and living experiences of patients with HNC is important for the health care professionals to improve the care. PMID:27559264

  18. Effect of Recombinant Human Deoxyribonuclease on Oropharyngeal Secretions in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancers Treated With Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Bharat B.; Wang, Edward; Sejpal, Samir; Agulnik, Mark; Mittal, Amit; Harris, Kirk

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The current study examined the effect of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) on quality of life (QOL) measures, clinical improvement, and DNA content of thick oropharyngeal secretions (OPS) in patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with local-regional advanced H and N cancer receiving chemoradiationtherapy (CRT) were randomized to receive either placebo or rhDNase. Endpoints included MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Head and Neck (FACT-NH) scores, along with clinical assessment and DNA concentration of OPS. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in patients' QOL outcomes over the study period. Both groups showed an increase in symptom and interference scores, although patients in the rhDNase group showed a greater decline in both scores during the 3 months posttreatment. Similarly, both groups showed a decline in physical and functional well being but recovered in the 3 months posttreatment follow-up, with the rhDNase group exhibiting speedier recovery. Patients in the rhDNase group exhibited significant clinical improvement in OPS, blindly assessed by a physician, compared with the placebo group (67% vs 27%, respectively; P=.046). The rhDNase group showed no change in OPS-DNA concentration, although the placebo group showed a significant increase in DNA concentration during the drug trial (P=.045). There was no differences in acute toxicities between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our preliminary data suggest that rhDNase did not significantly improve study primary endpoints of QOL measures compared with the placebo group. However, there was a significant improvement in secondary endpoints of clinically assessed OPS and DNA concentration compared with placebo in H and N cancer patients treated with CRT. Further investigation in larger numbers of patients is warranted.

  19. Dual-Lumen Chest Port Infection Rates in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Aaron Ahmed, Osman; Jilani, Danial; Giger, Maryellen; Funaki, Brian S.; Zangan, Steven M.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate dual-lumen chest port infection rates in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) compared to those with other malignancies (non-HNC).Materials and MethodsAn IRB-approved retrospective study was performed on 1,094 consecutive chest ports placed over a 2-year period. Patients with poor follow-up (n = 53), no oncologic history (n = 13), or single-lumen ports (n = 183) were excluded yielding a study population of 845 patients. The electronic medical records were queried for demographic information, data regarding ports and infections, and imaging review.ResultsHNC patients experienced more infections (42 vs. 30), an increased infection rate per 1,000 catheter days (0.68 vs. 0.21), and more early infections within 30 days compared to non-HNC patients (10 vs. 6) (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.02, respectively). An existing tracheostomy at the time of port placement was associated with infection in the HNC group (p = 0.02) but was not an independent risk factor for infection in the study population overall (p = 0.06). There was a significant difference in age, male gender, and right-sided ports between the HNC and non-HNC groups (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, and p = 0.01), although these were not found to be independent risk factors for infection (p = 0.32, p = 0.76, p = 0.16).ConclusionHNC patients are at increased risk for infection of dual-lumen chest ports placed via a jugular approach compared to patients with other malignancies. Tracheostomy is associated with infection in HNC patients but is not an independent risk factor for infection in the oncologic population as a whole.

  20. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  1. Smoking cessation care among patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Kristen; Martínez, Úrsula; Britton, Ben; Baker, Amanda; Bonevski, Billie; Carter, Gregory; Beck, Alison; Wratten, Chris; Guillaumier, Ashleigh; Halpin, Sean A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in improving cessation rates and smoking related behaviour in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Design A systematic review of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. Methods We searched the following data sources: CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL up to February 2016. A search of reference lists of included studies and Google Scholar (first 200 citations published online between 2000 and February 2016) was also undertaken. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool (EPHPP). 2 study authors independently screened and extracted data with disagreements resolved via consensus. Results Of the 5167 studies identified, 3 were eligible and included in the review. Trial designs of included studies were 2 randomised controlled trials and 1 non-randomised controlled trial. 2 studies received a weak methodological rating and 1 received a moderate methodological rating. The trials examine the impact of the following interventions: (1) nurse delivered cognitive–behaviour therapy (CBT) via telephone and accompanied by a workbook, combined with pharmacotherapy; (2) nurse and physician brief advice to quit and information booklets combined with pharmacotherapy; and (3) surgeon delivered enhanced advice to quit smoking augmented by booster sessions. Only the trial of the nurse delivered CBT and pharmacotherapy reported significant increases in smoking cessation rates. 1 study measured quit attempts and the other assessed consumption of cigarettes per day and readiness to change. There was no significant improvement in quit attempts or cigarettes smoked per day among patients in the intervention groups, relative to control. Conclusions There are very few studies evaluating the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions that report results specific to the HNC

  2. Quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer: are we improving?

    PubMed

    Best, James; Muzaffar, Jameel; Mitchell-Innes, Alistair

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the type, content, accessibility and quality of information available via the internet for patients with head and neck cancer. The Google search engine was used to generate lists of the first 100 websites for general head and neck cancer and the first ten for head and neck cancers by anatomical location (160 total). Websites were evaluated with the validated DISCERN and LIDA instruments, the SMOG (Simple measure of gobbledygook) readability score and against the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) criteria. 40 of the 160 websites ranked by Google were suitable for analysis. Seven websites (17.5%) partially or fully achieved all four JAMA benchmarks and only one (2.5%) site achieved none. 28 (70%) included reference to quality of life factors. Correlations were identified between Google site rank and all four of our appraisal tools; LIDA (-0.966, p = 0.006), JAMA (-5.93, p = 0.028), DISCERN (-0.568, p = 0.037) and SMOG (4.678, p = 0.04). Google site rank and both government run sites (-35.38, p = 0.034) and sites run by universities or hospitals (-27.32, p = 0.016) also showed an association. Comparing our observations with those of Riordain in 2008, there has been little improvement in the quality of head and neck cancer information available online over this time. Given the variability in quality of information online, patients would benefit from being directed to reliable websites by clinicians.

  3. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Anne, Pramila Rani . E-mail: rani.anne@mail.tju.edu; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients.

  4. [Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Hypomagnesemia in Patients Receiving Cetuximab Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer].

    PubMed

    Inose, Ryo; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Nagayama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Cetuximab was approved in Japan as the only clinically available molecular targeted drug for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Hypomagnesemia associated with cetuximab is considered one of the most serious adverse events. However, the factors influencing the development of hypomagnesemia are not clear, although the drug was previously approved for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Thus, we studied the factors involved in the development of hypomagnesemia in patients receiving cetuximab therapy for head and neck cancer. Patients' background data and laboratory values before starting cetuximab therapy did not affect the development of hypomagnesemia. Among patients who had never been treated with cisplatin (NT group), 36.4% developed hypomagnesemia. In contrast, all patients who had previously been treated with cisplatin (T group) developed hypomagnesemia (p=0.034). Magnesium is reabsorbed by transient receptor potential subfamily melastatin 6 (TRPM6) in the distal convoluted tubule. The expression level of TRPM6 is controlled by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. Cetuximab is an EGF receptor inhibitor and reduces the expression of TRPM6. Additionally, recent studies have shown that the expression of TRPM6 is reduced by cisplatin. Therefore, we considered that the serum magnesium level was cumulatively reduced by cetuximab and cisplatin. In conclusion, the T group was more likely to develop hypomagnesemia than the NT group, and therefore the serum magnesium level in the T group requires careful monitoring so that magnesium supplementation can be provided to patients when the level decreases.

  5. Transaminase Activity Predicts Survival in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Yukinori; Takemoto, Norihiko; Yasui, Toshimichi; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Uno, Atsuhiko; Miyabe, Haruka; Ashida, Naoki; Shimizu, Kotaro; Nakahara, Susumu; Hanamoto, Atshushi; Fukusumi, Takahito; Michiba, Takahiro; Cho, Hironori; Yamamoto, Masashi; Inohara, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Various serum biomarkers have been developed for predicting head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) prognosis. However, none of them have been proven to be clinically significant. A recent study reported that the ratio of aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) to alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) had a prognostic effect on non-metastatic cancers. This study aimed to examine the effect of the AST/ALT ratio on the survival of patients with HNSCC. Clinical data of 356 patients with locoregionally advanced HNSCC were collected. The effect of the AST/ALT ratio on overall survival was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazard model. Moreover, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to divide the patients into groups on the basis of the clinical stage and AST/ALT ratio. The prognostic ability of this grouping was validated using an independent data set (N = 167). The AST/ALT ratio ranged from 0.42 to 4.30 (median, 1.42) and was a prognostic factor for overall survival that was independent of age, primary sites, and tumor stage (hazard ratio: 1.36, confidence interval: 1.08−1.68, P = 0.010). RPA divided patients with stage IVA into the following two subgroups: high AST/ALT (≥2.3) and low AST/ALT (<2.3) subgroups. The 5-year survival rate for patients with stage III, stage IVA with a low AST/ALT ratio, stage IVA with a high AST/ALT ratio, and stage IVB were 64.8%, 49.2%, 28.6%, and 33.3%, respectively (p < 0.001). Compared with the low AST/ALT group, the adjusted hazard ratio for death was 2.17 for high AST/ALT group (confidence interval: 1.02–.22 P = 0.045). The AST/ALT ratio was demonstrated to be a prognostic factor of HNSCC. The ratio subdivided patients with stage IVA into low- and high-risk groups. Moreover, intensified treatment for the high-risk group may be considered. PMID:27732629

  6. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  7. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Akio Kato, Kenichi Suzuki, Michiko; Sone, Miyuki; Tanaka, Ryoichi Nakasato, Tatsuhiko Ehara, Shigeru

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.

  8. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  9. Intravenous paracetamol infusion: Superior pain management and earlier discharge from hospital in patients undergoing palliative head-neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Saikat; Das, Anjan; Kundu, Ratul; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Hazra, Bimal; Mitra, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol; a cyclooxygenase inhibitor; acts through the central nervous system as well as serotoninergic system as a nonopioid analgesic. A prospective, double-blinded, and randomized-controlled study was carried out to compare the efficacy of preoperative 1g intravenous (iv) paracetamol with placebo in providing postoperative analgesia in head-neck cancer surgery. Materials and Methods: From 2008 February to 2009 December, 80 patients for palliative head-neck cancer surgery were randomly divided into (F) and (P) Group receiving ivplacebo and iv paracetamol, respectively, 5 min before induction. Everybody received fentanyl before induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief at8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and amount of fentanyl were measured for postoperative pain assessment (24 h). Results and Statistical analysis: The mean VAS score in 1st, 2nd postoperative hour, and fentanyl requirement was less and the need for rescue analgesic was delayed in ivparacetamol group which were all statistically significant. Paracetamol group had a shorter surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and hospital stay which was also statistically significant. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the effectiveness of ivparacetamol as preemptive analgesic in the postoperative pain control after head-neck cancer surgery and earlier discharge from hospital. PMID:25276627

  10. Nuclear anomalies, chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rates in cultured lymphocytes of head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    George, Alex; Dey, Rupraj; Bhuria, Vikas; Banerjee, Shouvik; Ethirajan, Sivakumar; Siluvaimuthu, Ashok; Saraswathy, Radha

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are extremely complex disease types and it is likely that chromosomal instability is involved in the genetic mechanisms of its genesis. However, there is little information regarding the background levels of chromosome instability in these patients. In this pilot study, we examined spontaneous chromosome instability in short-term lymphocyte cultures (72 hours) from 72 study subjects - 36 newly diagnosed HNC squamous cell carcinoma patients and 36 healthy ethnic controls. We estimated chromosome instability (CIN) using chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis and nuclear level anomalies using the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus Cytome Assay (CBMN Cyt Assay). The proliferation rates in cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were assessed by calculating the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI). Our results showed a significantly higher mean level of spontaneous chromosome type aberrations (CSAs), chromatid type aberration (CTAs) dicentric chromosomes (DIC) and chromosome aneuploidy (CANEUP) in patients (CSAs, 0.0294±0.0038; CTAs, 0.0925±0.0060; DICs, 0.0213±0.0028; and CANEUPs, 0.0308±0.0035) compared to controls (CSAs, 0.0005±0.0003; CTAs, 0.0058±0.0015; DICs, 0.0005±0.0003; and CANEUPs, 0.0052±0.0013) where p<0.001. Similarly, spontaneous nuclear anomalies showed significantly higher mean level of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) among cases (MNi, 0.01867±0.00108; NPBs, 0.01561±0.00234; NBUDs, 0.00658±0.00068) compared with controls (MNi, 0.00027±0.00009; NPBs, 0.00002±0.00002; NBUDs, 0.00011±0.00007).The evaluation of CBPI supported genomic instability in the peripheral blood lymphocytes showing a significantly lower proliferation rate in HNC patients (1.525±0.005552) compared to healthy subjects (1.686±0.009520 ) (p<0.0001). In conclusion, our preliminary results showed that visible spontaneous genomic instability and low rate proliferation in the cultured peripheral

  11. Influence of pain severity on the quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer before antineoplastic therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the severity of pain and its impact on the quality of life (QoL) in untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods A study group of 127 patients with HNSCC were interviewed before antineoplastic treatment. The severity of pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire, and the QoL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the head and neck module (QLQ-H&N35). Results The mean age of the patients was 57.9 years, and there was a predominance of men (87.4%). The most frequent site of the primary tumor was the oral cavity (70.6%), and the majority of the patients had advanced cancers (stages III and IV). QoL in early stage of cancer obtained better scores. Conversely, the patients with advanced stage cancer scored significantly higher on the symptom scales regarding fatigue, pain, appetite loss and financial difficulties, indicating greater difficulties. Regard to the severity of pain, patients with moderate-severe pain revealed a significantly worse score than patients without pain. Conclusions The severity of pain is statistically related to the advanced stages of cancer and directly affects the QoL. An assessment of the quality of life and symptoms before therapy can direct attention to the most important symptoms, and appropriate interventions can then be directed toward improving QoL outcomes and the response to treatment. PMID:24460780

  12. Erlotinib, Docetaxel, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-05

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. Association between aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms and the phenomenon of field cancerization in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Muto, Manabu; Nakane, Mari; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Sasaki, Satoshi; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Ebihara, Satoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu

    2002-10-01

    Patients with squamous-cell carcinoma in the head and neck (HNSCC) often develop second primary esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas (ESCC). In addition, widespread epithelial oncogenic alterations are also frequently observed in the esophagus and can be made visible as multiple Lugol-voiding lesions (multiple LVL) by Lugol chromoendoscopy. Multiple occurrences of neoplastic change in the upper aerodigestive tract have been explained by the concept of 'field cancerization', usually associated with repeated exposure to carcinogens such as alcohol and cigarette smoke. However, the etiology of second ESCC in HNSCC patients remains unclear and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, has been implicated as the ultimate carcinogen in alcohol-related carcinogenesis. We first investigated the relation between second ESCC and multiple LVL in 78 HNSCC patients. Multiple LVL and second ESCC were observed in 29 (37%) and 21 (27%) patients, respectively. All of the second ESCC were accompanied by multiple LVL. This may indicate that episodes of multiple LVL are precursors for second ESCC. We then examined the association of multiple LVL with the patients' characteristics, including genetic polymorphisms of the alcohol metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase type 3 (ADH3) and aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2). We also investigated acetaldehyde concentrations in the breath of 52 of the 78 patients. All the patients with multiple LVL were both drinkers and smokers. Multivariable logistic analysis showed that the inactive ALDH2 allele (ALDH2-2) was the strongest contributing factor for the development of multiple LVL (odds ratio 17.6; 95% confidence intervals 4.7-65.3). After alcohol ingestion, acetaldehyde in the breath was elevated to a significantly higher level in all patients with the ALDH2-2 allele than in those without it. The high levels of breath acetaldehyde were significantly modified by the slow-metabolizing ADH3-2 allele. These results reveal strong

  14. Effect of selective elimination of the oral flora on mucositis in irradiated head and neck cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Spijkervet, F.K.; Van Saene, H.K.; Van Saene, J.J.; Panders, A.K.; Vermey, A.; Mehta, D.M.; Fidler, V. )

    1991-03-01

    Recently it has been reported that chlorhexidine 0.1% rinsing was not successful in eradication of gram-negative bacilli in patients who have head and neck cancer. These bacilli could play a role in irradiation mucositis. This study reports the effect of lozenges containing 2 mg polymyxin E, 1.8 mg tobramycin, and 10 mg amphotericin B qid on the oropharyngeal flora in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients. The results were compared with those of a previous study in two groups of 15 patients comparing chlorhexidine rinsing with placebo. In all patients using lozenges, eradication of gram-negative bacilli and yeasts was achieved within 3 weeks. A significant increase of enterococci was found. Mucositis was significantly reduced compared with the previous two groups. All patients showed erythema only, whereas 80% of both the placebo and chlorhexidine rinsing patients suffered from severe mucositis, with signs of pseudomembranes developing from the third week of conventional irradiation protocol. The effect of selective elimination of gram-negative bacilli from the oropharynx and the prevention of severe mucositis may be explained by the eradication of these bacteria and/or neutralization of salivary endotoxin, released by gram-negative bacilli, mediating the inflammatory processes.

  15. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, and Hydroxyurea Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous

  16. Pretreatment performance status and nutrition are associated with early mortality of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Huang, Jen-Seng; Lai, Chien-Hong; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lan, Yii-Jenq; Tsai, Jason Chien-Sheng; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-05-01

    Unexpected fatal events in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy are a clinical concern. Malnutrition, which is reported frequently in head and neck cancer patients, are associated with immunity derangement. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for early death of patients undergoing chemoradiation. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 194 stage III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer patients who were treated with chemoradiation between 2007 and 2009. We defined early death as death while receiving chemoradiation or within 60 days of treatment completion. Risk factors for early death were tested using univariate and multivariate analyses. Fourteen patients (7.2 %) experienced early death, 78.6 % of whom died of infection. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between early death and several pretreatment variables, including Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) >1, hemoglobin <10 g/dL, albumin <3 g/dL, body mass index (BMI) <19 kg/m(2), and peripheral blood total lymphocyte count <700/μL. Multivariate analysis showed that PS >1, BMI <19 kg/m(2), and peripheral blood total lymphocyte count <700/μL were independent variables associated with early death. Poor performance status and malnutrition before chemoradiation independently predict early death in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation. Cautious management of head and neck cancer patients with these risk factors is required throughout chemoradiation period.

  17. Head and neck cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Stepnick, David; Gilpin, David

    2010-05-01

    Ablative surgery for malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract is the most common reason why the reconstructive surgeon is called upon to reconstruct adult head and neck defects. An understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of head and neck malignancy is vital to the reconstructive surgeon so that restoration of both form and function can be achieved. It is important to understand the behavior of cancers of each head and neck subsite, as staging and ultimately the treatment of tumors from each subsite is different. Historically, the standard treatment of head and neck cancer was surgery and/or primary radiation therapy with surgical salvage for failure. Beginning in the 1980s, advances in chemotherapy and concurrent delivery with radiation offered new options to standard surgical therapy. Over the past two decades, the concept of organ preservation using chemotherapy together with radiation therapy has been definitively established. Yet, even with the strides made over these two decades with chemoradiation, surgical treatment of head and neck cancer and reconstruction thereof will be an important treatment option for the foreseeable future. Therefore, the relationship between the extirpative and reconstructive surgeon is vital, and a clear understanding of the biology and behavior of head and neck malignancy is crucial to successful patient outcomes.

  18. The Effects of Compliance with Nutritional Counselling on Body Composition Parameters in Head and Neck Cancer Patients under Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hopanci Bicakli, D; Ozkaya Akagunduz, O; Meseri Dalak, R; Esassolak, M; Uslu, R; Uyar, M

    2017-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) has been associated with increased risk of malnutrition in cancer patients, particularly in those with head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of compliance of patients with individual dietary counselling on body composition parameters in HNC patients under RT. Material and Methods. Sixty-nine consecutive patients (mean age: 61.0 ± 13.8) were prospectively followed. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was performed to determine body composition parameters before, in the middle of, and at the end of RT. All patients received nutritional counselling and majority of them (94.6%) received oral nutritional supplement (ONS) during RT or chemoradiotherapy. If a patient consumed ≥75% of the recommended energy and protein intake via ONS and regular food, he/she was considered to be "compliant" (n = 18), while those who failed to meet this criteria were considered to be "noncompliant" (n = 30). Results. Body mass index, weight, fat percentage, fat mass, fat free mass, and muscle mass did not decrease significantly over time in compliant patients, but in noncompliant patients, all of these indices decreased significantly from baseline compared to the end of treatment (p < 0.001). Hand grip strength did not differ significantly between the two groups at baseline and over time in each group. When retrospectively evaluated, heavy mucositis was less commonly observed in compliant than noncompliant patients (11.1% versus 88.9%, resp.) (p < 0.009). Conclusion. We conclude that body composition parameters were better in head and neck cancer patients considered as compliant with nutritional counselling than noncompliant ones during RT period.

  19. The Effects of Compliance with Nutritional Counselling on Body Composition Parameters in Head and Neck Cancer Patients under Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya Akagunduz, O.; Meseri Dalak, R.; Esassolak, M.; Uyar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) has been associated with increased risk of malnutrition in cancer patients, particularly in those with head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of compliance of patients with individual dietary counselling on body composition parameters in HNC patients under RT. Material and Methods. Sixty-nine consecutive patients (mean age: 61.0 ± 13.8) were prospectively followed. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was performed to determine body composition parameters before, in the middle of, and at the end of RT. All patients received nutritional counselling and majority of them (94.6%) received oral nutritional supplement (ONS) during RT or chemoradiotherapy. If a patient consumed ≥75% of the recommended energy and protein intake via ONS and regular food, he/she was considered to be “compliant” (n = 18), while those who failed to meet this criteria were considered to be “noncompliant” (n = 30). Results. Body mass index, weight, fat percentage, fat mass, fat free mass, and muscle mass did not decrease significantly over time in compliant patients, but in noncompliant patients, all of these indices decreased significantly from baseline compared to the end of treatment (p < 0.001). Hand grip strength did not differ significantly between the two groups at baseline and over time in each group. When retrospectively evaluated, heavy mucositis was less commonly observed in compliant than noncompliant patients (11.1% versus 88.9%, resp.) (p < 0.009). Conclusion. We conclude that body composition parameters were better in head and neck cancer patients considered as compliant with nutritional counselling than noncompliant ones during RT period. PMID:28116152

  20. Indomethacin sensitive suppressor cell activity in head and neck cancer patients pre- and postirradiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maca, R.D.; Panje, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    The effects of the addition of indomethacin to PHA or Con A stimulated lymphocytes from patients with untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or from patients with the disease who have just finished irradiation therapy from the disease was quantitated and compared to those of the control group. Lymphocytes from eight of 26 patients with untreated carcinoma were significantly augmented by the addition of indomethacin. The remaining eighteen patients were equal to the controls. For all 17 patients who had just finished extensive field irradiation therapy, significant enhancement of PHA and Con A reactivity by indomethacin was found, which did not appear to be solely a function of low baseline mitogen reactivity. The results of this study support the hypothesis that perhaps patients receiving irradiation therapy may benefit by the oral administration of indomethacin, an approach that needs further consideration.

  1. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Results Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. Conclusions The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy. PMID:22313843

  2. Venous Thromboembolism—Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Tertiary Care Experience in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem Sultan; Nawaz, Ahmad; Junaid, Montasir; Kazi, Maliha; Akhtar, Shabbir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) is seen with morbidity and mortality in various surgical specialties, scarce data are available in the head and neck surgery domain. Objective We aim to determine the incidence of VTE in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer. Methods Four hundred thirteen patients who underwent head and neck surgery procedures between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients with head and neck surgery had received thromboprophylaxis (i.e., compression stockings and subcutaneous heparin). Patient demographics, operating time, and length of hospital stay were analyzed. The incidence of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) during the initial postoperative hospitalization was assessed. Results Twelve patients were identified who developed VTE. Three patients developed DVT, and nine developed PE. The incidence of DVT and PE was 0.72 and 2.17%, respectively. Interestingly, all of these patients had undergone excision of extensive head and neck cancers accompanied by a reconstructive procedure. Patients who developed PE had a longer hospital stay compared with those who only had DVT. There were overall three mortalities in the nine patients who developed PE. Conclusion Although VTE has a low incidence, it is a known complication of extensive head and neck surgeries with life-threatening outcomes. We recommend early mobilization and physiotherapy with the possible aid from appropriate mechanical and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. PMID:26157492

  3. Is ExacTrac x-ray system an alternative to CBCT for positioning patients with head and neck cancers?

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, Stefania; Chiumento, Costanza; Fiorentino, Alba; Cozzolino, Mariella; Oliviero, Caterina; Califano, Giorgia; Caivano, Rocchina; Fusco, Vincenzo; Simeon, Vittorio

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a six-degrees-of freedom (6D) correction using ExacTrac robotics system in patients with head-and-neck (HN) cancer receiving radiation therapy.Methods: Local setup accuracy was analyzed for 12 patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patient position was imaged daily upon two different protocols, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and ExacTrac (ET) images correction. Setup data from either approach were compared in terms of both residual errors after correction and punctual displacement of selected regions of interest (Mandible, C2, and C6 vertebral bodies).Results: On average, both protocols achieved reasonably low residual errors after initial correction. The observed differences in shift vectors between the two protocols showed that CBCT tends to weight more C2 and C6 at the expense of the mandible, while ET tends to average more differences among the different ROIs.Conclusions: CBCT, even without 6D correction capabilities, seems preferable to ET for better consistent alignment and the capability to see soft tissues. Therefore, in our experience, CBCT represents a benchmark for positioning head and neck cancer patients.

  4. Clinical impact of surveillance for head and neck cancer in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Yano, Tomonori; Yoda, Yusuke; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical impact of surveillance for head and neck (HN) region with narrow band imaging (NBI) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Since 2006, we introduced the surveillance for HN region using NBI for all patients with ESCC before treatment, and each follow-up. The patients with newly diagnosed stage I to III ESCC were enrolled and classified into two groups as follows: Group A (no surveillance for HN region); between 1992 and 2000), and Group B (surveillance for HN region with NBI; between 2006 and 2008). We comparatively evaluated the detection rate of superficial head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and the serious events due to metachronous advanced HNSCC during the follow-up. RESULTS A total 561 patients (group A: 254, group B: 307) were enrolled. Synchronous superficial HNSCC was detected in 1 patient (0.3%) in group A, and in 12 (3.9%) in group B (P = 0.008). During the follow up period, metachronous HNSCC were detected in 10 patients (3.9%) in group A and in 30 patients (9.8%) in group B (P = 0.008). All metachronous lesions in group B were early stage, and 26 patients underwent local resection, however, 6 of 10 patients (60%) in group A lost their laryngeal function and died with metachronous HNSCC. CONCLUSION Surveillance for the HN region by using NBI endoscopy increase the detection rate of early HNSCC in patients with ESCC, and led to decrease serious events related to advanced metachronous HNSCC. PMID:28246479

  5. Quality of life associated factors in head and neck cancer patients in a developing country using the FACT-H&N.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Sobia; Doss, Jennifer Geraldine; Cella, David; Rogers, Simon N

    2015-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated factors are vital considerations prior to treatment decision-making for head and neck cancer patients. The study aimed to identify potential socio-demographic and clinical prognostic value of HRQoL in head and neck cancer patients in a developing country. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H&N)-V4 in Urdu language was administered among 361 head and neck cancer patients. Data were statistically tested through multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and regression modeling to identify the potentially associated factors. Treatment status, tumor stage and tumor site had the strongest negative impact on patients HRQoL, with a statistically significant decrement in FACT summary scales (effect size >0.15). Moderate associated factors of HRQoL included treatment type, marital status, employment status and age (effect size range 0.06-0.15). Weak associated factors of HRQoL with a small effect size (>0.01-0.06) included tumor size and type, gender, education level and ethnicity. This study reports 12 socio-demographic and clinical variables that have a significant impact on HRQoL of head, and neck cancer patients, and that should be considered during treatment decision-making by multidisciplinary teams and also in future HRQoL studies conducted in other developing countries.

  6. [Superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for head and neck cancer--for tongue cancer patients in comparison patients with other therapies].

    PubMed

    Furusaka, Tohru

    2006-09-01

    In order to cure head and neck cancer without resection, chemotherapy (superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with DCF) was conducted by anterograde, superselective intra-arterial infusion of 50-60 mg/m(2) of DOC and 50-60 mg/m(2) of CDDP via the femoral artery on day 1 followed by continuous intravenous instillation of 600-750 mg/m(2)/day of 5-FU for 5 days from day 2. A total of 70 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the head and neck have been treated since April 2000. With the median follow-up duration of 1,017 days, the survival rate was 92.7% and the organ preservation rate was 90.1%. Almost no complications associated with this therapy were observed. Due to space limitations, here we report only cases of tongue cancer. Histological CR was obtained from all 19 patients with squamous cell cancer of the tongue. With the median follow-up duration of 1,371 days (45.7 months: 471-2, 133 days), the survival rate was 94.74% and the organ preservation rate was 88.42% by the Kaplan-Meier method. For both the survival rate and organ preservation rate, extremely good results were obtained by the superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with DCF compared to the intravenous infusion therapy using a combination of CDDP and 5-FU (five-year survival rate: 20%) as well as the superselective intra-arterial infusion of CDDP alone followed by continuous intravenous infusion of 5-FU (five year survival rate: 28.5%) that had been conducted before. Major adverse effects observed were leukopenia and alopecia. Although patients who underwent concurrent radiation therapy developed mucositis and dermatitis, both were reversible changes.

  7. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  8. Sequential chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Janinis, J; Papadakou, M; Panagos, G; Panousaki, A; Georgoulias, V; Hatzidaki, D; Lefantzis, D; Dokianakis, G

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the toxicity of a sequential chemoradiotherapy approach using docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (DCF) with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support in previously untreated patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Secondary endpoints included preliminary assessment of response. Patients with locally advanced HNC, a World Health Organization performance status 0 to 2, and no prior history of chemotherapy or radiotherapy were included. Treatment consisted of docetaxel 80 mg/m2 (1-hour infusion) on day 1, cisplatin 40 mg/m2 (1-hour infusion) on days 2 and 3, and 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m2 (24-hour continuous infusion), on days 1 to 3, repeated every 28 days for a maximum of 4 cycles per patient. All patients received granulocyte colony stimulating factors subcutaneously between days 4 and 9. Radiation therapy (RT) to the primary tumor site and neck lymph nodes was planned within 5 weeks of the last cycle of chemotherapy. The primary tumor site received 60 to 70 Gy. Twenty patients (median age 56 years, range: 40-72 years) received a total of 60 cycles of DCF. The median number of cycles was 3 (range: 1-4 cycles). All patients were evaluable for toxicity and response. The most common acute nonhematologic toxicities from DCF induction chemotherapy included alopecia, mucositis, peripheral sensory neuropathy, onycholysis, and asthenia. Febrile neutropenia developed in two patients and grade IV diarrhea in one patient. There were no treatment-related deaths. The overall response rate (RR) after DCF induction chemotherapy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 76.8-103.1%). After the completion of RT, the overall RR was 95% with a complete response rate of 73% (95% CI: 49.9-90.1%). Organ preservation was achieved in eight patients with laryngeal cancer and one patient with base of tongue involvement. After a median follow-up of 36 months (range: 5-43 months) the median disease-free and

  9. Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong; Chen, Guang

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient's neck skin feeling.

  10. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  11. Efficacy of Electrical Stimulation and Exercise for Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Langmore, Susan E; McCulloch, Timothy M; Krisciunas, Gintas P; Lazarus, Cathy L.; Van Daele, Douglas J; Pauloski, Barbara Roa; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrical stimulation (NMES) is a highly sought after but poorly studied treatment for dysphagia among head and neck cancer (HNC) patients with dysphagia. This study investigated the efficacy of NMES in this patient population. Methods In this double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, 170 HNC patients experiencing post-treatment dysphagia were randomized into active NMES + swallow exercise versus sham NMES + swallow exercise groups. Outcomes after a 12-week program included changes in fluoroscopy measures, diet, and quality of life. Results After the 12-week program, the active NMES group had significantly worse Penetration Aspiration Scale scores than the sham group. Both groups reported significantly better diet and quality of life. No other measures were significant. Conclusions NMES did not add benefit to traditional swallow exercises. Unfortunately swallow exercises were not effective by themselves either. For HNC patients with moderate-severe dysphagia caused by radiation therapy, current behavioral therapies are of limited help in reversing long-term dysphagia. PMID:26469360

  12. Outcome Analysis of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer and Extracapsular Spread in Neck Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Extracapsular spread (ECS) in neck lymph nodes is a major adverse prognostic factor in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We conducted a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors in this patient group and tried to identify a subset of patients with a worse prognosis suitable for more aggressive therapeutic interventions. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 255 OSCC patients with ECS in neck nodes and without evidence of distant metastasis. All participants were followed-up for at least 2 years or censored at last follow-up. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: Level IV/V lymph node metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm were independent predictors of 5-year survival and identified three prognostic groups. In the low-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth <12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 60%, 66%, and 50%, respectively. In the intermediate-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 39%, 41%, and 28%, respectively. In the high-risk group (evidence of level IV/V metastases), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 14%, 12%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusions: Among OSCC patients with ECS, those with level IV/V metastases appear to have the worst prognosis followed by without level IV/V metastases and tumor depth {>=}12 mm. An aggressive therapeutic approach may be suitable for intermediate- and high-risk patients.

  13. Impact of Molecular Predictors on the Response Rates in Head and Neck Cancer Patients - an Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, Arvind; Koushik, A S Kirthi; Gowri, Mangala; Janaki, M G; Kilara, Nalini; Ponni, T R Arul; Alva, Ram Charith; Kumar, S Mohan; Kannan, Ram Abhinav; Harjani, Ritika

    2016-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck region account for more than 25 % of male and more than 10 % of female cancers in India (1). Head and neck cancer treatment includes a multidisciplinary approach involving all specialties. Concurrent chemo-radiation is the standard of care in most of the subsites (2). Inspite of the multi-disciplinary approach, a plateau has been reached in terms of results with 5 year survival of locally advanced disease of around 30 % (3). In order to improve outcomes, there has been considerable interest in molecular profiling of head and neck cancers 4-10. However there is still significant paucity in terms of Indian data, hence the need for the study. The objectives are to assess the HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 status, to correlate HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 status with the response rates, to correlate HPV-p16,EGFR and p53 status with other factors like age, sex, tobacco use. Twenty five consecutive cases of histopathologically proven head and neck cancers were accrued. All patients were treated with external radiation to a dose of 66Gy in 33 fractions along with concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy at a dose of 40mg/sqm. HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 mutation analysis was done on paraffin embedded histopathological blocks. PCR technique used for HPV-p16, EGFR and p53 status detection. Response assessment was done based on RECIST criteria. Correlation of HPV, EGFR and p53 status on response was done. The EGFR positivity rate was 84 %, the p53 positivity rate was 76 % and the HPV p-16 positivity rate was 28 %. Out of 25 patients, 13(52%) had complete response, 7(28 %) had partial response, 3(12 %) had stable disease and 2(8 %) had progressive disease. On correlation of molecular profile with response, there was no statistical significance between EGFR status and response (p 0.5) or HPV-p16 and response (p 0.8). However, p53 positivity was approaching significance with respect to good response (p 0.07).

  14. Indomethacin sensitive suppressor cell activity in head and neck cancer patients pre- and postirradiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maca, R.D.; Panje, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    The effects of the addition of indomethacin to PHA or Con A stimulated lymphocytes from patients with untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck or from patients with the disease who have just finished irradiation therapy from the disease was quantitated and compared to those of the control group. Lymphocytes from eight of 26 patients with untreated carcinoma were significantly augmented by the addition of indomethacin. The remaining eighteen patients were equal to the controls. For all 17 patients who had just finished extensive field irradiation therapy, significant enhancement of PHA and Con A reactivity by indomethacin was found, which did not appear to be solely a function of low baseline mitogen reactivity. In additional studies, stimulated lymphocytes of irradiated patients were tested for their sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of PGE2. The mitogen treated lymphocytes from all patients that had just finished irradiation therapy were found to be significantly more sensitive to the inhibition by PGE2 as compared to the normal lymphocyte response. This effect was also found not to be related merely to a low PHA or Con A reactivity of the lymphocytes. The results of this study support the hypothesis that perhaps patients receiving irradiation therapy may benefit by the oral administration of indomethacin, an approach that needs further consideration.

  15. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy 1

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques; Ferreira, Elaine Barros; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate <80%, and was reformulated based on the participants' suggestions. All other items were considered appropriate and/or complete appropriate in the three blocks proposed: objectives - 92.38%, structure and form - 89.74%, and relevance - 94.44%. Conclusion: the face and content validation of the educative manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation. PMID:27305178

  16. Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Pretreatment Evaluation, Predictive Factors, and Assessment during Radio-Chemotherapy, Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco C.; Russi, Elvio G.

    2013-01-01

    Progress in head and neck cancer (HNC) therapies has improved tumor response, loco-regional control, and survival. However, treatment intensification also increases early and late toxicities. Dysphagia is an underestimated symptom in HNC patients. Impairment of swallowing process could cause malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration, and pneumonia. A comprehensive literature review finalized in May 2012 included searches of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and CAB abstracts) and scientific societies meetings materials (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Cervico-Cefalica, American Head and Neck Society, and European Society for Medical Oncology). Hand-searches of HNC journals and reference lists were carried out. Approximately one-third of dysphagia patients developed pneumonia requiring treatment. Aspiration pneumonia associated mortality ranged from 20% to 65%. Unidentified dysphagia caused significant morbidity, increased mortality, and decreased the quality of life. In this review we underline definition, causes, predictive factors of dysphagia and report on pretreatment and on-treatment evaluation, suggesting some key points to avoid underestimation. A multi-parameter assessment of swallowing problems may allow an earlier diagnosis. An appropriate evaluation might lead to a better treatment of both symptoms and cancer. PMID:24069513

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  18. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Ying J. Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m{sup 2} or 40 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m{sup 2} were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer.

  19. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) polymorphisms and survival in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Eva; Barricarte, Rubén; Cantero, Cristina; Honorato, Beatriz; Malumbres, Raquel; Zárate, Ruth; Alcalde, Juan; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2007-08-01

    EGFR overexpression has been implicated in the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This study evaluates the prognostic ability of four polymorphisms in EGFR gene for patients diagnosed with HNSCC and treated with chemoradiation. EGFR polymorphisms in the promoter region were not associated with clinical or pathological characteristics. In relation to R497K polymorphism, patients with the Arg/Arg genotype showed the highest risk of disease-specificity mortality and none of the patients with the Lys/Lys genotype died throughout the follow-up period of the study. Patients with (CA)(n) repeats <17 in both alleles tended toward inferior overall survival compared with those with (CA)(n) repeats > or = 17 in both alleles (p=0.07). Moreover, the distribution of patients with any (CA)(n) repeats > or = 17 and both alleles <17 was statistically different across patients who were recorded as having partial response or no response to therapy (p=0.034). Combination analysis of both polymorphisms, (CA)(n) repeats and R497K, suggests that these polymorphisms may be associated with clinical outcome in patients treated with chemoradiation.

  1. Relationship of inflammatory markers and pain in patients with head and neck cancer prior to anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, K.G.; von Zeidler, S.V.; Lamas, A.Z.; de Podestá, J.R.V.; Sena, A.; Souza, E.D.; Lenzi, J.; Lemos, E.M.; Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with cancer, including those with head and neck cancer (HNC). While studies suggest an association between chronic inflammation and pain, levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), have not been correlated with pain in HNC patients who are not currently undergoing anticancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between these inflammatory markers and perceived pain in HNC patients prior to anticancer therapy. The study group consisted of 127 HNC patients and 9 healthy controls. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and serum levels of CRP and TNF-α were determined using the particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and ELISA techniques, respectively. Patients experiencing pain had significantly higher levels of CRP (P<0.01) and TNF-α (P<0.05) compared with controls and with patients reporting no pain. There were significantly positive associations between pain, CRP level, and tumor stage. This is the first study to report a positive association between perceived pain and CRP in HNC patients at the time of diagnosis. The current findings suggest important associations between pain and inflammatory processes in HNC patients, with potential implications for future treatment strategies. PMID:25003634

  2. Iatrogenic salivary duct injury in head and neck cancer patients: Report of four cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulyapina, Alena; Ochandiano-Caicoya, Santiago; Navarro-Cuellar, Carlos; Navarro-Vila, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The lesions of the salivary ducts may be idiopathic, post- traumatic, or iatrogenic and lead to sialocele formation with persistent painful facial swelling or cutaneous fistula formation. No consensus on treatment of this condition exists: the options of treatment include needle aspiration, pressure dressings, antisialogogue therapy, radiotherapy, botulinum toxin and surgical approaches as duct repair, diversion, ligation, different drainage systems and even parotidectomy/submaxilectomy. The management and special features of iatrogenic salivary duct injury in patients with oral cancer who underwent head and neck reconstructive surgery has not been described yet. Material and Methods: We present four cases of iatrogenic lesions of salivary ducts and its management in patients with oral cancer. Conclusions: The iatrogenic lesions of salivary ducts are to be taken into account in patients with oral cancer as the distal ends of salivary ducts could be involved in the margins of surgical resection. Different options of treatment of this complication are described. Key words:Sialocele, oral cancer, salivary duct. PMID:25136433

  3. Setup Uncertainties of Anatomical Sub-Regions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients After Offline CBCT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kranen, Simon van; Beek, Suzanne van; Rasch, Coen; Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To quantify local geometrical uncertainties in anatomical sub-regions during radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Local setup accuracy was analyzed for 38 patients, who had received intensity-modulated radiotherapy and were regularly scanned during treatment with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for offline patient setup correction. In addition to the clinically used large region of interest (ROI), we defined eight ROIs in the planning CT that contained rigid bony structures: the mandible, larynx, jugular notch, occiput bone, vertebrae C1-C3, C3-C5, and C5-C7, and the vertebrae caudal of C7. By local rigid registration to successive CBCT scans, the local setup accuracy of each ROI was determined and compared with the overall setup error assessed with the large ROI. Deformations were distinguished from rigid body movements by expressing movement relative to a reference ROI (vertebrae C1-C3). Results: The offline patient setup correction protocol using the large ROI resulted in residual systematic errors (1 SD) within 1.2 mm and random errors within 1.5 mm for each direction. Local setup errors were larger, ranging from 1.1 to 3.4 mm (systematic) and 1.3 to 2.5 mm (random). Systematic deformations ranged from 0.4 mm near the reference C1-C3 to 3.8 mm for the larynx. Random deformations ranged from 0.5 to 3.6 mm. Conclusion: Head-and-neck cancer patients show considerable local setup variations, exceeding residual global patient setup uncertainty in an offline correction protocol. Current planning target volume margins may be inadequate to account for these uncertainties. We propose registration of multiple ROIs to drive correction protocols and adaptive radiotherapy to reduce the impact of local setup variations.

  4. Management of the neck in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of nodal metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancer ranges between 40% to 75%. Elective neck dissection is generally not advised in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer; however, if clinically apparent nodal disease is noted in the tracheoesophageal groove during surgery, central compartment clearance is advised. If clinically apparent nodal disease is present in the lateral compartment of the neck, modified neck dissection preserving the sternomastoid, accessory nerve, and jugular vein is advised. The "berry picking procedure" is generally not recommended because of the higher incidence of regional recurrence. Due consideration should be given for parathyroidal transplantation if the blood supply to the parathyroids is damaged during central compartment clearance. The incidence of lymph node metastasis is highest in young patients, however, lymph node metastasis has no bearing on long-term survival. There seems to be a higher incidence of regional recurrence in elderly individuals. If patients present with bulky nodal disease, consideration may be given for postoperative radioactive iodine dosimetry and ablation if necessary. Differentiated thyroid cancer represents a unique disease in the human body, where lymph node metastasis has no prognostic implication. Aggressive surgical clearance is advised in patients with medullary thyroid cancer in the central compartment and the jugular chain lymph nodes.

  5. The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database

    PubMed Central

    Overgaard, Jens; Jovanovic, Aleksandar; Godballe, Christian; Grau Eriksen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the database The Danish Head and Neck Cancer database is a nationwide clinical quality database that contains prospective data collected since the early 1960s. The overall aim of this study was to describe the outcome of the national strategy for multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck cancer in Denmark and to create a basis for clinical trials. Study population The study population consisted of all Danish patients referred for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, or neck nodes from unknown primary or any histopathological type (except lymphoma) of cancer in the nasal sinuses, salivary glands, or thyroid gland (corresponding to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision, classifications C.01–C.11, C.30–C.32, C.73, and C.80). Main variables The main variables used in the study were symptoms and the duration of the symptoms; etiological factors; pretreatment and diagnostic evaluation, including tumor–node–metastasis classification, imaging, histopathology, and laboratory tests; primary treatment with semidetailed information of radiotherapy, surgery, and medical treatment; follow-up registration of tumor status and side effects; registration of relapse and treatment thereof; and registration of death and cause of death. Main results Data from >33,000 patients have been recorded during a period of >45 years. In this period, the outcome of treatment improved substantially, partly due to better treatment as a result of a series of continuous clinical trials and subsequent implementation in national guidelines. The database has furthermore been used to describe the effect of reduced waiting time, changed epidemiology, and influence of comorbidity and socioeconomic parameters. Conclusion Half a century of registration of head and neck cancer treatment and outcome has created the basis for understanding and has substantially contributed to improve the treatment of head and neck cancer at both

  6. TAK1 mRNA expression in the tumor tissue of locally advanced head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Honorato, Beatriz; Alcalde, Juan; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Zabalegui, Natalia; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesús

    2008-02-14

    Resistance to radio and chemotherapy is one of the major drawbacks in the progression of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) patients, evidencing the importance of finding optimum molecular prognosis markers to develop personalized treatment schedules. TGF-beta effector TAK1 activity has been related to a greater aggressiveness in several types of cancer (Kondo et al. 1998; Edlund et al. 2003; Kaur et al. 2005) and, although there has been described no significant implication of TAK1 in HNSCC development, we have further examined the role of its mRNA expression as a marker of prognosis in HNSCC. Fifty-nine advanced HNSCC patients were recruited for the study. The tumor expression of TAK1 mRNA was analyzed with RT-PCR using Taqman technology and its relationship with the clinical outcome of the patients studied. TAK1 mRNA expression was lower in patients that relapsed than in those that did not, but the difference was only significant between the patients that showed response to treatment (p < 0.001). ROC curve analyses pointed a 0.5 expression ratio TAK1/B2M value as an optimum cut-off point for relapse and response. Our data suggest the TAK1 mRNA analysis by Taqman RT-PCR can predict the risk of relapse in HNSCC patients.

  7. TAK1 mRNA Expression in the Tumor Tissue of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Honorato, Beatriz; Alcalde, Juan; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Zabalegui, Natalia; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to radio and chemotherapy is one of the major drawbacks in the progression of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) patients, evidencing the importance of finding optimum molecular prognosis markers to develop personalized treatment schedules. TGF-β effector TAK1 activity has been related to a greater aggressiveness in several types of cancer (Kondo et al. 1998; Edlund et al. 2003; Kaur et al. 2005) and, although there has been described no significant implication of TAK1 in HNSCC development, we have further examined the role of its mRNA expression as a marker of prognosis in HNSCC. Fifty-nine advanced HNSCC patients were recruited for the study. The tumor expression of TAK1 mRNA was analyzed with RT-PCR using Taqman technology and its relationship with the clinical outcome of the patients studied. TAK1 mRNA expression was lower in patients that relapsed than in those that did not, but the difference was only significant between the patients that showed response to treatment (p < 0.001). ROC curve analyses pointed a 0.5 expression ratio TAK1/B2M value as an optimum cut-off point for relapse and response. Our data suggest the TAK1 mRNA analysis by Taqman RT-PCR can predict the risk of relapse in HNSCC patients. PMID:19787075

  8. Comparison of the prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis in head and neck, gastrointestinal and lung cancer patients by three classification methods

    PubMed Central

    Platek, Mary E.; Popp KPf, Johann V.; Possinger, Candi S.; DeNysschen, Carol A.; Horvath, Peter; Brown, Jean K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is prevalent among patients within certain cancer types. There is lack of universal standard of care for nutrition screening, lack of agreement on an operational definition and on validity of malnutrition indicators. Objective In a secondary data analysis, we investigated prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis by three classification methods using data from medical records of a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer center. Interventions/Methods Records of 227 patients hospitalized during 1998 with head and neck, gastrointestinal or lung cancer were reviewed for malnutrition based on three methods: 1) physician diagnosed malnutrition related ICD-9 codes; 2) in-hospital nutritional assessment summary conducted by Registered Dietitians; and 3) body mass index (BMI). For patients with multiple admissions, only data from the first hospitalization was included. Results Prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis ranged from 8.8% based on BMI to approximately 26% of all cases based on dietitian assessment. Kappa coefficients between any methods indicated a weak (kappa=0.23, BMI and Dietitians and kappa=0.28, Dietitians and Physicians) to fair strength of agreement (kappa=0.38, BMI and Physicians). Conclusions Available methods to identify patients with malnutrition in an NCI designated comprehensive cancer center resulted in varied prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis. Universal standard of care for nutrition screening that utilizes validated tools is needed. Implications for Practice The Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations requires nutritional screening of patients within 24 hours of admission. For this purpose, implementation of a validated tool that can be used by various healthcare practitioners, including nurses, needs to be considered. PMID:21242767

  9. Free flap reconstruction for head and neck cancer can be safely performed in both young and elderly patients after careful patient selection.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas T A; Post, Sophie F; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Roodenburg, Jan L N; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Werker, Paul M N; Halmos, Gyorgy B

    2015-10-01

    Surgical treatment of head and neck cancer often results in complex defects requiring reconstruction with microvascular free tissue transfer. However, in elderly patients, curative treatment with radical surgery and free flap reconstruction is often withheld. The objective of this study is to assess the outcomes of free flap surgery in elderly patients, using a standard surgical complication classification system. A retrospective review was conducted of patients who underwent primary free flap reconstruction following major surgery for head and neck cancer between 1995 and 2010. Complications were assessed using the Clavien Dindo classification system, and grades III-V were classified as major complications. Comorbidity was classified according to the adult comorbidity evaluation index 27. A comparison was done between patients <70 and ≥70 years. Two hundred-two patients were included in this study. Multivariate analysis showed that only disease stage was a significant predictor of recipient site complications, and comorbidity was the only significant predictor of medical complications. Age was not a predictor of complications. There were no significant differences in disease specific or overall survival between young and elderly patients. Optimal patient selection for free flap surgery is essential. This requires thorough pre-operative assessment, including analysis of comorbidity in both young and elderly patients. Patients' biological age, and not chronological age, should be individually determined to assess feasibility of major surgery. Patients should not be denied surgery based on age alone.

  10. The Role of Computed Tomography in the Management of the Neck After Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Clavel, Sebastien; Charron, Marie-Pierre; Belair, Manon; Delouya, Guila; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Soulieres, Denis; Filion, Edith; Guertin, Louis; and others

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the outcome in patients with head-and neck-squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) followed up without neck dissection (ND) after concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) based on computed tomography (CT) response. The second objective was to establish CT characteristics that can predict which patients can safely avoid ND. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, 369 patients with node-positive HNSCC were treated with primary CRT at our institution. After a clinical and a radiologic evaluation based on CT done 6 to 8 weeks after CRT, patients were labeled with a complete neck response (CR) or with a partial neck response (PR). Results: The median follow-up was 44 months. The number of patients presenting with N3, N2, or N1 disease were 54 (15%), 268 (72%), and 47 (13%), respectively. After CRT, 263 (71%) patients reached a CR, and 253 of them did not undergo ND. Ninety-six patients reached a PR and underwent ND. Of those, 34 (35%) had residual disease on pathologic evaluation. A regression of the diameter of {>=}80% and a residual largest diameter of 15 mm of nodes had negative pathologic predictive values of 100% and 86%, respectively. The 3-year regional control and survival rates were not different between patients with CR who had no ND and patients with PR followed by ND. Conclusion: Node-positive patients presenting a CR as determined by CT evaluation 6 to 8 weeks after CRT had a low rate of regional recurrence without ND. This study also suggests that lymph node residual size and percentage of regression on CT after CRT may be useful criteria to guide clinical decisions regarding neck surgery. Those results can help diminish the number of ND procedures with negative results and their associated surgical complications.

  11. Free Flap Procedures for Reconstruction After Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kini, Erin

    2015-12-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer are seeking improved surgical procedures to avoid severe defects that result from head and neck cancer resection. Free flap reconstruction provides vascularized tissue that has been transferred from a distant donor site on a patient's body to a recipient site, markedly improving wound closure and protecting structures of the head and neck. This article discusses free flap procedures for reconstruction after head and neck cancer resection, including the following procedure phases: airway protection and neck dissections, tumor resection, flap harvest, microvascular anastomosis of the flap, and reconstruction and closure. The article also explains specific risk factors for patients undergoing free flap procedures that have been identified in the literature and include procedure length, hypothermia, and pressure injuries. Each of these factors is discussed regarding its specific effect on this patient population, and the nursing interventions to reduce these risks are identified.

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of Helical Tomotherapy and Linac-IMRT Treatment Plans for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter M.; Yan Yulong; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development and clinical implementation of external beam radiation treatment technologies continues. The existence of various commercially available technologies for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has stimulated interest in exploring the differential potential advantage one may have compared with another. Two such technologies, Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (HT) and conventional medical linear accelerator-based IMRT (LIMRT) have been shown to be particularly suitable for the treatment of head and neck cancers. In this study, 23 patients who were diagnosed with stages 3 or 4 head and neck cancers, without evidence of distance metastatic disease, were treated in our clinic. Treatment plans were developed for all patients simultaneously on the HT planning station and on the Pinnacle treatment planning system for step-and-shoot IMRT. Patients were treated only on the HT unit, with the LIMRT plan serving as a backup in case the HT system might not be available. All plans were approved for clinical use by a physician. The prescription was that patients receive at least 95% of the planning target volume (PTV), which is 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy per fraction. Several dosimetric parameters were computed: PTV dose coverage; PTV volume conformity index; the normalized total dose (NTD), where doses were converted to 2 Gy per fraction to organs at risk (OAR); and PTV dose homogeneity. Both planning systems satisfied our clinic's PTV prescription requirements. The results suggest that HT plans had, in general, slightly better dosimetric characteristics, especially regarding PTV dose homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. However, for both techniques, doses to OAR were well below the currently accepted normal tissue tolerances. Consequently, factors other than the dosimetric parameters studied here may have to be considered when making a choice between IMRT techniques.

  13. Validation and application of the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory in patients treated for head and neck cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Renata Lígia Vieira; Angelis, Elisabete Carrara-de; Chen, Amy Y; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Vartanian, José Guilherme

    2013-03-01

    Analysis of quality of life (QOL) has revealed that preservation of swallowing, speech, and breathing functions has a direct impact on QOL and that these functions are important patient-reported outcomes. The purposes of this study were to adapt and culturally validate the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) to the Brazilian Portuguese language and to evaluate QOL related to dysphagia in patients treated for head and neck cancer. This was a cross-sectional study that included 72 adult patients with a mean age of 63 years who were treated for head and neck cancer. Construct validity and reliability analyses were performed through the comparison of the MDADI with three other health-related QOL questionnaires administered at the time of enrollment and MDADI application 2 weeks thereafter, respectively. Reliability was established by assuring both internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC). Test-retest reliability for the total score in the MDADI had an ICC greater than 0.795 (p < 0.001). The MDADI had significant statistical correlations with the other questionnaires. Patients treated for head and neck cancer had a mean total score of 83 on the MDADI, which is indicative of minimal limitation in overall QOL. In conclusion, the present study validates the adaptation of the MDADI to the Brazilian Portuguese language and provides another tool to evaluate the impact of dysphagia on the QOL of head and neck cancer patients.

  14. SBRT for recurrent head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, M.; Kabarriti, R.; Baliga, S.; Guha, C.; Tome, W.; Kalnicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers is complex. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab.

  15. Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D expression in H1299 lung cancer cells following benzo[a]pyrene exposure as well as in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chang-Shen; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Tzu-Fen; Lin, Yuan-Jen; Huang, Jau-Ling

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair genes play critical roles in response to carcinogen-induced and anticancer therapy-induced DNA damage. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), the most carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is classified as a group 1 carcinogen by International Agency for Research on Cancer. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the effects of BaP on DNA repair activity and expression of DNA repair genes in vitro and (2) examine the role of xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D (XPD) mRNA expression in human head and neck cancers. Host cell reactivation assay showed that BaP inhibited nucleotide excision repair in H1299 lung cancer cells. DNA repair through the non-homologous end-joining pathway was not affected by BaP. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot demonstrated that XPD was downregulated by BaP treatment. BaP exposure did not apparently affect expression of another 11 DNA repair genes. BaP treatment increased the DNA damage marker γ-H2AX and ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, supporting an impairment of DNA repair in BaP-treated cells. XPD expression was also examined by quantitative RT-PCR in 68 head and neck cancers, and a lower XPD mRNA level was found in smokers' cancer specimens. Importantly, reduced XPD expression was correlated with patient 5-year overall survival rate (35 vs. 56%) and was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio: 2.27). Data demonstrated that XPD downregulation was correlated with BaP exposure and human head and neck cancer survival.

  16. Effectiveness of Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer in an Older Patient Population

    SciTech Connect

    VanderWalde, Noam A.; Meyer, Anne Marie; Deal, Allison M.; Layton, J. Bradley; Liu, Huan; Carpenter, William R.; Weissler, Mark C.; Fleming, Mary E.; and others

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with radiation therapy (RT) only in an older patient population with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992-2007), we identified a retrospective cohort of nonmetastatic HNSCC patients and divided them into treatment groups. Comparisons were made between CRT and RT cohorts. Propensity scores for CRT were estimated from covariates associated with receipt of treatment using multivariable logistic regression. Standardized mortality ratio weights (SMRW) were created from the propensity scores and used to balance groups on measured confounders. Multivariable and SMR-weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death for receipt of CRT versus RT among the whole group and for separate patient and tumor categories. Results: The final cohort of 10,599 patients was 68% male and 89% white. Median age was 74 years. Seventy-four percent were treated with RT, 26% were treated with CRT. Median follow-up points for CRT and RT survivors were 4.6 and 6.3 years, respectively. On multivariable analysis, HR for death with CRT was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.20; P<.01). Using the SMRW model, the HR for death with CRT was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.02-1.15; P=.01). Conclusions: Although the addition of chemotherapy to radiation has proven efficacious in many randomized controlled trials, it may be less effective in an older patient population treated outside of a controlled trial setting.

  17. Outlier Analysis Defines Zinc Finger Gene Family DNA Methylation in Tumors and Saliva of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Gaykalova, Daria A; Vatapalli, Rajita; Wei, Yingying; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Chi; Hennessey, Patrick T; Guo, Theresa; Tan, Marietta; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Julie; Khan, Zubair; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A; Zaboli, David; Koch, Wayne M; Khan, Tanbir; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common cancer, annually affecting over half a million people worldwide. Presently, there are no accepted biomarkers for clinical detection and surveillance of HNSCC. In this work, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of epigenetic alterations in primary HNSCC tumors was employed in conjunction with cancer-specific outlier statistics to define novel biomarker genes which are differentially methylated in HNSCC. The 37 identified biomarker candidates were top-scoring outlier genes with prominent differential methylation in tumors, but with no signal in normal tissues. These putative candidates were validated in independent HNSCC cohorts from our institution and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Using the top candidates, ZNF14, ZNF160, and ZNF420, an assay was developed for detection of HNSCC cancer in primary tissue and saliva samples with 100% specificity when compared to normal control samples. Given the high detection specificity, the analysis of ZNF DNA methylation in combination with other DNA methylation biomarkers may be useful in the clinical setting for HNSCC detection and surveillance, particularly in high-risk patients. Several additional candidates identified through this work can be further investigated toward future development of a multi-gene panel of biomarkers for the surveillance and detection of HNSCC.

  18. Outlier Analysis Defines Zinc Finger Gene Family DNA Methylation in Tumors and Saliva of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Vatapalli, Rajita; Wei, Yingying; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Chi; Hennessey, Patrick T.; Guo, Theresa; Tan, Marietta; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Julie; Khan, Zubair; Westra, William H.; Bishop, Justin A.; Zaboli, David; Koch, Wayne M.; Khan, Tanbir; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common cancer, annually affecting over half a million people worldwide. Presently, there are no accepted biomarkers for clinical detection and surveillance of HNSCC. In this work, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of epigenetic alterations in primary HNSCC tumors was employed in conjunction with cancer-specific outlier statistics to define novel biomarker genes which are differentially methylated in HNSCC. The 37 identified biomarker candidates were top-scoring outlier genes with prominent differential methylation in tumors, but with no signal in normal tissues. These putative candidates were validated in independent HNSCC cohorts from our institution and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Using the top candidates, ZNF14, ZNF160, and ZNF420, an assay was developed for detection of HNSCC cancer in primary tissue and saliva samples with 100% specificity when compared to normal control samples. Given the high detection specificity, the analysis of ZNF DNA methylation in combination with other DNA methylation biomarkers may be useful in the clinical setting for HNSCC detection and surveillance, particularly in high-risk patients. Several additional candidates identified through this work can be further investigated toward future development of a multi-gene panel of biomarkers for the surveillance and detection of HNSCC. PMID:26544568

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  20. To treat or not to treat: balancing therapeutic outcomes, toxicity and quality of life in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Barbara A

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of challenges facing head and neck cancer patients who present with metastatic or locally recurrent head and neck cancer; such as, limited treatment options, overall poor prognosis, and high symptom burden secondary to tumor and treatment. Disease and symptom management can be difficult, and requires that the potential benefits versus the adverse effects of systemic therapy be weighed very carefully. Individual patient characteristics including performance status, weight loss, symptom burden, comorbidities, and social supports must be taken into consideration. Unfortunately, reliable data describing the impact of therapy on symptom burden and quality of life (QOL) is lacking. Recently completed randomized phase III treatment trials have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating patient reported outcome measures to assess symptoms and QOL into clinical studies. Nonetheless, obstacles to accurate and thorough QOL reporting remain. Development of tools directed at symptom burden and functional impairment in the metastatic or recurrent head and neck cancer population is needed. Such tools would enhance our ability to assess the impact of treatment, thus optimizing treatment decisions for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer.

  1. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Feasibility and Safety of Overtubes for PEG-Tube Placement in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Musumba, Crispin O; Hsu, Julia; Ahlenstiel, Golo; Tutticci, Nicholas J; Nanda, Kavinderjit S; van der Poorten, David; Lee, Eric Y; Kwan, Vu

    2015-01-01

    Background. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement using the "pull" technique is commonly utilized for providing nutritional support in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients, but it may be complicated by peristomal metastasis in up to 3% of patients. Overtube-assisted PEG placement might reduce this risk. However, this technique has not been systemically studied for this purpose to date. Methods. Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with HNC who underwent overtube-assisted PEG placement at Westmead Hospital, Australia, between June 2011 and December 2013. Data were extracted from patients' endoscopy reports and case notes. We present our technique for PEG insertion and discuss the feasibility and safety of this method. Results. In all 53 patients studied, the PEG tubes were successfully placed using 25 cm long flexible overtubes, in 89% prophylactically (before commencing curative chemoradiotherapy), and in 11% reactively (for treatment of tumor related dysphagia or weight loss). During a median follow-up period of 16 months, 3 (5.7%) patients developed peristomal infection and 3 others developed self-limiting peristomal pain. There were no cases of overtube-related adverse events or overt cutaneous metastases observed. Conclusions. Overtube-assisted PEG placement in patients with HNC is a feasible, simple, and safe technique and might be effective for preventing cutaneous metastasis.

  3. The efficacy of an intraoral fluoride-releasing system in irradiated head and neck cancer patients: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meyerowitz, C; Watson, G E

    1998-09-01

    This study compared the anticaries effectiveness of an intraoral fluoride-releasing system, or IFRS, with a standard regimen of daily application of a 1.1 percent neutral sodium fluoride gel in custom trays. Caries protection in subjects in the IFRS group was comparable to that in subjects in the 1.1 percent neutral sodium fluoride group. The subjects all had head or neck cancer and had received radiation therapy, but no more recently than three months before taking part in the study. Overall, IFRS devices were well-tolerated and patient satisfaction was high. The IFRS appears to offer several advantages over the daily application of fluoride gels in custom trays.

  4. Bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations in head and neck cancer patients analyzed by classical cytogenetics and FISH.

    PubMed

    Zych, M; Schlade-Bartusiak, K; Chorostkowska, A; Stembalska, A; Krêcicki, T; Sasiadek, M

    2000-05-01

    Individual sensitivity to mutagens has been considered to play an important role in head-and-neck squamous cells carcinoma (HNSCC) development. The bleomycin test was introduced for establishing constitutional susceptibility to mutagens (T.C. Hsu, D.A. Johnston, L.M. Cherry, D. Ramkisson, S.P. Schantz, J.M. Jessup, R.J. Winn, L. Shirley, C. Furlong, Sensitivity to genotoxic effects of bleomycin in humans: possible relationship to environmental carcinogenesis, Int. J. Cancer 43 (1989) 403-409). Its criteria are based on scoring of chromosome aberrations (CAs, mainly breaks) in Giemsa-stained chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) offers an easy method for analysis of translocations, acentric fragments and dicentrics. In the present study FISH was applied in the analysis of bleomycin-induced CAs of the HNSCC patients and controls. The results proved that FISH is a complementary method to the classical staining in monitoring of bleomycin-induced CAs.

  5. Nutritional Assessment of Patients with Head and Neck Cancer in North-East India and Dietary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Abhinandan; Bahar, Iqbal; Saikia, Abijit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Head and neck cancer (HNCA) patients have poor nutritional status which clearly bears a negative prognosis in cancer. There is no study and consensus on nutritional assessment tools and diet structure for such patients. This study intends to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and formulate a diet chart keeping in view the general food habit and economic condition of HNCA patients of North East (NE) region. Aim: To find out an affordable dietary intervention for HNCA patients based on dietary principles. To assess the role of nutritional assessment tools in these group of patients. Materials and Methods: This is a 1-year prospective interventional study on HNCA patients attending the Dept of ENT of a teaching hospital. The outcome of the nutritional intervention using a specific diet were assessed using clinical, laboratory and anthropomorphic assessment tools and indices like Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI) and Nutritional Assessment Index (NAI). Results: The study diet provided appropriate amounts of nutrients to HNCA patients as evident from improvements in anthropomorphic parameters and nutritional indices. Clinically, Hemoglobin percentage (Hb%), Body Mass Index (BMI), Mid Arm Circumference (MAC) and triceps skin fold thickness (TST) were found to be reliable malnutrition markers. Conclusion: Nutritional Assessment Index has been found to be the best index to evaluate malnutrition. The daily requirement of nutrients for HNCA patients can be satisfactorily met by adopting specific diet chart presented in our study. As no structured diet plan are available in literature, our diet chart can act as a template diet appropriate for HNCA patients of this region. PMID:26600696

  6. US-guided biopsy of neck masses in postoperative management of patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R T; Reading, C C; Charboneau, J W; James, E M; Grant, C S; Hay, I D

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency (10-MHz) sonography demonstrated a cervical mass or lymphadenopathy, or both, during postoperative follow-up of 52 patients who had undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. Percutaneous biopsy with ultrasonographic (US) guidance was performed in all 52 masses, 44 of which were nonpalpable. Malignant cells were obtained in 29 biopsies, and the results of 20 biopsies were negative, yielding benign lymphocytes only. Results in three biopsies were nondiagnostic due to hypocellular specimens. Therefore, 94% of biopsy results (49) of 52) were confidently assigned as either positive (56%) or negative (38%) for malignancy. There were no complications. High-frequency sonography can demonstrate clinically occult thyroid bed tumor recurrence and lymph node metastases. US-guided biopsy is an accurate and safe technique to confirm or exclude malignancy in patients at high risk of recurrence of thyroid cancer.

  7. Towards a pain free hospital: an in-depth qualitative analysis of the pain experiences of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Natalie; Brown, Matthew RD; Gubbay, Anthony; Peacock, Janet; Ross, Joy R; Chapman, Suzanne; Sauzet, Odile; Williams, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment for head and neck cancer can frequently be a painful experience with implications for patients in terms of quality of life, nutrition and ultimately treatment outcomes. Pain may arise for a number of reasons in this patient group including the influence of localised tissue damage from radiotherapy, the effects of chemotherapeutic agents as well as the disease process itself. Early identification of cancer pain, through screening and early analgesic and pain management are thought to be the most appropriate approaches to the problem. Aim: To explore in-depth, patients’ views of the experience of pain related to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, within the context of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of pain screening and intervention. Sample: A purposive sample of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy who were participating in a separate RCT of a proactive pain screening intervention. Methods: A qualitative design using one-off, face-to-face, in-depth interviews. Data were inductively analysed for themes using thematic analysis. Data were collected from September 2012 to January 2013. Findings: Eight participants were interviewed. Several issues around pain management arose and the influence of various factors became apparent. Four dominant themes emerged: facets of radiotherapy pain in head and neck cancer, facilitators and barriers to pain management, pain services and finally interdisciplinary working. Conclusion: The specific issues faced by head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy highlight the need for pain relieving interventions delivered by pain specialists, in tandem with the development of robust self-management strategies. An integrated approach to care is optimal, comprising pain screening at each outpatient encounter, and review by specialists as necessary. PMID:27551409

  8. The Experiences of Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer With a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Janna P Y; Stokes, Edith J; Posluns, Elaine C; Fitch, Margaret I; McAndrew, Alison; Vandenbussche, Katherine A

    2014-08-01

    Background: While the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube has become an established part of the management regimen for patients with head and neck cancer (HNCA) with impaired nutrition and functional status, limited research has explored the impact and experiences of living with a PEG tube from the patient's perspective. This qualitative study serves as a follow-up investigation undertaken to describe the experiences of patients with advanced HNCA living with a PEG tube. Materials and Methods: Eligible patients from convenience sampling were invited to participate until data saturation was reached. In-depth interviews were conducted with consenting participants. Qualitative descriptive design guided the content analysis of the interview transcripts. Results: Of the 49 patients invited, a total of 15 participants' interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Each interview was 15-90 minutes in length. Four of 22 content codes were chosen to describe the overarching ideas of the progressive experience of a patient's journey from the initial decision-making process around tube insertion through to its removal. Difficulty swallowing and weight loss emerged as primary factors for PEG tube insertion, and all participants became accustomed to living with the tube. Resuming a complete oral diet was a gradual transition. All participants recognized the value of the tube, and most acknowledged its necessity for their survival. Conclusions: Results describe the overall PEG tube experience as a dichotomy. While there were issues with the PEG tube, all participants found the tube to be beneficial. This study provides invaluable insight from a practice perspective.

  9. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  10. Psychosocial aspects of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, W; Holland, J

    1988-02-01

    The major psychosocial issues in managing the patient with a head and neck tumor are dealing with the emotional reactions to structural and functional deficits, recognizing and treating preexisting personality problems, especially those related to alcohol and tobacco abuse, which frequently complicate their treatment course. These factors influence the rehabilitation process which should begin in the preoperative period with careful attention to psychologic and social assessment and psychiatric evaluation; if an alcoholic history is elicited. Important continuity in rehabilitation can be accomplished by contact with the rehabilitative team members before surgery, preoperative chemotherapy or radiation. Attention to appropriate adaptation to facial prostheses and dealing early with communication disorders requires a specialized staff and a rehabilitative team which can call on a range of skills including a psychiatric consultant. While the ordeal of the head and neck cancer patient is psychologically difficult and challenging, most patients are able, with the proper help, to resume full and productive lives.

  11. Haptic palpation of head and neck cancer patients--implication for education and telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Stalfors, J; Kling-Petersen, T; Rydmark, M; Westin, T

    2001-01-01

    Malignancy in the head and neck area is a disease that often gives high morbidity in functions like speech, eating, breathing and cosmetics. To ensure a treatment of high clinical standard these patients are presented for a multidisciplinary tumor-team at Sahlgren University hospital. The team usually involves ENT-surgeons (Ear, Nose and Throat), oncologists, radiologists, pathologists, plastic surgeon, general surgeon and oral surgeons. The aim of the presentation is to classificate the tumor and suggests a treatment. The patients presented are from the whole western region of Sweden, and therefore some patients have to travel long distances. To minimize travel telemedicine was introduced 1998 with success [1]. One concern, when presenting a patient with telemedicine, has been the lack of possibility to palpate the tumor and the tissue surrounding it. To address this problem a 3D model of the tumor visualizes the region and possibly allows haptic palpation. Based on a series of high resolution CT/MR scans, a model of the region around the patients tumor is created. Haptic properties are added to the skin and subcutaneous structures (including the tumor) of the model. Initially, the haptic tuning is done by an examining physician, but in the final telemedical application, the aim is to develop a sensory device for this purpose (e.g. a position sensitive glove, such as Virtual Technologies, Inc. CyberGlove [2] and a graded system for setting firmness of the tissue). The model with its haptic properties can then be examined visually and haptically, the latter using a haptic device such as the SensAble PHANToM [3]. The present system uses a 3D model in VRML format based on reconstructed structures in the ROI (which includes the jawbones, the vertebra, the throat, major muscles and the skin) from high resolution CT. Haptic properties are added using MAGMA 2.5 (ReachIn Technologies AB, Sweden) [4]. Haptic force feedback is provided using a PHANToM Desktop (Sens

  12. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  13. Medical Communication-related Informational Need and Resource Preferences Among Family Caregivers for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Margaret L; Galloway, Thomas J; Parvanta, Claudia F; Fang, Carolyn Y

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in treatment, head and neck cancer (HNC) patients often experience considerable functional impairment during and following treatment. As a result, family caregivers are essential in a patient's recovery; however, few caregivers are well-prepared to handle the extensive caregiving needs of this patient population. To date, little is known about HNC caregivers' informational needs in this role. Thus, we surveyed a sample of HNC caregivers about their informational needs including those related to interacting in the medical context as a caregiver and meeting patient needs. We also asked these caregivers their preferences for obtaining caregiving information. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 59 family caregivers for HNC patients who had completed radiation therapy at a comprehensive cancer center. The majority of caregivers (74.6%) reported having high informational need at diagnosis related to interacting as a caregiver. Although the need for such information decreased over time, over half still had a high need for information at treatment end. Importantly, caregivers who desired information about reducing patient pain and distress also reported having greater informational needs on issues related to interacting in the medical context. Further, the caregivers most often preferred to receive information from health-care professionals as a first source. However, preferring an informal (e.g., Internet) resource at first was significantly associated with needing information on how to talk to a doctor or nurse. The development of evidence-based resources and tools for HNC caregivers as well as clinicians may help caregivers more effectively manage patient symptoms and warrants further attention. Further, Internet resources may represent an effective resource for providing caregivers with strategies toward enhancing communication with healthcare professionals.

  14. Phase I trial of tirapazamine, cisplatin, and concurrent accelerated boost reirradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Loh, Elwyn; Shen, Liji; Lusinchi, Antoine; Vokes, Everett E.; Bourhis, Jean

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation (re-RT) with concurrent chemotherapy offers a therapeutic option in patients who have locoregional recurrence of head and neck cancer (HNC). The hypoxic cell sensitizer, tirapazamine (TPZ), has demonstrated promising results in first-line therapy for HNC. This phase I trial was designed to test the feasibility of giving TPZ in the re-RT setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with recurrent HNC who received prior radiotherapy (RT) were enrolled and received TPZ (260 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) Weeks 1, 3, and 5 concurrently with RT (72 Gy, 42 fractions over 6 weeks). TPZ (160 mg/m{sup 2}) alone was added on Days 1, 3, and 5 of Week 2 (cohort 1) or Weeks 2 and 4 (cohort 2). Results: Twenty-five subjects were enrolled, 7 and 18 on cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. Significant toxicities included Grade 3 dermatitis (20%) and Grade 3 mucositis (40%). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed on cohort 2 (1 patient with aspiration pneumonia). Four deaths occurred during treatment. Two fatalities occurred after completing therapy as a result of carotid artery rupture. With a minimum and median follow-up of 14 and 24 months, respectively, median overall survival was 14 months with actuarial 1-year and 2-year survival of 56% and 27%, respectively. Conclusion: Reirradiation with concomitant chemotherapy including TPZ in patients with unresectable recurrent HNC is feasible and results in long-term survival in a significant proportion of patients.

  15. Rapidly Developed Multiple Face and Neck Skin Cancers in a Patient with Sjögren’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Lean San; Lai, Ji-Ching; Lian, Je Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Skin cancer Symptoms: Skin Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic, systemic disorder of an autoimmune nature, and its primary etiopathogenetic events are not known. Previous studies have found elevated incidence of malignancies in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome. However, there are few reports regarding the association of Sjögren’s syndrome with skin cancers, especially with multiple skin cancers developed within a short time. Case Report: We reported an unusual case of a patient with primary Sjögren’s syndrome who suffered from rapidly developed facial and neck skin cancers within two years. Conclusions: Sjögren’s syndrome associated with skin cancer is rare. Our case report suggests that Sjögren’s syndrome patients require continuous follow-up with conventional cancer examination, including skin biopsy for suspected skin lesions. PMID:28373638

  16. RapidArc Planning and Delivery in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Doornaert, Patricia; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Bieker, Michael; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems) permits the delivery of highly conformal dose distributions. We studied planning and delivery in patients who underwent RapidArc for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: A total of 35 consecutive patients who completed RapidArc with concurrent chemotherapy for Stages III-IV tumors of the oro- and hypopharynx/larynx in our center were identified. All underwent bilateral neck irradiation and 21 patients had at least N2 disease. A simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) delivered 70 Gy (in 2 Gy/fraction) to the planning target volume (PTV){sub boost} and elective nodal regions (PTV{sub elect}) received 57.75 Gy. A standard planning constraint set was used and constraints for parotid glands were individually adapted. Treatments were delivered using two arcs after all plans were verified in a solid water phantom using GafChromic External Beam Therapy films. Results: RapidArc planning generally took 1.5-2 h, which was faster than with our previous seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy sliding window technique. Film dosimetry revealed that 0.6% of films exceeded a combination of dose differences {>=}3% or distance to agreement {>=}2 mm. More than 99% of both PTVs received {>=}95% of the prescription dose. Average plan conformity index was 1.13 and mean dose to ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands were 31.4 Gy and 26.1 Gy, respectively. The mean beam-on time was <3 min and mean number of monitor units was 426. Conclusions: RapidArc achieved excellent target coverage and normal tissue sparing, with delivery completed in less than 3 min. RA is currently our standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy approach for advanced HNC.

  17. Evaluation of the Accuracy of a 3D Surface Imaging System for Patient Setup in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gopan, Olga; Wu Qiuwen

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system (AlignRT) registration algorithms for head-and-neck cancer patient setup during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients, each undergoing six repeated weekly helical computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment course (total 77 CTs including planning CT), were included in the study. Patient surface images used in AlignRT registration were not captured by the 3D cameras; instead, they were derived from skin contours from these CTs, thereby eliminating issues with immobilization masks. The results from surface registrations in AlignRT based on CT skin contours were compared to those based on bony anatomy registrations in Pinnacle{sup 3}, which was considered the gold standard. Both rigid and nonrigid types of setup errors were analyzed, and the effect of tumor shrinkage was investigated. Results: The maximum registration errors in AlignRT were 0.2 Degree-Sign for rotations and 0.7 mm for translations in all directions. The rigid alignment accuracy in the head region when applied to actual patient data was 1.1 Degree-Sign , 0.8 Degree-Sign , and 2.2 Degree-Sign in rotation and 4.5, 2.7, and 2.4 mm in translation along the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes at 90% confidence level. The accuracy was affected by the patient's weight loss during treatment course, which was patient specific. Selectively choosing surface regions improved registration accuracy. The discrepancy for nonrigid registration was much larger at 1.9 Degree-Sign , 2.4 Degree-Sign , and 4.5 Degree-Sign and 10.1, 11.9, and 6.9 mm at 90% confidence level. Conclusions: The 3D surface imaging system is capable of detecting rigid setup errors with good accuracy for head-and-neck cancer. Further investigations are needed to improve the accuracy in detecting nonrigid setup errors.

  18. The impacts of liver cirrhosis on head and neck cancer patients undergoing microsurgical free tissue transfer: an evaluation of flap outcome and flap-related complications.

    PubMed

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Chang, Kai-Ping; Ching, Wei-Cheng; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2009-12-01

    Several authors have cited liver cirrhosis as a risk factor for surgery but no study performed statistical correlation between flap outcome and severity of liver cirrhosis in patients with head and neck cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of 3108 patients who underwent free tissue transfer after head and neck cancer ablation between January 2000 and December 2008. Liver cirrhosis was identified in 62 patients. Forty-two patients (67.7%) were classified as having Child's class A cirrhosis, seventeen (27.4%) as having class B, and three (4.9%) as having class C cirrhosis. The overall complete flap survival rate was 90.3% (56/62). The flap-related complications of patients with Child's class A, B, and C were 38.1% (16/42), 47.1% (8/17), and 100% (3/3), respectively and showed no significant difference between these three groups (p=0.2758). The rate of postoperative neck hematoma was 14.5%; the risk of postoperative neck hematoma was significantly higher in patients with more advanced liver cirrhosis (p=0.0003). The recipient-site complications of patients with Child's class A cirrhosis, Child's class B, and Child's class C cirrhosis were 35.7%, 41.1%, and 66.6%, respectively, with no significant difference among the three groups. The statistical analysis demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is significantly associated with a negative prognosis for free flap reconstruction (p=0.0364). The flap survival rate and patency of microvascular anastomosis have no association with liver cirrhosis. To achieve a superior surgical outcome, preoperative optimization and a multidisciplinary team responsible for the evaluation and treatment of head and neck cancer patients with cirrhosis are necessary.

  19. Significant differences in demographic, clinical, and pathological features in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption among 1,633 head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Moyses, Raquel Ajub; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Cury, Patrícia Maluf; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; de Gois Filho, José Francisco; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Head; GENCAPO, Neck Genome Project; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Michaluart, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As a lifestyle-related disease, social and cultural disparities may influence the features of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in different geographic regions. We describe demographic, clinical, and pathological aspects of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck according to the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of patients in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of 1,633 patients enrolled in five São Paulo hospitals that participated in the Brazilian Head and Neck Genome Project – Gencapo. RESULTS: The patients who smoked and drank were younger, and those who smoked were leaner than the other patients, regardless of alcohol consumption. The non-smokers/non-drinkers were typically elderly white females who had more differentiated oral cavity cancers and fewer first-degree relatives who smoked. The patients who drank presented significantly more frequent nodal metastasis, and those who smoked presented less-differentiated tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck demonstrated demographic, clinical, and pathological features that were markedly different according to their smoking and drinking habits. A subset of elderly females who had oral cavity cancer and had never smoked or consumed alcohol was notable. Alcohol consumption seemed to be related to nodal metastasis, whereas smoking correlated with the degree of differentiation. PMID:23778492

  20. SU-E-T-206: Improving Radiotherapy Toxicity Based On Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Daniel D; Wernicke, A Gabriella; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, KSC; Parashar, Bhupesh; Chang, Jenghwa

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study is to build the estimator of toxicity using artificial neural network (ANN) for head and neck cancer patients Materials/Methods: An ANN can combine variables into a predictive model during training and considered all possible correlations of variables. We constructed an ANN based on the data from 73 patients with advanced H and N cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy at our institution. For the toxicity estimator we defined input data including age, sex, site, stage, pathology, status of chemo, technique of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), length of treatment, dose of EBRT, status of post operation, length of follow-up, the status of local recurrences and distant metastasis. These data were digitized based on the significance and fed to the ANN as input nodes. We used 20 hidden nodes (for the 13 input nodes) to take care of the correlations of input nodes. For training ANN, we divided data into three subsets such as training set, validation set and test set. Finally, we built the estimator for the toxicity from ANN output. Results: We used 13 input variables including the status of local recurrences and distant metastasis and 20 hidden nodes for correlations. 59 patients for training set, 7 patients for validation set and 7 patients for test set and fed the inputs to Matlab neural network fitting tool. We trained the data within 15% of errors of outcome. In the end we have the toxicity estimation with 74% of accuracy. Conclusion: We proved in principle that ANN can be a very useful tool for predicting the RT outcomes for high risk H and N patients. Currently we are improving the results using cross validation.

  1. Evaluating the Primary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke of Oral Antithrombotic Therapy in Head and Neck Cancer Patients with Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), the impact of oral antithrombotic therapy (OAT) on this risk has not yet been assessed. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of OAT in patients with HNC treated with RT. This retrospective cohort study was performed using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. A total of 37,638 patients diagnosed with HNC included in the study were classified as users and nonusers of OAT. Primary outcome was IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA), and secondary outcomes were death and major bleeding. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was no significant difference in the risk of IS or TIA between patients on continuous OAT and nonusers (adjusted HR, 0.812; 95% CI, 0.199–3.309). The risk of major bleeding was not significantly different between the groups. From a national population database, we did not find an association between OAT and decreasing risk of ischemic stroke/TIA or increasing hazard of major bleeding. PMID:27990433

  2. Perioperative Immunonutrition in Well-Nourished Patients Undergoing Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer: Evaluation of Inflammatory and Immunologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Turnock, Amy; Calder, Philip C.; West, Annette L.; Izzard, Mark; Morton, Randall P.; Plank, Lindsay D.

    2013-01-01

    Limited work is available on the benefits of nutritional support enriched with arginine and n-3 fatty acids in surgical patients with head and neck cancer, particularly if well-nourished. We conducted a pilot study in these patients to examine effects on inflammatory markers and clinical outcome. Patients scheduled for radical resection of the oral cavity were randomised to 5 day preoperative and 5 day postoperative Impact® (IMN, n = 4), or no preoperative supplementary nutrition and Isosource® postoperatively (STD, n = 4). Plasma fatty acids, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were measured at baseline, day of surgery and on postoperative days (POD) 2, 4 and 10. Postoperative complications were recorded. The (eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid) to arachidonic acid ratio was significantly higher in IMN patients on POD 2, 4 and 10 (P < 0.01). While not statistically significant, CRP, TNF-α, and IL-6 concentrations were higher in the STD group on POD2 while IL-10 was lower. Median length of stay was 10 (range 10–43) days in the IMN group and 21.5 (7–24) days in the STD group. Five complications were seen in the STD group and two in the IMN group. The results support the need for a larger trial focusing on clinical outcome. PMID:23571650

  3. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tube feeding for patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Liu, Minjie; Liu, Chao; Ye, Yun; Huang, Guanhong

    2014-05-01

    There are two main enteral feeding strategies-namely nasogastric (NG) tube feeding and percutaneous gastrostomy-used to improve the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). But up till now there has been no consistent evidence about which method of enteral feeding is the optimal method for this patient group. To compare the effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy and NGT feeding in patients with HNC, relevant literature was identified through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane, Wiley and manual searches. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-experimental studies comparing percutaneous gastrostomy-including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy (PFG) -with NG for HNC patients. Data extraction recorded characteristics of intervention, type of study and factors that contributed to the methodological quality of the individual studies. Data were then compared with respect to nutritional status, duration of feeding, complications, radiotherapy delays, disease-free survival and overall survival. Methodological quality of RCTs and non-experimental studies were assessed with separate standard grading scales. It became apparent from our studies that both feeding strategies have advantages and disadvantages.

  4. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  5. Initial Experience of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated in an Oncologist Led Palliative Cancer Care Clinic at a Tertiary Cancer Care Center in Uttar Pradesh: Is the Initiative of a Full-fledged Palliative Care for Cancer Patients Justified

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Punita; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Gaurav; Shrivastava, Resham; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor socioeconomic status and illiteracy attribute to the advanced presentation of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients in India and are candidates for palliation in our setup. We set up a palliative cancer care clinic (PCCC), and an audit of initial 153 HNC patients is presented. Aims and Objectives: To assess the impact of palliative cancer care services. Methodology: Data of advanced HNC patients suited for palliation were collected to document demography, symptomatology, cancer treatment, and supportive care. Results: One hundred and fifty-three patients were seen during January 2013 to March 2015 in the PCCC. Seventy-two (47%) referral cases were due to disease progression and 81 (53%) due to de novo advanced cases. Median follow-up for this group was 5.3 months. Ninety (59%) cases needed some degree of assistance for their normal activities. Sixty-seven (44%) patients belonged to poor socioeconomic status and 65 (43%) were educated up to equivalent of high school. One hundred and thirty-five (88%) patients had an adequate family support. Pain was the most common presenting symptom in 134 (87%) cases with adequate relief in 112 (84%) patients with another 13 (09%) could not be assessed. Overall median duration of symptoms was 6 months. Cancer-directed therapy was used in 143 (93%) patients. Near the end of life in 47 (73%) out of 63 documented cases, caregivers were psychologically prepared for the inevitable. Conclusion: The role of palliative care team in alleviating physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues of patient and family members was significant. PCCC seems to be a feasible working model in our setup. PMID:27803571

  6. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Multi-atlas-based Segmentation of the Parotid Glands of MR Images in Patients Following Head-and-neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guanghui; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Ning; Xu, Zhijian; Zhao, Hongfu; Wang, Yuefeng; Liu, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Xerostomia (dry mouth), resulting from radiation damage to the parotid glands, is one of the most common and distressing side effects of head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy. Recent MRI studies have demonstrated that the volume reduction of parotid glands is an important indicator for radiation damage and xerostomia. In the clinic, parotid-volume evaluation is exclusively based on physicians’ manual contours. However, manual contouring is time-consuming and prone to inter-observer and intra-observer variability. Here, we report a fully automated multi-atlas-based registration method for parotid-gland delineation in 3D head-and-neck MR images. The multi-atlas segmentation utilizes a hybrid deformable image registration to map the target subject to multiple patients’ images, applies the transformation to the corresponding segmented parotid glands, and subsequently uses the multiple patient-specific pairs (head-and-neck MR image and transformed parotid-gland mask) to train support vector machine (SVM) to reach consensus to segment the parotid gland of the target subject. This segmentation algorithm was tested with head-and-neck MRIs of 5 patients following radiotherapy for the nasopharyngeal cancer. The average parotid-gland volume overlapped 85% between the automatic segmentations and the physicians’ manual contours. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the feasibility of an automatic multi-atlas based segmentation algorithm to segment parotid glands in head-and-neck MR images. PMID:25914491

  8. Is There Any Age Cutoff to Treat Elderly Patients with Head and Neck Cancer? Comparing with Septuagenarians and Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in life expectancy, age is no longer considered as a limitation for treatment. Nevertheless, the treatment of elderly patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) remains controversial. Here, we aimed to review our experience with the treatment for elderly patients, while particularly focusing on the differences among older old patients (septuagenarians vs. octogenarians). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 260 elderly patients who were assigned to 3 groups according to age: 70 years old ≤ group 1 < 75 years old, 75 years old ≤ group 2 < 80 years old, and group 3 ≥ 80 years old. The patients were assessed for comorbidities using the Adult Comorbidity Evaluation (ACE)-27, and the American Society of Anesthesia (ASA) physical status was also compared. Group 1, 2, and 3, consisted of 97, 102, and 61 patients, respectively. No significant difference in demographic data was noted among the groups. However, group 3 showed more comorbidities than groups 1 and 2. With regard to the initial treatment for HNC, radiation therapy (RT) was more frequently performed in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2. Among 7 patients of non-compliant to treatment in group 3, 6 patients had have performed RT. In group 3, a total of 18 patients underwent surgery, including microvascular free flap reconstruction and no significant difference in complications was observed postoperatively compared with group 1 and 2. Moreover, no significant difference was noted in overall survival between the groups, regardless of the treatment modality chosen. In conclusion, octogenarians with HNC should be more carefully managed than septuagenarians with HNC. Surgical treatment can be considered in octogenarians with HNC, if it can be tolerated. PMID:27478343

  9. Importance of Radiation Oncologist Experience Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Xu, Beibei; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Mell, Loren K.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has replaced conventional radiation techniques in the management of head-and-neck cancers (HNCs). We conducted this population-based study to evaluate the influence of radiation oncologist experience on outcomes in patients with HNC treated with IMRT compared with patients with HNC treated with conventional radiation therapy. Methods We identified radiation providers from Medicare claims of 6,212 Medicare beneficiaries with HNC treated between 2000 and 2009. We analyzed the impact of provider volume on all-cause mortality, HNC mortality, and toxicity end points after treatment with either conventional radiation therapy or IMRT. All analyses were performed by using either multivariable Cox proportional hazards or Fine-Gray regression models controlling for potential confounding variables. Results Among patients treated with conventional radiation, we found no significant relationship between provider volume and patient survival or any toxicity end point. Among patients receiving IMRT, those treated by higher-volume radiation oncologists had improved survival compared with those treated by low-volume providers. The risk of all-cause mortality decreased by 21% for every additional five patients treated per provider per year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.94). Patients treated with IMRT by higher-volume providers had decreased HNC-specific mortality (subdistribution HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.91) and decreased risk of aspiration pneumonia (subdistribution HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.99). Conclusion Patients receiving IMRT for HNC had improved outcomes when treated by higher-volume providers. These findings will better inform patients and providers when making decisions about treatment, and emphasize the critical importance of high-quality radiation therapy for optimal treatment of HNC. PMID:26729432

  10. Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  11. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Click here to listen to the Podcast A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation. PMID:27843642

  12. ASCO highlights podcast: head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Merlano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of the head and neck cancer research highlights of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting 2016, held in June 2016 in Chicago, is presented in this podcast. Considering the most interesting and practice-changing trials reported at the meeting, the key trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin against 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) plus cisplatin in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is highlighted. The GORTEC2007-02 trial comparing induction docetaxel/platinum/5-FU followed by cetuximab-radiotherapy against concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for N2b/c-N3 non operated stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is also discussed. An overview of the research reported using immunotherapy in head and neck cancer is also given, considering maturing data and particularly in relapsing patients, where response rates, though low, are better than with current therapies, and the responses are long lasting. Future developments are also considered, again with a focus on immunotherapy, but also considering combination with radiotherapy and chemoradiation.

  13. Touch screen computer-assisted health-related quality of life and distress data collection in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    de Bree, R; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; Keizer, A L; Houffelaar, A; Leemans, C R

    2008-04-01

    Touch screen computer-assisted health-related quality of life data collection in head and neck cancer patients is feasible. Touch screen computer-assisted health-related quality of life data collection can be used for scientific documentation as well as in clinical setting. Patients are willing to complete the questionnaire on a touch-screen and find the equipment easy to use. Compliance needs improvement by instructing clinicians and nurses and a better alert system.

  14. Result of two randomized trials comparing nolatrexed (Thymitaq) versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Pivot, X; Wadler, S; Kelly, C; Ruxer, R; Tortochaux, J; Stern, J; Belpomme, D; Humblet, Y; Domenge, C; Clendeninn, N; Johnston, A; Penning, C; Schneider, M

    2001-11-01

    We report on two randomized trials performed in the USA and Europe, which compared methotrexate and nolatrexed as treatment for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer. Eligibility criteria included: histologically confirmed squamous-cell carcinoma, measurable disease, adequate hematological, renal and hepatic functions, failure of a first-line chemotherapy, and informed consent. Methotrexate 40 mg/m2 was weekly given by short infusion, and nolatrexed 725 mg/m2 per day was administered as a five-day continuous infusion, every three weeks. A total of 139 patients (63 in the USA. 76 in Europe) were randomized based on a ratio of 2/1: 93 and 46 received nolatrexed and methotrexate, respectively. Patient characteristics included 115 males and 24 females; median age 60 years. In the nolatrexed arm, the following grade 3-4 toxicities occurred: neutropenia (29.9%) with 3.1% of febrile neutropenia, mucositis (33.3%), and vomiting (10.3%). In the MTX arm, the grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (7.1%) and mucositis (6.9%). There was no difference in activity between the nolatrexed and the methotrexate treatment: 3.3% and 10.8% of objective responses, 1.9 versus 1.5 months of disease-free progression and 3.5 versus 3.7 months of overall survival, respectively. Nolatrexed has demonstrated a similar activity to methotrexate.

  15. Incidental uptake of 18F-fluorocholine (FCH) in the head or in the neck of patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hodolic, Marina; Huchet, Virginie; Balogova, Sona; Michaud, Laure; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valérie; Cimitan, Marino; Fettich, Jure; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2014-01-01

    Background Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorocholine (FCH) is routinely performed in patients with prostate cancer. In this clinical context, foci of FCH uptake in the head or in the neck were considered as incidentalomas, except for those suggestive of multiple bone metastases. Results In 8 patients the incidental focus corresponded to a benign tumour. The standard of truth was histology in two cases, correlative imaging with MRI in four cases, 99mTc-SestaMIBI scintigraphy, ultrasonography and biochemistry in one case and biochemistry including PTH assay in one case. The final diagnosis of benign tumours consisted in 3 pituitary adenomas, 2 meningiomas, 2 hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands and 1 thyroid adenoma. Malignancy was proven histologically in 2 other patients: 1 papillary carcinoma of the thyroid and 1 cerebellar metastasis. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, FCH uptake by pituitary adenomas or hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has never been described previously. We thus discuss whether there might be a future indication for FCH PET/CT when one such tumour is already known or suspected: to detect a residual or recurrent pituitary adenoma after surgery, to guide surgery or radiotherapy of a meningioma or to localise a hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland. In these potential indications, comparative studies with reference PET tracers or with 99mTc-sestaMIBI in case of hyperparathyroidism could be undertaken. PMID:25177236

  16. Fatigue is associated with inflammation in patients with head and neck cancer before and after intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Canhua; Beitler, Jonathan J; Higgins, Kristin A; Conneely, Karen; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Felger, Jennifer; Wommack, Evanthia C; Shin, Dong M; Saba, Nabil F; Ong, Luke Yeeloo; Kowalski, Jeanne; Bruner, Deborah W; Miller, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have particularly high rates of fatigue, and pre- and post-radiotherapy fatigue are prognostic factors for pathologic tumor responses and poor survival. Although inflammation has been proposed as one of the potential mechanisms of fatigue in cancer patients, findings have not been consistent, and there is a dearth of longitudinal studies. Accordingly, we conducted a prospective study in 46 HNC patients pre- and one-month post-IMRT. Fatigue was measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI)-20 at both time points along with the assessment of peripheral blood inflammatory markers including interleukin (IL)-6, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and gene expression. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between inflammatory markers and fatigue. Gene enrichment analysis using MetaCore software was performed using up-regulated genes that were significantly associated with IMRT and fatigue. Significant associations between fatigue and IL-6 as well as CRP, which were independent of time, were observed. In addition the change in fatigue from pre- to post-IMRT was positively associated with the change in IL-6 and CRP. Analysis of up-regulated gene transcripts as a function of IMRT and fatigue revealed overrepresentation of transcripts related to the defense response and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, our findings support the hypotheses that inflammation is associated with fatigue over time in HNC patients. Future studies on how inflammation contributes to fatigue as well as strategies targeting inflammation to reduce fatigue are warranted.

  17. Prospective assessment of oral mucositis and its impact on quality of life and patient-reported outcomes during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Martini, Stefania; Di Muzio, Jacopo; Cavallin, Chiara; Arcadipane, Francesca; Rampino, Monica; Ostellino, Oliviero; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Garzino Demo, Paolo; Fasolis, Massimo; Airoldi, Mario; Ricardi, Umberto

    2017-05-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common acute side effect during radiotherapy treatments for head and neck cancer (HNC), with a potential impact on patient's compliance to therapy, quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes. Its timely and appropriate management is of paramount importance. Several quantitative scoring scales are available to properly assess OM and its influence on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and QoL. We prospectively assessed OM in a cohort of HNC patients submitted to radiation using the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS), while its impact on PROs and QoL was evaluated employing the Oral Mucositis Weekly Questionnaire-Head and Neck Cancer (OMWQ-HN) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck Cancer (FACT-HN). Evaluation of OMAS scores highlighted a progressive increase in OM during treatment and a partial recovery after the end of radiation. These trends were correlated to PROs and QoL as evaluated with OMWQ-HN and FACT-HN questionnaires. In the present study, we provided a quantitative assessment of OM, PROs and QoL in HNC patient undergoing radiotherapy, potentially useful for future comparison.

  18. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  19. Pattern of neck recurrence after lateral neck dissection for cervical metastases in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, William F.; Wang, Laura Y.; Palmer, Frank L.; Nixon, Iain J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the rate and pattern of nodal recurrence in patients who underwent a therapeutic, lateral neck dissection (LND) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with clinically evident cervical metastases and to determine if there was any correlation between the extent of initial dissection and the rate and pattern of neck recurrence. Methods A total of 3,664 patients with PTC treated between 1986 and 2010 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were identified from our institutional database. Tumor factors, patient demographics, extent of initial LND, and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Patterns of recurrent lateral neck metastases by level involvement were recorded and outcomes calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A total of 484 patients had an LND for cervical metastases; 364 (75%) had a comprehensive LND (CLND) and 120 (25%) had a selective neck dissection (SND). The median duration of follow-up was 63.5 months. As expected, patients with CLND had a greater number of nodes removed as well as a greater number of positive nodes (P < .001). There was no difference in overall lateral neck recurrence-free status (CLND 94.4% vs SND 89.4%, P = .158), but in the dissected neck, the ipsilateral lateral neck recurrence-free status was superior in the CLND patients (97.7% vs 89.4%, P < .001). Conclusion Patients with clinically evident neck metastases from PTC managed by CLND have lesser rates of recurrence in the dissected neck compared with patients managed by SND. SND should only be done in highly selected cases with small volume disease. PMID:26994486

  20. Preoperative [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Standardized Uptake Value of Neck Lymph Nodes Predicts Neck Cancer Control and Survival Rates in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) depends heavily on locoregional control. In this prospective study, we sought to investigate whether preoperative maximum standardized uptake value of the neck lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) may predict prognosis in OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All subjects underwent a [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan within 2 weeks before radical surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in the presence of pathologic risk factors. Optimal cutoff values of SUVnodal-max were chosen based on 5-year disease-free survival (DFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. The optimal cutoff value for SUVnodal-max was 5.7. Multivariate analyses identified the following independent predictors of poor outcome: SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 for the 5-year neck cancer control rate, distant metastatic rate, DFS, DSS, and extracapsular spread (ECS) for the 5-year DSS and OS. Among ECS patients, the presence of a SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 identified patients with the worst prognosis. Conclusion: A SUVnodal-max of 5.7, either alone or in combination with ECS, is an independent prognosticator for 5-year neck cancer control and survival rates in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes.

  1. Grade 3/4 Dermatitis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cetuximab and IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, Gabriela; Brown, Michelle; Salgueiro, Eveline Barata; Schmueckle, Hildegard; Romancuk, Natalie; Winkler, Gisela; Lee, Soon Jae; Straeuli, Ariane; Kissling, Beatrix; Dummer, Reinhard; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the rate of serious (>Grade 2, CTCAE 3.0) dermatitis in our head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients undergoing simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concomitant cetuximab (SIB-IMRT-cetuximab). We hypothesized a positive association between the radiation dose to the skin and the degree of dermatitis in patients receiving cetuximab. Methods and Materials: Between April 2006 and December 2009, 99 HNC patients underwent SIB-IMRT-cetuximab. In 69/99 (70%), systemic treatment consisted of concomitant cetuximab only, whereas 30 (30%) were switched from concomitant cisplatin to concomitant cetuximab. Treatment-related dermatitis was prospectively monitored. Ninety-nine patients treated with four to seven concomitant cycles of cisplatin only served as an internal control group. The radiation dose delivered to the skin was measured and related to dermal reactions. Results: Grade 3/4 dermatitis developed in 34% of the cetuximab cohort, which was substantially higher than in the control cohort (3%, p < 0.01). No cases of skin necrosis or other fatal events related to cetuximab have occurred so far. A significantly larger mean skin area was found exposed to high radiation doses in patients with severe cetuximab-related dermatitis, compared with those without (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Concomitant cetuximab resulted in a {approx}10-fold increase in the rate of severe transient dermatitis compared with the use of concomitant cisplatin. We found a positive association between the incidence of Grade 3/4 dermatitis and the radiation dose delivered to the skin in patients receiving cetuximab.

  2. Dosimetric impact of setup errors in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjit; Rawat, Sheh; Ahlawat, Parveen; Kakria, Anjali; Gupta, Gourav; Saxena, Upasna; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    To assess and analyze the impact of setup uncertainties on target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Translational setup errors in 25 HNC patients were observed by kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT). Two plans were generated. Plan one – the original plan which was the initially optimized and approved plan of the patient. All patients were treated according to their respective approved plans at a defined isocenter. Plan two – the plan sum which was the sum of all plans recalculated at a different isocenter according to setup errors in x, y, and z-direction. Plan sum was created to evaluate doses that would have been received by planning target volume (PTV) and OARs if setup errors were not corrected. These 2 plans were analyzed and compared in terms of target volume coverage and doses to OARs. A total 503 kV CBCT images were acquired for evaluation of setup errors in 25 HNC patients. The systematic (mean) and random errors (standard deviation) combined for 25 patients in x, y, and z directions were 0.15 cm, 0.21 cm, and 0.19 cm and 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The study showed that there was a significant difference in PTV coverage between 2 plans. The doses to various OARs showed a nonsignificant increase in the plan sum. The correction of translational setup errors is essential for IGRT treatment in terms of delivery of planned optimal doses to target volume. PMID:27217627

  3. Jejunal free flap for reconstruction of pharyngeal defects in patients with head and neck cancer-the Birmingham experience.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel J; Parmar, Satyesh; Praveen, Prav; Martin, Tim; Pracy, Paul; Jennings, Chris; Simms, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    We retrospectively audited operative complications, success of flaps, and speech and swallowing outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer who had reconstruction with jejunal free tissue transfer to the pharynx. A total of 104 patients had jejunal free flaps between 1987 and 2009 at University Hospital, Birmingham. Management was by a multidisciplinary team, and the same vascular surgeon did all the anastomoses. We investigated the relations between patients, operative factors, and postoperative complications, and noted the ischaemic time of the flaps and coexisting conditions of the patients. Outcomes measured included initial and final survival rates of flaps, donor and recipient site complications, and speech and swallowing outcomes on discharge and up to 2 years postoperatively. Of the 104 patients, 14 (13%) had initial flap complications but overall flap survival was 97%. A total of 11 (11%) patients developed a fistula at a mean of 15 days postoperatively and 11 (11%) had minor donor site complications. A total of 95 (91%) were able to resume oral diet on discharge. Of the 44 who were followed up on discharge, 32 (73%) were able to maintain oral intake at 2 years and 31 (70%) could use their voice in everyday situations. The jejunal free flap enables the tumour to be removed, and reconstruction and restoration of function to be done in a single operation using tissue that is versatile. The operation is associated with low morbidity at the donor and recipient sites, and results in good speech and swallowing outcomes. The flap can also be used to reconstruct pharyngolaryngeal defects.

  4. Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Jen, Yee-Min; Chung, Yih-Lin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  5. Evaluating the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced changes in virally mediated head and neck cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Elizabeth; Owen, Rebecca; Mengersen, Kerrie; Harden, Fiona; Porceddu, Sandro

    2013-12-15

    Patients with virally mediated head and neck cancer (VMHNC) often present with advanced nodal disease that is highly radioresponsive as demonstrated by tumour and nodal regression during treatment. The resultant changes may impact on the planned dose distribution and so adversely affect the therapeutic ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced anatomical changes in VMHNC patients who had undergone a replan. Thirteen patients with virally mediated oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal cancer who presented for definitive radiotherapy between 2005 and 2010 and who had a replan generated were investigated. The dosimetric effect of anatomical changes was quantified by comparing dose–volume histograms (DVH) of primary and nodal gross target volumes and organs at risk (OAR), including spinal cord and parotid glands, from the original plan and a comparison plan. Eleven three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and two intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were evaluated. Dose to the spinal cord and brainstem increased by 4.1% and 2.6%, respectively. Mean dose to the parotid glands also increased by 3.5%. In contrast, the dose received by 98% of the primary and nodal gross tumour volumes decreased by 0.15% and 0.3%, respectively, when comparing the initial treatment plan to the comparison plan. In this study, treatment-induced anatomical changes had the greatest impact on OAR dose with negligible effect on the dose to nodal gross tumour volumes. In the era of IMRT, accounting for treatment-induced anatomical changes is important as focus is placed on minimizing the acute and long-term side effects of treatment.

  6. Management of acute skin toxicity with Hypericum perforatum and neem oil during platinum-based concurrent chemo-radiation in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Rampino, Monica; Ostellino, Oliviero; Schena, Marina; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Garzino Demo, Paolo; Fasolis, Massimo; Arcadipane, Francesca; Martini, Stefania; Cavallin, Chiara; Airoldi, Mario; Ricardi, Umberto

    2017-02-01

    Acute skin toxicity is a frequent finding during combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Its timely and appropriate management is crucial for both oncological results and patient's global quality of life. We herein report clinical data on the use of Hypericum perforatum and neem oil in the treatment of acute skin toxicity during concurrent chemo-radiation for head and neck cancer. A consecutive series of 50 head and neck cancer patients undergoing concomitant radio-chemotherapy with weekly cisplatin was analyzed. Treatment with Hypericum perforatum and neem oil was started in case of G2 acute skin toxicity according to the RTOG/EORTC scoring scale and continued during the whole treatment course and thereafter until complete recovery. The maximum detected acute skin toxicity included Grade 2 events in 62% of cases and G3 in 32% during treatment and G2 and G3 scores in 52 and 8%, respectively, at the end of chemo-radiation. Grade 2 toxicity was mainly observed during weeks 4-5, while G3 during weeks 5-6. Median times spent with G2 or G3 toxicity were 23.5 and 14 days. Patients with G3 toxicity were reconverted to a G2 profile in 80% of cases, while those with a G2 score had a decrease to G1 in 58% of cases. Time between maximum acute skin toxicity and complete skin recovery was 30 days. Mean worst pain score evaluated with the Numerical Rating Scale-11 was 6.9 during treatment and 4.5 at the end of chemo-radiotherapy. Hypericum perforatum and neem oil proved to be a safe and effective option in the management of acute skin toxicity in head and neck cancer patients submitted to chemo-radiation with weekly cisplatin. Further studies with a control group and patient-reported outcomes are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  7. Accuracy of Computed Tomography for Predicting Pathologic Nodal Extracapsular Extension in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Undergoing Initial Surgical Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan S.; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Hanasoge, Sheela; Aiken, Ashley H.; Hudgins, Patricia A.; Hall, William A.; Chen, Susie A.; Eaton, Bree R.; Higgins, Kristin A.; Saba, Nabil F.; Beitler, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Nodal extracapsular extension (ECE) in patients with head-and-neck cancer increases the loco-regional failure risk and is an indication for adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). To reduce the risk of requiring trimodality therapy, patients with head-and-neck cancer who are surgical candidates are often treated with definitive CRT when preoperative computed tomographic imaging suggests radiographic ECE. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of preoperative CT imaging for predicting pathologic nodal ECE (pECE). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 432 consecutive patients with oral cavity or locally advanced/nonfunctional laryngeal cancer who underwent preoperative CT imaging before initial surgical resection and neck dissection. Specimens with pECE had the extent of ECE graded on a scale from 1 to 4. Results: Radiographic ECE was documented in 46 patients (10.6%), and pECE was observed in 87 (20.1%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 43.7%, 97.7%, 82.6%, and 87.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of radiographic ECE increased from 18.8% for grade 1 to 2 ECE, to 52.9% for grade 3, and 72.2% for grade 4. Radiographic ECE criteria of adjacent structure invasion was a better predictor than irregular borders/fat stranding for pECE. Conclusions: Radiographic ECE has poor sensitivity, but excellent specificity for pECE in patients who undergo initial surgical resection. PPV and NPV are reasonable for clinical decision making. The performance of preoperative CT imaging increased as pECE grade increased. Patients with resectable head-and-neck cancer with radiographic ECE based on adjacent structure invasion are at high risk for high-grade pECE requiring adjuvant CRT when treated with initial surgery; definitive CRT as an alternative should be considered where appropriate.

  8. Low-level laser therapy for the prevention of low salivary flow rate after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Palma, Luiz Felipe; Giordani, Adelmo José; Deboni, Aline Lima Silva; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low-level laser therapy can prevent salivary hypofunction after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods We evaluated 23 head and neck cancer patients, of whom 13 received laser therapy and 10 received clinical care only. An InGaAlP laser was used intra-orally (at 660 nm and 40 mW) at a mean dose of 10.0 J/cm2 and extra-orally (at 780 nm and 15 mW) at a mean dose of 3.7 J/cm2, three times per week, on alternate days. Stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests were performed before the first radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions (N0) and at 30 days after the end of treatment (N30). Results At N30, the mean salivary flow rates were significantly higher among the laser therapy patients than among the patients who received clinical care only, in the stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests (p = 0.0131 and p = 0.0143, respectively). Conclusion Low-level laser therapy, administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, appears to mitigate treatment-induced salivary hypofunction in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:27141130

  9. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Adelstein, David J.

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  10. Monte Carlo evaluation of tissue heterogeneities corrections in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; McClinton, Christopher; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Saleh, Habeeb; Jiang, Hongyu; Lominska, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate Monte Carlo computed dose distributions with the X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and compare to heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm. This study includes 10 head and neck cancer patients who underwent SRT re-irradiation using heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm for dose calculation. Prescription dose was 24-40 Gy in 3-5 fractions (treated 3-5 fractions per week) with at least 95% of the PTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose. A stereotactic head and neck localization box was attached to the base of the thermoplastic mask fixation for target localization. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were contoured on the 3D CT images. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the GTV with 0 to 5 mm uniform expansion; PTV ranged from 10.2 to 64.3 cc (average=35.0±17.5 cc). OARs were contoured on the 3D planning CT and consisted of spinal cord, brainstem, optic structures, parotids, and skin. In the BrainLab treatment planning system (TPS), clinically optimal SRT plans were generated using hybrid planning technique (combination of 3D conformal noncoplanar arcs and nonopposing static beams) for the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV-SRS (1000 MU/min) beam. For the purposes of this study, treatment plans were recomputed using XVMC algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry, multileaf positions, and monitor units and compared to the corresponding clinical PB-hete plans. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions show small decreases (<1.5%) in calculated dose for D99, Dmean, and Dmax of the PTV coverage between the two algorithms. However, the average target volume encompassed by the prescribed percent dose (Vp) was about 2.5% less with XVMC vs. PB-hete and

  11. Monte Carlo evaluation of tissue heterogeneities corrections in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; McClinton, Christopher; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Saleh, Habeeb; Jiang, Hongyu; Lominska, Christopher

    2016-03-08

    The purpose of this study was to generate Monte Carlo computed dose distributions with the X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and compare to heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm. This study includes 10 head and neck cancer patients who underwent SRT re-irradiation using heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm for dose calculation. Prescription dose was 24-40 Gy in 3-5 fractions (treated 3-5 fractions per week) with at least 95% of the PTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose. A stereotactic head and neck localization box was attached to the base of the thermoplastic mask fixation for target localization. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were contoured on the 3D CT images. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the GTV with 0 to 5 mm uniform expansion; PTV ranged from 10.2 to 64.3 cc (average = 35.0±17.5 cc). OARs were contoured on the 3D planning CT and consisted of spinal cord, brainstem, optic structures, parotids, and skin. In the BrainLab treatment planning system (TPS), clinically optimal SRT plans were generated using hybrid planning technique (combination of 3D conformal nonco-planar arcs and nonopposing static beams) for the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV-SRS (1000 MU/min) beam. For the purposes of this study, treatment plans were recomputed using XVMC algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry, multileaf positions, and monitor units and compared to the corresponding clinical PB-hete plans. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions show small decreases (< 1.5%) in calculated dose for D99, Dmean, and Dmax of the PTV coverage between the two algorithms. However, the average target volume encompassed by the prescribed percent dose (Vp) was about 2.5% less with XVMC vs. PB-hete and

  12. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Lidia; Pedicini, Piernicola; D'Andrea, Marco; Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina; Benassi, Marcello

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  13. Impact of low-level laser therapy on hyposalivation, salivary pH, and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients post-radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Palma, Luiz Felipe; Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Marcucci, Marcelo; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2017-03-03

    Late effects of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer treatment have been increasingly investigated due to its impact on patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy on hyposalivation, low salivary pH, and quality of life in head and neck cancer patients post-radiotherapy. Twenty-nine patients with radiation-induced xerostomia received laser sessions twice a week, during 3 months (24 sessions). For this, a continuous wave Indium-Gallium-Aluminium-Phosphorus diode laser device was used punctually on the major salivary glands (808 nm, 0.75 W/cm(2), 30 mW, illuminated area 0.04 cm(2), 7.5 J/cm(2), 10 s, 0.3 J). Six extraoral points were illuminated on each parotid gland and three on each submandibular gland, as well as two intraoral points on each sublingual gland. Stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rate, pH (two scales with different gradations), and quality of life (University Of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. There were significant increases in both mean salivary flow rates (unstimulated: p = 0.0012; stimulated: p < 0.0001), mean pH values (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0004), and mean score from the quality of life questionnaire (p < 0.0001). Low-level laser therapy seems to be effective to mitigate salivary hypofunction and increase salivary pH of patients submitted to radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, thereby leading to an improvement in quality of life.

  14. Racial survival disparity in head and neck cancer results from low prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in black oropharyngeal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Settle, Kathleen; Posner, Marshall R; Schumaker, Lisa M; Tan, Ming; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Goloubeva, Olga; Strome, Scott E; Haddad, Robert I; Patel, Shital S; Cambell, Earl V; Sarlis, Nicholas; Lorch, Jochen; Cullen, Kevin J

    2009-09-01

    The burden of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is greater for blacks than for whites, especially in oropharyngeal cases. We previously showed retrospectively that disease-free survival was significantly greater in white than in black SCCHN patients treated with chemoradiation, the greatest difference occurring in the oropharyngeal subgroup. Oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in incidence and in its association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection; HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer patients have significantly better outcomes (versus HPV-negative). These collective data led to the present analyses of overall survival (OS) in our retrospective cohort and of OS and HPV status (tested prospectively in pretreatment biopsy specimens) in the phase 3, multicenter TAX 324 trial of induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation in SCCHN patients. Median OS in the retrospective cohort of 106 white and 95 black SCCHN patients was 52.1 months (white) versus only 23.7 months (black; P = 0.009), due entirely to OS in the subgroup of patients with oropharyngeal cancer--69.4 months (whites) versus 25.2 months (blacks; P = 0.0006); no significant difference by race occurred in survival of non-oropharyngeal SCCHN (P = 0.58). In TAX 324, 196 white patients and 28 black patients could be assessed for HPV status. Median OS was significantly worse for black patients (20.9 months) than for white patients (70.6 months; P = 0.03) and dramatically improved in HPV-positive (not reached) versus HPV-negative (26.6 months, 5.1 hazard ratio) oropharyngeal patients (P < 0.0001), 49% of whom were HPV-16 positive. Overall, HPV positivity was 34% in white versus 4% in black patients (P = 0.0004). Survival was similar for black and white HPV-negative patients (P = 0.56). This is the first prospective assessment of confirmed HPV status in black versus white SCCHN patients. Worse OS for black SCCHN patients was driven by oropharyngeal cancer outcomes, and that for

  15. Impact of Radiation-Induced Xerostomia on Quality of Life After Primary Radiotherapy Among Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jellema, Anke Petra Slotman, Ben J.; Doornaert, Patricia; Leemans, C. Rene M.D.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of xerostomia on overall quality of life (QoL) outcome and related dimensions among head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 288 patients with Stage I-IV disease without distant metastases were included. Late xerostomia according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG-xerostomia) and QoL (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLC-C30) were assessed at baseline and every 6th month from 6 months to 24 months after radiotherapy. Results: A significant association was found between RTOG-xerostomia and overall QoL outcome (effect size [ES] 0.07, p < 0.001). A significant relationship with global QoL, all functioning scales, and fatigue and insomnia was observed. A significant interaction term was present between RTOG-xerostomia and gender and between RTOG-xerostomia and age. In terms of gender, RTOG-xerostomia had a larger impact on overall QoL outcome in women (ES 0.13 for women vs. 0.07 for men). Furthermore, in women ES on individual scales were larger, and a marked worsening was observed with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. No different ES according to age was seen (ES 0.10 for 18-65 years vs. 0.08 for >65 years). An analysis of the impact of RTOG-xerostomia on overall QoL outcome over time showed an increase from 0.09 at 6 months to 0.22 at 24 months. With elapsing time, a worsening was found for these individual scales with increasing RTOG-xerostomia. Conclusions: The results of this prospective study are the first to show a significant impact of radiation-induced xerostomia on QoL. Although the incidence of Grade {>=}2 RTOG-xerostomia decreases with time, its impact on QoL increases. This finding emphasizes the importance of prevention of xerostomia.

  16. Acute skin toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy or EGFR inhibitors: Literature review and consensus.

    PubMed

    Russi, Elvio G; Moretto, Francesco; Rampino, Monica; Benasso, Marco; Bacigalupo, Almalina; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Numico, Gianmauro; Bossi, Paolo; Buglione, Michela; Lombardo, Antonino; Airoldi, Mario; Merlano, Marco C; Licitra, Lisa; Denaro, Nerina; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine; Bensadoun, Renè-Jean; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2015-10-01

    The adverse effects of radiation therapy, often integrated with chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, on the skin include severe acute and chronic dermatitis associated with pain, discomfort, itching, and burning, and may heavily affect patients' quality of life. The management of these skin adverse effects in head and neck cancer patients (HNCPs) are very heterogeneous due to the lack of shared rigorous classification systems and evidence based treatments. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of dermatitis in HNCPs treated with radiotherapy with or without systemic therapies in order to improve skin toxicity management. The Delphi Appropriateness Method was used. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. This paper offers contains seven clusters of statements about the management of dermatitis in HNCPs and a review of recent literature on these topics.

  17. [Genetic basis of head and neck cancers and gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Özel, Halil Erdem; Özkırış, Mahmut; Gencer, Zeliha Kapusuz; Saydam, Levent

    2013-01-01

    Surgery and combinations of traditional treatments are not successful enough particularly for advanced stage head and neck cancer. The major disadvantages of chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the lack of specificity for the target tissue and toxicity to the patient. As a result, gene therapy may offer a more specific approach. The aim of gene therapy is to present therapeutic genes into cancer cells which selectively eliminate malignant cells with no systemic toxicity to the patient. This article reviews the genetic basis of head and neck cancers and important concepts in cancer gene therapy: (i) inhibition of oncogenes; (ii) tumor suppressor gene replacement; (iii) regulation of immune response against malignant cells; (iv) genetic prodrug activation; and (v) antiangiogenic gene therapy. Currently, gene therapy is not sufficient to replace the traditional treatments of head and neck cancers, however there is no doubt that it will have an important role in the near future.

  18. Delayed Development of Brain Abscesses Following Stent-Graft Placement in a Head and Neck Cancer Patient Presenting with Carotid Blowout Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Oweis, Yaseen; Gemmete, Joseph J. Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya; Ansari, Sameer

    2011-02-15

    We describe the delayed development of intracranial abscesses following emergent treatment with a covered stent-graft for carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) in a patient with head and neck cancer. The patient presented with hemoptysis and frank arterial bleeding through the tracheostomy site. A self-expandable stent-graft was deployed across a small pseudoaneurysm arising from the right common carotid artery (RCCA) and resulted in immediate hemostasis. Three months later, the patient suffered a recurrent hemorrhage. CT of the neck demonstrated periluminal fluid around the caudal aspect of the stent-graft with intraluminal thrombus and a small pseudoaneurysm. Subsequently, the patient underwent a balloon test occlusion study and endovascular sacrifice of the RCCA and right internal carotid artery. MRI of the brain demonstrated at least four ring-enhancing lesions within the right cerebral hemisphere consistent with intracranial abscesses that resolved with broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage.

  19. Prospective study of inner ear radiation dose and hearing loss in head-and-neck cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Charlie C.; Eisbruch, Avraham . E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu; Lee, Julia S.; Snorrason, Rhonda M.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Kileny, Paul R.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the radiation dose to the inner ear and long-term hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those receiving curative radiotherapy (RT) for head-and-neck cancer. After enrollment, patients underwent three-dimensional conformal RT planning and delivery (180-200 cGy/fraction) appropriate for their disease site and stage. The inner ear was contoured on axial CT planning images. Dose-volume histograms, as well as the mean and maximal dose for each structure, were calculated. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry at baseline (before treatment) and 1, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after RT. The threshold level (the greater the value, the more hearing loss) in decibels was recorded for 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz. For patients receiving predominantly unilateral RT, the contralateral ear served as the de facto control. The differences in threshold level between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears were calculated, and the temporal pattern and dose-response relation of hearing loss were analyzed using statistical methods that take into account the correlation between two ears in the same subject and repeated, sequential measurements of each subject. Results: Of the 40 patients enrolled in this study, 35 qualified for analysis. Four patients who received concurrent chemotherapy and RT were analyzed separately. The 31 unilaterally treated patients received a median dose of 47.4 Gy (range, 14.1-68.8 Gy) to the ipsilateral inner ear and 4.2 Gy (range, 0.5-31.3 Gy) to the contralateral inner ear. Hearing loss was associated with the radiation dose received by the inner ear (loss of 210dB was observed in ears receiving {>=}45 Gy) and was most appreciable in the higher frequencies ({>=}2000 Hz). For a 60-year-old patient with no previous hearing loss in either ear, after receiving 45 Gy, the ipsilateral ear, according to our clinical model, would have a 19.3-dB (95% confidence interval [CI], 15

  20. Racial Survival Disparity in Head and Neck Cancer Results from Low Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Black Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Settle, Kathleen; Posner, Marshall R.; Schumaker, Lisa M.; Tan, Ming; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Goloubeva, Olga; Strome, Scott E.; Haddad, Robert I.; Patel, Shital S.; Cambell, Earl V.; Sarlis, Nicholas; Lorch, Jochen; Cullen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is greater for blacks than for whites, especially in oropharyngeal cases. We previously showed retrospectively that disease-free survival was significantly greater in white than in black SCCHN patients treated with chemoradiation, the greatest difference occurring in the oropharyngeal subgroup. Oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in incidence and in its association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection; HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer patients have significantly better outcomes (versus HPV-negative). These collective data led to the present analyses of overall survival (OS) in our retrospective cohort and of OS and HPV status (tested prospectively in pretreatment biopsy specimens) in the phase 3, multicenter TAX 324 trial of induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation in SCCHN patients. Median OS in the retrospective cohort of 106 white and 95 black SCCHN patients was 52.1 months (white) versus only 23.7 months (black; P = 0.009), due entirely to OS in the subgroup of patients with oropharyngeal cancer—69.4 months (whites) versus 25.2 months (blacks; P = 0.0006); no significant difference by race occurred in survival of non-oropharyngeal SCCHN (P = 0.58). In TAX 324, 196 white patients and 28 black patients could be assessed for HPV status. Median OS was significantly worse for black patients (20.9 months) than for white patients (70.6 months; P = 0.03) and dramatically improved in HPV-positive (not reached) versus HPV-negative (26.6 months, 5.1 hazard ratio) oropharyngeal patients (P < 0.0001), 49% of whom were HPV-16 positive. Overall, HPV positivity was 34% in white versus 4% in black patients (P = 0.0004). Survival was similar for black and white HPV-negative patients (P = 0.56). This is the first prospective assessment of confirmed HPV status in black versus white SCCHN patients. Worse OS for black SCCHN patients was driven by oropharyngeal cancer outcomes, and that for

  1. Impact of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life for Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Matched-Pair Comparison with Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, Pierre . E-mail: p.graff@nancy.fnclcc.fr; Lapeyre, Michel; Desandes, Emmanuel; Ortholan, Cecile; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Alfonsi, Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Giraud, Philippe; Bourhis, Jean; Marchesi, Vincent; Mege, Alice; Peiffert, Didier

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the benefit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with conventional RT for the quality of life (QOL) of head and neck cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Cross-sectional QOL measures (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire C30 and head and neck cancer module) were used with a French multicenter cohort of patients cured of head and neck cancer (follow-up {>=} 1 year) who had received bilateral neck RT ({>=} 45 Gy) as a part of their initial treatment. We compared the QOL mean scores regarding RT modality (conventional RT vs. IMRT). The patients of the two groups were matched (one to one) according to the delay between the end of RT and the timing of the QOL evaluation and the T stage. Each QOL item was divided into two relevant levels of severity: 'not severe' (responses, 'not at all' and 'a little') vs. 'severe' (responses 'quite a bit' and 'very much'). The association between the type of RT and the prevalence of severe symptoms was approximated, through multivariate analysis using the prevalence odds ratio. Results: Two comparable groups (67 pairs) were available. Better scores were observed on the head and neck cancer module QOL questionnaire for the IMRT group, especially for dry mouth and sticky saliva (p < 0.0001). Severe symptoms were more frequent with conventional RT concerning saliva modifications and oral discomfort. The adjusted prevalence odds ratios were 3.17 (p = 0.04) for dry mouth, 3.16 (p = 0.02) for sticky saliva, 3.58 (p = 0.02) for pain in the mouth, 3.35 (p = 0.04) for pain in the jaw, 2.60 (p = 0.02) for difficulties opening the mouth, 2.76 (p = 0.02) for difficulties with swallowing, and 2.68 (p = 0.03) for trouble with eating. Conclusion: The QOL assessment of head and neck cancer survivors demonstrated the benefit of IMRT, particularly in the areas of salivary dysfunction and oral discomfort.

  2. The impact of tissue glue in wound healing of head and neck patients undergoing neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Wei; Wang, Chen-Chi; Jiang, Rong-San; Huang, Yu-Chia; Ho, Hui-Ching; Liu, Shih-An

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the impact of fibrin glue on postoperative drainage amount and duration in head and neck cancer patients who underwent neck dissection. This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients who were scheduled to undergo neck dissection due to head and neck cancer were eligible for this study. After receiving a detailed explanation, all patients signed an informed consent form before enrollment. Patients were then randomly assigned to the study group (fibrin glue) or control group. In the study group, 2 ml of fibrin glue (Tissucol(®); Duploject, Baxter AG) was applied on the surface of the surgical wound before closure. Basic demographic data along with tumor-related features, operation-related variables, postoperative drainage amount/duration, postoperative pain, and analgesic usage were collected and analyzed. A total of 15 patients were included in the final analyses, with eight patients in the study group and seven patients in the control group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in age, gender, primary site, clinical N stage, neck dissection levels, perioperative bleeding, postoperative drainage amount/duration, hospitalization duration, and postoperative pain status. The application of 2 ml fibrin glue by the method described herein did not reduce the postoperative drainage amount/duration nor the postoperative pain status in patients who underwent neck dissection.

  3. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Francois; Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu; Liu, Geoffrey

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  4. Tetracaine oral gel in patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Final results of a phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Alterio, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.alterio@ieo.it; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Zuccotti, Gabriele Fulvio Phar; Leon, Maria Elena; Omodeo Sale, Emanuela Phar; Pasetti, Marcella; Modena, Tiziana Phar; Perugini, Paola; Mariani, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a phase II study to assess feasibility, pain relief, and toxicity of a tetracaine-based oral gel in the treatment of radiotherapy (RT)-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with RT for head-and-neck cancer with clinical evidence of acute oral mucositis of grade {>=}2 were scheduled to receive the tetracaine gel. A questionnaire evaluating the effect of the gel was given to all subjects. Results: In 38 patients (79.2%), a reduction in oral cavity pain was reported. Thirty-four patients (82.9%) reported no side effect. Seventy-one percent of patients had no difficulties in gel application. Unpleasant taste of the gel and interference with food taste were noticed in 5 (12%) and 16 patients (39%), respectively. Planned RT course was interrupted less frequently in patients who reported benefit from gel application than in patients who did not (p = 0.014). None of the patients who experienced pain relief needed a nasogastric tube, opposite to the patients who did not report any benefit from gel application (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Tetracaine oral gel administration seemed feasible and safe while reducing RT-induced mucositis-related oral pain in a sizeable proportion of treated head-and-neck cancer patients. A trial designed to compare efficacy of this gel vs. standard treatment is warranted.

  5. Thyroid disorders in patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: A retrospective analysis of seventy-three patients

    SciTech Connect

    Alterio, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.alterio@ieo.it; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Franchi, Benedetta; D'Onofrio, Alberto Sc.D.; Piazzi, Valeria; Rondi, Elena; Ciocca, Mario; Gibelli, Bianca; Grosso, Enrica; Tradati, Nicoletta; Mariani, Luigi; Boboc, Genoveva Ionela; Orecchia, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of thyroid disorders and dose distribution to the thyroid in patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinomas. Methods and Materials: A retrospective evaluation of data from 73 patients treated for head-and-neck cancers in our department was performed. Thyroid function was evaluated mainly by the measurement of thyrotropin (thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH]). A retrospective analysis of treatment plans was performed for 57 patients. Percentages of thyroid glandular volume absorbing 10, 30, and 50 Gy (V10, V30, and V50 respectively) were considered for statistical analysis. Results: A majority of patients (61%) had a normal thyroid function whereas 19 patients (26%) had hypothyroidism. Mean thyroid volume was 30.39 cc. Point 3 (located at isthmus) absorbed lower doses compared with other points (p < 0.0001). Median values of V10, V30, and V50 were 92% (range, 57-100%), 75% (range, 28.5-100%), and 35% (range, 3-83%) respectively. Gender was associated with toxicity (presence of any kind of thyroid disorders) (p < 0.05), with females displaying higher levels of TSHr (relative TSH = patient's value/maximum value of the laboratory range) (p = 0.0005) and smaller thyroid volume (p 0.0012) compared with male population. TSHr values were associated with thyroid volume, and the presence of midline shielding block in the anterior field was associated with relative free thyroxine (FT4r = patient's value/maximum value of the laboratory range) values. Conclusions: Gender and thyroid volume seem to play an important role in the occurrence of thyroid toxicity, but further studies on dose-effect relationship for radiotherapy-induced thyroid toxicity are needed.

  6. Evaluation of Efficacy of an Herbal Compound on Dry Mouth in Patients With Head and Neck Cancers: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Ahmad; Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Choopani, Rasool; Ghobadi, Ali; Gachkar, Latif

    2016-01-01

    Dry mouth is a common complication of radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. This study compared the efficacy of an herbal compound containing Malva sylvestris and Alcea digitata (Boiss) with artificial saliva (Hypozalix) for improving the symptoms of dry mouth in head and neck cancer patients. The study examined a total of 62 subjects assigned to 2 groups. The herbal compound and Hypozalix were administered for 4 weeks. Efficacy was assessed using the visual analog scale and by grading the degree of dry mouth. Both groups showed a significant difference between visual analog scale before and following intervention. There was also a significant difference in visual analog scale between groups at 4 weeks after onset of intervention. The herbal group showed a significant difference between the grade of dry mouth before and after intervention, but no change was observed for grade of dry mouth in the Hypozalix group. This study supports the efficacy of the herbal compound for controlling symptoms of dry mouth in head and neck cancer patients.

  7. Migration from full-head mask to "open-face" mask for immobilization of patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Lovelock, D Michael; Mechalakos, James; Rao, Shyam; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Amols, Howard; Lee, Nancy

    2013-09-06

    To provide an alternative device for immobilization of the head while easing claustrophobia and improving comfort, an "open-face" thermoplastic mask was evaluated using video-based optical surface imaging (OSI) and kilovoltage (kV) X-ray radiography. A three-point thermoplastic head mask with a precut opening and reinforced strips was developed. After molding, it provided sufficient visible facial area as the region of interest for OSI. Using real-time OSI, the head motion of ten volunteers in the new mask was evaluated during mask locking and 15minutes lying on the treatment couch. Using a nose mark with reference to room lasers, forced head movement in open-face and full-head masks (with a nose hole) was compared. Five patients with claustrophobia were immobilized with open-face masks, set up using OSI and kV, and treated in 121 fractions, in which 61 fractions were monitored during treatment using real-time OSI. With the open-face mask, head motion was found to be 1.0 ± 0.6 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in volunteers during the experiment, and 0.8 ± 0.3 mm and 0.4° ± 0.2° in patients during treatment. These agree with patient motion calculated from pre-/post-treatment OSI and kV data using different anatomical landmarks. In volunteers, the head shift induced by mask-locking was 2.3 ± 1.7 mm and 1.8° ± 0.6°, and the range of forced movements in the open-face and full-head masks were found to be similar. Most (80%) of the volunteers preferred the open-face mask to the full-head mask, while claustrophobic patients could only tolerate the open-face mask. The open-face mask is characterized for its immobilization capability and can immobilize patients sufficiently (< 2 mm) during radiotherapy. It provides a clinical solution to the immobilization of patients with head and neck (HN) cancer undergoing radiotherapy, and is particularly beneficial for claustrophobic patients. This new open-face mask is readily adopted in radiotherapy clinic as a superior alternative to

  8. Blood nickel and chromium levels in association with smoking and occupational exposure among head and neck cancer patients in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Feki-Tounsi, Molka; Chakroun, Amine; Rebai, Ahmed; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2013-11-01

    Chronic exposure to chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) has long been recognized as being capable to increase head and neck cancer (HNC) incidence among exposed human populations. This study represents the first biomonitoring of Cr and Ni exposure in Tunisia and focuses on a possible association with HNC risk. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of Cr and Ni in the blood of HNC patients and controls. Metals blood levels of 169 HNC patients and 351 controls were determined using a Perkin-Elmer Analyst 800 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Mean blood levels of Cr and Ni in HNC cases (52.15 and 111.60 μg/L, respectively) were significantly higher than those of controls (37.04 and 30.50 μg/L, respectively). Cases' blood levels of Cr and Ni were significantly higher than those of controls after controlling for the other risk factors of HNC, including smoking, shisha consumption, occupational exposure, and nearby environment (P<0.05). Among these risk factors, smoking and occupational exposure presented the most significant association with HNC (odds ratio (OR)=6.54 and 7.66, respectively, P<0.001). Cr and Ni levels in blood sample of cases and controls that are smoker/occupationally exposed were higher than that of non-smoker/non-occupationally exposed (P<0.05). Smokers who are occupationally exposed present the most significant association with HNC (OR=25.08, P<0.0001). High levels of blood Cr (OR=2.09) and high levels of blood Ni (OR=8.87) were strongly associated with HNC after other potential confounders were controlled (P=0.004 and P<0.0001, respectively). This study suggested a potential role of Cr and Ni in the mechanism of HNC development.

  9. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  10. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  11. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  12. Spinal metastasis in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of head and neck cancer is relatively low in developed countries and highest in South East Asia. Notwithstanding advances in surgery and radiotherapy over the past several decades, the 5-year survival rate for head and neck cancer has stagnated and remains at 50–55%. This is due, in large part, to both regional and distant disease spread, including spinal metastasis. Spinal metastasis from head and neck cancer is rare, has a poor prognosis and can significantly impede end-stage quality of life; normally only palliative care is given. This study aims to conduct a systematic review of the evidence available on management of spinal metastasis from head and neck cancer and to use such evidence to draw up guiding principles in the management of the distant spread. Methods Systematic review of the electronic literature was conducted regarding the management of spinal metastasis of head and neck malignancies. Results Due to the exceptional rarity of head and neck cancers metastasizing to the spine, there is a paucity of good randomized controlled trials into the management of spinal metastasis. This review produced only 12 case studies/reports and 2 small retrospective cohort studies that lacked appropriate controls. Conclusion Management should aim to improve end-stage quality of life and maintain neurological function. This review has found that radiotherapy +/− medical adjuvant is considered the principle treatment of spinal metastasis of head and neck cancers. There is an absence of a definitive treatment protocol for head and neck cancer spinal metastasis. Our failure to find and cite high-quality scientific evidence only serves to stress the need for good quality research in this area. PMID:22716187

  13. Protocol for a randomized controlled trial of early prophylactic feeding via gastrostomy versus standard care in high risk patients with head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with head and neck cancer are at high risk of malnutrition and dysphagia. Enteral tube feeding via a gastrostomy or nasogastric tube is often required in response to dysphagia, odynophagia or side effects of treatment that lead to dehydration and/or weight-loss. A recent systematic review concluded that the optimal method of tube feeding remains unclear; however prophylactic gastrostomy, placed in anticipation of its use during and after treatment, is common practice, following a number of demonstrated benefits. However the majority of these studies have been undertaken in patients receiving radiotherapy alone. More recent studies in patient populations receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy are showing that despite prophylactic gastrostomy placement significant weight loss still occurs, placing the patient at risk of the consequences of malnutrition. Therefore we set out to investigate innovative prophylactic nutrition support via the gastrostomy to optimise the nutritional outcomes of patients with head and neck cancer. Methods/Design Patients with head and neck cancer will be eligible for this single centre randomised controlled trial if they are identified for referral for a prophylactic gastrostomy using local guidelines. Patients will be excluded if they are: under the age of eighteen; pregnant; unable to give informed consent; or severely malnourished or moderately malnourished with significant dysphagia requiring a liquid or puree diet. All eligible patients who consent for the study will be allocated randomly to either the intervention or control group (usual care). The intervention group will commence prophylactic supplementary nutrition support via the gastrostomy immediately following placement compared to usual care where nutrition support is commenced via the gastrostomy when clinically indicated during treatment. Key outcome measures will be percentage weight loss, body composition, nutritional status and quality of life, measured

  14. Comparison of methods for estimating glomerular filtration rate in head and neck cancer patients treated with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lotte; Brødbæk, Kasper; Hägerström, Erik G; Bentzen, Jens; Kristensen, Bent; Zerahn, Bo

    2017-03-20

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in the treatment of various solid tumors. Cisplatin induces nephrotoxicity and may lead to long-term reduction of kidney function. Consequently, determination of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is used to monitor potential kidney damage. This study aimed to compare two commonly used algorithms for estimating GFR (eGFR) from plasma creatinine (PCr) with (51)Cr-EDTA clearance (CrCl) as a reference method. This was a retrospective single center study of 94 head and neck cancer patients treated with cisplatin. CrCl was performed once before, during, and after treatment, and PCr was measured concurrently. eGFR was assessed from PCr applying the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) and the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations. Agreement was assessed applying the statistical methods of Bland and Altman. A predefined limit of clinically acceptable variation between CrCl and eGFR of 14% was applied. Comparison of CrCl and eGFRCKD revealed a positive slope of the linear regression line, suggesting proportional bias (p < 0.001). No systematic bias was found for eGFRCG. Pre-treatment, 42 (46%), 53 (56%) and 48 (53%) observations were within the clinically acceptable limit of variation for standardized eGFRCKD, BSA corrected eGFRCKD, and eGFRCG, respectively. The observed body weight changes were significant. In conclusion, estimated GFRCKD cannot sufficiently replace CrCl in the assessment of GFR during treatment with cisplatin due to systematic bias. Consequently, if CrCl is unavailable, then the CG equation is the better choice provided proper attention is paid to the large variation between methods.

  15. Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Tongue Cancer

  16. Evaluation of efficacy of Caphosol in prevention and alleviation of acute side effects in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jarzabski, Andrzej; Kawecki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is a common side effect of the oral mucosa due to anticancer therapy, especially for head and neck cancer. Caphosol is indicated for dryness of the mouth and oropharynx and treatment of mucositis due to irradiation or high-dose chemotherapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Caphosol in preventing and alleviating mucositis due to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Material and methods Caphosol was used from the beginning of the irradiation and for two weeks more after the treatment was completed. Mucositis, xerostomia, and dysphagia were scored by radiotherapists. Subjective evaluation was made by patients. Caphosol was assessed in a non-blinded, matched clinical study. Each treatment arm consisted of 50 patients. The groups were similar. The only difference in the management protocol between the treatment arms was the use of Caphosol in the experimental arm. Results A statistically significant difference in mean severity of early irradiation-induced side effects between the studied groups was observed with respect to: mucositis in the clinical target volume (CTV) area, mucositis in the increased dose (boost) area, dysphagia and xerostomia (p < 0.001 for all reactions). In the group of patients who used Caphosol, the mucositis was less intense, both in the CTV and in the boost area. Conclusions The use of Caphosol reduces the severity of acute mucositis, dysphagia and xerostomia, exerting a positive effect on comfort in the oral cavity in patients irradiated for head and neck tumors.

  17. Local Setup Errors in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patients Immobilized With a Custom-Made Device

    SciTech Connect

    Giske, Kristina; Stoiber, Eva M.; Schwarz, Michael; Stoll, Armin; Muenter, Marc W.; Timke, Carmen; Roeder, Falk; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Thieke, Christian; Bendl, Rolf

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local positioning uncertainties during fractionated radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer patients immobilized using a custom-made fixation device and discuss the effect of possible patient correction strategies for these uncertainties. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 head-and-neck patients underwent regular control computed tomography scanning using an in-room computed tomography scanner. The local and global positioning variations of all patients were evaluated by applying a rigid registration algorithm. One bounding box around the complete target volume and nine local registration boxes containing relevant anatomic structures were introduced. The resulting uncertainties for a stereotactic setup and the deformations referenced to one anatomic local registration box were determined. Local deformations of the patients immobilized using our custom-made device were compared with previously published results. Several patient positioning correction strategies were simulated, and the residual local uncertainties were calculated. Results: The patient anatomy in the stereotactic setup showed local systematic positioning deviations of 1-4 mm. The deformations referenced to a particular anatomic local registration box were similar to the reported deformations assessed from patients immobilized with commercially available Aquaplast masks. A global correction, including the rotational error compensation, decreased the remaining local translational errors. Depending on the chosen patient positioning strategy, the remaining local uncertainties varied considerably. Conclusions: Local deformations in head-and-neck patients occur even if an elaborate, custom-made patient fixation method is used. A rotational error correction decreased the required margins considerably. None of the considered correction strategies achieved perfect alignment. Therefore, weighting of anatomic subregions to obtain the optimal correction vector should be investigated in the

  18. Prospective intra-patient evaluation of a shoulder retraction device for radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Newbold, Katie L.; Bhide, Shreerang; Convery, Helen; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2012-10-01

    Irradiation of tumors in the larynx and pharynx is often technically challenging in patients with a short neck or high shoulders. Shoulder retraction devices can sometimes resolve this problem and allow irradiation via lateral beam directions. This study aimed to measure the proportion of patients who would benefit from such an approach and to quantify the magnitude of the benefit obtained. Twenty patients were studied. Simulator images were obtained before and after intervention. The additional exposure of the cervical spine was measured. Patient comfort and acceptability were assessed with a questionnaire. Improvement of exposure of the cervical spine was observed in 80% of patients. In 20%, there was either no difference or the position was worse. Shoulder retraction exposed a mean of 8.4-10.2 mm more of the cervical spine. Patients in general reported the device as comfortable. The use of a shoulder retraction device produced clinically significant improvements in exposure of the tissues of the cervical spine and neck and should be considered in patients being irradiated for tumors arising in the larynx or hypopharynx.

  19. Screening for EGFR Mutations in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Treated with Gefitinib on a Compassionate-Use Program: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Samuel; Bobos, Mattheos; Angouridakis, Nikolaos; Nikolaou, Angelos; Linardou, Helena; Razis, Evangelia; Fountzilas, George

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim. EGFR is commonly expressed in cancers of the head and neck (H and N), and anti-EGFR agents have demonstrated improvements in outcomes (TTP and OS). The aim of this study was to determine EGFR gene status in H and N cancer patients treated with gefitinib and to correlate mutational status with clinico-pathological data and response. Patients and Methods. Patients with histologically confirmed H and N cancer having failed prior treatment for advanced disease entered this compassionate-use-program. Nineteen patients received gefitinib. EGFR expression was assessed by IHC, gene copy number by FISH, and mutation analysis was conducted for EGFR (18-21), KRAS, BRAF (V600E), and HER-2 exon 20. An additional TKI naive cohort of 73 patients was also screened. Results. Mutations were detected in 6/19 patients (3× EGFR, 1× KRAS, and 2× HER2-exon 20). There were no significant differences in TTP or OS for patients with somatic EGFR mutations. No BRAF mutations were detected. Conclusions. The incidence of EGFR mutations in H and N cancer in this study was 5.3%. No statistically relevant correlations between mutation or gene gain and response or survival were observed. Due to the limited number of patients and low incidence of genetic aberrations in the genes analyzed, additional studies are warranted. PMID:21274259

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer in the Elderly or Patients with Poor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Arya; McDermott, Jessica D.; Gan, Gregory; Bhatia, Shilpa; Sumner, Whitney; Fisher, Christine M.; Jimeno, Antonio; Bowles, Daniel W.; Raben, David; Karam, Sana D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is increasingly used to treat a variety of tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in the recurrent setting. While there are published data for re-irradiation using SBRT for HNSCC, there are limited data supporting its use as upfront treatment for locally advanced disease. Study Design/Methods: Here, we describe three patients who received SBRT as the primary treatment for their HNSCC along with a review of the current literature and discussion of future pathways. Results: The three cases discussed tolerated treatment well with manageable acute toxicities and had either a clinical or radiographic complete response to therapy. Conclusion: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma presents a unique challenge in the elderly, where medical comorbidities make it difficult to tolerate conventional radiation, often given with a systemic sensitizer. For these individuals, providing a shortened course using SBRT may offer an effective alternative. PMID:25340041

  1. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thorstad, W; Oh, J; Apte, A; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer who undergo radiotherapy often experience several undesirable side-effects, including xerostomia, trismus, and pain in the head and neck area, but little is know about the dose-volume predictors of such pain. We investigated the association between radiation dose and both throat and esophagus pain during radiotherapy. Methods: We analyzed 124 head and neck patients who received radiotherapy at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. For these patients, weekly PROs were recorded, including 16 pain and anatomical location questions. In addition, 17 observational symptoms were recorded. Patients were asked to describe their pain at each site according to a four-level scale: none (0), mild (1), moderate (2), and severe (3). We explored the association between throat pain and the mean dose received in oral cavity and between esophageal pain and the mean dose received in the esophagus. The severity of pain was determined by the difference between the baseline (week 1) pain score and the maximum pain score during treatment. The baseline pain score was defined as the first available pain score before receiving 10 Gy because radiotherapy pain originates later during treatment. Dose-volume metrics were extracted from treatment plans using CERR. To evaluate the correlation between pain and radiation dose, Spearman's correlation coefficient (Rs) was used. Results: The associations between throat pain and the mean dose to the oral cavity, and between esophagus pain and the mean dose to the esophagus, were both statistically significant, with Rs=0.320 (p=0.003) and Rs=0.424 (p<0.0001), respectively. Mean dose, for each structure, was a better predictor of pain than total integral dose. Conclusion: We demonstrated that pain during radiotherapy in head and neck patients highly correlates with the dose delivered. We will further investigate the association between other pain locations and relevant normal tissue dose

  2. Cross-Cultural Translation, Adaptation and Reliability of the Danish M. D. Andeson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hajdú, Sara Fredslund; Plaschke, Christina Caroline; Johansen, Christoffer; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Wessel, Irene

    2017-03-07

    The objectives were to translate and culturally adapt the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) into Danish and subsequently test the reliability of the Danish version. The MDADI was translated into Danish and cross culturally adapted through cognitive interviews. The final version was test-retest evaluated in a group of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients who responded to the questionnaire twice with a mean of eight days apart. Interclass correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha, floor and ceiling effects, standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change were investigated. Fourteen patients were interviewed on the comprehensibility of the Danish MDADI, and all found the questionnaire meaningful, easy to understand, non-offensive and to include relevant aspects of dysphagia related to HNC. Sixty-four patients were included in the test-retest study. Especially, one item in the emotional scale (E7) appeared to be often misinterpreted, and ceiling effects were found in all four subdomains (global, emotional, functional and physical). The four subdomains and the composite score showed acceptable test-retest reliability and internal consistency in a Danish population of HNC patients. The Danish MDADI is reliable in terms of internal consistency and test-retest reproducibility and can be used in assessing the health-related quality of life in head and neck cancer patients with dysphagia.

  3. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David; Chen Changhu

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  4. Soft, fortified ice-cream for head and neck cancer patients: a useful first step in nutritional and swallowing difficulties associated with multi-modal management.

    PubMed

    Trinidade, Aaron; Martinelli, Katrina; Andreou, Zenon; Kothari, Prasad

    2012-04-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer have complex swallowing and nutritional concerns. Most patients are malnourished, and treatment modalities within the aerodigestive tract have profound effects on future swallowing and nutrition. The objective of this study is to investigate whether the introduction of fortified soft ice-cream to post-operative head and neck cancer patients would increase compliance with oral-feeding regimes. Using a questionnaire study, an ice-cream machine that produces fortified soft ice-cream was introduced onto our ward, and 30 patients were asked to fill out questionnaires based on their experience in addition to their oral-feeding regime. Results indicate that overall patient satisfaction and compliance with oral-feeding regimes increased: 77% felt that the taste was excellent and also felt that it was easy to eat; 60% felt that it eased the symptoms associated with their symptoms, in particular its cold temperature. We conclude from the results that the inability of patients undergoing multi-modal treatment for upper aerodigestive tract cancer to enjoy normal foods and its effects on their quality of life is underestimated. Providing a food to that is palatable, familiar and acceptable as it is safe and nutritionally sound can increase compliance with oral-feeding regimes. The ice-cream was safe to use in the early post-operative period, especially soothing in patients undergoing upper aerodigestive radiotherapy and high in protein and calorific content. Our practice may have wider benefits, including patients with oral and oropharyngeal infections, the elderly and patients with neurological dysphagia resulting from stroke.

  5. Hypoxia Imaging With FAZA-PET and Theoretical Considerations With Regard to Dose Painting for Individualization of Radiotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia Souvatzoglou, Michael; Roeper, Barbara; Dobritz, Martin; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Jacob, Vesna; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Reischl, Gerald; Machulla, Hans-Juergen; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Piert, Morand

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of hypoxia positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluoroazomycin-arabinoside (FAZA) in head and neck cancer for radiation treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer were included. Both FAZA-PET and axial CT were performed using mask fixation. The data were coregistered using software based on mutual information. Contours of tumor (primary gross tumor volume, GTV/CT-P) and lymph node metastases (GTV/CT-N) were outlined manually, and FAZA standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated automatically. The hypoxic subvolume (GTV/PET-FAZA) having at least 50% more FAZA uptake than background (mean SUV) neck muscle tissue was contoured automatically within GTV/CT-P (GTV/PET-FAZA-P) and GTV/CT-N (GTV/PET-FAZA-N). Results: The median GTV/PET-FAZA-P was 4.6 mL, representing 10.8% (range, 0.7-52%) of the GTV/CT-P. The GTV/PET-FAZA-P failed to correlate significantly with the GTV/CT-P (p = 0.06). The median GTV/PET-FAZA-N was 4.1 mL, representing 8.3% (range, 2.2-51.3%) of the GTV/CT-N. It was significantly correlated with the GTV/PET-N (p = 0.006). The GTV/PET-FAZA-P was located in a single confluent area in 11 of 18 patients (61%) and was diffusely dispersed in the whole GTV/CT-P in 4 of 18 patients (22%), whereas no hypoxic areas were identified in 3 of 18 patients (17%). The GTV/PET-FAZA-N was outlined as a single confluent region in 7 of 18 patients (39%), in multiple diffuse hypoxic regions in 4 of 18 patients (22%), and was not delineated in 7 of 18 patients (39%). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that FAZA-PET imaging could be used for a hypoxia-directed intensity-modulated radiotherapy approach in head and neck cancer.

  6. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  7. Epidemiologic survey of head and neck cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Moon; Kim, Young Mo; Shim, Yoon-Sang; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chang, Hyuck Soon; Choi, Jong Ouck; Rho, Young Soo; Kim, Min-Sik; Choi, Eun Chang; Choi, Geon; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Sang-Yun; Lee, Yong-Sik; Baek, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ho; Im, Jung-Hyuk; Choi, Sang-Hak; Kim, Jae-Hee

    2003-02-01

    Head and neck cancers have never been systematically studied for clinical purposes yet in Korea. This epidemiological survey on head and neck cancer patients was undertaken from January to December 2001 in 79 otorhinolaryngology resident-training hospitals nationwide. The number of head and neck cancer patients was 1,063 cases in the year. The largest proportion of cases arose in the larynx, as many as 488 cases, which accounted for 45.9%. It was followed by, in order of frequency, oral cavity (16.5%), oropharynx (10.0%), and hypopharynx (9.5%). The male:female ratio was 5:1, and the mean age was 60.3 yr. Surgery was the predominant treatment modality in head and neck cancers: 204 (21.5%) cases were treated with only surgery, 198 (20.8%) cases were treated with surgery and radiotherapy, 207 cases (21.8%) were treated with combined therapy of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Larynx and hypopharynx cancers had a stronger relationship with smoking and alcohol drinking than other primary site cancers. Of them, 21 cases were found to be metastasized at the time of diagnosis into the lung, gastrointestinal tract, bone, or brain. Coexisting second primary malignancies were found in 23 cases. At the time of diagnosis, a total of 354 cases had cervical lymph node metastasis accounting for 42.0%.

  8. Outcomes of Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shoushtari, Asal; Saylor, Drew; Kerr, Kara-Lynne; Sheng, Ke; Thomas, Christopher; Jameson, Mark; Reibel, James; Shonka, David; Levine, Paul; Read, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze survival, failure patterns, and toxicity in patients with head-and-neck carcinoma of unknown primary origin (HNCUP) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Records from 27 patients with HNCUP treated during the period 2002-2008 with IMRT were reviewed retrospectively. Nodal staging ranged from N1 to N3. The mean preoperative dose to gross or suspected disease, Waldeyer's ring, and uninvolved bilateral cervical nodes was 59.4, 53.5, and 51.0 Gy, respectively. Sixteen patients underwent neck dissection after radiation and 4 patients before radiation. Eight patients with advanced nodal disease (N2b-c, N3) or extracapsular extension received chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 41.9 months (range, 25.3-93.9 months) for nondeceased patients, the 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, and nodal control rates were 70.9%, 85.2%, and 88.5%, respectively. Actuarial disease-free survival rates for N1, N2, and N3 disease were 100%, 94.1%, and 50.0%, respectively, at 5 years. When stratified by nonadvanced (N1, N2a nodal disease without extracapsular spread) vs. advanced nodal disease (N2b, N2c, N3), the 5-year actuarial disease-free survival rate for the nonadvanced nodal disease group was 100%, whereas for the advanced nodal disease group it was significantly lower at 66.7% (p = 0.017). Three nodal recurrences were observed: in 1 patient with bulky N2b disease and 2 in patients with N3 disease. No nodal failures occurred in patients with N1 or N2a disease who received only radiation and surgery. Conclusion: Definitive IMRT to 50-56 Gy followed by neck dissection results in excellent nodal control and overall and disease-free survival, with acceptable toxicity for patients with T0N1 or nonbulky T0N2a disease without extracapsular spread. Patients with extracapsular spread, advanced N2 disease, or N3 disease may benefit from concurrent chemotherapy, targeted therapeutic agents, or

  9. Risk factors for second primary neoplasia of esophagus in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of esophageal neoplasia in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients is not low; however, routine esophageal surveillance is not included in staging of newly-diagnosed H&N cancers. We aimed to investigate the risk factors for synchronous esophageal neoplasia and the impact of endoscopy on management of H&N cancer patients. Methods A total of 129 newly diagnosed H&N cancer patients who underwent endoscopy with white-light imaging, narrow-band imaging (NBI) with magnifying endoscopy (ME), and chromoendoscopy with 1.5% Lugol’s solution, before definite treatment were enrolled prospectively. Results 60 esophageal lesions were biopsied from 53 (41.1%) patients, including 11 low-grade, 14 high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and 12 invasive carcinoma in 30 (23.3%) patients. Alcohol consumption [odds ratio (OR) 5.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-26.44], advanced stage (stage III and IV) of index H&N cancers (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.11-7.99), and lower body mass index (BMI) (every 1-kg/m2 increment with OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-0.99) were independent risk factors for synchronous esophageal neoplasia. NBI with ME was the ideal screening tool (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 97.3%, 94.1%, and 96.3%, respectively, for detection of dysplastic and cancerous esophageal lesions). The treatment strategy was modified after endoscopy in 20 (15.5%) patients. The number needed to screen was 6.45 (95% CI 4.60-10.90). Conclusions NBI-ME surveillance of esophagus should be done in newly-diagnosed H&N cancer patients, especially those with alcohol drinking, lower BMI, and advanced stage of primary tumor. PMID:24456340

  10. Predictability of oral and laryngopharyngeal function for aspiration and limitation of oral intake in patients after surgery for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hey, Christiane; Lange, Benjamin P; Aere, Christina; Eberle, Silvia; Zaretsky, Yevgen; Sader, Robert; Stöver, Timo; Wagenblast, Jens

    2013-08-01

    Swallowing disorders are common in patients after surgery for head and neck cancer. The clinical assessment of oral and laryngopharyngeal abilities is widely used as a dysphagia assessment tool in this patient group, despite a lack of research. The goal of this study was to assess the predictability of clinical parameters for aspiration and limitation of oral intake. A swallowing disorder with the need for further intervention was identified by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in 65%, with aspiration in 49%, silently in 21%, and limited oral intake with tube dependency in 56% of studied patients. Four clinical parameters (dysglossia, wet voice, tongue motility, and tongue strength) correlated significantly with aspiration and limitation of oral intake. However, none of these clinical parameters was able to predict one of our two reference criteria, due to low positive likelihood ratios, mostly less than two. Clinical assessment is therefore inappropriate for early detection of swallowing disorders in such patients.

  11. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy: patient selection, practical aspects, and current evidence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Sil

    2017-03-01

    Locoregional failure is the most frequent pattern of failure in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients and it leads to death in most of the patients. Second primary tumors occurring in the other head and neck region reach up to almost 40% of long-term survivors. Recommended and preferred retreatment option in operable patients is salvage surgical resection, reporting a 5-year overall survival of up to 40%. However, because of tumor location, extent, and underlying comorbidities, salvage surgery is often limited and compromised by incomplete resection. Reirradiation with or without combined chemotherapy is an appropriate option for unresectable recurrence. Reirradiation is carefully considered with a case-by-case basis. Reirradiation protocol enrollment is highly encouraged prior to committing patient to an aggressive therapy. Radiation doses greater than 60 Gy are usually recommended for successful salvage. Despite recent technical improvement in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the use of concurrent chemotherapy, and the emergence of molecularly targeted agents, careful patient selection remain as the most paramount factor in reirradiation. Tumors that recur or persist despite aggressive prior chemoradiation therapy imply the presence of chemoradio-resistant clonogens. Treatment protocols that combine novel targeted radiosensitizing agents with conformal high precision radiation are required to overcome the resistance while minimizing toxicity. Recent large number of data showed that IMRT may provide better locoregional control with acceptable acute or chronic morbidities. However, additional prospective studies are required before a definitive conclusion can be drawn on safety and effectiveness of IMRT.

  12. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  13. Epigenetics in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Syeda Marriam; Ali, Amjad; Barh, Debmalya

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without a change in DNA sequence. Research has shown that epigenetic mechanisms provide an "extra" layer of transcriptional control that regulates how genes are expressed. These mechanisms are critical components in the normal development and growth of cells. Epigenetic abnormalities have been found to be causative factors in cancer, genetic disorders, and pediatric syndromes. Head and neck cancers are a group of malignancies with diverse biological behaviors and a strong, well-established association with environmental effects. Although the hunt for genetic alterations in head and neck cancer has continued in the past two decades, with unequivocal proof of a genetic role in multistage head and neck carcinogenesis, epigenetic alteration in association with promoter CpG islands hypermethylation has emerged in the past few years as one of the most active areas of cancer research. Silencing of the genes by hypermethylation or induction of oncogenes by promoter hypomethylation is a frequent mechanism in head and neck cancer and achieves increasing diagnostic and therapeutic importance. In this context it is important for clinicians to understand the principles of epigenetic mechanisms and how these principles relate to human health and disease. It is important to address the use of epigenetic pathways in new approaches to molecular diagnosis and novel targeted treatments across the clinical spectrum.

  14. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  15. Reconstructive options in patients with late complications after surgery and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: remember the deltopectoral flap.

    PubMed

    Krijgh, David D; Mureau, Marc A M

    2013-08-01

    During the past 40 years, free vascularized flaps have become the golden standard in the reconstruction of postoncologic head and neck defects. When there is a need for an osteofasciocutaneous free flap, the free fibula flap is the first choice because of the advantages of its long bone structure, high reliability, and minimal donor-site morbidity. However, most of these patients receive adjuvant radiation therapy, which sometimes causes symptomatic fibrosis, contractures, and (osteo)radionecrosis. In case of these late complications, locoregional reconstructive options are often limited, and complex secondary free flap procedures are not always feasible or preferred by the patient. The present paper discusses regional and free flap reconstructive options and demonstrates with 3 cases that the delayed deltopectoral flap remains a very safe, reliable, and easy flap, which still has a place in the management of these complex reconstructive challenges.

  16. Feasibility of Non-invasive Brain Modulation for Management of Pain Related to Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Su; Fisher, Clayton A.; Munz, Stephanie M.; Toback, Rebecca L.; Nascimento, Thiago D.; Bellile, Emily L.; Rozek, Laura; Eisbruch, Avraham; Worden, Francis P.; Danciu, Theodora E.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer often experience a significant decrease in their quality of life during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) due to treatment-related pain, which is frequently classified as severe. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a method of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been frequently used in experimental and clinical pain studies. In this pilot study, we investigated the clinical impact and central mechanisms of twenty primary motor cortex (M1) stimulation sessions with tDCS during 7 weeks of CRT for head and neck cancer. From 48 patients screened, seven met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded before and after tDCS stimulation as well as across the trial to monitor short and long-term impact on brain function. The compliance rate during the long trial was extremely high (98.4%), and patients mostly reported mild side effects in line with the literature (e.g., tingling). Compared to a large standard of care study from our institution, our initial results indicate that M1-tDCS stimulation has a pain relief effect during the CRT that resulted in a significant attenuation of weight reduction and dysphagia normally observed in these patients. These results translated to our patient cohort not needing feeding tubes or IV fluids. Power spectra analysis of EEG data indicated significant changes in α, β, and γ bands immediately after tDCS stimulation and, in addition, α, δ, and θ bands over the long term in the seventh stimulation week (p < 0.05). The independent component EEG clustering analysis showed estimated functional brain regions including precuneus and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) in the seventh week of tDCS stimulation. These areas colocalize with our previous positron emission tomography (PET) study where there was activation in the endogenous μ-opioid system during M1-tDCS. This study provides preliminary evidence demonstrating the feasibility and safety of M1-t

  17. Identification of Patient Benefit From Proton Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients Based on Individual and Subgroup Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobi, Annika; Bandurska-Luque, Anna; Stützer, Kristin; Haase, Robert; Löck, Steffen; Wack, Linda-Jacqueline; Mönnich, David; Thorwarth, Daniela; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine, by treatment plan comparison along with normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling, whether a subpopulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) could be identified that would gain substantial benefit from proton therapy in terms of NTCP. Methods and Materials: For 45 HNSCC patients, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was compared to intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Physical dose distributions were evaluated as well as the resulting NTCP values, using modern models for acute mucositis, xerostomia, aspiration, dysphagia, laryngeal edema, and trismus. Patient subgroups were defined based on primary tumor location. Results: Generally, IMPT reduced the NTCP values while keeping similar target coverage for all patients. Subgroup analyses revealed a higher individual reduction of swallowing-related side effects by IMPT for patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area, whereas the risk reduction of acute mucositis was more pronounced in patients with tumors in the larynx region. More patients with tumors in the upper head and neck area had a reduction in NTCP of more than 10%. Conclusions: Subgrouping can help to identify patients who may benefit more than others from the use of IMPT and, thus, can be a useful tool for a preselection of patients in the clinic where there are limited PT resources. Because the individual benefit differs within a subgroup, the relative merits should additionally be evaluated by individual treatment plan comparisons.

  18. Moving Toward Bioadjuvant Approaches to Head and Neck Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Nabil F.; Hammond, Anthea; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma affects >45,000 Americans annually. Patients who are successfully treated for their primary tumor are at high risk of developing a second primary tumor, making effective preventive strategies highly desirable for this disease. Although a landmark study in 1990 suggested some benefit of high-dose retinoids in head and neck cancer prevention, subsequent trials using more tolerable doses have shown limited clinical success. Newer preventive strategies have included bioadjuvant therapy combining retinoids with interferon and {alpha}-tocopherol, combinations of molecularly targeted agents, and oncolytic viruses. Furthermore, considerable evidence has supported a cancer protective role for several nutrients, including green tea and curcumin analogs. Natural compounds such as these with favorable long-term safety profiles might be particularly suited to the cancer prevention setting, in which patients will usually tolerate only moderate risk and toxicity.

  19. Prospective Trial Incorporating Pre-/Mid-Treatment [{sup 18}F]-Misonidazole Positron Emission Tomography for Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Nehmeh, Sadek; Schoeder, Heiko; Fury, Matthew; Chan, Kelvin; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To report the results from a prospective study of a series of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy and to discuss the findings of their pre-/mid-treatment [{sup 18}F]-misonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients agreed to participate in this study. Of these 28 patients, 20 (90% with an oropharyngeal primary cancer) were able to undergo the requirements of the protocol. Each patient underwent four PET scans: one pretreatment fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography scan, two pretreatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET/computed tomography scans, and a third {sup 18}F-FMISO PET (mid-treatment) scan performed 4 weeks after the start of chemoradiotherapy. The {sup 18}F-FMISO PET scans were acquired 2-3 h after tracer administration. Patients were treated with 2-3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy concurrent with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: A heterogeneous distribution of {sup 18}F-FMISO was noted in the primary and/or nodal disease in 90% of the patients. Two patients had persistent detectable hypoxia on their third mid-treatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET scan. One patient experienced regional/distant failure but had no detectable residual hypoxia on the mid-treatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET scan. Conclusion: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this series of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy despite evidence of detectable hypoxia on the pretreatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET/computed tomography scans of 18 of 20 patients. In this prospective study, neither the presence nor the absence of hypoxia, as defined by positive {sup 18}F-FMISO findings on the mid-treatment PET scan, correlated with patient outcome. The results of this study have confirmed similar results reported previously.

  20. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients

    SciTech Connect

    Penoncello, Gregory P.; Ding, George X.

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2 cm{sup 3} for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5 cm{sup 3} for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens.

  1. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients.

    PubMed

    Penoncello, Gregory P; Ding, George X

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2cm(3) for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5cm(3) for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens.

  2. A randomized preventive rehabilitation trial in advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy: feasibility, compliance, and short-term effects.

    PubMed

    van der Molen, Lisette; van Rossum, Maya A; Burkhead, Lori M; Smeele, Ludi E; Rasch, Coen R N; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of (preventive) rehabilitation on swallowing and mouth opening after concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Forty-nine patients with advanced oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx, or nasopharynx cancer treated with CCRT were randomized into a standard (S) or an experimental (E) preventive rehabilitation arm. Structured multidimensional assessment (i.e., videofluoroscopy, mouth-opening measurement, structured questionnaires) was performed before and 10 weeks after CCRT. In both S and E arms, feasibility was good (all patients could execute the exercises within a week) and compliance was satisfactory (mean days practiced per week was 4). Nevertheless, mouth opening, oral intake, and weight decreased significantly. Compared to similar CCRT studies at our institute, however, fewer patients were still tube-dependent after CCRT. Furthermore, some functional outcomes seemed less affected than those of studies in the literature that did not incorporate rehabilitation exercises. Patients in the E arm practiced significantly fewer days in total and per week, but they obtained results comparable to the S arm patients. Preventive rehabilitation (regardless of the approach, i.e., experimental or standard) in head and neck cancer patients, despite advanced stage and burdensome treatment, is feasible, and compared with historical controls, it seems helpful in reducing the extent and/or severity of various functional short-term effects of CCRT.

  3. Metabolic Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy T.; Heaster, Tiffany M.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-01-01

    Head and neck cancer patients suffer from toxicities, morbidities, and mortalities, and these ailments could be minimized through improved therapies. Drug discovery is a long, expensive, and complex process, so optimized assays can improve the success rate of drug candidates. This study applies optical imaging of cell metabolism to three-dimensional in vitro cultures of head and neck cancer grown from primary tumor tissue (organoids). This technique is advantageous because it measures cell metabolism using intrinsic fluorescence from NAD(P)H and FAD on a single cell level for a three-dimensional in vitro model. Head and neck cancer organoids are characterized alone and after treatment with standard therapies, including an antibody therapy, a chemotherapy, and combination therapy. Additionally, organoid cellular heterogeneity is analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Gold standard measures of treatment response, including cell proliferation, cell death, and in vivo tumor volume, validate therapeutic efficacy for each treatment group in a parallel study. Results indicate that optical metabolic imaging is sensitive to therapeutic response in organoids after 1 day of treatment (p<0.05) and resolves cell subpopulations with distinct metabolic phenotypes. Ultimately, this platform could provide a sensitive high-throughput assay to streamline the drug discovery process for head and neck cancer. PMID:28099487

  4. Invariant NKT cells are resistant to circulating CD15+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Horinaka, Atsushi; Sakurai, Daiju; Ihara, Fumie; Makita, Yuji; Kunii, Naoki; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Nakayama, Toshinori; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature and progenitor myeloid cells with an immunosuppressive role in various types of cancer, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, the effect on the host immune system, especially on invariant NKT (iNKT) cells with potent anti-tumor activity, remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of circulating MDSC subsets on the peripheral lymphocytes of patients with head and neck tumors. A significant accumulation of CD15+ granulocytic MDSC (G-MDSC) and CD14+ monocytic MDSC (M-MDSC) was demonstrated in HNSCC patients. The percentage of G-MDSC showed an inverse correlation with the percentage of T cells in the peripheral blood. The increased G-MDSC was significantly associated with advanced clinical stage and poor prognosis of HNSCC patients. The proliferation and viability of T cells were suppressed by CD15+ cells, and the suppression was reversed by adding the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase. However, iNKT cell activation upon α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation was not affected by the presence or absence of CD15+ G-MDSC. These results indicate that increased G-MDSC negatively affects peripheral T cell immunity, but not iNKT cells, in HNSCC patients, and that T cells are more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide produced by G-MDSC than iNKT cells. Cancer immunotherapy designed to enhance the antitumor activity of iNKT cells by stimulation with αGalCer may remain effective in the presence of G-MDSC.

  5. Patterns of Care and Outcomes Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Older Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Sharma, Richa; Makarov, Danil V.; Decker, Roy H.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Desai, Rani A.; Cramer, Laura D.; Gross, Cary P.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) requires a high degree of expertise compared with standard radiation therapy (RT). We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare patients treated with IMRT compared with standard RT to assess outcomes in national practice. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified patients treated with radiation for cancer of the head and neck from 2002 to 2005. We used multivariate Cox models to determine whether the receipt of IMRT was associated with differences in survival. Results: We identified 1613 patients, 33.7% of whom received IMRT. IMRT was not associated with differences in survival: the 3-year overall survival was 50.5% for IMRT vs. 49.6% for standard RT (p = 0.47). The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 60.0% for IMRT vs. 58.8% (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Despite its complexity and resource intensive nature, IMRT use seems to be as safe as standard RT in national community practice, because the use of IMRT did not have an adverse impact on survival.

  6. The use of rapid and cost-effective blood-based biomarkers in combination with tumour TNM stage for individual head and neck cancer patient treatment selection.

    PubMed

    Laytragoon Lewin, Nongnit; Lewin, Freddi; Andersson, Bengt-Åke; Löfgren, Sture; Rutqvist, Lars Erik

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck (H&N) cancer is an aggressive disease and the incidence has increased in younger population worldwide. Tumour TNM staging is the main basis for treatment decision despite significant variation in clinical outcome. Survival time of these patients has marginally improved during the last 30 years. Various biomarkers with cumbersome analysis, high cost, time consumption and requirement of special laboratory facilities have been investigated. However, none of these biomarkers have been shown to be suitable to use for individual H&N cancer patient treatment selection in the clinic. For practical use in clinical settings, the given biomarkers must be simple to analyse, rapid, cost effective and available in routine laboratories. With this intension, we suggested the combination of standard TNM staging and biomarkers associated with inflammation such as neutrophils, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, plasma C-reactive protein or plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) and single-nucleotide polymorphism in TNFa rs1800629 using blood-based analysis. The optimal treatment outcome of H&N cancer by using combination of TNM stage and these blood-based biomarkers for individual patient selection need further investigation.

  7. Amide proton transfer-weighted imaging of the head and neck at 3 T: a feasibility study on healthy human subjects and patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Chen, Shuzhong; King, Ann D; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bhatia, Kunwar S; Zhang, Qinwei; Yeung, David Ka Wei; Wei, Juan; Mok, Greta Seng Peng; Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and repeatability of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MRI for the head and neck on clinical MRI scanners. Six healthy volunteers and four patients with head and neck tumors underwent APTw MRI scanning at 3 T. The APTw signal was quantified by the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.5 ppm. Z spectra of normal tissues in the head and neck (masseter muscle, parotid glands, submandibular glands and thyroid glands) were analyzed in healthy volunteers. Inter-scan repeatability of APTw MRI was evaluated in six healthy volunteers. Z spectra of patients with head and neck tumors were produced and APTw signals in these tumors were analyzed. APTw MRI scanning was successful for all 10 subjects. The parotid glands showed the highest APTw signal (~7.6% average), whereas the APTw signals in other tissues were relatively moderate. The repeatability of APTw signals from the masseter muscle, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland of healthy volunteers was established. Four head and neck tumors showed positive mean APTw ranging from 1.2% to 3.2%, distinguishable from surrounding normal tissues. APTw MRI was feasible for use in the head and neck regions at 3 T. The preliminary results on patients with head and neck tumors indicated the potential of APTw MRI for clinical applications.

  8. A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Murphy, Barbara A.; Netterville, James L.; Burkey, Brian B.; Shyr, Yu; Shakhtour, Bashar; Kish, Bonnie; Raben, David; Chen Changhu; Song, John I.; Kane, Madeleine A.; Cmelak, Anthony J. . E-mail: anthony.cmelak@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To determine efficacy and toxicities of postoperative concurrent chemoradiation using docetaxel in high-risk head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk patients were enrolled 2-8 weeks after surgery. Treatment included 60 Gy for 6 weeks with weekly docetaxel 25 mg/m{sup 2} and erythropoietin alpha 40,000 U for hemoglobin {<=}12 g/dL. Primary endpoints included locoregional control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and patterns of failure (POF). Secondary endpoints were toxicity and quality of life. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (14 male, 4 female), aged 24-70 years (median, 55 years). Primary site included oropharynx = 7, oral cavity 8, hypopharynx = 1, and larynx = 2. Pathologic American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage was III = 3 patients, IV = 15 patients. High-risk eligibility included {>=}2 positive lymph nodes = 13, extracapsular extension = 10, positive margins = 8 (11 patients with two or more risk factors). Docetaxel was reduced to 20 mg/m{sup 2}/week after 5 patients had prolonged Grade 3 or higher mucositis. Overall, number of doses delivered was 2 of 6 = 1, 3 of 6 2, 4 of 6 = 2, 5 of 6 = 4, 6 of 6 = 9 patients. With median follow-up of 30 months (range, 5-66), 10 (56%) patients are alive and have no evidence of disease (NED); POF: three local recurrences (two with distant) and 1 distant only. One-year survival was 76%, median PFS and DFS had not been reached. Three-year LC was 82%. No Grade 3 or higher late toxicities were observed, although a few cases of prolonged mucositis and taste loss (>3 months) were seen, particularly at 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Conclusion: Postoperative radiation therapy with weekly docetaxel 20 or 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week for high-risk postoperative head and neck cancer caused intolerable mucosal toxicity, prompting early study termination. Further studies should consider 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Actuarial 3-year LC is 82%, similar to cisplatin-based chemoradiation regimens. Distant metastasis remains an

  9. Differences in the whole saliva baseline proteome profile associated with development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jehmlich, Nico; Stegmaier, Petra; Golatowski, Claas; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Rischke, Christian; Henke, Michael; Völker, Uwe

    2015-07-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common, painful and often treatment-limiting side effect of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Unstimulated saliva was collected before the first radiotherapy application in 50 HNC patients. 41 out of 50 patients developed OM (grade III) during radiotherapy, of which 14 patients even displayed an early OM (grade III) at a low radiation dose of 30Gy. Nine patients did not develop OM (grade III). Using an LC-MS/MS approach 5323 tryptic peptides were assigned to 487 distinct proteins (≥2 peptides) in the data set. The levels of 48 proteins differed significantly (p<0.05) between patients developing OM or not. 17 proteins displayed increased levels (≥1.3-fold) and 31 proteins decreased in level in OM, respectively. Furthermore, using partial least square analysis protein patterns could be used to distinguish subjects which did not develop grade III OM even after 70Gy total dose (n=9) and those displaying early OM (grade III at <30Gy total dose, n=14). Using leave one out cross validation 37 of 41 patients (90%) developing OM could be correctly assigned indicating that prognostic proteome signatures may help identify patients that should be specifically monitored to increase overall effectiveness of RT treatment.

  10. Zinc supplementation to improve mucositis and dermatitis in patients after radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers: A double-blind, randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.-C. . E-mail: 8508A6@mail.chimei.org.tw; Que, Jenny; Lin, L.-K.; Lin, F.-C.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether zinc supplementation can accelerate the healing of mucositis and dermatitis after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In this double-blind study, patients were placed into two randomized groups (experimental and control) of 50 patients each. The groups were homogeneous with respect to medical history, tumor characteristics, and therapeutic details. The experimental group received a standard dose of a zinc supplement, and the control group was given a placebo. Results: Patients in the control group developed Grade 2 mucositis and dermatitis earlier and sooner than patients in the experimental group. There was also a significant difference in the development of Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis between the two groups. Patients in the experimental group were found to have milder mucositis and dermatitis. Zinc supplementation did not show much benefit in those patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy or make a substantial impact on weight changes. Conclusions: Zinc supplementation used in conjunction with radiotherapy could postpone the development of severe mucositis and dermatitis for patients with cancers of the head and neck. Zinc supplementation can also alleviate the degree of mucositis and dermatitis. The impact of zinc on tumor growth and patient survival is under further investigation.

  11. SU-E-T-166: Evaluation of Integral Dose in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Basheer, A; Hunag, J; Kaminski, J; Dasher, B; Howington, J; Stewart, J; Martin, D; Kong, F; Jin, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) usually achieves higher conformity of radiation doses to targets and less delivery time than Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). We hypothesized that VMAT will increase integral dose (ID) to patients which will decrease the count of white blood count (WBC) lymphocytes, and consequently has a subsequent impact on the immune system. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ID to patients undergoing IMRT and VMAT for Head and Neck cancers and its impact on the immune system. Methods: As a pilot study, 30 head and neck patients who received 9-fields IMRT or 3-arcs Radip-Arcbased VMAT were included in this study. Ten of these patients who received the VMAT plans were re-planned using IMRT with the same objectives. ID was calculated for all cases. All patients also had a baseline WBC obtained prior to treatment, and 3 sets of labs drawn during the course of radiation treatment. Results: For the 10 re-planned patients, the mean ID was 13.3 Gy/voxel (range 10.2–17.5 Gy/voxel) for the 9-fields IMRT plans, and was 15.9 Gy/voxel (range 12.4-20.9 Gy/voxel) for the 3-Arc VMAT plan (p=0.01). The integral dose was significant correlated with reducing WBC count during RT even when controlling for concurrent chemotherapy (R square =0.56, p=0.008). Conclusion: Although VMAT can deliver higher radiation dose conformality to targets, this benefit is achieved generally at the cost of greater integral doses to normal tissue outside the planning target volume (PTV). Lower WBC counts during RT were associated with higher Integral doses even when controlling for concurrent chemotherapy. This study is ongoing in our Institution to exam the impact of integral doses and WBC on overall survival.

  12. Gene therapy in head and neck cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, E; Bapat, U; Chisholm, C; Alusi, G; Vassaux, G

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy for cancer is a rapidly evolving field with head and neck squamous cell cancer being one of the more frequently targeted cancer types. The number of clinical trials in the UK is growing and there is already a commercially available agent in China. Various gene therapy strategies along with delivery mechanisms for targeting head and neck cancer are reviewed. PMID:18057169

  13. SU-E-T-109: An Investigation of Including Variable Relative Biological Effectiveness in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Planning Optimization for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W; Zaghian, M; Lim, G; Randeniya, K; Mohan, R; Titt, U

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current practice of considering the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning is to use a generic RBE value of 1.1. However, RBE is indeed a variable depending on the dose per fraction, the linear energy transfer, tissue parameters, etc. In this study, we investigate the impact of using variable RBE based optimization (vRBE-OPT) on IMPT dose distributions compared by conventional fixed RBE based optimization (fRBE-OPT). Methods: Proton plans of three head and neck cancer patients were included for our study. In order to calculate variable RBE, tissue specific parameters were obtained from the literature and dose averaged LET values were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Biological effects were calculated using the linear quadratic model and they were utilized in the variable RBE based optimization. We used a Polak-Ribiere conjugate gradient algorithm to solve the model. In fixed RBE based optimization, we used conventional physical dose optimization to optimize doses weighted by 1.1. IMPT plans for each patient were optimized by both methods (vRBE-OPT and fRBE-OPT). Both variable and fixed RBE weighted dose distributions were calculated for both methods and compared by dosimetric measures. Results: The variable RBE weighted dose distributions were more homogenous within the targets, compared with the fixed RBE weighted dose distributions for the plans created by vRBE-OPT. We observed that there were noticeable deviations between variable and fixed RBE weighted dose distributions if the plan were optimized by fRBE-OPT. For organs at risk sparing, dose distributions from both methods were comparable. Conclusion: Biological dose based optimization rather than conventional physical dose based optimization in IMPT planning may bring benefit in improved tumor control when evaluating biologically equivalent dose, without sacrificing OAR sparing, for head and neck cancer patients. The research

  14. Topical application of a sandal wood oil and turmeric based cream prevents radiodermatitis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Palatty, P L; Azmidah, A; Rao, S; Jayachander, D; Thilakchand, K R; Rai, M P; Haniadka, R; Simon, P; Ravi, R; Jimmy, R; D'souza, P F; Fayad, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study objective was to assess the effectiveness of a turmeric- and sandal wood oil-containing cream [Vicco® turmeric cream (VTC); Vicco Laboratories, Parel, India] on radiodermatitis in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy. Methods: A total of 50 patients with head and neck cancer requiring >60 Gy of curative radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy were enrolled in the study. The volunteers were randomly divided into two groups of 25 patients. Group 1 was assigned to a topical application of Johnson's® baby oil (Johnson & Johnson Ltd, Baddi, India) and Group 2 for VTC. Prophylactic application of the cream was initiated on Day 1 and continued every day until 2 weeks after the end of treatment. Both agents were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field five times a day, and the acute skin reactions were assessed twice weekly in accordance with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scores by an investigator who was unaware of the details. Results: The incidence of radiodermatitis increased with the exposure to radiation and was the highest in both groups at Week 7. However, a significant reduction in grades of dermatitis were seen in cohorts applying VTC at all time points, including 2 weeks post radiotherapy (p < 0.015 to p < 0.001). The occurrence of Grade 3 dermatitis was lower in the cohorts using VTC and was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Additionally, follow-up observations 2 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy also showed a reduced degree of radiodermatitis in cohorts applying VTC, which was significant (p = 0.015). Conclusion: VTC is shown to be effective in preventing radiodermatitis and needs to be validated in larger double-blind trials. Advances in knowledge: For the first time, this study shows that the turmeric- and sandal oil-based cream was effective in preventing radiation-induced dermatitis. PMID:24694358

  15. Patient-Reported Voice and Speech Outcomes After Whole-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Griffith, Kent A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively. Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and

  16. The effects of oral zinc sulphate during radiotherapy on anti-oxidant enzyme activities in patients with head and neck cancer: a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, M V; Koç, M; Karslioğlu, I; Sezen, O; Taysi, S; Bakan, N

    2004-07-01

    The purpose was to determine the effects of oral zinc sulphate along with radiotherapy on anti-oxidant enzyme activities in patients with head and neck cancer. Thirty patients with head and neck cancer were randomly assigned to receive either zinc sulphate capsules (including 50 mg zinc) (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15) three times a day, starting on the day of the first radiotherapy fraction and continuing throughout the scheduled radiotherapy course including weekends and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The patients were treated with telecobalt radiation at conventional fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction and five fractions/ week in 20-35 fractions for a period of 4-7 weeks. Blood samples for biochemical parameters were collected after an overnight fast (12 h) before radiotherapy, the first day and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. In the placebo group, three patients were excluded. No difference was detected in any final measurement activities of erythrocyte anti-oxidant enzyme such as copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the direct comparison between the zinc sulphate and the placebo group, except erythrocyte SOD activities measured the first day after radiotherapy (p < 0.03). In the respective measurement analysis of the groups in themselves, in the zinc sulphate group, while the statistical analysis for the activities of erythrocyte CAT and GSH-Px were significantly different (chi2 = 12.4, p < 0.05; chi2 = 8.9, p < 0.05, respectively) before radiotherapy, the first day and 6 weeks after radiotherapy, the activities of SOD did not differ (chi2 = 4.2, p > 0.05). In these three measurements, there was no statistical significance in the activities of enzymes in erythrocyte Cu-Zn SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the placebo group. Before radiotherapy, plasma zinc levels were normal in 16 patients (59.2%) and were lower in 11 patients (40.8%) compared with laboratory levels. It would be worthwhile studying the effect of oral zinc

  17. Evaluation of a commercial orthopaedic metal artefact reduction tool in radiation therapy of patients with head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, H; Kim, K S; Chun, Y M; Wu, H-G; Carlson, J N K; Park, J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the image quality and dosimetric effects of the Philips orthopaedic metal artefact reduction (OMAR) (Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, OH) function for reducing metal artefacts on CT images of head and neck (H&N) patients. Methods: 11 patients and a custom-built phantom with metal bead inserts (alumina, titanium, zirconia and chrome) were scanned. The image was reconstructed in two ways: with and without OMAR (OMAR and non-OMAR image). The mean and standard deviation values of CT Hounsfield unit (HU) for selected regions of interest of each case were investigated for both images. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were generated for all cases. Gamma analysis of each dose distribution pair in the patient (1%/1 mm criteria) and phantom (2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria) images was performed. The film measurements in phantom for two metal beads were conducted for evaluating the calculated dose on both OMAR and non-OMAR images. Results: In the OMAR images, noise values were generally reduced, and the mean HU became closer to the reference value (measured from patients without metal implants) in both patient and phantom cases. Although dosimetric difference was insignificant for the eight closed-mouth patients (γ = 99.4 ± 0.5%), there was a large discrepancy in dosimetric calculation between OMAR and non-OMAR images for the three opened-mouth patients (γ = 91.1%, 94.8% and 96.6%). Moreover, the calculated dose on the OMAR image is closer to the real delivered dose on a radiochromic film than was the dose from the non-OMAR image. Conclusion: The OMAR algorithm increases the accuracy of CT HU and reduces the noise such that the entire radiation treatment planning process can be improved, especially for contouring and segmentation. Advances in knowledge: OMAR reconstruction is appropriate for the radiotherapy planning process of H&N patients, particularly of patients who use a bite block. PMID:25993487

  18. Talactoferrin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  19. Primary Tumor Volume Is an Important Predictor of Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Treated With Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, Anna; Yovino, Susannah; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Cullen, Kevin; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Regine, William; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The tumor volume has been established as a significant predictor of outcomes among patients with head-and-neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy alone. The present study attempted to add to the existing data on tumor volume as a prognostic factor among patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 patients who had undergone definitive chemoradiotherapy for Stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the hypopharynx, oropharynx, and larynx were identified. The primary tumor volumes were calculated from the treatment planning computed tomography scans, and these were correlated to the survival and tumor control data obtained from the retrospective analysis. Results: The interval to progression correlated with the primary tumor volume (p = .007). The critical cutoff point for the tumor volume was identified as 35 cm{sup 3}, and patients with a tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a significantly better prognosis than those with a tumor volume >35 cm{sup 3} at 5 years (43% vs. 71%, p = .010). Longer survival was also correlated with smaller primary tumor volumes (p = .022). Similarly, patients with a primary tumor volume <35 cm{sup 3} had a better prognosis in terms of both progression-free survival (61% vs. 33%, p = .004) and overall survival (84% vs. 41%, p = < .001). On multivariate analysis, the primary tumor volume was the best predictor of recurrence (hazard ratio 4.7, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11.6; p = .001) and survival (hazard ratio 10.0, 95% confidence interval 2.9-35.1; p = < .001). In contrast, the T stage and N stage were not significant factors. Analysis of variance revealed that tumors with locoregional failure were on average 21.6 cm{sup 3} larger than tumors without locoregional failure (p = .028) and 27.1-cm{sup 3} larger than tumors that recurred as distant metastases (p = .020). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the primary tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in patients with advanced cancer

  20. Metabolic microscopy of head and neck cancer organoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Amy T.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies for head and neck cancer have primarily relied on cell lines or in vivo animal studies. However, a technique that combines the benefits of high-throughput in vitro studies with a complex, physiologically relevant microenvironment would be advantageous for understanding drug effects. Organoids provide a unique platform that fulfills these goals. Organoids are generated from excised and digested tumor tissue and are grown in culture. Fluorescence microscopy provides high-resolution images on a similar spatial scale as organoids. In particular, autofluorescence imaging of the metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD can provide insight into response to anti-cancer treatment. The optical redox ratio reflects relative amounts of NAD(P)H and FAD, and the fluorescence lifetime reflects enzyme activity of NAD(P)H and FAD. This study optimizes and characterizes the generation and culture of organoids grown from head and neck cancer tissue. Additionally, organoids were treated for 24 hours with a standard chemotherapy, and metabolic response in the organoids was measured using optical metabolic imaging. Ultimately, combining head and neck cancer organoids with optical metabolic imaging could be applied to test drug sensitivity for drug development studies as well as treatment planning for cancer patients.

  1. Phase II study of capecitabine as palliative treatment for patients with recurrent and metastatic squamous head and neck cancer after previous platinum-based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Trufero, J; Isla, D; Adansa, J C; Irigoyen, A; Hitt, R; Gil-Arnaiz, I; Lambea, J; Lecumberri, M J; Cruz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Platinum-based therapy (PBT) is the standard therapy for recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer (HNC), but the incidence of recurrence remains high. This study evaluates the efficacy and tolerability of capecitabine as palliative monotherapy for recurrent HNC previously treated with PBT. Methods: Patients aged 18–75 years, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0–2, squamous HNC with locoregional and/or metastatic recurrence previously treated with PBT and adequate organ functions, were included. Capecitabine (1.250 mg m−2 BID) was administered on days 1–14 every 21 days for at least two cycles. Results: A total of 40 male patients with a median age of 58 years were analysed. All patients received a median number of four cycles of capecitabine (range: 1–9) and the median relative dose intensity was 91%. Seven patients were not evaluable for response. Overall response rate was 24.2%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 4.8 and 7.3 months, respectively. Haematological adverse events (AEs) grade 3/4 were reported in six patients. Most common grade 3/4 non-haematological AEs were asthenia (12.5%), palmar-plantar eritrodisestesia (10%), mucositis (10%), dysphagia (10%) and diarrhoea (7.5%). Conclusions: Capecitabine seems to be an active, feasible and well-tolerated mode of palliative treatment for advanced HNC patients who have previously received PBT schedules. PMID:20485287

  2. Genetic variations and head and neck cancer risks.

    PubMed

    Masood, Nosheen; Yasmin, Azra; Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar

    2014-01-01

    Variations in CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 in head and neck cancer have been frequently found in literature. But these studies give an overview of these genetic variations in different populations. The current mini review focus on the analysis of these genetic variations at DNA, mRNA and protein levels in the same study group. Eight publications were reviewed on the same study samples yielding results at DNA, mRNA and protein levels. At DNA level, CYP1A1 showed significantly higher mutations in head and neck cancer patients compared to controls at g.2842A>C and g.2842_2843insT. GSTM1 and GSTT1 showed deletion polymorphisms and heterozygous deletion confers protection against cancer. Mutations were also found in GSTP1 at g.2848A>T, g.2849G>A, g.1074delC and g.1466delC. mRNA and protein expressional analysis revealed underexpression of CYP1A1, loss or underexpression of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and overexpression of GSTP1. In addition an unusual intronic variant of GSTP1 mRNA was also found, retaining the intronic portion between exons. The current review gives a complete study overview regarding CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 variations at DNA, mRNA and protein levels in head and neck cancer. The review is helpful in designing a new experiment or gene therapy for head and neck cancer patients.

  3. Assessment of Interfraction Patient Setup for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Computed Tomography-Based Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angie Y.; Lee, Steve P.; Lee, Percy; DeMarco, John; Li, X. Allen; Steinberg, Michael L.; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5Σ + 0.7 σ, where Σ and σ were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, −0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, −0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup

  4. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  5. Principal component analysis-based anatomical motion models for use in adaptive radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.

    Purpose: To develop standard and regularized principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients, assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART), and to extract quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of H&N patients were artificially deformed to create "digital phantom" images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during Radiation Therapy (RT). Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients' actual deformations, and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms), and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific standard PCA (SPCA) and regularized PCA (RPCA) models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. Eigenvectors, or eigenDVFs (EDVFs), having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Modeled anatomies were used to assess the dose deviations with respect to the planned dose distribution. Results: PCA models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade SPCA's ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes, and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. For dose assessment it has been shown that the modeled dose distribution was different from the planned dose for the parotid glands due to their shrinkage and shift into

  6. Risk of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death in patients with Fanconi anemia who did and did not receive transplants.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Philip S; Socié, Gerard; Alter, Blanche P; Gluckman, Eliane

    2005-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) is currently the only therapy that can restore normal hematopoiesis in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). Patients with FA have a high baseline risk of squamous cell cancers (SCCs) of the head, neck, and esophagus, and SCT conditioning may increase SCC incidence. We evaluated the risks of SCC and death in 145 patients with FA in the North American Survey (NAS) cohort who did not receive transplants, and 117 patients with FA in the Hôpital Saint Louis (SLH) cohort who did receive transplants. The age-specific hazard of SCC was 4.4-fold higher in patients who received transplants than in those who did not (P = .003), and SCCs occurred at significantly younger ages in the former (respective medians, 18 and 33 years, P = .004). Survival after SCC was similarly poor in both cohorts (P = .135, median, 13 months). The hazard of SCC increased at a greater than linear rate, to 4.4% per year by age 40 in NAS and 4.7% per year by 10 years after transplant in SLH. In SLH, the hazard of non-SCC death was biphasic, declining significantly (P = .004) from 7.1% per month during the first 6 months after transplant to 0.13% per month (1.6% per year) after the first year. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host diseases were significant SCC risk factors. Adverse event rates in these cohorts provide historical control rates to assess emerging therapies for FA.

  7. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Afonso, Sergio Luis; Cardoso Tavares, Vivian; Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  8. Correlation of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scan with Smoking, Tumor Size, Stage and Differentiation in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pleitz, Jordan L.; Sinha, Partha; Dressler, Emily V.; Aouad, Rony K.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify associations between positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in patients presenting with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with tumor site, size, histologic differentiation, smoking, and diabetes. Charts of patients with oropharyngeal and laryngeal SCC who underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans were reviewed between May 2007 and August 2013. Statistical analyses included modeling log-transformed SUVmax values by tumor site, size, histologic differentiation, smoking status, and diabetes using unadjusted linear regressions. Differences were considered statistically significant for P< 0.05. A total of 111 patients (54 with oropharynx and 57 with larynx cancers) were included, 83 men and 28 women with an average age of 57.5 years old. There was a significantly higher pack-year smoking history (P = 0.005) in the larynx cancer group. While tumor T-stage was found to be significantly different (P < 0.0001), there was no difference in tumor size between the two groups: 3.16 cm and 3.58 cm in the oropharynx and larynx, respectively (P = 0.55). In the oropharynx cohort, SUVmax was associated with both tumor size (P = 0.0001) and stage (P < 0.0002). Interestingly, SUVmax differed by tumor differentiation in the larynx (P = 0.04) but not the oropharynx (P = 0.71). Finally, there was no significant difference in SUVmax relative to diabetes and smoking status. PET/CT SUVmax correlated with both tumor size and stage in oropharyngeal cancer patients, and it correlated only with tumor differentiation but not the size or stage in the larynx. There were no significant differences in SUVmax by diabetes or smoking status. PMID:28217020

  9. TU-AB-303-02: A Novel Surrogate to Identify Anatomical Changes During Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gros, S; Roeske, J; Surucu, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel method to monitor external anatomical changes in head and neck cancer patients in order to help guide adaptive radiotherapy decisions. Methods: The method, developed in MATLAB, reveals internal anatomical changes based on variations observed in external anatomy. Weekly kV-CBCT scans from 11 Head and neck patients were retrospectively analyzed. The pre-processing step first corrects each CBCT for artifacts and removes pixels from the immobilization mask to produce an accurate external contour of the patient’s skin. After registering the CBCTs to the initial planning CT, the external contours from each CBCT (CBCTn) are transferred to the first week — reference — CBCT{sub 1}. Contour radii, defined as the distances between an external contour and the central pixel of each CBCT slice, are calculated for each scan at angular increments of 1 degree. The changes in external anatomy are then quantified by the difference in radial distance between the external contours of CBCT1 and CBCTn. The radial difference is finally displayed on a 2D intensity map (angle vs radial distance difference) in order to highlight regions of interests with significant changes. Results: The 2D radial difference maps provided qualitative and quantitative information, such as the location and the magnitude of external contour divergences and the rate at which these deviations occur. With this method, anatomical changes due to tumor volume shrinkage and patient weight loss were clearly identified and could be correlated with the under-dosage of targets or over-dosage of OARs. Conclusion: This novel method provides an efficient tool to visualize 3D external anatomical modification on a single 2D map. It quickly pinpoints the location of differences in anatomy during the course of radiotherapy, which can help determine if a treatment plan needs to be adapted.

  10. Evaluation of Tumor Shape Variability in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Using Implanted Gold Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Beek, Suzanne van; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Herk, Marcel van; Brekel, Michiel Wilhelmus Maria van den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coenraad Robert Nico

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies tumor shape variability in head-and-neck cancer patients during radiation therapy using implanted markers. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with oropharyngeal tumors treated with (chemo)radiation were included. Helical gold markers (0.35 Multiplication-Sign 2 mm, 3-10/patient, average 6) were implanted around the tumor. Markers were identified on planning computed tomography (CT) and daily cone beam CT (CBCT). After bony anatomy registration, the daily vector length on CBCT in reference to the planning CT and daily marker movement perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) surface at planning CT (d{sub normal}) of each marker were analyzed. Time trends were assessed with linear regression of the {sub markers}. In 2 patients, 2 markers were implanted in normal tissue to evaluate migration by measuring intermarker distances. Results: Marker implantation was feasible without complications. Three-dimensional vectors (4827 measurements, mean 0.23 cm, interquartile ratio 0.24 cm) were highest in base of tongue sublocalization (P<.001) and bulky tumors (vectors exceeded 0.5 cm in 5.7% [0-20 mL], 12.0% [21-40 mL], and 21.7% [{>=}41 mL], respectively [P<.001] of measurements). The measured inward time trend in 11/27 patients correlated with the visual observed marker pattern. In patients with an outward trend (5/27) or no trend (11/27), visual observation showed predominantly an inhomogeneous pattern. Remarkably, in 6 patients, outward marker movement was observed in the posterior pharyngeal wall. The difference in distance between normal tissue markers (1 SD) was 0.05-0.06 cm without time trend, indicating that implanted markers did not migrate. Conclusions: During head-and-neck radiation therapy, normal tissue markers remained stable. Changes in position of tumor markers depended on sublocalization and tumor volume. Large differences in marker patterns between patients as well as within patients were observed

  11. The effect of clove-based herbal mouthwash on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a single-blind randomized preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Moonkyoo; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Yoon, Seong Woo; Kim, Jinsung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clove-based herbal mouthwash in ameliorating radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods Fourteen patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and randomized to either an experimental group or a control group. The patients of the experimental group swished their mouths with a clove-based herbal mouthwash during radiotherapy (RT), while the patients of the control group swished with clear water. The primary end point of this study was incidence of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The secondary end points were time to onset of radiation-induced oral mucositis, duration of radiation-induced oral mucositis, incidence of supplemental nutrition through feeding tube, maximum pain score, body weight loss, incidence of RT interruption, and duration of RT interruption. Results The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash shortened the duration of grade ≥2 mucositis (24.3 days vs 37.1 days, P=0.044) and reduced body weight loss during RT (3.1% vs 7.4%, P=0.023) compared with clear water. The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash also reduced the incidence of grade 3 mucositis (28.6% vs 57.1%), supplemental nutrition (0% vs 28.6%), and RT interruption (14.3% vs 28.6%), and reduced the duration of grade 3 mucositis (5.1 days vs 17.7 days) and RT interruption (1 days vs 8.5 days). In addition, clove-based herbal mouthwash delayed the time to onset of mucositis (26.6 days vs 24.5 days) and reduced the maximum pain score (4.1 vs 4.9). However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Although we could not find significant differences in some end points, this single-blind randomized study showed that a clove-based herbal mouthwash can have a potentially beneficial effect on minimizing or preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. To confirm the results of our study, well-designed randomized studies with large

  12. Subclavian Vein Versus Arm Vein for Totally Implantable Central Venous Port for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akahane, Akio Sone, Miyuki; Ehara, Shigeru; Kato, Kenichi; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare central venous ports (CVP) from two different routes of venous access-the subclavian vein and arm vein-in terms of safety for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods: Patients with HNC who underwent image-guided implantations of CVPs were retrospectively evaluated. All CVPs were implanted under local anesthesia. Primary outcome measurements were rates and types of adverse events (AEs). Secondary outcomes included technical success and rate and reason of CVP removal. Results: A total of 162 patients (subclavian port group, 47; arm port group, 115) were included in this study. Technical success was achieved in all patients. The median follow-up period was 94 (range, 1-891) days. Two patients in the subclavian port group experienced periprocedural complications. Postprocedural AEs were observed in 8.5 and 22.6% of the subclavian port and arm port group patients, respectively (P = 0.044). Phlebitis and system occlusions were observed only in the arm port group. The rate of infection was not significantly different between the two groups. The CVP was removed in 34 and 39.1% of the subclavian port and arm port patients, respectively. Conclusions: Both subclavian and arm CVPs are feasible in patients with HNC. AEs were more frequent in the arm port group; thus, the arm port is not recommended as the first choice for patients with HNC. However, further experience is needed to improve the placement technique and the maintenance of CVPs and a prospective analysis is warranted.

  13. Translation and validation of EORTC QLQ-H&N 35 into Moroccan Arabic for ENT head and neck cancer patients in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Ouattassi, N; Benmansour, N; ElFakir, S; Nejjari, C; Alami, M N

    2016-09-01

    Disease-specific quality of life (QOL) measures have enhanced the capacity of outcome measures to evaluate subtle changes and differences between groups. As many of the QOL measures have been developed in English, they require translation to ensure their usefulness in a multi-cultural and/or international society. Published guidelines provide formal methods to achieve cross-culturally comparable versions of a QOL tool. The aim of this study was to adapt the head and neck specific module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-H&N 35 questionnaire) into Moroccan Arabic and to determine its psychometric properties. After translation, back translation and pretesting of the pre-final version, the translated version was submitted to a committee of professionals composed by otolaryngologists and epidemiologists. The psychometric properties were tested in patients with ENT cancer. Internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's alpha and the test-retest reliability using interclass correlation coefficients. Construct validity was assessed by examining item convergent and divergent validity. It was also tested using Spearman's correlation between QLQ-H&N 35 scales and EQ-5D. The study was conducted in 120 patients. The Moroccan version was internally reliable, Cronbach's α ranged from 0.71 for "trouble with social contact" to 0.94 for "senses impairment", indicating good internal consistency. Test-retest reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient, which ranged from 0.64 for "speech trouble" to 0.89 for "physical activities". The instrument demonstrated a good construct and concomitant validity. We have developed a semantically equivalent translation with cultural adaptation of EORTC QLQ-H&N 35 questionnaire. The assessment of its measurement properties showed that it is quite reliable and a valid measure of the effect of cancer on the quality of life in Moroccan patients.

  14. Lesion regression rate based on RECIST: prediction of treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy compared with FDG PET-CT

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Munetaka; Tuji, Hiroyuki; Shimode, Yuzo; Kondo, Tamaki; Oota, Kiyotaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the lesion regression rate (ΔLR) based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria could be used for the prediction of treatment outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) compared with FDG PET-CT. A total of 33 patients underwent MRI and PET-CT at pretreatment and at 8 weeks after CRT. We assessed the treatment outcome by analyzing the following parameters: the RECIST criteria, ΔLR, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria, and pretreatment SUVmax of the primary tumor and node. The correlation between the analysis of the parameters and the results of the long-term follow-up of the patients was determined. The RECIST did not significantly correlate with locoregional control (LRC) or survival. The ΔLR was significantly lower for the lesions with locoregional failure (LRF) than for those with LRC. A threshold ΔLR of 48% revealed a sensitivity of 72.7% and specificity of 77.3% for the prediction of LRF. Progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with ΔLR ≥ 48% was significantly better than that of patients with ΔLR < 48% (P = 0.001), but not overall survival. There was a significant correlation between LRC and the EORTC (P = 0.02). The patients who achieved a complete response by the EORTC criteria showed significantly better PFS and overall survival (P = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). The ΔLR was inferior to FDG PET-CT with respect to the prediction of patient survival; however, it may be useful for selecting patients in need of more aggressive monitoring after CRT. PMID:25829531

  15. One-Year Effect of a Nurse-Led Psychosocial Intervention on Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    May, Anne M.; Ros, Wynand J.G.; Oosterom, Miriam; Hordijk, Gert-Jan; Koole, Ron; de Leeuw, J. Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Many patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) experience depressive symptoms after treatment. This randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of a psychosocial nurse counseling and after intervention (NUCAI) versus usual care on the depressive and HNC-related physical symptoms of patients with HNC at 1 year after diagnosis. Methods. A total of 205 patients with HNC were randomly assigned to either intervention (n = 103) or usual care (n = 102), with stratification for gender and tumor stage. The NUCAI, which consisted of six bimonthly 45-minute counseling sessions, was a problem-focused intervention aimed at helping patients to manage the physical, psychological, and social consequences of HNC and its treatment. It was nurse-led and offered in combination with regular medical follow-up visits at the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands. Depressive symptoms at 1 year after diagnosis were the primary outcome. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis for the total sample and for a predefined subgroup of patients with raised levels of depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression score ≥12; n = 91) at baseline using mixed-effect models. Results. One year after HNC treatment, levels of depressive symptoms were significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group in the total sample and in the subgroup of patients with raised levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusion. The NUCAI was feasible and effective in reducing depressive symptoms in patients with HNC 1 year after HNC treatment, and especially in patients with raised levels of depressive symptoms. The results of this study need to be confirmed in future studies before the NUCAI can be used in daily clinical practice. PMID:23429740

  16. Water swallow screening test for patients after surgery for head and neck cancer: early identification of dysphagia, aspiration and limitations of oral intake.

    PubMed

    Hey, Christiane; Lange, Benjamin P; Eberle, Silvia; Zaretsky, Yevgen; Sader, Robert; Stöver, Timo; Wagenblast, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are at high risk for oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) following surgical therapy. Early identification of OD can improve outcomes and reduce economic burden. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of a water screening test using increasing volumes postsurgically for patients with HNC (N=80) regarding the early identification of OD in general, and whether there is a need for further instrumental diagnostics to investigate the presence of aspiration as well as to determine the limitations of oral intake as defined by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. OD in general was identified in 65%, with aspiration in 49%, silent aspiration in 21% and limitations of oral intake in 56%. Despite a good sensitivity, for aspiration of 100% and for limitations of oral intake of 97.8%, the presented water screening test did not satisfactorily predict either of these reference criteria due to its low positive likelihood ratio (aspiration=2.6; limitations of oral intake=3.1). However, it is an accurate tool for the early identification of OD in general, with a sensitivity of 96.2% and a positive likelihood ratio of 5.4 in patients after surgery for HNC.

  17. Measuring uncertainty in dose delivered to the cochlea due to setup error during external beam treatment of patients with cancer of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.; Lovelock, D.; Hunt, M.; Mechalakos, J.; Hu, Y.; Pham, H.; Jackson, A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To use Cone Beam CT scans obtained just prior to treatments of head and neck cancer patients to measure the setup error and cumulative dose uncertainty of the cochlea. Methods: Data from 10 head and neck patients with 10 planning CTs and 52 Cone Beam CTs taken at time of treatment were used in this study. Patients were treated with conventional fractionation using an IMRT dose painting technique, most with 33 fractions. Weekly radiographic imaging was used to correct the patient setup. The authors used rigid registration of the planning CT and Cone Beam CT scans to find the translational and rotational setup errors, and the spatial setup errors of the cochlea. The planning CT was rotated and translated such that the cochlea positions match those seen in the cone beam scans, cochlea doses were recalculated and fractional doses accumulated. Uncertainties in the positions and cumulative doses of the cochlea were calculated with and without setup adjustments from radiographic imaging. Results: The mean setup error of the cochlea was 0.04 ± 0.33 or 0.06 ± 0.43 cm for RL, 0.09 ± 0.27 or 0.07 ± 0.48 cm for AP, and 0.00 ± 0.21 or −0.24 ± 0.45 cm for SI with and without radiographic imaging, respectively. Setup with radiographic imaging reduced the standard deviation of the setup error by roughly 1–2 mm. The uncertainty of the cochlea dose depends on the treatment plan and the relative positions of the cochlea and target volumes. Combining results for the left and right cochlea, the authors found the accumulated uncertainty of the cochlea dose per fraction was 4.82 (0.39–16.8) cGy, or 10.1 (0.8–32.4) cGy, with and without radiographic imaging, respectively; the percentage uncertainties relative to the planned doses were 4.32% (0.28%–9.06%) and 10.2% (0.7%–63.6%), respectively. Conclusions: Patient setup error introduces uncertainty in the position of the cochlea during radiation treatment. With the assistance of radiographic imaging during setup

  18. Measuring uncertainty in dose delivered to the cochlea due to setup error during external beam treatment of patients with cancer of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Yan, M.; Lovelock, D.; Hunt, M.; Mechalakos, J.; Hu, Y.; Pham, H.; Jackson, A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To use Cone Beam CT scans obtained just prior to treatments of head and neck cancer patients to measure the setup error and cumulative dose uncertainty of the cochlea. Methods: Data from 10 head and neck patients with 10 planning CTs and 52 Cone Beam CTs taken at time of treatment were used in this study. Patients were treated with conventional fractionation using an IMRT dose painting technique, most with 33 fractions. Weekly radiographic imaging was used to correct the patient setup. The authors used rigid registration of the planning CT and Cone Beam CT scans to find the translational and rotational setup errors, and the spatial setup errors of the cochlea. The planning CT was rotated and translated such that the cochlea positions match those seen in the cone beam scans, cochlea doses were recalculated and fractional doses accumulated. Uncertainties in the positions and cumulative doses of the cochlea were calculated with and without setup adjustments from radiographic imaging. Results: The mean setup error of the cochlea was 0.04 ± 0.33 or 0.06 ± 0.43 cm for RL, 0.09 ± 0.27 or 0.07 ± 0.48 cm for AP, and 0.00 ± 0.21 or −0.24 ± 0.45 cm for SI with and without radiographic imaging, respectively. Setup with radiographic imaging reduced the standard deviation of the setup error by roughly 1–2 mm. The uncertainty of the cochlea dose depends on the treatment plan and the relative positions of the cochlea and target volumes. Combining results for the left and right cochlea, the authors found the accumulated uncertainty of the cochlea dose per fraction was 4.82 (0.39–16.8) cGy, or 10.1 (0.8–32.4) cGy, with and without radiographic imaging, respectively; the percentage uncertainties relative to the planned doses were 4.32% (0.28%–9.06%) and 10.2% (0.7%–63.6%), respectively. Conclusions: Patient setup error introduces uncertainty in the position of the cochlea during radiation treatment. With the assistance of radiographic imaging during setup

  19. Aspiration pneumonia after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Boero, Isabel J.; Hwang, Lindsay; Le, Quynh-Thu; Moiseenko, Vitali; Sanghvi, Parag R.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia represents an under-reported complication of chemoradiotherapy in head-and-neck cancer. This study evaluated the incidence, risk factors, and mortality of aspiration pneumonia in a large cohort of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods Patients with head-and-neck cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 were identified from the SEER-Medicare database. Aspiration pneumonia was identified from Medicare billing claims. The cumulative incidence, risk factors, and survival after aspiration pneumonia were estimated and compared to a non-cancer population. Results Of 3,513 head-and-neck cancer patients, 801 patients developed aspiration pneumonia at a median time of 5 months after initiating treatment. The 1- and 5-year cumulative incidence of aspiration pneumonia was 15.8% and 23.8% for head-and-neck cancer patients and 3.6% and 8.7% for non-cancer controls, respectively. Among cancer patients multivariate analysis identified independent risk factors (p<0.05) for aspiration pneumonia including hypopharyngeal and nasopharyngeal tumors, male gender, older age, increased comorbidity, no surgery prior to radiation, and care received at a teaching hospital. Among cancer patients who experienced aspiration pneumonia, 674 (84%) were hospitalized of which 301 (45%) were admitted to an intensive care unit. Thirty-day mortality after hospitalization for aspiration pneumonia was 32.5%. Aspiration pneumonia was associated with a 42% increased risk of death (HR=1.42, p<0.001) after controlling for confounders. Conclusions This study found that nearly one-quarter of elderly patients will develop aspiration pneumonia within 5 years of chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. A better understanding of mitigating factors will help identify patients at risk for this potentially lethal complication. PMID:25537836

  20. Two-year clinical performance of glass ionomer and resin composite restorations in xerostomic head- and neck-irradiated cancer patients.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland J G; Stassen, Inge G; van 't Veldt, Yoke; Torbeyns, Dries; Hommez, Geert M G

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of adhesive filling materials in class V cavities in xerostomic head- and neck-irradiated cancer patients, in terms of marginal adaptation, anatomical form and recurrent caries. We selected 35 high-caries-risk, post-radiation, xerostomic adults with ≥3 cervical carious lesions in the same arch. Every patient received a KetacFil (KF), PhotacFil (PF) and Herculite XRV (HX) restoration. Patients were instructed to use a neutral 1% sodium fluoride gel in custom trays, on a daily basis. After 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, the restorations were examined for material loss, marginal integrity and recurrent caries. Fluoride compliance was determined at each recall appointment and recorded as the percentage of recommended use during that interval [compliance of ≤50% = NFUs, >50% = FUs]. Only 30 patients were available for recall at 6 months, with 28 patients at 12 and 18 months, and 27 patients at 24 months. In the NFU group, differences in recurrent caries were found between KF and HX at all observation times (p < 0.05). Differences (p < 0.05) in adaptation and/or anatomical form were found between KF and PF in NFUs after 18 and 24 months. In FUs, significant differences were observed between KF and PF, and KF and HX after 6 and 12 months, between KF and HX, PF and HX after 18 and 24 months. In summary, glass ionomers (especially the conventionally setting formulation) provide clinical caries inhibition but erode easily, while composite resin provides greater structural integrity.

  1. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about oral complications, such as mucositis and salivary gland dysfunction, that occur in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the head and neck.

  2. Head and Neck Cancers, Version 1.2015

    PubMed Central

    Pfster, David G.; Spencer, Sharon; Brizel, David M.; Burtness, Barbara; Busse, Paul M.; Caudell, Jimmy J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Dunphy, Frank; Eisele, David W.; Foote, Robert L.; Gilbert, Jill; Gillison, Maura L.; Haddad, Robert I.; Haughey, Bruce H.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Jimeno, Antonio; Kies, Merrill S.; Lydiatt, William M.; Maghami, Ellie; McCaffrey, Thomas; Mell, Loren K.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Ridge, John A.; Rodriguez, Cristina P.; Samant, Sandeep; Shah, Jatin P.; Weber, Randal S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Worden, Frank; Yom, Sue S.; McMillian, Nicole; Hughes, Miranda

    2016-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the 2015 NCCN Guidelines for Head and Neck (H&N) Cancers. These Insights describe the different types of particle therapy that may be used to treat H&N cancers, in contrast to traditional radiation therapy (RT) with photons (x-ray). Research is ongoing regarding the different types of particle therapy, including protons and carbon ions, with the goals of reducing the long-term side effects from RT and improving the therapeutic index. For the 2015 update, the NCCN H&N Cancers Panel agreed to delete recommendations for neutron therapy for salivary gland cancers, because of its limited availability, which has decreased over the past 2 decades; the small number of patients in the United States who currently receive this treatment; and concerns that the toxicity of neutron therapy may offset potential disease control advantages. PMID:26150579

  3. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important.

  4. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  5. Clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients: successes and barriers*

    PubMed Central

    Vissink, Arjan; Mitchell, James B; Baum, Bruce J; Limesand, Kirsten H; Jensen, Siri Beier; Fox, Philip C; Elting, Linda S; Langendijk, Johannes A; Coppes, Robert P; Reyland, Mary E

    2010-01-01

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head and neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This paper addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to: (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy. PMID:20970030

  6. Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vissink, Arjan; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.; Limesand, Kirsten H.; Jensen, Siri Beier; Fox, Philip C.; Elting, Linda S.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Reyland, Mary E.

    2010-11-15

    The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

  7. Validation of the Swedish M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) in patients with head and neck cancer and neurologic swallowing disturbances.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Sigrid; Rydén, Anna; Rudberg, Ingrid; Bove, Mogens; Bergquist, Henrik; Finizia, Caterina

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the Swedish version of the dysphagia-specific quality-of-life questionnaire, the M. D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI). Patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia due to neurologic disease (n = 30) and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients with post-treatment subjective dysphagia (n = 85) were compared to an age- and gender-matched nondysphagic control group (n = 115). A formal forward-backward translation was performed and followed international guidelines. Validity and reliability were tested against the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Internal-consistency reliability was calculated by means of Cronbach's α coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation (ICC). Convergent and discriminant validity were assessed by correlations between MDADI, SF-36, and HADS. Known-group validity was examined and statistically tested. Of 126 eligible patients, 115 agreed to participate (response rate = 91.3%). The age of the participants ranged between 37 and 92 years. Most of the MDADI items showed good variability and only minor floor or ceiling effects in solitary items were found. The internal-consistency reliability (Cronbach's α) of the MDADI total score was 0.88 (after correction for systematic errors in the subjects' responses to two reversed questions). All estimates reached over the satisfactory >0.70 reliability standard for group-level comparison. ICC ranged between 0.83 and 0.97 in the test-retest. The mean MDADI total score was 66.9 (SD = 14.7) for the H&N cancer patients, 65.0 (16.9) for the neurologic patients, and 97.5 (4.4) for the control group (P < 0.001; study patients vs. controls). The MDADI was also sensitive to disease severity as measured by different food textures. The Swedish version of the MDADI showed good psychometric properties and is a valid instrument to assess dysphagia-related quality of life. It was also shown to be a reliable

  8. Untreated head and neck cancer in Korea: a national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Geun; Park, Bumjung; Ahn, Soon-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have analyzed the survival of patients with untreated head and neck cancer. The objective of this study is to assess the survival rates of untreated head and neck cancer patients and to determine why the patients were not treated. Using data from a national patient sample cohort (1,025,340 cases) from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, 605 patients with diagnoses of head and neck cancer (lip and oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and laryngeal cancer) between 2003 and 2013 were evaluated. Cox proportional hazards modeling and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed. Of the considered cases of head and neck cancer, 32.2% were untreated. The median survival rate of untreated groups was 9 months. The untreated group showed poorer survival than the treatment groups. Old age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.37, 95% confidence internal (CI) 1.25-1.49, P < 0.001] and low income (AOR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.89-1.00, P = 0.028) were related to not receiving treatment. Many head and neck cancers go untreated. Clinicians should focus on untreated patients and seek to understand the reasons for their lack of treatment.

  9. Hyperlipidemia and statins use for the risk of new-onset anxiety/depression in patients with head and neck cancer: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-I; Lin, Li-Ching; Tien, Hung-Cheng; Que, Jenny; Ting, Wei Chen; Chen, Po-Chun; Wu, Hsin-Min; Ho, Chung-Han; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wang, Ren-Hong; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Objective Anxiety/depression is common among patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), and can negatively affect treatment compliance and outcome. The aim of this study was to assess the association between hyperlipidemia and the risk of new-onset anxiety/depression after the diagnosis of HNC and the influence of administering statins. Methods A matched longitudinal cohort study of 1632 subjects (408 HNC patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia and 1224 age- and sex-matched HNC patients without hyperlipidemia) was included and analyzed by using data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1996 to December 2012. The incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for the development of new-onset anxiety/depression were examined between the two groups. Cox proportional hazard regression was applied to estimate the relative risks of anxiety/depressive disorders adjusted for potential confounding factors. To estimate the risks of anxiety/depression in different sub-groups, a stratified analysis was also used. Results HNC patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia had a higher risk for comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease (P <0.001). The incidence rate of anxiety/depression in the HNC patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia was also significantly higher than that among patients without hyperlipidemia (10.78% vs 7.27%, respectively; P = 0.03). A Cox regression model revealed that preexisting hyperlipidemia was an independent risk factor for anxiety/depression (aHR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.30–2.94). Statins use was protective against anxiety/depression among HNC patients with hyperlipidemia (aHR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.46–1.57), especially for individuals older than 65 years and for females. Conclusions Preexisting hyperlipidemia was associated with increased risk of new-onset anxiety/depression in the HNC patients. Statins use for HNC patients with hyperlipidemia could decrease the risk of anxiety/depression, especially

  10. PD-L1 expression on immune cells, but not on tumor cells, is a favorable prognostic factor for head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Ryun; Ha, Sang-Jun; Hong, Min Hee; Heo, Su Jin; Koh, Yoon Woo; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Eun Kyung; Pyo, Kyoung Ho; Jung, Inkyung; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Jaewoo; Cho, Byoung Chul; Yoon, Sun Och

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and immune checkpoints and their prognostic value for resected head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). PD-L1 expression on tumor cells (TC) and tumor-infiltrating immune cells (IC), abundance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), and expression of the immune checkpoints were investigated in 402 HNSCC patients. PD-L1 expression on TC and IC was categorized into four groups according to the percentage of PD-L1-positive cells. PD-L1 positivity was defined as ≥5% of cells based on immunohistochemistry. High PD-L1 expression on IC, but not TC, was an independent favorable prognostic factor for RFS and OS adjusted for age, gender, smoking, stage, and HPV. High frequencies of CD3+ or CD8+ TILs, Foxp3+ Tregs, and PD-1+ TILs were strongly associated with favorable prognosis. PD-L1 was exclusively expressed on either TC or IC. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that IC3 expressed higher levels of the effector T cell markers than TC3, suggesting that PD-L1 expression is regulated via an adaptive IFNγ-mediated mechanism. High PD-L1 expression on IC, but not TC, and high abundance of PD-1+ T cells and Foxp3+ Tregs are favorable prognostic factors for resected HNSCC. This study highlights the importance of comprehensive assessment of both TC and IC. PMID:27841362

  11. DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath; Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna; Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

  12. Improving swallowing outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer using a theory-based pretreatment swallowing intervention package: protocol for a randomised feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christina H; Barratt, Helen; Taylor, Stuart A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of head and neck cancer (HNC) in the UK is rising, with an average of 31 people diagnosed daily. Patients affected by HNC suffer significant short-term and long-term post-treatment morbidity as a result of dysphagia, which affects daily functioning and quality of life (QOL). Pretreatment swallowing exercises may provide additional benefit over standard rehabilitation in managing dysphagia after primary HNC treatments, but uncertainty about their effectiveness persists. This study was preceded by an intervention development phase to produce an optimised swallowing intervention package (SIP). The aim of the current study is to assess the feasibility of this new intervention and research processes within a National Health Service (NHS) setting. Method and analysis A two-arm non-blinded randomised controlled feasibility study will be carried out at one tertiary referral NHS centre providing specialist services in HNC. Patients newly diagnosed with stage III and IV disease undergoing planned surgery and/or chemoradiation treatments will be eligible. The SIP will be delivered pre treatment, and a range of swallowing-related and QOL measures will be collected at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months post-treatment. Outcomes will test the feasibility of a future randomised controlled trial (RCT), detailing rate of recruitment and patient acceptance to participation and randomisation. Salient information relating to protocol implementation will be collated and study material such as the case report form will be tested. A range of candidate outcome measures will be examined for suitability in a larger RCT. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from an NHS Research Ethics Committee. Findings will be published open access in a peer-reviewed journal, and presented at relevant conferences and research meetings. Trial registration number ISRCTN40215425; Pre-results. PMID:28348190

  13. In Vivo Correlation of Glucose Metabolism, Cell Density and Microcirculatory Parameters in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Results Using Simultaneous PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kubiessa, Klaus; Boehm, Andreas; Barthel, Henryk; Kluge, Regine; Kahn, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Stumpp, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous acquisition of 18F-FDG-PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (T1w-DCE) in an integrated simultaneous PET/MRI in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and to investigate possible correlations between these parameters. Methods 17 patients that had given informed consent (15 male, 2 female) with biopsy-proven HNSCC underwent simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE. SUVmax, SUVmean, ADCmean, ADCmin and Ktrans, kep and ve were measured for each tumour and correlated using Spearman’s ρ. Results Significant correlations were observed between SUVmean and Ktrans (ρ = 0.43; p ≤ 0.05); SUVmean and kep (ρ = 0.44; p ≤ 0.05); Ktrans and kep (ρ = 0.53; p ≤ 0.05); and between kep and ve (ρ = -0.74; p ≤ 0.01). There was a trend towards statistical significance when correlating SUVmax and ADCmin (ρ = -0.35; p = 0.08); SUVmax and Ktrans (ρ = 0.37; p = 0.07); SUVmax and kep (ρ = 0.39; p = 0.06); and ADCmean and ve (ρ = 0.4; p = 0.06). Conclusion Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE in patients with HNSCC is feasible and allows depiction of complex interactions between glucose metabolism, microcirculatory parameters and cellular density. PMID:26270054

  14. A review of the predictive role of functional imaging in patients with mucosal primary head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Min, Myo; Lin, Peter; Liney, Gary; Lee, Mark; Forstner, Dion; Fowler, Allan; Holloway, Lois

    2017-02-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, have been reported to reduce toxicities by improving the dose conformity in mucosal primary head and neck cancer (MPHNC). However, to further optimize the therapeutic ratio, details on individual patient and disease characteristics may be necessary to tailor treatments. This is likely to include identifying poor responders for treatment intensification and good responders for de-escalation strategies. Non-invasive, repeatable imaging biomarkers are attractive modalities in both pre-treatment and intra-treatment response prediction with a view to individualized treatment options. This review has assessed the current literature on the prognostic/predictive role of widely available functional imaging (FI) studies such as fMRI(functional magnetic resonance imaging), functional computed tomography (fCT) and positron-emission-tomography(PET). A literature search was carried out using Medline, Embase and PubMed. Studies were included if imaging was undertaken pre and/or during radiotherapy (with or without the addition of chemotherapy and/or surgery). A total of 99 relevant studies were identified: 14 fMRI, 10 fCT, 59 FDG-PET and 16 non-FDG-PET studies. These articles were reviewed to identify imaging parameters demonstrating a correlation with patient outcome or a factor considered to impact on patient outcome and thus likely to be of potential predictive value in MPHNC and associated future radiotherapy treatment directions. Several studies have demonstrated that both pre-treatment and mid-treatment FDG-PET is predictive of outcomes. However, further studies are required to confirm the role of other imaging studies including fMRI and PET using other tracers. There is large heterogeneity within and between published studies, including tumour sites, treatment options, outcome endpoints and parameters assessed. We propose a minimum set of factors that should be reported and make recommendations for

  15. Breast cancer metastases to the head and neck: Case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jeremiah C; Mildenhall, Nicholas R; Wein, Richard O; O'Leary, Miriam A

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Despite the relatively high prevalence of this disease, breast cancer manifestations in the head and neck are relatively rare. Supraclavicular lymphadenopathy and bony metastases to the mandible and maxilla are the most common manifestation of breast cancer in the head and neck. Head and neck metastases are the first presentation of distant disease in approximately one-third of cases. The prognosis of breast cancer with distant metastases to the head and neck is generally poor, and the management of these lesions is controversial. Overall extent of disease and individual patient prognosis must guide treatment decisions. Atypical cases including maxillary sinus mass, jugular foramen mass, and dermal metastases are presented. Metastatic breast cancer is a rare diagnosis in the head and neck, yet metastatic disease from an infraclavicular primary deserves inclusion on any comprehensive differential diagnosis list. In women, breast carcinoma is the most common infraclavicular primary to metastasize to the head and neck.

  16. Multimodality therapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mary K

    2003-05-01

    The refinement of radiation therapy techniques should result in a decrease in morbidity in canine and feline nasal carcinoma patients and should further allow for the addition of adjuvant therapies. Patients with large oral tumors that are incompletely excised should have radiation therapy added to their treatment regimen. Tumors with significant metastatic potential, such as melanoma, should be considered for addition of chemotherapy. Carboplatin has activity in melanomas and is being added at several institutions, but trial results are not yet available. Chemoradiation has become the treatment of choice for human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas but remains largely unexplored in veterinary medicine. Hopefully, development of chemoradiation will benefit feline squamous cell carcinoma patients, because current treatment regimens are largely ineffective. Immunotherapy agents and targeted biologic therapeutics seem to hold promise for the future.

  17. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Janice K. . E-mail: janice.ryu@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 {mu}g/m{sup 2} or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer.

  18. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  19. Bupropion Hydrochloride or Patient's Choice for Smoking Cessation in Patients With Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Current Smoker; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  20. Tumor site and disease stage as predictors of quality of life in head and neck cancer: a prospective study on patients treated with surgery or combined therapy with surgery and radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Dennis; Probst, Gunther; Marek, Astrid; Noack, Volker; Ural, Ahmet; Adamietz, Irenaeus; Dazert, Stefan; Minovi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, we compared the short-term quality of life (QOL) of two subgroups of head and neck cancers: oropharyngeal and laryngeal cancers. Patients treated with curative surgery, were asked to participate in the study using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and H&N35 questionnaires to examine QOL. The oropharynx group consisted of 32 (48 %) patients, while the larynx group consisted of 35 (52 %) patients. All patients were treated with either curative surgery alone or curative surgery combined with adjuvant radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. The questionnaires were handed out pre- and post-therapy (10 months). At baseline, an impaired overall QOL (=EORTC QLQ-C30 global score) with a value of 53.4 for the whole patient collective was found; the overall QOL after 10 months improved (60.2, p < 0.05). Between the two patient groups, there was no difference in the global score after 10 months. The oropharynx patients described more problems with fatigue and oral cavity associated. The main symptoms in the larynx group were loss of sensual function and coughing. The present investigation revealed that the general post-therapy QOL in two subgroups of head and neck cancer reached a satisfying level.

  1. Prevalence of swallowing and speech problems in daily life after chemoradiation for head and neck cancer based on cut-off scores of the patient-reported outcome measures SWAL-QOL and SHI.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Rico N; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Doornaert, Patricia; Buter, Jan; de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A; Aaronson, Neil K; Leemans, C René

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer, based on the patient-reported outcome measures Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI), both provided with cut-off scores. This is a cross-sectional study. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery of a University Medical Center. Sixty patients, 6 months to 5 years after chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and SHI, both validated in Dutch and provided with cut-off scores. Associations were tested between the outcome measures and independent variables (age, gender, tumor stage and site, and radiotherapy technique, time since treatment, comorbidity and food intake). Fifty-two patients returned the SWAL-QOL and 47 the SHI (response rate 87 and 78 %, respectively). Swallowing and speech problems were present in 79 and 55 %, respectively. Normal food intake was noticed in 45, 35 % had a soft diet and 20 % tube feeding. Patients with soft diet and tube feeding reported more swallowing problems compared to patients with normal oral intake. Tumor subsite was significantly associated with swallowing outcome (less problems in larynx/hypopharynx compared to oral/oropharynx). Radiation technique was significantly associated with psychosocial speech problems (less problems in patients treated with IMRT). Swallowing and (to a lesser extent) speech problems in daily life are frequently present after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future prospective studies will give more insight into the course of speech and swallowing problems after chemoradiation and into efficacy of new radiation techniques and swallowing and speech rehabilitation programs.

  2. Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org; Chan, Kelvin; Bekelman, Justin E.; Zhung, Joanne; Mechalakos, James; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted.

  3. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  4. Implant rehabilitation in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer: role of Intensity-Moduled Radiotherapy (IMRT) in planning the insertion site

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Pisapia, Valeria; Monai, Dario; Barbano, Lorena; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose currently, head and neck irradiation is not considered an absolute contraindication for implant placement (1), especially due to the transition from conventional to conformal radiotherapy. However, there is a difference in the success rate of implant placement between irradiated and non-irradiated bones (5). Successful osseointegration is mainly affected by the total dose of radiation (6). The main purpose of this study was to minimize problems related to radiation dose by evaluating in advance the most suitable site for implant insertion on the basis of the mean absorbed dose. Additional aims were: to estimate the appropriate timing for implant insertion in irradiated bones, to analyze the difference in stability between maxilla and mandible, and to evaluate the success of implants with wrinkled microgeometry and increased layer of TiO2. Materials and methods five patients who had been irradiated for head and neck cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were recruited for our study. Surgical procedures were performed following a pre-surgical evaluation of the correct insertion position of implant fixtures. The latter was based on a scrutiny of dose-volume histograms (DVH) developed by a team of experts in medical physics and radiotherapists after dentists had contoured the volumes of interest. Student’s t test and Pearson’s correlation test were used for comparison and correlation between the variables considered. Results the percentage of osseointegration was 100%, which supports the usefulness of the adopted technique. A statistically significant difference in stability and crestal bone resorption emerged in the comparison between maxilla and mandible, but not between times of insertion. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between radiation dose and ISQ values: an increase in radiation dose corresponded to a decrease in primary stability. However, the correlation between ISQ values and implant length was not significant

  5. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  6. Nutritional consequences of the radiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chencharick, J.D.; Mossman, K.L.

    1983-03-01

    Nutrition-related complications of radiotherapy were evaluated in 74 head and neck cancer patients. Subjective changes of mouth dryness, taste, dysphagia, appetite, and food preferences were determined by questionnaire before and at weekly intervals during curative radiotherapy. Changes in body weight during therapy were also recorded. In addition, 24-hour dietary histories were taken from eight patients at the beginning and end of treatment. Results of the study indicate that patients were subjectively aware of nutritional problems prior to therapy and that therapy exacerbated these problems. As many as 25% of the patients experienced oral complications such as taste loss and/or dry mouth prior to initiation of radiotherapy. By the end of radiotherapy, over 80% of the patients were aware of oral and nutritional problems. Patients had an average weight loss of 5 kg prior to therapy; this loss of weight did not change during therapy. Diet histories of eight patients indicate significant caloric deficiencies early and late in radiotherapy. The oral and nutritional problems experienced by patients, even prior to therapy, support the idea that nutritional evaluation and maintenance are important not only during therapy, but prior to radiotherapy as well. Nutritional evaluation should be made a routine, integral part of therapy for every cancer patient.

  7. Acetylcysteine Rinse in Reducing Saliva Thickness and Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Mucositis; Oral Complications; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Mucoepidermoid

  8. Planned neck dissection for patients with complete response to chemoradiotherapy: a concept approaching obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Alfio; Corry, June; Silver, Carl E; Shaha, Ashok R; Thomas Robbins, K; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-02-01

    The question of efficacy of "planned" neck dissection following complete response to chemoradiation of head and neck cancer is discussed. There is general agreement that preemptive neck dissection in patients who present initially with low volume (N1) neck disease is not necessary. However, routine performance of planned neck dissection for patients who present initially with high volume (> or =N2) disease remains controversial. The authors reviewed a large number of studies reported in the recent literature and discuss how they affect this debate.Twenty-four of the reviewed studies indicate a benefit in regional control obtained by "planned" neck dissection among patients who had bulky neck disease pretreatment. All these studies are retrospective, they do not assess treatment response prior to surgery, although they do show very good regional control rates. Twenty-six studies demonstrate no benefit from "planned" neck dissection after complete clinical response. The reasons for these different conclusions include the development of more effective chemoradiation regimens which have improved the initial locoregional control rates of patients undergoing primary chemoradiation treatment, and improvements in diagnostic technology which have increased ability to detect low volume persistent tumor in the post treatment period. When neck dissection is necessary for persistent or recurrent disease, recent studies have shown that selective or superselective neck dissection may produce results therapeutically equivalent to those obtained with more extensive procedures, with less morbidity.There is now a large body of evidence, based on long-term clinical outcomes, that patients who have achieved a complete clinical (including radiologic) response to chemoradiation have a low rate of isolated neck failure, and the continued use of planned neck dissection for these patients cannot be justified.

  9. The role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers: A review.

    PubMed

    Al Sarraf, M D; El Hariry, I

    2008-07-01

    Induction CT have evolved since its introduction in the mid of 1970s for patients with previously untreated locally advanced HNC. We went from single agent cisplatin to cisplatin bleomycin combinations, to PF and now to the three drugs combination of TPF or its safer modification. We started with single cycle of induction CT, to two courses and now the best to give is the three cycles of CT. We not only improved on the effectiveness of the induction CT, but also reduced the possible side effects and improved the quality of life for those receiving such treatment. Induction CT followed by RT alone is superior to RT only in patients with previously untreated unresectable/inoperable HNC. Although, the "standard" of care of these patients today is concurrent CT+RT. Induction TPF followed by the best local treatment(s) usually concurrent CT+RT was superior to PF followed by the best local therapy in these patients. Will this mean that in patients with locally advanced unresectable/inoperable HNC induction TPF followed by concurrent CT+RT is the treatment of choice, in our opinion is yes, but this is not acceptable by the majority of investigators. This is why we do have more than four prospective randomized phase III trials trying to answer such an important question. In our opinion and strong believe that all patients with locally advanced HNC including patients with NPC not on active protocol(s) may be offered induction three drugs combination followed by concurrent CT+RT as their primary planned treatment. In those patients who are resectable/operable before any such therapy and did not respond (CR or PR) to such induction CT may offer surgical resection followed by post-operative concurrent CT + RT. Table 5 summarize the rational of the continue use of the total treatment of induction CT followed by concurrent CT+RT in patients with previously untreated and locally advanced HNC.

  10. The etiologic spectrum of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Gao, Xiao-lei; Liang, Xin-hua; Tang, Ya-ling

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), accounting for more than 80% in head and neck malignancies, kills thousands of people a year in the world. Despite most of the patients are more than 45, and the occurrences of head and neck cancer shows a decreasing trend; however, horribly, the incidences of the patients under 45 years old is steadily increasing. Hence, it's of vital importance to get more pathogen information about risk factors of HNSCC in children and young adults. This review outlines the etiologic spectrum of HNSCC, especially oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, in patients under 45 years of age. PMID:27528225

  11. Elective neck irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, F.; Leborgne, J.H.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 69 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue Stages T1-2-3 N0 were treated between 1952 and 1982 at one cancer center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Of 52 patients with the primary disease controlled, 2 had elective cervical lymph node dissection, and were therefore excluded from the study, 25 were treated with elective neck irradiation, and 25 were followed without irradiation to the neck. In the untreated group, 40% developed neck node metastases, while this was observed only in 20% of the group receiving elective neck irradiation, but only 4% recurred in the elective irradiated areas of the neck (p: 0.0028). The survival was the same for each group (5-year absolute survival with NED 67% for the neck irradiation group and 64% for the unirradiated group). From this retrospective study, we conclude that elective neck irradiation in carcinoma of the oral tongue decreases the incidence of neck metastases but an improvement in survival of these patients was not demonstrated.

  12. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer: Unique Features of Epidemiology and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica H.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Ferris, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a recently identified causative agent for a subset of head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, and is largely responsible for the rising worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Patients with HPV-positive OPC have distinct risk factor profiles and generally have a better prognosis than patients with traditional, HPV-negative, head and neck cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation is a widely accepted primary treatment modality for many patients with HPV-positive OPC. However, recent advances in surgical modalities, including transoral laser and robotic surgery, have led to the reemergence of primary surgical treatment for HPV-positive patients. Clinical trials are under way to determine optimal treatment strategies for the growing subset of patients with HPV-positive OPC. Similarly, identifying those patients with HPV-positive cancer who are at risk for recurrence and poor survival is critical in order to tailor individual treatment regimens and avoid potential undertreatment. PMID:26332002

  13. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer: Unique Features of Epidemiology and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Jessica H; Grandis, Jennifer R; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a recently identified causative agent for a subset of head and neck cancers, primarily in the oropharynx, and is largely responsible for the rising worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Patients with HPV-positive OPC have distinct risk factor profiles and generally have a better prognosis than patients with traditional, HPV-negative, head and neck cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation is a widely accepted primary treatment modality for many patients with HPV-positive OPC. However, recent advances in surgical modalities, including transoral laser and robotic surgery, have led to the reemergence of primary surgical treatment for HPV-positive patients. Clinical trials are under way to determine optimal treatment strategies for the growing subset of patients with HPV-positive OPC. Similarly, identifying those patients with HPV-positive cancer who are at risk for recurrence and poor survival is critical in order to tailor individual treatment regimens and avoid potential undertreatment.

  14. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  15. MicroRNAs Involvement in Radioresistance of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parwez; Slavik, Marek; Slampa, Pavel; Smilek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to the ionizing radiation is a current problem in the treatment and clinical management of various cancers including head and neck cancer. There are several biological and molecular mechanisms described to be responsible for resistance of the tumors to radiotherapy. Among them, the main mechanisms include alterations in intracellular pathways involved in DNA damage and repair, apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis. It has been found that regulation of these complex processes is often controlled by microRNAs. MicroRNAs are short endogenous RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally modulate gene expression and their deregulated expression has been observed in many tumors including head and neck cancer. Specific expression patterns of microRNAs have also been shown to predict prognosis and therapeutic response in head and neck cancer. Therefore, microRNAs present promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets that might overcome resistance to radiation and improve prognosis of head and neck cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the functional role of microRNAs in radioresistance of cancer with special focus on head and neck cancer. PMID:28325958

  16. Free jejunal flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction in head and neck cancer patients: An evaluation of donor site complications

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Matros, Evan; Paty, Philip B.; Cordeiro, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Free jejunal transfer for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction has often been criticized for its associated donor site morbidity. Conversely, the same argument has been invoked to support use of fasciocutaneous flaps, given their low incidence of donor site complications. The purpose of the current study was to document donor site complication rate with free jejunal flaps for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction, in the hands of an experienced surgeon. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of consecutive patients who underwent free jejunal transfer between 1992 and 2012 by the senior author. Demographic data, abdominal complications, surgical characteristics of small bowel anastomoses and postoperative bowel function were specifically noted. Results Ninety-two jejunal flap reconstructions were performed in 90 patients. Mean follow up time was 29 months. Twelve (13%) patients had prior abdominal surgery. Donor site complications included ileus (n=2), wound cellulitis (n=1), wound dehiscence (n=1) and small bowel obstruction (n=1). Mean time to initiation of tube feeds after reconstruction was 5 days. Seventy-seven (86.5%) patients were discharged on an oral diet. The perioperative mortality rate of 2% was not associated with any donor site complication. Conclusion Free jejunal transfer is associated with minimal and acceptable donor site complication rates. The choice of flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction should be determined by the type of defect, potential recipient site complications and the surgeon’s familiarity with the flap. Potential donor site complications should not be a deterrent for free jejunal flaps given the low rate described in this study. PMID:26220434

  17. Current advances in diagnosis and surgical treatment of lymph node metastasis in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teymoortash, A.; Werner, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Still today, the status of the cervical lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor for head and neck cancer. So the individual treatment concept of the lymphatic drainage depends on the treatment of the primary tumor as well as on the presence or absence of suspect lymph nodes in the imaging diagnosis. Neck dissection may have either a therapeutic objective or a diagnostic one. The selective neck dissection is currently the method of choice for the treatment of patients with advanced head and neck cancers and clinical N0 neck. For oncologic reasons, this procedure is generally recommended with acceptable functional and aesthetic results, especially under the aspect of the mentioned staging procedure. In this review article, current aspects on pre- and posttherapeutic staging of the cervical lymph nodes are described and the indication and the necessary extent of neck dissection for head and neck cancer is discussed. Additionally the critical question is discussed if the lymph node metastasis bears an intrinsic risk of metastatic development and thus its removal in a most possible early stage plays an important role. PMID:23320056

  18. Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Survival for Patients With Node-Positive Head and Neck Cancer: An Analysis by Primary Site and Nodal Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Johnny Lavaf, Amir; Teng, Marita S.; Huang, Delphine; Genden, Eric M.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is frequently recommended for node-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary surgery. The impact of RT on survival for various subgroups of node-positive HNSCC has not been clearly demonstrated. Methods and Materials: Within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Database, we identified 5297 patients with node-positive (N1 to N3) HNSCC treated with definitive surgery with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2001. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Results: Adjuvant RT significantly improved 5-year overall survival (46.3%: 95% confidence interval [CI], 44.7-48.0% for surgery + RT, vs. 35.2%: 95% CI, 32.0-38.5% for surgery alone, p < 0.001) and cancer-specific survival (54.8%: 95% CI, 53.2-56.4% for surgery + RT, vs. 46.2% for surgery alone 95% CI, 42.4-50.0%, p < 0.05). Use of adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor of survival on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.68-0.83; p < 0.001). Subset analyses demonstrated that adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved survival for N1 (HR, 0.78; 95% CI; 0.67-0.90; p = 0.001), N2a (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99, p = 0.048) and N2b to N3 nodal disease (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.51-0.75; p < 0.001). Adjuvant RT increased overall survival for node-positive patients with oropharynx (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.90; p 0.004), hypopharynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88; p = 0.004), larynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52-0.84; p = 0.001), and oral cavity (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; p = 0.025) primary tumors. Conclusions: In a large population-based analysis, adjuvant RT significantly improves overall survival for patients with node-positive HNSCC. All nodal stages, including N1, appear to benefit from the addition of RT to definitive surgery.

  19. Implementing the National Institute of Clinical Excellence improving outcome guidelines for head and neck cancer: developing a business plan with reorganisation of head and neck cancer services.

    PubMed

    Jeannon, J-P; Abbs, I; Calman, F; Gleeson, M; Lyons, A; Hussain, K; McGurk, M; O'Connell, M; Probert, D; Ng, R; Simo, R

    2008-04-01

    The implementation of the National Institute of Clinical Excellence improving outcome guidelines (NICE-IOG) manual for head and neck cancer may have a huge potential cost implication. Head and neck cancer is a rare disease which utilises large quantities of resources which can only be provided in a tertiary centre. Head and neck cancer services should be centralised into a single site for each cancer network. A new higher tariff rate for complex head and neck cancer cases is needed which recognises the true cost of this work. Each network should set its own tariff to make head and neck cancer care financially viable.

  20. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  1. HPV Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Tara; Bruce, Jeff; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours that are associated with diverse clinical outcomes. Recent evidence has demonstrated that human papillomavirus (HPV) is involved in up to 25% of HNCs; particularly in the oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) subtype where it can account for up to 60% of such cases. HPVs are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial cells; numerous HPV subtypes, including 16, 18, 31, 33, and 35, drive epithelial cell transformation and tumourigenesis. HPV positive (HPV+) HNC represents a distinct molecular and clinical entity from HPV negative (HPV−) disease; the biological basis for which remains to be fully elucidated. HPV positivity is strongly correlated with a significantly superior outcome; indicating that such tumours should have a distinct management approach. This review focuses on the recent scientific and clinical investigation of HPV+ HNC. In particular, we discuss the importance of molecular and clinical evidence for defining the role of HPV in HNC, and the clinical impact of HPV status as a biomarker for HNC. PMID:27527216

  2. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Botanical Therapy in Treating Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Who Have Undergone Chemoradiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-14

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  4. Maintaining physical activity during head and neck cancer treatment: Results of a pilot controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuang G.; Alexander, Neil B.; Djuric, Zora; Zhou, Jessica; Tao, Yebin; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Worden, Francis P.; Strath, Scott J.; Jolly, Shruti

    2017-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (concurrent CRT) to treat head and neck cancer is associated with significant reductions of weight, mobility, and quality of life (QOL). An intervention focusing on functional exercise may attenuate these losses. Methods We allocated patients to a 14-week functional resistance and walking program designed to maintain physical activity during cancer treatment (MPACT group; n = 11), or to usual care (control group; n = 9). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, and 7 and 14 weeks. Results Compared to controls, the MPACT participants had attenuated decline or improvement in several strength, mobility, physical activity, diet, and QOL endpoints. These trends were statistically significant (p < .05) in knee strength, mental health, head and neck QOL, and barriers to exercise. Conclusion In this pilot study of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent CRT, MPACT training was feasible and maintained or improved function and QOL, thereby providing the basis for larger future interventions with longer follow-up. PMID:26445898

  5. Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Halyard, Michele Y.; Jatoi, Aminah . E-mail: Jatoi.aminah@mayo.edu; Sloan, Jeff A.; Bearden, James D.; Vora, Sujay A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Perez, Edith A.; Soori, Gammi; Zalduendo, Anthony C.; Zhu, Angela; Stella, Philip J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Taste alterations (dysgeusia) are well described in head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT). Anecdotal observations and pilot studies have suggested zinc may mitigate these symptoms. This multi-institutional, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to provide definitive evidence of this mineral's palliative efficacy. Methods and Materials: A total of 169 evaluable patients were randomly assigned to zinc sulfate 45 mg orally three times daily vs. placebo. Treatment was to be given throughout RT and for 1 month after. All patients were scheduled to receive {>=}2,000 cGy of external beam RT to {>=}30% of the oral cavity, were able to take oral medication, and had no oral thrush at study entry. Changes in taste were assessed using the previously validated Wickham questionnaire. Results: At baseline, the groups were comparable in age, gender, and planned radiation dose (<6,000 vs. {>=}6,000 cGy). Overall, 61 zinc-treated (73%) and 71 placebo-exposed (84%) patients described taste alterations during the first 2 months (p = 0.16). The median interval to taste alterations was 2.3 vs. 1.6 weeks in the zinc-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.09). The reported taste alterations included the absence of any taste (16%), bitter taste (8%), salty taste (5%), sour taste (4%), sweet taste (5%), and the presence of a metallic taste (10%), as well as other descriptions provided by a write in response (81%). Zinc sulfate did not favorably affect the interval to taste recovery. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as prescribed in this trial, did not prevent taste alterations in cancer patients who were undergoing RT to the oral pharynx.

  6. Speech and swallow rehabilitation in head and neck cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P; Radford, K; Coffey, M; Stewart, M

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. The disease itself and the treatment can have far reaching effects on speech and swallow function, which are consistently prioritised by survivors as an area of concern. This paper provides recommendations on the assessments and interventions for speech and swallow rehabilitation in this patient group. Recommendations • All multidisciplinary teams should have rehabilitation patient pathways covering all stages of the patient's journey including multidisciplinary and pre-treatment clinics. (G) • Clinicians treating head and neck cancer patients should consult the National Cancer Rehabilitation Pathway for head and neck cancers. (G) • All head and neck cancer patients should have a pre-treatment assessment of speech and swallowing. (G) • A programme of prophylactic exercises and the teaching of swallowing manoeuvres can reduce impairments, maintain function and enable a speedier recovery. (R) • Continued speech and language therapist input is important in maintaining voice and safe and effective swallow function following head and neck cancer treatment. (R) • Disease recurrence must be ruled out in the management of stricture and/or stenosis. (R) • Continuous radial expansion balloons offer a safe, effective dilation method with advantages over gum elastic bougies. (R) • Site, length and completeness of strictures as well as whether they are in the presence of the larynx or not, need to be assessed when establishing the likelihood of surgically improved outcome. (G) • Primary surgical voice restoration should be offered to all patients undergoing laryngectomy. (R) • Attention to surgical detail and long-term speech and language therapist input is required to optimise speech and swallowing after laryngectomy. (G) • Patients should commence wearing heat and moisture exchange devices as soon as possible after

  7. Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hans, S; Delas, B; Gorphe, P; Ménard, M; Brasnu, D

    2012-02-01

    Robots have invaded industry and, more recently, the field of medicine. Following the development of various prototypes, Intuitive Surgical® has developed the Da Vinci surgical robot. This robot, designed for abdominal surgery, has been widely used in urology since 2000. The many advantages of this transoral robotic surgery (TORS) are described in this article. Its disadvantages are essentially its high cost and the absence of tactile feedback. The first feasibility studies in head and neck cancer, conducted in animals, dummies and cadavers, were performed in 2005, followed by the first publications in patients in 2006. The first series including more than 20 patients treated by TORS demonstrated the feasibility for the following sites: oropharynx, supraglottic larynx and hypopharynx. However, these studies did not validate the oncological results of the TORS technique. TORS decreases the number of tracheotomies, and allows more rapid swallowing rehabilitation and a shorter length of hospital stay. Technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new generation robots, therefore more adapted to the head and neck, will probably be available in the future.

  8. IMRT Reirradiation of Head and Neck Cancer-Disease Control and Morbidity Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Sulman, Erik P.; Schwartz, David L. Le, Thuy T.; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Ahamad, Anesa; Kies, Merril; Glisson, Bonnie; Garden, Adam S.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Institutional and cooperative group experience has demonstrated the feasibility of reirradiation for head and neck cancer. Limited data are available regarding the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for this indication. We reviewed our initial experience using IMRT for previously irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Records of 78 consecutive patients reirradiated with IMRT for head and neck cancer between 1999 and 2004 were reviewed; 74 cases were analyzed. Reirradiation was defined as any overlap between original and new radiation treatment volumes regardless of the time interval between initial and subsequent treatment. Severe reirradiation-related toxicity was defined as toxic events resulting in hospitalization, corrective surgery, or patient death. Longitudinal estimates of survival were calculated by Kaplan-Meier technique. Results: Twenty (27%) patients underwent salvage surgical resection and 36 (49%) patients received chemotherapy. Median follow-up from reirradiation was 25 months. Median time interval between initial radiation and reirradiation was 46 months. Median reirradiation dose was 60 Gy. Median lifetime radiation dose was 116.1 Gy. The 2-year overall survival and locoregional control rates were 58% and 64%, respectively. Severe reirradiation related toxicity occurred in 15 patients (20%); one treatment-related death was observed. Conclusions: The use of IMRT for reirradiation of recurrent or second primary head and neck cancers resulted in encouraging local control and survival. Reirradiation-related morbidity was significant, but may be less severe than previously published reports using conventional techniques.

  9. Head and Neck Cancer: An Evolving Treatment Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Cognetti, David M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-01-01

    Since the inception of this journal in 1948, the understanding of etiologic factors that contribute to and the treatment of head and neck cancer has evolved dramatically. Advances in surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have improved locoregional control, survival, and quality of life. The outcomes of these treatment modalities have shifted the focus of curative efforts from radical ablation to preservation and restoration of function. This evolution has been documented in the pages of Cancer for the past 6 decades. This review focuses on the evolution of treatment approaches for head and neck cancer and future directions while recognizing the historic contributions recorded within this journal. PMID:18798532

  10. Current clinical immunotherapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto Chervin, Carolina; Brockstein, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    It was estimated that 59,340 new cases of head and neck cancer would be diagnosed in the US alone in 2015 and that 12,290 deaths would be attributed to the disease. Local and regional recurrences may be treated with chemotherapy and radiation; however, metastatic head and neck cancer is fatal and is treated with chemotherapy for palliation. Recent successful treatment of a variety of solid and hematological malignancies by immunotherapeutic approaches (i.e. harnessing the body’s own immune system to combat disease) has added a fourth therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. This commentary will review the status of immunotherapies in clinical development for the specific treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:27239282

  11. Treatment Outcome of Combined Modalities for Buccal Cancers: Unilateral or Bilateral Neck Radiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-Y.; Lee, L.-Y.; Huang, S.-F.; Kang, C.-J.; Fan, K.-H.; Wang, H.-M.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of treatment for buccal cancers and assess the impact of unilateral vs. bilateral adjuvant neck radiation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the course of 145 patients newly diagnosed with buccal squamous cell carcinoma without distant metastases who completed definitive treatment between January 1994 and December 2000. Of 145 patients, 112 (77%) had Stage III or IV disease. All underwent radical surgery with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 64 Gy), including unilateral neck treatment in most (n = 120, 82.8%). After 1997, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy was given for high-risk patients with more than two involved lymph nodes, extracapsular spread, and/or positive margins. Results: The 5-year disease-specific survival rate for Stages I-IV was 87%, 83%, 61%, and 60%, respectively (p = 0.01). The most significant prognostic factor was N stage, with the 5-year disease-specific survival rate for N0, N1, and N2 being 79%, 65%, and 54%, respectively (p 0.001). For patients with more than two lymph nodes or positive extracapsular spread, cisplatin-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control (p = 0.02). Locoregional control did not differ between patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral neck treatments (p = 0.95). Contralateral neck failure occurred in only 2.1%. Conclusions: In patients with buccal carcinoma after radical resection, ipsilateral neck radiation is adequate. Bilateral prophylactic neck treatment does not confer an added benefit.

  12. Acute Normal Tissue Reactions in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With IMRT: Influence of Dose and Association With Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA DSB Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Werbrouck, Joke Ruyck, Kim de; Duprez, Frederic; Veldeman, Liv; Claes, Kathleen; Eijkeren, Marc van; Boterberg, Tom; Willems, Petra; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between dose-related parameters and polymorphisms in DNA DSB repair genes XRCC3 (c.-1843A>G, c.562-14A>G, c.722C>T), Rad51 (c.-3429G>C, c.-3392G>T), Lig4 (c.26C>T, c.1704T>C), Ku70 (c.-1310C>G), and Ku80 (c.2110-2408G>A) and the occurrence of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 88 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)-treated head-and-neck cancer patients. Mucositis, dermatitis, and dysphagia were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events v.3.0 scale. The population was divided into a CTC0-2 and CTC3+ group for the analysis of each acute effect. The influence of the dose on critical structures was analyzed using dose-volume histograms. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single base extension assays. Results: The mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the oral cavity and constrictor pharyngeus (PC) muscles was significantly associated with the development of mucositis and dysphagia, respectively. These parameters were considered confounding factors in the radiogenomics analyses. The XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with the development of severe dysphagia (CTC3+). No association was found between the investigated polymorphisms and the development of mucositis or dermatitis. A risk analysis model for severe dysphagia, which was developed based on the XRCC3c.722CT/TT and Ku70c.-1310CG/GG genotypes and the PC dose, showed a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 77.6%. Conclusions: The XRCC3c.722C>T and Ku70c.-1310C>G polymorphisms as well as the D{sub mean} to the PC muscles were highly associated with the development of severe dysphagia after IMRT. The prediction model developed using these parameters showed a high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Jeffrey V; Ramsinghani, Nilam S; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S A L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate our initial experience in treating previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancers using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Between July 1997 and September 1999, 12 patients with previously irradiated, locally recurrent head-and-neck cancers were treated with IMRT. These included cancers of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, paranasal sinus, skin of the head-and-neck region, and malignant melanoma. Five of these 12 patients had received radiation as the primary treatment, with doses ranging from 66.0 to 126.0 Gy, and the remaining 7 patients had undergone definitive surgeries followed by an adjuvant course of radiation treatment, with doses ranging between 36.0 and 64.8 Gy. Recurrence after the initial course of radiation occurred in periods ranging from 4 to 35 months, with 11 of 12 cases recurring fully in the fields of previous irradiation. Recurrent tumors were treated with IMRT to total doses between 30 to 70 Gy (> 50 Gy in 10 cases) prescribed at the 75% to 92% isodose lines with daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The results revealed that acute toxicities were acceptable except in 1 patient who died of aspiration pneumonia during the course of retreatment. There were 4 complete responders, 2 partial responders, and 2 patients with stable disease in the IMRT-treated volumes. Three patients received IMRT as adjuvant treatment following salvage surgery. At 4 to 16 months of follow-up, 7 patients were still alive, with 5 revealing no evidence of disease. In conclusion, this pilot study demonstrates that IMRT offers a viable mode of re-irradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers in previously irradiated sites. Longer follow-up time and a larger number of patients are needed to better define the therapeutic advantage of IMRT in recurrent, previously irradiated head-and-neck cancers.

  14. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  15. Unilateral Cervical Polyneuropathies following Concurrent Bortezomib, Cetuximab, and Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Elghouche, Alhasan; Shokri, Tom; Qin, Yewen; Wargo, Susannah; Citrin, Deborah; Van Waes, Carter

    2016-01-01

    We report a constellation of cervical polyneuropathies in a patient treated with concurrent bortezomib, cetuximab, and cisplatin alongside intensity modulated radiotherapy for carcinoma of the tonsil with neck metastasis. The described deficits include brachial plexopathy, cervical sensory neuropathy, and oculosympathetic, recurrent laryngeal, and phrenic nerve palsies within the ipsilateral radiation field. Radiation neuropathy involving the brachial plexus is typically associated with treatment of breast or lung cancer; however, increased awareness of this entity in the context of investigational agents with potential neuropathic effects in head and neck cancer has recently emerged. With this report, we highlight radiation neuropathy in the setting of investigational therapy for head and neck cancer, particularly since these sequelae may present years after therapy and entail significant and often irreversible morbidity.

  16. Cancer-related trauma, stigma and growth: the 'lived' experience of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Threader, J; McCormack, L

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is associated with multiple layers of distress including stigma. Stigma attraction or devalued social identity is twofold: (1) it is a cancer associated with lifestyle risk factors and (2) treatment often results in confronting facial disfigurement. Subjective interpretations from nine head and neck cancer patients were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. An overarching superordinate theme--Distress, Stigma and Psychological Growth--encompassed four subordinate themes. Two themes captured the expressed trauma and terror as a result of diagnosis and treatment, and two the redefining of self despite stigma through meaning making. Distress was interpreted as a catalyst for awakening new life interpretations and combined with social support to facilitate two distinct pathways of growth: (1) psychological growth without support; (2) psychological and relational growth with support. Previously unfelt empathetic understanding and altruism for others with cancer emerged from the impact of stigma on 'self'. Acceptance allowed a new sense of identity that recognised cancer-related traumatic distress as integral to growth for these participants. The present study offers a unique insight into cancer-related trauma and stigma and the potential to redefine a more accepting, empathic and altruistic 'self' for psychological growth. Implications are discussed.

  17. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  18. THE IMPACT OF CONCURRENT GRANULOCYTE MACROPHAGE-COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR ON QUALITY OF LIFE IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS: RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLED RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP 9901 TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Stephanie; James, Jennifer L.; Scarantino, Charles; Movsas, Benjamin; Valicenti, Richard K.; Fortin, Andre; Pollock, JonDavid; Kim, Harold; Brachman, David G.; Berk, Lawrence B.; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, trial evaluating the efficacy of GM-CSF in reducing mucosal injury and symptom burden from curative radiotherapy for head-and-neck (H&N) cancer. Methods Eligible patients with H&N cancer receiving radiation encompassing ≥ 50% of the oral cavity or oropharynx received subcutaneous GM-CSF or placebo. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the RTOG modified University of Washington H&N symptom questionnaire at baseline, 4, 13, 26 and 48 weeks from radiation initiation. Results Of 125 eligible patients, 114 were evaluable for QoL (58 GM-CSF, 56 placebo). Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and baseline symptom scores were well balanced between the treatment arms. At the end of the acute period (13 weeks) patients in both arms reported negative change in total symptom score indicating increase in symptom burden relative to baseline (mean −18.4 GM-CSF, −20.8 placebo). There was no difference in change in total symptom score (p>0.05) or change in mucous, pain, eating, or activity domain scores (p>0.01) between patients in the GM-CSF and placebo arms. Analysis limited to patients treated per protocol or with an acceptable protocol deviation also found no difference in change in total symptom score (p>0.05) or change in domain scores (p>0.01) between treatment arms. Provider assessment of acute mucositis during treatment did not correlate with patient-reported mucous domain and total symptom scores (p>0.05) Conclusion GM-CSF administered concurrently during head-and-neck radiation does not appear to significantly improve patient-reported QoL symptom burden. PMID:24492945

  19. Evaluation of speech outcomes using English version of the Speech Handicap Index in a cohort of head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Raghav C; St Rose, Suzanne; Chisholm, Edward J; Bisase, Brian; Amen, Furrat; Nutting, Christopher M; Clarke, Peter M; Kerawala, Cyrus J; Rhys-Evans, Peter H; Harrington, Kevin J; Kazi, Rehan

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore post-treatment speech impairments using English version of Speech Handicap Index (SHI) (first speech-specific questionnaire) in a cohort of oral cavity (OC) and oropharyngeal (OP) cancer patients. Sixty-three consecutive OC and OP cancer patients in follow-up participated in this study. Descriptive analyses have been presented as percentages, while Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskall-Wallis test have been used for the quantitative variables. Statistical Package for Social Science-15 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used for the statistical analyses. Over a third (36.1%) of patients reported their speech as either average or bad. Speech intelligibility and articulation were the main speech concerns for 58.8% and 52.9% OC and 31.6% and 34.2% OP cancer patients, respectively. While feeling of incompetent and being less outgoing were the speech-related psychosocial concerns for 64.7% and 23.5% OC and 15.8% and 18.4% OP cancer patients, respectively. Worse speech outcomes were noted for oral tongue and base of tongue cancers vs. tonsillar cancers, mean (SD) values were 56.7 (31.3) and 52.0 (38.4) vs. 10.9 (14.8) (P<0.001) and late vs. early T stage cancers 65.0 (29.9) vs. 29.3 (32.7) (P<0.005). The English version of the SHI is a reliable, valid and useful tool for the evaluation of speech in HNC patients. Over one-third of OC and OP cancer patients reported speech problems in their day-do-day life. Advanced T-stage tumors affecting the oral tongue or base of tongue are particularly associated with poor speech outcomes.

  20. Intraoperative radiation therapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer: The UCSF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; Singer, Mark I.; Garcia, Joaquin; Kaplan, Michael J.; Chan, Albert S.; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To review a single-institutional experience with the use of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for recurrent head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 137 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for recurrence or persistence of locoregional cancer of the head and neck. One hundred and thirteen patients (83%) had previously received external beam radiation as a component of definitive therapy. Ninety-four patients (69%) had squamous cell histology. Final surgical margins were microscopically positive in 56 patients (41%). IORT was delivered using either a modified linear accelerator or a mobile electron unit and was administered as a single fraction to a median dose of 15 Gy (range, 10-18 Gy). Median follow-up among surviving patients was 41 months (range, 3-122 months). Results: The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year estimates of in-field control after salvage surgery and IORT were 70%, 64%, and 61%, respectively. Positive margins at the time of IORT predicted for in-field failure (p = 0.001). The 3-year rates of locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 51%, 46%, and 36%, respectively. There were no perioperative fatalities. Complications included wound infection (4 patients), orocutaneous fistula (2 patients), flap necrosis (1 patient), trismus (1 patient), and neuropathy (1 patient). Conclusions: Intraoperative RT results in effective disease control with acceptable toxicity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent or persistent cancers of the head and neck.

  1. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  2. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  3. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mena, Esther; Thippsandra, Shwetha; Yanamadala, Anusha; Redy, Siddaling; Pattanayak, Puskar; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    The concept of using tumor genomic profiling information has revolutionized personalized cancer treatment. Head and neck (HN) cancer management is being influenced by recent discoveries of activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor and related targeted therapies with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, targeted therapies for Kristen Rat Sarcoma, and MET proto-oncogenes. Molecular imaging using PET plays an important role in assessing the biologic behavior of HN cancer with the goal of delivering individualized cancer treatment. This review summarizes recent genomic discoveries in HN cancer and their implications for functional PET imaging in assessing response to targeted therapies, and drug resistance mechanisms.

  4. Evaluation of Human Papillomavirus Antibodies and Risk of Subsequent Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Johansson, Mattias; Waterboer, Tim; Kaaks, Rudolf; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Drogen, Dagmar; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J. Ramón; González, Carlos A.; Sánchez, Maria José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Travis, Ruth C.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Laurell, Göran; Hallmans, Göran; Manjer, Jonas; Ekström, Johanna; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ferrari, Pietro; Byrnes, Graham; Romieu, Isabelle; Riboli, Elio; Hildesheim, Allan; Boeing, Heiner; Pawlita, Michael; Brennan, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infection is causing an increasing number of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States and Europe. The aim of our study was to investigate whether HPV antibodies are associated with head and neck cancer risk when measured in prediagnostic sera. Methods We identified 638 participants with incident head and neck cancers (patients; 180 oral cancers, 135 oropharynx cancers, and 247 hypopharynx/larynx cancers) and 300 patients with esophageal cancers as well as 1,599 comparable controls from within the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Prediagnostic plasma samples from patients (collected, on average, 6 years before diagnosis) and control participants were analyzed for antibodies against multiple proteins of HPV16 as well as HPV6, HPV11, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, and HPV52. Odds ratios (ORs) of cancer and 95% CIs were calculated, adjusting for potential confounders. All-cause mortality was evaluated among patients using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present in prediagnostic samples for 34.8% of patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 0.6% of controls (OR, 274; 95% CI, 110 to 681) but was not associated with other cancer sites. The increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer among HPV16 E6 seropositive participants was independent of time between blood collection and diagnosis and was observed more than 10 years before diagnosis. The all-cause mortality ratio among patients with oropharyngeal cancer was 0.30 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.67), for patients who were HPV16 E6 seropositive compared with seronegative. Conclusion HPV16 E6 seropositivity was present more than 10 years before diagnosis of oropharyngeal cancers. PMID:23775966

  5. Individualized optimal surgical extent of the lateral neck in papillary thyroid cancer with lateral cervical metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Yong; Koo, Bon Seok

    2014-06-01

    Despite an excellent prognosis, cervical lymph node (LN) metastases are common in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The presence of metastasis is associated with an increased risk of locoregional recurrence, which significantly impairs quality of life and may decrease survival. Therefore, it has been an important determinant of the extent of lateral LN dissection in the initial treatment of PTC patients with lateral cervical metastasis. However, the optimal extent of therapeutic lateral neck dissection (ND) remains controversial. Optimizing the surgical extent of LN dissection is fundamental for balancing the surgical morbidity and oncological benefits of ND in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. We reviewed the currently available literature regarding the optimal extent of lateral LN dissection in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. Even in cases with suspicion of metastatic LN at the single lateral level or isolated metastatic lateral LN, the application of ND including all sublevels from IIa and IIb to Va and Vb may be overtreatment, due to the surgical morbidity. When there is no suspicion of LN metastasis at levels II and V, or when multilevel aggressive neck metastasis is not found, sublevel IIb and Va dissection may not be necessary in PTC patients with lateral neck metastasis. Thus consideration of the individualized optimal surgical extent of lateral ND is important when treating PTC patients with lateral cervical metastasis.

  6. A patient with a painless neck tumour revealed as a carotid paraganglioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Peric, Barbara; Marinsek, Ziva Pohar; Skrbinc, Breda; Music, Maja; Zagar, Ivana; Hocevar, Marko

    2014-08-20

    Carotid paragangliomas are usually slowly enlarging and painless lateral neck masses. These mostly benign lesions are recognized due to their typical location, vessel displacement and specific blood supply, features that are usually seen on different imaging modalities. Surgery for carotid paraganglioma can be associated with immediate cerebrovascular complications or delayed neurological impairment.We are reporting the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with a painless mass on the right side of his neck 11 months after being treated for testicular cancer. After a fine-needle aspiration biopsy, he was diagnosed with a testicular cancer lymph node metastasis. Neck US and fluorine [F-18]-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET-CT showed no signs of hypervascularity or vessel displacement. The patient underwent a level II to V functional neck dissection. During the procedure, suspicion of a carotid paraganglioma was raised and the tumour was carefully dissected from the walls of the carotid arteries with minimal blood loss and no cranial nerve dysfunction.The histology report revealed carotid paraganglioma with no metastasis in the rest of the lymph nodes. The patient's history of testicular germ cell tumour led to a functional neck dissection during which a previously unrecognized carotid paraganglioma was removed.Surgery for carotid PG can be associated with complications that have major impact on quality of life. A thorough assessment of the patient and neck mass must therefore be performed preoperatively in order to perform the surgical procedure under optimal conditions.

  7. A simple technique for intubating the mouth during OGD in patients with previous neck radiation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Christina E; Achakzai, Akbar Amin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Trismus and microstomia are commonly associated complications of neck irradiation. In recent years we are seeing an increase in the number of patients with various head and neck cancers being treated with radiotherapy. This can pose a significant challenge in performing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) in this cohort of patients. We describe a novel technique for intubating the mouth during OGD in patients with previous neck radiation. Instead of placing a standard mouthpiece, we place the barrel of a 5 mm syringe, which is cut in half, into the patient's mouth. This method allows easy passage of the gastroscope, where the mouth opening is limited by trismus from prior radiation. It also serves to protect the patient's teeth during OGD. Successful intubation with a gastroscope is possible in patients with severe trismus using our novel technique. PMID:24849645

  8. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis mimicking pancreatic cancer and neck metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhou, Qiang; Brigstock, David R; Yan, Su; Xiu, Ming; Piao, Rong-Li; Gao, Yan-Hang; Gao, Run-Ping

    2014-12-14

    Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner's tumour) is an uncommon disorder that has recently been confirmed as an IgG4-related disease. Here, we describe a rare case of a 53-year-old male patient who primarily presented with pancreatic body mass, left neck mass and several lumps in his lower lip mimicking pancreatic cancer (PC) and neck metastasis. The patient underwent pancreatic body mass and labial gland lumps resection as well as an ultrasound-guided biopsy of the left neck mass. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related focal type of AIP (f-AIP) and Küttner's tumour by immunohistochemistry. The patient responded well to corticosteroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at one year follow-up. The differentiation of f-AIP from PC is very important to avoid unnecessary pancreatic resection.

  9. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle as a prognostic indicator of survival in head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Władysiuk, M.S.; Mlak, R.; Morshed, K.; Surtel, W.; Brzozowska, A.; Małecka-Massalska, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phase angle could be an alternative to subjective global assessment for the assessment of nutrition status in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 75 stage iiib and iv head-and-neck patients treated at the Otolaryngology Department, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Lublin, Poland. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was performed in all patients using an analyzer that operated at 50 kHz. The phase angle was calculated as reactance divided by resistance (Xc/R) and expressed in degrees. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate survival. Results Median overall survival in the cohort was 32.0 months. At the time of analysis, 47 deaths had been recorded in the cohort (62.7%). The risk of shortened overall survival was significantly higher in patients whose phase angle was less than 4.733 degrees than in the remaining patients (19.6 months vs. 45 months, p = 0.0489; chi-square: 3.88; hazard ratio: 1.8856; 95% confidence interval: 1.0031 to 3.5446). Conclusions Phase angle might be prognostic of survival in patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer. Further investigation in a larger population is required to confirm our results. PMID:27803609

  10. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Denise; Flint, Stephen R; Healy, Claire; Stassen, Leo F A

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of 'field cancerisation'/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  11. Tadalafil augments tumor specific immunity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Califano, Joseph A; Khan, Zubair; Noonan, Kimberly A.; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hao; Goodman, Steven; Gourin, Christine G.; Ha, Patrick K.; Fakhry, Carole; Saunders, John; Levine, Marshall; Tang, Mei; Neuner, Geoffrey; Richmon, Jeremy D.; Blanco, Ray; Agrawal, Nishant; Koch, Wayne M.; Marur, Shanthi; Weed, Donald T.; Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors can augment immune function in head and neck cancer patients through inhibition of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Experimental Design We performed a randomized, prospective, double blinded, placebo controlled, phase II clinical trial to determine the in vivo effects of systemic PDE5 inhibition on immune function in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. Results Tadalafil augmented immune response, increasing ex vivo T cell expansion to a mean 2.4 fold increase compared to 1.1 fold in control patients (P= 0.01), reducing peripheral MDSC numbers to mean 0.81 fold change compared to a 1.26 fold change in control patients (P=0.001), and increasing general immunity as measured by delayed type hypersensitivity response (P=0.002). Tumor specific immunity in response to HNSCC tumor lysate was augmented in tadalafil treated patients (P=0.04). Conclusions These findings demonstrate that tadalafil augments general and tumor-specific immunity in HNSCC patients and has therapeutic potential in HNSCC. Evasion of immune surveillance and suppression of systemic and tumor specific immunity is a significant feature of head and neck cancer development. This study demonstrates that a PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, can reverse tumor specific immune suppression in head and neck cancer patients, with potential for therapeutic application. PMID:25564570

  12. Evaluation of the in vivo genotoxic effects of gamma radiation on the peripheral blood leukocytes of head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Samit B; Shyama, Soorambail K; Almeida, Valentine G

    2013-04-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on non-target cells of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) patients exposed to various cumulative doses of gamma rays during radiotherapy. The ten patients (P1-P10) were treated with cobalt 60 gamma radiation (External Beam Radiotherapy) for a period of five to six weeks with a daily fraction of 2Gy for 5 days each week. The genotoxic effects of radiation (single strand breaks - SSBs) in these patients were analyzed using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) technique, with the Olive Tail Moment (OTM) as the critical parameter. A sample of each patient's peripheral blood before starting with radiotherapy (pre-therapy) served as the control, and blood collected at weekly time intervals during the course of the radiotherapy served as treated (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60Gy) samples. In vivo radiosensitivity of these patients, as indicated by SSB's after the cumulative radiation doses at the various times, was assessed using Student's t-test. Significant DNA damage relative to the individual patient's pre-therapy baseline data was observed in all patients. Inter-individual variation of the genotoxic effects was analyzed using two-way ANOVA. The correlation between doses for the means of smoker and non-smoker patients was calculated using the Pearson test. The results of this study may indicate the need to reduce the daily radiotherapy dose further to prevent genotoxic effects on non-target cells, thus improving safety. Furthermore, these results may indicate that the estimation of DNA damage following exposure to a gamma radiation, as measured by the comet assay in whole blood leukocytes, can be used to screen human populations for radiation-induced genetic damage at the molecular level.

  13. Influence of excisional or incisional biopsy of metastatic neck nodes on the management of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.T.; Million, R.R.; Cassisi, N.J.

    1985-08-01

    Between November 1964 and December 1981, 80 patients who had undergone an open biopsy of a cervical lymph node containing squamous cell carcinoma were treated with curative intent in the University of Florida Division of Radiation Therapy. Irradiation was the initial step in the definitive treatment of all patients, followed by neck dissection and/or primary resection, as indicated. The patients were divided into two groups. (a) NX (no gross residual neck disease) (25 patients). No neck dissections were added following irradiation in this group of patients. The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in the NX group was 79%, and the rate of neck disease control was 96%. (b) Gross residual neck disease (55 patients). The absolute 5 year disease-free survival in this group of patients was 31%, and the rate of neck disease control was 64%. The more consistent addition of a neck dissection in recent years has resulted in improved neck control rates in this group. There are some differences in the rates of neck control, control above the clavicles, survival, distant metastasis, and complications between this series and other reported series in which open neck-node biopsy preceded definitive treatment. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed.

  14. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  15. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2017;123:1259-1271. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  16. Histone modifications: Targeting head and neck cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Le, John M; Squarize, Cristiane H; Castilho, Rogerio M

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and is responsible for a quarter of a million deaths annually. The survival rate for HNSCC patients is poor, showing only minor improvement in the last three decades. Despite new surgical techniques and chemotherapy protocols, tumor resistance to chemotherapy remains a significant challenge for HNSCC patients. Numerous mechanisms underlie chemoresistance, including genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer cells that may be acquired during treatment and activation of mitogenic signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer-of activated B cell, that cause reduced apoptosis. In addition to dysfunctional molecular signaling, emerging evidence reveals involvement of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in tumor development and in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These observations have sparked interest in understanding the mechanisms involved in the control of CSC function and fate. Post-translational modifications of histones dynamically influence gene expression independent of alterations to the DNA sequence. Recent findings from our group have shown that pharmacological induction of post-translational modifications of tumor histones dynamically modulates CSC plasticity. These findings suggest that a better understanding of the biology of CSCs in response to epigenetic switches and pharmacological inhibitors of histone function may directly translate to the development of a mechanism-based strategy to disrupt CSCs. In this review, we present and discuss current knowledge on epigenetic modifications of HNSCC and CSC response to DNA methylation and histone modifications. In addition, we discuss chromatin modifications and their role in tumor resistance to therapy. PMID:25426249

  17. Reactions to cancer: communicating with patients, family and carers.

    PubMed

    Newton, J Tim

    2010-06-01

    Effective communication has benefits for both patients and members of the health care team. Five main communication tasks in head and neck cancer are identified: Screening for head and neck cancer and communicating risk; Communicating the diagnosis of head and neck cancer; Providing information about treatment and pre-treatment; Communicating following treatment and dealing with fear of recurrence; Discussing the end of life. For each specific aspects of the communication situation are discussed. Underpinning each is the use of core communication skills.

  18. Clinical-dosimetric analysis of measures of dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube dependence among head and neck cancer patients treated definitively by intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between dose to various anatomical structures and dysphagia among patients with head and neck cancer treated by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and materials Thirty-nine patients with squamous cancer of the head and neck were treated by definitive concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 68 to 72). In each patient, a gastrostomy tube (GT) was prophylacticly placed prior to starting treatment. Prolonged GT dependence was defined as exceeding the median GT duration of 192 days. Dysphagia was scored using standardized quality-of-life instruments. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data incorporating the superior/middle pharyngeal constrictors (SMPC), inferior pharyngeal constrictor (IPC), cricoid pharyngeal inlet (CPI), and cervical esophagus (CE) were analyzed in relation to prolonged GT dependence, dysphagia, and weight loss. Results At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, 87% and 44% of patients, respectively, were GT dependent. Spearman's ρ analysis identified statistical correlations (p < 0.05) between prolonged GT dependence or high grade dysphagia with IPC V65, IPC V60, IPC Dmean, and CPI Dmax. Logistic regression model showed that IPC V65 > 30%, IPC V60 > 60%, IPC Dmean > 60 Gy, and CPI Dmax > 62 Gy predicted for greater than 50% probability of prolonged GT dependence. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that adhering to the following parameters may decrease the risk of prolonged GT dependence and dysphagia: IPC V65 < 15%, IPC V60 < 40%, IPC Dmean < 55 Gy, and CPI Dmax < 60 Gy. PMID:19909531

  19. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was <50 Gy in all nine patients in the control group. The onset of this syndrome was 5 months, 6 months and 15 months. The early-onset DHS may have something to do with dose to the neck extensor muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy).

  20. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  1. Targeting the c-Met/FZD8 signaling axis eliminates patient-derived cancer stem-like cells in head and neck squamous carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuyang; Liu, Suling; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Henghua; Hu, Yongjie; Zhou, Xianghui; Shi, Chaoji; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-12-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) thought to contribute to head and neck squamous carcinomas (HNSCC) may offer attractive therapeutic targets if a tractable approach can be developed. In this study, we report that silencing c-Met is sufficient to suppress sphere formation, tumor initiation, and metastatic properties of HN-CSC. Pharmacologic inhibition of c-Met with the selective inhibitor PF-2341066 preferentially targeted CSC and synergized with conventional chemotherapy to improve efficacy in a mouse xenograft model of HNSCC, impeding tumor growth and reducing metastasis. Mechanistic investigations showed that CSC elimination was due to downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HN-CSC and that the Wnt pathway receptor FZD8 was essential for interactions of c-Met and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HN-CSC. Notably, ectopic expression of FZD8 rescued the impaired phenotype of HN-CSC where c-Met was inhibited. Furthermore, c-Met upregulated FZD8 through the ERK/c-Fos cascade in HN-CSC. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for targeting the c-Met/FZD8 signaling axis as a CSC-directed therapy to improve HNSCC treatment.

  2. Radiotherapy With or Without Erythropoietin for Anemic Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: A Randomized Trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 99-03)

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell Pajak, Thomas F.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Shenouda, George; Hershock, Diane; Stripp, Diana C.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Schulsinger, Alan

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the addition of recombinant human erythropoietin (Epo) could improve the outcomes of anemic patients receiving definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had SCCHN, with a plan for continuous-course definitive radiotherapy (66-72 Gy) with or without chemotherapy. Patients with Stage III or IV SCCHN were required to undergo concurrent chemoradiotherapy and/or accelerated fractionation radiotherapy. Preradiotherapy hemoglobin was required to be between 9.0 g/dL and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for women). Patients randomized to Epo received 40,000 U once weekly, starting 7-10 days before start of radiotherapy. Results: A total of 148 patients were enrolled; 141 were evaluable. Median pretreatment hemoglobin was 12.1 g/dL. Hemoglobin levels at 4 weeks rose by an average of 1.66 g/dL in the Epo arm, compared with an average 0.24 g/dL decrease in the control arm (p = 0.0001). Median follow-up was 2.5 years (3.1 years for surviving patients). There was no statistically significant difference in the primary endpoint of local-regional failure (LRF) rate between the treatment arms. The 3-year LRF rate was 36% for control and 44% for Epo (p = 0.56). There were also no significant differences in local-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS), patterns of failure, overall survival, or toxicity. The 3-year LRPFS rate was 52% for control and 47% for Epo. The overall survival rate was 57% and 56%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of Epo to definitive radiotherapy for SCCHN did not improve outcomes. The study was not specifically designed to detect a potential negative association between Epo and tumor progression/survival.

  3. Patterns of failure in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer treated postoperatively with irradiation or concomitant irradiation with Mitomycin C and Bleomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Zakotnik, Branko . E-mail: bzakotnik@onko-i.si; Budihna, Marjan; Smid, Lojze; Soba, Erika; Strojan, Primoz; Fajdiga, Igor; Zargi, Miha; Oblak, Irena; Lesnicar, Hotimir

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The long term results and patterns of failure in patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma (SCHNC) treated in a prospective randomized trial in which concomitant postoperative radiochemotherapy with Mitomycin C and Bleomycin (CRT) was compared with radiotherapy only (RT), were analyzed. Patients and Methods: Between March 1997 and December 2001, 114 eligible patients with Stage III or IV SCHNC were randomized. Primary surgical treatment was performed with curative intent in all patients. Patients in both groups were postoperatively irradiated to the total dose of 56-70 Gy. Chemotherapy included Mitomycin C 15 mg/m{sup 2} after 10 Gy and 5 mg of Bleomycin twice weekly during irradiation. Median follow-up was 76 months (48-103 months). Results: At 5 years in the RT and CRT arms, the locoregional control was 65% and 88% (p = 0.026), disease-free survival 33% and 53% (p = 0.035), and overall survival 37% and 55% (p = 0.091) respectively. Patients who benefited from chemotherapy were those with high-risk factors. The probability of distant metastases was 22% in RT and 20% in CRT arm (p = 0.913), of grade III or higher late toxicity 19% in RT and 26% in CRT arm (p = 0.52) and of thyroid dysfunction 36% in RT and 56% in CRT arm (p = 0.24). The probability to develop a second primary malignancy (SPM) was 34% in the RT and 8% in the CRT arm (p = 0.023). One third of deaths were due to infection, but there was no difference between the 2 groups. Conclusion: With concomitant radiochemotherapy, locoregional control and disease free survival were significantly improved. Second primary malignancies in the CRT arm compared to RT arm were significantly less frequent. The high probability of post treatment hypothyroidism in both arms warrants regular laboratory evaluation.

  4. Impact of Salivary Gland Dosimetry on Post-IMRT Recovery of Saliva Output and Xerostomia Grade for Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With or Without Contralateral Submandibular Gland Sparing: A Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhonghe; Yan Chao; Zhang Zhiyuan; Zhang Chenping; Hu Haisheng; Tu Wenyong; Kirwan, Jessica; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To observe the recovery of saliva output and effect on xerostomia grade after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without contralateral submandibular gland (cSMG) sparing and to assess the impact of salivary gland dosimetry on this recovery among patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and May 2008, 52 patients with head-and-neck cancer received definitive (n = 5 patients) and postoperative (n = 47 patients) IMRT at our institution, with at least one parotid gland spared. Of these patients, 26 patients with a low risk of recurrence in the cSMG region underwent IMRT and had their cSMGs spared (cSMG-sparing group). The remaining 26 high-risk patients had no cSMGs spared (cSMG-unspared group). Xerostomia grades and salivary flow rates were monitored at five time points (before IMRT and at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months after IMRT). Results: Average mean doses and mean volumes receiving 30 Gy (V30) of the cSMGs were lower in the cSMG-sparing group than in the cSMG-unspared group (mean dose, 20.4 Gy vs. 57.4 Gy; mean V30, 14.7% vs. 99.8%, respectively). Xerostomia grades at 2 and 6 months post-IMRT were also significantly lower among patients in the cSMG-sparing group than in the cSMG-unspared group, but differences were not significant at 12 and 18 months after IMRT. Patients in the cSMG-sparing group had significantly better mean unstimulated salivary flow rates at each time point post- IMRT as well as better mean stimulated salivary flow rates at 2 months post-IMRT. Conclusions: Recovery of saliva output and grade of xerostomia post-IMRT in patients whose cSMGs were spared were much better than in patients whose cSMGs were not spared. The influence of the mean doses to the cSMG and parotid gland on the recovery of saliva output was equivalent to that of the mean V30 to the glands.

  5. SU-E-J-12: An Image-Guided Soft Robotic Patient Positioning System for Maskless Head-And-Neck Cancer Radiotherapy: A Proof-Of-Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunmolu, O; Gans, N; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a surface-image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system for maskless head-and-neck radiotherapy. The ultimate goal of this project is to utilize a soft robot to realize non-rigid patient positioning and real-time motion compensation. In this proof-of-concept study, we design a position-based visual servoing control system for an air-bladder-based soft robot and investigate its performance in controlling the flexion/extension cranial motion on a mannequin head phantom. Methods: The current system consists of Microsoft Kinect depth camera, an inflatable air bladder (IAB), pressured air source, pneumatic valve actuators, custom-built current regulators, and a National Instruments myRIO microcontroller. The performance of the designed system was evaluated on a mannequin head, with a ball joint fixed below its neck to simulate torso-induced head motion along flexion/extension direction. The IAB is placed beneath the mannequin head. The Kinect camera captures images of the mannequin head, extracts the face, and measures the position of the head relative to the camera. This distance is sent to the myRIO, which runs control algorithms and sends actuation commands to the valves, inflating and deflating the IAB to induce head motion. Results: For a step input, i.e. regulation of the head to a constant displacement, the maximum error was a 6% overshoot, which the system then reduces to 0% steady-state error. In this initial investigation, the settling time to reach the regulated position was approximately 8 seconds, with 2 seconds of delay between the command start of motion due to capacitance of the pneumatics, for a total of 10 seconds to regulate the error. Conclusion: The surface image-guided soft robotic patient positioning system can achieve accurate mannequin head flexion/extension motion. Given this promising initial Result, the extension of the current one-dimensional soft robot control to multiple IABs for non-rigid positioning control

  6. Chlorinated pesticides and cancer of the head and neck: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Govett, Gregg; Genuis, Stephen John; Govett, Hannah E; Beesoon, Sanjay

    2011-07-01

    Cancer of the head and neck is a pervasive problem with recognized determinants including tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and earlier radiation exposure. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) have been shown to have carcinogenic potential in both animals and humans. OCPs have previously been widely used in the agricultural industry of rural Oklahoma. Seven patients from rural Oklahoma with head and neck cancer and without any of the usual risk factors were tested for the presence of OCPs in their adipose tissue. Clinical and toxicological data on each of these patients are presented for consideration. Results were compared with (i) levels from five individuals not experiencing cancer but who lived in the same area, and (ii) adipose tissue OCP levels in other population groups. Each of the seven patients tested had markedly elevated levels of some OCPs in their adipose tissue compared with the cohort of noncancer patients. Further research is required to confirm whether there is a causative link between OCP bioaccumulation and head and neck cancer as suggested by this case series.

  7. Photodynamic therapy and fluorescent diagnostics of head and neck cancer with second-generation photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulovskaya, Elena G.

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) and fluorescent diagnostics (FD) using Photosense was provided in 50 patients with head and neck cancer T1-3 stage, in 89 patients with skin cancer, using Radaclorine (RC) in 42 patients with T1-4 stage basal cell carcinoma (BCC),in 6 patients with oral cancer. Detection of borders of tumor, intensity of accumulation of photosensitizers in tumor, normal tissues were done by Spectral-fluorescent Complex. We"ve got fluorescence o fa 11 tumors and additional fluorescence zones were found with cytological verification. We used semiconductive lasers: Milon - h = 660+2nm, light dose 200 - 300 J/cm2 and Biospec (h=672+2nm), multiple laser surface and interstitial irradiation with total 1 ight d ose till 4 00-600 Ji cm2. A fter P DT with P S in head and neck cancer we"ve had complete response (CR) in 66.0% and partial response (PR) in 30.0%, with RC CR in BCC T1- 2NOMO - 92.9%, in recurrrencies CR - 60,6%, PR - 39,4%. The efficacy of PDT with PS was higher (CR - 86.7%, PR - 13,3%) and the recurrence rate in 6 months lower. Our experience show pronounced efficacy of PDT for head and neck tumors of different localization and histology, FD is providing diagnostically significant information, demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity.

  8. SU-C-BRA-02: Gradient Based Method of Target Delineation On PET/MR Image of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dance, M; Chera, B; Falchook, A; Das, S; Lian, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Validate the consistency of a gradient-based segmentation tool to facilitate accurate delineation of PET/CT-based GTVs in head and neck cancers by comparing against hybrid PET/MR-derived GTV contours. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 head and neck target volumes (10 primary and 8 nodal) were retrospectively contoured using a gradient-based segmentation tool by two observers. Each observer independently contoured each target five times. Inter-observer variability was evaluated via absolute percent differences. Intra-observer variability was examined by percentage uncertainty. All target volumes were also contoured using the SUV percent threshold method. The thresholds were explored case by case so its derived volume matched with the gradient-based volume. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) were calculated to determine overlap of PET/CT GTVs and PET/MR GTVs. Results: The Levene’s test showed there was no statistically significant difference of the variances between the observer’s gradient-derived contours. However, the absolute difference between the observer’s volumes was 10.83%, with a range from 0.39% up to 42.89%. PET-avid regions with qualitatively non-uniform shapes and intensity levels had a higher absolute percent difference near 25%, while regions with uniform shapes and intensity levels had an absolute percent difference of 2% between observers. The average percentage uncertainty between observers was 4.83% and 7%. As the volume of the gradient-derived contours increased, the SUV threshold percent needed to match the volume decreased. Dice coefficients showed good agreement of the PET/CT and PET/MR GTVs with an average DSC value across all volumes at 0.69. Conclusion: Gradient-based segmentation of PET volume showed good consistency in general but can vary considerably for non-uniform target shapes and intensity levels. PET/CT-derived GTV contours stemming from the gradient-based tool show good agreement with the anatomically and

  9. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Kian Ang, K.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  10. Risk Factors of Ototoxicity After Cisplatin-Based Chemo-Irradiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Multivariate Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zuur, Charlotte L. . E-mail: cl.zuur@vumc.nl; Simis, Yvonne J.; Lansdaal, Pauline E.; Hart, Augustinus A.; Rasch, Coen R.; Schornagel, Jan H.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Balm, Alfons J.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Cisplatin chemo-irradiation is increasingly used in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The objective of this study is to determine risk factors of ototoxicity due to intra-arterial high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospective analysis of hearing thresholds at low and (ultra) high frequencies obtained before, during, and after treatment in 146 patients. Treatment consisted of intra-arterial infusion of high-dose cisplatin (150 mg/m{sup 2}, four courses) with sodium thiosulfate rescue and concurrent radiation therapy (70 Gy). Patient and chemoradiation variables were studied in a multivariate analysis. Results: After treatment, 23% of the ears were under consideration for hearing aids because of therapy. Twenty-two percent of the patients developed an increase in air-bone gap >10 dB during or after therapy. In the multivariate explanatory analysis, cumulative dose of cisplatin and radiation therapy, and young age displayed a causal relationship with increased sensorineural hearing loss during and after therapy (p < 0.001). In the multivariate prediction analysis, pretreatment hearing level of the concerning ear was identified as an independent predictive factor for hearing capability after therapy (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Both cisplatin and radiation therapy were proven to induce sensorineural hearing loss, in this study with short-term follow-up. Of all patient and treatment variables studied, the patients pretreatment hearing level appeared to be the main predictive factor for hearing capability after high-dose intra-arterial cisplatin chemoradiation.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary: Toxicity and Preliminary Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, Michelle L. Mechalakos, James G.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Pfister, David G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Unknown primary head and neck cancers often require comprehensive mucosal and bilateral neck irradiation. With conventional techniques, significant toxicity can develop. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to minimize the toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 21 patients underwent IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer at our center. Of the 21 patients, 5 received IMRT with definitive intent and 16 as postoperative therapy; 14 received concurrent chemotherapy and 7 IMRT alone. The target volumes included the bilateral neck and mucosal surface. The median dose was 66 Gy. Acute and chronic toxicities, esophageal strictures, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence were evaluated. Progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, the 2-year regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 90%, and 85%, respectively. Acute grade 1 and 2 xerostomia was seen in 57% and 43% of patients, respectively. Salivary function improved with time. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement was required in 72% with combined modality treatment and 43% with IMRT alone. Only 1 patient required percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy support at the last follow-up visit. Two patients treated with combined modality and one treated with IMRT alone developed esophageal strictures, but all had improvement or resolution with dilation. Conclusion: The preliminary analysis of IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer has shown acceptable toxicity and encouraging efficacy. The analysis of the dosimetric variables showed excellent tumor coverage and acceptable doses to critical normal structures. Esophageal strictures developed but were effectively treated with dilation. Techniques to limit the esophageal dose

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Sujith; Kabarriti, Rafi; Ohri, Nitin; Haynes-Lewis, Hilda; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K

    2017-03-01

    The management of patients with recurrent head and neck cancers remains a challenging clinical dilemma. Concerns over toxicity with re-irradiation have limited its use in the clinical setting. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged as a highly conformal and precise type of radiotherapy and has the advantage of sparing normal tissue. Although SBRT is an attractive treatment modality, its use in the clinic is limited, given the technically challenging nature of the procedure. In this review, we attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancers, with particular attention to the advent of SBRT and its use with systemic therapies such as cetuximab. In the second portion of this review, we present our systematic review of published experiences with SBRT in recurrent head and neck cancers in an attempt to provide data on response rates (RR), overall survival and toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 595-601, 2017.

  13. Relation between acute and late irradiation impairment of four basic tastes and irradiated tongue volume in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi . E-mail: yamachan07291973@yahoo.co.jp; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Nakamura, Naoki; Abe, Keiko; Asakage, Takahiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Okada, Shinji; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Hosoi, Yoshio; Sasano, Nakashi; Yamakawa, Sen; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Taste loss is a major cause of morbidity in patients undergoing head-and-neck irradiation. The relationship between the time course and the degree of taste disorder was studied in both acute and late phases. Methods and Materials: Taste ability was measured by the taste threshold for the four basic tastes using a filter paper disc method in patients before, during, and after radiotherapy. The subjects were divided into two groups. In Group A, Radiation fields included most of the tongue (n = 100), and in Group B Radiation fields did not include the tip of the tongue (n = 18). Results: In Group A, there was a significant impairment of the threshold of all four basic tastes at 3 weeks after starting radiotherapy (RT), and this impairment remained at 8 weeks (p < 0.05). This was not seen in Group B. In Group A, there was no significant difference in the patterns of taste sensitivity change between the high-dose (>20 Gy) and low-dose ({<=}20 Gy) groups. In the late phase, recovery of taste loss was seen in both groups since 4 months after completing RT. Conclusions: Unless the anterior part of the tongue was irradiated, taste loss was not observed during RT. When the anterior part of the tongue was irradiated, a difference by radiation dose was not observed in the taste loss pattern. Additionally, radiation-induced taste dysfunction appears to be a temporal effect.

  14. Soothing and balmy, cure without disfigurement: Benjamin Bye, false promises, and head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jennifer; Shuman, Andrew G

    2015-04-01

    One century ago, patients dreaded a diagnosis of head and neck cancer, fearing not only the progression of the disease but also the prospect of surgery. A cadre of charlatans preyed upon these fears to make a profit. We unearth the tale of Benjamin Bye, an Indianapolis doctor peddling the Combination Oil Cure. His collection of creams applied to the face offered unsuspecting patients a painless cure of their head and neck cancer. Bye eventually came under the fire of muckrakers as well as the federal government. Not long thereafter, Bye's practice was declared fraudulent, and the US Postmaster General refused to send his products. Bye's story recalls a time in which curative options were few and fear of malignancy was pervasive. Today, as our treatment armamentarium grows, we are reminded to critically assess efficacy, honestly discuss options with patients, and ensure that charlatanism remains a shadow of the past.

  15. Induction Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Past, Present, Future?

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Glenn J.; Haddad, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck is still evolving. Induction chemotherapy (IC) is widely used in this patient population and it is unclear how to best incorporate IC into multimodality treatment. Recently, the results of two randomized clinical trials were presented (the PARADIGM and Docetaxel Based Chemotherapy Plus or Minus Induction Chemotherapy to Decrease Events in Head and Neck Cancer trials), which showed no demonstrable benefit of IC followed by concurrent chemoradiation over concurrent chemoradiotherapy alone. However, a lower rate of distant metastatic disease was noted, suggesting that patients who are at high risk for metastatic disease may benefit from IC. This review summarizes how IC has evolved over the years, provides an update of recent developments, and discusses how IC may develop in the future. PMID:23442306

  16. The history of sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer: From visualization of lymphatic vessels to sentinel nodes.

    PubMed

    de Bree, Remco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the history of sentinel node biopsy in head and neck cancer. Sentinel node biopsy is a minimally invasive technique to select patients for treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Although this procedure has only recently been accepted for early oral cancer, the first studies on visualization of the cervical lymphatic vessels were reported in the 1960s. In the 1980s mapping of lymphatic drainage from specific head and neck sites was introduced. Sentinel node biopsy was further developed in the 1990s and after validation in this century the procedure is routinely performed in early oral cancer in several head and neck centers. New techniques may improve the accuracy of sentinel node biopsy further, particularly in difficult subsites like the floor of mouth.

  17. Current relevance of hypoxia in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius G.; Ernst, Jutta; El-Kochairi, Ilhem; Dahlem, Yuliya; Ikenberg, Kristian; Schumann, Desiree M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and Neck cancer (HNC) is a complex mix of cancers and one of the more common cancers with a relatively poor prognosis. One of the factors that may assist us in predicting survival and allow us to adjust our treatment strategies is the presence of tumor hypoxia. In this overview we aim to evaluate the current evidence and potential clinical relevance of tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancer according to an extensive search of current literature. An abundance of evidence and often contradictory evidence is found in the literature. Even the contradictory evidence and comparisons are difficult to judge as criteria and methodologies differ greatly, furthermore few prospective observational studies exist for verification of the pre-clinical studies. Despite these discrepancies there is clear evidence of associations between prognosis and poor tumor oxygenation biomarkers such as HIF-1α, GLUT-1 and lactate, though these associations are not exclusive. The use of genetic markers is expanding and will probably lead to significantly more and complex evidence. The lack of oxygenation in head and neck tumors is of paramount importance for the prediction of treatment outcomes and prognosis. Despite the wide array of conflicting evidence, the drive towards non-invasive prediction of tumor hypoxia should continue. PMID:27434126

  18. A Retrospective Evaluation of Clinical Profile of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Nupur; Kumar, J Vijaya; Khurana, Anil; Chauhan, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Incidence of Second Primary Malignancy (SPM) after successful treatment of primary is increasing and may cause the problem for optimal treatment. Aim This study was conducted retrospectively to analyse incidence, disease free survival between malignancies, pattern of treatment and outcome. Materials and Methods Sixteen out of 22 patients of previously treated cases of head and neck cancer those develop SPM of head and neck region managed over a period of January 2012 to December 2015 in Department of Radiotherapy–II, Pt. BD Sharma PGIMS, Rohtak were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen patients with unresectable disease were given reirradiation with external beam radiotherapy. Results Median age of presentation of first malignancy was 27 years (Ranged 26 -65 years), whereas median age was 60 years for second malignancy (range 45-71 years). All patients were smokers during first malignancy; 87.5% (14/16) had historyof smoking during second malignancy. Oropharynx (50%) was most common site of presentation of primary tumor whereas oral cavity was most common site of presentation in second primary tumor. Conclusion Incidence of Second primary head and neck tumor after successful treatment for primary Head and neck cancer are increasing due to newer treatment strategies, longer survival and follow up. Reirradiation, surgery and or chemotherapy are treatment modalities. However second primary tumor of this region are associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27891442

  19. A Comparison of Dose-Response Models for the Parotid Gland in a Large Group of Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Houweling, Antonetta C.; Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Dijkema, Tim; Roesink, Judith M.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The dose-response relationship of the parotid gland has been described most frequently using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. However, various other normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models exist. We evaluated in a large group of patients the value of six NTCP models that describe the parotid gland dose response 1 year after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 patients with head-and-neck tumors were included in this prospective parotid gland dose-response study. The patients were treated with either conventional radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Dose-volume histograms for the parotid glands were derived from three-dimensional dose calculations using computed tomography scans. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before and 1 year after radiotherapy. A threshold of 25% of the pretreatment flow rate was used to define a complication. The evaluated models included the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, the mean dose model, the relative seriality model, the critical volume model, the parallel functional subunit model, and the dose-threshold model. The goodness of fit (GOF) was determined by the deviance and a Monte Carlo hypothesis test. Ranking of the models was based on Akaike's information criterion (AIC). Results: None of the models was rejected based on the evaluation of the GOF. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model based on the AIC. The TD{sub 50} in these models was approximately 39 Gy. Conclusions: The mean dose model was preferred for describing the dose-response relationship of the parotid gland.

  20. Isolation and characterization of cancer stem cells from primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong S.; Pearson, Alexander T.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance remains a significant problem in the treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Recent reports showed that a sub-population of highly tumorigenic cells (cancer stem cells) is uniquely resistant to chemotherapy, and suggesting that these cells play an important role in the relapse of HNSCC. The development of methods for the isolation and culture of cancer stem cells is a key step to enable studies exploring the mechanisms underlying the role of these cells in chemoresistance. Here, we describe a method to isolate cancer stem cells from primary head and neck tumors and for the generation of orospheres, i.e. the culture of these cells in suspension in ultra-low attachment plates. PMID:26910078

  1. L-glutamine decreases the severity of mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Takae; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Wasa, Masafumi; Takenaka, Yukinori; Nakahara, Susumu; Takagi, Tastuya; Tsugane, Mamiko; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Inohara, Hidenori; Uejima, Etsuko; Ito, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe mucositis in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx is high among patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) receiving chemoradiotherapy (CRT), resulting in significant pain and impairment of quality of life. The present study investigated whether L-glutamine (glutamine) decreases the severity of mucositis in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx induced by CRT. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 40 untreated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. Patients received 66 or 70 Gy of total radiation at the rate of 2 Gy/fraction daily and 5 fractions/week. Cisplatin (20 mg/m2) and docetaxel (10 mg/m2) were intravenously co-administered once a week for 6 weeks. Patients were randomized to orally receive either glutamine (group G) or placebo (group P) at a dose of 10 g 3 times a day throughout the CRT course. Mucositis was assessed using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The primary end point was mucositis severity. Mucositis developed in all patients. A maximal mucositis grade of G4 was observed in 0 and 25% group G and P patients, respectively, while that of G2 was observed in 10 and 0% group G and P patients, respectively (p=0.023). Glutamine significantly decreased the maximal mucositis grade (group G, 2.9±0.3; group P, 3.3±0.4; p=0.005) and pain score at weeks 4, 5 and 6. Glutamine significantly decreased mucositis severity in the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx induced by CRT in patients with HNC.

  2. Surgical correction of bladder neck contracture following prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Simon; Andrich, Daniela E; Mundy, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The surgical and non-surgical treatment of localised prostate cancer may be complicated by bladder neck contractures, prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures. In general, such complications following radical prostatectomy are less extensive, easier to treat and associated with a better outcome and more rapid recovery than the same complications following radiotherapy, high-intensity focussed ultrasound and cryotherapy. Treatment options range from minimally invasive endoscopic procedures to more complex and specialised open surgical reconstruction.In this chapter the surgical management of bladder neck contractures following the treatment of prostate cancer is described together with the management of prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures, given the difficulty in distinguishing them from one another clinically.

  3. Evaluation of the benefit and use of multidisciplinary teams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Lisa; Keilholz, Ulrich; Tahara, Makoto; Lin, Jin-Ching; Chomette, Pauline; Ceruse, Philippe; Harrington, Kevin; Mesia, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Given the complexities of multimodality treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, the rationale for the use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) to define individual optimal treatment strategies on a per-patient basis is apparent. Increased use of guideline-directed approaches, reduced time to treatment and improved outcomes, which result from use of an MDT approach in head and neck cancer, have been documented. A discussion of these recent advances, as well as presentation of available country-specific guidance on the roles and responsibilities of team members, supports the creation of similar local-language recommendations for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. Finally, expert practical advice on the implementation of MDTs may enable the establishment of the MDT approach more universally around the world.

  4. Cigarette Smoking Prior to First Cancer and Risk of Second Smoking-Associated Cancers Among Survivors of Bladder, Kidney, Head and Neck, and Stage I Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Gibson, Todd; Sampson, Joshua; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Beane Freeman, Laura; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Caporaso, Neil; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Elena, Joanne; Freedman, Neal D.; Robien, Kim; Black, Amanda; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on smoking and second cancer risk among cancer survivors are limited. We assessed associations between smoking before first cancer diagnosis and risk of second primary smoking-associated cancers among survivors of lung (stage I), bladder, kidney, and head/neck cancers. Methods Data were pooled from 2,552 patients with stage I lung cancer, 6,386 with bladder cancer, 3,179 with kidney cancer, and 2,967 with head/neck cancer from five cohort studies. We assessed the association between prediagnostic smoking and second smoking-associated cancer risk with proportional hazards regression, and compared these estimates to those for first smoking-associated cancers in all cohort participants. Results Compared with never smoking, current smoking of ≥ 20 cigarettes per day was associated with increased second smoking-associated cancer risk among survivors of stage I lung (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.26; 95% CI, 0.92 to 11.6), bladder (HR = 3.67; 95% CI, 2.25 to 5.99), head/neck (HR = 4.45; 95% CI, 2.56 to 7.73), and kidney cancers (HR = 5.33; 95% CI, 2.55 to 11.1). These estimates were similar to those for first smoking-associated cancer among all cohort participants (HR = 5.41; 95% CI, 5.23 to 5.61). The 5-year cumulative incidence of second smoking-associated cancers ranged from 3% to 8% in this group of cancer survivors. Conclusion Understanding risk factors for second cancers among cancer survivors is crucial. Our data indicate that cigarette smoking before first cancer diagnosis increases second cancer risk among cancer survivors, and elevated cancer risk in these survivors is likely due to increased smoking prevalence. The high 5-year cumulative risks of smoking-associated cancers among current smoking survivors of stage I lung, bladder, kidney, and head/neck cancers highlight the importance of smoking cessation in patients with cancer. PMID:25385740

  5. Potential biomarkers for radiosensitivity in head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Reoyo, Sherly; Roig-Lopez, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer. However, the morbidity of treatment remains a clinical challenge. Molecular profiling has provided further insight into tumor biology and tumor sensitivity to radiation, and this information could be used to personalize treatment. In this review, we discuss published signatures of radiosensitivity and discuss the pathways that may be important in dictating radiation sensitivity. Applications of these signatures could result in less morbidity if dose de-escalation efforts are successful. PMID:28149885

  6. [Clinical and paraclinical follow-up after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Clément-Colmou, K; Troussier, I; Bardet, É; Lapeyre, M

    2015-10-01

    Head and neck cancer management often involves heavy multimodal treatments including radiotherapy. Despite the improvement of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, acute and late toxicities remain important. After such treatment, patients have to face different potential problems, depending on the post-therapeutic delay. In this way, short-term follow-up permits to appreciate the healing of acute toxicities and response to treatment. Long-term follow-up aims to recognize second primitive tumours and distant failure, and to detect and manage late toxicities. Medical and psychosocial supportive cares are essential, even after several years of complete remission. The objective of this article is to review the modalities of short-term and long-term follow-up of patients who receive a radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

  7. Dental care during and after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Singh, Nimisha

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a major health problem. Oral cancer is increasing in Indian subcontinent mainly due to lack of hygiene, tobacco use, chewing tobacco, smoking, and many other factors. Radiation therapy is the most common form of treatment along with surgery and chemotherapy. There are 2 types of complication that occurs during and after radiotherapy, that occur because of effects on normal tissue. Radiotherapy-induced effects occur on the oral mucosa salivary glands, bone, teeth, and musculature of face and neck. These complications needs special attention for their prevention and treatment, Preradiotherapy evaluation and disease stabilization are necessary in every patient, counseling of patients before during and after radiotherapy is important to help them become aware of several oral complications and their prevention. PMID:25937720

  8. Autoantibody Approach for Serum-Based Detection of Head and Neck Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our long term goal is to improve survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) through early detection using simple noninvasive serum assays in an ELISA-like platform. The objective of this proposal is to improve and confirm the validity of a diagnostic serum assay based on a panel of cancer-specific biomarkers for early cancer detection in patients with HNSCC. Our central hypothesis is that the detection of antibody responses to HNSCC-specific antigens, using a panel of biomarkers, can provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity suitable for clinical testing in the primary setting to screen and diagnose HNSCC in high risk populations to improve early detection.

  9. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederholt, Peggy A. Connor, Nadine P.; Hartig, Gregory K.; Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

  10. Capacitance of Membrane As a Prognostic Indicator of Survival in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Mlak, Radosław; Smoleń, Agata; Brzozowska, Anna; Surtel, Wojciech; Morshed, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluation of prognostic value of capacitance of membrane (Cm), parameter measured by bioelectrical impedance (BIA) as an alternative to known clinical factors in patients with Head and Neck Cancer (HNC). Methods A cohort of 75 stage IIIB and IV HNC patients treated in Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Lublin, Poland were prospectively evaluated. Cm measurements were performed in all patients using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer that was set on a frequency of 50 kHz. Results of Cm measurements were presented in nF. Survival differences were estimated using Kaplan–Meier method. Results Significantly higher Cm median was noted in well-nourished(n = 45) compared to malnourished (n = 30) patients (1.41 vs 1.01 respectively; p = 0.0009). Established in ROC curves analysis cut-off value (0.743) was characterized by 98% specificity and 37% sensitivity in the detection of malnutrition. Median overall survival (mOS) in the cohort was 32months. At the time of analysis deaths were recorded in 47 cases (62.7%). In patients who had Cm below the level of 0.743 risk of OS shortening was significantly higher than in other patients (12.1 and 43.4 months respectively; HR = 8.47, 95%CI: 2.91–24.66; χ2 = 15.38, p = 0.0001). Conclusion Cm is a strong, independent prognostic factor in head and neck cancer. PMID:27802349

  11. Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Hajiioannou, Jiannis; Tolia, Maria; Kouloulias, Vassilios; Lachanas, Vasileios; Skoulakis, Charalambos; Skarlatos, Ioannis; Rapidis, Alexandros; Bizakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multimodality therapy constitutes the standard treatment of advanced and recurrent head and neck cancer. Since locoregional recurrence comprises a major obstacle in attaining cure, the role of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) as an add-on in improving survival and local control of the disease has been investigated. IORT allows delivery of a single tumoricidal dose of radiation to areas of potential residual microscopic disease while minimizing doses to normal tissues. Advantages of IORT include the conformal delivery of a large dose of radiation in an exposed and precisely defined tumor bed, minimizing the risk of a geographic miss creating the potential for subsequent dose reduction of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). This strategy allows for shortening overall treatment time and dose escalation. The aim of this review is to summarize recent published work on the use of IORT as an adjuvant modality to treat common head and neck cancer in the primary or recurrent setting. Methods: We searched the Medline, Scopus, Ovid, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases for articles published from 1980 up to March 2016. Results: Based on relevant publications it appears that including IORT in the multimodal treatment may contribute to improved local control. However, the benefit in overall survival is not so clear. Conclusion: IORT seems to be a safe, promising adjunct in the management of head and neck cancer and yet further well organized clinical trials are required to determine its role more precisely. PMID:27977569

  12. Genome-wide association study suggests common variants within RP11-634B7.4 gene influencing severe pre-treatment pain in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C.; Wang, Jian; Silvas, Mary Rose T.; Yu, Robert K.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Shete, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pain is often one of the first signs of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Pain at diagnosis is an important prognostic marker for the development of chronic pain, and importantly, for the overall survival time. To identify variants influencing severe pre-treatment pain in 1,368 patients newly diagnosed with HNSCC, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on 730,525 tagging SNPs. The